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Sample records for active tuberculosis tb

  1. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis (TB) Overview In developed countries, such as the ... thought to be infected with TB bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ). TB is a chronic bacterial infection. It ...

  2. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis Research The New Challenge for TB Research NIAID ... HIV/AIDS Multidrug-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Research Agenda (PDF) TB Research at NIAID Research ...

  3. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Departments & Divisions Home Conditions Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Diagnosing Tuberculosis History of TB Our Specialists Charles L. Daley, ...

  4. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  5. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  6. T-SPOT.TB in Detection of Active Tuberculosis During Pregnancy: A Retrospective Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiaopei; Guo, Xuxiao; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Maoshui

    2016-01-01

    Background Interferon-gamma release assays have not been validated in active TB among pregnant women. Therefore, the objective of this retrospective study was to estimate the diagnostic value of T-SPOT.TB in active TB among pregnant women. Material/Methods Between May 2012 and May 2015, 26 consecutive pregnant women with suspected TB were enrolled in our study. The clinicopathological characteristics and T-SPOT.TB results were reviewed and analyzed. Results Pregnant patients were divided into a TB group (n=21) and a Non-TB group (n=5). In the TB group, 5 patients had pulmonary TB, 5 had pulmonary TB+ extrapulmonary TB, and 11 had exclusively extrapulmonary TB. The most common site of extrapulmonary TB was pleural (n=11). Statistical analysis showed that the lymphocyte count in the TB group was lower than in the Non-TB group (P<0.05). For detection of active TB during pregnancy, T-SPOT.TB had a high sensitivity of 100.0% (84.5%–100.0%) and a specificity of 80.0% (37.6–96.4%). Conclusions T-SPOT.TB shows good performance in detection of active tuberculosis during pregnancy. Interferon gamma release assay for TB screening of pregnant women is recommended in clinical practice because it may be a more appropriate diagnostic tool than the tuberculin skin test. PMID:26732770

  7. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  8. Diagnostic Utility of QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Ahmed; Hamdan, AL-Jahdali; Salim, Baharoon; Yosra, Ali; Hani, Mohamed; Abdullah, AL-Harbi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The utility of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-G) test in the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease has been validated in high and low tuberculosis-prevalent (TB) countries. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the performance of the QFT-G test in the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease among tuberculosis patients in an intermediate prevalent country. Setting and Design: A retrospective study at the King Abdulaziz Medical City-Riyadh (KAMC-R) Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia, including tuberculosis, admitted to KAMC-R between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. We included only patients with an available result of the QFT-G test. A total of 142 tuberculosis cases and 226 pneumonia cases were studied, to assess the utility of the QFT-G test in diagnosing tuberculosis cases. Results: Among the tuberculosis (n = 142) cases, the QFT-G tested positive in 68.3%, negative in 23.2%, and indeterminate in 12 cases (8.5%). Of the 226 pneumonia cases, the QFT-G tested positive in only 20.4%, while a majority of 66.4% tested negative, with 30 cases (13.3%) being indeterminate. When we excluded 42 patients with indeterminate results, the QFT-G test achieved a sensitivity of 74.6% [95% CI: 66.09 to 81.65%] and specificity of 76.53 % [95% CI: 69.85 to 82.15%] in the diagnosis of tuberculosis cases. Conclusions: This study concludes that the QFT-G test is a useful tool for detecting tuberculosis disease when used as an adjunct tool for the diagnosis of active TB cases. It certainly cannot be used solely and indiscriminately, separate from other clinical and radiological information, in the diagnosis of active tuberculosis cases. PMID:26392718

  9. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  10. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  11. Recent tuberculosis diagnosis toward the end TB strategy.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Seon Ah; Cho, Hyun Hee; Kim, Jeonghyo; Lee, Jaebeom; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite global TB eradication efforts, it is still a global public health concern, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Most of the active TB infections are curable with early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, but drug-resistant TB is difficult and expensive to treat in immunocompetent as well as immunocompromised individuals. Thus, rapid, economic, and accurate point-of care tools for TB diagnosis are required urgently. This review describes the history of M. tuberculosis detection methods up to date and the recent advances using nanotechnology for point-of-care testing of TB diagnosis. PMID:26853124

  12. First-Line Treatment for Tuberculosis (TB), Drug Resistant TB -- A Visual Tour

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    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis Drugs First-Line Treatment of TB for Drug- ... ago. See how these drugs work . Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB) and Second-Line Treatments MDR TB ...

  13. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE protein Rv1168c induces stronger B cell response than Rv0256c in active TB patients.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Philip Raj; Udgata, Atul; Latha, Gaddam Suman; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a serious global health problem and is responsible for millions of deaths every year. For effective control of this dreadful disease, it is necessary to diagnose TB cases at the initial stages of infection. The serodiagnosis of disease represents simple, rapid and inexpensive method that can be used at the primary health care levels. In this study we have compared sensitivity of two PPE proteins of M. tuberculosis, i.e., Rv0256c and Rv1168c for their use as serodiagnostic markers in active tuberculosis patients. Employing a standardized enzyme immunoassay with these PPE proteins as candidate antigens we were able to successfully discriminate the TB patients' sera from the BCG-vaccinated healthy controls. Further, we observed that Rv1168c displayed higher sensitivity in detecting extrapulmonary and smear negative pulmonary TB cases which are difficult to diagnose by available diagnostic methods. Overall the study highlights that Rv1168c can be used as a potential serodiagnostic marker for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis disease. PMID:26364913

  14. Risk of Active Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients in Taiwan with Free Access to HIV Care and a Positive T-Spot.TB Test

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Liu, Wen-Chun; Su, Yi-Ching; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) have been used to identify individuals at risk for developing active tuberculosis (TB). However, data regarding the risk of TB development in HIV-infected patients testing positive for IGRAs remain sparse in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. Methods Between 2011 and 2013, 608 HIV-infected patients without active TB undergoing T-Spot.TB testing were enrolled in this prospective observational study at a university hospital designated for HIV care in Taiwan with a declining TB incidence from 72 per 100,000 population in 2005 to 53 per 100,000 population in 2012. All of the subjects were followed until September 30, 2014. The national TB registry was accessed to identify any TB cases among those lost to follow-up. Results T-Spot.TB tested negative in 534 patients (87.8%), positive in 64 patients (10.5%), and indeterminate in 10 patients (1.6%). In multivariate analysis, positive T-Spot.TB was significantly associated with older age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.172 per 10-year increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.022-1.344, P=0.023), past history of TB (AOR, 13.412; 95% CI, 6.106-29.460, P<0.001), and higher CD4 counts at enrollment (AOR, per 50-cell/μl increase, 1.062; 95% CI, 1.017-1.109, P=0.007). Of the 64 patients testing positive for T-Spot.TB, none received isoniazid preventive therapy and all but 5 received combination antiretroviral therapy at the end of follow-up with the latest CD4 count and plasma HIV RNA load being 592.8 cells/μL and 1.85 log10 copies/mL, respectively. One patient (1.6%) developed active TB after 167 person-years of follow-up (PYFU), resulting in an incidence rate of 0.599 per 100 PFYU. None of the 534 patients testing negative for T-Spot.TB developed TB after 1380 PYFU, nor did the 24 patients with old TB and positive T-Spot.TB tests develop TB after 62.33 PYFU. Conclusions The risk of developing active TB in HIV-infected patients with positive T-Spot.TB receiving

  15. Tuberculosis: Learn the Signs and Symptoms of TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Tuberculosis (TB) Disease: Symptoms & Risk Factors Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ...

  16. The effect of HIV coinfection, HAART and TB treatment on cytokine/chemokine responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens in active TB patients and latently Mtb infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Desta; de Jager, Wilco; Gebremichael, Gebremedhin; Alemayehu, Yodit; Ran, Leonie; Fransen, Justin; Wolday, Dawit; Messele, Tsehaynesh; Tegbaru, Belete; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; van Baarle, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    Identification of Mtb specific induced cytokine/chemokine host biomarkers could assist in developing novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tools for TB. Levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, IL-10, IP-10 and MIP-1α were measured in supernatants of whole blood stimulated with Mtb specific fusion protein ESAT-6/CFP-10 using xMAP technology. The study groups were HIV positive TB patients (HIV(+)TB(+)), HIV negative TB patients (HIV(-)TB(+)), HIV positive tuberculin skin test positive (TST+) (HIV(+)TST(+)), HIV negative TST+ (HIV(-)TST(+)), and HIV(-)TST(-) individuals. Compared to HIV(-)TST(-), latent TB infection led to increased levels of IP-10, IFN-γ and IL-17, while levels of IL-2 and IP-10 were increased with active TB. Levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, MIP-1α, and IL-10 were increased in HIV(-)TST(+) individuals compared to HIV(-)TB(+) patients. HIV coinfection decreased the level of IFN-γ, IL-17, IP-10 and IL-2. After six months (M6) of anti-TB treatment (ATT) in HIV(-)TB(+) patients, IFN-γ, IL-10, and MIP-1α levels normalized. After M6 and M18 of ATT plus HAART in HIV(+)TB(+) patients, levels of MIP-1α and IL-10 normalized, while this was not the case for IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, and IP-10 levels. In HIV(+)TST(+) patients on HAART, levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-10 and MIP-1α normalized, while no change in the levels of IL-2 and IP-10 were observed. In conclusion, the simultaneous measurement of IFN-γ, IL-17 and IP-10 may assist in diagnosing LTBI; IL-2 and IP-10 may assist in diagnosing active TB; while IFN-γ, IL-17, MIP-1α, and IL-10 levels could help to discriminate LTBI and active TB. In addition, IL-10 and MIP-1α levels could help to monitor responses to TB treatment and HAART. PMID:26631832

  17. Partners against tuberculosis: Ethiopia's "TB clubs".

    PubMed

    Getahun, H

    1998-11-01

    TB (tuberculosis) clubs were first introduced in the Estie district of South Gonder administrative zone, Amhara region of northwestern Ethiopia in January 1997, in an attempt to improve TB control in rural areas. Before the clubs were introduced, patients who were family members or close neighbors were given different treatment follow-up dates. Walking long distances alone to secure treatment, patients often grew discouraged from continuing treatment once their health began to improve. However, upon the introduction of the TB clubs, neighboring patients, or those in the same family, had their follow-up appointment dates rearranged in the same clinics. Local neighborhoods were also used to group nearby patients in the same follow-up clinic. The patients then formed their own groups (TB clubs) and elected leaders. 3-10 members usually comprise each club, with the club leaders monitoring drug intake and new developments, such as drug side effects and toxic skin reactions. The social ostracism and stigma otherwise experienced by patients have been largely overcome as a result of the TB information disseminated within the communities by the clubs, while patient attendance for treatment has increased from 68% to 98%, according to one study's findings. This intervention has taken place using the long-course treatment protocol (2STH/EH and 10TH/EH). TB clubs are improving patient adherence to treatment, passive case detection, defaulter tracing, TB reporting and recording, and community involvement in health care. PMID:12294916

  18. Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) with Abdominal Tuberculosis (TB).

    PubMed

    Bhatty, Shaheen A; Lal, Hari; Talib, Abu; Mahmood, Khalid; Naqvi, Iftekhar; Zaidi, Syeda Shaheera

    2015-10-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO), previously regarded as a form of multiple sclerosis, is defined by Gault and Devic, as a retrobulbar neuritis or papillitis accompanied by acute myelitis and occasionally other neurological symptom or signs not restricted to the spinal cord or optic nerves. With the diagnosis of specific antibodies, probable role of humoral immunity supports its pathogenesis. Only a few cases of NMO have been reported in association with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Here we report a case of young girl with acute onset paraplegia diagnosed to have NMO, who later on during hospital stay developed ascites which cultured positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This association of abdominal TB with NMO is under-reported in literature. PMID:26522188

  19. Tuberculosis: The Connection between TB and HIV (the AIDS Virus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force Tuberculosis: The Connection between TB and HIV Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Order this ... if I am infected with both TB and HIV? If you have HIV, it is important to ...

  20. Role of QuantiFERON-TB Gold antigen-specific IL-1β in diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prabhavathi, Maddineni; Kabeer, Basirudeen Syed Ahamed; Deenadayalan, Anbarasu; Raja, Alamelu

    2015-10-01

    The main objective of the study was to evaluate whether in vitro QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) assay antigen-specific IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-12 (p40) production is associated with active TB. In a cohort of 77 pulmonary TB patients (PTB), 67 healthy household contacts (HHC) and 83 healthy control subjects (HCS), the antigen-specific cytokines levels were determined in supernatants generated from QFT-GIT tubes. Antigen-specific IL-1β levels were significantly higher in PTB than HHC and HCS. At a fixed cutoff point (1,108 pg/ml), IL-1β showed positivity of 62.33% in PTB, 22.38% in HHC and 22.89% in HCS. Moreover, antigen-specific IL-1β assay can differentiate PTB and HHC (believed to be latently infected) (p < 0.0001). Like IL-1β, significantly higher levels of antigen-specific TNF-α were associated with PTB and displayed 43.63% positivity in PTB. The antigen-specific IL-2 levels were associated both with PTB (54.54%) and HHC (48.14%). Other cytokines levels did not differ among the groups. Our results suggest that antigen-specific IL-1β can be used as a biomarker for active TB diagnosis as well as for differential diagnosis of PTB and LTBI. PMID:25504009

  1. Combination of Cytokine Responses Indicative of Latent TB and Active TB in Malawian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Yun-Gyoung; Gorak-Stolinska, Patricia; Ben-Smith, Anne; Lalor, Maeve K.; Chaguluka, Steven; Dacombe, Russell; Doherty, T. Mark; Ottenhoff, Tom H.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Crampin, Amelia C.

    2013-01-01

    Background An IFN-γ response to M. tuberculosis-specific antigens is an effective biomarker for M. tuberculosis infection but it cannot discriminate between latent TB infection and active TB disease. Combining a number of cytokine/chemokine responses to M. tuberculosis antigens may enable differentiation of latent TB from active disease. Methods Asymptomatic recently-exposed individuals (spouses of TB patients) were recruited and tuberculin skin tested, bled and followed-up for two years. Culture supernatants, from a six-day culture of diluted whole blood samples stimulated with M. tuberculosis-derived PPD or ESAT-6, were measured for IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, TNF-α and CXCL10 using cytokine ELISAs. In addition, 15 patients with sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB were recruited and tested. Results Spouses with positive IFN-γ responses to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 (>62.5 pg/mL) and TB patients showed high production of IL-17, CXCL10 and TNF-α. Higher production of IL-10 and IL-17 in response to ESAT-6 was observed in the spouses compared with TB patients while the ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/IL-17 in response to M. tuberculosis-derived PPD were significantly higher in TB patients compared with the spouses. Tuberculin skin test results did not correlate with cytokine responses. Conclusions CXCL10 and TNF-α may be used as adjunct markers alongside an IFN-γ release assay to diagnose M. tuberculosis infection, and IL-17 and IL-10 production may differentiate individuals with LTBI from active TB. PMID:24260295

  2. TB database: an integrated platform for tuberculosis research.

    PubMed

    Reddy, T B K; Riley, Robert; Wymore, Farrell; Montgomery, Phillip; DeCaprio, Dave; Engels, Reinhard; Gellesch, Marcel; Hubble, Jeremy; Jen, Dennis; Jin, Heng; Koehrsen, Michael; Larson, Lisa; Mao, Maria; Nitzberg, Michael; Sisk, Peter; Stolte, Christian; Weiner, Brian; White, Jared; Zachariah, Zachariah K; Sherlock, Gavin; Galagan, James E; Ball, Catherine A; Schoolnik, Gary K

    2009-01-01

    The effective control of tuberculosis (TB) has been thwarted by the need for prolonged, complex and potentially toxic drug regimens, by reliance on an inefficient vaccine and by the absence of biomarkers of clinical status. The promise of the genomics era for TB control is substantial, but has been hindered by the lack of a central repository that collects and integrates genomic and experimental data about this organism in a way that can be readily accessed and analyzed. The Tuberculosis Database (TBDB) is an integrated database providing access to TB genomic data and resources, relevant to the discovery and development of TB drugs, vaccines and biomarkers. The current release of TBDB houses genome sequence data and annotations for 28 different Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and related bacteria. TBDB stores pre- and post-publication gene-expression data from M. tuberculosis and its close relatives. TBDB currently hosts data for nearly 1500 public tuberculosis microarrays and 260 arrays for Streptomyces. In addition, TBDB provides access to a suite of comparative genomics and microarray analysis software. By bringing together M. tuberculosis genome annotation and gene-expression data with a suite of analysis tools, TBDB (http://www.tbdb.org/) provides a unique discovery platform for TB research. PMID:18835847

  3. Diagnostic 'omics' for active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Haas, Carolin T; Roe, Jennifer K; Pollara, Gabriele; Mehta, Meera; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-01-01

    The decision to treat active tuberculosis (TB) is dependent on microbiological tests for the organism or evidence of disease compatible with TB in people with a high demographic risk of exposure. The tuberculin skin test and peripheral blood interferon-γ release assays do not distinguish active TB from a cleared or latent infection. Microbiological culture of mycobacteria is slow. Moreover, the sensitivities of culture and microscopy for acid-fast bacilli and nucleic acid detection by PCR are often compromised by difficulty in obtaining samples from the site of disease. Consequently, we need sensitive and rapid tests for easily obtained clinical samples, which can be deployed to assess patients exposed to TB, discriminate TB from other infectious, inflammatory or autoimmune diseases, and to identify subclinical TB in HIV-1 infected patients prior to commencing antiretroviral therapy. We discuss the evaluation of peripheral blood transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to develop the next generation of rapid diagnostics for active TB. We catalogue the studies published to date seeking to discriminate active TB from healthy volunteers, patients with latent infection and those with other diseases. We identify the limitations of these studies and the barriers to their adoption in clinical practice. In so doing, we aim to develop a framework to guide our approach to discovery and development of diagnostic biomarkers for active TB. PMID:27005907

  4. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... other federal agencies and international partners to raise awareness and enhance strategies for TB prevention worldwide by: Strengthening TB services for people living with HIV/AIDS; Guiding preparedness and outbreak investigation responses; Improving ...

  5. An Update on Global Tuberculosis (TB)

    PubMed Central

    Talip, Balkis A.; Sleator, Roy D.; Lowery, Colm J.; Dooley, James S.G.; Snelling, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis globally results in almost 2 million human deaths annually, with 1 in 4 deaths from tuberculosis being human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related. Primarily a pathogen of the respiratory system, aerobic Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infects the lungs via the inhalation of infected aerosol droplets generated by people with pulmonary disease through coughing. This review focuses on M. tuberculosis transmission, epidemiology, detection methods and technologies. PMID:24847176

  6. Drug Resistance Pattern of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates From Patients Referred to TB Reference Laboratory in Ahvaz

    PubMed Central

    Badie, Fereshteh; Arshadi, Maniya; Mohsenpoor, Maryam; Gharibvand, Soodabeh S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Tuberculosis remains one of the top three infectious disease killers. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has increased substantially in the past 20 years. When drug resistance is not detected, MDR-TB patients cannot access life-saving treatment; this puts their communities at risk of ongoing MDR-TB transmission. We aimed to determine the patterns of resistance to antituberculosis drugs among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Khuzestan province in Iran. Methods A total of 850 clinical specimens from patients suspected of active TB were cultured in 2015. Drug susceptibility testing to the first line antiTB drugs for culture positive MTB was performed on Lowenstein–Jensen medium using the proportion method. Results Of 850 cultured specimens, 272 (32%) were culture positive for mycobacteria. Of 64 MTB isolates that were analyzed by the proportion method, 62 (96.8%) were pan-susceptible and two (3.1%) were MDR. Conclusion An important way to prevent the emergence of MDR and XDR TB, and the principles of full implementation of the strategy is directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS). The efficient diagnosis and timely treatment of MDR-TB patients can prevent disease transmission, reduce the risk of drug resistance developing, and avoid further lung damage. PMID:26981340

  7. Towards earlier inclusion of Children in Tuberculosis (TB) drugs trials: Consensus statements from an Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Sharon; Ahmed, Amina; Amanullah, Farhana; Becerra, Mercedes C; Botgros, Radu; Brigden, Grania; Browning, Renee; Gardiner, Elizabeth; Hafner, Richard; Hesseling, Anneke; How, Cleotilde; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Lessem, Erica; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Mbelle, Nontombi; Marais, Ben; McIlleron, Helen; Mc Neeley, David F; Mendel, Carl; Murray, Stephen; Navarro, Eileen; Oramasionwu, Gloria E; Porcalla, Ariel R; Powell, Clydette; Powell, Mair; Rigaud, Mona; Rouzier, Vanessa; Samson, Pearl; Schaaf, H. Simon; Shah, Seema; Starke, Jeff; Swaminathan, Soumya; Wobudeya, Eric; Worrell, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Children represent a significant proportion of the global tuberculosis (TB) burden, and may be disproportionately more affected by its most severe clinical manifestations. Currently available treatments for pediatric drug-susceptible (DS) and drug-resistant (DR) TB, albeit generally effective, are hampered by high pill burden, long duration of treatment, coexistent toxicities, and an overall lack of suitable, child-friendly formulations. The complex and burdensome nature of administering the existing regimens to treat DS TB also contributes to the rise of DR TB strains. Despite the availability and use of these therapies for decades, a dearth of dosing evidence in children underscores the importance of sustained efforts for TB drug development to better meet the treatment needs of children with TB. Several new TB drugs and regimens with promising activity against both DS and DR TB strains have recently entered clinical development and are in various phases of clinical evaluation in adults or have received marketing authorization for adults. However, initiation of clinical trials to evaluate these drugs in children is often deferred, pending the availability of complete safety and efficacy data in adults or after drug approval. This document summarizes consensus statements from an international panel of childhood TB opinion leaders which support the initiation of evaluation of new TB drugs and regimens in children at earlier phases of the TB Drug development cycle. PMID:25957923

  8. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  9. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prisons, or homeless shelters. If you work in hospitals or health-care settings where TB patients are likely to be seen, you should consult infection control or occupational health experts. Ask about administrative and ...

  10. [Tuberculosis annual report 2008--series 2. TB in foreigners].

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    Statistics on tuberculosis (TB) in foreigners have been obtained since 1998 in Japan. The number of foreign TB patients increased from 739 in 1998 to 945 in 2008. In contrast, the number of Japanese TB patients decreased during this period and hence the proportion of foreign TB patients increased from 2.1% in 1998 to 3.9% in 2008, excluding those of unknown nationality. Especially, the proportion of those aged 20-29 years increased greatly from 9.1% in 1998 to 26.3% in 2008. Although the number of nationalities was 47, the majority of patients were from China (27.7%), the Philippines (24.8%) and Korea (10.2%) in 2008. The number of foreign TB patients aged 20-29 years was 468, accounting for 49.5% of all foreign TB patients in 2008. Seventy-seven percent of foreign patients aged 20-29 years had developed TB within 5 years of entering Japan. The equivalent proportion was 49% of those aged 30-39 years and 32% of those aged 40-49 years. Regarding occupation, 39.7% of foreign patients aged 20-29 years were full-time workers, 28.6% were students and 13.7% were part-time workers. PMID:19999597

  11. Outbreak of Tuberculosis in a Colony of Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) after Possible Indirect Contact with a Human TB Patient.

    PubMed

    Mätz-Rensing, K; Hartmann, T; Wendel, G M; Frick, J S; Homolka, S; Richter, E; Munk, M H; Kaup, F-J

    2015-01-01

    Simian tuberculosis is one of the most important bacterial diseases of non-human primates. Outbreaks of tuberculosis have been reported in primate colonies almost as long as these animals have been used experimentally or kept in zoological gardens. Significant progress has been made in reducing the incidence of tuberculosis in captive non-human primates, but despite reasonable precautions, outbreaks continue to occur. The most relevant reason is the high incidence of tuberculosis (TB) amongst the human population, in which tuberculosis is regarded as an important re-emerging disease. Furthermore, many non-human primate species originate from countries with a high burden of human TB. Therefore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a significant threat in animals imported from countries with high rates of human infection. We report an outbreak of tuberculosis among a group of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) living in a closed, long-term colony. The outbreak coincided with reactivation of a TB infection in a co-worker who never had direct access to the animal house or laboratories. Eleven of 26 rhesus monkeys developed classical chronic active tuberculosis with typical caseous granulomata of varying size within different organs. The main organ system involved was the lung, suggesting an aerosol route of infection. Such an outbreak has significant economic consequences due to animal loss, disruption of research and costs related to disease control. Precautionary measures must be improved in order to avoid TB in non-human primate colonies. PMID:26166434

  12. Activities of the korean institute of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Sungweon; Kim, Hee Jin

    2014-12-01

    The Korean National Tuberculosis Association (KNTA) set up the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis (KIT) in 1970 to foster research and technical activities pertaining to tuberculosis (TB). The KNTA/KIT had successfully conducted a countrywide TB prevalence survey from 1965 to 1995 at 5-year intervals. The survey results (decline in TB rates) established Korea as a country that had successfully implemented national control programs for TB. The KIT developed the Korea Tuberculosis Surveillance System and the Laboratory Management Information System, both of which were transferred to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention after its establishment. The KIT functions as a central and supranational reference TB laboratory for microbiological and epidemiological research and provides training and education for health-care workers and medical practitioners. Recently, the KIT has expanded its activities to countries such as Ethiopia, Laos, and Timor-Leste to support TB control and prevention. The KIT will continue to support research activities and provide technical assistance in diagnosing the infection until it is completely eliminated in Korea. PMID:25861580

  13. Too Busy for TB: Managing a Case of Tuberculosis Disease in the School Setting.

    PubMed

    Galemore, Cynthia A

    2016-03-01

    School nurses actively monitor the school population for signs of communicable disease on a daily basis. State regulations outline reportable diseases and provide guidance to control disease outbreak, including management of disease outbreak in the school setting. The purpose of this article is to review strategies recently used in managing a tuberculosis (TB) outbreak at a large high school in Kansas. A timeline of events is presented along with a discussion of the differences between latent TB infection and TB disease. Partnering across agencies and departments enabled the timely testing of over 400 individuals and subsequent management of individuals testing positive for latent TB infection. Public information officers provided necessary guidance to communicate to audiences both internally and externally. PMID:26822133

  14. Sensitivity of C-Tb: a novel RD-1-specific skin test for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Soren T; Peter, Jonathan G; Theron, Grant; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tingskov, Pernille N; Aggerbeck, Henrik; Kolbus, Daniel; Ruhwald, Morten; Andersen, Peter; Dheda, Keertan

    2016-03-01

    C-Tb, a novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target/10-kDa culture filtrate protein (ESAT-6/CFP-10)-specific skin test, has high specificity in bacille Calmette-Guerin-vaccinated healthy controls. However, the sensitivity of C-Tb has hitherto not been determined. The objective was to determine the sensitivity of C-Tb in patients with active tuberculosis (TB) in comparison with the tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT).C-Tb and TST were randomly administered in a double-blinded fashion to one or the other forearm in 253 patients with active TB with or without HIV co-infection. QFT-GIT testing was performed prior to skin testing.Using a receiver operating characteristic curve-derived cut-point of 5 mm, C-Tb sensitivity was similar to QFT-GIT (73.9 (95% CI 67.8-79.3) versus 75.1 (95% CI 69.3-80.2)), and similar in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients (76.7 (95% CI 69.0-83.3) versus 69.5 (95% CI 59.2-78.5)). However, sensitivity was significantly diminished in HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts <100 cells·mm(-3). C-Tb and QFT-GIT combined had significantly higher sensitivity than C-Tb alone (p<0.0001). C-Tb was safe with no significant adverse events. The 5 mm cut-point corresponded to that found in the previously published specificity study (TESEC-04).C-Tb has similar sensitivity compared with QFT-GIT for the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection. Sensitivity was reduced only in HIV-infected patients with severe immunosuppression. Further studies in different settings are required to validate the proposed 5 mm cut-point. PMID:26677940

  15. TIME Impact - a new user-friendly tuberculosis (TB) model to inform TB policy decisions.

    PubMed

    Houben, R M G J; Lalli, M; Sumner, T; Hamilton, M; Pedrazzoli, D; Bonsu, F; Hippner, P; Pillay, Y; Kimerling, M; Ahmedov, S; Pretorius, C; White, R G

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide, predominantly affecting low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where resources are limited. As such, countries need to be able to choose the most efficient interventions for their respective setting. Mathematical models can be valuable tools to inform rational policy decisions and improve resource allocation, but are often unavailable or inaccessible for LMICs, particularly in TB. We developed TIME Impact, a user-friendly TB model that enables local capacity building and strengthens country-specific policy discussions to inform support funding applications at the (sub-)national level (e.g. Ministry of Finance) or to international donors (e.g. the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria).TIME Impact is an epidemiological transmission model nested in TIME, a set of TB modelling tools available for free download within the widely-used Spectrum software. The TIME Impact model reflects key aspects of the natural history of TB, with additional structure for HIV/ART, drug resistance, treatment history and age. TIME Impact enables national TB programmes (NTPs) and other TB policymakers to better understand their own TB epidemic, plan their response, apply for funding and evaluate the implementation of the response.The explicit aim of TIME Impact's user-friendly interface is to enable training of local and international TB experts towards independent use. During application of TIME Impact, close involvement of the NTPs and other local partners also builds critical understanding of the modelling methods, assumptions and limitations inherent to modelling. This is essential to generate broad country-level ownership of the modelling data inputs and results. In turn, it stimulates discussions and a review of the current evidence and assumptions, strengthening the decision-making process in general.TIME Impact has been effectively applied in a variety of settings. In South Africa, it

  16. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with ...

  17. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  18. staffTRAK-TB: software for surveillance of tuberculosis infection in healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Burwen, D R; Seawright, M F

    1999-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends periodic tuberculin skin testing of healthcare workers with potential exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, many healthcare facilities have neither a system to identify workers due for their skin test nor a means of analyzing aggregate data. To illustrate some of the complexities involved in tuberculin skin test (TST) tracking and analysis, and how these might be addressed, this report describes a software package called staffTRAK-TB, developed by the CDC to facilitate surveillance of tuberculosis infection in healthcare workers. staffTRAK-TB records data for each healthcare worker, including demographic information, occupation, work location, multiple TST results, and results of evaluations to determine if clinically active tuberculosis is present. Programmed reports include lists of workers due and overdue for skin tests, and skin test conversion rates by occupation or worksite. Standardization of types of occupations and locations allows data from multiple facilities to be aggregated and compared. Data transfer to the CDC can be performed via floppy diskettes. staffTRAK-TB illustrates important issues in software structure, standardization of occupation and work-location information, relevant data items, and reports and analyses that would be useful in practice. Developing software that adequately addresses the epidemiological issues is complex, and the lessons learned may serve as a model for hospital epidemiologists, infection control personnel, occupational health personnel, and computer programmers considering software development in this area or trying to optimize their facility's TST surveillance. PMID:10580631

  19. Tackling tuberculosis: Insights from an international TB Summit in London

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arundhati; Danquah, Cynthia A; Scotti, Francesca; Howard, Tracey K; Kamil, Tengku K; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses a grave predicament to the world as it is not merely a scientific challenge but a socio-economic burden as well. A prime cause of mortality in human due to an infectious disease; the malady and its cause, Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained an enigma with many questions that remain unanswered. The ability of the pathogen to survive and switch between varied physiological states necessitates a protracted therapeutic regimen that exerts an excessive strain on low-resource countries. To complicate things further, there has been a significant rise of antimicrobial resistance. Existing control measures, including treatment regimens have remained fairly uniform globally for at least half a century and require reinvention. Overcoming the societal and scientific challenges requires an increase in dialog to identify key regions that need attention and effective partners with whom successful collaborations can be fostered. In this report, we explore the discussions held at the International TB Summit 2015 hosted by EuroSciCon, which served as an excellent platform for researchers to share their recent findings. Ground-breaking results require outreach to affect policy design, governance and control of the disease. Hence, we feel it is important that meetings such as these reach a wider, global audience. PMID:26151309

  20. Tackling tuberculosis: Insights from an international TB Summit in London.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Arundhati; Danquah, Cynthia A; Scotti, Francesca; Howard, Tracey K; Kamil, Tengku K; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses a grave predicament to the world as it is not merely a scientific challenge but a socio-economic burden as well. A prime cause of mortality in human due to an infectious disease; the malady and its cause, Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained an enigma with many questions that remain unanswered. The ability of the pathogen to survive and switch between varied physiological states necessitates a protracted therapeutic regimen that exerts an excessive strain on low-resource countries. To complicate things further, there has been a significant rise of antimicrobial resistance. Existing control measures, including treatment regimens have remained fairly uniform globally for at least half a century and require reinvention. Overcoming the societal and scientific challenges requires an increase in dialog to identify key regions that need attention and effective partners with whom successful collaborations can be fostered. In this report, we explore the discussions held at the International TB Summit 2015 hosted by EuroSciCon, which served as an excellent platform for researchers to share their recent findings. Ground-breaking results require outreach to affect policy design, governance and control of the disease. Hence, we feel it is important that meetings such as these reach a wider, global audience. PMID:26151309

  1. TB Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  2. Difference Between Latent TB Infection and Active TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray, or positive sputum smear or culture • • Has active TB bacteria in his/her body • • Usually feels sick and may have symptoms such as coughing, fever, and weight loss • • May spread TB bacteria to others • • Needs treatment to treat ...

  3. Patient Reported Delays in Seeking Treatment for Tuberculosis among Adult and Pediatric TB Patients and TB Patients Co-Infected with HIV in Lima, Peru: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.; Alban, Rebecca E.; Dimos Jones, Christy; Powell, Amy R.; Oberhelman, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health challenge worldwide, and particularly in Peru with one of the highest incidence rates in Latin America. TB patient behavior has a direct influence on whether a patient will receive timely diagnosis and successful treatment of their illness. Objectives: The objective was to understand the complex factors that can impact TB patient health seeking behavior. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with adult and parents of pediatric patients receiving TB treatment (n = 43), within that group a sub-group was also co-infected with HIV (n = 11). Results: Almost all of the study participants recognized delays in seeking either their child’s or their own diagnosis of their TB symptoms. The principal reasons for treatment-seeking delays were lack of knowledge and confusion of TB symptoms, fear and embarrassment of receiving a TB diagnosis, and a patient tendency to self-medicate prior to seeking formal medical attention. Conclusion: Health promotion activities that target patient delays have the potential to improve individual patient outcomes and mitigate the spread of TB at a community level. PMID:25566523

  4. Designing and Construction of a DNA Vaccine Encoding Tb10.4 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rashidian, Samira; Teimourpour, Roghayeh; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains as a major cause of death. Construction of a new vaccine against tuberculosis is an effective way to control it. Several vaccines against this disease have been developed. The aim of the present study was to cloning of tb10.4 gene in pcDNA3.1+ plasmid and evaluation of its expression in eukaryotic cells. Methods: Firstly, tb10.4 fragment was amplified by PCR and the PCR product was digested with restriction enzymes. Next, it was cloned into pcDNA3.1+ plasmid. Following that, pcDNA3.1+/tb10.4 recombinant plasmid was transfected into eukaryotic cells. Results: 5700 bp band for pcDNA3.1+/tb10.4 recombinant plasmid and 297 bp fragment for tb10.4 were observed. Cloning and transfection were successful. Conclusion: Successful cloning provides a basis for the development of new DNA vaccines against tuberculosis.

  5. Antiretroviral Treatment Scale-Up and Tuberculosis Mortality in High TB/HIV Burden Countries: An Econometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Isabel; Bendavid, Eran; Korenromp, Eline L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in patients with active tuberculosis (TB), but the population-level relationship between ART coverage and TB mortality is untested. We estimated the reduction in population-level TB mortality that can be attributed to increasing ART coverage across 41 high HIV-TB burden countries. Methods We compiled TB mortality trends between 1996 and 2011 from two sources: (1) national program-reported TB death notifications, adjusted for annual TB case detection rates, and (2) WHO TB mortality estimates. National coverage with ART, as proportion of HIV-infected people in need, was obtained from UNAIDS. We applied panel linear regressions controlling for HIV prevalence (5-year lagged), coverage of TB interventions (estimated by WHO and UNAIDS), gross domestic product per capita, health spending from domestic sources, urbanization, and country fixed effects. Results Models suggest that that increasing ART coverage was followed by reduced TB mortality, across multiple specifications. For death notifications at 2 to 5 years following a given ART scale-up, a 1% increase in ART coverage predicted 0.95% faster mortality rate decline (p = 0.002); resulting in 27% fewer TB deaths in 2011 alone than would have occurred without ART. Based on WHO death estimates, a 1% increase in ART predicted a 1.0% reduced TB death rate (p<0.001), and 31% fewer deaths in 2011. TB mortality was higher at higher HIV prevalence (p<0.001), but not related to coverage of isoniazid preventive therapy, cotrimoxazole preventive therapy, or other covariates. Conclusion This econometric analysis supports a substantial impact of ART on population-level TB mortality realized already within the first decade of ART scale-up, that is apparent despite variable-quality mortality data. PMID:27536864

  6. Targeted screening and treatment for latent tuberculosis infection using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold is cost-effective in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, J. L.; Kahn, J. G.; Strathdee, S. A.; Valencia-Mendoza, A.; Bautista-Arredondo, S.; Laniado-Laborin, R.; Castañeda, R.; Deiss, R.; Garfein, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVE To assess the cost-effectiveness of screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using a commercially available detection test and treating individuals at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a middle-income country. DESIGN We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost per LTBI case detected, TB case averted and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for a cohort of 1000 individuals at high risk for HIV infection over 20 years. Baseline model inputs for LTBI prevalence were obtained from published literature and cross-sectional data from tuberculosis (TB) screening using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) testing among sex workers and illicit drug users at high risk for HIV recruited through street outreach in Tijuana, Mexico. Costs are reported in 2007 US dollars. Future costs and QALYs were discounted at 3% per year. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate model robustness. RESULTS Over 20 years, we estimate the program would prevent 78 cases of active TB and 55 TB-related deaths. The incremental cost per case of LTBI detected was US$730, cost per active TB averted was US$529 and cost per QALY gained was US$108. CONCLUSIONS In settings of endemic TB and escalating HIV incidence, targeting LTBI screening and treatment among high-risk groups may be highly cost-effective. PMID:19723375

  7. Generation and application of ssDNA aptamers against glycolipid antigen ManLAM of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for TB diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Shi-Min; Xie, Yan; Song, Neng; Guan, Qing; Yuan, Chunhui; Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Lian

    2016-05-01

    The development of effective Mycobacterial antigen diagnostic reagents remains a high priority. Mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) is a lipoglycan serving as a major cell wall component. ManLAM is also an early released antigen in the blood circulation system during Mycobacteria tuberculosis (M.tb) infection and is a perfect target antigen for TB diagnosis. In this study, ssDNA aptamers "antibodies" against ManLAM of the predominant clinical epidemic M.tb Beijing genotype strains were generated by the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) technique. The selected single aptamer T9 demonstrated the highest specificity and binding affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 668 ± 159 nmol/L. We further detected ManLAM antigens in serum and sputum samples from active pulmonary tuberculosis (aPTB) patients, extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) patients and healthy donors by using a T9 based enzyme-linked oligonucleotide assay (ELONA). The results showed that the specificity and sensitivity were 95.31% and 83.00% (for 100 aPTB serum samples), 98.70% and 92.71% (for 96 aPTB sputum samples), and 94.44% and 88.71% (for 62 EPTB serum samples), respectively. A good correlation was observed between the T9 aptamer-based ELONA and the clinical T-SPOT.TB. Thus, T9 based ELONA has potentials for diagnosis of TB, including inactive TB, smear-negative TB, EPTB, and TB with immunodeficiency, and assist the diagnosis of LTBI albeit it could not distinguish LTBI and active TB. PMID:26850356

  8. Current perspective in tuberculosis vaccine development for high TB endemic regions.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aliabbas A; Daginawala, Hatim F; Singh, Lokendra; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a global epidemic, despite of the availability of Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccine for more than six decades. In an effort to eradicate TB, vaccinologist around the world have made considerable efforts to develop improved vaccine candidates, based on the understanding of BCG failure in developing world and immune response thought to be protective against TB. The present review represents a current perspective on TB vaccination research, including additional research strategies needed for increasing the efficacy of BCG, and for the development of new effective vaccines for high TB endemic regions. PMID:27156631

  9. Identification of inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis thiamin phosphate synthase, an important target for the development of anti-TB drugs.

    PubMed

    Khare, Garima; Kar, Ritika; Tyagi, Anil K

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to pose a serious challenge to human health afflicting a large number of people throughout the world. In spite of the availability of drugs for the treatment of TB, the non-compliance to 6-9 months long chemotherapeutic regimens often results in the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis adding to the precariousness of the situation. This has necessitated the development of more effective drugs. Thiamin biosynthesis, an important metabolic pathway of M. tuberculosis, is shown to be essential for the intracellular growth of this pathogen and hence, it is believed that inhibition of this pathway would severely affect the growth of M. tuberculosis. In this study, a comparative homology model of M. tuberculosis thiamin phosphate synthase (MtTPS) was generated and employed for virtual screening of NCI diversity set II to select potential inhibitors. The best 39 compounds based on the docking results were evaluated for their potential to inhibit the MtTPS activity. Seven compounds inhibited MtTPS activity with IC(50) values ranging from 20-100 µg/ml and two of these exhibited weak inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth with MIC(99) values being 125 µg/ml and 162.5 µg/ml while one compound was identified as a very potent inhibitor of M. tuberculosis growth with an MIC(99) value of 6 µg/ml. This study establishes MtTPS as a novel drug target against M. tuberculosis leading to the identification of new lead molecules for the development of antitubercular drugs. Further optimization of these lead compounds could result in more potent therapeutic molecules against Tuberculosis. PMID:21818324

  10. The relationship between chitotriosidase activity and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Deng, J; Li, W; Su, C; Xia, Y; Wang, M; Li, X; Abuaku, B K; Tan, H; Wen, S W

    2015-11-01

    Chitotriosidase, secreted by activated macrophages, is a biomarker of activated macrophages. In this study, we explored whether chitotriosidase could be adopted as a biomarker to evaluate the curative effect on tuberculosis (TB). Five counties were randomly selected out of 122 counties/cities/districts in Hunan Province, China. Our cases were all TB patients who were newly diagnosed or had been receiving treatment at the Centers for Disease Control (CDCs) of these five counties between April and August in 2009. Healthy controls were selected from a community health facility in the Kaifu district of Changsha City after frequency-matching of gender and age with the cases. Chitotriosidase activity was evaluated by a fluorometric assay. Categorical variables were analysed with the χ 2 test. Measurement data in multiple groups were tested with analysis of variance and least significant difference (LSD). Correlation between chitotriosidase activity and the degree of radiological extent (DRE) was examined by Spearman's rank correlation test. The average chitotriosidase activity levels of new TB cases, TB cases with different periods of treatment (6 months) and the control group were 54·47, 34·77, 21·54, 12·73 and 10·53 nmol/h.ml, respectively. Chitotriosidase activity in TB patients declined along with the continuity of treatment. The chitotriosidase activity of both smear-positive and the smear-negative pulmonary TB patients decreased after 6 months' treatment to normal levels (P < 0·05). Moreover, chitotriosidase activity was positively correlated with DRE (r = 0·607, P < 0·001). Our results indicate that chitotriosidase might be a marker of TB treatment effects. However, further follow-up study of TB patients is needed in the future. PMID:26418349

  11. 'TB or not TB?' Problems of differential diagnosis of cutaneous mycobacteriosis and tuberculosis - A Case Study and interdisciplinary discussion.

    PubMed

    Szmygin-Milanowska, Katarzyna; Grzywa-Celińska, Anna; Zwolska, Zofia; Krawczyk, Paweł; Guz, Leszek; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis poses a serious challenge due to many skin diseases of different etiology resembling the lesions caused by the TB (tuberculosis) bacillus, and difficulties in confirming the disease. The presented case concerns skin lesions in a hobby aquarist stung in the finger of the left hand by a fish. The resulting inflammatory infiltration was to be cutaneous tuberculosis or mycobacteriosis caused by MOTT (Mycobacterium other than tuberculosis). Laboratory, pathomorphologic, genetic and microbiologic tests of samples obtained from the patient, fish and water in the aquarium gave ambiguous results. A multidisciplinary discussion is presented on the difficulties in the differential diagnosis, problems with a clear interpretation of the results of various conducted tests, and possible ways of transmission of the infection, relevant to the described example. PMID:27007525

  12. GSMN-TB: a web-based genome-scale network model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Dany JV; Hooper, Tracy; Stewart, Graham; Bonde, Bhushan; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio; Bushell, Michael E; Wheeler, Paul; Klamt, Steffen; Kierzek, Andrzej M; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2007-01-01

    Background An impediment to the rational development of novel drugs against tuberculosis (TB) is a general paucity of knowledge concerning the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly during infection. Constraint-based modeling provides a novel approach to investigating microbial metabolism but has not yet been applied to genome-scale modeling of M. tuberculosis. Results GSMN-TB, a genome-scale metabolic model of M. tuberculosis, was constructed, consisting of 849 unique reactions and 739 metabolites, and involving 726 genes. The model was calibrated by growing Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette Guérin in continuous culture and steady-state growth parameters were measured. Flux balance analysis was used to calculate substrate consumption rates, which were shown to correspond closely to experimentally determined values. Predictions of gene essentiality were also made by flux balance analysis simulation and were compared with global mutagenesis data for M. tuberculosis grown in vitro. A prediction accuracy of 78% was achieved. Known drug targets were predicted to be essential by the model. The model demonstrated a potential role for the enzyme isocitrate lyase during the slow growth of mycobacteria, and this hypothesis was experimentally verified. An interactive web-based version of the model is available. Conclusion The GSMN-TB model successfully simulated many of the growth properties of M. tuberculosis. The model provides a means to examine the metabolic flexibility of bacteria and predict the phenotype of mutants, and it highlights previously unexplored features of M. tuberculosis metabolism. PMID:17521419

  13. Screening strategies for active tuberculosis: focus on cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dobler, Claudia Caroline

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in screening for active tuberculosis (TB), also called active case-finding (ACF), as a possible means to achieve control of the global TB epidemic. ACF aims to increase the detection of TB, in order to diagnose and treat patients with TB earlier than if they had been diagnosed and treated only at the time when they sought health care because of symptoms. This will reduce or avoid secondary transmission of TB to other people, with the long-term goal of reducing the incidence of TB. Here, the history of screening for active TB, current screening practices, and the role of TB-diagnostic tools are summarized and the literature on cost-effectiveness of screening for active TB reviewed. Cost-effectiveness analyses indicate that community-wide ACF can be cost-effective in settings with a high incidence of TB. ACF among close TB contacts is cost-effective in settings with a low as well as a high incidence of TB. The evidence for cost-effectiveness of screening among HIV-infected persons is not as strong as for TB contacts, but the reviewed studies suggest that the intervention can be cost-effective depending on the background prevalence of TB and test volume. None of the cost-effectiveness analyses were informed by data from randomized controlled trials. As the results of randomized controlled trials evaluating different ACF strategies will become available in future, we will hopefully gain a better understanding of the role that ACF can play in achieving global TB control. PMID:27418848

  14. Advanced development of the digital tuberculosis tester for MDR-TB screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jason E.; Simkulet, Michelle D.; Gutin, Alexander; Gutin, Alexy; Bardarov, Savco; Jacobs, William R., Jr.; Castracane, James; Tang, Oliver; Riska, Paul

    2001-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of death in the world from a single infectious disease, and the threat is becoming more critical with the spread of multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB). TB detection, and susceptibility testing for drug resistant strain identification, is advancing with the development of Luciferase Reporter Mycobacteriophages (LRM). LRM will emit visible light at very low intensity when in the presence of live mycobacteria cells such as Tuberculosis strains. InterScience, Inc., together with its collaboration, is developing a highly sensitive, real-time digital detection system for the analysis of luminescent assays. Recent advances in system sensitivity, design, and implementation, as well as preliminary results of the development of individual test cartridges, will be presented. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a versatile luminescence detection tool for widespread research and clinical applications.

  15. Quality of life among tuberculosis (TB), TB retreatment and/or TB-HIV co-infected primary public health care patients in three districts in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction TB and HIV co-morbidity amount to a massive burden on healthcare systems in many countries. This study investigates health related quality of life among tuberculosis (TB), TB retreatment and TB-HIV co-infected public primary health care patients in three districts in South Africa. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among 4900 TB patients who were in the first month of anti-TB treatment in primary public health care clinics in three districts in South Africa. Quality of life was assessed using the social functioning (SF)-12 Health Survey through face to face interviews. Associations of physical health (Physical health Component Summary = PCS) and mental health (Mental health Component Summary = MCS) were identified using logistic regression analyses. Results The overall physical and mental health scores were 42.5 and 40.7, respectively. Emotional role, general health and bodily pain had the lowest sub-scale scores, while energy and fatigue and mental health had the highest domain scores. Independent Kruskal–Wallis tests found significant positive effects of being TB-HIV co-infected on the domains of mental health functioning, emotional role, energy and fatigue, social function and physical role, while significant negative effects were observed on general health, bodily pain and physical function. In multivariable analysis higher educational, lower psychological distress, having fewer chronic conditions and being HIV negative were significantly positively associated with PCS, and low poverty, low psychological distress and being HIV positive were positively significantly associated with MCS. Conclusion TB and HIV weaken patients’ physical functioning and impair their quality of life. It is imperative that TB control programmes at public health clinics design strategies to improve the quality of health of TB and HIV co-infected patients. PMID:22742511

  16. Genome sequencing and annotation of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) PR10 strain

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Mohd Zakihalani A.; Jaafar, Mohammad Maaruf; Teh, Lay Kek; Ismail, Mohamad Izwan; Lee, Lian Shien; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Nor, Norazmi Mohd; Zainuddin, Zainul Fadziruddin; Tang, Thean Hock; Najimudin, Mohd Nazalan Mohd; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of a multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain PR10 (MDR-TB PR10) isolated from a patient diagnosed with tuberculosis. The size of the draft genome MDR-TB PR10 is 4.34 Mbp with 65.6% of G + C content and consists of 4637 predicted genes. The determinants were categorized by RAST into 400 subsystems with 4286 coding sequences and 50 RNAs. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010968. PMID:26981419

  17. Genome sequencing and annotation of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) PR10 strain.

    PubMed

    Halim, Mohd Zakihalani A; Jaafar, Mohammad Maaruf; Teh, Lay Kek; Ismail, Mohamad Izwan; Lee, Lian Shien; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Nor, Norazmi Mohd; Zainuddin, Zainul Fadziruddin; Tang, Thean Hock; Najimudin, Mohd Nazalan Mohd; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2016-03-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of a multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain PR10 (MDR-TB PR10) isolated from a patient diagnosed with tuberculosis. The size of the draft genome MDR-TB PR10 is 4.34 Mbp with 65.6% of G + C content and consists of 4637 predicted genes. The determinants were categorized by RAST into 400 subsystems with 4286 coding sequences and 50 RNAs. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010968. PMID:26981419

  18. World TB Day 2016: an interview with leading experts in tuberculosis research.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick P J; Fletcher, Helen A; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Lipman, Marc C I; McHugh, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    In this interview, we talk to leading tuberculosis (TB) experts from University College London and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine about the current challenges in TB research. The video of this interview is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75Die7MQBec&feature=youtu.be . The video can also be downloaded via Additional file 1. PMID:27007648

  19. Rapid diagnosis of MDR and XDR tuberculosis with the MeltPro TB assay in China

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yu; Dong, Haiyan; Tan, Yaoju; Deng, Yunfeng; Cai, Xingshan; Jing, Hui; Xia, Hui; Li, Qiang; Ou, Xichao; Su, Biyi; Li, Xuezheng; Zhang, Zhiying; Li, Junchen; Zhang, Jiankang; Huan, Shitong; Zhao, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    New diagnostic methods have provided a promising solution for rapid and reliable detection of drug-resistant TB strains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the MeltPro TB assay in identifying multidrug-resistant (MDR-) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients from sputum samples. The MeltPro TB assay was evaluated using sputum samples from 2057 smear-positive TB patients. Phenotypic Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 drug susceptibility testing served as a reference standard. The sensitivity of the MeltPro TB assay was 94.2% for detecting resistance to rifampicin and 84.9% for detecting resistance to isoniazid. For second-line drugs, the assay showed a sensitivity of 83.3% for ofloxacin resistance, 75.0% for amikacin resistance, and 63.5% for kanamycin resistance. However, there was a significant difference for detecting kanamycin resistance between the two pilot sites in sensitivity, which was 53.2% in Guangdong and 81.5% in Shandong (P = 0.015). Overall, the MeltPro TB assay demonstrated good performance for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB, with a sensitivity of 86.7% and 71.4%, respectively. The MeltPro TB assay is an excellent alternative for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB cases in China, with high accuracy, short testing turn-around time, and low unit price compared with other tests. PMID:27149911

  20. Rapid diagnosis of MDR and XDR tuberculosis with the MeltPro TB assay in China.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Dong, Haiyan; Tan, Yaoju; Deng, Yunfeng; Cai, Xingshan; Jing, Hui; Xia, Hui; Li, Qiang; Ou, Xichao; Su, Biyi; Li, Xuezheng; Zhang, Zhiying; Li, Junchen; Zhang, Jiankang; Huan, Shitong; Zhao, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    New diagnostic methods have provided a promising solution for rapid and reliable detection of drug-resistant TB strains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the MeltPro TB assay in identifying multidrug-resistant (MDR-) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients from sputum samples. The MeltPro TB assay was evaluated using sputum samples from 2057 smear-positive TB patients. Phenotypic Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 drug susceptibility testing served as a reference standard. The sensitivity of the MeltPro TB assay was 94.2% for detecting resistance to rifampicin and 84.9% for detecting resistance to isoniazid. For second-line drugs, the assay showed a sensitivity of 83.3% for ofloxacin resistance, 75.0% for amikacin resistance, and 63.5% for kanamycin resistance. However, there was a significant difference for detecting kanamycin resistance between the two pilot sites in sensitivity, which was 53.2% in Guangdong and 81.5% in Shandong (P = 0.015). Overall, the MeltPro TB assay demonstrated good performance for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB, with a sensitivity of 86.7% and 71.4%, respectively. The MeltPro TB assay is an excellent alternative for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB cases in China, with high accuracy, short testing turn-around time, and low unit price compared with other tests. PMID:27149911

  1. Antitubercular activity of disulfiram, an antialcoholism drug, against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Horita, Yasuhiro; Takii, Takemasa; Yagi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Kenji; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Inagaki, Emi; Kremer, Laurent; Sato, Yasuo; Kuroishi, Ryuji; Lee, Yoosa; Makino, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Hajime; Hasegawa, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-08-01

    The antimycobacterial activities of disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) clinical isolates were evaluated in vitro. Both DSF and DDC exhibited potent antitubercular activities against 42 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, including MDR/XDR-TB strains. Moreover, DSF showed remarkable bactericidal activity ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, DSF might be a drug repurposed for the treatment of MDR/XDR-TB. PMID:22615274

  2. Antitubercular Activity of Disulfiram, an Antialcoholism Drug, against Multidrug- and Extensively Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Kenji; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Inagaki, Emi; Kremer, Laurent; Sato, Yasuo; Kuroishi, Ryuji; Lee, YooSa; Makino, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Hajime; Hasegawa, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-01-01

    The antimycobacterial activities of disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) clinical isolates were evaluated in vitro. Both DSF and DDC exhibited potent antitubercular activities against 42 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, including MDR/XDR-TB strains. Moreover, DSF showed remarkable bactericidal activity ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, DSF might be a drug repurposed for the treatment of MDR/XDR-TB. PMID:22615274

  3. Mortality among MDR-TB Cases: Comparison with Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Delgado, Kocfa; Guillen-Bravo, Sonia; Revilla-Montag, Alejandro; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background An increase in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases is evident worldwide. Its management implies a complex treatment, high costs, more toxic anti-tuberculosis drug use, longer treatment time and increased treatment failure and mortality. The aims of this study were to compare mortality between MDR and drug-susceptible cases of tuberculosis, and to determine risk factors associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases. Methods and Results A retrospective cohort study was performed using data from clinical records of the National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Lima, Peru. In the first objective, MDR-TB, compared to drug-susceptible cases, was the main exposure variable and time to death, censored at 180 days, the outcome of interest. For the second objective, different variables obtained from clinical records were assessed as potential risk factors for death among MDR-TB cases. Cox regression analysis was used to determine hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). A total of 1,232 patients were analyzed: mean age 30.9 ±14.0 years, 60.0% were males. 61 patients (5.0%) died during treatment, whereas the MDR-TB prevalence was 19.2%. MDR-TB increased the risk of death during treatment (HR = 7.5; IC95%: 4.1–13.4) when compared to presumed drug-susceptible cases after controlling for potential confounders. Education level (p = 0.01), previous TB episodes (p<0.001), diabetes history (p<0.001) and HIV infection (p = 0.04) were factors associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases. Conclusions MDR-TB is associated with an increased risk of death during treatment. Lower education, greater number of previous TB episodes, diabetes history, and HIV infection were independently associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases. New strategies for appropriate MDR-TB detection and management should be implemented, including drug sensitivity tests, diabetes and HIV screening, as well as guarantee for a complete adherence to

  4. High Incidence of Tuberculosis Infection in Rheumatic Diseases and Impact for Chemoprophylactic Prevention of Tuberculosis Activation during Biologics Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fengmin; Zhang, Shu; Jiang, Ting; Shen, Jie; Zhu, Qi; Yue, Tao; Shao, Lingyun; Gao, Yan; Feng, Yun; Weng, Xinhua; Zou, Hejian; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a long-term follow-up study in patients with rheumatic diseases who were candidates for biologics treatment to evaluate the effects of biologic agents on the risk of tuberculosis infection and the effect of prophylactic treatment on tuberculosis activation. One hundred one patients with rheumatic diseases who were candidates for biologics treatment were recruited, and 57 healthy subjects were recruited as controls. Tuberculin skin test (TST) and the T-SPOT.TB test were performed for all subjects at baseline. Follow-up testing by the T-SPOT.TB assay was performed every 6 months in patients with rheumatic diseases and at 2 years of recruitment in the healthy controls. In patients with rheumatic diseases and healthy controls, the TST-positive (induration, ≥10 mm) rates were 37.6% (38/101) and 34.0% (18/53), respectively (P > 0.05), while the T-SPOT.TB-positive rates were 46.5% (47/101) and 21.1 (12/57), respectively (P = 0.0019). Fifty-two patients were followed up at month 6 with a T-SPOT.TB-positive rate of 40.4%, and 49 were followed up for ≥12 months with a T-SPOT.TB-positive rate of 36.7%, with no significant difference in the positive rate at different time points including baseline (P > 0.05). Long-term follow-up revealed that conversion to T-SPOT.TB positivity occurred only in the biologics treatment group, with a positive conversion rate of 11.2% (4/38). Most importantly, no latent tuberculosis developed into active tuberculosis during follow-up with T-SPOT.TB screening and preemptive treatment with isoniazid. Biologics treatment appears to increase the risk of tuberculosis infection. However, tuberculosis activation could be prevented by preemptive isoniazid treatment in patients with latent tuberculosis infection while receiving biologics therapy. PMID:23554465

  5. [Medical economics in tuberculosis management: what will come after the TB ward?].

    PubMed

    Yotsumoto, Hideki

    2009-11-01

    Current unprofitability of medical services in tuberculosis (TB) ward in Japan has been induced by low medical fee and long-term hospital stays, aggravated by unoccupied beds due to the decrease in the number of patients. For the solution of this issue, the increase of medical fee, shortening of the length of hospital stay and drastic reduction of oversupplied beds are essential. An increment of medical fee by the change in the system would be appreciated, but even under the current system, the balance between revenue and expenditure could be obtained by reducing the length of hospital stay toward 4 weeks, and the elimination of deficit in TB ward could be accomplished by these efforts; shortening of length of hospital stay and reduction of TB beds. Although the latter might result in the difficulty of sustaining TB wards, these patients could be treated in the infectious disease ward. The integration of TB Control Law to Infectious Disease Control Law suggests that TB is not a special disease in Japan. If a true "short course therapy" era would be realized by novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, a dramatic change in TB management would occur in the near future. PMID:19999596

  6. Testing for TB Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  7. High Rates of Potentially Infectious Tuberculosis and Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) among Hospital Inpatients in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa Indicate Risk of Nosocomial Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Bantubani, Nonkqubela; Kabera, Gaetan; Connolly, Catherine; Rustomjee, Roxana; Reddy, Tarylee; Cohen, Ted; Pym, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nosocomial transmission has been implicated as a key factor in the outbreak of extensively drug resistant (XDR) and multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) tuberculosis at Church of Scotland Hospital (CoSH), in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa. The aim of this study was to quantify the burden of potentially infectious tuberculosis and the proportion of drug resistance among hospital inpatients throughout the province of KZN. Methods Inpatients with current cough, capable of producing sputum were selected from 19 public hospitals in KZN. After informed consent, demographic and clinical data, and sputum samples were collected. Samples were processed for fluorescent microscopy, liquid culture and first and second-line anti-tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing. Results There were a total of 2,964 inpatients where sampling was done. About 1,585 inpatients (53%) had a current cough and sufficient microbiological and clinical data for inclusion. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from 543 inpatients (34% of those tested and 18% of all inpatients). Eighty-four (15%) inpatients with TB were found to be MDR-TB infected and 16 (3%) had XDR-TB. There was no association between the prevalence of MDR-TB and proximity to CoSH. Among patients with microbiologically confirmed TB, MDR/XDR-TB was associated with male sex, a longer length of stay between hospital admission and date of sample collection, and current or previous TB treatment. Conclusions One in five inpatients had potentially infectious TB. This is an underestimate since patients without current cough were not tested. MDR-TB was frequently observed and was found in nearly one in six active TB inpatients. While present at lower levels than the original outbreak report at CoSH, XDR-TB was detected in hospitals throughout KZN. The high burden of potentially infectious TB and confirmed MDR-TB, much of it undiagnosed, indicates a serious risk for nosocomial transmission and the need for intensified infection

  8. Modified TB rapid test by proteinase K for rapid diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yari, Shamsi; Hadizadeh Tasbiti, Alireza; Ghanei, Mostafa; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Fateh, Abolfazl; Yari, Fatemeh; Bahrmand, Ahmadreza

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis continues to be a challenge due to the low sensitivity of traditional diagnostic methods. Better and more rapid tests are needed for diagnosis of pleural TB. In this study, pleural fluids were tested with rapid test to determine Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB antigen). Affinity chromatography was used to purify specific polyclonal antibodies against MTB antigen. Pleural samples after decontamination were treated with proteinase K. Rapid test for pleural fluids was prepared by specific antibody. Rapid test was performed on 85 pleural fluid patients. The patients had a mean age of 46.55 ± 15.96 years and 38 were men. The performance of rapid test, using proteinase K, was found to be the most impressive: sensitivity 93%, specificity 94%, PPV 90%, and NPV 96% compared with adenosine deaminase test (ADA), PCR, smear, and culture. The present study did demonstrate that modified TB rapid test can substantially improve the diagnosis of extrapulmonary TB. PMID:26693840

  9. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tiruviluamala, Parvathi; Reichman, Lee B

    2002-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Of these, the most common species to infect humans is M. tuberculosis. The TB bacillus is an extremely successful human pathogen, infecting two billion persons worldwide; an estimated 2 to 3 million people die from tuberculosis each year. In the United States, TB rates decreased steadily at the rate of 5% per year from 1953 until 1985 when the trend reversed, with the number of TB cases peaking in 1992. Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were reported, and these cases were documented to be transmitted in nosocomial and congregate settings, including hospitals and prisons. AIDS patients infected with M. tb developed disease rapidly, and case-fatality rates of >80% were noted in those infected with multidrug-resistant M. tb. Intensive intervention, at enormous cost, caused the number of TB cases to decline. This article discusses factors that led to the increase in TB cases, their subsequent decline, and measures needed in the future if TB is to be eliminated in the United States. PMID:11910069

  10. Gamma interferon release assay for monitoring of treatment response for active tuberculosis: an explosion in the spaghetti factory.

    PubMed

    Denkinger, Claudia M; Pai, Madhukar; Patel, Meena; Menzies, Dick

    2013-02-01

    Few studies have correlated the results of interferon (gamma interferon) release assays (IGRAs) with known markers of tuberculosis (TB) treatment response. We report the results of serial QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube assay (QFT) testing on 149 patients with active tuberculosis and correlate the results with smear and culture conversion. We show that QFT results do not offer much value for treatment monitoring of TB disease. PMID:23175268

  11. Incidence of tuberculosis and immunological profile of TB/HIV co-infected patients in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Baba Maiyaki; Musa, Babashani; Muhammed, Hamza; Ibrahim, Nashabaru; Musa, Abubakar Garbati

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We obtained estimates of the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) among patients receiving HIV Treatment. We also modeled the relationship between incident TB and change in CD4 count over the follow-up period. METHODS: We analyzed the incidence of TB over 10 years from initiation of HIV treatment among 345 HIV treatment-naïve persons, who were enrolled in a cohort in Kano, Nigeria. We used Generalized Estimating Equation [GEE] to identify determinants of TB incidence and model the relationship between the occurrences of TB with change in CD4 count over the follow-up period. We created Kaplan-Meier curves stratified by anti-retroviral therapy (ART) treatment failure status to examine the effect of first line ART treatment failure on occurrence of TB. RESULT: During the 10-year period, 47(13.62%) had TB [incidence was 7.43 per (1,000) person year)]. It is associated with decreasing age (OR = 0.98), female gender (OR = 0.83), being on first line ART other than AZT (OR = 0.87), poor adherence (OR = 1.25), change in ART regimen (OR = 2.3) and ART treatment failure (OR = 1.51). Odds of TB occurrence was also associated with CD4 increment at 10 years (OR = 0.99). Those with TB/HIV co-infection tend to have statistically significant shorter time to failing first line ART regimen compared to those with HIV infection alone. CONCLUSION: There was high incidence of TB in the studied HIV cohort with a deleterious effect on the outcome of ART treatment. There is need for early TB screening and re-screening among all HIV patients. PMID:26229561

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lipolytic Enzymes as Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Belinda; Lecoufle, Mélanie; Tuaillon, Edouard; Dedieu, Luc; Canaan, Stéphane; Valverde, Viviane; Kremer, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Background New diagnosis tests are urgently needed to address the global tuberculosis (TB) burden and to improve control programs especially in resource-limited settings. An effective in vitro diagnostic of TB based on serological methods would be regarded as an attractive progress because immunoassays are simple, rapid, inexpensive, and may offer the possibility to detect cases missed by standard sputum smear microscopy. However, currently available serology tests for TB are highly variable in sensitivity and specificity. Lipolytic enzymes have recently emerged as key factors in lipid metabolization during dormancy and/or exit of the non-replicating growth phase, a prerequisite step of TB reactivation. The focus of this study was to analyze and compare the potential of four Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipolytic enzymes (LipY, Rv0183, Rv1984c and Rv3452) as new markers in the serodiagnosis of active TB. Methods Recombinant proteins were produced and used in optimized ELISA aimed to detect IgG and IgM serum antibodies against the four lipolytic enzymes. The capacity of the assays to identify infection was evaluated in patients with either active TB or latent TB and compared with two distinct control groups consisting of BCG-vaccinated blood donors and hospitalized non-TB individuals. Results A robust humoral response was detected in patients with active TB whereas antibodies against lipolytic enzymes were infrequently detected in either uninfected groups or in subjects with latent infection. High specifity levels, ranging from 93.9% to 97.5%, were obtained for all four antigens with sensitivity values ranging from 73.4% to 90.5%, with Rv3452 displaying the highest performances. Patients with active TB usually exhibited strong IgG responses but poor IgM responses. Conclusion These results clearly indicate that the lipolytic enzymes tested are strongly immunogenic allowing to distinguish active from latent TB infections. They appear as potent biomarkers providing high

  13. Diagnostic value of antibody responses to multiple antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in active and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Senoputra, Muhammad Andrian; Shiratori, Beata; Hasibuan, Fakhrial Mirwan; Koesoemadinata, Raspati Cundarani; Apriani, Lika; Ashino, Yugo; Ono, Kenji; Oda, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Makoto; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Hattori, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the antibody responses to 10 prospective Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antigens and evaluated their ability to discriminate between latent (LTBI) and active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Our results indicate that plasma levels of anti-α-crystallin (ACR), antilipoarabinomannan, anti-trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate, and anti-tubercular-glycolipid antigen antibodies were higher in patients with active TB, compared to those in the LTBI and control subjects. No differences in the antibodies were observed between the control and LTBI subjects. Antibodies against the glycolipid antigens could not distinguish between Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC)-negative TB patients and MAC-infected LTBI individuals. The most useful serological marker was antibodies to ACR, with MAC-negative TB patients having higher titers than those observed in MAC-positive LTBI and control subjects. Our data indicate that antibody to ACR is a promising target for the serological diagnosis of patients with active TB patients. When dealing with antiglycolipid antibodies, MAC coinfection should always be considered in serological studies. PMID:26307672

  14. Evaluation of heat shock proteins for discriminating between latent tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Seema D; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is of the utmost concern. The available tests, the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the Quantiferon-TB Gold test (QFT-G) cannot discriminate between active TB and LTBI. Therefore, the aim of the study is to identify new biomarkers that can discriminate between active TB and LTBI and can also assess the risk of the individual developing active TB. In total, 55 blood samples were collected, of which 10 samples were from the active TB infection group, 10 were from the high-risk exposure group, 23 were from the low-risk exposure group, and 12 were from healthy controls living in a non-TB endemic area. A panel of heat shock proteins (Hsps), including host Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Hsp16, were evaluated in all of the collected samples using ELISA. The levels of the host Hsp(s) (Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90) and MTB Hsp16 were significantly (p<0.05) elevated in the active TB group compared to the high-risk exposure group, the low-risk exposure group and the control group. Notably, the levels of the same panel of Hsp(s) were elevated in the high-risk exposure group compared to the low-risk exposure group. On follow-up, out of the 10 high-risk exposure participants, 3 converted into active TB, indicating that this group has the highest risk of developing TB. Thus, the evaluated panel of Hsp(s) can discriminate between LTBI and active TB. They can also identify individuals who are at the highest risk of developing active TB. Because they can be rapidly detected, Hsp(s) have an edge over the existing diagnostic tools for LTBI. The evaluation of these proteins will be useful in designing better diagnostic methods for LTBI. PMID:26300163

  15. QuantiFERON-TB Gold Assay on Plasma for Confirmation of Presumed Tuberculosis-Related Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Stefania; Bua, Alessandra; Molicotti, Paola; Maiore, Irene; Pinna, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    The QuantiFERON-TB Gold assay was used to measure interferon gamma levels in plasma from 4 patients with presumed tuberculosis-related uveitis before, during, and after antitubercular therapy. After treatment, all patients showed clinical improvement. The concentrations showed a reversion to an absence of interferon gamma in one case, decreased in two cases, and remained stable in one case. These results suggest that the QuantiFERON assay may be useful for tuberculosis-related uveitis diagnosis and follow-up. PMID:27252466

  16. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB. We conducted a nested case–control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates. From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78–0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66–0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine. In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  17. Tuberculosis Screening on a Health Science Campus: Use of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test for Students and Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Smith, Phillip Karl; Handy, Barry; Martin, Sharon R.

    2007-01-01

    Detecting and managing "Mycobacterium tuberculosis" (TB) infection in a health-science center population is a clinical dilemma. Tuberculin skin tests are still the preferred method for detecting present or past infection of TB. The authors discuss the performance of whole blood interferon gamma release assay test commercially known as…

  18. Immunopathogenesis of tuberculosis and novel mechanisms of vaccine activity.

    PubMed

    Schrager, Lewis K; Izzo, Angelo; Velmurugan, Kamalakannan

    2016-08-01

    The 4th Global Forum on TB Vaccines, convened in Shanghai, China, from 21 - 24 April 2015, brought together a wide and diverse community involved in tuberculosis vaccine research and development to discuss the current status of, and future directions for this critical effort. This paper summarizes the sessions on Immunopathogenesis of Tuberculosis, and Immunopathogenesis and Novel Mechanisms of Vaccine Activity. Summaries of all sessions from the 4th Global Forum are compiled in a special supplement of Tuberculosis. PMID:27450395

  19. Integrated Source Case Investigation for Tuberculosis (TB) and HIV in the Caregivers and Household Contacts of Hospitalised Young Children Diagnosed with TB in South Africa: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lala, Sanjay G.; Little, Kristen M.; Tshabangu, Nkeko; Moore, David P.; Msandiwa, Reginah; van der Watt, Martin; Chaisson, Richard E.; Martinson, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Contact tracing, to identify source cases with untreated tuberculosis (TB), is rarely performed in high disease burden settings when the index case is a young child with TB. As TB is strongly associated with HIV infection in these settings, we used source case investigation to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed TB and HIV in the caregivers and household contacts of hospitalised young children diagnosed with TB in South Africa. Methods Caregivers and household contacts of 576 young children (age ≤7 years) with TB diagnosed between May 2010 and August 2012 were screened for TB and HIV. The primary outcome was the detection of laboratory-confirmed, newly-diagnosed TB disease and/or HIV-infection in close contacts. Results Of 576 caregivers, 301 (52·3%) self-reported HIV-positivity. Newly-diagnosed HIV infection was detected in 63 (22·9%) of the remaining 275 caregivers who self-reported an unknown or negative HIV status. Screening identified 133 (23·1%) caregivers eligible for immediate anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Newly-diagnosed TB disease was detected in 23 (4·0%) caregivers. In non-caregiver household contacts (n = 1341), the prevalence of newly-diagnosed HIV infection and TB disease was 10·0% and 3·2% respectively. On average, screening contacts of every nine children with TB resulted in the identification of one case of newly-diagnosed TB disease, three cases of newly diagnosed HIV-infection, and three HIV-infected persons eligible for ART. Conclusion In high burden countries, source case investigation yields high rates of previously undiagnosed HIV and TB infection in the close contacts of hospitalised young children diagnosed with TB. Furthermore, integrated screening identifies many individuals who are eligible for immediate ART. Similar studies, with costing analyses, should be undertaken in other high burden settings–integrated source case investigation for TB and HIV should be routinely undertaken if our findings are confirmed

  20. Tuberculosis: General Information

    MedlinePlus

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  1. Increased Complement C1q Level Marks Active Disease in Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxia; Liu, Haiying; Zhang, Guoliang; Deng, Qunyi; Huang, Jian; Gao, Zhiliang; Zhou, Boping; Feng, Carl G.; Chen, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    Background Complement functions as an important host defense system and complement C5 and C7 have been implicated in immunopathology of tuberculosis. However, little is known about the role of other complement components in tuberculosis. Methods Complement gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of tuberculosis patients and controls were determined using whole genome transcriptional microarray assays. The mRNA and protein levels of three C1q components, C1qA, C1qB, and C1qC, were further validated by qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The percentages of C1q expression in CD14 positive cells were determined by flow cytometry. Finally, C1qC protein level was quantified in the pleural fluid of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis pleurisy. Results C1q expression increases significantly in the peripheral blood of patients with active tuberculosis compared to healthy controls and individuals with latent TB infection. The percentage of C1q-expressing CD14 positive cells is significantly increased in active TB patients. C1q expression in the peripheral blood correlates with sputum smear positivity in tuberculosis patients and is reduced after anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Notably, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that C1qC mRNA levels in peripheral blood efficiently discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection and healthy controls. Additionally, C1qC protein level in pleural effusion shows improved power in discriminating tuberculosis from non-tuberculosis pleurisy when compared to other inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. Conclusions C1q expression correlates with active disease in human tuberculosis. C1q could be a potential diagnostic marker to discriminate active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection as well as tuberculosis pleurisy from non-tuberculosis pleurisy. PMID:24647646

  2. Accuracy of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test for Tuberculosis Diagnosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Michela; Buonsenso, Danilo; Goletti, Delia; D’Alfonso, Pamela; Zumbo, Antonella; Fadda, Giovanni; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Delogu, Giovanni; Valentini, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold assay (QFT-IT) in children with suspected active or latent TB infection (LTBI). Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 621 children (0–14 years old) evaluated for TB infection or disease. Following clinical assessment, children were tested with the QFT-IT assay. Results Among the 140 active TB suspects, we identified 19 cases of active disease. The overall sensitivity for active TB was 87.5%, ranging from 62.5% in children 25–36 months old to 100% in children older than 49 months. The overall specificity for active TB was 93.6%. Among the 481 children tested for LTBI screening, 38 scored positive and all but 2 had at least one risk factor for TB infection. Among the 26 children with indeterminate results, bacterial, viral or fungal pneumonia were later diagnosed in 11 (42.3%) cases and non-TB related extra-pulmonary infections in 12 (46.1%). Conclusions Our results indicate that the children's response to QFT-IT associates to active TB and risk factors for LTBI. Moreover, we show that mitogen response is also found in children of 1 year of age, providing support for QFT-IT use also in young children. PMID:26439935

  3. Taking forward the World TB Day 2016 theme 'Unite to End Tuberculosis' for the WHO Africa Region.

    PubMed

    Ntoumi, Francine; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Macete, Eusebio; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Maeurer, Markus; Petersen, Eskild; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global emergency, with an estimated 9.6 million new TB cases worldwide reported in 2014. Twenty-eight percent of these cases were in the World Health Organization (WHO) Africa Region, where the annual case detection rate was 281 per 100000 population-more than double the global average of 133 per 100000. Of the 9.6 million people who developed TB, an estimated 1.2 million (12%) were HIV-positive, and the Africa Region accounted for 74% of these cases. Three million people with TB remain undiagnosed and untreated. Globally, an estimated 480000 had multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). Whilst of the African countries, only South Africa has reported a high prevalence of MDR-TB, it is likely that all of Sub-Saharan Africa has an unreported high load of drug-resistant TB. Tragically, in 2014, only 48% of individuals diagnosed with MDR-TB had successful treatment and an estimated 190000 people died of MDR-TB. Of the global TB funding gap of US$ 0.8 billion, the largest funding gap was in the Africa Region, amounting to US$ 0.4 billion in 2015. The MDR-TB pandemic in particular now threatens to devastate entire regions and may fundamentally alter the life-expectancy and demographic profile of many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The theme designated for this year's World TB Day, March 24, 2016, is 'Unite to End TB'. From the Africa Region, there is an urgent need to seriously address the political, economic, and social factors that influence host-Mycobacterium tuberculosis interactions and result in disease. Recent political and funder initiatives that provide renewed hope for the alleviation of Africa's TB and TB/HIV problems are discussed. PMID:26969406

  4. Active case finding of tuberculosis: historical perspective and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Golub, J. E.; Mohan, C. I.; Comstock, G. W.; Chaisson, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite a history of remarkable scientific achievements in microbiology and therapeutics, tuberculosis (TB) continues to pose an extraordinary threat to human health. Case finding and treatment of TB disease are the principal means of controlling transmission and reducing incidence. This review presents a historical perspective of active case finding (ACF) of TB, detailing case detection strategies that have been used over the last century. This review is divided into the following sections: mass radiography, house-to-house surveys, out-patient case detection, enhanced case finding, high-risk populations and cost-effectiveness. The report concludes with a discussion and recommendations for future case finding strategies. Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of these methods will help inform and shape ACF as a TB control policy in the twenty-first century. PMID:16333924

  5. Blood or Urine IP-10 Cannot Discriminate between Active Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Different from Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Linda; Cannas, Angela; Aloi, Francesco; Nsubuga, Martin; Sserumkuma, Joseph; Nazziwa, Ritah Angella; Jugheli, Levan; Lukindo, Tedson; Girardi, Enrico; Reither, Klaus; Goletti, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10), either in blood or in urine, has been proposed as a tuberculosis (TB) biomarker for adults. This study aims to evaluate the potential of IP-10 diagnostics in children from Uganda, a high TB-endemic country. Methods. IP-10 was measured in the blood and urine concomitantly taken from children who were prospectively enrolled with suspected active TB, with or without HIV infection. Clinical/microbiological parameters and commercially available TB-immune assays (tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT)) were concomitantly evaluated. Results. One hundred twenty-eight children were prospectively enrolled. The analysis was performed on 111 children: 80 (72%) of them were HIV-uninfected and 31 (27.9%) were HIV-infected. Thirty-three healthy adult donors (HAD) were included as controls. The data showed that IP-10 is detectable in the urine and blood of children with active TB, independent of HIV status and age. However, although IP-10 levels were higher in active TB children compared to HAD, the accuracy of identifying “active TB” was low and similar to the TST and QFT-IT. Conclusion. IP-10 levels are higher in children with respiratory illness compared to controls, independent of “TB status” suggesting that the evaluation of this parameter can be used as an inflammatory marker more than a TB test. PMID:26346028

  6. Evaluation of two line probe assays for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance, and non-TB Mycobacteria in HIV-infected individuals with suspected TB.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Kendall, Michelle A; Wu, Xingye; Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Jentsch, Ute; Swindells, Susan; Qasba, Sarojini S; Sanchez, Jorge; Havlir, Diane V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Sanne, Ian M; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2014-04-01

    Limited performance data from line probe assays (LPAs), nucleic acid tests used for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance are available for HIV-infected individuals, in whom paucibacillary TB is common. In this study, the strategy of testing sputum with GenoType MTBDRplus (MTBDR-Plus) and GenoType Direct LPA (Direct LPA) was compared to a gold standard of one mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture. HIV-positive (HIV(+)) individuals with suspected TB from southern Africa and South America with <7 days of TB treatment had 1 sputum specimen tested with Direct LPA, MTBDR-Plus LPA, smear microscopy, MGIT, biochemical identification of mycobacterial species, and culture-based drug-susceptibility testing (DST). Of 639 participants, 59.3% were MGIT M. tuberculosis culture positive, of which 276 (72.8%) were acid-fast bacillus (AFB) smear positive. MTBDR-Plus had a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 100%, with sensitivities of 44.1% in AFB smear-negative versus 94.6% in AFB smear-positive specimens. For specimens that were positive for M. tuberculosis by MTBDR-Plus, the sensitivity and specificity for rifampin resistance were 91.7% and 96.6%, respectively, and for isoniazid (INH) they were 70.6% and 99.1%. The Direct LPA had a sensitivity of 88.4% and a specificity of 94.6% for M. tuberculosis detection, with a sensitivity of 72.5% in smear-negative specimens. Ten of 639 MGIT cultures grew Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium kansasii, half of which were detected by Direct LPA. Both LPA assays performed well in specimens from HIV-infected individuals, including in AFB smear-negative specimens, with 72.5% sensitivity for M. tuberculosis identification with the Direct LPA and 44.1% sensitivity with MTBDR-Plus. LPAs have a continued role for use in settings where rapid identification of INH resistance and clinically relevant NTM are priorities. PMID:24430455

  7. Treatment: Latent TB Infection (LTBI) and TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Rapid Screening of MDR-TB in Cases of Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis Using Geno Type MTBDRplus

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Richa; Tripathi, Rajneesh; Pandey, Alok Prakash; Banerjee, Tuhina; Sinha, Pallavi; Anupurba, Shampa

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug resistance in tuberculosis is a major public health challenge in developing countries. The limited data available on drug resistance in extra pulmonary tuberculosis stimulated us to design our study on anti-tuberculosis drug resistance pattern in cases of extra pulmonary tuberculosis in a tertiary referral hospital of North India. We performed Geno Type MTBDRplus assay in comparison with conventional drug susceptibility testing by proportion method to study the mutation patterns in rpoB, katG and inhA genes. Methods A total of 510 extra pulmonary samples were included in this study. After the smear microscopy, all the specimens were subjected for culture on Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) media. Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) was performed on LJ media for all the MTB isolates and compared with the results of Geno Type MTBDRplus assay which was performed with the DNA isolated from the culture by conventional method. Results Of 510 specimens cultured, the total culture positivity obtained was 11.8% (60) encompassing 54 (10.6%) Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 6 (1.2%) non-tubercular mycobacteria (NTM). DST results by Geno Type MTBDRplus assay and solid culture methods were compared in 51 MTB isolates excluding the two Rif indeterminate and one invalid test. Geno Type MTBDRplus accurately identified 13 of 14 rifampicin-resistant strains, 14 of 15 isoniazid-resistant strains and 13 of 14 as multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in comparison with conventional method. Sensitivity and specificity were 92.86% and 97.30% respectively for detection of RIF resistance, 93.33% and 94.44% respectively for detection of INH resistance, 92.86% and 97.30% respectively for detection of MDR-TB, while the overall concordance of Geno Type MTBDRplus assay with conventional DST was 94.11%. The turn-around time for performing Geno Type MTBDRplus assay test was 48 hours. Conclusion The problem of MDR in extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) cannot be overlooked and

  9. Risk factors for false-negative results of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay in non-HIV-infected patients with culture-confirmed tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Kang, Young Ae

    2011-07-01

    Limited information is available on the risk factors for false-negative results with the new generation of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) tests in non-HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis (TB). We sought to identify risk factors for false-negative QFT-GIT results in culture-confirmed TB patients. We reviewed the microbiological, laboratory, radiographic, and clinical data of 362 patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures who received QFT-GIT tests at a Korean tertiary hospital between September 2006 and March 2010. Of these, 311 (85.9%) had true-positive and 51 (14.1%) had false-negative results. The false-negative group was more likely to have immunosuppressant diseases and lower platelet, protein, and albumin levels than the true-positive group. An immunosuppressive condition was an independent risk factor for false-negative QFT-GIT results in non-HIV-infected patients with active TB (odds ratio, 2.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.38-6.47; P = .006). Careful interpretation of negative QFT-GIT results is thus necessary in immunocompromised patients suspected of having active TB. PMID:21546200

  10. B in TB: B Cells as Mediators of Clinically Relevant Immune Responses in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Martin; Valentini, Davide; Poiret, Thomas; Dodoo, Ernest; Parida, Shreemanta; Zumla, Alimuddin; Brighenti, Susanna; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The protective role of B cells and humoral immune responses in tuberculosis infection has been regarded as inferior to cellular immunity directed to the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, B-cell–mediated immune responses in tuberculosis have recently been revisited in the context of B-cell physiology and antigen presentation. We discuss in this review the diverse functions of B cells in tuberculosis, with a focus on their biological and clinical relevance to progression of active disease. We also present the peptide microarray platform as a promising strategy to discover unknown antigenic targets of M. tuberculosis that could contribute to the better understanding of epitope focus of the humoral immune system against M. tuberculosis. PMID:26409285

  11. [Human resource capacity building on TB laboratory work for TB control program--through the experience of international TB laboratory training course for TB control at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis, JATA, Japan].

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Akiko; Kato, Seiya

    2008-06-01

    The international training course on TB laboratory work for national tuberculosis program (NTP) has been conducted at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis since 1975 funded by Japan International Cooperation Agency in collaboration with WHO Western Pacific Regional Office. The aim of the course is to train key personnel in TB laboratory field for NTP in resource-limited countries. The course has trained 265 national key personnel in TB laboratory service from 57 resource-limited countries in the last 33 years. The number of participants trained may sound too small in the fight against the large TB problem in resource-limited countries. However, every participant is playing an important role as a core and catalyst for the TB control program in his/her own country when they were back home. The curriculum is composed of technical aspects on TB examination, mainly sputum microscopy in addition since microscopy service is provided at many centers that are deployed in a widely spread area, the managerial aspect of maintaining quality TB laboratory work at the field laboratory is another component of the curriculum. Effective teaching methods using materials such as artificial sputum, which is useful for panel slide preparation, and technical manuals with illustrations and pictures of training procedure have been developed through the experience of the course. These manuals are highly appreciated and widely used by the front line TB workers. The course has also contributed to the expansion of EQA (External Quality Assessment) system on AFB microscopy for the improvement of the quality of TB laboratory service of NTP. The course is well-known for not only having a long history, but also for its unique learning method emphasizing "Participatory Training", particularly for practicum sessions to master the skills on AFB microscopy. The method in learning AFB microscopy, which was developed by the course, was published as a training manual by IUATLD, RIT and USAID. As it is

  12. Risk Factors for Bovine Tuberculosis (bTB) in Cattle in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Fitsum A.; Mekonnen, Daniel A.; Alemu, Zelalem E.; Kelkay, Tessema Z.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) infection is generally correlated with individual cattle’s age, sex, body condition, and with husbandry practices such as herd composition, cattle movement, herd size, production system and proximity to wildlife—including bTB maintenance hosts. We tested the correlation between those factors and the prevalence of bTB, which is endemic in Ethiopia’s highland cattle, in the Afar Region and Awash National Park between November 2013 and April 2015. A total of 2550 cattle from 102 herds were tested for bTB presence using the comparative intradermal tuberculin test (CITT). Data on herd structure, herd movement, management and production system, livestock transfer, and contact with wildlife were collected using semi-structured interviews with cattle herders and herd owners. The individual overall prevalence of cattle bTB was 5.5%, with a herd prevalence of 46%. Generalized Linear Mixed Models with a random herd-effect were used to analyse risk factors of cattle reactors within each herd. The older the age of the cattle and the lower the body condition the higher the chance of a positive bTB test result, but sex, lactation status and reproductive status were not correlated with bTB status. At herd level, General Linear Models showed that pastoral production systems with transhumant herds had a higher bTB prevalence than sedentary herds. A model averaging analysis identified herd size, contact with wildlife, and the interaction of herd size and contact with wildlife as significant risk factors for bTB prevalence in cattle. A subsequent Structural Equation Model showed that the probability of contact with wildlife was influenced by herd size, through herd movement. Larger herds moved more and grazed in larger areas, hence the probability of grazing in an area with wildlife and contact with either infected cattle or infected wildlife hosts increased, enhancing the chances for bTB infection. Therefore, future bTB control strategies in cattle in

  13. Questions and Answers about TB

    MedlinePlus

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  14. Post-treatment change in Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Ho; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Shin Yup; Cha, Seung Ick; Park, Jae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Monitoring tuberculosis (TB) treatment response remains challenging due to lack of reliable laboratory markers. In recent years, increased efforts have been exerted toward development of new biomarkers reflecting treatment response appropriately. While performance of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) to monitor anti-TB treatment has been extensively evaluated, there is no data about post-treatment changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antigen-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) release in active TB patients. Herein, we explored whether the MTB antigen-stimulated TNF-α release would be useful for monitoring responses to anti-TB treatment. Methods We compared unstimulated (TNF-αNil), MTB antigen-stimulated (TNF-αAg), and MTB antigen-stimulated minus unstimulated TNF-α levels (TNF-αAg-Nil) in supernatants from QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube tests before and after treatment in 16 active TB patients, 25 latent TB infection (LTBI) subjects, and 10 healthy controls (HC). Results TNF-αAg and TNF-αAg-Nil levels decreased significantly after treatment in patients with active TB. In addition, TNF-αNil, TNF-αAg, and TNF-αAg-Nil levels were significantly higher in untreated active TB patients compared to LTBI subjects and HC. Conclusions This finding cautiously suggests that MTB Ag-stimulated TNF-α response may be a potential adjunctive marker for monitoring treatment response in active TB patients. PMID:26101647

  15. Evaluation of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lina; Sasaki, Yuka; Nagai, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Satoru; Takamori, Mikio; Sakashita, Kentaro; Saito, Takefumi; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Igarashi, Yuriko; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Takaki, Akiko; Mori, Toru; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Performance of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays still needs to be improved. The data on the performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus (QFT-Plus), a new-generation of QFT assay are limited. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus, and compared to that of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Blood samples were collected from 162 bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (TB) patients and 212 Mycobacterium tuberculosis-uninfected volunteers; these samples were then tested with QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. The IFN-γ concentration of QFT-Plus was lower than that of QFT-GIT in TB patients (p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves were compared between QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. Both assays showed area under the curve values over 0.99 without significant difference. Using the conventional cut-off (0.35 IU/mL) for QFT-GIT, QFT-Plus had a lower sensitivity of 91.1% compared to 96.2% (p = 0.008) at its optimum cut-off (0.168 IU/mL) with the same specificity. Moreover, IFN-γ values were significantly reduced with age in QFT-GIT (p = 0.035) but not in QFT-Plus. The diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus was as accurate as that of QFT-GIT despite a lack of TB7.7 antigen and despite the decrease in quantitative values. However, the cut-off value for QFT-Plus should be considered independently from that of QFT-GIT to obtain the best sensitivity without compromising specificity. PMID:27470684

  16. Evaluation of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lina; Sasaki, Yuka; Nagai, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Satoru; Takamori, Mikio; Sakashita, Kentaro; Saito, Takefumi; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Igarashi, Yuriko; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Takaki, Akiko; Mori, Toru; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Performance of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays still needs to be improved. The data on the performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus (QFT-Plus), a new-generation of QFT assay are limited. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus, and compared to that of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Blood samples were collected from 162 bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (TB) patients and 212 Mycobacterium tuberculosis-uninfected volunteers; these samples were then tested with QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. The IFN-γ concentration of QFT-Plus was lower than that of QFT-GIT in TB patients (p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves were compared between QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. Both assays showed area under the curve values over 0.99 without significant difference. Using the conventional cut-off (0.35 IU/mL) for QFT-GIT, QFT-Plus had a lower sensitivity of 91.1% compared to 96.2% (p = 0.008) at its optimum cut-off (0.168 IU/mL) with the same specificity. Moreover, IFN-γ values were significantly reduced with age in QFT-GIT (p = 0.035) but not in QFT-Plus. The diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus was as accurate as that of QFT-GIT despite a lack of TB7.7 antigen and despite the decrease in quantitative values. However, the cut-off value for QFT-Plus should be considered independently from that of QFT-GIT to obtain the best sensitivity without compromising specificity. PMID:27470684

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Potentially Involved in the TB Epidemic in Sweden a Century Ago

    PubMed Central

    Groenheit, Ramona; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Pennhag, Alexandra; Jonsson, Jerker; Hoffner, Sven; Couvin, David; Koivula, Tuija; Rastogi, Nalin; Källenius, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    A hundred years ago the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in Sweden was one of the highest in the world. In this study we conducted a population-based search for distinct strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated from patients born in Sweden before 1945. Many of these isolates represent the M. tuberculosis complex population that fueled the TB epidemic in Sweden during the first half of the 20th century. Methods Genetic relationships between strains that caused the epidemic and present day strains were studied by spoligotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results The majority of the isolates from the elderly population were evolutionary recent Principal Genetic Group (PGG)2/3 strains (363/409 or 88.8%), and only a low proportion were ancient PGG1 strains (24/409 or 5.9%). Twenty-two were undefined. The isolates demonstrated a population where the Euro-American superlineage dominated; in particular with Haarlem (41.1%) and T (37.7%) spoligotypes and only 21.2% belonged to other spoligotype families. Isolates from the elderly population clustered much less frequently than did isolates from a young control group population. Conclusions A closely knit pool of PGG2/3 strains restricted to Sweden and its immediate neighbours appears to have played a role in the epidemic, while PGG1 strains are usually linked to migrants in todaýs Sweden. Further studies of these outbreak strains may give indications of why the epidemic waned. PMID:23056484

  18. Immunotherapy for tuberculosis: future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Getahun; Hoft, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major global health problem. A third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only ~10% of infected individuals develop TB but there are 9 million TB cases with 1.5 million deaths annually. The standard prophylactic treatment regimens for latent TB infection take 3–9 months, and new cases of TB require at least 6 months of treatment with multiple drugs. The management of latent TB infection and TB has become more challenging because of the spread of multidrug-resistant and extremely drug-resistant TB. Intensified efforts to find new TB drugs and immunotherapies are needed. Immunotherapies could modulate the immune system in patients with latent TB infection or active disease, enabling better control of M. tuberculosis replication. This review describes several types of potential immunotherapies with a focus on those which have been tested in humans. PMID:27529060

  19. Direct inhibitors of InhA active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, Ujjini H.; Rao, Srinivasa P. S.; Kondreddi, Ravinder Reddy; Noble, Christian G.; Camacho, Luis R.; Tan, Bee H.; Ng, Seow H.; Ng, Pearly Shuyi; Ma, N. L.; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Herve, Maxime; Barnes, S. Whitney; Yu, Weixuan; Kuhen, Kelli; Blasco, Francesca; Beer, David; Walker, John R.; Tonge, Peter J.; Glynne, Richard; Smith, Paul W.; Diagana, Thierry T.

    2015-01-01

    New chemotherapeutic agents are urgently required to combat the global spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The mycobacterial enoyl reductase, InhA, is one of the few clinically-validated targets in tuberculosis drug discovery. Here, we report the identification of a new class of direct InhA inhibitors, the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones, using phenotypic high-throughput whole-cell screening. This class of orally-active compounds showed potent bactericidal activity against common isoniazid-resistant TB clinical isolates. Biophysical studies revealed that 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones bound specifically to InhA in an NADH-dependent manner and blocked the enoyl-substrate binding pocket. The lead compound NITD-916 directly blocked InhA in a dose-dependent manner and showed in vivo efficacy in acute and established mouse models of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Collectively, our structural and biochemical data open up new avenues for rational structure-guided optimization of the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridone class of compounds for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:25568071

  20. Cost-comparison of different management policies for tuberculosis patients in Italy. AIPO TB Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Migliori, G. B.; Ambrosetti, M.; Besozzi, G.; Farris, B.; Nutini, S.; Saini, L.; Casali, L.; Nardini, S.; Bugiani, M.; Neri, M.; Raviglione, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Although in developing countries the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) cases is among the most cost-effective health interventions, few studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of TB control in low-prevalence countries. The aim of the present study was to carry out an economic analysis in Italy that takes into account both the perspective of the resource-allocating authority (i.e. the Ministry of Health) and the broader social perspective, including a cost description based on current outcomes applied to a representative sample of TB patients nationwide (admission and directly observed treatment (DOT) during the initial intensive phase of treatment); a cost-comparison analysis of two alternative programmes: current policy based on available data (scenario 1) and an hypothetical policy oriented more towards outpatient care (scenario 2) (both scenarios included the option of including or not including DOT outside hospital admission, and incentives) were compared in terms of cost per case treated successfully. Indirect costs (such as loss of productivity) were included in considerations of the broader social perspective. The study was designed as a prospective monitoring activity based on the supervised collection of forms from a representative sample of Italian TB units. Individual data were collected and analysed to obtain a complete economic profile of the patients enrolled and to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. A separate analysis was done for each scenario to determine the end-point at different levels of cure rate (50-90%). The mean length of treatment was 6.6 months (i.e. patients hospitalized during the intensive phase; length of stay was significantly higher in smear-positive patients and in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients). Roughly six direct smear and culture examinations were performed during hospital admission and three during ambulatory treatment. The cost of a single bed day was US$186.90, whereas that of a

  1. TB-SA antibody test for diagnosis and monitoring treatment outcome of sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxu; Xu, Hancheng; Jiang, Shiwen; Jing, Kuanhe; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Li, Weibin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Lixia

    2011-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the suitability of the TB-SA antibody test to diagnose tuberculosis in sputum smear negative (SS-) pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients and its applicability for monitoring treatment outcomes in these patients. This study was conducted in three counties/districts in Chongqing Municipality, Liaoning Province, China between June 2005 and June 2007. A total of 432 SS suspected pulmonary TB patients were recruited and their blood was collected prior to treatment, at the end of 1 month of treatment, 2 months of treatment and 6 months of treatment (E6MT). The serum samples were analyzed with a TB-SA antibody test kit. Of the 432 SS suspected pulmonary TB patients, serum samples were obtained at all time points in 316 patients and analyzed. The 316 patients were divided into three groups according to sputum smear and sputum culture results and the chest X-ray results before treatment and at E6MT. Ten point four percent were SS-/culture positive (C+), 73.1% were SS-/culture negative (C-) with X-rays abnormalities, and 16.5% were SS-/C- without X-rays abnormalities. The positive rates for TB-SA antibody in the three groups were 57.6, 44.6 and 44.2%, respectively, before treatment, and 18.2, 19.1 and 26.9%, respectively, at E6MT. There was a significant decrease in TB-SA antibody positivity with treatment for all 3 groups. The TB-SA antibody test may be a useful adjunct to diagnose tuberculosis in SS- pulmonary TB patients, and may be useful for monitoring treatment outcomes of SS- pulmonary TB patients. PMID:22299440

  2. MUBII-TB-DB: a database of mutations associated with antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is an infectious bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It remains a major health threat, killing over one million people every year worldwide. An early antibiotic therapy is the basis of the treatment, and the emergence and spread of multidrug and extensively drug-resistant mutant strains raise significant challenges. As these bacteria grow very slowly, drug resistance mutations are currently detected using molecular biology techniques. Resistance mutations are identified by sequencing the resistance-linked genes followed by a comparison with the literature data. The only online database is the TB Drug Resistance Mutation database (TBDReaM database); however, it requires mutation detection before use, and its interrogation is complex due to its loose syntax and grammar. Description The MUBII-TB-DB database is a simple, highly structured text-based database that contains a set of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations (DNA and proteins) occurring at seven loci: rpoB, pncA, katG; mabA(fabG1)-inhA, gyrA, gyrB, and rrs. Resistance mutation data were extracted after the systematic review of MEDLINE referenced publications before March 2013. MUBII analyzes the query sequence obtained by PCR-sequencing using two parallel strategies: i) a BLAST search against a set of previously reconstructed mutated sequences and ii) the alignment of the query sequences (DNA and its protein translation) with the wild-type sequences. The post-treatment includes the extraction of the aligned sequences together with their descriptors (position and nature of mutations). The whole procedure is performed using the internet. The results are graphs (alignments) and text (description of the mutation, therapeutic significance). The system is quick and easy to use, even for technicians without bioinformatics training. Conclusion MUBII-TB-DB is a structured database of the mutations occurring at seven loci of major therapeutic value in tuberculosis management

  3. Successful Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes among HIV/TB Coinfected Patients Down-Referred from a District Hospital to Primary Health Clinics in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Karen B.; Moll, Anthony P.; Friedland, Gerald H.; Shenoi, Sheela V.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV and tuberculosis (TB) coinfection remains a major public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Integration and decentralization of HIV and TB treatment services are being implemented, but data on outcomes of this strategy are lacking in rural, resource-limited settings. We evaluated TB treatment outcomes in TB/HIV coinfected patients in an integrated and decentralized system in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods We retrospectively studied a cohort of HIV/TB coinfected patients initiating treatment for drug-susceptible TB at a district hospital HIV clinic from January 2012-June 2013. Patients were eligible for down-referral to primary health clinics(PHCs) for TB treatment completion if they met specific clinical criteria. Records were reviewed for patients’ demographic, baseline clinical and laboratory information, past HIV and TB history, and TB treatment outcomes. Results Of 657(88.7%) patients, 322(49.0%) were female, 558(84.9%) were new TB cases, and 572(87.1%) had pulmonary TB. After TB treatment initiation, 280(42.6%) were down-referred from the district level HIV clinic to PHCs for treatment completion; 377(57.4%) remained at the district hospital. Retained patients possessed characteristics indicative of more severe disease. In total, 540(82.2%) patients experienced treatment success, 69(10.5%) died, and 46(7.0%) defaulted. Down-referred patients experienced higher treatment success, and lower mortality, but were more likely to default, primarily at the time of transfer to PHC. Conclusion Decentralization of TB treatment to the primary care level is feasible in rural South Africa. Treatment outcomes are favorable when patients are carefully chosen for down-referral. Higher mortality in retained patients reflects increased baseline disease severity while higher default among down-referred patients reflects failed linkage of care. Better linkage mechanisms are needed including improved identification of potential defaulters, increased

  4. Inflammasome genetics contributes to the development and control of active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Souza de Lima, D; Ogusku, M M; Sadahiro, A; Pontillo, A

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major public health problem. An estimated one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) but remains asymptomatic (latent TB) and only 5% to 10% of these latent individuals will develop active pulmonary TB. Factors affecting the balance between latent and active TB are mostly unknown, even if host genome has been shown to contribute to the outcome of Mtb response. Acute inflammation and Th1 response are important in the early clearance of the bacteria as it was emphasized by the association between immune genes (i.e.: HLA, IFNG, TNF, NRPAM1, IL10) variants and the development of active pulmonary TB. Recently, the role of the inflammasome in experimental TB has been demonstrated, however, to our knowledge, no data still exist about the contribution of inflammasome genetics to Mtb susceptibility and/or to the development of active TB. For this reason, selected polymorphisms in inflammasome genes were analysed in a case/control cohort of individuals with active pulmonary TB from an endemic area of Brazil Amazon. Our data evidence the novel association between polymorphisms in NLRP3-inflammasome encoding genes and active pulmonary TB, and replicated the association between P2X7 and TB observed in other populations. These results emphasize the role of NLRP3-inflammasome also in human TB, and contribute to our knowledge about pathways involved in the development of active TB, even if deeper investigation are needed to fully elucidate the role of the complex in Mtb infection. PMID:27101784

  5. FOXO3 rs12212067: T > G Association with Active Tuberculosis in Han Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Zhu, Yaowu; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Feng; Peng, Jing; Hou, Hongyan; Sun, Ziyong

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that the human innate immune and adaptive immune response play important role in tuberculosis (TB) infection and progress. Emerging evidence shows that FOXO3 plays an important role in the human immune system. Recent research has shown that the FOXO3 genetic variants are associated malaria infection. In this study, 268 confirmed TB patients, 321 patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and 475 TB-free controls were recruited; the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs12212067: T > G in FOXO3 was genotyped using predesigned TaqMan® allelic discrimination assays. The results showed that the G allele of rs12212067 in FOXO3 was more common in health control and the latent TB group compared with the active TB group (p = 0.048, odds ratio (OR) 95 % confidence intervals (CI) = 1.37 (1.00-1.89); p = 0.042, OR 95 % CI = 1.42 (1.01-1.99), respectively); furthermore, within active TB patients, the G allele of rs12212067 in FOXO3 was more frequent in extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) group compared to pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) group (p = 0.035, OR 95 % CI = 0.57 (0.33-0.97). In conclusion, this study found that rs12212067 in FOXO3 was associated with increased risk of active TB. The minor G allele might be a protection factor which was found more common in latent TB patients and healthy controls than active TB patients. PMID:26223437

  6. PrimaTB STAT-PAK Assay, a Novel, Rapid Lateral-Flow Test for Tuberculosis in Nonhuman Primates▿

    PubMed Central

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Greenwald, David; Nacy, Carol A.; Gibson, Susan; Didier, Peter J.; Washington, Marc; Szczerba, Peter; Motzel, Sherri; Handt, Larry; Pollock, John M.; McNair, James; Andersen, Peter; Langermans, Jan A. M.; Verreck, Frank; Ervin, Sean; Ervin, Frank; McCombs, Candace

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the most important zoonotic bacterial disease in nonhuman primates (NHP). The current diagnostic method, the intradermal palpebral tuberculin test, has serious shortcomings. We characterized antibody responses in NHP against Mycobacterium tuberculosis to identify immunodominant antigens and develop a rapid serodiagnostic test for TB. A total of 422 NHP were evaluated, including 243 rhesus (Macaca mulatta), 46 cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis), and 133 African green (Cercopithecus aethiops sabaeus) monkeys at five collaborative centers. Of those, 50 monkeys of the three species were experimentally inoculated with M. tuberculosis. Antibody responses were monitored every 2 to 4 weeks for up to 8 months postinfection by MultiAntigen Print ImmunoAssay with a panel of 12 recombinant antigens. All of the infected monkeys produced antibodies at various levels and with different antigen recognition patterns. ESAT-6 and MPB83 were the most frequently recognized proteins during infection. A combination of selected antigens which detected antibodies in all of the infected monkeys was designed to develop the PrimaTB STAT-PAK assay by lateral-flow technology. Serological evaluation demonstrated high diagnostic sensitivity (90%) and specificity (99%). The highest rate of TB detection was achieved when the skin test was combined with the PrimaTB STAT-PAK kit. This novel immunoassay provides a simple, rapid, and accurate test for TB in NHP. PMID:17652522

  7. Development of a POC Test for TB Based on Multiple Immunodominant Epitopes of M. tuberculosis Specific Cell-Wall Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jesus M.; Francis, Bryan; Burda, Sherri; Hess, Kaitlyn; Behera, Digamber; Gupta, Dheeraj; Agarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Verma, Indu; Verma, Ajoy; Myneedu, Vithal Prasad; Niedbala, Sam; Laal, Suman

    2014-01-01

    The need for an accurate, rapid, simple and affordable point-of-care (POC) test for Tuberculosis (TB) that can be implemented in microscopy centers and other peripheral health-care settings in the TB-endemic countries remains unmet. This manuscript describes preliminary results of a new prototype rapid lateral flow TB test based on detection of antibodies to immunodominant epitopes (peptides) derived from carefully selected, highly immunogenic M. tuberculosis cell-wall proteins. Peptide selection was initially based on recognition by antibodies in sera from TB patients but not in PPD-/PPD+/BCG-vaccinated individuals from TB-endemic settings. The peptides were conjugated to BSA; the purified peptide-BSA conjugates striped onto nitrocellulose membrane and adsorbed onto colloidal gold particles to devise the prototype test, and evaluated for reactivity with sera from 3 PPD-, 29 PPD+, 15 PPD-unknown healthy subjects, 10 patients with non-TB lung disease and 124 smear-positive TB patients. The assay parameters were adjusted to determine positive/negative status within 15 minutes via visual or instrumented assessment. There was minimal or no reactivity of sera from non-TB subjects with the striped BSA-peptides demonstrating the lack of anti-peptide antibodies in subjects with latent TB and/or BCG vaccination. Sera from most TB patients demonstrated reactivity with one or more peptides. The sensitivity of antibody detection ranged from 28–85% with the 9 BSA-peptides. Three peptides were further evaluated with sera from 400 subjects, including additional PPD-/PPD+/PPD-unknown healthy contacts, close hospital contacts and household contacts of untreated TB patients, patients with non-TB lung disease, and HIV+TB- patients. Combination of the 3 peptides provided sensitivity and specificity>90%. While the final fully optimized lateral flow POC test for TB is under development, these preliminary results demonstrate that an antibody-detection based rapid POC lateral flow test

  8. Host Protein Biomarkers Identify Active Tuberculosis in HIV Uninfected and Co-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Cortes, Laetitia; Croteau, Pascal; Yanofsky, Corey; Mentinova, Marija; Rajotte, Isabelle; Schirm, Michael; Zhou, Yiyong; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Larsen, Michelle; Allard, René; Hunter, Joanna; Paramithiotis, Eustache

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed to improve rapid TB diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify serum protein expression changes associated with TB but not latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI), uninfected states, or respiratory diseases other than TB (ORD). Serum samples from 209 HIV uninfected (HIV−) and co-infected (HIV+) individuals were studied. In the discovery phase samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, and in the verification phase biologically independent samples were analyzed via a multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay. Compared to LTBI and ORD, host proteins were significantly differentially expressed in TB, and involved in the immune response, tissue repair, and lipid metabolism. Biomarker panels whose composition differed according to HIV status, and consisted of 8 host proteins in HIV− individuals (CD14, SEPP1, SELL, TNXB, LUM, PEPD, QSOX1, COMP, APOC1), or 10 host proteins in HIV+ individuals (CD14, SEPP1, PGLYRP2, PFN1, VASN, CPN2, TAGLN2, IGFBP6), respectively, distinguished TB from ORD with excellent accuracy (AUC = 0.96 for HIV− TB, 0.95 for HIV+ TB). These results warrant validation in larger studies but provide promise that host protein biomarkers could be the basis for a rapid, blood-based test for TB. PMID:26501113

  9. Host Protein Biomarkers Identify Active Tuberculosis in HIV Uninfected and Co-infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Cortes, Laetitia; Croteau, Pascal; Yanofsky, Corey; Mentinova, Marija; Rajotte, Isabelle; Schirm, Michael; Zhou, Yiyong; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Larsen, Michelle; Allard, René; Hunter, Joanna; Paramithiotis, Eustache

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed to improve rapid TB diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify serum protein expression changes associated with TB but not latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI), uninfected states, or respiratory diseases other than TB (ORD). Serum samples from 209 HIV uninfected (HIV(-)) and co-infected (HIV(+)) individuals were studied. In the discovery phase samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, and in the verification phase biologically independent samples were analyzed via a multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay. Compared to LTBI and ORD, host proteins were significantly differentially expressed in TB, and involved in the immune response, tissue repair, and lipid metabolism. Biomarker panels whose composition differed according to HIV status, and consisted of 8 host proteins in HIV(-) individuals (CD14, SEPP1, SELL, TNXB, LUM, PEPD, QSOX1, COMP, APOC1), or 10 host proteins in HIV(+) individuals (CD14, SEPP1, PGLYRP2, PFN1, VASN, CPN2, TAGLN2, IGFBP6), respectively, distinguished TB from ORD with excellent accuracy (AUC = 0.96 for HIV(-) TB, 0.95 for HIV(+) TB). These results warrant validation in larger studies but provide promise that host protein biomarkers could be the basis for a rapid, blood-based test for TB. PMID:26501113

  10. Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Interventions Among Immigrants, Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Schepisi, Monica Sañé; Gualano, Gina; Piselli, Pierluca; Mazza, Marta; D’Angelo, Donatella; Fasciani, Francesca; Barbieri, Alberto; Rocca, Giorgia; Gnolfo, Filippo; Olivani, Piefranco; Ferrarese, Maurizio; Codecasa, Luigi Ruffo; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Girardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    In Italy tuberculosis (TB) is largely concentrated in vulnerable groups such as migrants and in urban settings. We analyzed three TB case finding interventions conducted at primary centers and mobile clinics for regular/irregular immigrants and refugees/asylum seekers performed over a four-year period (November 2009-March 2014) at five different sites in Rome and one site in Milan, Italy. TB history and presence of symptoms suggestive of active TB were investigated by verbal screening through a structured questionnaire in migrants presenting for any medical condition to out-patient and mobile clinics. Individuals reporting TB history or symptoms were referred to a TB clinic for diagnostic workup. Among 6347 migrants enrolled, 891 (14.0%) reported TB history or symptoms suggestive of active TB and 546 (61.3%) were referred to the TB clinic. Of them, 254 (46.5%) did not present for diagnostic evaluation. TB was diagnosed in 11 individuals representing 0.17% of those screened and 3.76% of those evaluated. The overall yield of this intervention was in the range reported for other TB screening programs for migrants, although we recorded an unsatisfactory adherence to diagnostic workup. Possible advantages of this intervention include low cost and reduced burden of medical procedures for the screened population. PMID:27403270

  11. Increased mortality associated with treated active tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kabali, Conrad; Mtei, Lillian; Brooks, Daniel R; Waddell, Richard; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky; Arbeit, Robert D; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C Fordham; Horsburgh, C Robert

    2013-07-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected patients, even when successfully treated, may be associated with excess mortality. We conducted a prospective cohort study nested in a randomized TB vaccine trial to compare mortality between HIV-infected patients diagnosed and treated for TB (TB, n = 77) and HIV-infected patients within the same CD4 range, who were not diagnosed with or treated for active TB (non-TB, n = 308) in the period 2001-2008. Only twenty four subjects (6%) were on antiretroviral therapy at the beginning of this study. After accounting for covariate effects including use of antiretroviral therapy, isoniazid preventive therapy, and receipt of vaccine, we found a four-fold increase in mortality in TB patients compared with non-TB patients (adjusted Hazard Ratio 4.61; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.63, 13.05). These findings suggest that treatment for TB alone is not sufficient to avert the excess mortality associated with HIV-related TB and that prevention of TB may provide a mortality benefit. PMID:23523641

  12. Increased mortality associated with treated active tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kabali, Conrad; Mtei, Lillian; Brooks, Daniel R.; Waddell, Richard; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky; Arbeit, Robert D.; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C. Fordham; Horsburgh, C. Robert

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Active tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected patients, even when successfully treated, may be associated with excess mortality. We conducted a prospective cohort study nested in a randomized TB vaccine trial to compare mortality between HIV-infected patients diagnosed and treated for TB (TB, n=77) and HIV-infected patients within the same CD4 range, who were not diagnosed with or treated for active TB (non-TB, n=308) in the period 2001–2008. Only twenty four subjects (6%) were on antiretroviral therapy at the beginning of this study. After accounting for covariate effects including use of antiretroviral therapy, isoniazid preventive therapy, and receipt of vaccine, we found a four-fold increase in mortality in TB patients compared with non-TB patients (adjusted Hazard Ratio 4.61; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.63, 13.05). These findings suggest that treatment for TB alone is not sufficient to avert the excess mortality associated with HIV-related TB and that prevention of TB may provide a mortality benefit. PMID:23523641

  13. Aberrant Inflammasome Activation Characterizes Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hong Yien; Yong, Yean Kong; Shankar, Esaki M; Paukovics, Geza; Ellegård, Rada; Larsson, Marie; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; French, Martyn A; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2016-05-15

    Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) complicates combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in up to 25% of patients with HIV/TB coinfection. Monocytes and IL-18, a signature cytokine of inflammasome activation, are implicated in TB-IRIS pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated inflammasome activation both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients. HIV/TB patients exhibited higher proportions of monocytes expressing activated caspase-1 (casp1) pre-cART, compared with HIV patients without TB, and patients who developed TB-IRIS exhibited the greatest increase in casp1 expression. CD64(+) monocytes were a marker of increased casp1 expression. Furthermore, IL-1β, another marker of inflammasome activation, was also elevated during TB-IRIS. TB-IRIS patients also exhibited greater upregulation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome mRNA, compared with controls. Analysis of plasma mitochondrial DNA levels showed that TB-IRIS patients experienced greater cell death, especially pre-cART. Plasma NO levels were lower both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence of inadequate inflammasome regulation. Plasma IL-18 levels pre-cART correlated inversely with NO levels but positively with monocyte casp1 expression and mitochondrial DNA levels, and expression of IL-18Rα on CD4(+) T cells and NK cells was higher in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence that IL-18 is a marker of inflammasome activation. We propose that inflammasome activation in monocytes/macrophages of HIV/TB patients increases with ineffective T cell-dependent activation of monocytes/macrophages, priming them for an excessive inflammatory response after cART is commenced, which is greatest in patients with TB-IRIS. PMID:27076678

  14. Genomic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Cantabria (Spain), a Moderate TB Incidence Setting

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C.; Lillebaek, Troels; Pedersen, Mathias K.; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Folkvardsen, Dorte B.; Agüero, Jesús; Rasmussen, E. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies are focused mainly on prevention, early diagnosis, compliance to treatment and contact tracing. The objectives of this study were to explore the frequency and risk factors of recent transmission of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in Cantabria in Northern Spain from 2012 through 2013 and to analyze their clonal complexity for better understanding of the transmission dynamics in a moderate TB incidence setting. Methods DNA from 85 out of 87 isolates from bacteriologically confirmed cases of MTBC infection were extracted directly from frozen stocks and genotyped using the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) method. The MIRU-VNTRplus database tool was used to identify clusters and lineages and to build a neighbor joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree. In addition, data were compared to the SITVIT2 database at the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results The rate of recent transmission was calculated to 24%. Clustering was associated with being Spanish-born. A high prevalence of isolates of the Euro-American lineage was found. In addition, MIRU-VNTR profiles of the studied isolates corresponded to previously found MIRU-VNTR types in other countries, including Spain, Belgium, Great Britain, USA, Croatia, South Africa and The Netherlands. Six of the strains analyzed represented clonal variants. Conclusion Transmission of MTBC is well controlled in Cantabria. The majority of TB patients were born in Spain. The population structure of MTBC in Cantabria has a low diversity of major clonal lineages with the Euro-American lineage predominating. PMID:27315243

  15. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to address TB and HIV coinfection around the world? The President’s U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS ... of those suffering from HIV/AIDS around the world. PEPFAR’s Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and ...

  16. Impact of awareness drives and community-based active tuberculosis case finding in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Parija, D; Patra, T K; Kumar, A M V; Swain, B K; Satyanarayana, S; Sreenivas, A; Chadha, V K; Moonan, P K; Oeltmann, J E

    2014-09-01

    India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control programme employs passive case detection. The new sputum smear-positive case detection rate is less than 70% in Odisha State. During April-June 2012, active case finding (ACF) was conducted through awareness drives and field-based tuberculosis (TB) screening in select communities with the lowest case detection rates. During the campaign, 240 sputum smear-positive TB cases were detected. The number of smear-positive cases detected increased by 11% relative to April-June 2011 in intervention communities compared to an 0.8% increase in non-intervention communities. ACF brought TB services closer to the community and increased TB case detection. PMID:25189560

  17. Clinical implications of molecular drug resistance testing for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a TBNET/RESIST-TB consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, J; Boettger, E C; Cirillo, D; Cobelens, F; Eisenach, K D; Gagneux, S; Hillemann, D; Horsburgh, R; Molina-Moya, B; Niemann, S; Tortoli, E; Whitelaw, A; Lange, C

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a challenge to global tuberculosis (TB) control. Although culture-based methods have been regarded as the gold standard for drug susceptibility testing (DST), molecular methods provide rapid information on mutations in the M. tuberculosis genome associated with resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. We ascertained consensus on the use of the results of molecular DST for clinical treatment decisions in TB patients. This document has been developed by TBNET and RESIST-TB groups to reach a consensus about reporting standards in the clinical use of molecular DST results. Review of the available literature and the search for evidence included hand-searching journals and searching electronic databases. The panel identified single nucleotide mutations in genomic regions of M. tuberculosis coding for katG, inhA, rpoB, embB, rrs, rpsL and gyrA that are likely related to drug resistance in vivo. Identification of any of these mutations in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis has implications for the management of TB patients, pending the results of in vitro DST. However, false-positive and false-negative results in detecting resistance-associated mutations in drugs for which there is poor or unproven correlation between phenotypic and clinical drug resistance complicate the interpretation. Reports of molecular DST results should therefore include specific information on the mutations identified and provide guidance for clinicians on interpretation and on the choice of the appropriate initial drug regimen. PMID:26688526

  18. Fluctuating Behavior and Influential Factors in the Performance of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Assay in the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yaojie; Shao, Lingyun; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Shuihua; Zhang, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Background The QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) is a newly developed but widely used interferon-γ release assay for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB). However, research has not determined whether age or the use of an immune suppressive or anti-TB treatment influences this assay’s ability to detect TB. We assessed the QFT-GIT diagnostic performance for active tuberculosis (ATB) in children and adults in an endemic country and explored the effects of glucocorticoids and anti-TB therapy on the diagnostic value of the QFT-GIT. Methods A total of 60 children and 212 adults with suspected ATB were evaluated with the QFT-GIT. The association between the QFT-GIT diagnostic value and pretreatment factors was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. Results The sensitivity of the QFT-GIT was 83.9% (95% CI 66.3%-94.6%) in children, and 73.7% (95% CI 57.8%-85.2%) in adults. Glucocorticoids affected the mitogen-stimulated response in both children and adults. In subjects undergoing glucocorticoid pretreatment, 25.0% of the children presented with false-negative QFT-GIT results, 28.6% of adults presented with indeterminate results. For subjects pre-treated with anti-TB drugs, 44.4% presented with false-negative QFT-GIT results. Conclusions The QFT-GIT has higher sensitivity and specificity in children than adults. Glucocorticoid treatment negatively impacts the diagnostic value of the QFT-GIT in all age groups. Anti-TB treatment decreases the sensitivity of the QFT-GIT. Therefore, we recommend that the QFT-GIT assay be performed before TB-specific treatment is initiated and the test should not be used on people undergoing immunosuppression treatment, regardless of their age. A quantitative analysis of the QFT-GIT could be useful for assessing and monitoring TB-specific and non-specific immunity during conversion of the disease. PMID:26287382

  19. Clinical features of active tuberculosis that developed during anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Wook; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jeong Wook; Kang, Sang Bum; Koo, Ja Seol; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, You Sun; Joo, Young Eun; Chang, Sae Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for active ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with increased risks of tuberculosis (TB) infection. We analyzed the incidence and clinical features of Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who developed active TB during anti-TNF therapy. Methods Ten cases of active TB developed in patients treated with infliximab (n=592) or adalimumab (n=229) for UC (n=160) or CD (n=661) were reviewed. We analyzed demographics, interval between start of anti-TNF therapy and active TB development, tests for latent TB infection (LTBI), concomitant medications, and the details of diagnosis and treatments for TB. Results The incidence of active TB was 1.2% (10/821): 1.5% (9/592) and 0.4% (1/229) in patients receiving infliximab and adalimumab, respectively. The median time to the development of active TB after initiation of anti-TNF therapy was three months (range: 2–36). Three patients had past histories of treatment for TB. Positive findings in a TB skin test (TST) and/or interferon gamma releasing assay (IGRA) were observed in three patients, and two of them received anti-TB prophylaxis. Two patients were negative by both TST and IGRA. The most common site of active TB was the lungs, and the active TB was cured in all patients. Conclusions Active TB can develop during anti-TNF therapy in IBD patients without LTBI, and even in those with histories of TB treatment or LTBI prophylaxis. Physicians should be aware of the potential for TB development during anti-TNF therapy, especially in countries with a high prevalence of TB. PMID:27175115

  20. Co-infection of long-standing extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XDR-TB) and non-tuberculosis mycobacteria: A case report.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Nafiseh; Derakhshan, Mohammad; Samiei, Amin; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2015-01-01

    We report a 69-years-old Iranian HIV negative male patient, with long-standing pulmonary tuberculosis (eleven years) co-infected with non-tuberculosis mycobacteria. Despite of initiation of first line anti-tuberculosis therapy after diagnosis the patient poorly respond because of low compliance with anti-TB treatment. After several incomplete treatments the smear was still positive and thus drug susceptibility tests were performed on isolated organism which revealed that the organisms was resistant not only against isoniazid and rifampin but also against Ofloxacin (OFX), Capreomycin (CAP), p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS), ethionamide (ETH), Kanamycin (KAN), ciprofloxacin (Cip), amikacin (AMK) and cycloserine (CYC). Persistence and resistance of infection had led us to do more investigation using molecular methods, which revealed co-infection with Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM). The patient is still alive with cough and shortness of breath. PMID:26236585

  1. Coincident Helminth Infection Modulates Systemic Inflammation and Immune Activation in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Sridhar, Rathinam; Hanna, Luke E.; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity) in TB is not known. Methodology We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB) with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB) with or without Ss infection. Principal Findings Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection. Conclusions Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease. PMID:25375117

  2. Interleukin 17-Producing γδ T Cells Increased in Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Meiyu; Wang, Zhaohua; Yao, Chunyan; Jiang, Lina; Jin, Qili; Wang, Jing; Li, Baiqing

    2008-01-01

    Although it has been known that γδ T cells may play an important role in the immune response to infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), the mechanisms by which the γδ T cells participate in the innate and/or acquired immunity to tuberculosis (TB) have not been full elucidated. In the present study, 27 patients with active pulmonary TB and 16 healthy donors (HD) were performed. We found that proportion of IL-17-producing cells among lymphocyte was similar between TB patients and HD, whereas the proportions of γδ T cells in IL-17-producing cells (59.2%) and IL-17-producing cells in γδ T cells (19.4%) in peripheral blood were markedly increased in TB patients when compared to those in HD (43.9% and 7.7%, respectively). In addition, the proportions of IFN-γ-producing γδ T cells in TB patients were obviously lower than that in HD. Upon re-stimulated with M. tb heat-treated antigen (M. tb-HAg) in vitro, fewer IL-17-producing γδ T cells were generated from HD and TB patients, whereas IFN-γ-producing γδ T cells were increased in TB patients compared to that in HD. Our findings in TB patients and healthy human were consistent with other murine investigation that the IL-17-producing γδ T cells were main source of IL-17 in mouse model of BCG infection, suggesting that γδ T cells might be involved in the formation of tubercular granuloma in pulmonary TB patients, but need further identification. PMID:18582402

  3. Listening to Those at the Frontline: Patient and Healthcare Personnel Perspectives on Tuberculosis Treatment Barriers and Facilitators in High TB Burden Regions of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Iribarren, Sarah J.; Rubinstein, Fernando; Discacciati, Vilda; Pearce, Patricia F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In Argentina, tuberculosis (TB) control measures have not achieved key treatment targets. The purpose of this study was to identify modes of treatment delivery and explore patient and healthcare personnel perceptions of barriers and facilitators to treatment success. Methods. We used semistructured group and individual interviews for this descriptive qualitative study. Eight high burden municipalities were purposively selected. Patients in treatment for active TB (n = 16), multidisciplinary TB team members (n = 26), and TB program directors (n = 12) at local, municipal, regional, and national levels were interviewed. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results. Modes of treatment delivery varied across municipalities and types of healthcare facility and were highly negotiated with patients. Self-administration of treatment was common in hospital-based and some community clinics. Barriers to TB treatment success were concentrated at the system level. This level relied heavily on individual personal commitment, and many system facilitators were operating in isolation or in limited settings. Conclusions. We outline experiences and perspectives of the facilitating and challenging factors at the individual, structural, social, and organizational levels. Establishing strong patient-healthcare personnel relationships, responding to patient needs, capitalizing on community resources, and maximizing established decentralized system could mitigate some of the barriers. PMID:25328701

  4. Determinants of active pulmonary tuberculosis in Ambo Hospital, West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mengiste, Bezatu; Mesfin, Frehiwot; Godana, Wanzahun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis seen in cases in Ambo Hospital, Ethiopia. Design A facility-based prospective case-control study. Setting Patients attending Ambo Hospital from 01 December 2011 to 29 March 2012. Participants The sample included 312 adult patients attending Ambo Hospital. The main outcome measure was presence of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Explanatory measures Age, gender, occupation, educational status, marital status, place of residence, patient history of TB, family history of TB, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, smoking, alcohol intake, khat chewing, body mass index (BMI), employment, diabetes, history of asthma, previous history of worm infestation, history of hospitalisation, number of adults living in the household (HH), person per room, housing condition. Results A total of 312 study participants, including 104 active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases (cases) and 208 non-active PTB cases (controls), were recruited for the present study. Having one or more family member with a history of TB (OR = 4.4; 95% CI: 1.50–12.90), marital status (OR = 7.6; 95% CI: 2.2–12.6), male gender (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.4–7), rural residence (OR = 3.3; P = 0.012), being a current or past smoker (OR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.1–7.2), BMI < 18.5 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.03–4.2), HIV infection (OR = 8.8; 95% CI: 2.4–23.8) and a history of worm infestation (OR = 6.4; 95% CI: 2.6–15.4) remained significant independent host-related factors for active PTB. Conclusion Patients who came from a compound with more than two HHs were more likely to develop active PTB than those who came from a compound with only one HH. Those who lived in houses with no windows were more likely to develop active PTB than those who lived in houses with one or more windows, had a family history of TB, lived in rural areas. Sex of the patient was a predicting factor. Not being the owner of the house was

  5. Association of Strong Immune Responses to PPE Protein Rv1168c with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nooruddin; Alam, Kaiser; Nair, Shiny; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Murthy, Kolluri J. R.; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2008-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) infection is critical for the treatment, prevention, and control of TB. Conventional diagnostic tests based on purified protein derivative (PPD) do not achieve the required diagnostic sensitivity. Therefore, in this study, we have evaluated the immunogenic properties of Rv1168c, a member of the PPE family, in comparison with PPD, which is routinely used in the tuberculin test, and Hsp60 and ESAT-6, well-known immunodominant antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In a conventional enzyme immunoassay, the recombinant Rv1168c protein displayed stronger immunoreactivity against the sera obtained from patients with clinically active TB than did PPD, Hsp60, or ESAT-6 and could distinguish TB patients from Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated controls. Interestingly, Rv1168c antigen permits diagnosis of smear-negative pulmonary TB as well as extrapulmonary TB cases, which are often difficult to diagnose by conventional tests. The immunodominant nature of Rv1168c makes it a promising candidate to use in serodiagnosis of TB. In addition, our studies also show that Rv1168c is a potent T-cell antigen which elicits a strong gamma interferon response in sensitized peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from TB patients. PMID:18400969

  6. A Toolbox for Tuberculosis (TB) Diagnosis: An Indian Multi-Centric Study (2006-2008); Evaluation of Serological Assays Based on PGL-Tb1 and ESAT-6/CFP10 Antigens for TB Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lagrange, Philippe H.; Thangaraj, Satheesh K.; Dayal, Rajeshwar; Deshpande, Alaka; Ganguly, Nirmal K.; Girardi, Enrico; Joshi, Beenu; Katoch, Kiran; Katoch, Vishwa M.; Kumar, Manoj; Lakshmi, Vemu; Leportier, Marc; Longuet, Christophe; Malladi, Subbalaxmi V. S.; Mukerjee, Deepali; Nair, Deepthi; Raja, Alamelu; Raman, Balambal; Rodrigues, Camilla; Sharma, Pratibha; Singh, Amit; Singh, Sarman; Sodha, Archana; Kabeer, Basirudeen Syed Ahamed; Vernet, Guy; Goletti, Delia

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this multi-centric prospective study in India was to assess the accuracy of a serological test as an additional tool for diagnosing active tuberculosis (ATB). In particular, an assay based on ELISA using a phenolic glycolipid (PGL-Tb1) or a fusion protein (ESAT-6/CFP10) was compared to the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the microbiological results according to HIV status. Methods Individuals with and without ATB and HIV infection were enrolled. Serology and TST results were analyzed per se and in combination with the microbiological data. Results Among the 778 ATB patients, 102 were HIV-infected, 316 HIV-uninfected and 360 had an HIV-unknown status. Of the 945 non-ATB subjects, 559 were at low risk (community adults) and 386 at high risk of M. tuberculosis exposure. Among those with ATB, the sensitivity of ELISA-PGL-Tb1 for ATB was higher than that of ELISA-ESAT-6/CFP10, both in HIV-infected (72.3% versus 63.7%, p = 0.29) and HIV-uninfected/HIV-unknown groups (40.5% versus 28.6%; p<0.0001), whereas the specificity was around 91% for both tests. Sensitivity for ATB increased when the results of the two ELISA were combined, reaching 75.5% in the HIV-infected and 50.9% in the group of HIV-uninfected/HIV-unknown ATB, with a significant decrease of the global specificity (83.9%). Analyzing the ELISA results with the microbiological results, we observed that the sensitivity of both serology tests was independent of the ATB patients' smear microscopy (SM) status and grade. Combining the results of SM with both ELISA, the detection of ATB patients significantly increased (p<0.0001), particularly in those with extrapulmonary TB (up to 45.1%) or HIV infection (up to 83.3%). No significant association was observed between TST and serology results. Conclusions In this prospective multi-centric study, the combination of two rapid tests, such as SM and serology, might be useful in detecting ATB, especially in HIV-infected patients. PMID:24797271

  7. The Use of Xpert MTB/Rif for Active Case Finding among TB Contacts in North West Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Lebina, Limakatso; Fuller, Nigel; Osoba, Tolu; Scott, Lesley; Motlhaoleng, Katlego; Rakgokong, Modiehi; Abraham, Pattamukkil; Variava, Ebrahim; Martinson, Neil Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality especially in high HIV burden settings. Active case finding is one strategy to potentially reduce TB disease burden. Xpert MTB/Rif has recently been recommended for diagnosis of TB. Methods. Pragmatic randomized trial to compare diagnosis rate and turnaround time for laboratory testing for Xpert MTB/Rif with TB microscopy and culture in household contacts of patients recently diagnosed with TB. Results. 2464 household contacts enrolled into the study from 768 active TB index cases. 1068 (44%) were unable to give sputum, but 24 of these were already on TB treatment. 863 (53%) participants sputum samples were tested with smear and culture and 2.7% (23/863; CI: 1.62-3.78) were diagnosed with active TB. Xpert MTB/Rif was used in 515 (21%) participants; active TB was diagnosed in 1.6% (8/515; CI: 0.52-2.68). Discussion and Conclusions. Additional 31 cases were diagnosed with contact tracing of household members. When Xpert MTB/Rif is compared with culture, there is no significant difference in diagnostic yield. PMID:27493800

  8. The Use of Xpert MTB/Rif for Active Case Finding among TB Contacts in North West Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Osoba, Tolu; Scott, Lesley; Motlhaoleng, Katlego; Rakgokong, Modiehi; Martinson, Neil Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality especially in high HIV burden settings. Active case finding is one strategy to potentially reduce TB disease burden. Xpert MTB/Rif has recently been recommended for diagnosis of TB. Methods. Pragmatic randomized trial to compare diagnosis rate and turnaround time for laboratory testing for Xpert MTB/Rif with TB microscopy and culture in household contacts of patients recently diagnosed with TB. Results. 2464 household contacts enrolled into the study from 768 active TB index cases. 1068 (44%) were unable to give sputum, but 24 of these were already on TB treatment. 863 (53%) participants sputum samples were tested with smear and culture and 2.7% (23/863; CI: 1.62–3.78) were diagnosed with active TB. Xpert MTB/Rif was used in 515 (21%) participants; active TB was diagnosed in 1.6% (8/515; CI: 0.52–2.68). Discussion and Conclusions. Additional 31 cases were diagnosed with contact tracing of household members. When Xpert MTB/Rif is compared with culture, there is no significant difference in diagnostic yield. PMID:27493800

  9. The Cyclic Peptide Ecumicin Targeting ClpC1 Is Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Kim, Jin-Yong; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Akopian, Tatos; Hong, Seungpyo; Jin, Ying-Yu; Kandror, Olga; Kim, Jong-Woo; Lee, In-Ae; Lee, Sun-Young; McAlpine, James B.; Mulugeta, Surafel; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Wang, Yuehong; Yang, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Tae-Mi; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Pauli, Guido F.; Cho, Sanghyun

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) has lent urgency to finding new drug leads with novel modes of action. A high-throughput screening campaign of >65,000 actinomycete extracts for inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis viability identified ecumicin, a macrocyclic tridecapeptide that exerts potent, selective bactericidal activity against M. tuberculosis in vitro, including nonreplicating cells. Ecumicin retains activity against isolated multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis. The subcutaneous administration to mice of ecumicin in a micellar formulation at 20 mg/kg body weight resulted in plasma and lung exposures exceeding the MIC. Complete inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth in the lungs of mice was achieved following 12 doses at 20 or 32 mg/kg. Genome mining of lab-generated, spontaneous ecumicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains identified the ClpC1 ATPase complex as the putative target, and this was confirmed by a drug affinity response test. ClpC1 functions in protein breakdown with the ClpP1P2 protease complex. Ecumicin markedly enhanced the ATPase activity of wild-type (WT) ClpC1 but prevented activation of proteolysis by ClpC1. Less stimulation was observed with ClpC1 from ecumicin-resistant mutants. Thus, ClpC1 is a valid drug target against M. tuberculosis, and ecumicin may serve as a lead compound for anti-TB drug development. PMID:25421483

  10. Analysis of Host Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens in a Multi-Site Study of Subjects with Different TB and HIV Infection States in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jayne S.; Lalor, Maeve K.; Black, Gillian F.; Ambrose, Lyn R.; Loxton, Andre G.; Chegou, Novel N.; Kassa, Desta; Mihret, Adane; Howe, Rawleigh; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Gomez, Marie P.; Donkor, Simon; Franken, Kees; Hanekom, Willem; Klein, Michel R.; Parida, Shreemanta K.; Boom, W. Henry; Thiel, Bonnie A.; Crampin, Amelia C.; Ota, Martin; Walzl, Gerhard; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat with 9 million new cases and 1.4 million deaths per year. In order to develop a protective vaccine, we need to define the antigens expressed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which are relevant to protective immunity in high-endemic areas. Methods We analysed responses to 23 Mtb antigens in a total of 1247 subjects with different HIV and TB status across 5 geographically diverse sites in Africa (South Africa, The Gambia, Ethiopia, Malawi and Uganda). We used a 7-day whole blood assay followed by IFN-γ ELISA on the supernatants. Antigens included PPD, ESAT-6 and Ag85B (dominant antigens) together with novel resuscitation-promoting factors (rpf), reactivation proteins, latency (Mtb DosR regulon-encoded) antigens, starvation-induced antigens and secreted antigens. Results There was variation between sites in responses to the antigens, presumably due to underlying genetic and environmental differences. When results from all sites were combined, HIV- subjects with active TB showed significantly lower responses compared to both TST- and TST+ contacts to latency antigens (Rv0569, Rv1733, Rv1735, Rv1737) and the rpf Rv0867; whilst responses to ESAT-6/CFP-10 fusion protein (EC), PPD, Rv2029, TB10.3, and TB10.4 were significantly higher in TST+ contacts (LTBI) compared to TB and TST- contacts fewer differences were seen in subjects with HIV co-infection, with responses to the mitogen PHA significantly lower in subjects with active TB compared to those with LTBI and no difference with any antigen. Conclusions Our multi-site study design for testing novel Mtb antigens revealed promising antigens for future vaccine development. The IFN-γ ELISA is a cheap and useful tool for screening potential antigenicity in subjects with different ethnic backgrounds and across a spectrum of TB and HIV infection states. Analysis of cytokines other than IFN-γ is currently on-going to determine correlates of protection, which may

  11. Analysis of Immune Responses against a Wide Range of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens in Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kassa, Desta; Ran, Leonie; Geberemeskel, Wudneh; Tebeje, Mekashaw; Alemu, Amelewerk; Selase, Alemayehu; Tegbaru, Belete; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Friggen, Annemieke H.; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Wolday, Dawit; Messele, Tsehaynesh

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing host immune responses to molecular targets of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essential to develop effective immunodiagnostics and better vaccines. We investigated the immune response against a large series of M. tuberculosis antigens, including 5 classical and 64 nonclassical (39 DosR regulon-encoded, 4 resuscitation-promoting factor [RPF], and 21 reactivation-associated) antigens in active-pulmonary-tuberculosis (TB) patients. Whole blood from TB patients (n = 34) was stimulated in vitro with M. tuberculosis antigens. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was measured after 7 days of stimulation, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The majority of the study participants responded to the classical M. tuberculosis antigens TB10.4 (84.8%), early secreted antigenic target-6 kDa (ESAT-6)/CFP-10 (70.6%), and purified protein derivative (PPD) (55.9%). However, only 26.5% and 24.2% responded to HSP65 and Ag85A/B, respectively. Of the 64 nonclassical antigens, 23 (33.3%) were immunogenic (IFN-γ levels, >62 pg/ml) and 8 were strong inducers of IFN-γ (IFN-γ levels, ≥100 pg/ml). The RPF antigens were the most immunogenic. In addition, we observed distinct cytokine expression profiles in response to several M. tuberculosis antigens by multiplex immunoassay. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and IL-6 were commonly detected at high levels after stimulation with 4/15 latency antigens (Rv0081, Rv2006, Rv2629, and Rv1733c) and were found especially in supernatants of the three strong IFN-γ inducers (Rv2629, Rv1009, and Rv2389c). IL-8, IL-6, and IL-17 were exclusively detected after stimulation with Rv0574c, Rv2630, Rv1998, Rv054c, and Rv2028c. In conclusion, in active-pulmonary-TB patients, we identified 23 new immunogenic M. tuberculosis antigens. The distinct expression levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in response to specific subsets of M. tuberculosis antigens may be promising for the development of immunodiagnostics

  12. Prevalence, Risk Factors and Social Context of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Prison Inmates in Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    Winetsky, Daniel E.; Almukhamedov, Olga; Pulatov, Dilshod; Vezhnina, Natalia; Dooronbekova, Aizhan; Zhussupov, Baurzhan

    2014-01-01

    Setting Tuberculosis (TB) is highly prevalent in prisons of the former Soviet Union. Objective To understand the behavioral, demographic and biological factors placing inmates in Tajikistan at risk for active TB. Design We administered a behavioral and demographic survey to 1317 inmates in two prison facilities in Sughd province, Tajikistan along with radiographic screening for pulmonary TB. Suspected cases were confirmed bacteriologically. Inmates undergoing TB treatment were also surveyed. In-depth interviews were conducted with former prisoners to elicit relevant social and behavioral characteristics. Results We identified 59 cases of active pulmonary TB (prevalence 4.5%). Factors independently associated with increased prevalence of active TB were: HIV-infection by self-report (PR 7.88; 95%CI 3.40–18.28), history of previous TB (PR 10.21; 95%CI 6.27–16.63) and infrequent supplemental nutrition beyond scheduled meals (PR 3.00; 95%CI 1.67–5.62). Access to supplemental nutrition was associated with frequency of visits from friends and family and ability to rely on other inmates for help. Conclusion In prison facilities of Tajikistan, HIV-infection, injection drug use and low access to supplemental nutrition were associated with prevalent cases of active pulmonary TB. Policies that reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users and improve the nutritional status of socially isolated inmates may alleviate the TB burden in Tajikistan’s prisons. PMID:24465861

  13. Granulocytic Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells Expansion during Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Is Associated with High Nitric Oxide Plasma Level

    PubMed Central

    El Daker, Sary; Sacchi, Alessandra; Tempestilli, Massimo; Carducci, Claudia; Goletti, Delia; Vanini, Valentina; Colizzi, Vittorio; Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Martini, Federico; Martino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still the principal cause of death caused by a single infectious agent, and the balance between the bacillus and host defense mechanisms reflects the different manifestations of the pathology. The aim of this work was to study the role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) during active pulmonary tuberculosis at the site of infection. We observed an expansion of MDSCs in the lung and blood of patients with active TB, which are correlated with an enhanced amount of nitric oxide in the plasma. We also found that these cells have the remarkable ability to suppress T-cell response, suggesting an important role in the modulation of the immune response against TB. Interestingly, a trend in the diminution of MDSCs was found after an efficacious anti-TB therapy, suggesting that these cells may be used as a potential biomarker for monitoring anti-TB therapy efficacy. PMID:25879532

  14. PD-1 Expression and Cytokine Secretion Profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Subsets; Potential Correlates of Containment in HIV-TB Co-Infection.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Katrina M; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S; Kapembwa, Moses S; Kon, Onn M; Sampson, Robert D; Taylor, Graham P; Lalvani, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    HIV co-infection is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB) providing a powerful model in which to dissect out defective, protective and dysfunctional Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific immune responses. To identify the changes induced by HIV co-infection we compared MTB-specific CD4+ responses in subjects with active TB and latent TB infection (LTBI), with and without HIV co-infection. CD4+ T-cell subsets producing interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and expressing CD279 (PD-1) were measured using polychromatic flow-cytometry. HIV-TB co-infection was consistently and independently associated with a reduced frequency of CD4+ IFN-γ and IL-2-dual secreting T-cells and the proportion correlated inversely with HIV viral load (VL). The impact of HIV co-infection on this key MTB-specific T-cell subset identifies them as a potential correlate of mycobacterial immune containment. The percentage of MTB-specific IFN-γ-secreting T-cell subsets that expressed PD-1 was increased in active TB with HIV co-infection and correlated with VL. This identifies a novel correlate of dysregulated immunity to MTB, which may in part explain the paucity of inflammatory response in the face of mycobacterial dissemination that characterizes active TB with HIV co-infection. PMID:26756579

  15. PD-1 Expression and Cytokine Secretion Profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Subsets; Potential Correlates of Containment in HIV-TB Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    HIV co-infection is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB) providing a powerful model in which to dissect out defective, protective and dysfunctional Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific immune responses. To identify the changes induced by HIV co-infection we compared MTB-specific CD4+ responses in subjects with active TB and latent TB infection (LTBI), with and without HIV co-infection. CD4+ T-cell subsets producing interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and expressing CD279 (PD-1) were measured using polychromatic flow-cytometry. HIV-TB co-infection was consistently and independently associated with a reduced frequency of CD4+ IFN-γ and IL-2-dual secreting T-cells and the proportion correlated inversely with HIV viral load (VL). The impact of HIV co-infection on this key MTB-specific T-cell subset identifies them as a potential correlate of mycobacterial immune containment. The percentage of MTB-specific IFN-γ-secreting T-cell subsets that expressed PD-1 was increased in active TB with HIV co-infection and correlated with VL. This identifies a novel correlate of dysregulated immunity to MTB, which may in part explain the paucity of inflammatory response in the face of mycobacterial dissemination that characterizes active TB with HIV co-infection. PMID:26756579

  16. Discriminating Active Tuberculosis from Latent Tuberculosis Infection by flow cytometric measurement of CD161-expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianting; Xu, Qian; Chen, Qi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Mingxia; Cai, Yi; Liu, Haiying; Zhou, Yiping; Deng, Guofang; Deng, Qunyi; Zhou, Boping; Kornfeld, Hardy; Chen, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) significantly increases the possibility for early diagnosis of tuberculosis, but IGRAs alone cannot discriminate active TB from LTBI. Therefore, fast and reliable discrimination of active tuberculosis, especially bacteriology negative tuberculosis, from LTBI is a great necessity. Here we established an assay based on flow cytometric multiparameter assay assessing expression of CD161 along with CD3, CD4, and CD8, whereby a set of indices formulated by the percentages of CD3+CD161+, CD3+CD4+CD161+ and CD3+CD8+CD161+ T cells multiplied with lymphocyte/monocyte ratio were established. Application of the CD3+CD8+CD161+ index to compare a cohort of active tuberculosis with a cohort of LTBI or health control yielded 0.7662 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6559–0.8552) or 0.7922 (95%  CI 0.6846–0.8763) for sensitivity and 0.9048 (95%  CI 0.8209–0.9580) or 0.8939 (95% CI 0.8392–0.9349) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB+; the corresponding results were 0.7481 (95%  CI 0.6648–0.8198) or 0.7557 (95%  CI 0.6730–0.8265) for sensitivity and 0.8571 (95%  CI 0.7637–0.9239) or 0.8603 (95%  CI 0.8008–0.9075) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB−. Our results reveal that in combination with IGRAs, CD161-based indices provide a novel, fast diagnostic solution addressing the limitation of current tuberculosis diagnostics. PMID:26643453

  17. Effect of Active Case Finding on Prevalence and Transmission of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Dhaka Central Jail, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Banu, Sayera; Rahman, Md. Toufiq; Uddin, Mohammad Khaja Mafij; Khatun, Razia; Khan, Md. Siddiqur Rahman; Rahman, Md. Mojibur; Uddin, Syed Iftekhar; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Heffelfinger, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding tuberculosis (TB) transmission dynamics is essential for establishing effective TB control strategies in settings where the burden and risk of transmission are high. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of active screening on controlling TB transmission and also to characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains for investigating transmission dynamics in a correctional setting. Methods The study was carried out in Dhaka Central Jail (DCJ), from October 2005 to February 2010. An active case finding strategy for pulmonary TB was established both at the entry point to the prison and inside the prison. Three sputum specimens were collected from all pulmonary TB suspects and subjected to smear microscopy, culture, and drug susceptibility testing as well as genotyping which included deletion analysis, spoligotyping and analysis of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU). Results A total of 60,585 inmates were screened during the study period. We found 466 inmates with pulmonary TB of whom 357 (77%) had positive smear microscopy results and 109 (23%) had negative smear microscopy results but had positive results on culture. The number of pulmonary TB cases declined significantly, from 49 cases during the first quarter to 8 cases in the final quarter of the study period (p=0.001). Deletion analysis identified all isolates as M. tuberculosis and further identified 229 (70%) strains as ‘modern’ and 100 (30%) strains as ‘ancestral’. Analysis of MIRU showed that 347 strains (85%) exhibited unique patterns, whereas 61 strains (15%) clustered into 22 groups. The largest cluster comprised eight strains of the Beijing M. tuberculosis type. The rate of recent transmission was estimated to be 9.6%. Conclusions Implementation of active screening for TB was associated with a decline in TB cases in DCJ. Implementation of active screening in prison settings might substantially reduce the national burden of TB in Bangladesh

  18. Tuberculosis and HIV Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Judith; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Källenius, Gunilla

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) constitute the main burden of infectious disease in resource-limited countries. In the individual host, the two pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV, potentiate one another, accelerating the deterioration of immunological functions. In high-burden settings, HIV coinfection is the most important risk factor for developing active TB, which increases the susceptibility to primary infection or reinfection and also the risk of TB reactivation for patients with latent TB. M. tuberculosis infection also has a negative impact on the immune response to HIV, accelerating the progression from HIV infection to AIDS. The clinical management of HIV-associated TB includes the integration of effective anti-TB treatment, use of concurrent antiretroviral therapy (ART), prevention of HIV-related comorbidities, management of drug cytotoxicity, and prevention/treatment of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). PMID:25722472

  19. Validation of the BrockTB Stat-Pak Assay for Detection of Tuberculosis in Eurasian Badgers (Meles meles) and Influence of Disease Severity on Diagnostic Accuracy▿

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Mark A.; Crawshaw, Tim; Waterhouse, Sue; Delahay, Richard; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.

    2008-01-01

    A lateral-flow immunoassay (BrockTB Stat-Pak) for detecting tuberculosis in Eurasian badgers was 49% sensitive and 93% specific against culture for M. bovis (n = 1,464) at necropsy. However, the sensitivity was significantly higher (66 to 78%) in animals with more severe tuberculosis, indicating that the BrockTB Stat-Pak may be useful for the detection of badgers with the greatest risk of transmitting disease. PMID:18272706

  20. Presumed latent ocular tuberculosis diagnosed with the positive quantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test in a HLA-A29-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Carlos Mario; Atencia, Cesar; Merayo-Lloves, Jesus; Fernandez-Vega Sanz, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    A 59-year-old Hispanic woman presented with a 3-year history of floaters associated with bilateral reduced visual acuity. Her best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/40. Both anterior segments were without inflammation, but fundoscopy showed mild vitreous inflammation and multiple inflammatory choroidal lesions. Tests for inflammatory and infectious diseases were negative except for human leucocyte antigen A29. The patient was diagnosed with birdshot choroidoretinopathy, and treatment was initiated with cyclosporine A 2.5 mg/kg/day. One year after treatment, the patient reported systemic symptoms with no improvement in visual acuity. Fundus findings remained with vitreal inflammation. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test was positive, and a diagnosis of presumed latent ocular tuberculosis (TB) was made. We initiated anti-TB treatment for 9 months. At 6 months of anti-TB therapy, there was no active inflammation. The patient was followed for 2 years with no medications and no active inflammation. Her final BCVA was 20/25. PMID:26045521

  1. Association of autophagy-related IRGM polymorphisms with latent versus active tuberculosis infection in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Li, Qian; Peng, Jing; Zhu, Yaowu; Wang, Feng; Wang, Chunyu; Wang, Xiong

    2016-03-01

    The autophagy-related immunity-related GTPase family M protein, IRGM, plays an important role in the defense against tuberculosis (TB) infection. IRGM polymorphisms are associated with TB infection susceptibility, and recent studies demonstrate host genetic differences between active and latent TB. Here, we investigated the association between IRGM polymorphisms and TB infection type in a Chinese population. We recruited 268 and 321 patients with confirmed or latent TB, respectively, and 475 TB-free healthy controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs10065172, rs10051924, and rs13361189 within IRGM were genotyped using TaqMan-based assays. Interferon-gamma release levels were tested by T-SPOT. rs10065172 (P = 0.024, OR 0.67 (95% CI 0.48-0.95)), rs10051924 (P = 0.01, OR 0.64 (95% CI 0.46-0.90)), and rs13361189 (P = 0.055, OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.51-1.01)) were associated with a protective role against latent TB progression. Haplotype analysis showed that TCC was protective for latent TB (P = 0.022, OR 0.74 (95% CI 0.57-0.96)) whereas TTC conferred a higher risk of active TB. Additionally, patients with the rs10065172 TT genotype had a higher response to TB specific antigens. Thus, IRGM polymorphism differences between latent and active TB suggests that genetic differences in autophagy might partly affect host TB infection status. PMID:26980495

  2. Understanding the gender aspects of tuberculosis: a narrative analysis of the lived experiences of women with TB in slums of Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Khan, Koushambhi Basu

    2012-01-01

    There have been few ethnographic studies on gender aspects of tuberculosis (TB). In this article, drawing on a qualitative study on TB in Delhi slums and through an intersectional analysis of group interviews and personal narratives of women living with TB, I bring forth the "genderization" of TB and the associated sufferings for women. With my findings I demonstrate how gender, in conjunction with other social forces, influences the disease outcomes and stigmatizes women, how lives in slums are uniquely organized by multiple discourses that contribute to the gender makings of TB, and, finally, how women strategize to reduce their burden of illness. PMID:22150263

  3. Effect of tuberculosis on the survival of HIV-infected men in a country with low TB incidence

    PubMed Central

    López-Gatell, H; Cole, SR; Margolick, JB; Witt, MD; Martinson, J; Phair, JP; Jacobson, LP

    2010-01-01

    Evidence regarding the effect of tuberculosis disease (TB) on HIV disease progression at the population level remains inconclusive. We estimated the effect of incident TB on time to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related death, using a marginal structural Cox model. Between 1984 and 2005, 2,882 HIV-infected men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study contributed 21,914 person-years while followed for a median of 5.4 years. At study entry, the median CD4 cell count and HIV-1 RNA viral load were 533 cells/mm3 (interquartile range [IQR], 365 – 737) and 12,953 copies/ml (IQR, 2,453 – 48,540), respectively. This study was performed in a setting with a modest exposure to HAART; 8,295 of 23,801 (35%) person-years were followed during the HAART era. Fifteen men incurred incident TB, yielding a TB incidence of 7 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4, 14) per 10,000 person-years, and 1,072 died of AIDS-related causes. Accounting for potential confounders, including CD4 cell count and viral load, the hazard of AIDS-related death was 2.4 times larger for the person-time with TB, compared to the person-time without TB (95% CI: 1.2, 4.7). Results underscore the importance of avoiding TB by using preventive interventions, such as treatment of latent TB infection, particularly in populations with a large prevalence of HIV/TB co-infected individuals. PMID:18753866

  4. EFFECT OF PYRAZINAMIDASE ACTIVITY ON PYRAZINAMIDE RESISTANCE IN MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Patricia; Ferrer, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; López-Llano, Jon; Fuentes, Patricia; Valencia, Eddy; Zimic, Mirko J.

    2009-01-01

    Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to pyrazinamide is associated with mutations in the pncA gene, which codes for pyrazinamidase. The association between the enzymatic activity of mutated pyrazinamidases and the level of pyrazinamide resistance remains poorly understood. Twelve M. tuberculosis clinical isolates resistant to pyrazinamide were selected based on Wayne activity and localization of pyrazinamidase mutation. Recombinant pyrazinamidases were expressed and tested for their kinetic parameters (activity, kcat, Km, and efficiency). Pyrazinamide resistance level was measured by Bactec-460TB and 7H9 culture. The linear correlation between the resistance level and the kinetic parameters of the corresponding mutated pyrazinamidase was calculated. The enzymatic activity and efficiency of the mutated pyrazinamidases varied with the site of mutation and ranged widely from low to high levels close to the corresponding of the wild-type enzyme. The level of resistance was significantly associated with pyrazinamidase activity and efficiency, but only 27.3% of its statistical variability was explained. Although pyrazinamidase mutations are indeed associated with resistance, the loss of pyrazinamidase activity and efficiency as assessed in the recombinant mutated enzymes is not sufficient to explain a high variability of the level of pyrazinamide resistance, suggesting that complementary mechanisms for pyrazinamide resistance in M. tuberculosis with mutations in pncA are more important than currently thought. PMID:19249243

  5. CD4+ T cell polyfunctional profile in HIV-TB coinfection are similar between individuals with latent and active TB infection

    PubMed Central

    Canaday, David H.; Sridaran, Sankar; Van Epps, Puja; Aung, Htin; Burant, Christopher J.; Nsereko, Mary; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Betts, Michael R.; Toossi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cell counts of HIV-infected individuals with pulmonary TB (PTB) are higher than with other opportunistic infections suggesting that progression to PTB is not merely due to T cell depletion but also dysfunction. There are limited data examining T cell functional signatures in human HIV-TB co-infection particularly in PTB which accounts for about 80% of active TB disease overall. We examined a cohort of HIV-infected anti-retroviral naïve individuals in Kampala, Uganda, a TB endemic area using multi-parametric flow cytometry analysis to determine IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, and TNF-α production in CD4+ memory T cell subsets. The cytokine frequency and polyfunctionality profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV-infected persons with latent TB infection (LTBI) or PTB is comparable. This similarity suggests that LTBI may represent a smoldering state of persistent MTB replication rather than dormant infection. This may be a contributory mechanism to the significantly increased risk of progression to PTB in this population. PMID:25956974

  6. Adverse Events in Healthy Individuals and MDR-TB Contacts Treated with Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs Potentially Effective for Preventing Development of MDR-TB: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Langendam, Miranda W.; Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Sandgren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A recent systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness to support or reject preventive therapy for treatment of contacts of patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Whether preventive therapy is favorable depends both on the effectiveness and the adverse events of the drugs used. We performed a systematic review to assess adverse events in healthy individuals and MDR-TB contacts treated with anti-tuberculosis drugs potentially effective for preventing development of MDR-TB. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other databases (August 2011). Record selection, data extraction, and study quality assessment were done in duplicate. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Of 6,901 identified references, 20 studies were eligible. Among the 16 studies in healthy volunteers (a total of 87 persons on either levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, or rifabutin, mostly for 1 week), serious adverse events and treatment discontinuation due to adverse events were rare (<1 and <5%, respectively), but mild adverse events frequently occurred. Due to small sample sizes of the levofloxacin and ofloxacin studies an increased frequency of mild adverse events compared to placebo could not be demonstrated or excluded. For moxifloxacin the comparative results were inconsistent. In four studies describing preventive therapy of MDR-TB contacts, therapy was stopped for 58–100% of the included persons because of the occurrence of adverse events ranging from mild adverse events such as nausea and dizziness to serious events requiring treatment. The quality of the evidence was very low. Although the number of publications and quality of evidence are low, the available evidence suggests that shortly after starting treatment the occurrence of serious adverse events is rare. Mild adverse events occur more frequently and may be of importance because these may provoke treatment interruption. PMID:23326464

  7. Vitamin D Status in Botswana Children Under 2 Years Old With and Without Active Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ludmir, Jonathan; Mazhani, Loeto; Cary, Mark S; Chakalisa, Unoda A; Pettifor, John M; Molefi, Mooketsi; Redwood, Abiona; Stallings, Virginia A; Gross, Robert; Steenhoff, Andrew P

    2016-05-01

    Additional strategies are needed to prevent and treat tuberculosis (TB). Although vitamin D may have antimycobacterial effects, it is unknown whether low vitamin D status confers a risk for active TB in African children. This case-control study assessed serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration in children with and without active TB in Gaborone, Botswana. A total of 80 children under 2 years old with and without active TB, seen at hospitals and clinics in the greater Gaborone area between September 2010 and November 2012, were enrolled. Of these, 39 cases did not differ from the 41 controls in median 25(OH)D levels (P = 0.84). The 25(OH)D was < 20 ng/mL in 8/39 (21%) cases and 7/41 (17%) controls (P = 0.69, χ(2)). Univariate analyses of subject clinical characteristics (other than 25(OH)D levels) showed that any degree of weight loss was associated with a diagnosis of TB (P = 0.047). Other clinical characteristics, including age (P = 0.08) or weight below third percentile (P = 0.58), showed no association with TB. There was no significant difference in vitamin D status between children under 2 years old with and without active TB. Lower vitamin D status did not appear to be a risk factor for TB in this small Gaborone cohort. PMID:26976889

  8. Discrimination between active and latent tuberculosis based on ratio of antigen-specific to mitogen-induced IP-10 production.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun Hee; Hur, Yun-Gyoung; Lee, Hyejon; Kim, Sunghyun; Cho, Jang-Eun; Chang, Jun; Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Hyeyoung; Kang, Young Ae; Cho, Sang-Nae; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). The gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA) has been widely used to diagnose TB by testing cell-mediated immune responses but has no capacity for distinguishing between active TB and latent TB infection (LTBI). This study aims to identify a parameter that will help to discriminate active TB and LTBI. Whole-blood samples from 33 active TB patients, 20 individuals with LTBI, and 26 non-TB controls were applied to the commercial IFN-γ release assay, QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube, and plasma samples were analyzed for interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), IFN-γ, monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG), interferon gamma inducible protein 10 (IP-10), interferon-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC), and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) by using a commercial cytometric bead array. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-specific production of most of the assayed cytokines and chemokines was higher in the active TB than in the LTBI group. The mitogen-induced responses were lower in the active TB than in the LTBI group. When the ratio of TB-specific to mitogen-induced responses was calculated, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MIG, and IP-10 were more useful in discriminating active TB from LTBI. In particular, most patients showed higher IP-10 production to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens than to mitogen at the individual level, and the ratio for IP-10 was the strongest indicator of active infection versus LTBI with 93.9% sensitivity and 90% specificity. In conclusion, the ratio of the TB-specific to the mitogen-induced IP-10 responses showed the most promising accuracy for discriminating active TB versus LTBI and should be further studied to determine whether it can serve as a biomarker that might help clinicians administer appropriate treatments. PMID:25428147

  9. The Prevalence of Tuberculosis in Zambia: Results from the First National TB Prevalence Survey, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Kapata, Nathan; Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Ngosa, William; Metitiri, Mine; Klinkenberg, Eveline; Kalisvaart, Nico; Sunkutu, Veronica; Shibemba, Aaron; Chabala, Chishala; Chongwe, Gershom; Tembo, Mathias; Mulenga, Lutinala; Mbulo, Grace; Katemangwe, Patrick; Sakala, Sandra; Chizema-Kawesha, Elizabeth; Masiye, Felix; Sinyangwe, George; Onozaki, Ikushi; Mwaba, Peter; Chikamata, Davy; Zumla, Alimuddin; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis in Zambia is a major public health problem, however the country does not have reliable baseline data on the TB prevalence for impact measurement; therefore it was among the priority countries identified by the World Health Organization to conduct a national TB prevalence survey Objective To estimate the prevalence of tuberculosis among the adult Zambian population aged 15 years and above, in 2013–2014. Methods A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted in 66 clusters across all the 10 provinces of Zambia. Eligible participants aged 15 years and above were screened for TB symptoms, had a chest x-ray (CXR) performed and were offered an HIV test. Participants with TB symptoms and/or CXR abnormality underwent an in-depth interview and submitted one spot- and one morning sputum sample for smear microscopy and liquid culture. Digital data collection methods were used throughout the process. Results Of the 98,458 individuals who were enumerated, 54,830 (55.7%) were eligible to participate, and 46,099 (84.1%) participated. Of those who participated, 45,633/46,099 (99%) were screened by both symptom assessment and chest x-ray, while 466/46,099 (1.01%) were screened by interview only. 6,708 (14.6%) were eligible to submit sputum and 6,154/6,708 (91.7%) of them submitted at least one specimen for examination. MTB cases identified were 265/6,123 (4.3%). The estimated national adult prevalence of smear, culture and bacteriologically confirmed TB was 319/100,000 (232-406/100,000); 568/100,000 (440-697/100,000); and 638/100,000 (502-774/100,000) population, respectively. The risk of having TB was five times higher in the HIV positive than HIV negative individuals. The TB prevalence for all forms was estimated to be 455 /100,000 population for all age groups. Conclusion The prevalence of tuberculosis in Zambia was higher than previously estimated. Innovative approaches are required to accelerate the control of TB. PMID:26771588

  10. Improved texture analysis for automatic detection of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs with bone suppression images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; Philipsen, Rick; Schalekamp, Steven; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-03-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs (CXR) is challenging due to over-lapping structures. Suppression of normal structures can reduce overprojection effects and can enhance the appearance of diffuse parenchymal abnormalities. In this work, we compare two CAD systems to detect textural abnormalities in chest radiographs of TB suspects. One CAD system was trained and tested on the original CXR and the other CAD system was trained and tested on bone suppression images (BSI). BSI were created using a commercially available software (ClearRead 2.4, Riverain Medical). The CAD system is trained with 431 normal and 434 abnormal images with manually outlined abnormal regions. Subtlety rating (1-3) is assigned to each abnormal region, where 3 refers to obvious and 1 refers to subtle abnormalities. Performance is evaluated on normal and abnormal regions from an independent dataset of 900 images. These contain in total 454 normal and 1127 abnormal regions, which are divided into 3 subtlety categories containing 280, 527 and 320 abnormal regions, respectively. For normal regions, original/BSI CAD has an average abnormality score of 0.094+/-0.027/0.085+/-0.032 (p - 5.6×10-19). For abnormal regions, subtlety 1, 2, 3 categories have average abnormality scores for original/BSI of 0.155+/-0.073/0.156+/-0.089 (p = 0.73), 0.194+/-0.086/0.207+/-0.101 (p = 5.7×10-7), 0.225+/-0.119/0.247+/-0.117 (p = 4.4×10-7), respectively. Thus for normal regions, CAD scores slightly decrease when using BSI instead of the original images, and for abnormal regions, the scores increase slightly. We therefore conclude that the use of bone suppression results in slightly but significantly improved automated detection of textural abnormalities in chest radiographs.

  11. Yield of intensified tuberculosis case-finding activities using Xpert® MTB/RIF among risk groups in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Baral, S.; Shrestha, P.; Puri, M.; Kandel, S.; Lamichanne, B.; Elsey, H.; Brouwer, M.; Goel, S.; Chinnakali, P.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Twenty-two districts of Nepal, where intensified case-finding (ICF) activities for tuberculosis (TB) were implemented among risk groups under the TB REACH initiative in collaboration with the National TB Programme from July 2013 to November 2015. Objectives: To assess the yield of TB screening using an algorithm with smear microscopy followed by Xpert® MTB/RIF. Design: A descriptive study using routinely collected data. Results: Of 145 679 individuals screened, 28 574 (19.6%) had presumptive TB; 1239 (4.3%) of these were diagnosed with TB and 1195 (96%) were initiated on anti-tuberculosis treatment. The yield of screening was highest among people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) (6.1%), followed by household contacts (3.5%) and urban slum dwellers (0.5%). Among other risk groups, such as prisoners, factory workers, refugees and individuals with diabetes, the yield was less than 0.5%. The number needed to screen to diagnose an active TB case was 17 for PLHIV, 29 for household contacts and 197 for urban slum dwellers. Of 11 525 patients from ICF and the routine programme, 112 (1%) were diagnosed with multidrug-resistant TB. Conclusion: There was a substantial yield of TB cases among risk groups such as PLHIV and household contacts. Although the yield in urban slum dwellers was found to be moderate, some intervention should nonetheless be targeted because of the large population and poor access to care in this group. PMID:27358808

  12. Detection of Tuberculosis Infection Hotspots Using Activity Spaces Based Spatial Approach in an Urban Tokyo, from 2003 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Kiyohiko; Ohkado, Akihiro; Uchimura, Kazuhiro; Murase, Yoshiro; Tatsumi, Yuriko; Kayebeta, Aya; Watanabe, Yu; Ishikawa, Nobukatsu

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying ongoing tuberculosis infection sites is crucial for breaking chains of transmission in tuberculosis-prevalent urban areas. Previous studies have pointed out that detection of local accumulation of tuberculosis patients based on their residential addresses may be limited by a lack of matching between residences and tuberculosis infection sites. This study aimed to identify possible tuberculosis hotspots using TB genotype clustering statuses and a concept of “activity space”, a place where patients spend most of their waking hours. We further compared the spatial distribution by different residential statuses and describe urban environmental features of the detected hotspots. Methods Culture-positive tuberculosis patients notified to Shinjuku city from 2003 to 2011 were enrolled in this case-based cross-sectional study, and their demographic and clinical information, TB genotype clustering statuses, and activity space were collected. Spatial statistics (Global Moran’s I and Getis-Ord Gi* statistics) identified significant hotspots in 152 census tracts, and urban environmental features and tuberculosis patients’ characteristics in these hotspots were assessed. Results Of the enrolled 643 culture-positive tuberculosis patients, 416 (64.2%) were general inhabitants, 42 (6.5%) were foreign-born people, and 184 were homeless people (28.6%). The percentage of overall genotype clustering was 43.7%. Genotype-clustered general inhabitants and homeless people formed significant hotspots around a major railway station, whereas the non-clustered general inhabitants formed no hotspots. This suggested the detected hotspots of activity spaces may reflect ongoing tuberculosis transmission sites and were characterized by smaller residential floor size and a higher proportion of non-working households. Conclusions Activity space-based spatial analysis suggested possible TB transmission sites around the major railway station and it can assist in further

  13. Baseline assessment of collaborative tuberculosis/HIV activities in Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Martinot, Amanda; Van Rie, Annelies; Mulangu, Sabue; Mbulula, Marie; Jarrett, Nikki; Behets, Frieda; Bola, Valentin; Bahati, Etienne

    2008-07-01

    Ninety-two clinics were surveyed in 2005 as part of a baseline assessment of HIV activities in Tuberculosis (TB) clinics in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Some HIV activities were implemented in 58% of TB clinics. The majority of health had > or = 1 health care worker (HCW) trained in either HIV counseling or testing (71%). Fifty-three clinics offered counseling and testing to TB patients; twenty-two (42%) routinely offered HIV CT to all patients, while others used selective criteria. While most offered on-site counseling (92%) and testing (77%), not all 53 clinics had a HCW trained in counseling and only 31 had access to a counseling room. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was offered in 51% of clinics; antiretroviral treatment in 17%. Shortcomings in human resources, infrastructure and quality of services were revealed. Strengthening those clinics already implementing HIV activities could be prioritized to achieve the goals set forward by the Global Plan to Stop TB. PMID:18628533

  14. Lower Pre-Treatment T Cell Activation in Early- and Late-Onset Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goovaerts, Odin; Jennes, Wim; Massinga-Loembé, Marguerite; Ondoa, Pascale; Ceulemans, Ann; Vereecken, Chris; Worodria, William; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Colebunders, Robert; Kestens, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) is an inflammatory complication in HIV-TB co-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). The role of disturbed T cell reconstitution in TB-IRIS is not well understood. We investigated T cell activation and maturation profiles in patients who developed TB-IRIS at different intervals during ART. Methods Twenty-two HIV-TB patients who developed early-onset TB-IRIS and 10 who developed late-onset TB-IRIS were matched for age, sex and CD4 count to equal numbers of HIV-TB patients who did not develop TB-IRIS. Flow cytometry analysis was performed on fresh blood, drawn before and after ART initiation and during TB-IRIS events. T cell activation and maturation was measured on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells using CD45RO, CD38, HLA-DR, CCR7 and CD27 antibodies. Results CD8+ T cell activation before ART was decreased in both early-onset (77% vs. 82%, p = 0.014) and late-onset (71% vs. 83%, p = 0.012) TB-IRIS patients compared to non-IRIS controls. After ART initiation, the observed differences in T cell activation disappeared. During late-onset, but not early-onset TB-IRIS, we observed a skewing from memory to terminal effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations (p≤0.028). Conclusion Our data provide evidence of reduced CD8+ T cell activation before ART as a common predisposing factor of early- and late-onset TB-IRIS. The occurrence of TB-IRIS itself was not marked by an over-activated CD8+ T cell compartment. Late- but not early-onset TB-IRIS was characterized by a more terminally differentiated T cell phenotype. PMID:26208109

  15. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Lucy C. K.; Pollara, Gabriele; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tomlinson, Gillian S.; Lehloenya, Rannakoe J.; Roe, Jennifer; Meldau, Richard; Miller, Robert F.; Ramsay, Alan; Chain, Benjamin M.; Dheda, Keertan; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-01-01

    Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th)1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART) exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST) to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral blood. TST

  16. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Lucy C K; Pollara, Gabriele; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tomlinson, Gillian S; Lehloenya, Rannakoe J; Roe, Jennifer; Meldau, Richard; Miller, Robert F; Ramsay, Alan; Chain, Benjamin M; Dheda, Keertan; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-03-01

    Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th)1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART) exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST) to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral blood. TST

  17. Putting Tuberculosis (TB) To Rest: Transformation of the Sleep Aid, Ambien, and “Anagrams” Generated Potent Antituberculosis Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Zolpidem (Ambien, 1) is an imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide and an approved drug for the treatment of insomnia. As medicinal chemists enamored by how structure imparts biological function, we found it to have strikingly similar structure to the antitubercular imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-carboxyamides. Zolpidem was found to have antituberculosis activity (MIC of 10–50 μM) when screened against replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv. Manipulation of the Zolpidem structure, notably, to structural isomers (“anagrams”), attains remarkably improved potency (5, MIC of 0.004 μM) and impressive potency against clinically relevant drug-sensitive, multi- and extensively drug-resistant Mtb strains (MIC < 0.03 μM). Zolpidem anagrams and analogues were synthesized and evaluated for their antitubercular potency, toxicity, and spectrum of activity against nontubercular mycobacteria and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These efforts toward the rational design of isomeric anagrams of a well-known sleep aid underscore the possibility that further optimization of the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine core may well “put TB to rest”. PMID:25984566

  18. A Note on Derivatives of Isoniazid, Rifampicin, and Pyrazinamide Showing Activity Against Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nusrath Unissa, Ameeruddin; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2016-04-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a serious problem that impedes the success of the TB control program. Of note, multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB and extensively drug-resistant (XDR)-TB have certainly complicated the scenario. One of the possible strategies to overcome drug resistance in an economic and simple manner would involve modification of existing anti-TB drugs to obtain derivatives that can work on resistant TB bacilli. These may have improved half-life and increased bioavailability, be more efficacious, and serve as cost-effective alternatives, as compared to new drugs identified through conventional methods of drug discovery and development. Although extensive literature is available on the activity of various derivatives of first-line drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide) on drug-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), reports on the activity of derivatives on resistant MTB are very limited, to our knowledge. In light of this, the present review aims to provide a concise report on the derivatives of first-line drugs that have the potential to overcome the resistance to the parental drug and could thus serve as effective alternatives. PMID:26613382

  19. Infectious Diseases (ID) Learning Unit: How Rapidly to Evaluate for Active Tuberculosis Disease in Low-Prevalence Settings.

    PubMed

    Chida, Natasha; Shah, Maunank

    2016-03-01

    With declining tuberculosis (TB) incidence in low-prevalence settings, many clinicians are likely unaware that the approach to diagnosing active TB is evolving with newer technologies. Rapid molecular assays are commercially available, and more are likely to enter the market in the coming years. These tests, such as the Xpert MTB/RIF, which can detect TB and drug-resistance in 2 hours, are increasingly used in settings with higher TB prevalence; however, uptake has been slower in low-prevalence settings. Newer algorithms incorporating rapid TB diagnostics have the ability to alter current clinical and infection control practice patterns. In this learning unit, we review current and newly available tests for the detection of active TB disease and their usage in low-prevalence settings. PMID:27186583

  20. Infectious Diseases (ID) Learning Unit: How Rapidly to Evaluate for Active Tuberculosis Disease in Low-Prevalence Settings

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Natasha; Shah, Maunank

    2016-01-01

    With declining tuberculosis (TB) incidence in low-prevalence settings, many clinicians are likely unaware that the approach to diagnosing active TB is evolving with newer technologies. Rapid molecular assays are commercially available, and more are likely to enter the market in the coming years. These tests, such as the Xpert MTB/RIF, which can detect TB and drug-resistance in 2 hours, are increasingly used in settings with higher TB prevalence; however, uptake has been slower in low-prevalence settings. Newer algorithms incorporating rapid TB diagnostics have the ability to alter current clinical and infection control practice patterns. In this learning unit, we review current and newly available tests for the detection of active TB disease and their usage in low-prevalence settings. PMID:27186583

  1. MHEALTH INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT TO SUPPORT PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE TUBERCULOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Iribarren, Sarah J.; Beck, Susan L.; Pearce, Patricia F.; Chirico, Cristina; Etchevarria, Mirta; Rubinstein, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile Health (mHealth) based interventions have been increasingly used to improve a broad range of health outcomes. However, few researchers have reported on the process or the application of theory to guide the development of mHealth based interventions, or specifically for tuberculosis (TB) treatment management. Aims To describe the steps, process, and considerations in developing a text messaging-based intervention to promote treatment adherence and provide support to patients with active TB. Methods Traditional qualitative techniques, including semi-structured interviews, field notes, content analysis, iterative coding, and thematic analysis, were used to design and document the intervention development with a multidisciplinary team of researchers, clinicians, administrators, and patients who were in active TB treatment. The Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model was used to guide the coding scheme for content analysis of patient-directed TB educational material and intervention development. Results The development steps included: a) establishing intervention components, including justifications, considerations, timing and frequency of components; b) developing educational messages, including cultural adaption, text or short message service (SMS) formatting, and prioritizing message delivery order; and c) determining implementation protocol. A set of 16 IMB-based messages were developed for the educational component. Final intervention development was achieved in 3 months. Conclusion A collaborative approach and application of a theory to guide the intervention design and development is supported. Although a collaborative approach was more time consuming, it resulted in a more responsive, culturally appropriate, and comprehensive intervention. Considerations for developing a text messaging based intervention are provided and may serve as a guide for similar interventions. Further empirical evidence is needed for applying the IMB model

  2. A prospective cohort study of latent tuberculosis in adult close contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Hyo; Lee, Seung Jun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kim, Ho Cheol; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Hee Jin; Menzies, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in adult close contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients in Korea. Methods: Adult close contacts of active pulmonary TB patients were recruited at a regional tertiary hospital in Korea. The participants were tested for LTBI using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and/or QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) test. LTBI patients, who consented to treatment, were randomly assigned to receive isoniazid for 9 months (9INH) or rifampin for 4 months (4RIF). Results: We examined 189 adult close contacts (> 18 years) of 107 active pulmonary TB patients. The TST and QFT-G were positive (≥ 10 mm) in 75/183 (39.7%) and 45/118 (38.1%) tested participants, respectively. Among 88 TST or QFT-G positive LTBI participants, 45 participants were randomly assigned to receive 4RIF (n = 21) or 9INH (n = 24), respectively. The average treatment duration for the 4RIF and 9INH groups was 3.3 ± 1.3 and 6.1 ± 2.7 months, respectively. Treatment was completed in 25 participants (4RIF, n = 16; 9INH, n = 9). LTBI participants who accepted treatment were more likely to be women and have more cavitary lesions on the chest radiographs of index cases and positive TST and QFT-G results compared to those who refused treatment. Conclusions: About 40% of adult close contacts of active pulmonary TB patients had LTBI; about 50% of these LTBI participants agreed to treatment. PMID:27052266

  3. Global Tuberculosis Report 2015

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store Tuberculosis (TB) Menu Tuberculosis The End TB Strategy Areas ... data News, events and features About us Global tuberculosis report 2015 This is the twentieth global report ...

  4. Pulmonary tuberculosis: clinical features and patient management.

    PubMed

    Gough, Andrea; Kaufman, Gerri

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is a common infectious disease and a major cause of illness and death throughout the world, particularly in developing countries. This article explores the difference between latent TB infection and active TB disease, and discusses the pharmacological management of TB and issues around adherence to medication. Although TB is usually managed by specialist teams it is essential that all practitioners have an understanding of the signs and symptoms of the disease to ensure early referral and accurate diagnosis. PMID:21888103

  5. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB.We conducted a nested case-control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates.From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78-0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66-0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine.In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  6. Potential novel markers to discriminate between active and latent tuberculosis infection in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-juan; Liang, Yan; Yang, You-rong; Feng, Jin-dong; Luo, Zhan-peng; Zhang, Jun-Xian; Wu, Xue-qiong

    2016-02-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) constitutes the main reservoir for reactivation tuberculosis. The finding of potential biomarkers for differentiating between TB and LTBI is very necessary. In this study, the immunological characteristics and potential diagnostic utility of Rv2029c, Rv2628 and Rv1813c proteins were assessed. These three proteins stimulated PBMCs from ELISPOT-positive LTBI subjects produced higher levels of IFN-γ in comparison with TB patients and ELISPOT-negative healthy subjects (p<0.05). BCG vaccination and non-TB respiratory disease had little influence on the immunological responses of Rv2029c and Rv2628 proteins (p>0.05). The LTBI diagnostic performance of Rv2029c was higher than Rv2628 and Rv1813c by ROC evaluation. But Rv2628 had much higher specificity than Rv2029c in active TB patients and uninfected healthy subjects. The IgG level against Rv1813c was higher in the TB group than in LTBI and uninfected healthy subjects (p<0.05). These results suggest that T cell response to Rv2628 and antibody against Rv1813c might be applicable as biomarkers to distinguish TB from LTBI and uninfected individuals. PMID:26851588

  7. Differential gene expression of activating Fcγ receptor classifies active tuberculosis regardless of human immunodeficiency virus status or ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J S; Loxton, A G; Haks, M C; Kassa, D; Ambrose, L; Lee, J-S; Ran, L; van Baarle, D; Maertzdorf, J; Howe, R; Mayanja-Kizza, H; Boom, W H; Thiel, B A; Crampin, A C; Hanekom, W; Ota, M O C; Dockrell, H; Walzl, G; Kaufmann, S H E; Ottenhoff, T H M

    2014-04-01

    New diagnostics and vaccines for tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed, but require an understanding of the requirements for protection from/susceptibility to TB. Previous studies have used unbiased approaches to determine gene signatures in single-site populations. The present study utilized a targeted approach, reverse transcriptase multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (RT-MLPA), to validate these genes in a multisite study. We analysed ex vivo whole blood RNA from a total of 523 participants across four sub-Saharan countries (Ethiopia, Malawi, South Africa, and The Gambia) with differences in TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status. We found a number of genes that were expressed at significantly lower levels in participants with active disease than in those with latent TB infection (LTBI), with restoration following successful TB treatment. The most consistent classifier of active disease was FCGR1A (high-affinity IgG Fc receptor 1 (CD64)), which was the only marker expressed at significantly higher levels in participants with active TB than in those with LTBI before treatment regardless of HIV status or genetic background. This is the first study to identify a biomarker for TB that is not affected by HIV status or geo-genetic differences. These data provide valuable clues for understanding TB pathogenesis, and also provide a proof-of-concept for the use of RT-MLPA in rapid and inexpensive validation of unbiased gene expression findings. PMID:24205913

  8. A comparison between passive and active case finding in TB control in the Arkhangelsk region

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir N.; Grjibovski, Andrej M.; Mariandyshev, Andrey O.; Johansson, Eva; Bjune, Gunnar A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In Russia, active case finding (ACF) for certain population groups has been practiced uninterruptedly for many decades, but no studies comparing ACF and passive case finding (PCF) approaches in Russia have been published. Objective The aim of this study was to describe the main differences in symptoms and diagnostic delay between patients who come to TB services through PCF and ACF strategies. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 453 new pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients, who met criteria of TB diagnostic delay in Arkhangelsk. Results ACF patients used self-treatment more often than PCF patients (90.1% vs. 24.6%) and 36.3% of them were alcohol abusers (as opposed to only 26.2% of PCF patients). The median patient delay (PD) in PCF was 4 weeks, IQR (1–8 weeks), and less than 1 week in ACF. Twenty-three per cent of the PCF patients were seen by a medical provider within the first week of their illness onset. Conclusion Patients diagnosed through ACF tended to under-report their TB symptoms and showed low attention to their own health. However, ACF allowed for discovering TB patients earlier than PCF, and this was also the case for alcohol abusing patients. PCF systems should be supplemented with ACF strategies. PMID:24563859

  9. TGS-TB: Total Genotyping Solution for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Short-Read Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Akifumi; Murase, Yoshiro; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kato, Seiya; Kuroda, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) with next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) is an increasingly accessible and affordable method for genotyping hundreds of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) isolates, leading to more effective epidemiological studies involving single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in core genomic sequences based on molecular evolution. We developed an all-in-one web-based tool for genotyping Mtb, referred to as the Total Genotyping Solution for TB (TGS-TB), to facilitate multiple genotyping platforms using NGS for spoligotyping and the detection of phylogenies with core genomic SNVs, IS6110 insertion sites, and 43 customized loci for variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) through a user-friendly, simple click interface. This methodology is implemented with a KvarQ script to predict MTBC lineages/sublineages and potential antimicrobial resistance. Seven Mtb isolates (JP01 to JP07) in this study showing the same VNTR profile were accurately discriminated through median-joining network analysis using SNVs unique to those isolates. An additional IS6110 insertion was detected in one of those isolates as supportive genetic information in addition to core genomic SNVs. The results of in silico analyses using TGS-TB are consistent with those obtained using conventional molecular genotyping methods, suggesting that NGS short reads could provide multiple genotypes to discriminate multiple strains of Mtb, although longer NGS reads (≥300-mer) will be required for full genotyping on the TGS-TB web site. Most available short reads (~100-mer) can be utilized to discriminate the isolates based on the core genome phylogeny. TGS-TB provides a more accurate and discriminative strain typing for clinical and epidemiological investigations; NGS strain typing offers a total genotyping solution for Mtb outbreak and surveillance. TGS-TB web site: https://gph.niid.go.jp/tgs-tb/. PMID:26565975

  10. Adrenal function in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D J; Naraqi, S; Temu, P; Turtle, J R

    1989-01-01

    Although tuberculosis is a recognised cause of adrenal insufficiency, little is known about adrenal function in patients with active tuberculosis. Ninety Melanesian adults with active tuberculosis (30 pulmonary, 30 miliary, 30 extrapulmonary) had adrenal function assessed prospectively before and three to four weeks after starting antituberculous chemotherapy. Basal serum cortisol concentrations were normal in 55 (61%) and raised in 35 (39%) of the subjects. No patient had a low basal cortisol concentration. After Synacthen stimulation, cortisol responses were normal in 81 (92%) of the patients and subnormal in seven (8%). After antituberculous chemotherapy the response to Synacthen stimulation was normal in all but one patient. It is concluded that adrenal dysfunction is an uncommon problem in patients with active tuberculosis, and that, contrary to recent reports, antituberculous chemotherapy regimens that include rifampicin do not have an adverse effect on adrenal function. PMID:2763243

  11. Comparison of QuantiFERON-TB gold in tube test versus tuberculin skin test for screening of latent tuberculosis infection in Saudi Arabia: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Balkhy, Hanan H.; El Beltagy, Kamel; El-Saed, Aiman; Aljasir, Badr; Althaqafi, Abdulhakeem; Alothman, Adel F.; Alshalaan, Mohammad; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare QuantiFERON-TB gold in tube (QFT-GIT) test with tuberculin skin test (TST) in detecting latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) among a general population in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted between July 2010 and March 2013 among individuals randomly selected from the list of those receiving care at primary healthcare centers in three provinces of Saudi Arabia; Central, Western, and Eastern provinces. Those younger than 5 years, immunocompromised, had a current or previous history of active TB, LTBI, or who were receiving anti-TB medications were excluded. Informed consent was obtained before the study questionnaire was completed. Participants were then evaluated for LTBI using QFT-GIT test followed immediately by TST. RESULTS: Of the 1369 subjects included in the final analysis, QFT-GIT was positive in 124 (9.1%) and TST was positive in 127 (9.3%). Positive concordance was observed in 49 (3.6%) subjects while negative concordance was observed in 1167 (85.2%) subjects. The overall agreement between the two tests was 88.8% with a significant kappa (κ) test (κ = 0.332, P < 0.001). Concordance was significantly higher in younger age, female gender, single status, students, primary education, living in middle-sized families, and never smoked. CONCLUSIONS: The overall agreement of TST and QFT-GIT for the detection of LTBI among a Saudi general population was 88.8%. QFT-GIT is probably comparable to TST for detecting LTBI in an intermediate TB burden country with high at birth bacille calmette guerin vaccination coverage. Further prospective studies are needed to compare the ability of both tests to predict TB disease. PMID:27512509

  12. Serial image analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis colony growth reveals a persistent subpopulation in sputum during treatment of pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Barr, David A.; Kamdolozi, Mercy; Nishihara, Yo; Ndhlovu, Victor; Khonga, Margaret; Davies, Geraint R.; Sloan, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Faster elimination of drug tolerant ‘persister’ bacteria may shorten treatment of tuberculosis (TB) but no method exists to quantify persisters in clinical samples. We used automated image analysis to assess whether studying growth characteristics of individual Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonies from sputum on solid media during early TB treatment facilitates ‘persister’ phenotyping. As Time to Detection (TTD) in liquid culture inversely correlates with total bacterial load we also evaluated the relationship between individual colony growth parameters and TTD. Sputum from TB patients in Malawi was prepared for solid and liquid culture after 0, 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Serial photography of agar plates was used to measure time to appearance (lag time) and radial growth rate for each colony. Mixed-effects modelling was used to analyse changing growth characteristics from serial samples. 20 patients had colony measurements recorded at ≥1 time-point. Overall lag time increased by 6.5 days between baseline and two weeks (p = 0.0001). Total colony count/ml showed typical biphasic elimination, but long lag time colonies (>20days) had slower, monophasic decline. TTD was associated with minimum lag time (time to appearance of first colony1). Slower elimination of long lag time colonies suggests that these may represent a persister subpopulation of bacilli. PMID:27156626

  13. Serial image analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis colony growth reveals a persistent subpopulation in sputum during treatment of pulmonary TB.

    PubMed

    Barr, David A; Kamdolozi, Mercy; Nishihara, Yo; Ndhlovu, Victor; Khonga, Margaret; Davies, Geraint R; Sloan, Derek J

    2016-05-01

    Faster elimination of drug tolerant 'persister' bacteria may shorten treatment of tuberculosis (TB) but no method exists to quantify persisters in clinical samples. We used automated image analysis to assess whether studying growth characteristics of individual Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonies from sputum on solid media during early TB treatment facilitates 'persister' phenotyping. As Time to Detection (TTD) in liquid culture inversely correlates with total bacterial load we also evaluated the relationship between individual colony growth parameters and TTD. Sputum from TB patients in Malawi was prepared for solid and liquid culture after 0, 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Serial photography of agar plates was used to measure time to appearance (lag time) and radial growth rate for each colony. Mixed-effects modelling was used to analyse changing growth characteristics from serial samples. 20 patients had colony measurements recorded at ≥1 time-point. Overall lag time increased by 6.5 days between baseline and two weeks (p = 0.0001). Total colony count/ml showed typical biphasic elimination, but long lag time colonies (>20days) had slower, monophasic decline. TTD was associated with minimum lag time (time to appearance of first colony1). Slower elimination of long lag time colonies suggests that these may represent a persister subpopulation of bacilli. PMID:27156626

  14. Bovine Tuberculosis Risk Factors for British Herds Before and After the 2001 Foot-and-Mouth Epidemic: What have we Learned from the TB99 and CCS2005 Studies?

    PubMed

    Vial, F; Miguel, E; Johnston, W T; Mitchell, A; Donnelly, C A

    2015-10-01

    Over the last couple of decades, the UK experienced a substantial increase in the incidence and geographical spread of bovine tuberculosis (TB), in particular since the epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in 2001. The initiation of the Randomized Badger Culling Trial (RBCT) in 1998 in south-west England provided an opportunity for an in-depth collection of questionnaire data (covering farming practices, herd management and husbandry, trading and wildlife activity) from herds having experienced a TB breakdown between 1998 and early 2006 and randomly selected control herds, both within and outside the RBCT (the so-called TB99 and CCS2005 case-control studies). The data collated were split into four separate and comparable substudies related to either the pre-FMD or post-FMD period, which are brought together and discussed here for the first time. The findings suggest that the risk factors associated with TB breakdowns may have changed. Higher Mycobacterium bovis prevalence in badgers following the FMD epidemic may have contributed to the identification of the presence of badgers on a farm as a prominent TB risk factor only post-FMD. The strong emergence of contact/trading TB risk factors post-FMD suggests that the purchasing and movement of cattle, which took place to restock FMD-affected areas after 2001, may have exacerbated the TB problem. Post-FMD analyses also highlighted the potential impact of environmental factors on TB risk. Although no unique and universal solution exists to reduce the transmission of TB to and among British cattle, there is an evidence to suggest that applying the broad principles of biosecurity on farms reduces the risk of infection. However, with trading remaining as an important route of local and long-distance TB transmission, improvements in the detection of infected animals during pre- and post-movement testing should further reduce the geographical spread of the disease. PMID:24330476

  15. Rate of tuberculosis infection in children and adolescents with household contact with adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis as assessed by tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, M A G; Spina, F G; Weckx, L Y; Lederman, H M; De Moraes-Pinto, M I

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection was evaluated in Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents exposed and unexposed (control group) to adults with active pulmonary TB. Both groups were analysed by clinical and radiological assessment, TST, QFT-IT and T-SPOT.TB. The three tests were repeated after 8 weeks in the TB-exposed group if results were initially negative. Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) were treated and tests were repeated after treatment. Fifty-nine TB-exposed and 42 controls were evaluated. Rate of infection was 69·5% and 9·5% for the exposed and control groups, respectively. The exposed group infection rate was 61% assessed by TST, 57·6% by T-SPOT.TB, and 59·3%, by QFT-IT. No active TB was diagnosed. Agreement between the three tests was 83·1% and 92·8% in the exposed and control groups, respectively. In the exposed group, T-SPOT.TB added four TB diagnoses [16%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·6-30·4] and QFT-IT added three TB diagnoses (12%, 95% CI 0-24·7) in 25 individuals with negative tuberculin skin test (TST). Risk factors associated to TB infection were contact with an adult with active TB [0-60 days: odds ratio (OR) 6·9; >60 days: OR 27·0] and sleeping in the same room as an adult with active TB (OR 5·2). In Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents, TST had a similar performance to interferon-gamma release assays and detected a high rate of LTBI. PMID:26234295

  16. A Broad Profile of Co-Dominant Epitopes Shapes the Peripheral Mycobacterium tuberculosis Specific CD8+ T-Cell Immune Response in South African Patients with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson-Robertson, Rebecca; Loxton, André G.; Walzl, Gerhard; Ehlers, Marthie M.; Kock, Marleen M.; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    We studied major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptide-presentation and nature of the antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell response from South African tuberculosis (TB) patients with active TB. 361 MHC class I binding epitopes were identified from three immunogenic TB proteins (ESAT-6 [Rv3875], Ag85B [Rv1886c], and TB10.4 [Rv0288], including amino acid variations for Rv0288, i.e., A10T, G13D, S27N, and A71S for MHC allotypes common in a South African population (e.g., human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A*30, B*58, and C*07). Inter-allelic differences were identified regarding the broadness of the peptide-binding capacity. Mapping of frequencies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells using 48 different multimers, including the newly constructed recombinant MHC class I alleles HLA-B*58:01 and C*0701, revealed a low frequency of CD8+ T-cell responses directed against a broad panel of co-dominant M. tb epitopes in the peripheral circulation of most patients. The antigen-specific responses were dominated by CD8+ T-cells with a precursor-like phenotype (CD45RA+CCR7+). The data show that the CD8+ T-cell response from patients with pulmonary TB (prior to treatment) is directed against subdominant epitopes derived from secreted and non-secreted M. tb antigens and that variant, natural occurring M. tb Rv0288 ligands, have a profound impact on T-cell recognition. PMID:23555576

  17. Target prediction for an open access set of compounds active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Papadatos, George; Yang, Lun; Wallace, Iain M; Kumar, Vinod; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Brown, James R; Overington, John P; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects an estimated two billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. The development of new anti-TB therapeutics is required, because of the emergence of multi-drug resistance strains as well as co-infection with other pathogens, especially HIV. Recently, the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline published the results of a high-throughput screen (HTS) of their two million compound library for anti-mycobacterial phenotypes. The screen revealed 776 compounds with significant activity against the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, including a subset of 177 prioritized compounds with high potency and low in vitro cytotoxicity. The next major challenge is the identification of the target proteins. Here, we use a computational approach that integrates historical bioassay data, chemical properties and structural comparisons of selected compounds to propose their potential targets in M. tuberculosis. We predicted 139 target--compound links, providing a necessary basis for further studies to characterize the mode of action of these compounds. The results from our analysis, including the predicted structural models, are available to the wider scientific community in the open source mode, to encourage further development of novel TB therapeutics. PMID:24098102

  18. Target Prediction for an Open Access Set of Compounds Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Papadatos, George; Yang, Lun; Wallace, Iain M.; Kumar, Vinod; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Brown, James R.; Overington, John P.; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects an estimated two billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. The development of new anti-TB therapeutics is required, because of the emergence of multi-drug resistance strains as well as co-infection with other pathogens, especially HIV. Recently, the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline published the results of a high-throughput screen (HTS) of their two million compound library for anti-mycobacterial phenotypes. The screen revealed 776 compounds with significant activity against the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, including a subset of 177 prioritized compounds with high potency and low in vitro cytotoxicity. The next major challenge is the identification of the target proteins. Here, we use a computational approach that integrates historical bioassay data, chemical properties and structural comparisons of selected compounds to propose their potential targets in M. tuberculosis. We predicted 139 target - compound links, providing a necessary basis for further studies to characterize the mode of action of these compounds. The results from our analysis, including the predicted structural models, are available to the wider scientific community in the open source mode, to encourage further development of novel TB therapeutics. PMID:24098102

  19. Potential Role of M. tuberculosis Specific IFN-γ and IL-2 ELISPOT Assays in Discriminating Children with Active or Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Elena; Della Bella, Chiara; Bonsignori, Francesca; Sollai, Sara; Amedei, Amedeo; Galli, Luisa; Niccolai, Elena; Singh, Mahavir; D'Elios, Mario M.; de Martino, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Background Although currently available IGRA have been reported to be promising markers for TB infection, they cannot distinguish active tuberculosis (TB) from latent infection (LTBI). Objective Children with LTBI, active TB disease or uninfected were prospectively evaluated by an in-house ELISPOT assay in order to investigate possible immunological markers for a differential diagnosis between LTBI and active TB. Methods Children at risk for TB infection prospectively enrolled in our infectious disease unit were evaluated by in-house IFN-γ and IL-2 based ELISPOT assays using a panel of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. Results Twenty-nine children were classified as uninfected, 21 as LTBI and 25 as active TB cases (including 5 definite and 20 probable cases). Significantly higher IFN-γ ELISPOT responses were observed in infected vs. uninfected children for ESAT-6 (p<0.0001), CFP-10 (p<0.0001), TB 10.3 (p = 0.003), and AlaDH (p = 0.001), while differences were not significant considering Ag85B (p = 0.063), PstS1 (p = 0.512), and HspX (16 kDa) (p = 0.139). IL-2 ELISPOT assay responses were different for ESAT-6 (p<0.0001), CFP-10 (p<0.0001), TB 10.3 (p<0.0001), HspX (16 kDa) (p<0.0001), PstS1 (p<0.0001) and AlaDH (p = 0.001); but not for Ag85B (p = 0.063). Comparing results between children with LTBI and those with TB disease differences were significant for IFN-γ ELISPOT only for AlaDH antigen (p = 0.021) and for IL-2 ELISPOT assay for AlaDH (p<0.0001) and TB 10.3 antigen (p = 0.043). ROC analyses demonstrated sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 81% of AlaDH-IL-2 ELISPOT assay in discriminating between latent and active TB using a cut off of 12.5 SCF per million PBMCs. Conclusion Our data suggest that IL-2 based ELISPOT with AlaDH antigen may be of help in discriminating children with active from those with latent TB. PMID:23029377

  20. Evaluation of the MeltPro TB/STR assay for rapid detection of streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Hu, Siyu; Li, Guoli; Li, Hui; Liu, Xiaoli; Niu, Jianjun; Wang, Feng; Wen, Huixin; Xu, Ye; Li, Qingge

    2015-03-01

    Rapid and comprehensive detection of drug-resistance is essential for the control of tuberculosis, which has facilitated the development of molecular assays for the detection of drug-resistant mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We hereby assessed the analytical and clinical performance of an assay for streptomycin-resistant mutations. MeltPro TB/STR is a closed-tube, dual-color, melting curve analysis-based, real-time PCR test designed to detect 15 streptomycin-resistant mutations in rpsL 43, rpsL 88, rrs 513, rrs 514, rrs 517, and rrs 905-908 of M. tuberculosis. Analytical studies showed that the accuracy was 100%, the limit of detection was 50-500 bacilli per reaction, the reproducibility in the form of Tm variation was within 1.0 °C, and we could detect 20% STR resistance in mixed bacterial samples. The cross-platform study demonstrated that the assay could be performed on six models of real-time PCR instruments. A multicenter clinical study was conducted using 1056 clinical isolates, which were collected from three geographically different healthcare units, including 709 STR-susceptible and 347 STR-resistant isolates characterized on Löwenstein-Jensen solid medium by traditional drug susceptibility testing. The results showed that the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the MeltPro TB/STR was 88.8% and 95.8%, respectively. Sequencing analysis confirmed the accuracy of the mutation types. Among all the 8 mutation types detected, rpsL K43R (AAG → AGG), rpsL K88R (AAG → AGG) and rrs 514 A → C accounted for more than 90%. We concluded that MeltPro TB/STR represents a rapid and reliable assay for the detection of STR resistance in clinical isolates. PMID:25553930

  1. Sputum is a surrogate for bronchoalveolar lavage for monitoring Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional profiles in TB patients.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Benjamin J; Loxton, Andre G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Van, Tran T; Davis, J Lucian; de Jong, Bouke C; Voskuil, Martin I; Leach, Sonia M; Schoolnik, Gary K; Walzl, Gerhard; Strong, Michael; Walter, Nicholas D

    2016-09-01

    Pathogen-targeted transcriptional profiling in human sputum may elucidate the physiologic state of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) during infection and treatment. However, whether M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum recapitulates transcription in the lung is uncertain. We therefore compared M. tuberculosis transcription in human sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 11 HIV-negative South African patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. We additionally compared these clinical samples with in vitro log phase aerobic growth and hypoxic non-replicating persistence (NRP-2). Of 2179 M. tuberculosis transcripts assayed in sputum and BAL via multiplex RT-PCR, 194 (8.9%) had a p-value <0.05, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing. Categorical enrichment analysis indicated that expression of the hypoxia-responsive DosR regulon was higher in BAL than in sputum. M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum was distinct from both aerobic growth and NRP-2, with a range of 396-1020 transcripts significantly differentially expressed after multiple testing correction. Collectively, our results indicate that M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum approximates M. tuberculosis transcription in the lung. Minor differences between M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum suggested lower oxygen concentrations or higher nitric oxide concentrations in BAL. M. tuberculosis-targeted transcriptional profiling of sputa may be a powerful tool for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and monitoring treatment responses in vivo. PMID:27553415

  2. Toward an Evidence-Based Nonclinical Road Map for Evaluating the Efficacy of New Tuberculosis (TB) Drug Regimens: Proceedings of a Critical Path to TB Drug Regimens-National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases In Vivo Pharmacology Workshop for TB Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Nuermberger, Eric; Sizemore, Christine; Romero, Klaus; Hanna, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Novel tuberculosis (TB) drug regimens are urgently needed, and their development will be enabled by improved preclinical approaches that more effectively inform and ensure safe selection of clinical candidates and drug combination/regimens. An evidence-based approach for the assessment of nonclinical models supporting TB drug development has been proposed by a joint partnership between the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the Critical Path to TB Drug Regimens (CPTR) Consortium. PMID:26824941

  3. Kinetic mechanism determination and analysis of metal requirement of dehydroquinate synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv: an essential step in the function-based rational design of anti-TB drugs.

    PubMed

    de Mendonça, Jordana Dutra; Adachi, Osao; Rosado, Leonardo Astolfi; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; Basso, Luiz Augusto

    2011-01-01

    The number of new cases of tuberculosis (TB) arising each year is increasing globally. Migration, socio-economic deprivation, HIV co-infection and the emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main causative agent of TB in humans, have all contributed to the increasing number of TB cases worldwide. Proteins that are essential to the pathogen survival and absent in the host, such as enzymes of the shikimate pathway, are attractive targets to the development of new anti-TB drugs. Here we describe the metal requirement and kinetic mechanism determination of M. tuberculosis dehydroquinate synthase (MtDHQS). True steady-state kinetic parameters determination and ligand binding data suggested that the MtDHQS-catalyzed chemical reaction follows a rapid-equilibrium random mechanism. Treatment with EDTA abolished completely the activity of MtDHQS, and addition of Co(2+) and Zn(2+) led to, respectively, full and partial recovery of the enzyme activity. Excess Zn(2+) inhibited the MtDHQS activity, and isotitration microcalorimetry data revealed two sequential binding sites, which is consistent with the existence of a secondary inhibitory site. We also report measurements of metal concentrations by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The constants of the cyclic reduction and oxidation of NAD(+) and NADH, respectively, during the reaction of MtDHQS was monitored by a stopped-flow instrument, under single-turnover experimental conditions. These results provide a better understanding of the mode of action of MtDHQS that should be useful to guide the rational (function-based) design of inhibitors of this enzyme that can be further evaluated as anti-TB drugs. PMID:20978656

  4. Mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and in a murine model of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S; Villela, Anne D; Gonçalves, Raoni S B; Abbadi, Bruno Lopes; Trindade, Rogério Valim; López-Gavín, Alexandre; Tudó, Griselda; González-Martín, Julian; Basso, Luiz Augusto; de Souza, Marcus V N; Campos, Maria Martha; Santos, Diógenes Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Repurposing of drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB) has been considered an alternative to overcome the global TB epidemic, especially to combat drug-resistant forms of the disease. Mefloquine has been reported as a potent drug to kill drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, mefloquine-derived molecules have been synthesised and their effectiveness against mycobacteria has been assessed. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the activities of mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound 1E in a murine model of TB infection following administration of both drugs by the oral route. The effects of associations between mefloquine or 1E with the clinically used antituberculosis drugs isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, moxifloxacin and streptomycin were also investigated. Importantly, combination of mefloquine with isoniazid and of 1E with streptomycin showed a two-fold decrease in their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Moreover, no tested combinations demonstrated antagonist interactions. Here we describe novel evidence on the activity of mefloquine and 1E against a series of quinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. These data show MICs against quinolone-resistant strains (0.5-8 µg/mL) similar to or lower than those previously reported for multidrug-resistant strains. Taking these results together, we can suggest the use of mefloquine or 1E in combination with clinically available drugs, especially in the case of resistant forms of TB. PMID:27364701

  5. High and equitable tuberculosis awareness coverage in the community-driven Axshya TB control project in India

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, S. S.; Das, A.; Mohanty, S.; Tonsing, J.

    2015-01-01

    Data from surveys on knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) on tuberculosis (TB) conducted under the Axshya project at two time points (baseline 2010–2011 and mid-line 2012–2013) were analysed for changes in coverage and equity of TB awareness after project interventions. Overall coverage increased from 84% at baseline to 88% at midline (5% increase, P < 0.05). In comparison to baseline results, coverage at the midline survey had significantly increased, from 81% to 87% among the rural population, from 81% to 86% among women, from 73% to 85% in the ⩾55 years age group, from 71% to 80% among illiterates and from 73% to 81% in the south zone (P < 0.05). The equity gap among the different study groups (settlement, sex, age, education and zones) decreased from 6–23% at baseline to 3–11% during the midline survey. The maximum decline was observed for type of settlement (rural vs. urban), from 10% to 3% (P < 0.05). This community-driven TB control project has achieved high and equitable coverage of TB awareness, offering valuable lessons for the global community. PMID:26400604

  6. Determination of Urinary Neopterin/Creatinine Ratio to Distinguish Active Tuberculosis from Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael; Hargreaves, Dougal S.; Scott, Anne; Housley, David; Walters, Andrew; Mulla, Rohinton

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biomarkers to distinguish latent from active Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis infection in clinical practice are lacking. The urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio can quantify the systemic interferon-gamma effect in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. Methods. In a prospective observational study, urinary neopterin levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with active tuberculosis, in people with latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in healthy controls and the urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio was calculated. Results. We included a total of 44 patients with M. tuberculosis infection and nine controls. 12 patients had active tuberculosis (8 of them culture-confirmed). The median age was 15 years (range 4.5 to 49). Median urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio in patients with active tuberculosis was 374.1 micromol/mol (129.0 to 1072.3), in patients with latent M. tuberculosis infection it was 142.1 (28.0 to 384.1), and in controls it was 146.0 (40.3 to 200.0), with significantly higher levels in patients with active tuberculosis (p < 0.01). The receiver operating characteristics curve had an area under the curve of 0.84 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.97) (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Urinary neopterin/creatinine ratios are significantly higher in patients with active tuberculosis compared to patients with latent infection and may be a significant predictor of active tuberculosis in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27433370

  7. Economic Support to Patients in HIV and TB Grants in Rounds 7 and 10 from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Linda M.; Lönnroth, Knut; Desmond, Chris; Jackson, Robin; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Weil, Diana

    2014-01-01

    People with TB and/or HIV frequently experience severe economic barriers to health care, including out-of-pocket expenses related to diagnosis and treatment, as well as indirect costs due to loss of income. These barriers can both aggravate economic hardship and prevent or delay diagnosis, treatment and successful outcome, leading to increased transmission, morbidity and mortality. WHO, UNAIDS and the ILO argue that economic support of various kinds is essential to enable vulnerable people to protect themselves from infection, avoid delayed diagnosis and treatment, overcome barriers to adherence, and avert destitution. This paper analyses successful country proposals to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria that include economic support in Rounds 7 and 10; 36 and 20 HIV and TB grants in Round 7 and 32 and 26, respectively, in Round 10. Of these, up to 84 percent included direct or indirect economic support for beneficiaries, although the amount constituted a very small proportion of the total grant. In TB grants, the objectives of economic support were generally clearly stated, and focused on mechanisms to improve treatment uptake and adherence, and the case was most clearly made for MDR-TB patients. In HIV grants, the objectives were much broader in scope, including mitigation of adverse economic and social effects of HIV and its treatment on both patients and families. The analysis shows that economic support is on the radar for countries developing Global Fund proposals, and a wide range of economic support activities are in place. In order to move forward in this area, the wealth of country experience that exists needs to be collated, assessed and disseminated. In addition to trials, operational research and programme evaluations, more precise guidance to countries is needed to inform evidence-based decision about activities that are cost-effective, affordable and feasible. PMID:24489702

  8. The Prevalence Rate of Tuberculin Skin Test Positive by Contacts Group to Predict the Development of Active Tuberculosis After School Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jin; Chun, Byung Chul; Kwon, AmyM; Lee, Gyeong-Ho; Ryu, Sungweon; Oh, Soo Yeon; Lee, Jin Beom; Yoo, Se Hwa; Kim, Eui Sook; Kim, Je Hyeong; Shin, Chol

    2015-01-01

    Background The tuberculin skin test (TST) is the standard tool to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in mass screening. The aim of this study is to find an optimal cut-off point of the TST+ rate within tuberculosis (TB) contacts to predict the active TB development among adolescents in school TB outbreaks. Methods The Korean National Health Insurance Review and Assessment database was used to identify active TB development in relation to the initial TST (cut-off, 10 mm). The 7,475 contacts in 89 schools were divided into two groups: Incident TB group (43 schools) and no incident TB group (46 schools). LTBI treatment was initiated in 607 of the 1,761 TST+ contacts. The association with active TB progression was examined at different cut-off points of the TST+ rate. Results The mean duration of follow-up was 3.9±0.9 years. Thirty-three contacts developed active TB during the 4,504 person-years among the TST+ contacts without LTBI treatment (n=1,154). The average TST+ rate for the incident TB group (n=43) and no incident TB group (n=46) were 31.0% and 15.5%, respectively. The TST+ rate per group was related with TB progression (odds ratio [OR], 1.025; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.001-1.050; p=0.037). Based on the TST+ rate per group, active TB was best predicted at TST+ ≥ 16% (OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.29-7.51; area under curve, 0.64). Conclusion Sixteen percent of the TST+ rate per group within the same grade students can be suggested as an optimal cut-off to predict active TB development in middle and high schools TB outbreaks. PMID:26508922

  9. Impaired activation of Stat1 and c-Jun as a possible defect in macrophages of patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Solís, H; Quiñones-Falconi, F; Zarain-Herzberg, A; Amieva-Fernández, R I; López-Vidal, Y

    2009-10-01

    Studies of patients with active tuberculosis (TB) and infected healthy individuals have shown that interferon (IFN)-gamma is present in sites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in comparable levels. This suggests that there is a deficiency in the macrophage response to IFN-gamma in TB patients. We used recombinant human IFN-gamma to stimulate adherent monocyte-derived macrophages from three groups of people: patients with active tuberculosis (TBP), their healthy household contacts (HHC) and healthy uninfected controls from the community (CC). We then evaluated the ability of the macrophages to inhibit the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv as well as their cytokine profile at early in infection (48 h). After IFN-gamma treatment, macrophages of healthy individuals (HHC and CC) controlled M. tuberculosis growth and produced mainly nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin (IL)-12p70, whereas TBP macrophages did not kill M. tuberculosis. Additionally, TBP macrophages produced low levels of NO and IL-12p70 and high levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-10. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta levels were similar among all three groups. M. tuberculosis infection had little effect on the cytokine response after IFN-gamma stimulus, but infection alone induced more IL-10 and TGF-beta in TBP macrophages. There were no differences in Stat1 nuclear translocation and DNA binding between the groups. However, the phosphorylated Stat1 and c-Jun (AP-1) in nuclear protein extracts was diminished in TBP macrophages compared to macrophages of healthy individuals. These results indicate an impairment of Stat1-dependent and Stat1-independent IFN-gamma signalling in macrophages of people with active tuberculosis, suggesting a different molecular regulation that could impact macrophage functionality and disease outcome. PMID:19737230

  10. Predictive value of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-tuberculosis Gold In-Tube test for development of active tuberculosis in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Ekrem Cengiz; Gunluoglu, Gulşah; Gunluoglu, Mehmet Zeki; Tural, Seda; Sökücü, Sinem

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemodialysis (HD) patients are at increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) compared with the general population. QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) for LTBI detection is more promising than tuberculin skin test (TST) in HD patients. AIM: In our study, we evaluated the value of the TST and QFT-G In-Tube (QFG-IT) test in the development of active tuberculosis (TB), in the HD patients, and in healthy controls. METHODS: The study enrolled 95 HD patients and ninety age-matched, healthy controls. The TST and QFG-IT were performed. All the subjects were followed up 5 years for active TB disease. RESULTS: Compared to the healthy controls, a high prevalence of LTBI was found in the HD patients by QFG-IT (41% vs. 25%). However, no significant difference was detected by TST (32% vs. 31%). Four HD patients and one healthy control progressed to active TB disease within the 5-year follow-up. For active TB discovered subjects, QFG-IT was positive in all, but TST was positive in two (one patient and one healthy control). In HD patients; sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of QFG-IT, and TST for active TB was 100% and 25%, 62% and 67%, 10%, and 3%, and 100% and 95%, respectively. Receiver operating curve analysis revealed that the results are significantly different (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: QFG-IT test is a more useful diagnostic method than TST for detecting those who will progress to active TB in HD patients. PMID:27168859

  11. Adverse neuro-immune-endocrine interactions in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bottasso, Oscar; Bay, María Luisa; Besedovsky, Hugo; Del Rey, Adriana

    2013-03-01

    The nervous, endocrine and immune systems play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis and interact with each other for a successful defensive strategy against injurious agents. However, the situation is different in long-term diseases with marked inflammation, in which defensive mechanisms become altered. In the case of tuberculosis (TB), this is highlighted by several facts: an imbalance of plasma immune and endocrine mediators, that results in an adverse environment for mounting an adequate response against mycobacteria and controlling inflammation; the demonstration that dehidroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion by a human adrenal cell line can be inhibited by culture supernatants from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells - PBMC - of TB patients, with this effect being partly reverted when neutralizing transforming growth factor-β in such supernantants; the in vitro effects of adrenal steroids on the specific immune response of PBMC from TB patients, that is a cortisol inhibition of mycobacterial antigen-driven lymphoproliferation and interferon-γ production as well as a suppression of TGF-β production in DHEA-treated PBMC; and lastly the demonstration that immune and endocrine compounds participating in the regulation of energy sources and immune activity correlated with the consumption state of TB patients. Collectively, immune-endocrine disturbances of TB patients are involved in critical components of disease pathology with implications in the impaired clinical status and unfavorable disease outcome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroinflammation in neurodegeneration and neurodysfunction'. PMID:23147110

  12. The association between sterilizing activity and drug distribution into tuberculosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Prideaux, Brendan; Via, Laura E.; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Eum, Seokyong; Sarathy, Jansy; O’Brien, Paul; Chen, Chao; Kaya, Firat; Weiner, Danielle M.; Chen, Pei-Yu; Song, Taeksun; Lee, Myungsun; Shim, TaeSun; Cho, Jeong Su; Kim, Wooshik; Cho, Sang Nae; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Barry, Clifton E.; Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Finding new treatment-shortening antibiotics to improve cure rates and curb the alarming emergence of drug resistance is the major objective of tuberculosis (TB) drug development. Using a MALDI mass spectrometry imaging suite in a biosafety containment facility, we show that the key sterilizing drugs rifampicin and pyrazinamide efficiently penetrate the sites of TB infection in lung lesions. Rifampicin even accumulates in necrotic caseum, a critical lesion site where persisting tubercle bacilli reside1. In contrast, moxifloxacin which is active in vitro against persisters, a sub-population of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that persists in specific niches under drug pressure, and achieved treatment shortening in mice2, does not diffuse well in caseum, concordant with its failure to shorten therapy in recent clinical trials. We also suggest that such differential spatial distribution and kinetics of accumulation in lesions may create temporal and spatial windows of monotherapy in specific niches, allowing the gradual development of multidrug resistant TB. We propose an alternative working model to prioritize new antibiotic regimens based on quantitative and spatial distribution of TB drugs in the major lesion types found in human lungs. The finding that lesion penetration contributes to treatment outcome has wide implications for TB. PMID:26343800

  13. Highly active antiretroviral therapy and tuberculosis control in Africa: synergies and potential.

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Hargreaves, Nicola J.; Chimzizi, Rehab; Salaniponi, Felix M.

    2002-01-01

    HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and TB (tuberculosis) are two of the world's major pandemics, the brunt of which falls on sub-Saharan Africa. Efforts aimed at controlling HIV/AIDS have largely focused on prevention, little attention having been paid to care. Work on TB control has concentrated on case detection and treatment. HIV infection has complicated the control of tuberculosis. There is unlikely to be a decline in the number of cases of TB unless additional strategies are developed to control both this disease and HIV simultaneously. Such strategies would include active case-finding in situations where TB transmission is high, the provision of a package of care for HIV-related illness, and the application of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The latter is likely to have the greatest impact, but for this therapy to become more accessible in Africa the drugs would have to be made available through international support and a programme structure would have to be developed for its administration. It could be delivered by means of a structure based on the five-point strategy called DOTS, which has been adopted for TB control. However, it may be unrealistic to give TB control programmes the responsibility for running such a programme. A better approach might be to deliver highly active antiretroviral therapy within a comprehensive HIV/AIDS management strategy complementing the preventive work already being undertaken by AIDS control programmes. TB programmes could contribute towards the development and implementation of this strategy. PMID:12132003

  14. The increased risk of active tuberculosis disease in patients with dermatomyositis – a nationwide retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping-Hsun; Lin, Yi-Ting; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Yu-Chih; Lin, Yi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    The risk of active tuberculosis (TB) in patients with dermatomyositis (DM) is poorly understood. The cohort study aimed to investigate the association between DM and the risk of active TB disease. We conducted a population based study on 4,958 patients with newly diagnosed DM and 19,832 matched controls according to age, sex, and index date between 1998 and 2008. The hazard ratios (HRs) and cumulative incidences of active TB disease between DM patients and controls were analyzed. During the study period, a total of 85 (1.7%) DM patients developed active TB disease, which was significantly higher than that of non-DM patients (0.64%). The incidence rate of active TB disease was higher among DM patients than controls (incidence rate ratio 2.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.24 to 3.88). The Cox regression model demonstrated significantly higher active TB disease rate among DM patients compared with controls (adjusted HR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.97 to 3.54; p < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, and underlying medical disorders. The most significant risk factors for developing active TB included male sex, diabetes mellitus comorbidity, and use of corticosteroids and azathioprine in DM patients. In conclusion, DM patients are at a greater risk for active TB disease. PMID:26573418

  15. Predictors of tuberculosis (TB) and antiretroviral (ARV) medication non-adherence in public primary care patients in South Africa: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the downward trend in the absolute number of tuberculosis (TB) cases since 2006 and the fall in the incidence rates since 2001, the burden of disease caused by TB remains a global health challenge. The co-infection between TB and HIV adds to this disease burden. TB is completely curable through the intake of a strict anti-TB drug treatment regimen which requires an extremely high and consistent level of adherence.The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with adherence to anti-TB and HIV treatment drugs. Methods A cross-sectional survey method was used. Three study districts (14 primary health care facilities in each) were selected on the basis of the highest TB caseload per clinic. All new TB and new TB retreatment patients were consecutively screened within one month of anti-tuberculosis treatment. The sample comprised of 3107 TB patients who had been on treatment for at least three weeks and a sub-sample of the total sample were on both anti-TB treatment and anti-retro-viral therapy(ART) (N = 757). Data collection tools included: a Socio-Demographic Questionnaire; a Post-Traumatic-Stress-Disorder (PTSD) Screen; a Psychological Distress Scale; the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT); and self-report measures of tobacco use, perceived health status and adherence to anti-TB drugs and ART. Results The majority of the participants (N = 3107) were new TB cases with a 55.9% HIV co-infection rate in this adult male and female sample 18 years and older. Significant predictors of non-adherence common to both anti-TB drugs and to dual therapy (ART and anti-TB drugs) included poverty, having one or more co-morbid health condition, being a high risk for alcohol mis-use and a partner who is HIV positive. An additional predictor for non-adherence to anti-TB drugs was tobacco use. Conclusions A comprehensive treatment programme addressing poverty, alcohol mis-use, tobacco use and psycho-social counseling is indicated

  16. Untreated Active Tuberculosis in Pregnancy with Intraocular Dissemination: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    LoBue, Stephen; Adams, Daniel; Oladipo, Yewande; Posso, Ramses; Mapp, Tiffany; Santiago, Crystal; Jain, Manisha; Marino, William D.; Henderson, Cassandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease that affects hundreds of millions of people across the world. However, the incidence in developed countries has decreased over the past decades causing physicians to become unfamiliar with its unspecific symptoms. Pregnant individuals are especially difficult because many symptoms of active TB can mimic normal physiological changes of pregnancy. We present a case report of a 26-year-old multiparous woman, G4P3003, at 38-week gestation with a history of positive PPD who emigrated from Ghana 6 years ago. She came to the hospital with an initial complaint of suprapubic pain, pressure, and possible leakage of amniotic fluid for the past week. Patient also complained of a productive cough for the past 3 to 4 months with a decrease in vision occurring with the start of pregnancy. Visual acuity was worse than 20/200 in both eyes. Definitive diagnosis of active TB was delayed due to patient refusal of chest X-ray. Fortunately, delay in diagnosis was minimized since patient delivered within 24 hours of admission. Active TB was confirmed with intraocular dissemination. Patient had optic atrophy OS (left eye) and papillitis, choroiditis, and uveitis OD (right eye) due to TB infiltration. Fetus was asymptomatic and anti-TB therapy was started for both patients. PMID:26693374

  17. The use of Quantiferon-TB gold in-tube test in screening latent tuberculosis among Saudi Arabia dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Wakeel, Jamal Saleh; Makoshi, Ziyad; Al Ghonaim, Mohammed; Al Harbi, Ali; Al Suwaida, Abdulkareem; Algahtani, Farjah; Al Hedaithy, Mogbil; Almogairin, Sultan; Abdullah, Sami

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Screening for tuberculosis (TB) is a key strategy for controlling infection. This study aimed to detect latent TB among dialysis patients. METHODS: This is a prospective study conducted in King Saud University, Riyadh involving hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients aged ≥18 years. Patients were screened for latent TB infection (LTBI) using both TBskin test (TST) and QuantiFERONTB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT). All participants were followed-up clinically and radiologically every 3 months for 2 years. RESULTS: A total of 243 (181 HD and 62 PD) patients were included and 112(46.1%) were males. 45.3% showed positive QFT in HD patients with sensitivity of 91.7%, specificity of 71.4%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 19.5%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 91.1%. TST results in HD showed that positive TST was 17.4%, sensitivity was 63.2%, specificity was 95.5%, PPV was 51.5%, and NPV was 91.1%. Five (8.1%) showed positive QFT in PD patients with sensitivity of 7.7%, specificity of 91.8%, PPV of 6.6%, and NPV of 92.3%. TST results in PD showed that positive TST was 9.8%, sensitivity was 35.7%, specificity was 97.9%, PPV was 55.8%, and NPV was 93.3%. Previous TB infection was significantly correlated with QFT only in HD patients, but significantly associated with TST in both HD and PD patients. Also in HD, QFT was significantly associated with TST (P = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS: Due to high variability of QFT-GIT sensitivity, we recommend its use for its NPV and to use either TST or QFT in screening latent TB. PMID:26664568

  18. Suppressed Type 1, Type 2, and Type 17 Cytokine Responses in Active Tuberculosis in Children ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Pavan; Anuradha, R.; Suresh, R.; Ganesh, R.; Shankar, Janani; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 cytokine responses are known to play an important role in immunity to tuberculosis (TB) in children, although little is known about other factors that might be important. In addition, children are more prone to developing extrapulmonary manifestations of TB than adults. To identify the immune responses important both in control of infection and in extrapulmonary dissemination, we examined mycobacterium-specific cytokine responses of children with pulmonary TB (PTB) and extrapulmonary TB (ETB) and compared them with those of healthy control children (HC). No significant differences were found in the cytokine responses either with no stimulation or following mycobacterial-antigen (Ag) stimulation between children with PTB and ETB. On the other hand, children with active TB compared with HC showed markedly diminished production of type 1 (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]), 2 (interleukin 4 [IL-4] and IL-13), and 17 (IL-17A, IL-21, and IL-23)-associated cytokines with no stimulation and in response to mycobacterial antigens. This was not associated with significantly altered production of IL-10 or transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). Among children with ETB, those with neurologic involvement exhibited more significantly diminished Ag-driven IFN-γ and IL-17 production. Pediatric TB is characterized by diminished type 1, 2, and 17 cytokine responses, with the most profound diminution favoring development of neurologic TB, suggesting a crucial role for these cytokines in protection against pediatric tuberculosis. PMID:21955625

  19. Tuberculosis Treatment Non-Adherence and Lost to Follow Up among TB Patients with or without HIV in Developing Countries: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    TOLA, Habteyes Hailu; TOL, Azar; SHOJAEIZADEH, Davoud; GARMAROUDI, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This systematic review intended to combine factors associated with tuberculosis treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up among TB patients with/without HIV in developing countries. Comprehensive remote electronic databases (MEDLINE, (PMC, Pub Med Central), Google scholar and Web of science) search was conducted using the following keywords: Tuberculosis, treatment, compliance, adherence, default, behavioural factors and socioeconomic factors. All types of studies intended to assess TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up in developing countries among adult TB patient from 2008 to data extraction date were included. Twenty-six original and one-reviewed articles, which meet inclusion criteria, were reviewed. TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were continued across developing countries. The main factors associated with TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were socioeconomic factors: lack of transportation cost, lack of social support, and patients-health care worker poor communication. Behavioural factors were Feeling better after few weeks of treatments, tobacco and alcohol use, knowledge deficit about duration of treatment and consequences of non-adherence and lost to follow up. TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were continued across developing countries throughout the publication years of reviewed articles. Numerous, socioeconomic and behavioural factors were influencing TB treatment adherence and lost to follow up. Therefore, well understanding and minimizing of the effect of these associated factors is very important to enhance treatment adherence and follow up completion in developing countries. PMID:26060770

  20. Tuberculosis Treatment Non-Adherence and Lost to Follow Up among TB Patients with or without HIV in Developing Countries: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tola, Habteyes Hailu; Tol, Azar; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Garmaroudi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review intended to combine factors associated with tuberculosis treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up among TB patients with/without HIV in developing countries. Comprehensive remote electronic databases (MEDLINE, (PMC, Pub Med Central), Google scholar and Web of science) search was conducted using the following keywords: Tuberculosis, treatment, compliance, adherence, default, behavioural factors and socioeconomic factors. All types of studies intended to assess TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up in developing countries among adult TB patient from 2008 to data extraction date were included. Twenty-six original and one-reviewed articles, which meet inclusion criteria, were reviewed. TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were continued across developing countries. The main factors associated with TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were socioeconomic factors: lack of transportation cost, lack of social support, and patients-health care worker poor communication. Behavioural factors were Feeling better after few weeks of treatments, tobacco and alcohol use, knowledge deficit about duration of treatment and consequences of non-adherence and lost to follow up. TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were continued across developing countries throughout the publication years of reviewed articles. Numerous, socioeconomic and behavioural factors were influencing TB treatment adherence and lost to follow up. Therefore, well understanding and minimizing of the effect of these associated factors is very important to enhance treatment adherence and follow up completion in developing countries. PMID:26060770

  1. Hepatitis C Virus Infection Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Active Tuberculosis Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping-Hsun; Lin, Yi-Ting; Hsieh, Kun-Pin; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Sheu, Chau-Chyun

    2015-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection contribute to major disease mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, the causal link between HCV infection and TB risk remains unclear. We conducted a population-based cohort study to elucidate the association between HCV infection and TB disease by analyzing Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. We enrolled 5454 persons with HCV infection and 54,274 age- and sex-matched non-HCV-infected persons between January 1998 and December 2007. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to measure the association between HCV infection and active TB disease. Incidence rate of active TB disease was higher among HCV infection than in control (134.1 vs 89.1 per 100,000 person-years; incidence rate ratio 1.51; P = 0.014). HCV infection was significantly associated with active TB disease in multivariate Cox regression (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 3.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.85-5.53; P < 0.001) and competing death risk event analysis (adjusted HR 2.11; 95% CI, 1.39-3.20; P < 0.001). Multivariate stratified analysis further revealed that HCV infection was a risk of active TB disease in most strata. This nationwide cohort study suggests that HCV infection is associated with a higher risk of developing active TB disease. PMID:26287416

  2. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in Hiv-positive adults

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a global health priority. HIV-associated TB may have different clinical presentations and is challenging to diagnose. Conventional sputum tests have reduced sensitivity in HIV-positive individuals, who have higher rates of extrapulmonary TB compared with HIV-negative individuals. The lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) is a new, commercially available point-of-care test that detects lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a lipopolysaccharide present in mycobacterial cell walls, in people with active TB disease. Objectives To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM for the diagnosis of active TB disease in HIV-positive adults who have signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB diagnosis).To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM as a screening test for active TB disease in HIV-positive adults irrespective of signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB screening). Search methods We searched the following databases without language restriction on 5 February 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE (PubMed,1966); EMBASE (OVID, from 1980); Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, from 1900), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, from 1900), and BIOSIS Previews (from 1926) (all three using the Web of Science platform; MEDION; LILACS (BIREME, from 1982); SCOPUS (from 1995); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&l (from 1861). Selection criteria Eligible study types included randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional studies, and cohort studies that determined LF-LAM accuracy for TB against a microbiological reference standard (culture or nucleic acid amplification test from any body site). A higher quality reference standard was one in which two or more specimen types were

  3. Tracking and Treating Mobile Populations. The TB Net System. Migrant Clinicians Network Monograph Series. = El Sistema de Red para la TB.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migrant Clinicians Network, Inc., Austin, TX.

    A comprehensive tracking and referral network that helps provide continuity of care for mobile populations with active tuberculosis (TB) or TB infection is considered essential for effective treatment of TB. However, the interstate referral system that exists between state health departments has been highly inefficient for serving migrant…

  4. Transformation of cinnamic acid from trans- to cis-form raises a notable bactericidal and synergistic activity against multiple-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ling; Huang, Shao-Tsung; Sun, Fang-Ming; Chiang, Yu-Ling; Chiang, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Chiung-Man; Weng, Chia-Jui

    2011-06-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The long course of treatments on TB with a combination of antibiotics leads unfavorable side effects and poor patient compliance which contributes to sustaining multiple-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Therefore, the development of a new effective drug or synergist to reduce the prevalence of MDR-TB is urgent to date. Cinnamic acid (CA) is a natural occurring phenolic compound with anti-microbial activity. Both trans- and cis-isoforms of CA exist in planta, and cis-cinnamic acid (c-CA) can be transformed from trans-cinnamic acid (t-CA) under sunlight. Due to the unavailability of c-CA, the literature regarding the biological functions of c-CA is still limited. We had previously developed a practicable method for the transformation of c-CA from t-CA and the isolation of c-CA. Using the techniques, sufficient c-CA was obtained to evaluate its antituberculosis activity against a MDR M. tuberculosis strain. Moreover, the synergistic effects of c-CA and t-CA with two first-line anti-TB antibiotics, isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF), were also determined. Although both of c-CA and t-CA decreased the viability of MDR-TB bacilli in a dose-dependent manner, the antituberculosis activity of c-CA was approximately 120-fold of t-CA. Furthermore, the c-CA exhibited higher synergistic effect with INH or RIF against tuberculosis than t-CA. The micrographs of scanning electron microscope (SEM) display that c-CA caused an injury on the out-layer of MDR-TB bacilli. The c-CA might be a potential anti-mycobacterial or synergistic agent that can be developed to against tuberculosis. PMID:21536127

  5. Specificity of the Tuberculin Skin Test and the T-SPOT."TB" Assay among Students in a Low-Tuberculosis Incidence Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Elizabeth A.; Harland, Dawn; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Burrer, Sherry; Adams, Lisa V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Interferon-[gamma] release assays (IGRAs) are an important tool for detecting latent "Mycobacterium tuberculosis" infection (LTBI). Insufficient data exist about IGRA specificity in college health centers, most of which screen students for LTBI using the tuberculin skin test (TST). Participants: Students at a low-TB incidence college…

  6. Stereochemical Analysis of Leubethanol, an Anti-TB Active Serrulatane, from Leucophyllum frutescens

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Salinas, Gloria M.; Rivas-Galindo, Verónica M.; Said-Fernández, Salvador; Lankin, David C.; Muñoz, Marcelo A.; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro; Pauli, Guido F.; Waksman, Noemí

    2013-01-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the methanolic root bark extract of Leucophyllum frutescens (Berl.) I.M. Johnst. led to the identification of leubethanol (1), a new serrulatane-type diterpene with activity against both multi drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Leubethanol (1) was identified by 1D/2D NMR data, as a serrulatane closely related to erogorgiane (2), and exhibited anti-TB activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations in the range 6.25–12.50 µg/mL. Stereochemical evidence for 1 was gleaned from 1D and 2D NOE experiments, 1H-NMR full spin analysis, as well as by comparison of the experimental vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectrum to density functional theory calculated VCD spectra of two diastereomers. PMID:21859082

  7. Mechanistic insights on immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Esaki M; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Larsson, Marie

    2015-02-12

    Immunosenescence is marked by accelerated degradation of host immune responses leading to the onset of opportunistic infections, where senescent T cells show remarkably higher ontogenic defects as compared to healthy T cells. The mechanistic association between T-cell immunosenescence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, and functional T-cell responses in HIV-tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection remains to be elaborately discussed. Here, we discussed the association of immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-TB co-infection and reviewed the role played by mediators of immune deterioration in HIV-TB co-infection necessitating the importance of designing therapeutic strategies against HIV disease progression and pathogenesis. PMID:25674514

  8. Differences between TB cases infected with M. africanum, West-African type 2, relative to Euro-American M. tuberculosis- an update

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Bouke C; Adetifa, Ifedayo; Walther, Brigitte; Hill, Philip C; Antonio, Martin; Ota, Martin; Adegbola, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    M. africanum is a common cause of human pulmonary TB in West Africa. We previously described phenotypic differences between M. africanum and M. tuberculosis among 290 patients. In the present analysis we compared 692 TB patients infected with the two most common lineages within the M. tuberculosis complex found in the Gambia, namely M. africanum West African type 2 (39% prevalence) and Euro American M. tuberculosis (55% prevalence). We identified additional phenotypic differences between infections with these two organisms. M. africanum patients were more likely to be of older age and HIV infected. In addition, they had worse disease on chest x-ray, despite complaining of cough for equal duration, and were more likely severely malnourished. In this cohort the prevalence of M. africanum did not change significantly over a seven year period. PMID:20002176

  9. IL-10 Dependent Suppression of Type 1, Type 2 and Type 17 Cytokines in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Gopinath, Venugopal; Sridhar, Rathinam; Hanna, Luke E.; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Jawahar, Mohideen S.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2013-01-01

    Background Although Type 1 cytokine responses are considered protective in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), their role as well as those of Type 2, 17 and immunoregulatory cytokines in tuberculous lymphadenitis (TBL) and latent tuberculosis (LTB) have not been well studied. Aim and Methods To identify cytokine responses associated with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), TB lymphadenitits and latent TB, we examined mycobacterial antigen-specific immune responses of PTB, TBL and LTB individuals. More specifically, we examined ESAT-6 and CFP-10 induced Type 1, Type 2 and Type 17 cytokine production and their regulation using multiplex ELISA. Results PTB individuals exhibited a significantly lower baseline as well as antigen-specific production of Type 1 (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2); Type 2 (IL-4) and Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines in comparison to both TBL and LTB individuals. TBL individuals exhibited significantly lower antigen-specific IFNγ responses alone in comparison to LTB individuals. Although, IL-10 levels were not significantly higher, neutralization of IL-10 during antigen stimulation resulted in significantly enhanced production of IFNγ, IL-4 and IL-17A in PTB individuals, indicating that IL-10 mediates (at least partially) the suppression of cytokine responses in PTB. Conclusion Pulmonary TB is characterized by an IL-10 dependent antigen-specific suppression of Type 1, Type 2 and Type 17 cytokines, reflecting an important association of these cytokines in the pathogenesis of active TB. PMID:23544075

  10. QuantiFERON-TB Gold and Tuberculin Skin Test for the Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi Asl, Hossein; Alborzi, Abdolvahab; Pourabbas, Bahman; Kalani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) play the most important role in the control of tuberculosis. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of LTBI among healthy tuberculosis unexposed children vaccinated with BCG using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and comparing the agreement between the two tests. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out between October 2009 and March 2010 in 24 schools and 11 daycare centers. A total of 967 children were divided into 15 age groups, with a minimum of 64 children per group. Results: The prevalence rates of LTBI with TST were 3.8%, and 2.2% with QFT-GIT. One case was positive in TST and QFT-GIT, 20 cases were QFT-GIT positive, but TST negative and 36 cases were TST positive, but QFT-GIT negative, and finally, 910 cases were negative in both. There was poor agreement between TST and QFT-GIT (1.8%, 95%, CI: 0%-5.3%, k=0.007). The specificity of QFT-GIT in the BCG vaccinated, children aged 1-15 years old, was 97.8% (97.8%, 95% CI: 96.8%-98.8%). After three months, 2/17 (11.8%) of those initially QFT-GIT negative converted, and 10/15 (66%) of those initially QFT-GIT positive reverted. Conclusion: It seems that TST and QFT-GIT are not appropriate tests for the diagnosis of LTBI among healthy tuberculosis unexposed BCG vaccinated children. There was a low reproducibility rate of QFT-GIT. The cause of the the poor agreement requires further studies. PMID:26379347

  11. Socio-Demographic Predictors and Distribution of Pulmonary Tuberculosis (TB) in Xinjiang, China: A Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wubuli, Atikaimu; Xue, Feng; Jiang, Daobin; Yao, Xuemei; Upur, Halmurat; Wushouer, Qimanguli

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Xinjiang is one of the high TB burden provinces of China. A spatial analysis was conducted using geographical information system (GIS) technology to improve the understanding of geographic variation of the pulmonary TB occurrence in Xinjiang, its predictors, and to search for targeted interventions. Methods Numbers of reported pulmonary TB cases were collected at county/district level from TB surveillance system database. Population data were extracted from Xinjiang Statistical Yearbook (2006~2014). Spatial autocorrelation (or dependency) was assessed using global Moran’s I statistic. Anselin’s local Moran’s I and local Getis-Ord statistics were used to detect local spatial clusters. Ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, spatial lag model (SLM) and geographically-weighted regression (GWR) models were used to explore the socio-demographic predictors of pulmonary TB incidence from global and local perspectives. SPSS17.0, ArcGIS10.2.2, and GeoDA software were used for data analysis. Results Incidence of sputum smear positive (SS+) TB and new SS+TB showed a declining trend from 2005 to 2013. Pulmonary TB incidence showed a declining trend from 2005 to 2010 and a rising trend since 2011 mainly caused by the rising trend of sputum smear negative (SS-) TB incidence (p<0.0001). Spatial autocorrelation analysis showed the presence of positive spatial autocorrelation for pulmonary TB incidence, SS+TB incidence and SS-TB incidence from 2005 to 2013 (P <0.0001). The Anselin’s Local Moran’s I identified the “hotspots” which were consistently located in the southwest regions composed of 20 to 28 districts, and the “coldspots” which were consistently located in the north central regions consisting of 21 to 27 districts. Analysis with the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic expanded the scope of “hotspots” and “coldspots” with different intensity; 30 county/districts clustered as “hotspots”, while 47 county/districts clustered as

  12. Latent Tuberculosis in Health Care Workers Exposed to Active Tuberculosis in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Khamis, Faryal; Al-Lawati, Adil; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al-Abri, Seif; Al-Naamani, Jaleelah; Al-Harthi, Harith; Al-Jardani, Amina; Al-Harthi, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Data on the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in healthcare workers (HCW) in Oman and the Arabian Gulf is scarce. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis (LTB) among HCW exposed to active TB in one of the tertiary care hospitals in Muscat. Methods Exposed HCW were screened for LTB from January to June 2012 using skin tuberculin and serum interferon tests. Candidates were followed-up for a total of nine months. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Results A total of 371 exposed HCW were involved in the study. The incidence of LTB in exposed HCW was 33.2% (n = 123). Almost 54% (66/123) of the HCW started treatment and only 42.4% (28/66) completed the full nine-month treatment course. Conclusions The high prevalence of LTBI in exposed HCW merits further evaluation of the screening and treatment programs in the country. Future countrywide studies are warranted to provide more precise statistics on the prevalence and management of this public health issue. PMID:27403243

  13. Neuron-specific enolase as a novel biomarker reflecting tuberculosis activity and treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sung-Jin; Jeong, Jee-Yeong; Jang, Tae-Won; Jung, Mann-Hong; Chun, Bong-Kwon; Cha, Hee-Jae; Oak, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: It is not clear which tests are indicative of the activity and severity of tuberculosis (TB). This study aimed to investigate the predictive value of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and to determine the origin of NSE in TB patients. Methods: A single-center retrospective analysis was conducted on newly diagnosed TB patients between January and December 2010. Patients were categorized into one of two disease groups (focal segmental or extensive) based on chest X-ray. Pre- and post-treatment NSE concentrations were evaluated. To determine the origin of serum NSE concentration, NSE staining was compared with macrophage-specific CD68 staining in lung tissues and with a tissue microarray using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Results: A total of 60 newly diagnosed TB patients were analyzed. In TB patients, NSE serum concentration was significantly increased and NSE level decreased after treatment (p < 0.001). In proportion to serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration, the mean serum concentration of NSE in the extensive group (25.12 ng/mL) was significantly higher than that in the focal segmental group (20.23 ng/mL, p = 0.04). Immunohistochemical staining revealed a large number of macrophages that stained positively for both NSE and CD68 in TB tissues. In addition, NSE signals mostly co-localized with CD68 signals in the tissue microarray of TB patients. Conclusions: Our results suggest that NSE may be a practical parameter that can be used to monitor TB activity and treatment response. Elevated serum NSE level originates, at least in part, from macrophages in granulomatous lesions. PMID:27271274

  14. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Peptides in the Exosomes of Patients with Active and Latent M. tuberculosis Infection Using MRM-MS

    PubMed Central

    Kruh-Garcia, Nicole A.; Wolfe, Lisa M.; Chaisson, Lelia H.; Worodria, William O.; Nahid, Payam; Schorey, Jeff S.; Davis, J. Lucian; Dobos, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of easily measured, accurate diagnostic biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) will have a significant impact on global TB control efforts. Because of the host and pathogen complexities involved in TB pathogenesis, identifying a single biomarker that is adequately sensitive and specific continues to be a major hurdle. Our previous studies in models of TB demonstrated that exosomes, such as those released from infected macrophages, contain mycobacterial products, including many Mtb proteins. In this report, we describe the development of targeted proteomics assays employing multiplexed multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) in order to allow us to follow those proteins previously identified by western blot or shotgun mass spectrometry, and enhance biomarker discovery to include detection of Mtb proteins in human serum exosomes. Targeted MRM-MS assays were applied to exosomes isolated from human serum samples obtained from culture-confirmed active TB patients to detect 76 peptides representing 33 unique Mtb proteins. Our studies revealed the first identification of bacteria-derived biomarker candidates of active TB in exosomes from human serum. Twenty of the 33 proteins targeted for detection were found in the exosomes of TB patients, and included multiple peptides from 8 proteins (Antigen 85B, Antigen 85C, Apa, BfrB, GlcB, HspX, KatG, and Mpt64). Interestingly, all of these proteins are known mycobacterial adhesins and/or proteins that contribute to the intracellular survival of Mtb. These proteins will be included as target analytes in future validation studies as they may serve as markers for persistent active and latent Mtb infection. In summary, this work is the first step in identifying a unique and specific panel of Mtb peptide biomarkers encapsulated in exosomes and reveals complex biomarker patterns across a spectrum of TB disease states. PMID:25080351

  15. [New Drugs for the Treatment of Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB)].

    PubMed

    Schaberg, T; Otto-Knapp, R; Bauer, T

    2015-05-01

    This article summarizes the state of development of new drugs for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. We focused on delamanid, bedaquiline, pretomanid, SQ 109 and sutezolid. PMID:25970122

  16. Systematic Expression Profiling Analysis Identifies Specific MicroRNA-Gene Interactions that May Differentiate between Active and Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Huang, Kai-Yao; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second most common cause of death from infectious diseases. About 90% of those infected are asymptomatic—the so-called latent TB infections (LTBI), with a 10% lifetime chance of progressing to active TB. To further understand the molecular pathogenesis of TB, several molecular studies have attempted to compare the expression profiles between healthy controls and active TB or LTBI patients. However, the results vary due to diverse genetic backgrounds and study designs and the inherent complexity of the disease process. Thus, developing a sensitive and efficient method for the detection of LTBI is both crucial and challenging. For the present study, we performed a systematic analysis of the gene and microRNA profiles of healthy individuals versus those affected with TB or LTBI. Combined with a series of in silico analysis utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and published literature data, we have uncovered several microRNA-gene interactions that specifically target both the blood and lungs. Some of these molecular interactions are novel and may serve as potential biomarkers of TB and LTBI, facilitating the development for a more sensitive, efficient, and cost-effective diagnostic assay for TB and LTBI for the Taiwanese population. PMID:25276827

  17. Identifying an active case of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, G; Alarcon, E; Jittimanee, S; Walusimbi, M; Sebek, M; Berga, E; Villa, T S

    2008-04-01

    The best practice standards set out in chapter 2 of the Best Practice guide focus on the various aspects of identifying an active case of TB and aim to address some of the challenges associated with case detection. The importance of developing a good relationship with the patient from the start, when he or she is often most vulnerable, is emphasised. The first standard focuses on the assessment of someone who might have TB and the second gives detailed guidance about the collection of sputum for diagnosis. The standards are aimed at the health care worker, who assesses the patient when he or she presents at a health care facility and therefore needs to be familiar with the signs, symptoms and risk factors associated with TB. Having suspected TB, the health care worker then needs to ensure that the correct tests are ordered and procedures are followed so that the best quality samples possible are sent to the laboratory and all documentation is filled out clearly and correctly. The successful implementation of these standards can be measured by the accurate and prompt reporting of results, the registration of every case detected and the continued attendance of every patient who needs treatment. PMID:18371262

  18. Rifapentine Is Not More Active than Rifampin against Chronic Tuberculosis in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.; Illei, Peter B.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Pinn, Michael L.; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E.; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2012-01-01

    Rifamycins are key sterilizing drugs in the current treatment of active tuberculosis (TB). Daily dosing of rifapentine (P), a potent rifamycin with high intracellular accumulation, in place of rifampin (R) in the standard antitubercular regimen significantly shortens the duration of treatment needed to prevent relapse in a murine model of active TB. We undertook the current study to compare directly the activities of human-equivalent doses of P and R in a guinea pig model of chronic TB, in which bacilli are predominantly extracellular within human-like necrotic granulomas. Hartley strain guinea pigs were aerosol infected with ∼200 bacilli of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and treatment given 5 days/week was initiated 6 weeks later. R at 100 mg/kg of body weight and P at 100 mg/kg were given orally alone or in combination with isoniazid (H) at 60 mg/kg and pyrazinamide (Z) at 300 mg/kg. Culture-positive relapse was assessed in subgroups of guinea pigs after completion of 1 and 2 months of treatment. Human-equivalent doses of R and P showed equivalent bactericidal activity when used alone and in combination therapy. In guinea pigs treated with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide (RHZ) or PHZ, microbiological relapse occurred in the lungs of 8/10 animals treated for 1 month and in 0/10 animals treated for 2 months. Substitution of P for R in the standard antitubercular regimen did not shorten the time to cure in this guinea pig model of chronic TB. Data from ongoing clinical trials comparing the activity of these two drugs are awaited to determine the relevance of the guinea pig TB model in preclinical drug screening. PMID:22547623

  19. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  20. The association between the ratio of monocytes:lymphocytes at age 3 months and risk of tuberculosis (TB) in the first two years of life

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent transcriptomic studies revived a hypothesis suggested by historical studies in rabbits that the ratio of peripheral blood monocytes to lymphocytes (ML) is associated with risk of tuberculosis (TB) disease. Recent data confirmed the hypothesis in cattle and in adults infected with HIV. Methods We tested this hypothesis in 1,336 infants (540 HIV-infected, 796 HIV-exposed, uninfected (HEU)) prospectively followed in a randomized controlled trial of isoniazid prophylaxis in Southern Africa, the IMPAACT P1041 study. We modeled the relationship between ML ratio at enrollment (91 to 120 days after birth) and TB disease or death in HIV-infected children and latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection, TB disease or death in HEU children within 96 weeks (with 12 week window) of randomization. Infants were followed-up prospectively and routinely assessed for MTB exposure and outcomes. Cox proportional hazards models allowing for non-linear associations were used; in all cases linear models were the most parsimonious. Results Increasing ML ratio at baseline was significantly associated with TB disease/death within two years (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.17 per unit increase in ML ratio; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.34; P = 0.03). Neither monocyte count nor lymphocyte counts alone were associated with TB disease. The association was not statistically dissimilar between HIV infected and HEU children. Baseline ML ratio was associated with composite endpoints of TB disease and death and/or TB infection. It was strongest when restricted to probable and definite TB disease (HR 1.50; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.89; P = 0.006). Therefore, per 0.1 unit increase in the ML ratio at three to four months of age, the hazard of probable or definite TB disease before two years was increased by roughly 4% (95% CI 1.7% to 6.6%). Conclusion Elevated ML ratio at three- to four-months old is associated with increased hazards of TB disease before two years among

  1. Increased Risk of Active Tuberculosis following Acute Kidney Injury: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsui; Huang, Hui-Yu; Huang, Tao-Min; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Meng-Chun; Ko, Wen-Je; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Yu, Chong-Jen; Shu, Chin-Chung; Lee, Chih-Hsin; Wang, Jann-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Profound alterations in immune responses associated with uremia and exacerbated by dialysis increase the risk of active tuberculosis (TB). Evidence of the long-term risk and outcome of active TB after acute kidney injury (AKI) is limited. Methods This population-based-cohort study used claim records retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. We retrieved records of all hospitalized patients, more than 18 years, who underwent dialysis for acute kidney injury (AKI) during 1999–2008 and validated using the NSARF data. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model to adjust for the ongoing effect of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was conducted to predict long-term de novo active TB after discharge from index hospitalization. Results Out of 2,909 AKI dialysis patients surviving 90 days after index discharge, 686 did not require dialysis after hospital discharge. The control group included 11,636 hospital patients without AKI, dialysis, or history of TB. The relative risk of active TB in AKI dialysis patients, relative to the general population, after a mean follow-up period of 3.6 years was 7.71. Patients who did (hazard ratio [HR], 3.84; p<0.001) and did not (HR, 6.39; p<0.001) recover from AKI requiring dialysis had significantly higher incidence of TB than patients without AKI. The external validated data also showed nonrecovery subgroup (HR = 4.37; p = 0.049) had high risk of developing active TB compared with non-AKI. Additionally, active TB was associated with long-term all-cause mortality after AKI requiring dialysis (HR, 1.34; p = 0.032). Conclusions AKI requiring dialysis seems to independently increase the long-term risk of active TB, even among those who weaned from dialysis at discharge. These results raise concerns that the increasing global burden of AKI will in turn increase the incidence of active TB. PMID:23936044

  2. Gamma Interferon Assays Used in the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient disease that has infected humans for thousands of years. However, despite diagnostic tests that detect the disease and effective therapy, there are still millions of people worldwide who are infected with TB. The first TB test used to detect infected patients was a skin test that identifies individuals actively infected with TB. This test used a mix of proteins from culture filtrates of the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recently, two new diagnostic tests have been introduced; these two new tests can detect TB infection in patients by challenging peripheral blood cells with specific TB proteins. These assays measure the cellular immune response to these proteins. This minireview evaluates the new assays and compares them to the use of the TB skin test. The use of these new assays may have some advantages in detecting individuals with active tuberculosis. However, there is still a role for the use of the skin test, especially in young patients. PMID:26018533

  3. A novel molecule with notable activity against multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice O; Mangu, Naveen K; Seo, Byung I; Gund, Machhindra G

    2015-03-15

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is emerging as a serious global health problem, which has been elevated through co-infection involving HIV and MDR-Mtb. The discovery of new compounds with anti-MDR TB efficacy and favorable metabolism profiles is an important scientific challenge. Using computational biology and ligand docking data, we have conceived a multifunctional molecule, 2, as a potential anti-MDR TB agent. This compound was produced through a multi-step synthesis. It exhibited significant in vitro activity against MDR-TB (MIC 1.56μg/mL) and its half-life (t1/2) in human liver microsomes was 14.4h. The metabolic profiles of compound 2 with respect to human cytochrome P450 (CYP) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isozymes were favorable. Compound 2 also had relatively low in vitro cytotoxicity in uninfected macrophages. It displayed synergistic behavior against MDR-TB in combination with PA-824. Interestingly, compound 2 also displayed in vitro anti-HIV activity. PMID:25677656

  4. Systematic review on tuberculosis transmission on aircraft and update of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control risk assessment guidelines for tuberculosis transmitted on aircraft (RAGIDA-TB).

    PubMed

    Kotila, Saara M; Payne Hallström, Lara; Jansen, Niesje; Helbling, Peter; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    As a setting for potential tuberculosis (TB) transmission and contact tracing, aircraft pose specific challenges. Evidence-based guidelines are needed to support the related-risk assessment and contact-tracing efforts. In this study evidence of TB transmission on aircraft was identified to update the Risk Assessment Guidelines for TB Transmitted on Aircraft (RAGIDA-TB) of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Electronic searches were undertaken from Medline (Pubmed), Embase and Cochrane Library until 19 July 2013. Eligible records were identified by a two-stage screening process and data on flight and index case characteristics as well as contact tracing strategies extracted. The systematic literature review retrieved 21 records. Ten of these records were available only after the previous version of the RAGIDA guidelines (2009) and World Health Organization guidelines on TB and air travel (2008) were published. Seven of the 21 records presented some evidence of possible in-flight transmission, but only one record provided substantial evidence of TB transmission on an aircraft. The data indicate that overall risk of TB transmission on aircraft is very low. The updated ECDC guidelines for TB transmission on aircraft have global implications due to inevitable need for international collaboration in contract tracing and risk assessment. PMID:26848520

  5. Activity of 5-chloro-pyrazinamide in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zahoor; Tyagi, Sandeep; Minkowski, Austin; Almeida, Deepak; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Peck, Kaitlin M.; Welch, John T.; Baughn, Anthony D.; Jacobs, Williams R.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2012-01-01

    & conclusion: Our findings showed that 5-Cl-PZA at doses up to 150 mg/kg was not active in chronic murine TB model. Further studies need to be done to understand the mechanism and mode of inactivation in murine model of tuberculosis. PMID:23287128

  6. [Health examination in future at the era of low tuberculosis incidence--from contacts examination toward active epidemiological studies].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideo; Shirai, Chika

    2013-03-01

    Japan is still "intermediate burden" country as medium-incidence of tuberculosis (TB). But the incidence of TB varies by public health units. The priority for TB control would be lowering in the areas where the incidence of TB is relatively low. In addition, younger age groups get low prevalence of TB infection than elderly persons. As a result, fewer experiences for TB diagnosis and treatment in the hospital and the medical facility would cause the delay in the detection of TB patients which eventually cause outbreaks. Although there are differences in population density and population mobility between urban and rural areas, the socially economic vulnerable patients and foreign patients are the common risks. Any public health units' policies of TB should correspond to the individual situation. At the era of low tuberculosis incidence, the infection risk is to be "From ubiquitous to the uneven distribution". This makes TB detection much more difficult. At this symposium, each speaker presented the case for actually experienced with QFT test and/or VNTR analysis. They mainly focused on the paradigm shift in TB control which is indispensable for resolving the gaps in regional differences and the differences in diagnostic capability. Although the cases in this symposium were not for the low incidence situation, the pioneering approaches presented here would boost the future application of QFT and VNTR analysis nationwide. The discussions also partially covered the technical infrastructure for molecular epidemiology which covers the whole country. By making full use of QFT test and VNTR analysis as a contact screening tool, we can appropriately understand the risk of TB infection in the region from a buildup of bacteria and patient information. Now is the time to prepare for. Active surveillance of TB by this way would clarify the risk of the disease and lead to the advocacy essential for the resolution. 1. Current situation and challenge of contact survey by using QFT

  7. The Effect of Garcin® in Preventing AntiTB-Induced Hepatitis in Newly Diagnosed Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tabarsi, Payam; Fahimi, Fanak; Heidarzadeh, Nader; Haghgoo, Roodabeh; Kazempour, Mehdi; Masjedi, Mohammadreza; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Adverse effects of antituberculosis agents such as hepatotoxicity may reduce treatment effectiveness, because they significantly contribute to nonadherence and eventually result in treatment failure, relapse or the emergence of drug resistance. Garlic is an ancient herbal substance, which its effectiveness on isoniazid and rifampicin-induced hepatic injury in animal models has been demonstrated (1). In the present study a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group clinical trial was designed to assess the effect(s) of garlic tablets (1000 mg daily) administered for two weeks orally. Fifty eight newly diagnosed, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients, with age ranges between 18-65 years old, were randomly allocated into two groups. Each patient received either garlic or placebo tablets for the first two weeks of tuberculosis treatment. Of total 58 patients, 31 received garlic tablets while 27 received placebo. No significant difference was found between the two groups regarding age, sex, nationality, smoking, underlying diseases and opium usage. During 8 weeks of anti-TB (antituberculosis) treatment, 8 (13.0%) patients developed drug-induced hepatotoxicity (DIH). Of them, 6 (75%) occurred in the first two weeks of treatment. Fifty percent of the patients who developed DIH were in garlic group. Results indicated no significant difference between groups in developing DIH (p=1.000). We could not show a significant role in preventing DIH by 1000 mg daily garlic administration. PMID:24711843

  8. The Effect of Garcin® in Preventing AntiTB-Induced Hepatitis in Newly Diagnosed Tuberculosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Tabarsi, Payam; Fahimi, Fanak; Heidarzadeh, Nader; Haghgoo, Roodabeh; Kazempour, Mehdi; Masjedi, Mohammadreza; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Adverse effects of antituberculosis agents such as hepatotoxicity may reduce treatment effectiveness, because they significantly contribute to nonadherence and eventually result in treatment failure, relapse or the emergence of drug resistance. Garlic is an ancient herbal substance, which its effectiveness on isoniazid and rifampicin-induced hepatic injury in animal models has been demonstrated (1). In the present study a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group clinical trial was designed to assess the effect(s) of garlic tablets (1000 mg daily) administered for two weeks orally. Fifty eight newly diagnosed, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients, with age ranges between 18-65 years old, were randomly allocated into two groups. Each patient received either garlic or placebo tablets for the first two weeks of tuberculosis treatment. Of total 58 patients, 31 received garlic tablets while 27 received placebo. No significant difference was found between the two groups regarding age, sex, nationality, smoking, underlying diseases and opium usage. During 8 weeks of anti-TB (antituberculosis) treatment, 8 (13.0%) patients developed drug-induced hepatotoxicity (DIH). Of them, 6 (75%) occurred in the first two weeks of treatment. Fifty percent of the patients who developed DIH were in garlic group. Results indicated no significant difference between groups in developing DIH (p=1.000). We could not show a significant role in preventing DIH by 1000 mg daily garlic administration. PMID:24711843

  9. TB in Correctional Facilities Is a Public Health Concern

    MedlinePlus

    ... component to TB elimination in the United States. Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ... is essential to these efforts. More Information Reported Tuberculosis in the United States, 2012 TB in Correctional ...

  10. Achievements in and Challenges of Tuberculosis Control in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Han; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2015-11-01

    After the Korean War (1950-1953), nearly 6.5% of South Korea's population had active tuberculosis (TB). In response, South Korea implemented the National Tuberculosis Program in 1962. From 1965 to 1995, the prevalence of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB in South Korea decreased from 940 to 219 cases per 100,000 population. Astounding economic growth might have contributed to this result; however, TB incidence in South Korea remains the highest among high-income countries. The rate of decrease in TB incidence seems to have slowed over the past 15 years. A demographic shift toward an older population, many of whom have latent TB and various concurrent conditions, is challenging TB control efforts in South Korea. The increasing number of immigrants also plays a part in the prolonged battle against TB. A historical review of TB in South Korea provides an opportunity to understand national TB control efforts that are applicable to other parts of the world. PMID:26485188

  11. Latent tuberculosis screening tests and active tuberculosis infection rates in Turkish inflammatory bowel disease patients under anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Çekiç, Cem; Aslan, Fatih; Vatansever, Sezgin; Topal, Firdevs; Yüksel, Elif Sarıtaş; Alper, Emrah; Dallı, Ayşe; Ünsal, Belkıs

    2015-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors increase the risk of tuberculosis (TB). The objective of the present study was to determine the rate of active TB infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients receiving anti-TNF therapy and to determine the results of their latent TB infection (LTBI) screening tests during the follow up. Methods This is a retrospective observational study of IBD patients receiving anti-TNF therapy. Tuberculin skin test (TST), interferon-γ release assay (IGRA), and chest radiography were used to determine LTBI. Active TB infection rate during anti-TNF treatment was determined. Results Seventy-six IBD patients (25 with ulcerative colitis, 51 with Crohn’s disease; 53 male; mean age 42.0±12.4 years) were included. Forty-four (57.9%) patients received infliximab and 32 (42.1%) adalimumab. Their median duration of anti-TNF therapy was 15 months. Forty-five (59.2%) patients had LTBI and received isoniazid (INH) prophylaxis. During the follow-up period, active TB was identified in 3 (4.7%) patients who were not receiving INH prophylaxis. There was a moderate concordance between the TST and the IGRA (kappa coefficient 0.44, 95% CI 0.24-0.76). Patients with or without immunosuppressive therapy did not differ significantly with respect to TST (P=0.318) and IGRA (P=0.157). Conclusion IBD patients receiving anti-TNF therapy and prophylactic INH have a decreased risk of developing active TB infection. However, despite LTBI screening, the risk of developing active TB infection persists. PMID:25831138

  12. A VSEIR model for transmission of tuberculosis (TB) disease in North Sumatera, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangkuti, Yulita M.; Sinaga, Marlina S.; Marpaung, F.; Side, Syafruddin

    2014-12-01

    In this work, Vaccination (V), Susceptible (S) Infected (I), and Recovered (R) (VSIR) model for transmission of Tuberculosis in North Sumatera is modified. An exposed class is adopted to VSIR model so called VSEIR to determine the probability of people who infectious before infected. This model is written in ordinary differential equation (ODEs) in five classes. Determination the equilibrium point and stability analysis of the model is discussed to determine the dynamic behaviour of systems. A simulation is also discussed to see the suitable model to North Sumatera data. The simulation of VSEIR model indicates Tuberculosis has not endemic in North Sumatera.

  13. Plasma Levels of Neopterin and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in Tuberculosis (TB) with and without HIV Coinfection in Relation to CD4 Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Skogmar, Sten; Schön, Thomas; Balcha, Taye Tolera; Sturegård, Erik; Jansson, Marianne; Björkman, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background While the risk of TB is elevated in HIV-positive subjects with low CD4 cell counts, TB may in itself be associated with CD4 lymphocytopenia. We investigated markers of immune activation (neopterin) and inflammation (CRP) in TB patients with and without HIV coinfection and their association with CD4 cell levels, and determined their predictive capacity as alternative markers of advanced immunosuppression. Methods Participants selected from a cohort of adults with TB at Ethiopian health centers (195 HIV+/TB+, 170 HIV-/TB+) and 31 controls were tested for plasma levels of neopterin and CRP. Baseline levels of neopterin and CRP were correlated to CD4 cell count before and after anti-TB treatment (ATT). The performance to predict CD4 cell strata for both markers were investigated using receiver operating curves. Results Levels of both biomarkers were elevated in TB patients (neopterin: HIV+/TB+ 54 nmol/l, HIV-/TB+ 23 nmol/l, controls 3.8 nmol/l; CRP: HIV+/TB+ 36 μg/ml, HIV-/TB+ 33 μg/ml, controls 0.5 μg/ml). Neopterin levels were inversely correlated (-0.53, p<0.001) to CD4 cell count, whereas this correlation was weaker for CRP (-0.25, p<0.001). Neither of the markers had adequate predictive value for identification of subjects with CD4 cell count <100 cells/mm3 (area under the curve [AUC] 0.64 for neopterin, AUC 0.59 for CRP). Conclusion Neopterin levels were high in adults with TB, both with and without HIV coinfection, with inverse correlation to CD4 cell count. This suggests that immune activation may be involved in TB-related CD4 lymphocytopenia. However, neither neopterin nor CRP showed promise as alternative tests for immunosuppression in patients coinfected with HIV and TB. PMID:26630153

  14. Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Kelly E.; Tang, Tania; Golub, Jonathan E.; Dorman, Susan E.; Cronin, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an emerging chronic health condition of developed and developing countries. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with active, culture-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) in Maryland to determine the impact of DM on TB treatment outcomes. Of 297 TB patients, 42 (14%) had DM. Patients with diabetes had 2.0 times higher odds of death than patients without diabetes (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74–5.2, P = 0.18). Adjusting for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), age, weight, and foreign birth, the odds of death were 6.5 times higher in patients with diabetes than patients without diabetes (95% CI 1.1–38.0, P = 0.039). In pulmonary TB patients, time to sputum culture conversion was longer in patients with diabetes than patients without diabetes (median 49 versus 39 days, P = 0.09). Two-month culture conversion proportions were similar (70% and 69%). Treatment failure occurred in 4.1% of patients without diabetes and 6.7% of patients with diabetes (P = 0.51). In conclusion, DM was a risk factor for death in Maryland TB patients. There was a trend toward increased time to culture conversion; two-month culture conversion proportions, however, were similar. PMID:19346391

  15. Respiratory infections: pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Choby, Beth A; Hunter, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Family physicians can prevent mortality and disability due to pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) by identifying high-risk patients. Recognition of symptoms (eg, cough for 3 weeks or longer) helps prevent overlooked diagnoses because results of tuberculin skin tests and interferon-gamma release assays are negative in up to 25% and 21%, respectively, of severe acute cases. The typical x-ray findings of cavities, infiltrates, and lymphadenopathy are minimal among immunosuppressed patients. Cases of active TB must be reported to local or state health departments within 24 hours of diagnosis. Sputum acid-fast bacillus tests provide results within hours and help quantify bacterial load but are not highly sensitive, and infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria can cause positive test results. Sputum cultures are adequately sensitive, identify mycobacterial species, and provide organisms for antibiotic susceptibility testing but require weeks for results. Molecular detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and of antibiotic-resistant mutations can expedite diagnosis and management of drug-resistant TB. Management of active TB should include directly observed therapy. Standard 6-month therapy with rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol resolves infection in nearly all immunocompetent adults with pansensitive TB. Multidrug-resistant TB requires second-line antibiotics (eg, fluoroquinolones, linezolid) in individualized regimens lasting 2 years. Management of latent TB infection prevents progression to active TB disease, particularly if management is completed within 2 years of infection. PMID:25685923

  16. Hypercalcemic encephalopathy in a patient on anti-TB treatment for glandular tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Abraham, G; Sadasivam, P B; Gaspar, J H; Isphani, N; Lawrence, R

    1992-08-01

    An 84 years old male patient presented with hypercalcemic encephalopathy and mild azotemia while on anti-tuberculous treatment for glandular tuberculosis. He recovered fully during treatment with hydration, intravenous frusemide and oral prednisolone while continuing on the antituberculous therapy. PMID:1308493

  17. targetTB: A target identification pipeline for Mycobacterium tuberculosis through an interactome, reactome and genome-scale structural analysis

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Karthik; Yeturu, Kalidas; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2008-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis still remains one of the largest killer infectious diseases, warranting the identification of newer targets and drugs. Identification and validation of appropriate targets for designing drugs are critical steps in drug discovery, which are at present major bottle-necks. A majority of drugs in current clinical use for many diseases have been designed without the knowledge of the targets, perhaps because standard methodologies to identify such targets in a high-throughput fashion do not really exist. With different kinds of 'omics' data that are now available, computational approaches can be powerful means of obtaining short-lists of possible targets for further experimental validation. Results We report a comprehensive in silico target identification pipeline, targetTB, for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The pipeline incorporates a network analysis of the protein-protein interactome, a flux balance analysis of the reactome, experimentally derived phenotype essentiality data, sequence analyses and a structural assessment of targetability, using novel algorithms recently developed by us. Using flux balance analysis and network analysis, proteins critical for survival of M. tuberculosis are first identified, followed by comparative genomics with the host, finally incorporating a novel structural analysis of the binding sites to assess the feasibility of a protein as a target. Further analyses include correlation with expression data and non-similarity to gut flora proteins as well as 'anti-targets' in the host, leading to the identification of 451 high-confidence targets. Through phylogenetic profiling against 228 pathogen genomes, shortlisted targets have been further explored to identify broad-spectrum antibiotic targets, while also identifying those specific to tuberculosis. Targets that address mycobacterial persistence and drug resistance mechanisms are also analysed. Conclusion The pipeline developed provides rational schema for drug target

  18. What's new in tuberculosis vaccines?

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Ann M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development has resurged as an active area of investigation. The renewed interest has been stimulated by the recognition that, although BCG is delivered to approximately 90% of all neonates globally through the Expanded Programme on Immunization, Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause over 8 million new cases of TB and over 2 million deaths annually. Over one hundred TB vaccine candidates have been developed, using different approaches to inducing protective immunity. Candidate vaccines are typically screened in small animal models of primary TB disease for their ability to protect against a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. The most promising are now beginning to enter human safety trials, marking real progress in this field for the first time in 80 years. PMID:12132007

  19. Rapid, Semiquantitative Assay To Discriminate among Compounds with Activity against Replicating or Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Quezada, Landys Lopez; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Warren, J. David; Nathan, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The search for drugs that can kill replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces practical bottlenecks. Measurement of CFU and discrimination of bacteriostatic from bactericidal activity are costly in compounds, supplies, labor, and time. Testing compounds against M. tuberculosis under conditions that prevent the replication of M. tuberculosis often involves a second phase of the test in which conditions are altered to permit the replication of bacteria that survived the first phase. False-positive determinations of activity against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis may arise from carryover of compounds from the nonreplicating stage of the assay that act in the replicating stage. We mitigate these problems by carrying out a 96-well microplate liquid MIC assay and then transferring an aliquot of each well to a second set of plates in which each well contains agar supplemented with activated charcoal. After 7 to 10 days—about 2 weeks sooner than required to count CFU—fluorometry reveals whether M. tuberculosis bacilli in each well have replicated extensively enough to reduce a resazurin dye added for the final hour. This charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) distinguishes between bacterial biomasses in any two wells that differ by 2 to 3 log10 CFU. The CARA thus serves as a pretest and semiquantitative surrogate for longer, more laborious, and expensive CFU-based assays, helps distinguish bactericidal from bacteriostatic activity, and identifies compounds that are active under replicating conditions, nonreplicating conditions, or both. Results for 14 antimycobacterial compounds, including tuberculosis (TB) drugs, revealed that PA-824 (pretomanid) and TMC207 (bedaquiline) are largely bacteriostatic. PMID:26239979

  20. Rapid, Semiquantitative Assay To Discriminate among Compounds with Activity against Replicating or Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ben; Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Quezada, Landys Lopez; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Warren, J David; Nathan, Carl

    2015-10-01

    The search for drugs that can kill replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces practical bottlenecks. Measurement of CFU and discrimination of bacteriostatic from bactericidal activity are costly in compounds, supplies, labor, and time. Testing compounds against M. tuberculosis under conditions that prevent the replication of M. tuberculosis often involves a second phase of the test in which conditions are altered to permit the replication of bacteria that survived the first phase. False-positive determinations of activity against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis may arise from carryover of compounds from the nonreplicating stage of the assay that act in the replicating stage. We mitigate these problems by carrying out a 96-well microplate liquid MIC assay and then transferring an aliquot of each well to a second set of plates in which each well contains agar supplemented with activated charcoal. After 7 to 10 days-about 2 weeks sooner than required to count CFU-fluorometry reveals whether M. tuberculosis bacilli in each well have replicated extensively enough to reduce a resazurin dye added for the final hour. This charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) distinguishes between bacterial biomasses in any two wells that differ by 2 to 3 log10 CFU. The CARA thus serves as a pretest and semiquantitative surrogate for longer, more laborious, and expensive CFU-based assays, helps distinguish bactericidal from bacteriostatic activity, and identifies compounds that are active under replicating conditions, nonreplicating conditions, or both. Results for 14 antimycobacterial compounds, including tuberculosis (TB) drugs, revealed that PA-824 (pretomanid) and TMC207 (bedaquiline) are largely bacteriostatic. PMID:26239979

  1. Characteristics of Active Tuberculosis Patients Requiring Intensive Care Monitoring and Factors Affecting Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Levent, Dalar; Emel, Eryüksel; Pelin, Uysal; Turkay, Akbaş; Aybüke, Kekeçoğlu

    2016-01-01

    Background One to three percent of cases of acute tuberculosis (TB) require monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU). The purpose of this study is to establish and determine the mortality rate and discuss the causes of high mortality in these cases, and to evaluate the clinical and laboratory findings of TB patients admitted to the pulmonary ICU. Methods The data of patients admitted to the ICU of Yedikule Chest Diseases and Chest Surgery Education and Research Hospital due to active TB were retrospectively evaluated. Demographic characteristics, medical history, and clinical and laboratory findings were evaluated. Results Thirty-five TB patients (27 males) with a median age of 47 years were included, of whom 20 died within 30 days (57%). The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were significantly higher, and albumin and PaO2/FIO2 levels were significantly lower, and shock, multiple organ failure, the need for invasive mechanical ventilation and drug resistance were more common in the patients who died. The mortality risk was 7.58 times higher in the patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. The SOFA score alone was a significant risk factor affecting survival. Conclusion The survival rate is low in cases of tuberculosis treated in an ICU. The predictors of mortality include the requirement of invasive mechanical ventilation and multiple organ failure. Another factor specific to TB patients is the presence of drug resistance, which should be taken seriously in countries where there is a high incidence of the disease. Finding new variables that can be established with new prospective studies may help to decrease the high mortality rate. PMID:27433176

  2. Potential utility of empirical tuberculosis treatment for HIV-infected patients with advanced immunodeficiency in high TB-HIV burden settings.

    PubMed

    Lawn, S D; Ayles, H; Egwaga, S; Williams, B; Mukadi, Y D; Santos Filho, E D; Godfrey-Faussett, P; Granich, R M; Harries, A D

    2011-03-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB-HIV) epidemics remain uncontrolled in many resource-limited regions, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The scale of these epidemics requires the consideration of innovative bold interventions and 'out-of-the-box' thinking. To this end, a symposium entitled 'Controversies in HIV' was held at the 40th Union World Conference on Lung Health in Cancun, Mexico, in December 2009. The first topic debated, entitled 'Annual HIV testing and immediate start of antiretroviral therapy for all HIV-infected persons', received much attention at international conferences and in the literature in 2009. The second topic forms the subject of this article. The rationale for the use of empirical TB treatment is premised on the hypothesis that in settings worst affected by the TB-HIV epidemic, a subset of HIV-infected patients have such a high risk of undiagnosed TB and of associated mortality that their prognosis may be improved by immediate initiation of empirical TB treatment used in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy. In addition to morbidity and mortality reduction, additional benefits may include prevention of nosocomial TB transmission and TB preventive effect. Potential adverse consequences, however, may include failure to consider other non-TB diagnoses, drug co-toxicity, compromised treatment adherence, and logistical and resource challenges. There may also be general reluctance among national TB programmes to endorse such a strategy. Following fruitful debate, the conclusion that this strategy should be carefully evaluated in randomised controlled trials was strongly supported. This paper provides an in-depth consideration of this proposed intervention. PMID:21333094

  3. Numerical study for multi-strain tuberculosis (TB) model of variable-order fractional derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sweilam, Nasser H; Al-Mekhlafi, Seham M

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we presented a novel multi-strain TB model of variable-order fractional derivatives, which incorporates three strains: drug-sensitive, emerging multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR), as an extension for multi-strain TB model of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which developed in 2014 by Arino and Soliman [1]. Numerical simulations for this variable-order fractional model are the main aim of this work, where the variable-order fractional derivative is defined in the sense of Grünwald-Letnikov definition. Two numerical methods are presented for this model, the standard finite difference method (SFDM) and nonstandard finite difference method (NSFDM). Numerical comparison between SFDM and NSFDM is presented. It is concluded that, NSFDM preserves the positivity of the solutions and numerically stable in large regions than SFDM. PMID:26966568

  4. Numerical study for multi-strain tuberculosis (TB) model of variable-order fractional derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Sweilam, Nasser H.; AL-Mekhlafi, Seham M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we presented a novel multi-strain TB model of variable-order fractional derivatives, which incorporates three strains: drug-sensitive, emerging multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR), as an extension for multi-strain TB model of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which developed in 2014 by Arino and Soliman [1]. Numerical simulations for this variable-order fractional model are the main aim of this work, where the variable-order fractional derivative is defined in the sense of Grünwald–Letnikov definition. Two numerical methods are presented for this model, the standard finite difference method (SFDM) and nonstandard finite difference method (NSFDM). Numerical comparison between SFDM and NSFDM is presented. It is concluded that, NSFDM preserves the positivity of the solutions and numerically stable in large regions than SFDM. PMID:26966568

  5. Asymptomatic Helminth Infection in Active Tuberculosis Is Associated with Increased Regulatory and Th-2 Responses and a Lower Sputum Smear Positivity

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Ebba; Belayneh, Meseret; Idh, Jonna; Diro, Ermias; Elias, Daniel; Britton, Sven; Aseffa, Abraham; Stendahl, Olle; Schön, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background The impact of intestinal helminth infection on the clinical presentation and immune response during active tuberculosis (TB) infection is not well characterized. Our aim was to investigate whether asymptomatic intestinal helminth infection alters the clinical signs and symptoms as well as the cell mediated immune responses in patients with active TB. Methodology Consecutive, newly diagnosed TB patients and healthy community controls (CCs) were recruited in North-west Ethiopia. TB-score, body mass index and stool samples were analyzed. Cells from HIV-negative TB patients (HIV-/TB) and from CCs were analyzed for regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and cytokine responses using flow cytometry and ELISPOT, respectively. Results A significantly higher ratio of helminth co-infection was observed in TB patients without HIV (Helm+/HIV-/TB) compared to HIV negative CCs, (40% (121/306) versus 28% (85/306), p = 0.003). Helm+/HIV-/TB patients showed significantly increased IL-5 secreting cells compared to Helm-/HIV-/TB (37 SFU (IQR:13–103) versus 2 SFU (1–50); p = 0.02, n = 30). Likewise, levels of absolute Tregs (9.4 (3.2–16.7) cells/μl versus 2.4 (1.1–4.0) cells/μl; p = 0.041) and IL-10 secreting cells (65 SFU (7–196) versus 1 SFU (0–31); p = 0.014) were significantly higher in Helm+/HIV-/TB patients compared to Helm-/HIV-/TB patients. In a multivariate analysis, a lower rate of sputum smear positivity for acid fast bacilli, lower body temperature, and eosinophilia were independently associated with helminth infection in TB patients. Conclusions Asymptomatic helminth infection is associated with increased regulatory T-cell and Th2-type responses and a lower rate of sputum smear positivity. Further studies are warranted to investigate the clinical and immunological impact of helminth infection in TB patients. PMID:26248316

  6. The other side of surveillance: Monitoring, application, and integration of tuberculosis data to guide and evaluate programme activities in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Podewils, L J; Murrison, L Bronner; Bristow, C; Bantubani, N; Mametja, L D

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of using surveillance data to monitor and evaluate programme activities has been emphasised in international policies for tuberculosis (TB) control. Objectives A survey was conducted to assess the use of TB surveillance data to monitor and guide TB programme activities in South Africa (SA). Methods As part of an evaluation of the SA national TB surveillance system, semi-structured interviews were conducted among TB staff at health facilities and offices in three provinces. At each site, all persons involved with TB care, management and surveillance were invited to participate. Results At least one person (range 1 – 4) was interviewed at 47/54 health facilities (87.0%), 11/13 subdistrict and district TB offices (84.6%), 2/3 provincial TB offices (66.7%), and at the national level (1/1, 100.0%). Of 119 TB staff, 64.7% recognised the purpose of TB surveillance as guiding programme planning, implementation and evaluation. However, only 16.0% reported using data to measure disease burden, 8.4% to monitor trends, and 9.2% to inform resource allocation. The majority reported using TB management tools provided by the national programme, but 44.5% also described using additional tools. Personnel mentioned the need for dedicated surveillance staff, training on recording and reporting, improved computer access, and methods to apply information from surveillance data to the programme. Conclusions The majority of TB staff understood the purpose of surveillance but did not routinely use data to guide programme planning, implementation and evaluation. Training and supporting TB staff to utilise surveillance data will help improve the TB surveillance system. PMID:27032857

  7. Evaluation of the Rapid Scale-up of Collaborative TB/HIV Activities in TB Facilities in Rwanda, 2005-2009

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2005, Rwanda drafted a national TB/HIV policy and began scaling-up collaborative TB/HIV activities. Prior to the scale-up, we evaluated existing TB/HIV practices, possible barriers to policy and programmatic implementation, and patient treatment outcomes. We then used our evaluation data as a baseline for evaluating the national scale-up of collaborative TB/HIV activities from 2005 through 2009. Methods Our baseline evaluation included a cross-sectional evaluation of 23/161 TB clinics. We conducted structured interviews with patients and clinic staff and reviewed TB registers and patient records to assess HIV testing practices, provision of HIV care and treatment for people with TB that tested positive for HIV, and patients' TB treatment outcomes. Following our baseline evaluation, we used nationally representative TB/HIV surveillance data to monitor the scale-up of collaborative TB/HIV activities Results Of 207 patients interviewed, 76% were offered HIV testing, 99% accepted, and 49% reported positive test results. Of 40 staff interviewed, 68% reported offering HIV testing to >50% of patients. From 2005-2009, scaled-up TB/HIV activities resulted in increased HIV testing of patients with TB (69% to 97%) and provision of cotrimoxazole (15% to 92%) and antiretroviral therapy (13% to 49%) for patients with TB disease and HIV infection (TB/HIV). The risk of death among patients with TB/HIV relative to patients with TB not infected with HIV declined from 2005 (RR = 6.1, 95%CI 2.6, 14.0) to 2007 (RR = 1.8, 95%CI 1.68, 1.94). Conclusions Our baseline evaluation highlighted that staff and patients were receptive to HIV testing. However, expanded access to testing, care, and treatment was needed based on the proportion of patients with TB having unknown HIV status and the high rate of HIV infection and poorer TB treatment outcomes for patients with TB/HIV. Following our evaluation, scale-up of TB/HIV services resulted in almost all patients with TB knowing

  8. Factors Associated with Prevalent Tuberculosis Among Patients Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Iroezindu, MO; Ofondu, EO; Mbata, GC; van Wyk, B; Hausler, HP; DH, Au; Lynen, L; Hopewell, PC

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity/mortality among human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals in Africa. Reducing TB burden in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a public health priority. Aim: We determined the factors associated with prevalent TB among patients receiving HAART. Subjects and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of adult patients who had received HAART for ≥12 weeks in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Patients whose TB diagnosis predated HAART were excluded from the study. Pre-HAART data were collected from the clinic records, whereas post-HAART data were obtained through medical history, physical examination, and laboratory investigations. Standard TB screening/diagnostic algorithms as applicable in Nigeria were used. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors independently associated with prevalent TB. Results: about 65.8% (222/339) were women. The mean age was 41.1 (10.0) years and 23.6% (73/339) had past history of TB. The prevalence of active TB was 7.7% (26/339). Among these patients, 42.3% (11/26) had pulmonary TB, 34.6% (9/26) had disseminated TB, whereas 23.1% (6/26) had only extra-pulmonary disease. Only 45% (9/20) of patients with pulmonary involvement had positive sputum smear. Factors independently associated with prevalent TB were lower social class (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 31.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1–1417.3), HAART non-adherence (aOR125.5; 95% CI: 9.6–1636.3), baseline CD4 <200cells/μl (aOR31.0; 95%CI: 1.6–590.6), previous TB (aOR13.8; 95% CI: 2.0–94.1), and current hemoglobin <10 g/dl (aOR10.3; 95% CI: 1.1–99.2). Conclusion: Factors associated with prevalent TB were a lower social class, HAART non-adherence, severe immunosuppression before HAART initiation, previous TB, and anemia post-HAART. TB case finding should be intensified in these high-risk groups. PMID:27213096

  9. Novel aryloxy azolyl chalcones with potent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Marrapu, Vijay K; Chaturvedi, Vinita; Singh, Shubhra; Singh, Shyam; Sinha, Sudhir; Bhandari, Kalpana

    2011-09-01

    A series of twenty seven novel aryloxy azolyl chalcones were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for the growth inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Ten compounds from this series exhibited good activity with MIC in the range of 3.12-0.78 μg/mL and six of them were found non-toxic against VERO cells and MBMDMøs (mouse bone-marrow derived macrophages), were further evaluated ex-vivo for their potential to kill intracellular bacilli. Two compounds 4 and 19 showed 99% and 71% killing respectively, of intracellular bacilli in MBMDMøs infection model. Further, compound 19, an imidazolyl chalcone with a 2,4-difluorobenzyloxy moiety also exhibited moderate in vivo activity in mice against virulent M. tuberculosis, thus providing a new structural lead towards TB drug development. PMID:21764184

  10. The Differential Gene Expression Pattern of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Response to Capreomycin and PA-824 versus First-Line TB Drugs Reveals Stress- and PE/PPE-Related Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Li M.; Tai, Shu C.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading infectious disease causing millions of deaths each year. How to eradicate mycobacterial persistence has become a central research focus for developing next-generation TB drugs. Yet, the knowledge in this area is fundamentally limited and only a few drugs, notably capreomycin and PA-824, have been shown to be active against non-replicating persistent TB bacilli. In this study, we performed a new bioinformatics analysis on microarray-based gene expression data obtained from the public domain to explore genes that were differentially induced by drugs between the group of capreomycin and PA-824 and the group of mainly the first-line TB drugs. Our study has identified 42 genes specifically induced by capreomycin and PA-824. Many of these genes are related to stress responses. In terms of the distribution of identified genes in a specific category relative to the whole genome, only the categories of PE/PPE and conserved hypotheticals have statistical significance. Six among the 42 genes identified in this study are on the list of the top 100 persistence targets selected by the TB Structural Genomics Consortium. Further biological elucidation of their roles in mycobacterial persistence is warranted. PMID:20016672

  11. GeneXpert assay for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens from a high TB endemic area of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shakir Ullah; Rahman, Hazir; Ayaz, Sultan; Qasim, Muhammad; Jabbar, Abdul; Khurshid, Mohsin; Hussain, Mubashir; Muhammad, Niaz; Rehman, Shoaib Ur; Ali, Nawab

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis is a global health problem, and its early diagnosis is the ultimate strategy for prevention and control. The current study was undertaken to evaluate conventional and molecular diagnostic assays for the detection of mycobacteria in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa region of Pakistan. A total of 259 clinically suspected patients of TB were processed for Zeihl Neelsen (ZN) microscopy, BACTEC MGIT liquid culture and GeneXpert assay. Among 259 samples, 28 (10.81%) were positive for acid fast bacilli (AFB) on ZN microscopy. In liquid culture, the growth of mycobacterium species was obtained in 36 (13.89%) samples while the GeneXpert assay detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in 49 (18.91%) samples. Detection rate of MTB was significantly high (n = 49, p < 0.0095) on GeneXpert as compared to microscopy (n = 28); however no significant difference (p = 0.1230) was observed on GeneXpert (n = 49) and culture (n = 36) based detection of MTB. The strength of agreement between GeneXpert and microscopy was also poor (Kappa value < 0.114, 95% CI: -0.72 - 0.301) which support our results. MTB detection rate among female was high as compared to male TB patients while in age wise, the age group 55-64 years has almost high detection rate on microscopy, culture and GeneXpert assay. Findings of the present study highlighted that GeneXpert is more efficient tool for timely diagnosis and proper TB control in high TB endemic area. PMID:27032999

  12. [Management of TB suspected cases of drug resistant tuberculosis requiring a second treatment].

    PubMed

    Caminero, José A

    2004-06-01

    The management of patients with resistance to anti tuberculous drugs is complex and therefore must be managed by physician specialists. The most difficult patients are the cases in retreatment, where some very different possibilities are possible, as abandonment, failures and relapses. Patients with multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis are the most difficult to treat; MDR appears in all the failures or non-adherences to the treatment regime. To elaborate a scheme of retreatment for these patients, two guidelines must be followed: (1) do not rely on outcomes of drug susceptibility tests and (2) a detailed history of drug treatment must be considered of paramount importance. With this information, a retreatment scheme can be formulated that involves the use of at least three drugs not previously taken by the patient. For a successful control of tuberculosis, the national tuberculosis programs in Latin American countries must assure careful management of newly diagnosed patients. Secondly, if resources are available, a bank of second-line drugs must be ready for managing retreatment situations (e.g., 3 Z-Kn-Eth-Of/15 Z-Eth-Of) if first line drug treatments fail. Using individualized retreatment with second line drugs is recommended only in industrialized countries, and for a few middle income countries as a last resort. PMID:15495588

  13. Development and Evaluation of a Pilot Nurse Case Management Model to Address Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and HIV in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Jason E.; Kelly, Ana M.; Reiser, Katrina; Brown, Maria; Kub, Joan; Davis, Jeane G.; Walshe, Louise; Van der Walt, Martie

    2014-01-01

    Setting Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) unit in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Objective To develop and evaluate a nurse case management model and intervention using the tenets of the Chronic Care Model to manage treatment for MDR-TB patients with a high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection. Design A quasi-experimental pilot programme utilizing a nurse case manager to manage care for 40 hospitalized MDR-TB patients, 70% HIV co-infected, during the intensive phase of MDR-TB treatment. Patients were followed for six months to compare proximal outcomes identified in the model between the pre- and post-intervention period. Results The greatest percent differences between baseline and six-month MDR-TB proximal outcomes were seen in the following three areas: baseline symptom evaluation on treatment initiation (95% improvement), baseline and monthly laboratory evaluations completed per guidelines (75% improvement), and adverse drug reactions acted upon by medical and/or nursing intervention (75% improvement). Conclusion Improvements were identified in guideline-based treatment and monitoring of adverse drug reactions following implementation of the nurse case management intervention. Further study is required to determine if the intervention introduced in this model will ultimately result in improvements in final MDR-TB treatment outcomes. PMID:25405988

  14. Prevalence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Prison Inmates in Ethiopia, a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Solomon; Haileamlak, Abraham; Wieser, Andreas; Pritsch, Michael; Heinrich, Norbert; Loscher, Thomas; Hoelscher, Michael; Rachow, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Setting Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major health problems in prisons. Objective This study was done to assess the prevalence and determinants of active tuberculosis in Ethiopian prisons. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2013 in 13 zonal prisons. All incarcerated inmates underwent TB symptom screening according to WHO criteria. From identified TB-suspects two sputum samples were analyzed using smear microscopy and solid culture. A standardized questionnaire assessing TB risk factors was completed for each TB suspect. Results 765 (4.9%) TB suspects were identified among 15,495 inmates. 51 suspects were already on anti-TB treatment (6.67%) and 20 (2.8%) new culture-confirmed TB cases were identified in the study, resulting in an overall TB prevalence of 458.1/100,000 (95%CI: 350-560/100,000). Risk factors for active TB were alcohol consumption, contact with a TB case before incarceration and no window in prison cell. HIV prevalence was not different between TB suspects and active TB cases. Further, the TB burden in prisons increased with advancing distance from the capital Addis Ababa. Conclusions The overall TB prevalence in Ethiopian prisons was high and extremely variable among different prisons. TB risk factors related to conditions of prison facilities and the impact of implemented TB control measures need to be further studied in order to improve TB control among inmates. PMID:26641654

  15. Impaired NK cells' activity and increased numbers of CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Renhua; Xiang, Yangen; Yang, Li; Liu, Yanke; Chen, Pingsheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wenjun; Yin, Ke; Fu, Manjiao; Xu, Yixin; Wu, Jialin

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) often causes persistent infection and chemotherapy failure, which brings heavy burden of society and family. Many immune cell subsets and regulatory mechanisms may operate throughout the various stages of infection. The presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is thought to be an important mechanism that TB successfully evades the immune system. Tregs play a central role in the prevention of autoimmunity and in the control of immune responses. The role of Tregs in MDR-TB infection and persistence is inadequately documented. The current study was designed to determine whether CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells may modulate innate immunity (such as NK cells) against human tuberculosis. Our results indicated that the numbers of CD4 + CD25+ Treg cells increased in MDR-TB patients' blood, and the cytokine production of IL-10 increased from MDR-patients compared with healthy subjects, along with the lower activity and low CD69 expression of NK cells in patients. These results suggested that immunity to MDR-TB patients induced circulating CD4 + CD25+ T regulatory cells expansion, which may be related to the persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, and to the balance between effectors immune responses and suppression immune responses. PMID:27156613

  16. Decreased Frequencies of Circulating CD4+ T Follicular Helper Cells Associated with Diminished Plasma IL-21 in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Sridhar, Rathinam; Hanna, Luke E.; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulating T follicular helper (Tfh) cells represent a distinct subset of CD4+ T cells and are important in immunity to infections. Although they have been shown to play a role in experimental models of tuberculosis infection, their role in human tuberculosis remains unexplored. Aims/Methodology To determine the distribution of circulating Tfh cells in human TB, we measured the frequencies of Tfh cells ex vivo and following TB - antigen or polyclonal stimulation in pulmonary TB (PTB; n = 30) and latent TB (LTB; n = 20) individuals, using the markers CXCR5, PD-1 and ICOS. Results We found that both ex vivo and TB - antigen induced frequencies of Tfh cell subsets was significantly lower in PTB compared to LTB individuals. Similarly, antigen induced frequencies of Tfh cells expressing IL-21 was also significantly lower in PTB individuals and this was reflected in diminished circulating levels of IL-21 and IFNγ. This was not accompanied by diminished frequencies of activated or memory B cell subsets. Finally, the diminution in frequency of Tfh cells in PTB individuals was dependent on IL-10, CTLA-4 and PD-L1 in vitro. Conclusions Thus, PTB is characterized by adiminution in the frequency of Tfh cell subsets. PMID:25343703

  17. Biomarkers on patient T cells diagnose active tuberculosis and monitor treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Adekambi, Toidi; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Cagle, Stephanie; Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Wang, Yun F.; Hu, Yijuan; Day, Cheryl L.; Ray, Susan M.; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The identification and treatment of individuals with tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health priority. Accurate diagnosis of pulmonary active TB (ATB) disease remains challenging and relies on extensive medical evaluation and detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in the patient’s sputum. Further, the response to treatment is monitored by sputum culture conversion, which takes several weeks for results. Here, we sought to identify blood-based host biomarkers associated with ATB and hypothesized that immune activation markers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells would be associated with Mtb load in vivo and could thus provide a gauge of Mtb infection. METHODS. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we evaluated the expression of immune activation markers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells from individuals with asymptomatic latent Mtb infection (LTBI) and ATB as well as from ATB patients undergoing anti-TB treatment. RESULTS. Frequencies of Mtb-specific IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells that expressed immune activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR as well as intracellular proliferation marker Ki-67 were substantially higher in subjects with ATB compared with those with LTBI. These markers accurately classified ATB and LTBI status, with cutoff values of 18%, 60%, and 5% for CD38+IFN-γ+, HLA-DR+IFN-γ+, and Ki-67+IFN-γ+, respectively, with 100% specificity and greater than 96% sensitivity. These markers also distinguished individuals with untreated ATB from those who had successfully completed anti-TB treatment and correlated with decreasing mycobacterial loads during treatment. CONCLUSION. We have identified host blood-based biomarkers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells that discriminate between ATB and LTBI and provide a set of tools for monitoring treatment response and cure. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Registration is not required for observational studies. FUNDING. This study was funded by Emory University, the NIH, and the Yerkes National Primate Center. PMID:25822019

  18. Active case finding for tuberculosis among people who inject drugs on methadone treatment in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A.; Mbwambo, J.; Mteza, I.; Shenoi, S.; Lambdin, B.; Nyandindi, C.; Doula, B. I.; Mfaume, S.; Bruce, R. D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING Active case finding is a World Health Organization (WHO) endorsed strategy for improving tuberculosis (TB) case detection. Despite WHO recommendations for active case finding among people who inject drugs (PWID), few studies have been published. The historical focus of case finding has been in populations that are human immunodeficiency virus-positive, incarcerated or at higher occupational risk. OBJECTIVE We sought to examine the yield of active case finding among PWID newly started on methadone in Tanzania. DESIGN Of 222 methadone clients, 156 (70%) met with study administrators; 150 consented to participate, 139 (93%) of whom were male. The median age was 34 years. A symptom-based questionnaire was developed by the investigators and administered to every consenting patient by a native Swahili speaker. RESULTS Of the 150 patients surveyed, 16 (11%) had one or more TB symptoms and were referred for laboratory testing. Six new TB cases were identified in this active case finding program, with a prevalence of 4%. CONCLUSION This study presents the first data on TB prevalence in a population of PWID in Tanzania. This prevalence is 23 times that of the general Tanzanian TB prevalence of 0.2%. These results have significant implications for TB control. PMID:24902554

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection as a zoonotic disease: transmission between humans and elephants.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, K.; Austin, C.; Diesel, S.; Bacon, M. J.; Zimmerman, P.; Maslow, J. N.

    1998-01-01

    Between 1994 and 1996, three elephants from an exotic animal farm in Illinois died of pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In October 1996, a fourth living elephant was culture-positive for M. tuberculosis. Twenty-two handlers at the farm were screened for tuberculosis (TB); eleven had positive reactions to intradermal injection with purified protein derivative. One had smear-negative, culture-positive active TB. DNA fingerprint comparison by IS6110 and TBN12 typing showed that the isolates from the four elephants and the handler with active TB were the same strain. This investigation indicates transmission of M. tuberculosis between humans and elephants. PMID:9621200

  20. Application of Elephant TB STAT-PAK assay and MAPIA (multi-antigen print immunoassay) for detection of tuberculosis and monitoring of treatment in black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis).

    PubMed

    Duncan, Ann E; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Rena; Miller, Michelle; Ball, Ray

    2009-12-01

    Many wildlife species including rhinos are susceptible to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or M. bovis. Antemortem diagnostic testing in large exotic hoof stock species has been limited by challenges associated with test administration, sample collection, and interpretation. Hence, a simple, rapid, blood-based test is needed. Two confirmed M. tuberculosis-infected black rhinoceros and one exposed suspect were evaluated for antibody responses using a lateral-flow rapid test (ElephantTB STAT-PAK) and multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA). All three animals were seropositive by both tests. MAPIA detected antibodies to ESAT-6, CFP10, and MPB83 antigens. When the rhinos were treated with antitubercular therapeutics, their antibody responses gradually declined. One rhinoceros died approximately 9 mo after initiation of treatment and showed an increase in antibody titer shortly before death. The other two rhinoceros, which were treated for 1 and 2 yr, respectively, had no clinical signs or positive culture for M. tuberculosis at the time of necropsy performed 2 or 6 yr later for unrelated reasons. The antibody levels in these rhinos continued to be significantly decreased. The findings suggest that the ElephantTB STAT-PAK and MAPIA may be useful tools to detect M. tuberculosis infection and monitor treatment in black rhinoceros. PMID:20063826

  1. Serological markers of hepatitis B and C in patients with HIV/AIDS and active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Mariz, Carolline; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa; Ximenes, Ricardo A A; Lacerda, Heloísa R; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito B; Montarroyos, Ulisses R; Barreto, Silvana; Salustiano, Daniela Medeiros; Albuquerque, Maria Fátima Pessoa Militão

    2016-06-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and C virus (HCV) are common in patients with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB). This is a cross-sectional study with patients infected with HIV/AIDS and active TB in Recife, Brazil, aiming to verify the prevalence of markers for HBV: antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc); and HCV: antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) by chemiluminescence, and to identify the frequency of associated factors. Data were collected through questionnaires, and blood was drawn from patients for analysis. We used the chi-square test and the Fisher exact test when necessary. We conducted a bivariate logistic regression analysis and the magnitude of the associations was expressed as odds ratio (OR) with a confidence interval of 95%. Among 166 patients studied with HIV/AIDS and active TB, anti-HBc was positive in 61 patients [36.7%; 95%CI (29.4-44.6%)] and anti-HCV in 11[6.6%; 95%CI (3.4-11.5%)]. In the logistic regression analysis, male sex, and age ≥40 years were independent factors associated with the occurrence of anti-HBc. In conclusion, we verified a high frequency of HBV contact marker and a low frequency of HCV markers in patients with HIV/AIDS and TB in Recife. J. Med. Virol. 88:996-1002, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26580855

  2. Use of a T cell interferon gamma release assay in the investigation for suspected active tuberculosis in a low prevalence area

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In settings with low background prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) infection, interferon-γ release assays (IGRA) could be useful for diagnosing active TB. This study aims to evaluate the performance of QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-G) in the investigation for suspected active TB, with particular attention to patients originating in high-incidence countries. Furthermore, factors associated with QFT-G results in patients with active TB were assessed. Methods From patients investigated for clinically suspected active TB, blood was obtained for QFT-G testing, in addition to routine investigations. Positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values for QFT-G were calculated, comparing patients with confirmed TB and those with other final diagnoses. QFT-G results in TB patients originating from countries with intermediate or high TB incidence were compared with QFT-G results from a control group of recently arrived asymptomatic immigrants from high-incidence countries. Factors associated with QFT-G outcome in patients with confirmed TB were assessed. Results Among 141 patients, 41/70 (58.6%) with confirmed TB had a positive QFT-G test, compared to 16/71 (22.6%) patients with other final diagnoses, resulting in overall PPV of 71.9% and NPV of 67.6%. For patients with pulmonary disease, PPV and NPV were 61.1% and 67.7%, respectively, and 90.5% and 66.7% for subjects with extrapulmonary manifestations. Comparing patients from high-incidence countries with controls yielded a PPV for active TB of 76.7%, and a NPV of 82.7%. Patients with confirmed TB and positive QFT-G results were characterized by a lower median peripheral white blood cell count (5.9 × 109/L vs. 8.8 × 109/L; P < 0.001) and a higher median body mass index (22.7 vs. 20.7; P = 0.043) as compared to QFT-G-negative TB patients. Conclusion The overall PPV and NPV of QFT-G for identifying active TB were unsatisfactory, especially for pulmonary disease. Thus, the usefulness of QFT-G for this purpose is

  3. Implementation and Operational Research: What Happens After a Negative Test for Tuberculosis? Evaluating Adherence to TB Diagnostic Algorithms in South African Primary Health Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Grant, A. D.; Chihota, V.; Ginindza, S.; Mvusi, L.; Churchyard, G. J.; Fielding, K.L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Background: Diagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) using sputum have suboptimal sensitivity among HIV-positive persons. We assessed health care worker adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms after negative sputum test results. Methods: The XTEND (Xpert for TB—Evaluating a New Diagnostic) trial compared outcomes among people tested for TB in primary care clinics using Xpert MTB/RIF vs. smear microscopy as the initial test. We analyzed data from XTEND participants who were HIV positive or HIV status unknown, whose initial sputum Xpert MTB/RIF or microscopy result was negative. If chest radiography, sputum culture, or hospital referral took place, the algorithm for TB diagnosis was considered followed. Analysis of intervention (Xpert MTB/RIF) effect on algorithm adherence used methods for cluster-randomized trials with small number of clusters. Results: Among 4037 XTEND participants with initial negative test results, 2155 (53%) reported being or testing HIV positive and 540 (14%) had unknown HIV status. Among 2155 HIV-positive participants [684 (32%) male, mean age 37 years (range, 18–79 years)], there was evidence of algorithm adherence among 515 (24%). Adherence was less likely among persons tested initially with Xpert MTB/RIF vs. smear [14% (142/1031) vs. 32% (364/1122), adjusted risk ratio 0.34 (95% CI: 0.17 to 0.65)] and for participants with unknown vs. positive HIV status [59/540 (11%) vs. 507/2155 (24%)]. Conclusions: We observed poorer adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms among HIV-positive persons tested initially with Xpert MTB/RIF vs. microscopy. Poor adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms and incomplete coverage of HIV testing represents a missed opportunity to diagnose TB and HIV, and may contribute to TB mortality. PMID:26966843

  4. Host Cytokine Responses Induced after Overnight Stimulation with Novel M. tuberculosis Infection Phase-Dependent Antigens Show Promise as Diagnostic Candidates for TB Disease

    PubMed Central

    Essone, Paulin N.; Chegou, Novel N.; Loxton, Andre G.; Stanley, Kim; Kriel, Magdalena; van der Spuy, Gian; Franken, Kees L.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.; Walzl, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) antigen-induced host markers that showed promise as TB diagnostic candidates in 7-day whole blood culture supernatants. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of these markers further, and cross-compare results with short-term antigen stimulated and unstimulated culture supernatants. Methods We recruited 15 culture confirmed TB cases and 15 non-TB cases from a high-TB endemic community in Cape Town, South Africa into a pilot case-control study from an on-going larger study. Blood samples collected from study participants were stimulated with 4 M.tb antigens that were previously identified as promising (ESAT6/CFP10 (early secreted), Rv2029c (latency), Rv2032 (latency) and Rv2389c (rpf)) in a 7-day or overnight culture assay. Supernatants were also collected form the standard QuantiFERON In Tube (QFT-IT) test. The levels of 26 host markers were evaluated in the three culture supernatants using the Luminex platform. Results The unstimulated levels of CRP, Serum amyloid P (SAP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) and ESAT-6/CFP-10 specific IP-10 and SAA were amongst the best discriminatory markers in all 3 assays, ascertaining TB with AUC of 72–84%. Four-marker models accurately classified up to 92%, 100% and 100% of study participants in the overnight, 7-day and Quantiferon culture supernatants, respectively, after leave-one-out cross validation. Conclusion Unstimulated and antigen-specific levels of CRP, SAA, IP-10, MMP-2 and sCD40L hold promise as diagnostic candidates for TB disease in short-term stimulation assays. Larger studies are required to validate these findings but the data suggest that antigen-specific cytokine production and in particular mutimarker biosignatures might contribute to future diagnostic strategies. PMID:25025278

  5. Gene Regulatory Networks Activated during Chronic Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a burden for most of world’s population. Several genes were found to be up-regulated at the late stage of chronic tuberculosis when DNA microarray protocol was used to analyze murine tuberculosis. Rv0348 is a potential transcriptional regulator that is highly expresse...

  6. Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti). Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous catt...

  7. Preferential adherence to antiretroviral therapy over tuberculosis (TB) treatment: a qualitative study of drug–resistant TB/HIV co–infected patients in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Amrita; Padayatchi, Nesri; O’Donnell, Max

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and second–line antituberculosis medications is essential to achieve successful outcomes among individuals co–infected with HIV and multi or extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR–TB). In 2012–13, we designed a qualitative study to explore barriers to adherence in KwaZulu–Natal, South Africa. We conducted six focus groups comprising 23 adults receiving treatment for either MDR-TB (n=2) or XDR-TB (n=21); 17 were on concurrent ART. Participants expressed a preference for ART over M/XDR–TB treatment as a result of greater tolerability, lower pill burden, and a commitment to ART. Treatment outcomes and the social morbidity associated with M/XDR-TB, characterised by public notification, stigma, and social isolation, were perceived to be worse than with HIV. Poor communication, low patient involvement, and provider supervision of treatment exacerbated participants’ negative experiences with TB care. To improve adherence, it is critical that new regimens for drug-resistant TB be developed with better efficacy, lower pill burden, and fewer adverse effects. For the first time, such improved regimens are on the horizon. In parallel and equally important is the implementation of a cohesive approach that promotes patient involvement, empowerment, and treatment literacy for HIV and for TB. PMID:25035943

  8. Control of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR-TB): A Root Cause Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2010-01-01

    The threat of global infectious agents has the potential to cripple national and global economies, as the outbreaks of SARS, Avian Flu, H1N1, and XDR-TB have demonstrated. This article offers a Root Cause Analysis (RCA) of one public health case study – the Speaker case of XDR-TB – pinpointing the underlying causal relationships associated with this global health incident and proposing recommendations for preventing its recurrence. An RCA approach identifies corrective actions directed at the root causes of the problem and advances them as necessary to eliminate global contagion with its major international public health risks. To my knowledge, this is the first root cause analysis of a global health problem. The reform this article proposes would be to add a standardized procedure akin to the informed consent process in clinical ethics, but within a shared health governance framework. This approach, addressing infectious agents at their origins or source, is potentially a more effective strategy to reduce uncertainty and avert global health threats. PMID:22506090

  9. Cytokine and chemokine expression profiles in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulation are altered in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected subjects with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Waruk, Jillian L M; Machuki, Zipporah; Mesa, Christine; Juno, Jennifer A; Anzala, Omu; Sharma, Meenu; Ball, T Blake; Oyugi, Julius; Kiazyk, Sandra

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects nearly 2 million people annually and is the most common cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. Tuberculosis (TB) diagnostics cater to HIV-uninfected individuals in non-endemic countries, are expensive, slow, and lack sensitivity for those most affected. Patterns of soluble immune markers from Mtb-stimulated immune cells are not well defined in HIV co-infection. We assessed immune differences between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals with active TB utilizing IFNγ-based QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) testing in Nairobi, Kenya. Excess QFT supernatants were used to measure cytokine and chemokine responses by a 17-plex bead array. Mtb/HIV co-infected participants were significantly less likely to be QFT+ (47.2% versus 84.2% in the HIV-uninfected group), and demonstrated lower expression of all cytokines except for IFNα2. Receiver operator characteristic analyses identified IL-1α as a potential marker of co-infection. Among HIV-infected individuals, CD4+ T cell count correlated weakly with the expression of several analytes. Co-expression analysis highlighted differences in immune profiles between the groups. These data suggest that there is a unique and detectable Mtb-specific immune response in co-infection. A better understanding of Mtb immunology can translate into much needed immunodiagnostics with enhanced sensitivity in HIV-infected individuals, facilitating their opportunity to obtain live-saving treatment. PMID:26073895

  10. NF-κB Repressing Factor Inhibits Chemokine Synthesis by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Alveolar Macrophages in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Hsiung; Wang, Chun-Hua; Lee, Kang-Yun; Lin, Shu-Min

    2013-01-01

    NF-κB repressing factor (NRF) is a transcriptional silencer implicated in the basal silencing of specific NF-κB targeting genes, including iNOS, IFN-β and IL-8/CXCL8. IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 are involved in neutrophil and lymphocyte recruitment against M. tuberculosis (MTb) and disease progression of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Alveolar macrophages (AM) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were used to study the regulatory role of NRF in pulmonary TB. AM and PBMC were purified from 19 TB patients and 15 normal subjects. To study the underlying mechanism, PBMC were exposed to heated TB bacilli. The regulation role of NRF in IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 was determined by NRF knock-down or over-expression. NRF binding capabilities in promoter sites were measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. The levels of IP-10/CXCL10, IL-8/CXCL8 and NRF were significantly higher in AM and PBMC in patients with active TB. NRF played an inhibitory role in IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 inductions. We delineate the role of NRF in pulmonary TB, which inhibits the expressions of IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 in AM and PBMC of patients with high bacterial load. NRF may serve as an endogenous repressor to prevent robust increase in IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 when TB bacterial load is high. PMID:24223729

  11. Cationic amphipathic D-enantiomeric antimicrobial peptides with in vitro and ex vivo activity against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yun; Lam, Jason T; Siu, Gilman K H; Yam, Wing Cheong; Mason, A James; Lam, Jenny K W

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of bacterial death worldwide. Due to the emergence of multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB), and the persistence of latent infections, a safe and effective TB therapy is highly sought after. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have therapeutic potential against infectious diseases and have the ability to target microbial pathogens within eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we investigated the activity of a family of six AMPs containing all-D amino acids (D-LAK peptides) against MDR and XDR clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) both in vitro and, using THP-1 cells as a macrophage model, cultured ex vivo. All the D-LAK peptides successfully inhibited the growth of Mtb in vitro and were similarly effective against MDR and XDR strains. D-LAK peptides effectively broke down the heavy clumping of mycobacteria in broth culture, consistent with a 'detergent-like effect' that could reduce the hydrophobic interactions between the highly lipidic cell walls of the mycobacteria, preventing bacteria cell aggregation. Furthermore, though not able to eradicate the intracellular mycobacteria, D-LAK peptides substantially inhibited the intracellular growth of drug-resistant Mtb clinical isolates at concentrations that were well tolerated by THP-1 cells. Finally, combining D-LAK peptide with isoniazid could enhance the anti-TB efficacy. D-LAK peptide, particularly D-LAK120-A, was effective as an adjunct agent at non-toxic concentration to potentiate the efficacy of isoniazid against drug-resistant Mtb in vitro, possibly by facilitating the access of isoniazid into the mycobacteria by increasing the surface permeability of the pathogen. PMID:25154927

  12. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  13. Is TB in Your Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Joanne; Elwell, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Points out the importance of effective health education to fight against tuberculosis (TB) which is the number one fatal infectious disease around the world. Describes a science curriculum on tuberculosis that includes information on the facts about tuberculosis, a forum on tuberculosis, and evaluation. (Contains 17 references.) (YDS)

  14. Diagnosis and Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important occupational risks for healthcare workers (HCWs) in South Korea. Many policies regarding the control and prevention of TB in healthcare settings recommend that HCWs are tested for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in addition to active TB. Moreover, the Korean Tuberculosis Prevention Act also recommends that HCWs receive regular testing for LTBI. However, there are no specific or detailed guidelines for dealing with LTBI in HCWs. Herein, we discuss the diagnosis and treatment of LTBI in HCWs and focus particularly on the baseline screening of hired HCWs, routine follow-up, and contact investigation. PMID:27433172

  15. Scaling up of HIV-TB collaborative activities: Achievements and challenges in India.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Rajesh; Shah, Amar; Sachdeva, K S; Sreenivas, A N; Gupta, R S; Khaparde, S D

    2016-01-01

    India has been implementing HIV/TB collaborative activities since 2001 with rapid scale-up of infrastructure across the country during past decade in National AIDS Control Programme and Revised National TB Control Programme. India has shown over 50% reduction in new infections and around 35% reduction in AIDS-related deaths, thereby being one of the success stories globally. Substantial progress in the implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities has occurred in India and it is marching towards target set out in the Global Plan to Stop TB and endorsed by the UN General Assembly to halve HIV associated TB deaths by 2015. While the successful approaches have led to impressive gains in HIV/TB control in India, there are emerging challenges including newer pockets with rising HIV trends in North India, increasing drug resistance, high mortality among co-infected patients, low HIV testing rates among TB patients in northern and eastern states in India, treatment delays and drop-outs, stigma and discrimination, etc. In spite of these difficulties, established HIV/TB coordination mechanisms at different levels, rapid scale-up of facilities with decentralisation of treatment services, regular joint supervision and monitoring, newer initiatives like use of rapid diagnostics for early diagnosis of TB among people living with HIV, TB notification, etc. have led to success in combating the threat of HIV/TB in India. This article highlights the steps taken by India, one of the largest HIV/TB programmes in world, in scaling up of the joint HIV-TB collaborative activities, the achievements so far and discusses the emerging challenges which could provide important lessons for other countries in scaling up their programmes. PMID:27235937

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Community Active Case Finding and Household Contact Investigation for Tuberculosis Case Detection in Urban Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sekandi, Juliet N.; Dobbin, Kevin; Oloya, James; Okwera, Alphonse; Whalen, Christopher C.; Corso, Phaedra S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Case detection by passive case finding (PCF) strategy alone is inadequate for detecting all tuberculosis (TB) cases in high burden settings especially Sub-Saharan Africa. Alternative case detection strategies such as community Active Case Finding (ACF) and Household Contact Investigations (HCI) are effective but empirical evidence of their cost-effectiveness is sparse. The objective of this study was to determine whether adding ACF or HCI compared with standard PCF alone represent cost-effective alternative TB case detection strategies in urban Africa. Methods A static decision modeling framework was used to examine the costs and effectiveness of three TB case detection strategies: PCF alone, PCF+ACF, and PCF+HCI. Probability and cost estimates were obtained from National TB program data, primary studies conducted in Uganda, published literature and expert opinions. The analysis was performed from the societal and provider perspectives over a 1.5 year time-frame. The main effectiveness measure was the number of true TB cases detected and the outcome was incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) expressed as cost in 2013 US$ per additional true TB case detected. Results Compared to PCF alone, the PCF+HCI strategy was cost-effective at US$443.62 per additional TB case detected. However, PCF+ACF was not cost-effective at US$1492.95 per additional TB case detected. Sensitivity analyses showed that PCF+ACF would be cost-effective if the prevalence of chronic cough in the population screened by ACF increased 10-fold from 4% to 40% and if the program costs for ACF were reduced by 50%. Conclusions Under our baseline assumptions, the addition of HCI to an existing PCF program presented a more cost-effective strategy than the addition of ACF in the context of an African city. Therefore, implementation of household contact investigations as a part of the recommended TB control strategy should be prioritized. PMID:25658592

  17. Factors that Predict Negative Results of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test in Patients with Culture-Confirmed Tuberculosis: A Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kim, Yee Hyung; Jeon, Kyeongman; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Ryu, Yon Ju; Choi, Jae Chol; Kim, Ho Cheol; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background Interferon-γ release assays such as the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test (QFT-GIT) are designed to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, whether latent or manifesting as disease. However, a substantial number of persons with culture-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) have negative QFT-GITs. Information on host factors contributing to false-negative and indeterminate results are limited. Methods A multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed with 1,264 culture-confirmed TB patients older than 18 years who were subjected to the QFT-GIT at one of the six hospitals between May 2007 and February 2014. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection were excluded. Clinical and laboratory data were collected in South Korea. Results Of all patients, 87.6% (1,107/1,264) were diagnosed with pulmonary TB and 12.4% (157/1,264) with extrapulmonary TB. The rate of negative results was 14.4% (182/1,264). The following factors were highly correlated with false-negative results in the QFT-GIT: advanced age (age ≥ 65 years, odds ratio [OR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03–2.39), bilateral disease as determined by chest radiography (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.13–2.72), malignancy (OR 2.42, 95% CI 1.30–4.49), and lymphocytopenia (total lymphocyte count < 1.0 × 109/L, OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.21–2.87). Conclusions Consequently, QFT-GIT results need to be interpreted with caution in patients with these host risk factors such as the elderly, bilateral disease on chest radiography, or malignancy, or lymphocytopenia. PMID:26070207

  18. Combined Analysis of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, IL-1RA and MCP-1 in QFT Supernatant Is Useful for Distinguishing Active Tuberculosis from Latent Infection.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Maho; Akashi, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hideaki; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Hebisawa, Akira; Ohta, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT), an interferon-γ release assay, is used to diagnose Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but its inaccuracy in distinguishing active tuberculosis from latent infection is a major concern. There is thus a need for an easy and accurate tool for achieving that goal in daily clinical settings. This study aimed to identify candidate cytokines for specifically differentiating active tuberculosis from latent infection. Our study population consisted of 31 active TB (tuberculosis) patients, 29 LTBI (latent tuberculosis infection) patients and 10 healthy control subjects. We assayed for 27 cytokines in QFT supernatants of both specific antigen-stimulated blood samples (TBAg) and negative-control samples (Nil). We analyzed their specificities and sensitivities by creating receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and measuring the area under those curves (AUCs). In TBAg-Nil supernatants, IL-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and IL-1RA showed high AUCs of 0.8120, 0.7842, 0.7419 and 0.7375, respectively. Compared with each cytokine alone, combined assay for these top four cytokines showed positive rates in diagnosing active TB, and GDA analysis revealed that MCP-1 and IL-5 are potent in distinguishing active TB from LTBI, with Wilk's lambda = 0.718 (p < 0.001). Furthermore, utilizing the unique characteristic of IL-2 that its TBAg-Nil supernatant levels are higher in LTBI compared to active TB, the difference between IFN-γ and IL-2 showed a large AUC of 0.8910. In summary, besides IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, IL-1RA and MCP-1 in QFT supernatants may be useful for distinguishing active TB from LTBI. Those cytokines may also help us understand the difference in pathogenesis between active TB and LTBI. PMID:27035669

  19. Combined Analysis of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, IL-1RA and MCP-1 in QFT Supernatant Is Useful for Distinguishing Active Tuberculosis from Latent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Suzukawa, Maho; Akashi, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hideaki; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Hebisawa, Akira; Ohta, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT), an interferon-γ release assay, is used to diagnose Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but its inaccuracy in distinguishing active tuberculosis from latent infection is a major concern. There is thus a need for an easy and accurate tool for achieving that goal in daily clinical settings. This study aimed to identify candidate cytokines for specifically differentiating active tuberculosis from latent infection. Our study population consisted of 31 active TB (tuberculosis) patients, 29 LTBI (latent tuberculosis infection) patients and 10 healthy control subjects. We assayed for 27 cytokines in QFT supernatants of both specific antigen-stimulated blood samples (TBAg) and negative-control samples (Nil). We analyzed their specificities and sensitivities by creating receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and measuring the area under those curves (AUCs). In TBAg–Nil supernatants, IL-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and IL-1RA showed high AUCs of 0.8120, 0.7842, 0.7419 and 0.7375, respectively. Compared with each cytokine alone, combined assay for these top four cytokines showed positive rates in diagnosing active TB, and GDA analysis revealed that MCP-1 and IL-5 are potent in distinguishing active TB from LTBI, with Wilk’s lambda = 0.718 (p < 0.001). Furthermore, utilizing the unique characteristic of IL-2 that its TBAg–Nil supernatant levels are higher in LTBI compared to active TB, the difference between IFN-γ and IL-2 showed a large AUC of 0.8910. In summary, besides IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, IL-1RA and MCP-1 in QFT supernatants may be useful for distinguishing active TB from LTBI. Those cytokines may also help us understand the difference in pathogenesis between active TB and LTBI. PMID:27035669

  20. Optimal Control for TB disease with vaccination assuming endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggriani, N.; Wicaksono, B. C.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the deadliest infectious disease in the world which caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The disease is spread through the air via the droplets from the infectious persons when they are coughing. The World Health Organization (WHO) has paid a special attention to the TB by providing some solution, for example by providing BCG vaccine that prevent an infected person from becoming an active infectious TB. In this paper we develop a mathematical model of the spread of the TB which assumes endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection factors. We also assume that some of the susceptible population are vaccinated. Furthermore we investigate the optimal vaccination level for the disease.

  1. Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Safak; Tatar, Oner; Akpancar, Serkan; Bilgic, Serkan; Ersen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (TB) is a significant form of TB, causing spinal deformity and paralysis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for avoiding multivertebral destruction and are critical for improving outcomes in spinal TB. We believe that appropriate treatment method should be implemented at the early stage of this disease and that the Gulhane Askeri Tıp Akademisi classification system can be considered a practical guide for spinal TB treatment planning in all countries. PMID:26609247

  2. Immunologic Cerebral Vasculitis and Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis: An Uncommon Association.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiyi; Li, Qian; Zhen, Xiaohan; Liu, Yuan; Wu, Qi

    2015-09-01

    Infection can cause cerebral vasculitis not only by direct invasion of the vessel wall, but by immune complex deposition, or through secondary cryoglobulineamia. There are also two types of cerebral vasculitis associated with tuberculosis (TB). In TB treatment, cerebral vasculitis caused by immunologic injury received little attention than vasculitis due to direct invasion of TB infection. We report a case in a young woman who presented with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, stroke-like events, movement disorder and coma, which was found to be active, lymph node TB with immunologic cerebral vacuities without tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:26500938

  3. Immunologic Cerebral Vasculitis and Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis: An Uncommon Association

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiyi; Li, Qian; Zhen, Xiaohan; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Infection can cause cerebral vasculitis not only by direct invasion of the vessel wall, but by immune complex deposition, or through secondary cryoglobulineamia. There are also two types of cerebral vasculitis associated with tuberculosis (TB). In TB treatment, cerebral vasculitis caused by immunologic injury received little attention than vasculitis due to direct invasion of TB infection. We report a case in a young woman who presented with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, stroke-like events, movement disorder and coma, which was found to be active, lymph node TB with immunologic cerebral vacuities without tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:26500938

  4. [Rapid diagnosis of mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex, using BACTEC 460 TB system].

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Sato, K; Tomioka, H; Inoue, K; Shigeto, E

    1992-02-01

    Fourty-five sputum specimens collected at the National Sanatorium Hiroshima Hospital were subjected to cultivation using either BACTEC 460 TB System (BACTEC method; Becton Dickinson Co., Towson, Md., U.S.A.) or 3% Ogawa egg medium. Test sputum was treated with four volumes of 4% NaOH for approximately two minutes, after which 0.1 ml of the treated sputum was immediately inoculated onto 3% Ogawa egg medium. After neutralizing the remaining pretreated sputum with 1N HCl, and diluting with 1/15 M phosphate buffer PB; pH 6.8), it was then centrifuged at 3,000 rpm for 20 min and the sediment was suspended in 1.5 ml of PB. Volumes of 0.5 ml each were inoculated into BACTEC 12B medium (4 ml), containing PANTA for prevention of contamination and POES for promoting the growth of mycobacteria. In the BBCTEC method, bacterial growth was measured in terms of increases in the Growth Index (GI) values which were determined by the amount of 14CO2 released from the 14C-labelled palmitate during cultivation at 37 degrees C (positive growth; GI greater than or equal to 50). Moreover, rho-nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxy-propiophenone (NAP)-sensitivity testing was done by transferring a part of the BACTEC 12B culture showing positive growth to a NAP vial, and thereafter subjected to further cultivation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1552698

  5. Collaborative activities and treatment outcomes in patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis in Viet Nam

    PubMed Central

    Nhung, N. V.; Shewade, H. D.; Hoa, N. B.; Harries, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: The National Tuberculosis (TB) Programme in Viet Nam and Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC). Objectives: To determine 1) at national level between 2011 and 2013, the relationship between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, uptake of TB-HIV interventions and adverse treatment outcomes among TB-HIV patients; and 2) in HCMC in 2013, patient characteristics associated with adverse outcomes. Design: An ecological study reviewing aggregate nationwide data and a retrospective cohort review in HCMC. Results: Nationwide, from 2011 to 2013, HIV testing increased in TB patients from 58% to 68% and antiretroviral therapy (ART) increased in TB-HIV patients from 54% to 63%. Adverse treatment outcomes in TB-HIV patients increased from 24% to 27%, largely due to transfer out (5–9% increase) and death. The Northern and Highland regions showed poor uptake of TB-HIV interventions. In HCMC, 303 (27%) of 1110 TB-HIV patients had adverse outcomes, with higher risks observed in those with previously treated TB, those diagnosed as HIV-positive before TB onset and those never placed on cotrimoxazole or ART. Conclusion: Despite improving HIV testing rates and TB-HIV interventions, adverse outcomes in TB-HIV patients remain at about 26%. Characteristics predicting higher risk of adverse outcomes must be addressed if Viet Nam wishes to end the TB epidemic by 2030. PMID:27051604

  6. Healthcare Worker Preferences for Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Programs in South Africa: A Best-Worst Scaling Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Nathan N.; Roy, Lilla; O’Hara, Lyndsay M.; Spiegel, Jerry M.; Lynd, Larry D.; FitzGerald, J. Mark; Yassi, Annalee; Nophale, Letshego E.; Marra, Carlo A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Healthcare workers (HCWs) in South Africa are at a high risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB) due to their occupational exposures. This study aimed to systematically quantify and compare the preferred attributes of an active TB case finding program for HCWs in South Africa. Methods A Best–Worst Scaling choice experiment estimated HCW’s preferences using a random-effects conditional logit model. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to explore heterogeneity in preferences. Results “No cost”, “the assurance of confidentiality”, “no wait” and testing at the occupational health unit at one’s hospital were the most preferred attributes. LCA identified a four class model with consistent differences in preference strength. Sex, occupation, and the time since a previous TB test were statistically significant predictors of class membership. Conclusions The findings support the strengthening of occupational health units in South Africa to offer free and confidential active TB case finding programs for HCWs with minimal wait times. There is considerable variation in active TB case finding preferences amongst HCWs of different gender, occupation, and testing history. Attention to heterogeneity in preferences should optimize screening utilization of target HCW populations. PMID:26197344

  7. A Bayesian Nonlinear Mixed-Effects Regression Model for the Characterization of Early Bactericidal Activity of Tuberculosis Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Divan Aristo; Schall, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Trials of the early bactericidal activity (EBA) of tuberculosis (TB) treatments assess the decline, during the first few days to weeks of treatment, in colony forming unit (CFU) count of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the sputum of patients with smear-microscopy-positive pulmonary TB. Profiles over time of CFU data have conventionally been modeled using linear, bilinear, or bi-exponential regression. We propose a new biphasic nonlinear regression model for CFU data that comprises linear and bilinear regression models as special cases and is more flexible than bi-exponential regression models. A Bayesian nonlinear mixed-effects (NLME) regression model is fitted jointly to the data of all patients from a trial, and statistical inference about the mean EBA of TB treatments is based on the Bayesian NLME regression model. The posterior predictive distribution of relevant slope parameters of the Bayesian NLME regression model provides insight into the nature of the EBA of TB treatments; specifically, the posterior predictive distribution allows one to judge whether treatments are associated with monolinear or bilinear decline of log(CFU) count, and whether CFU count initially decreases fast, followed by a slower rate of decrease, or vice versa. PMID:25322214

  8. The Pregnane X Receptor in Tuberculosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shehu, Amina I.; Li, Guangming; Xie, Wen; Ma, Xiaochao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Among the infectious diseases, tuberculosis (TB) remains the second cause of death after HIV. TB treatment requires the combination of multiple drugs including the rifamycin class. However, rifamycins are activators of human pregnane X receptor (PXR), a transcription factor that regulates drug metabolism, drug resistance, energy metabolism, and immune response. Rifamycin-mediated PXR activation may affect the outcome of TB therapy. Areas covered This review describes the role of PXR in modulating metabolism, efficacy, toxicity, and resistance to anti-TB drugs; as well as polymorphisms of PXR that potentially affect TB susceptibility. Expert opinion The wide range of PXR functions aside mediating drug metabolism and toxicity in TB therapy is underappreciated and thus understudied. Further studies are needed to determine the overall impact of PXR activation on the outcome of TB therapy. PMID:26592418

  9. Measurement of phenotype and absolute number of circulating heparin-binding hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and purified protein derivative antigen-specific CD4 T cells can discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Paul; Barkham, Timothy M S; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T

    2015-02-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154(+) TNF-α(+) cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154(+) TNF-α(+) IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+) and CD154(+) TNF-α(+) CXCR3(+). Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  10. Active Tuberculosis Is Associated with Worse Clinical Outcomes in HIV-Infected African Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Siika, Abraham M.; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara K.; Musick, Beverly S.; Mwangi, Ann W.; Diero, Lameck O.; Kimaiyo, Sylvester N.; Tierney, William M.; Carter, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This cohort study utilized data from a large HIV treatment program in western Kenya to describe the impact of active tuberculosis (TB) on clinical outcomes among African patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design We included all patients initiating ART between March 2004 and November 2007. Clinical (signs and symptoms), radiological (chest radiographs) and laboratory (mycobacterial smears, culture and tissue histology) criteria were used to record the diagnosis of TB disease in the program’s electronic medical record system. Methods We assessed the impact of TB disease on mortality, loss to follow-up (LTFU) and incident AIDS-defining events (ADEs) through Cox models and CD4 cell and weight response to ART by non-linear mixed models. Results We studied 21,242 patients initiating ART–5,186 (24%) with TB; 62% female; median age 37 years. There were proportionately more men in the active TB (46%) than in the non-TB (35%) group. Adjusting for baseline HIV-disease severity, TB patients were more likely to die (hazard ratio – HR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.18–1.47) or have incident ADEs (HR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.19–1.45). They had lower median CD4 cell counts (77 versus 109), weight (52.5 versus 55.0 kg) and higher ADE risk at baseline (CD4-adjusted odds ratio = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.31–1.85). ART adherence was similarly good in both groups. Adjusting for gender and baseline CD4 cell count, TB patients experienced virtually identical rise in CD4 counts after ART initiation as those without. However, the overall CD4 count at one year was lower among patients with TB (251 versus 269 cells/µl). Conclusions Clinically detected TB disease is associated with greater mortality and morbidity despite salutary response to ART. Data suggest that identifying HIV patients co-infected with TB earlier in the HIV-disease trajectory may not fully address TB-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:23301015

  11. Determination of MIC Distribution and Epidemiological Cutoff Values for Bedaquiline and Delamanid in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using the MGIT 960 System Equipped with TB eXiST

    PubMed Central

    Hömke, Rico; Ritter, Claudia; Valsesia, Giorgia; Bloemberg, Guido V.; Böttger, Erik C.

    2015-01-01

    Bedaquiline (Sirturo) and delamanid (Deltyba) have recently been approved by the regulatory authorities for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is not established for either substance. On the basis of the use of the MGIT 960 system equipped with EpiCenter/TB eXiST, we determined a mean bedaquiline MIC for wild-type strains of 0.65 mg/liter (median, 0.4 mg/liter) and an epidemiological cutoff (ECOFF) of 1.6 mg/liter; for delamanid, a mean wild-type drug MIC of 0.013 mg/liter (median, 0.01 mg/liter) and an ECOFF of 0.04 mg/liter were determined. PMID:25941226

  12. Determination of MIC distribution and epidemiological cutoff values for bedaquiline and delamanid in Mycobacterium tuberculosis using the MGIT 960 system equipped with TB eXiST.

    PubMed

    Keller, Peter M; Hömke, Rico; Ritter, Claudia; Valsesia, Giorgia; Bloemberg, Guido V; Böttger, Erik C

    2015-07-01

    Bedaquiline (Sirturo) and delamanid (Deltyba) have recently been approved by the regulatory authorities for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is not established for either substance. On the basis of the use of the MGIT 960 system equipped with EpiCenter/TB eXiST, we determined a mean bedaquiline MIC for wild-type strains of 0.65 mg/liter (median, 0.4 mg/liter) and an epidemiological cutoff (ECOFF) of 1.6 mg/liter; for delamanid, a mean wild-type drug MIC of 0.013 mg/liter (median, 0.01 mg/liter) and an ECOFF of 0.04 mg/liter were determined. PMID:25941226

  13. Optimal intervention strategies for tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowong, Samuel; Aziz Alaoui, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of optimal control of a deterministic model of tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus). We first present and analyze an uncontrolled tuberculosis model which incorporates the essential biological and epidemiological features of the disease. The model is shown to exhibit the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where a stable disease-free equilibrium co-exists with one or more stable endemic equilibria when the associated basic reproduction number is less than the unity. Based on this continuous model, the tuberculosis control is formulated and solved as an optimal control problem, indicating how control terms on the chemoprophylaxis and detection should be introduced in the population to reduce the number of individuals with active TB. Results provide a framework for designing the cost-effective strategies for TB with two intervention methods.

  14. Discordance across Phenotypic and Molecular Methods for Drug Susceptibility Testing of Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in a Low TB Incidence Country

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Suhail; Mokaddas, Eiman; Al-Mutairi, Noura; Eldeen, Hanaa S.; Mohammadi, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    With increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), accurate drug susceptibility testing (DST) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to first-line drugs has become crucial for proper patient management. We evaluated concordance of DST results for 70 M. tuberculosis isolates across two phenotypic and two molecular methods: BACTEC 460TB, MGIT 960 system, GenoType MTBDRplus and DNA sequencing of gene segments most commonly implicated in conferring resistance to anti-TB drugs. Most (84%) M. tuberculosis isolates were multidrug-resistant. Twenty-four isolates yielded discrepant DST results. For rifampicin, isoniazid and streptomycin, 96%, 97% and 93% of isolates, respectively, were susceptible or resistant by all four methods, whereas for ethambutol, this agreement was observed for only 76% of isolates (P <0.05 for rifampicin or isoniazid or streptomycin versus ethambutol). Occurrence of rare mutations in three isolates that confer low-level resistance caused lower agreement for rifampicin among the four methods (kappa coefficient (κ) range, 0.84 to 0.95). For isoniazid, there was perfect agreement among phenotypic methods and molecular methods (κ, 1.00) but lower agreement between phenotypic and molecular methods. Three isolates were detected as polydrug-resistant by MGIT 960 system but as multidrug-resistant by DNA sequence-based method. The agreement was higher for streptomycin among the two phenotypic methods (κ, 0.97) while targeted sequencing yielded lower agreement (κ range, 0.86 to 0.89). The discrepancy for ethambutol resulted largely due to lower concordance of MGIT 960 results (κ range, 0.53 to 0.64). The MGIT 960 system is an accurate method for DST of M. tuberculosis against isoniazid and streptomycin while the results of rifampicin susceptibility should be complemented with DNA sequencing-based method when the suspicion for resistance is high. The possibility of false susceptibility to ethambutol with MGIT 960 system suggests that

  15. Discordance across Phenotypic and Molecular Methods for Drug Susceptibility Testing of Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in a Low TB Incidence Country.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Suhail; Mokaddas, Eiman; Al-Mutairi, Noura; Eldeen, Hanaa S; Mohammadi, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    With increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), accurate drug susceptibility testing (DST) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to first-line drugs has become crucial for proper patient management. We evaluated concordance of DST results for 70 M. tuberculosis isolates across two phenotypic and two molecular methods: BACTEC 460TB, MGIT 960 system, GenoType MTBDRplus and DNA sequencing of gene segments most commonly implicated in conferring resistance to anti-TB drugs. Most (84%) M. tuberculosis isolates were multidrug-resistant. Twenty-four isolates yielded discrepant DST results. For rifampicin, isoniazid and streptomycin, 96%, 97% and 93% of isolates, respectively, were susceptible or resistant by all four methods, whereas for ethambutol, this agreement was observed for only 76% of isolates (P<0.05 for rifampicin or isoniazid or streptomycin versus ethambutol). Occurrence of rare mutations in three isolates that confer low-level resistance caused lower agreement for rifampicin among the four methods (kappa coefficient (κ) range, 0.84 to 0.95). For isoniazid, there was perfect agreement among phenotypic methods and molecular methods (κ, 1.00) but lower agreement between phenotypic and molecular methods. Three isolates were detected as polydrug-resistant by MGIT 960 system but as multidrug-resistant by DNA sequence-based method. The agreement was higher for streptomycin among the two phenotypic methods (κ, 0.97) while targeted sequencing yielded lower agreement (κ range, 0.86 to 0.89). The discrepancy for ethambutol resulted largely due to lower concordance of MGIT 960 results (κ range, 0.53 to 0.64). The MGIT 960 system is an accurate method for DST of M. tuberculosis against isoniazid and streptomycin while the results of rifampicin susceptibility should be complemented with DNA sequencing-based method when the suspicion for resistance is high. The possibility of false susceptibility to ethambutol with MGIT 960 system suggests that molecular

  16. Mycobacterial Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases A and B Inhibitors Augment the Bactericidal Activity of the Standard Anti-tuberculosis Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.; He, Rongjun; Pinn, Michael L.; He, Yantao; Burrows, Francis; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Karakousis, Petros C.

    2016-01-01

    Novel drugs are required to shorten the duration of treatment for tuberculosis (TB) and to combat the emergence of drug resistance. One approach has been to identify and target Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) virulence factors, which promote the establishment of TB infection and pathogenesis. Mtb produces a number of virulence factors, including two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), mPTPA and mPTPB, to evade the antimicrobial functions of host macrophages. To assess the therapeutic potential of targeting the virulent Mtb PTPs, we developed highly potent and selective inhibitors of mPTPA (L335-M34) and mPTPB (L01-Z08) with drug-like properties. We tested the bactericidal activity of L335-M34 and L01-Z08 alone or together in combination with the standard antitubercular regimen of isoniazid-rifampicin-pyrazinamide (HRZ) in the guinea pig model of chronic TB infection, which faithfully recapitulates some of the key histological features of human TB lesions. Following a single dose of L335-M34 50mg/kg and L01-Z08 20 mg/kg, plasma levels were maintained at levels 10-fold greater than the biochemical IC50 for 12–24 hours. Although neither PTP inhibitor alone significantly enhanced the antibacterial activity of HRZ, dual inhibition of mPTPA and mPTPB in combination with HRZ showed modest synergy, even after 2 weeks of treatment. After 6 weeks of treatment, the degree of lung inflammation correlated with the bactericidal activity of each drug regimen. This study highlights the potential utility of targeting Mtb virulence factors, and specifically the Mtb PTPs, as a strategy for enhancing the activity of standard anti-TB treatment. PMID:27478867

  17. Gamma delta T cell responses associated with the development of tuberculosis in health care workers.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane J; Pinto, Luisa; Costa, Leonor; Martins, Marta; Leandro, Clara; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Arroz, Maria J; Ventura, Fernando A; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2005-03-01

    This study evaluated T cell immune responses to purified protein derivative (PPD) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in health care workers who remained free of active tuberculosis (HCWs w/o TB), health care workers who went on to develop active TB (HCWs w/TB), non-health care workers who were TB free (Non-HCWs) and tuberculosis patients presenting with minimal (Min TB) or advanced (Adv TB) disease. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated with Mtb and PPD and the expression of T cell activation markers CD25+ and HLA-DR+, intracellular IL-4 and IFN-gamma production and cytotoxic responses were evaluated. PBMC from HCWs who developed TB showed decreased percentages of cells expressing CD8+CD25+ in comparison to HCWs who remained healthy. HCWs who developed TB showed increased gammadelta TCR+ cell cytotoxicity and decreased CD3+gammadelta TCR- cell cytotoxicity in comparison to HCWs who remained healthy. PBMC from TB patients with advanced disease showed decreased percentages of CD25+CD4+ and CD25+CD8+ T cells that were associated with increased IL-4 production in CD8+ and gammadelta TCR+ phenotypes, in comparison with TB patients presenting minimal disease. TB patients with advanced disease showed increased gammadelta TCR+ cytotoxicity and reduced CD3+gammadelta TCR- cell cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that HCWs who developed TB show an early compensatory mechanism involving an increase in lytic responses of gammadelta TCR+ cells which did not prevent TB. PMID:15708307

  18. Pediatric Tuberculosis in Italian Children: Epidemiological and Clinical Data from the Italian Register of Pediatric Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Luisa; Lancella, Laura; Tersigni, Chiara; Venturini, Elisabetta; Chiappini, Elena; Bergamini, Barbara Maria; Codifava, Margherita; Venturelli, Cristina; Tosetti, Giulia; Marabotto, Caterina; Cursi, Laura; Boccuzzi, Elena; Garazzino, Silvia; Tovo, Pier Angelo; Pinon, Michele; Le Serre, Daniele; Castiglioni, Laura; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Guarino, Alfredo; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Castagnola, Elio; Bossi, Grazia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Grandolfo, Rita; Fiorito, Valentina; Valentini, Piero; Buonsenso, Danilo; Domenici, Raffaele; Montesanti, Marco; Salvini, Filippo Maria; Riva, Enrica; Dodi, Icilio; Maschio, Francesca; Abbagnato, Luisa; Fiumana, Elisa; Fornabaio, Chiara; Ballista, Patrizia; Portelli, Vincenzo; Bottone, Gabriella; Palladino, Nicola; Valenzise, Mariella; Vecchi, Barbara; Di Gangi, Maria; Lupi, Carla; Villani, Alberto; de Martino, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Over the last decades, TB has also emerged in the pediatric population. Epidemiologic data of childhood TB are still limited and there is an urgent need of more data on very large cohorts. A multicenter study was conducted in 27 pediatric hospitals, pediatric wards, and public health centers in Italy using a standardized form, covering the period of time between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012. Children with active TB, latent TB, and those recently exposed to TB or recently adopted/immigrated from a high TB incidence country were enrolled. Overall, 4234 children were included; 554 (13.1%) children had active TB, 594 (14.0%) latent TB and 3086 (72.9%) were uninfected. Among children with active TB, 481 (86.8%) patients had pulmonary TB. The treatment of active TB cases was known for 96.4% (n = 534) of the cases. Overall, 210 (39.3%) out of these 534 children were treated with three and 216 (40.4%) with four first-line drugs. Second-line drugs where used in 87 (16.3%) children with active TB. Drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were reported in 39 (7%) children. Improving the surveillance of childhood TB is important for public health care workers and pediatricians. A non-negligible proportion of children had drug-resistant TB and was treated with second-line drugs, most of which are off-label in the pediatric age. Future efforts should concentrate on improving active surveillance, diagnostic tools, and the availability of antitubercular pediatric formulations, also in low-endemic countries. PMID:27322255

  19. Pediatric Tuberculosis in Italian Children: Epidemiological and Clinical Data from the Italian Register of Pediatric Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Galli, Luisa; Lancella, Laura; Tersigni, Chiara; Venturini, Elisabetta; Chiappini, Elena; Bergamini, Barbara Maria; Codifava, Margherita; Venturelli, Cristina; Tosetti, Giulia; Marabotto, Caterina; Cursi, Laura; Boccuzzi, Elena; Garazzino, Silvia; Tovo, Pier Angelo; Pinon, Michele; Le Serre, Daniele; Castiglioni, Laura; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Guarino, Alfredo; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Castagnola, Elio; Bossi, Grazia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Grandolfo, Rita; Fiorito, Valentina; Valentini, Piero; Buonsenso, Danilo; Domenici, Raffaele; Montesanti, Marco; Salvini, Filippo Maria; Riva, Enrica; Dodi, Icilio; Maschio, Francesca; Abbagnato, Luisa; Fiumana, Elisa; Fornabaio, Chiara; Ballista, Patrizia; Portelli, Vincenzo; Bottone, Gabriella; Palladino, Nicola; Valenzise, Mariella; Vecchi, Barbara; Di Gangi, Maria; Lupi, Carla; Villani, Alberto; de Martino, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Over the last decades, TB has also emerged in the pediatric population. Epidemiologic data of childhood TB are still limited and there is an urgent need of more data on very large cohorts. A multicenter study was conducted in 27 pediatric hospitals, pediatric wards, and public health centers in Italy using a standardized form, covering the period of time between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012. Children with active TB, latent TB, and those recently exposed to TB or recently adopted/immigrated from a high TB incidence country were enrolled. Overall, 4234 children were included; 554 (13.1%) children had active TB, 594 (14.0%) latent TB and 3086 (72.9%) were uninfected. Among children with active TB, 481 (86.8%) patients had pulmonary TB. The treatment of active TB cases was known for 96.4% (n = 534) of the cases. Overall, 210 (39.3%) out of these 534 children were treated with three and 216 (40.4%) with four first-line drugs. Second-line drugs where used in 87 (16.3%) children with active TB. Drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were reported in 39 (7%) children. Improving the surveillance of childhood TB is important for public health care workers and pediatricians. A non-negligible proportion of children had drug-resistant TB and was treated with second-line drugs, most of which are off-label in the pediatric age. Future efforts should concentrate on improving active surveillance, diagnostic tools, and the availability of antitubercular pediatric formulations, also in low-endemic countries. PMID:27322255

  20. Tuberculosis elimination: theory and practice in Europe.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Lia; Dara, Masoud; Tadolini, Marina; Centis, Rosella; Sotgiu, Giovanni; van der Werf, Marieke J; Gaga, Mina; Cirillo, Daniela; Spanevello, Antonio; Raviglione, Mario; Blasi, Francesco; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2014-05-01

    Although Europe identified the pathway to tuberculosis (TB) elimination in 1990, no information on programmes for country preparedness is available. A questionnaire investigating TB elimination activities was submitted to 38 national TB programme representatives of low TB incidence (<20 cases per 100 000 population) European countries/territories of the World Health Organization European region. Out of 31 providing a complete answer, 17 (54.8%) reported to have a dedicated national TB programme, 20 (64.5%) a national plan including TB elimination (13 (41.9%) including targets), 22 (71%) guidelines, 14 (45.2%) a specific budget for TB activities, and 23 (74.2%) TB reference centres. All countries reported having case-based electronic TB surveillance, 19 (61.3%) perform regular supervision, 12 (38.7%) have a monitoring and evaluation plan and five (16.1%) perform modelling. In three countries (9.7%), TB health services are free for insured individuals only. In 22 countries/territories (71%) not all TB drugs were available, while in 12 (38.7%) drug stock-outs have been described. Although high-risk group screening for latent TB infection is performed by the majority of countries, only 6 (19.4%) provided figures on preventive treatment completion rates. Not all elements identified as essential for country preparedness to achieve TB elimination are available in the countries surveyed. PMID:24389868

  1. Annual meeting of the Tuberculosis Surveillance and Research Unit, 2008.

    PubMed

    Zellweger, J-P; Verver, S; van den Hof, S; Hesseling, A; Williams, B; van Leth, F; Rieder, H L; Borgdorff, M W

    2009-02-01

    The Tuberculosis Surveillance and Research Unit (TSRU) held its last annual meeting in Helsinki, Finland, from 1 to 4 April 2008. Several topics of current interest for tuberculosis (TB) research and new research projects were presented and discussed in depth by 60 delegates from Europe, Africa and Asia. This paper summarises some of the highlights of the meeting which may be of interest to epidemiologists and managers active in the field of TB. PMID:19146744

  2. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  3. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ben; Smith, Robert; Nguyen, Quyen; Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Lopez Quezada, Landys; Somersan, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Little, David; Pingle, Maneesh; Zhang, David; Ballinger, Elaine; Zimmerman, Matthew; Dartois, Véronique; Hanson, Paul; Mitscher, Lester A; Porubsky, Patrick; Rogers, Steven; Schoenen, Frank J; Nathan, Carl; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2016-07-14

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  4. Elevated serum IL-35 and increased expression of IL-35-p35 or -EBI3 in CD4+CD25+ T cells in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Bin; Liu, Gan-Bin; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Fu, Xiao-Xia; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Gao, Yu-Chi; Lu, Yuan-Bin; Wu, Xian-Jing; Qiu, Feng; Wang, Wan-Dang; Yi, Lai-Long; Zhong, Ji-Xin; Chen, Zheng W; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent appreciation of interleukin 35 (IL-35) function in inflammatory diseases, little is known for IL-35 response in patients with active tuberculosis (ATB). In the current study, we demonstrated that ATB patients exhibited increases in serum IL-35 and in mRNA expression of both subunits of IL-35 (p35 and EBI3) in white blood cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Consistently, anti-TB drug treatment led to reduction in serum IL-35 level and p35 or EBI3 expression. TB infection was associated with expression of p35 or EBI3 protein in CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells. Most p35+CD4+ T cells and EBI3+CD4+ T cells expressed Treg-associated marker CD25. Our findings may be important in understanding immune pathogenesis of TB. IL-35 in the blood may potentially serve as a biomarker for immune status and prognosis in TB. PMID:27158354

  5. Increased Interleukin-4 production by CD8 and gammadelta T cells in health-care workers is associated with the subsequent development of active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane J; Costa, Leonor; Martins, Marta; Silveira, Henrique; Amaral, Leonard; Arroz, Maria J; Ventura, Fernando A; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2004-08-15

    We evaluated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 10 health-care workers (HCWs) and 10 non-HCWs and correlated their immune status with the development of active tuberculosis (TB). Twenty individuals were randomly recruited, tested, and monitored longitudinally for TB presentation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors were stimulated with M. tuberculosis and tested for cell proliferation and the production of interferon (IFN)- gamma, interleukin (IL)-5, and IL-4, by use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent or flow-cytometric assays. HCWs had higher levels of cell proliferation (24,258 cpm) and IFN- gamma (6373 pg/mL) to M. tuberculosis than did non-HCWs (cell proliferation, 11,462 cpm; IFN- gamma, 3228 pg/mL). Six of 10 HCWs showed increased median percentages of CD8+IL-4+ (4.7%) and gammadelta +IL-4+ (2.3%) T cells and progressed to active TB. HCWs who remained healthy showed increased median percentages of CD8+IFN- gamma+ (25.0%) and gammadelta +IFN- gamma+ (8.0%) and lower percentages of CD8+IL-4+ (0.05%) and gammadelta +IL-4+ (0.03%) T cells. PMID:15272404

  6. Differential cellular recognition pattern to M. tuberculosis targets defined by IFN-γ and IL-17 production in blood from TB + patients from Honduras as compared to health care workers: TB and immune responses in patients from Honduras

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A better understanding of the quality of cellular immune responses directed against molecularly defined targets will guide the development of TB diagnostics and identification of molecularly defined, clinically relevant M.tb vaccine candidates. Methods Recombinant proteins (n = 8) and peptide pools (n = 14) from M. tuberculosis (M.tb) targets were used to compare cellular immune responses defined by IFN-γ and IL-17 production using a Whole Blood Assay (WBA) in a cohort of 148 individuals, i.e. patients with TB + (n = 38), TB- individuals with other pulmonary diseases (n = 81) and individuals exposed to TB without evidence of clinical TB (health care workers, n = 29). Results M.tb antigens Rv2958c (glycosyltransferase), Rv2962c (mycolyltransferase), Rv1886c (Ag85B), Rv3804c (Ag85A), and the PPE family member Rv3347c were frequently recognized, defined by IFN-γ production, in blood from healthy individuals exposed to M.tb (health care workers). A different recognition pattern was found for IL-17 production in blood from M.tb exposed individuals responding to TB10.4 (Rv0288), Ag85B (Rv1886c) and the PPE family members Rv0978c and Rv1917c. Conclusions The pattern of immune target recognition is different in regard to IFN-γ and IL-17 production to defined molecular M.tb targets in PBMCs from individuals frequently exposed to M.tb. The data represent the first mapping of cellular immune responses against M.tb targets in TB patients from Honduras. PMID:23497342

  7. Optimization of Pyrrolamides as Mycobacterial GyrB ATPase Inhibitors: Structure-Activity Relationship and In Vivo Efficacy in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    P, Shahul Hameed; Mukherjee, Kakoli; Nandi, Vrinda; Waterson, David; Shandil, Radha; Balganesh, Meenakshi; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K.; Raichurkar, Anand Kumar; Deshpande, Abhijeet; Ghosh, Anirban; Awasthy, Disha; Shanbhag, Gajanan; Sheikh, Gulebahar; McMiken, Helen; Puttur, Jayashree; Reddy, Jitendar; Werngren, Jim; Read, Jon; Kumar, Mahesh; R, Manjunatha; Chinnapattu, Murugan; Madhavapeddi, Prashanti; Manjrekar, Praveena; Basu, Reetobrata; Gaonkar, Sheshagiri; Sharma, Sreevalli; Hoffner, Sven; Humnabadkar, Vaishali; Subbulakshmi, Venkita; Panduga, Vijender

    2014-01-01

    Moxifloxacin has shown excellent activity against drug-sensitive as well as drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), thus confirming DNA gyrase as a clinically validated target for discovering novel anti-TB agents. We have identified novel inhibitors in the pyrrolamide class which kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis through inhibition of ATPase activity catalyzed by the GyrB domain of DNA gyrase. A homology model of the M. tuberculosis H37Rv GyrB domain was used for deciphering the structure-activity relationship and binding interactions of inhibitors with mycobacterial GyrB enzyme. Proposed binding interactions were later confirmed through cocrystal structure studies with the Mycobacterium smegmatis GyrB ATPase domain. The most potent compound in this series inhibited supercoiling activity of DNA gyrase with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of <5 nM, an MIC of 0.03 μg/ml against M. tuberculosis H37Rv, and an MIC90 of <0.25 μg/ml against 99 drug-resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. The frequency of isolating spontaneous resistant mutants was ∼10−6 to 10−8, and the point mutation mapped to the M. tuberculosis GyrB domain (Ser208 Ala), thus confirming its mode of action. The best compound tested for in vivo efficacy in the mouse model showed a 1.1-log reduction in lung CFU in the acute model and a 0.7-log reduction in the chronic model. This class of GyrB inhibitors could be developed as novel anti-TB agents. PMID:24126580

  8. TB Is Back.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1992-01-01

    The reemergence of tuberculosis, particularly of new drug-resistant strains, points up the need for well-coordinated school health programs. Immigration effects, growing populations of HIV-infected persons, and relaxed screening procedures are partly responsible for TB's reemergence. Two sidebars offer advice on coping with TB at school and…

  9. A Clinical Algorithm to Identify HIV Patients at High Risk for Incident Active Tuberculosis: A Prospective 5-Year Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Tsai, Hung-Chin; Su, Ih-Jen; Yang, Chin-Hui; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hung, Chien-Chin; Sy, Cheng-Len; Wu, Kuan-Sheng; Chen, Jui-Kuang; Chen, Yao-Shen; Fang, Chi-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background Predicting the risk of tuberculosis (TB) in people living with HIV (PLHIV) using a single test is currently not possible. We aimed to develop and validate a clinical algorithm, using baseline CD4 cell counts, HIV viral load (pVL), and interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA), to identify PLHIV who are at high risk for incident active TB in low-to-moderate TB burden settings where highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is routinely provided. Materials and Methods A prospective, 5-year, cohort study of adult PLHIV was conducted from 2006 to 2012 in two hospitals in Taiwan. HAART was initiated based on contemporary guidelines (CD4 count < = 350/μL). Cox regression was used to identify the predictors of active TB and to construct the algorithm. The validation cohorts included 1455 HIV-infected individuals from previous published studies. Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated. Results Seventeen of 772 participants developed active TB during a median follow-up period of 5.21 years. Baseline CD4 < 350/μL or pVL ≥ 100,000/mL was a predictor of active TB (adjusted HR 4.87, 95% CI 1.49–15.90, P = 0.009). A positive baseline IGRA predicted TB in patients with baseline CD4 ≥ 350/μL and pVL < 100,000/mL (adjusted HR 6.09, 95% CI 1.52–24.40, P = 0.01). Compared with an IGRA-alone strategy, the algorithm improved the sensitivity from 37.5% to 76.5%, the negative predictive value from 98.5% to 99.2%. Compared with an untargeted strategy, the algorithm spared 468 (60.6%) from unnecessary TB preventive treatment. Area under the ROC curve was 0.692 (95% CI: 0.587–0.798) for the study cohort and 0.792 (95% CI: 0.776–0.808) and 0.766 in the 2 validation cohorts. Conclusions A validated algorithm incorporating the baseline CD4 cell count, HIV viral load, and IGRA status can be used to guide targeted TB preventive treatment in PLHIV in low-to-moderate TB burden settings where HAART is routinely provided to all PLHIV. The

  10. Review of policy and status of implementation of collaborative HIV-TB activities in 23 high-burden countries.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Granich, R; Date, A; Lepere, P; Hersh, B; Gouws, E; Samb, B

    2014-10-01

    Issuance of national policy guidance is a critical step to ensure quality HIV-TB (human immunodeficiency virus-tuberculosis) coordination and programme implementation. From the database of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), we reviewed 62 national HIV and TB guidelines from 23 high-burden countries for recommendations on HIV testing for TB patients, criteria for initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the Three I's for HIV/TB (isoniazid preventive treatment [IPT], intensified TB case finding and TB infection control). We used UNAIDS country-level programme data to determine the status of implementation of existing guidance. Of the 23 countries representing 89% of the global HIV-TB burden, Brazil recommends ART irrespective of CD4 count for all people living with HIV, and four (17%) countries recommend ART at the World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 guidelines level of CD4 count ⩿500 cells/mm(3) for asymptomatic persons. Nineteen (83%) countries are consistent with WHO 2013 guidelines and recommend ART for HIV-positive TB patients irrespective of CD4 count. IPT is recommended by 16 (70%) countries, representing 67% of the HIV-TB burden; 12 recommend symptom-based screening alone for IPT initiation. Guidelines from 15 (65%) countries with 79% of the world's HIV-TB burden include recommendations on HIV testing and counselling for TB patients. Although uptake of ART, HIV testing for TB patients, TB screening for people living with HIV and IPT have increased significantly, progress is still limited in many countries. There is considerable variance in the timing and content of national policies compared with WHO guidelines. Missed opportunities to implement new scientific evidence and delayed adaptation of existing WHO guidance remains a key challenge for many countries. PMID:25216827

  11. Influence of Age and Nutritional Status on the Performance of the Tuberculin Skin Test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube in Young Children Evaluated for Tuberculosis in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Jenum, Synne; Selvam, Sumithra; Mahelai, Diana; Jesuraj, Nelson; Cárdenas, Vicky; Kenneth, John; Hesseling, Anneke C.; Doherty, Timothy Mark; Vaz, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Background: Reliable identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection or tuberculosis (TB) disease in young children is vital to assure adequate preventive and curative treatment. The tuberculin skin test (TST) and IFNγ-release assays may supplement the diagnosis of pediatric TB as cases are typically bacteriologically unconfirmed. However, it is unclear to what extent the performance of TST and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT; Cellestis’ IFNγ-release assay test) depends on the demographic, clinical and nutritional characteristics of children in whom they are tested. Methods: During a 2-year prospective observational study of 4382 neonates in Southern India, children with suspected TB were investigated and classified by a standard TB diagnostic algorithm. Results: Clinical TB was diagnosed in 13 of 705 children referred for case verification with suspected TB. TST and QFT had a susceptibility for clinical TB of 31% and 23%, respectively, in this group. Children <2 years were more likely to test QFT indeterminate. A height-for-age Z score within the lowest quartile increased the odds ratio (OR) for a positive or indeterminate QFT result [OR 2.46 (1.19–5.06), OR 3.08 (1.10–8.58)], whereas the OR for a positive TST was reduced with a weight-for-height Z score within the lowest quartile [OR 0.17 (0.06–0.47)]. Conclusion: The sensitivities of the TST and QFT for clinical TB in children <3 years of age were equally poor in this population. Stunted children were more susceptible to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and more prone to indeterminate QFT results. TST was less reliable in children with wasting. PMID:24797993

  12. Perspectives on tuberculosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew; Ahmed, Yusuf; Kapata, Nathan; Maeurer, Markus; Mwaba, Peter; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been recognized as an important cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnancy for nearly a century, but research and efforts to roll out comprehensive TB screening and treatment in high-risk populations such as those with a high prevalence of HIV or other diseases of poverty, have lagged behind similar efforts to address HIV infection in pregnancy and the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission. Immunological changes during pregnancy make the activation of latent TB infection or de novo infection more likely than among non-pregnant women. TB treatment in pregnancy poses several problems that have been under-researched, such as contraindications to anti-TB and anti-HIV drugs and potential risks to the neonate, which are particularly important with respect to second-line TB treatment. Whilst congenital TB is thought to be rare, data from high HIV burden settings suggest this is not the case. There is a need for more studies screening for TB in neonates and observing outcomes, and testing preventative or curative actions. National tuberculosis control programmes (NTPs) should work with antenatal and national HIV programmes in high-burden populations to provide screening at antenatal clinics, or to establish functioning systems whereby pregnant women at high risk can drop in to routine NTP screening stations. PMID:25809768

  13. Activity of phosphino palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes against HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gama, Ntombenhle H; Elkhadir, Afag Y F; Gordhan, Bhavna G; Kana, Bavesh D; Darkwa, James; Meyer, Debra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is currently complicated by increased prevalence of co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of drug candidates that offer the simultaneous management of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) would be of great benefit in the holistic treatment of HIV/AIDS, especially in sub-Saharan Africa which has the highest global prevalence of HIV-TB coinfection. Bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-pyridylpalladium(II) chloride (1), bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-pyridylplatinum(II) chloride (2), bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-ethylpyridylpalladium(II) chloride (3) and bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-ethylpyridylplatinum(II) (4) were investigated for the inhibition of HIV-1 through interactions with the viral protease. The complexes were subsequently assessed for biological potency against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv by determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) using broth microdilution. Complex (3) showed the most significant and competitive inhibition of HIV-1 protease (p = 0.014 at 100 µM). Further studies on its in vitro effects on whole virus showed reduced viral infectivity by over 80 % at 63 µM (p < 0.05). In addition, the complex inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at an MIC of 5 µM and was non-toxic to host cells at all active concentrations (assessed by tetrazolium dye and real time cell electronic sensing). In vitro evidence is provided here for the possibility of utilizing a single metal-based compound for the treatment of HIV/AIDS and TB. PMID:27246555

  14. Micrococcin P1 - A bactericidal thiopeptide active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Degiacomi, Giulia; Personne, Yoann; Mondésert, Guillaume; Ge, Xueliang; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Boldrin, Francesca; Goel, Pavitra; Peisker, Kristin; Benjak, Andrej; Barrio, Maria Belén; Ventura, Marcello; Brown, Amanda C; Leblanc, Véronique; Bauer, Armin; Sanyal, Suparna; Cole, Stewart T; Lagrange, Sophie; Parish, Tanya; Manganelli, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    The lack of proper treatment for serious infectious diseases due to the emergence of multidrug resistance reinforces the need for the discovery of novel antibiotics. This is particularly true for tuberculosis (TB) for which 3.7% of new cases and 20% of previously treated cases are estimated to be caused by multi-drug resistant strains. In addition, in the case of TB, which claimed 1.5 million lives in 2014, the treatment of the least complicated, drug sensitive cases is lengthy and disagreeable. Therefore, new drugs with novel targets are urgently needed to control resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. In this manuscript we report the characterization of the thiopeptide micrococcin P1 as an anti-tubercular agent. Our biochemical experiments show that this antibiotic inhibits the elongation step of protein synthesis in mycobacteria. We have further identified micrococcin resistant mutations in the ribosomal protein L11 (RplK); the mutations were located in the proline loop at the N-terminus. Reintroduction of the mutations into a clean genetic background, confirmed that they conferred resistance, while introduction of the wild type RplK allele into resistant strains re-established sensitivity. We also identified a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. These data, in good agreement with previous structural studies suggest that also in M. tuberculosis micrococcin P1 functions by binding to the cleft between the 23S rRNA and the L11 protein loop, thus interfering with the binding of elongation factors Tu and G (EF-Tu and EF-G) and inhibiting protein translocation. PMID:27553416

  15. Tuberculosis Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organization Chart Advisory Groups Federal TB Task Force Data and Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... United States publication. PDF [6 MB] Interactive TB Data Tool Online Tuberculosis Information System (OTIS) OTIS is ...

  16. The MprB Extracytoplasmic Domain Negatively Regulates Activation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis MprAB Two-Component System

    PubMed Central

    Bretl, Daniel J.; Bigley, Tarin M.; Terhune, Scott S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an acid-fast pathogen of humans and the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB). It is estimated that one-third of the world's population is latently (persistently) infected with M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis persistence is regulated, in part, by the MprAB two-component signal transduction system, which is activated by and mediates resistance to cell envelope stress. Here we identify MprAB as part of an evolutionarily conserved cell envelope stress response network and demonstrate that MprAB-mediated signal transduction is negatively regulated by the MprB extracytoplasmic domain (ECD). In particular, we report that deregulated production of the MprB sensor kinase, or of derivatives of this protein, negatively impacts M. tuberculosis growth. The observed growth attenuation is dependent on MprAB-mediated signal transduction and is exacerbated in strains of M. tuberculosis producing an MprB variant lacking its ECD. Interestingly, full-length MprB, and the ECD of MprB specifically, immunoprecipitates the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK in vivo, while overexpression of dnaK inhibits MprAB-mediated signal transduction in M. tuberculosis grown in the absence or presence of cell envelope stress. We propose that under nonstress conditions, or under conditions in which proteins present in the extracytoplasmic space are properly folded, signaling through the MprAB system is inhibited by the MprB ECD. Following exposure to cell envelope stress, proteins present in the extracytoplasmic space become unfolded or misfolded, leading to removal of the ECD-mediated negative regulation of MprB and subsequent activation of MprAB. PMID:24187094

  17. Tuberculosis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contacts of Persons with Infectious TB Epidemiology of Pediatric Tuberculosis in the United States Targeted Tuberculosis Testing ... and unknown risks of second-line antituberculosis drugs. Breastfeeding Breastfeeding should not be discouraged for women being ...

  18. Accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube for diagnosing tuberculosis in a young pediatric population previously vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guérin

    PubMed Central

    Vallada, Marcelo Genofre; Okay, Thelma Suely; Del Negro, Gilda Maria B.; Antonio, Claudio Amaral; Yamamoto, Lidia; Ramos, Sonia Regina T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of an interferongamma release assay (QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube) for diagnosing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a young pediatric population. Methods: 195 children previously vaccinated with BCG were evaluated, being 184 healthy individuals with no clinical or epidemiological evidence of mycobacterial infection, and 11 with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, according to clinical, radiological, and laboratory parameters. A blood sample was obtained from each child and processed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The assay performance was evaluated by a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: In the group of 184 non-infected children, 130 (70.6%) were under the age of four years (mean age of 35 months). In this group, 177 children (96.2%) had negative test results, six (3.2%) had indeterminate results, and one (0.5%) had a positive result. In the group of 11 infected children, the mean age was 58.5 months, and two of them (18%) had negative results. The ROC curve had an area under the curve of 0.88 (95%CI 0.82-0.92; p<0.001), disclosing a predictive positive value of 81.8% for the test (95%CI 46.3-97.4). The assay sensitivity was 81.8% (95%CI 48.2-97.2) and the specificity was 98.8% (95%CI 96-99.8). Conclusions: In the present study, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube performance for diagnosing M. tuberculosis infection was appropriate in a young pediatric population. PMID:24676183

  19. Standardization of natural mycolic acid antigen composition and production for use in biomarker antibody detection to diagnose active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ndlandla, F L; Ejoh, V; Stoltz, A C; Naicker, B; Cromarty, A D; van Wyngaardt, S; Khati, M; Rotherham, L S; Lemmer, Y; Niebuhr, J; Baumeister, C R; Al Dulayymi, J R; Swai, H; Baird, M S; Verschoor, J A

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is characterized by the abundance of species specific, antigenic cell wall lipids called mycolic acids. These wax-like molecules all share an identical, amphiphilic mycolic motif, but have different functional groups in a long hydrophobic hydrocarbon mero-chain that divide them into three main classes: alpha-, keto- and methoxy-mycolic acids. Whereas alpha-mycolic acids constitutively maintain an abundance of around 50%, the ratio of methoxy- to keto-mycolic acid types may vary depending on, among other things, the growth stage of M. tuberculosis. In human patients, antibodies to mycolic acids have shown potential as diagnostic serum biomarkers for active TB. Variations in mycolic acid composition affect the antigenic properties and can potentially compromise the precision of detection of anti-mycolic acids antibodies in patient sera to natural mixtures. We demonstrate this here with combinations of synthetic mycolic acid antigens, tested against TB patient and control sera. Combinations of methoxy- and α-mycolic acids are more antigenic than combinations of keto- and α-mycolic acids, showing the former to give a more sensitive test for TB biomarker antibodies. Natural mixtures of mycolic acids isolated from mature cultures of M. tuberculosis H37Rv give the same sensitivity as that with synthetic methoxy- and α-mycolic acids in combination, in a surface plasmon resonance inhibition biosensor test. To ensure that the antigenic activity of isolates of natural mycolic acids is reproducible, we cultured M. tuberculosis H37Rv on Middlebrook 7H10 solid agar plates to stationary growth phase in a standardized, optimal way. The proportions of mycolic acid classes in various batches of the isolates prepared from these cultures were compared to a commercially available natural mycolic acid isolate. LC-MS/MS and NMR data for quantitation of mycolic acids class compositions show that the variation in batches

  20. Risk of Tuberculosis Among Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chin-Chung; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Wei, Yu-Feng; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Feng-Jung; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Chen, Jin-Shing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients on long-term dialysis are at high risk for tuberculosis (TB). Although latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is good target for TB eradication, interferon-gamma release assay-defined LTBI has a high proportion of negative conversion and lacks active TB correlation among patients on dialysis. Patients on long-term dialysis were screened in multiple centers in Taiwan. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT) was used to define LTBI and was performed thrice at 6-month intervals. The primary outcome was active TB diagnosed after LTBI screening. The incidence and predictive value of QFT-GIT were analyzed. The 940 dialysis patients enrolled had an average age of 59.3 years. The initial QFT-GIT results were positive in 193, including 49.6% with persistent positive results on second check. In an average follow-up period of 3 years, 7 patients had TB. Three (319.1 per 100,000 person-yrs) and 4 (141.8 per 100,000 person-yrs) of them were prevalent and incident TB cases, respectively. Persistent positive QFT-GIT for 2 and 3 times correlated with increased hazard ratio for TB (14.44 and 20.29, respectively) compared with a single positive result (hazard ratio 10.38). Among those with 3 positive QFT-GIT results, TB development rate was 4.5% and incidence rate was 1352.3 per 100,000 person-years. In contrast, none of the incident TB occurred in those with initial positive and then negative conversion of QFT-GIT. In an area of intermediate TB incidence, dialysis patients have high TB risk. LTBI status is a good predictor of TB development, especially for those with more than 1 positive result. After excluding prevalent TB cases, serial follow-up of LTBI may narrow the target population to reduce treatment costs. PMID:27258523

  1. Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Marais, Ben J.; Schaaf, H. Simon

    2014-01-01

    Many clinicians regard tuberculosis as an adult pulmonary disease, but tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of disease, both pulmonary and extrapulmonary, and death in young children from TB-endemic countries, especially in areas affected by poverty, social disruption, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article reviews the disease burden and the natural history of disease in children with TB. It also provides guidance regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of TB in children. PMID:25037105

  2. Tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J; Schaaf, H Simon

    2014-09-01

    Many clinicians regard tuberculosis as an adult pulmonary disease, but tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of disease, both pulmonary and extrapulmonary, and death in young children from TB-endemic countries, especially in areas affected by poverty, social disruption, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article reviews the disease burden and the natural history of disease in children with TB. It also provides guidance regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of TB in children. PMID:25037105

  3. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Tuberculosis Print A A A Text Size What's in ... When to You Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (popularly known as "TB") is a disease ...

  4. Comparison of Recoveries of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using the Automated BACTEC MGIT 960 System, the BACTEC 460 TB System, and Löwenstein-Jensen Medium

    PubMed Central

    Somoskövi, Ákos; Ködmön, Csaba; Lantos, Ákos; Bártfai, Zoltán; Tamási, Lilla; Füzy, Judit; Magyar, Pál

    2000-01-01

    Using two different liquid media and one conventional solid medium, a total of 57 mycobacterial isolates (Mycobacterium tuberculosis, n = 55; nontuberculous mycobacteria, n = 2) were recovered from 377 clinical specimens. The rates of recovery of M. tuberculosis were 96.4% with the BACTEC MGIT 960 liquid medium, 92.7% with BACTEC 12B liquid medium, and 81.8% with the Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium. The mean time to detection of M. tuberculosis in smear-positive specimens was 12.6 days for BACTEC MGIT 960 medium, 13.8 days for BACTEC 12B medium, and 20.1 days for LJ medium, and in smear-negative specimens it was 15.8 days for BACTEC MGIT 960 medium, 17.7 days for BACTEC 12B medium, and 42.2 days for LJ medium. The rates of contamination were 3.7, 2.9, and 1.2% for the BACTEC MGIT 960, BACTEC 12B, and LJ media, respectively. In conclusion, the nonradiometric, fully automated 7-ml BACTEC MGIT 960 system can be considered a viable alternative to the semiautomated, radiometric BACTEC 460 TB system. PMID:10835013

  5. Alcoholism and other socio-demographic risk factors for adverse TB-drug reactions and unsuccessful tuberculosis treatment – data from ten years’ observation at the Regional Centre of Pulmonology, Bydgoszcz, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Przybylski, Grzegorz; Dąbrowska, Anita; Trzcińska, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most dangerous infectious diseases and has one of the highest mortality rates. For decades a strong association has been evident between certain socio-economic factors and TB adverse events and failure of treatment, yet there is a limited quantity of literature available on this subject, especially in the Polish literature. Material/Methods We examined epidemiological data from 2025 TB patients treated at the Regional Centre of Pulmonology in Bydgoszcz, Poland between 2001 and 2010. This article focuses on the association between all forms of unsuccessful TB treatment outcomes or adverse drug reaction (ADR) and socio-demographic characteristics, condition on admission, and other biological, clinical, social, and healthcare access factors. Results The rate of TB-ADR during hospitalization was 38.9%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age (P<0.001) and alcohol abuse (P=0.007) were independently associated with the occurrence of TB-ADR. The rate of unsuccessful TB treatment was 10.5%. After adjusting for confounding variables, age (P<0.001), alcohol abuse (P=0.002), and education (P=0.01) were significantly associated with unsuccessful treatment. Smoking did not have any significant influence on occurrence of either TB-ADR during hospitalization or unsuccessful treatment. Conclusions Among our TB patients treated between 2001 and 2010, alcohol abuse significantly worsened the treatment outcome. This information will be crucial in developing strategies targeted at this demographic group. PMID:24643127

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases Also Exhibit Chaperone like Activity In-Vitro and In-Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Saurabh; Sharma, Ashish; Tripathi, Deeksha; Kumar, Ashutosh; Khubaib, Mohd; Bhuwan, Manish; Chaudhuri, Tapan Kumar; Hasnain, Seyed Ehtesham; Ehtesham, Nasreen Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (Ppiases), also known as cyclophilins, are ubiquitously expressed enzymes that assist in protein folding by isomerization of peptide bonds preceding prolyl residues. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) is known to possess two Ppiases, PpiA and PpiB. However, our understanding about the biological significance of mycobacterial Ppiases with respect to their pleiotropic roles in responding to stress conditions inside the macrophages is restricted. This study describes chaperone-like activity of mycobacterial Ppiases. We show that recombinant rPpiA and rPpiB can bind to non-native proteins in vitro and can prevent their aggregation. Purified rPpiA and rPpiB exist in oligomeric form as evident from gel filtration chromatography.E. coli cells overexpressing PpiA and PpiB of M.tb could survive thermal stress as compared to plasmid vector control. HEK293T cells transiently expressing M.tb PpiA and PpiB proteins show increased survival as compared to control cells in response to oxidative stress and hypoxic conditions generated after treatment with H2O2 and CoCl2 thereby pointing to their likely role in adaption under host generated oxidative stress and conditions of hypoxia. The chaperone-like function of these M.tuberculosis cyclophilins may possibly function as a stress responder and consequently contribute to virulence. PMID:26981873

  7. Cost-effectiveness of a tuberculosis active case finding program targeting household and neighborhood contacts in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rajendra P; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Satha, Peou; Eang, Mao T; Lubell, Yoel

    2014-05-01

    In many high-risk populations, access to tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis and treatment is limited and pockets of high prevalence persist. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of an extensive active case finding program in areas of Cambodia where TB notifications and household poverty rates are highest and access to care is restricted. Thirty operational health districts with high TB incidence and household poverty were randomized into intervention and control groups. In intervention operational health districts, all household and symptomatic neighborhood contacts of registered TB patients of the past two years were encouraged to attend screening at mobile centers. In control districts, routine passive case finding activities continued. The program screened more than 35,000 household and neighborhood contacts and identified 810 bacteriologically confirmed cases. The cost-effectiveness analysis estimated that in these cases the reduction in mortality from 14% to 2% would result in a cost per daily adjusted life year averted of $330, suggesting that active case finding was highly cost-effective. PMID:24615134

  8. Microwave synthesis and photocatalytic activity of Tb(3+) doped BiVO4 microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Fuyang; Hua, Yingjie; Wang, Chongtai; Zhao, Xudong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Hongdong

    2016-12-01

    Tb(3+) doped BiVO4 has been successfully synthesized by a simple microwave-assisted hydrothermal method at 140°C for 30min. The structure, morphology and optical property of the Tb(3+) doped BiVO4 products have been systematically investigated. This study indicates that the incorporation of Tb(3+) could induce the conversion of structure from monoclinic to tetragonal for BiVO4. Furthermore, the as-obtained Tb(3+) doped BiVO4 samples showed an obvious morphological change: the hollow square rod-like BiVO4 crystal gradually changed to spindle-like crystal. The Tb(3+) doped BiVO4 products exhibited extraordinary photocatalytic activity for Methylene Blue (MB) degradation under visible light irradiation. The doped BiVO4 at a molar ratio of 2at% (Tb and Bi) with a mixture of monoclinic and tetragonal phases showed and prominent photocatalytic degradation rate, which reached 99.9% in 120min. The results suggest that the differences in the photocatalytic activity of these BiVO4 crystals with different Tb(3+) doping concentrations can be attributed to the change of crystalline phases, and the coexistence of the monoclinic/tetragonal phases in BiVO4 products, which improve the efficient charge separation and transportation. PMID:27565962

  9. Thiolates chemically induce redox activation of BTZ043 and related potent nitroaromatic anti-tuberculosis agents.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Rohit; Moraski, Garrett C; Krchňák, Viktor; Miller, Patricia A; Colon-Martinez, Mariangelli; Herrero, Eliza; Oliver, Allen G; Miller, Marvin J

    2013-03-01

    The development of multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) forms of tuberculosis (TB) has stimulated research efforts globally to expand the new drug pipeline. Nitroaromatic compounds, including 1,3-benzothiazin-4-ones (BTZs) and related agents, are a promising new class for the treatment of TB. Research has shown that the nitroso intermediates of BTZs that are generated in vivo cause suicide inhibition of decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose 2' oxidase (DprE1), which is responsible for cell wall arabinogalactan biosynthesis. We have designed and synthesized novel anti-TB agents inspired from BTZs and other nitroaromatic compounds. Computational studies indicated that the unsubstituted aromatic carbons of BTZ043 and related nitroaromatic compounds are the most electron-deficient and might be prone to nucleophilic attack. Our chemical studies on BTZ043 and the additional nitroaromatic compounds synthesized by us and others confirmed the postulated reactivity. The results indicate that nucleophiles such as thiolates, cyanide, and hydride induce nonenzymatic reduction of the nitro groups present in these compounds to the corresponding nitroso intermediates by addition at the unsubstituted electron-deficient aromatic carbon present in these compounds. Furthermore, we demonstrate here that these compounds are good candidates for the classical von Richter reaction. These chemical studies offer an alternate hypothesis for the mechanism of action of nitroaromatic anti-TB agents, in that the cysteine thiol(ate) or a hydride source at the active site of DprE1 may trigger the reduction of the nitro groups in a manner similar to the von Richter reaction to the nitroso intermediates, to initiate the inhibition of DprE1. PMID:23402278

  10. Essential components of a tuberculosis prevention and control program. Recommendations of the Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) rates declined steadily for decades in the United States, but several complex social and medical factors caused TB morbidity to increase 14% from 1985 through 1993. The recent increases in TB morbidity have placed additional demands on state and local TB control programs, which already had been substantially weakened by inadequate staffing and funding support. TB programs throughout the nation must be revitalized if they are to provide core TB control activities that enable effective responses to this public health challenge. This report describes a model for TB control programs and the essential components of a successful TB control program, including three priority strategies for TB prevention and control: a) identifying and treating persons who have active TB, b) finding and screening persons who have had contact with TB patients to determine whether they are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or have active TB and providing appropriate treatment, and c) screening populations at high risk for TB infection and the development of TB disease to detect infected persons and providing therapy to prevent progression to active TB. State and local health departments have primary responsibility for preventing and controlling TB. To meet this challenge successfully, TB control programs should be able to administer activities that include the following core components: conducting overall planning and development of policy, identifying persons who have clinically active TB, managing persons who have or who are suspected of having disease, identifying and managing persons infected with M. tuberculosis, providing laboratory and diagnostic services, collecting and analyzing data, and providing training and education. The Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis has prepared this report to provide a national standard by which policymakers, TB control program managers, and others evaluating TB programs can assess individual TB control programs

  11. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes. PMID:26377143

  12. Activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis by extract of South African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Mativandlela, Sannah Patience Nkami; Meyer, Jacob Jacobus Marion; Hussein, Ahmed A; Houghton, Peter J; Hamilton, Chris J; Lall, Namrita

    2008-06-01

    Seven ethnobotanically selected medicinal plants were screened for their antimycobacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of four plants namely Artemisia afra, Dodonea angustifolia, Drosera capensis and Galenia africana ranged from 0.781 to 6.25 mg/mL against Mycobacterium smegmatis. G. africana showed the best activity exhibiting an MIC of 0.78 mg/mL and a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 1.56 mg/mL. The MICs of ethanol extracts of D. angustifolia and G. africana against M. tuberculosis were found to be 5.0 and 1.2 mg/mL respectively. The mammalian cytotoxicity IC(50) value of the most active antimycobacterial extract, from G. africana, was found to be 101.3 microg/mL against monkey kidney Vero cells. Since the ethanol G. africana displayed the best antimycobacterial activity, it was subjected to fractionation which led to the isolation of a flavone, 5,7,2'-trihydroxyflavone. The MIC of this compound was found to be 0.031 mg/mL against M. smegmatis and 0.10 mg/mL against M. tuberculosis. This study gives some scientific basis to the traditional use of these plants for TB-related symptoms. PMID:18412151

  13. Adenovirus type 35-vectored tuberculosis vaccine has an acceptable safety and tolerability profile in healthy, BCG-vaccinated, QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold (+) Kenyan adults without evidence of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Douglas S; Owira, Victorine; Polhemus, Mark; Otieno, Lucas; Andagalu, Ben; Ogutu, Bernhards; Waitumbi, John; Hawkridge, Anthony; Shepherd, Barbara; Pau, Maria Grazia; Sadoff, Jerald; Douoguih, Macaya; McClain, J Bruce

    2016-05-01

    In a Phase 1 trial, we evaluated the safety of AERAS-402, an adenovirus 35-vectored TB vaccine candidate expressing 3 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) immunodominant antigens, in subjects with and without latent Mtb infection. HIV-negative, BCG-vaccinated Kenyan adults without evidence of tuberculosis, 10 QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-G)(-) and 10 QFT-G(+), were randomized 4:1 to receive AERAS-402 or placebo as two doses, on Days 0 and 56, with follow up to Day 182. There were no deaths, serious adverse events or withdrawals. For 1 AERAS-402 QFT-G(-) and 1 AERAS-402 QFT-G(+) subject, there were 3 self-limiting severe AEs of injection site pain: 1 after the first vaccination and 1 after each vaccination, respectively. Two additional severe AEs considered vaccine-related were reported after the first vaccination in AERAS-402 QFT-G(+) subjects: elevated blood creatine phosphokinase and neutropenia, the latter slowly improving but remaining abnormal until study end. AERAS-402 was not detected in urine or throat cultures for any subject. In intracellular cytokine staining studies, curtailed by technical issues, we saw modest CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to Mtb Ag85A/b peptide pools among both QFT-G(-) and (+) subjects, with trends in the CD4+ T cells suggestive of boosting after the second vaccine dose, slightly more so in QFT-G(+) subjects. CD4+ and CD8+ responses to Mtb antigen TB10.4 were minimal. Increases in Adenovirus 35 neutralizing antibodies from screening to end of study, seen in 50% of AERAS-402 recipients, were mostly minimal. This small study confirms acceptable safety and tolerability profiles for AERAS-402, in line with other Phase 1 studies of AERAS-402, now to include QFT-G(+) subjects. PMID:27026148

  14. Identification of new diamine scaffolds with activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bogatcheva, Elena; Hanrahan, Colleen; Nikonenko, Boris; Samala, Rowena; Chen, Ping; Gearhart, Jacqueline; Barbosa, Francis; Einck, Leo; Nacy, Carol A.; Protopopova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    A diverse 5,000-compound library was synthesized from commercially available diamines and screened for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro, revealing 143 hits with MIC equal to or less than 12.5 µM. New prospective scaffolds with antitubercular activity derived from homopiperazine, phenyl- and benzyl substituted piperazines, 4-aminomethylpiperidine, 4-aminophenylethylamine, 4,4'-methylenebiscyclohexylamine were identified. Compound SQ775 derived from homopiperazine, and compound SQ786 derived from benzylpiperazine had potent antimicrobial activity against M. tuberculosis in experimental animals in vivo. PMID:16722620

  15. [Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases proposed for treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha antagonist drugs].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2006-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR) and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology (SPP) have developed guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (AT) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD), namely rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) antagonists. Due to the high risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with IJD, LTBI and AT screening should be performed as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis. Even if TB screening was performed at the beginning of the disease, the evaluation should be repeated before starting anti-TNF-a therapy. When TB (LTBI or AT) treatment is indicated, it should be performed before the beginning of anti-TNF-a therapy. If the IJD activity requires urgent anti-TNF-a therapy, these drugs can be started after two months of antituberculosis therapy in AT cases, or after one month in LTBI cases. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If abnormal, e.g. Gohn complex, the patient should be treated as LTBI; residual lesions require the exclusion of AT and patients with history of untreated or incomplete TB treatment should be treated as LTBI. In cases of suspected active lesions, AT diagnosis should be confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test (TST), with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If induration is less than 5 mm, the test should be repeated after 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and should be considered negative if the result is again inferior to 5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment. If TST is performed in immunosuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-a therapy, even in the presence of a negative test. PMID:17117328

  16. Rifampicin Mono-Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: A Significant Phenomenon in a High Prevalence TB-HIV Region

    PubMed Central

    Coovadia, Yacoob Mahomed; Mahomed, Sharana; Pillay, Melendhran; Werner, Lise; Mlisana, Koleka

    2013-01-01

    Setting The dual epidemics of HIV-TB including MDR-TB are major contributors to high morbidity and mortality rates in South Africa. Rifampicin (RIF) resistance is regarded as a proxy for MDR-TB. Currently available molecular assays have the advantage of rapidly detecting resistant strains of MTB, but the GeneXpert does not detect isoniazid (INH) resistance and the GenoTypeMTBDRplus(LPA) assay may underestimate resistance to INH. Increasing proportions of rifampicin mono-resistance resistance (RMR) have recently been reported from South Africa and other countries. Objective This laboratory based study was conducted at NHLS TB Laboratory, Durban, which is the reference laboratory for culture and susceptibility testing in KwaZulu-Natal. We retrospectively determined, for the period 2007 to 2009, the proportion of RMR amongst Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates, that were tested for both RIF and INH, using the gold standard of culture based phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST). Gender and age were also analysed to identify possible risk factors for RMR. Design MTB culture positive sputum samples from 16,748 patients were analysed for susceptibility to RIF and INH during the period 2007 to 2009. RMR was defined as MTB resistant to RIF and susceptible to INH. For the purposes of this study, only the first specimen from each patient was included in the analysis. Results RMR was observed throughout the study period. The proportion of RMR varied from a low of 7.3% to a high of 10.0% [overall 8.8%]. Overall, males had a 42% increased odds of being RMR as compared to females. In comparison to the 50 plus age group, RMR was 37% more likely to occur in the 25–29 year age category. Conclusion We report higher proportions of RMR ranging from 7.3% to 10% [overall 8.8%] than previously reported in the literature. To avoid misclassification of RMR, detected by the GeneXpert, as MDR-TB, culture based phenotypic DST must be performed on a second specimen, as

  17. Modulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in active and latent tuberculosis by coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Jaganathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Shen, Kui; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-12-01

    Helminth infections are known to induce modulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating systemic cytokine responses in active and latent tuberculosis (LTB) is not known. To define the systemic cytokine levels in helminth-TB coinfection, we measured the circulating plasma levels of Type 1, Type 2, Type 17, other pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in individuals with active TB (ATB) with or without coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection by multiplex ELISA. Similarly, we also measured the same cytokine levels in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant Ss infection in a cross-sectional study. Our data reveal that individuals with ATB or LTB and coexistent Ss infection have significantly lower levels of Type 1 (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2) and Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines compared to those without Ss infection. In contrast, those with ATB and LTB with Ss infection have significantly higher levels of the regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGFβ), and those with LTB and Ss infection also have significantly higher levels of Type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13) as well. Finally, those with LTB (but not ATB) exhibit significantly lower levels of other pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNα, IFNβ, IL-6, IL-12 and GM-CSF). Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the systemic cytokine responses in ATB and LTB and indicate that coincident helminth infections might influence pathogenesis of TB infection and disease. PMID:26542223

  18. Local Inflammation, Dissemination and Coalescence of Lesions Are Key for the Progression toward Active Tuberculosis: The Bubble Model.

    PubMed

    Prats, Clara; Vilaplana, Cristina; Valls, Joaquim; Marzo, Elena; Cardona, Pere-Joan; López, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a tuberculosis (TB) infection toward active disease is driven by a combination of factors mostly related to the host response. The equilibrium between control of the bacillary load and the pathology generated is crucial as regards preventing the growth and proliferation of TB lesions. In addition, some experimental evidence suggests an important role of both local endogenous reinfection and the coalescence of neighboring lesions. Herein we propose a mathematical model that captures the essence of these factors by defining three hypotheses: (i) lesions grow logistically due to the inflammatory reaction; (ii) new lesions can appear as a result of extracellular bacilli or infected macrophages that escape from older lesions; and (iii) lesions can merge when they are close enough. This model was implemented in Matlab to simulate the dynamics of several lesions in a 3D space. It was also fitted to available microscopy data from infected C3HeB/FeJ mice, an animal model of active TB that reacts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with an exaggerated inflammatory response. The results of the simulations show the dynamics observed experimentally, namely an initial increase in the number of lesions followed by fluctuations, and an exponential increase in the mean area of the lesions. In addition, further analysis of experimental and simulation results show a strong coincidence of the area distributions of lesions at day 21, thereby highlighting the consistency of the model. Three simulation series removing each one of the hypothesis corroborate their essential role in the dynamics observed. These results demonstrate that three local factors, namely an exaggerated inflammatory response, an endogenous reinfection, and a coalescence of lesions, are needed in order to progress toward active TB. The failure of one of these factors stops induction of the disease. This mathematical model may be used as a basis for developing strategies to stop the progression of

  19. Local Inflammation, Dissemination and Coalescence of Lesions Are Key for the Progression toward Active Tuberculosis: The Bubble Model

    PubMed Central

    Prats, Clara; Vilaplana, Cristina; Valls, Joaquim; Marzo, Elena; Cardona, Pere-Joan; López, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a tuberculosis (TB) infection toward active disease is driven by a combination of factors mostly related to the host response. The equilibrium between control of the bacillary load and the pathology generated is crucial as regards preventing the growth and proliferation of TB lesions. In addition, some experimental evidence suggests an important role of both local endogenous reinfection and the coalescence of neighboring lesions. Herein we propose a mathematical model that captures the essence of these factors by defining three hypotheses: (i) lesions grow logistically due to the inflammatory reaction; (ii) new lesions can appear as a result of extracellular bacilli or infected macrophages that escape from older lesions; and (iii) lesions can merge when they are close enough. This model was implemented in Matlab to simulate the dynamics of several lesions in a 3D space. It was also fitted to available microscopy data from infected C3HeB/FeJ mice, an animal model of active TB that reacts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with an exaggerated inflammatory response. The results of the simulations show the dynamics observed experimentally, namely an initial increase in the number of lesions followed by fluctuations, and an exponential increase in the mean area of the lesions. In addition, further analysis of experimental and simulation results show a strong coincidence of the area distributions of lesions at day 21, thereby highlighting the consistency of the model. Three simulation series removing each one of the hypothesis corroborate their essential role in the dynamics observed. These results demonstrate that three local factors, namely an exaggerated inflammatory response, an endogenous reinfection, and a coalescence of lesions, are needed in order to progress toward active TB. The failure of one of these factors stops induction of the disease. This mathematical model may be used as a basis for developing strategies to stop the progression of

  20. Economic evaluations of point of care testing strategies for active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zwerling, Alice; Dowdy, David

    2013-06-01

    Point of care (POC) diagnostics are often hailed as having the potential to transform tuberculosis (TB) control efforts. However, POC testing is better conceptualized as a system of diagnosis and treatment, not simply a test that can provide rapid, deployable results. Economic evaluations may help decision makers allocate scarce resources for TB control, but evaluations of POC testing face unique challenges that include evaluating the full diagnostic system, incorporating implementation costs, translating diagnostic results into health and accounting for downstream treatment costs. For economic evaluations to reach their full potential as decision-making tools for POC testing in TB, these challenges must be understood and addressed. PMID:23763529

  1. Mean Platelet Volume in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Young; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hee Joo; Park, Tae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mean platelet volume (MPV) has been thought as a useful index of platelet activation. It is supposed that MPV is also associated with several inflammatory and infectious diseases. Korea still has a high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study was to investigate MPV as an inflammatory marker in TB patients. Materials and Methods. MPV were determined in 221 patients with TB and 143 individuals for control group. MPV was estimated by an Advia 2120 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY, USA). Results. In the TB patient group, a positive correlation was found between CRP and MPV. Age and MPV had a positive correlation in TB patient group. Conclusions. We conclude that there is a significant relation between MPV and inflammatory conditions. MPV can be an inflammatory marker to determine the disease activity in TB patients. PMID:27419136

  2. Tuberculosis control in Malawian prisons: from research to policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Nyirenda, T E; Yadidi, A E; Gondwe, M K; Kwanjana, J H; Salaniponi, F M

    2004-05-01

    Following an operational research study in Zomba Central Prison, Malawi, in 1996, the National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTP) and the Prison Medical Services worked together to improve the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in prisoners. Prisoners are screened for TB on admission and during their prison sentences. A system was established of treating patients, according to NTP guidelines, while in prison and on discharge from prison. Monitoring and evaluation is undertaken using TB officers at district and regional level, and 6-monthly meetings are held with all stakeholders and the central unit to collate data and review prison TB control activities. PMID:15137540

  3. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  4. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  5. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  6. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  7. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE protein Rv0256c induces strong B cell response in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Philip Raj; Latha, Gaddam Suman; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important diseases of humans and major public health problem worldwide. Early and accurate diagnosis of TB is necessary for the treatment, prevention, and control of TB. Therefore, it is important to identify suitable antigens that can differentiate active tuberculosis patients from BCG-vaccinated individuals. In the present study, we have used Rv0256c (PPE2) protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to screen the sera of infected patients belonging to different clinical TB presentations, and BCG-vaccinated clinically healthy individuals by enzyme immunoassay. Our results demonstrated that Rv0256c displayed stronger and specific immunoreactivity against the sera obtained from clinically active tuberculosis patients compared to PPD and ESAT-6 and could differentiate the TB-patients from the BCG-vaccinated controls. Importantly, Rv0256c was also found to detect even the extrapulmonary and smear-negative pulmonary cases which often are tedious and difficult to detect using conventional diagnostic methods. This study suggests that Rv0256c can be used as a potential marker for the serodiagnosis of tuberculosis patients. PMID:23827809

  9. [TUBERCULOSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2014--(1) Summary of Statistics on Tuberculosis Notification and Foreign-born Tuberculosis Patients].

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    This brief is the first of a series of documents based on the Tuberculosis Annual Report 2014. It includes a summary of tuberculosis (TB) statistics, including data on foreign-born TB patients notified and registered in Japan in 2014. For the first time, the number of newly notified cases (all forms of TB) fell below 20,000. In 2014, a total of 19,615 patients were notified, a rate of 15.4 per 100,000 population The number of sputum-smear positive pulmonary. TB patients notified was 7,651, a rate of 6.0 per 100,000 population. The number of patients with latent TB infections increased slightly from 7,147 in 2013 to 7,562 in 2014. The proportion of miliary TB cases has constantly increased over the past 10 years, especially among women aged 80 years and older. The number of foreign-born TB patients continued to increase from 1,064 in 2013 to 1,101 in 2014. In 2014, new foreign-born TB patients aged 20-29 years accounted for 44.1% of all new TB patients in that age group. Among foreign-born TB patients, half were from the Philippines (26.5%) and China (23.5%). However, the number of patients from Vietnam and Nepal is increasing. Among foreign-born TB patients, 28% were regular employees, 26% were students, and 20% were unemployed. The changing trend in the nationality of foreign students entering Japan may at least partially explain the differences in TB burden among foreign-born patients, by country of birth. As we expect to see the proportion of foreign-born TB patients continue to rise, more tailored case identification and treatment support activities are needed. PMID:27263231

  10. Involvement of Antilipoarabinomannan Antibodies in Classical Complement Activation in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hetland, Geir; Wiker, Harald G.; Høgåsen, Kolbjørn; Hamasur, Beston; Svenson, Stefan B.; Harboe, Morten

    1998-01-01

    We examined alternative and classical complement activation induced by whole bacilli of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis products. After exposure to BCG, there were higher levels of the terminal complement complex in sera from Indian tuberculosis patients than in sera from healthy controls. The addition of BCG with or without EGTA to these sera indicated that approximately 70 to 85% of the total levels of the terminal complement complex was formed by classical activation. Sera from Indian tuberculosis patients contained more antibody to lipoarabinomannan (LAM) than sera from healthy Indians. Levels of anti-LAM immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2), but not anti-LAM IgM, correlated positively with classical activation induced by BCG in the sera. By flow cytometry, deposition of C3 and terminal complement complex on bacilli incubated with normal human serum was demonstrated. The anticomplement staining was significantly reduced in the presence of EGTA and EDTA. Flow cytometry also revealed the binding of complement to BCG incubated with rabbit anti-LAM and then with factor B-depleted serum. This indicates that classical activation plays a major role in complement activation induced by mycobacteria and that anti-LAM IgG on the bacilli can mediate this response. Classical complement activation may be important for the extent of phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis by mononuclear phagocytes, which may influence the course after infection. PMID:9521145

  11. Native New Zealand plants with inhibitory activity towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants have long been investigated as a source of antibiotics and other bioactives for the treatment of human disease. New Zealand contains a diverse and unique flora, however, few of its endemic plants have been used to treat tuberculosis. One plant, Laurelia novae-zelandiae, was reportedly used by indigenous Maori for the treatment of tubercular lesions. Methods Laurelia novae-zelandiae and 44 other native plants were tested for direct anti-bacterial activity. Plants were extracted with different solvents and extracts screened for inhibition of the surrogate species, Mycobacterium smegmatis. Active plant samples were then tested for bacteriostatic activity towards M. tuberculosis and other clinically-important species. Results Extracts of six native plants were active against M. smegmatis. Many of these were also inhibitory towards M. tuberculosis including Laurelia novae-zelandiae (Pukatea). M. excelsa (Pohutukawa) was the only plant extract tested that was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our data provide support for the traditional use of Pukatea in treating tuberculosis. In addition, our analyses indicate that other native plant species possess antibiotic activity. PMID:20537175

  12. Cytotoxic activity of dendritic cells as a possible mechanism of negative regulation of T lymphocytes in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sakhno, Ludmila V; Tikhonova, Marina A; Tyrinova, Tamara V; Leplina, Olga Yu; Shevela, Ekaterina Ya; Nikonov, Sergey D; Zhdanov, Oleg A; Ostanin, Alexander A; Chernykh, Elena R

    2012-01-01

    The PD-1/B7-H1-mediated induction of T cell apoptosis/anergy as a possible mechanism of immune response failure was studied in 76 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) with normal and low-proliferative response to antigens of M. tuberculosis (purified protein derivative (PPD)). It was revealed that dendritic cells (DCs), generated in vitro from patient blood monocytes with GM-CSF + IFN-α, were characterized by increased B7-H1 expression, upproduction of IL-10, and reducing of allostimulatory activity in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). Moreover, DCs of patients with TB were able to enhance T cell apoptosis and to block T-cell division in MLC. It was shown that neutralizing anti-PD1 antibodies significantly decreased the proapoptogenic/tolerogenic effect of DCs. Correlation analysis revealed a direct relationship between IL-10 production and level of B7-H1 expression in the general group of investigated patients. It was demonstrated that generation of healthy donor DCs in the presence of IL-10 led to an increase in the number of DCs-expressed B7-H1 molecule, DC proapoptogenic activity, and a decrease in their allostimulatory activity. Obviously, the revealed phenomenon of the PD-1/B7-H1-mediated pro-apoptogenic activity of DCs is clinically significant since the cytotoxic/tolerogenic potential of DCs is more pronounced in patients with PPD anergy. PMID:23056139

  13. Tuberculosis-resistant transgenic cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease that affects humans and many animal species. In humans, tuberculosis (TB) is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while most cases in cattle are caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, Mb can also cause, albeit rarely, human TB. In this issue, Wu et al. ...

  14. A Missed Tuberculosis Diagnosis Resulting in Hospital Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Belinda A.; Salinas, Gloria; Sanchez, Connie; Miramontes, Roque; Restrepo, Blanca I.; Haddad, Maryam B.; Lambert, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To find the source of tuberculin skin test conversions among 38 hospital employees on 1 floor during routine testing January–February 2010. METHODS Record review of patients at a private hospital during September–December 2009 and interviews with hospital employees. Names of patients from the state tuberculosis (TB) registry were cross-referenced with hospital records for admissions. Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotype results in the county and adjacent counties were examined, and contacts were evaluated for TB infection and disease. RESULTS One of the 38 employees, a nurse, was diagnosed with pulmonary TB with a matching M. tuberculosis genotype and drug resistance pattern (isoniazid monoresistant) to those of a county jail inmate also recently diagnosed with pulmonary TB. The nurse had no known contact with that inmate; however, another inmate in his 20’s from the same jail had been hospitalized under that nurse’s care in October 2009. That young man died, and a postmortem examination result subsequently confirmed TB, which had not been suspected. Exposure to this man with undiagnosed TB could explain the transmission: 87 (27%) of the 318 hospital-based contacts without previous positive tuberculin skin test results were infected, and 9 contacts had active TB. CONCLUSIONS This investigation demonstrated M. tuberculosis transmission in a hospital due to a missed diagnosis and nonadherence to national TB infection control guidelines. Routine TB screening of employees allowed early detection of this missed TB diagnosis, facilitating prompt evaluation of contacts. Healthcare providers should suspect TB in symptomatic persons and adhere to TB control policies. PMID:24709722

  15. Tuberculosis and nature's pharmacy of putative anti-tuberculosis agents.

    PubMed

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing problem of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, coupled with the twinning of tuberculosis (TB) to human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), the burden of TB is now difficult to manage. Therefore, new antimycobacterial agents are being sought from natural sources. This review focuses on natural antimycobacterial agents from endophytes and medicinal plants of Africa, Europe, Asia, South America and Canada. In the countries mentioned in this review, numerous plant species display putative anti-TB activity. Several antimycobacterial chemical compounds have also been isolated, including: ellagitannin punicalagin, allicin, anthraquinone glycosides, iridoids, phenylpropanoids, beta-sitosterol, galanthimine, crinine, friedelin, gallic acid, ellagic acids, anthocyanidin, taraxerol, termilignan B, arjunic acid, glucopyranosides, 1-epicatechol, leucopelargonidol, hydroxybenzoic acids, benzophenanthridine alkaloids, neolignans, and decarine. These compounds may provide leads to novel and more efficacious drugs to lessen the global burden of TB and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. If there is a long-term remedy for TB, it must lie in nature's pharmacy of putative antimycobacterial agents. PMID:26464047

  16. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Grobler, Liesl; Nagpal, Sukrti; Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Sinclair, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis and malnutrition are linked in a complex relationship. Tuberculosis may cause undernutrition through increased metabolic demands and decreased intake, and nutritional deficiencies may worsen the disease, or delay recovery by depressing important immune functions. At present, there is no evidence-based nutritional guidance for adults and children being treated for tuberculosis. Objectives To assess the effects of oral nutritional supplements in people being treated with antituberculous drug therapy for active tuberculosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 1, 2016), MEDLINE (from 1946 to 4 February 2016), EMBASE (from 1980 to 4 February 2016), LILACS (from 1982 to 4 February 2016), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the Indian Journal of Tuberculosis up to 4 February 2016, and checked the reference lists of all included studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared any oral nutritional supplement given for at least four weeks with no nutritional intervention, placebo, or dietary advice only for people being treated for active tuberculosis. The primary outcomes of interest were all-cause death, and cure at six and 12 months. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, and extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. We presented the results as risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous variables, and mean differences (MD) for continuous variables, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Where appropriate, we pooled data from trials with similar interventions and outcomes. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Main results Thirty-five trials

  17. [Imaging and Laboratory Diagnostics for Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Bauer, C M; Schmähl, A; Kreuter, M

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is difficult, since symptoms are often very unspecific or lacking. However active, prompt and accurate diagnosis is the key element in the public health response to tuberculosis and the cornerstone of tuberculosis control. Different diagnostic methods for an assured diagnosis of TB are necessary. Chest radiography is a useful keystone to identify tuberculosis, but diagnosis of tuberculosis cannot be established by radiography alone. CT scanning is used in patients without pathological chest radiography but clinically suspected active TB and to differentiate TB from other diseases. Radiological appearance is primarily determined by the immune status of patients and caverns and disseminated disease foci are often observed. Laboratory diagnostic methods include microscopic identification of acid-fast mycobacteria from any body fluid (especially sputum), as well as isolation and characterisation of mycobacteria in culture. It is then possible to type the pathogens by the shape of their colony, their growth behavior and their biochemical characteristics. These methods are regarded as the gold standard in diagnosis of active TB. In patients who are highly suspected of having TB, but whose sputum specimens tested negative for mycobacteria, a nucleic acid amplification test is additionally performed. Moreover, sensitivity testing with first and second line antitubercular drugs is applied as standard. Laboratory diagnostic testing of cellular immunity against pathogenic mycobacteria employs the tuberculin skin test (TST, Mantoux tuberculin test) or the more specific interferon γ test to determine γ interferon released by T lymphocytes stimulated in vitro. The new ELISA and ELISPOT procedures exhibit higher test specificity and less cross reactivity to NTM (non-tuberculosis mycobacteria), are independent of BCG-vaccination status and correlate better with the degree of exposure than does the TST. PMID:27187878

  18. Tuberculosis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Health Resource Center French (français) Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculose (TB) - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations ... Minnesota Department of Health Portuguese (português) Tuberculosis (TB) ... (TB) - português (Portuguese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations ...

  19. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cudahy, Patrick; Shenoi, Sheela V

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  20. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cudahy, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  1. Persistent Latent Tuberculosis Reactivation Risk in United States Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Painter, John; Parker, Matthew; Lowenthal, Phillip; Flood, Jennifer; Fu, Yunxin; Asis, Redentor; Reves, Randall

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Current guidelines limit latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) evaluation to persons in the United States less than or equal to 5 years based on the assumption that high TB rates among recent entrants are attributable to high LTBI reactivation risk, which declines over time. We hypothesized that high postarrival TB rates may instead be caused by imported active TB. Objectives: Estimate reactivation and imported TB in an immigrant cohort. Methods: We linked preimmigration records from a cohort of California-bound Filipino immigrants during 2001–2010 with subsequent TB reports. TB was likely LTBI reactivation if the immigrant had no evidence of active TB at preimmigration examination, likely imported if preimmigration radiograph was abnormal and TB was reported less than or equal to 6 months after arrival, and likely reactivation of inactive TB if radiograph was abnormal but TB was reported more than 6 months after arrival. Measurements and Main Results: Among 123,114 immigrants, 793 TB cases were reported. Within 1 year of preimmigration examination, 85% of TB was imported; 6 and 9% were reactivation of LTBI and inactive TB, respectively. Conversely, during Years 2–9 after U.S. entry, 76 and 24% were reactivation of LTBI and inactive TB, respectively. The rate of LTBI reactivation (32 per 100,000) did not decline during Years 1–9. Conclusions: High postarrival TB rates were caused by detection of imported TB through active postarrival surveillance. Among immigrants without active TB at baseline, reported TB did not decline over 9 years, indicating sustained high risk of LTBI reactivation. Revised guidelines should support LTBI screening and treatment more than 5 years after U.S. arrival. PMID:24308495

  2. Knowledge Gaining by Human Genetic Studies on Tuberculosis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hui-Qi; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious health issue in the developing world. Lack of knowledge on the etiological mechanisms of TB hinders the development of effective strategies for the treatment or prevention of TB disease. Human genetic study is an indispensable approach to understand the molecular basis of common diseases. Numerous efforts were made to screen the human genome for TB susceptibility by linkage mapping. A large number of candidate-based association studies of TB were performed to examine the association of predicted functional DNA variations in candidate genes. Recently, the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) on TB was reported. The GWAS is a proof-of-principle evidence which justifies the genetic approach to understand TB. Further hypothesis-free efforts on TB research may renovate the traditional idea of TB genetic susceptibility as none of the candidate genes with important roles in containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection was identified of association with active TB, while the TB-associated loci in the GWAS harbors no gene with function in MTB infection. PMID:21179108

  3. Modeling of Novel Diagnostic Strategies for Active Tuberculosis – A Systematic Review: Current Practices and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Zwerling, Alice; White, Richard G.; Vassall, Anna; Cohen, Ted; Dowdy, David W.; Houben, Rein M. G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The field of diagnostics for active tuberculosis (TB) is rapidly developing. TB diagnostic modeling can help to inform policy makers and support complicated decisions on diagnostic strategy, with important budgetary implications. Demand for TB diagnostic modeling is likely to increase, and an evaluation of current practice is important. We aimed to systematically review all studies employing mathematical modeling to evaluate cost-effectiveness or epidemiological impact of novel diagnostic strategies for active TB. Methods Pubmed, personal libraries and reference lists were searched to identify eligible papers. We extracted data on a wide variety of model structure, parameter choices, sensitivity analyses and study conclusions, which were discussed during a meeting of content experts. Results & Discussion From 5619 records a total of 36 papers were included in the analysis. Sixteen papers included population impact/transmission modeling, 5 were health systems models, and 24 included estimates of cost-effectiveness. Transmission and health systems models included specific structure to explore the importance of the diagnostic pathway (n = 4), key determinants of diagnostic delay (n = 5), operational context (n = 5), and the pre-diagnostic infectious period (n = 1). The majority of models implemented sensitivity analysis, although only 18 studies described multi-way sensitivity analysis of more than 2 parameters simultaneously. Among the models used to make cost-effectiveness estimates, most frequent diagnostic assays studied included Xpert MTB/RIF (n = 7), and alternative nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) (n = 4). Most (n = 16) of the cost-effectiveness models compared new assays to an existing baseline and generated an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Conclusion Although models have addressed a small number of important issues, many decisions regarding implementation of TB diagnostics are being made without

  4. MicroRNA-365 in macrophages regulates Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced active pulmonary tuberculosis via interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingzhang; Li, Hui; Shao, Hua; Li, Chunling; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the relationship between microRNA (miR)-365 expression and the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA and protein in patients with active tuberculosis. From June 2011 to June 2014, 48 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were included in the study. In addition, 23 healthy subjects were enrolled as control. Macrophages were collected by pulmonary alveolus lavage. In addition, serum and mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood. The levels of miR-365 and IL-6 in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of IL-6 in macrophages and mononuclear cells was measured using Western blotting, while that in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Expression of IL-6 mRNA and protein was significantly enhanced in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Increase of IL-6 protein concentration in serum was probably due to the release of IL-6 protein from mononuclear cells in the blood. In addition, miR-365 levels were significantly lowered in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Up-regulated IL-6 expression in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis is related to the down-regulation of miR-365, suggesting that miR-365 may regulate the occurrence and immune responses of active pulmonary tuberculosis via IL-6. PMID:26629035

  5. MicroRNA-365 in macrophages regulates Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced active pulmonary tuberculosis via interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qingzhang; Li, Hui; Shao, Hua; Li, Chunling; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the relationship between microRNA (miR)-365 expression and the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA and protein in patients with active tuberculosis. From June 2011 to June 2014, 48 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were included in the study. In addition, 23 healthy subjects were enrolled as control. Macrophages were collected by pulmonary alveolus lavage. In addition, serum and mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood. The levels of miR-365 and IL-6 in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of IL-6 in macrophages and mononuclear cells was measured using Western blotting, while that in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Expression of IL-6 mRNA and protein was significantly enhanced in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Increase of IL-6 protein concentration in serum was probably due to the release of IL-6 protein from mononuclear cells in the blood. In addition, miR-365 levels were significantly lowered in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Up-regulated IL-6 expression in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis is related to the down-regulation of miR-365, suggesting that miR-365 may regulate the occurrence and immune responses of active pulmonary tuberculosis via IL-6. PMID:26629035

  6. An acidic sphingomyelinase Type C activity from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garza, Jorge; González-Salazar, Francisco; Quinn, Frederick D; Karls, Russell K; De La Garza-Salinas, Laura Hermila; Guzmán-de la Garza, Francisco J; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomyelinases (SMases) catalyze the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphorylcholine. Sphingolipids are recognized as diverse and dynamic regulators of a multitude of cellular processes mediating cell cycle control, differentiation, stress response, cell migration, adhesion, and apoptosis. Bacterial SMases are virulence factors for several species of pathogens. Whole cell extracts of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains H37Rv and CDC1551 were assayed using [N-methyl-(14)C]-sphingomyelin as substrate. Acidic Zn(2+)-dependent SMase activity was identified in both strains. Peak SMase activity was observed at pH 5.5. Interestingly, overall SMase activity levels from CDC1551 extracts are approximately 1/3 of those of H37Rv. The presence of exogenous SMase produced by M. tuberculosis during infection may interfere with the normal host inflammatory response thus allowing the establishment of infection and disease development. This Type C activity is different from previously identified M. tuberculosis SMases. Defining the biochemical characteristics of M. tuberculosis SMases helps to elucidate the roles that these enzymes play during infection and disease. PMID:26948102

  7. Multicenter Evaluation of Anyplex Plus MTB/NTM MDR-TB Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Multidrug-Resistant Isolates in Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Specimens

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, Flavio; Caccuri, Francesca; Campilongo, Federica; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Fiorentini, Simona; Giagulli, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and the detection of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are critical for successful public health interventions. Therefore, TB diagnosis requires the availability of diagnostic tools that allow the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis and drug resistance in clinical samples. Here, we performed a multicenter study to evaluate the performance of the Seegene Anyplex MTB/NTM MDR-TB assay, a new molecular method based on a multiplex real-time PCR system, for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and genetic determinants of drug resistance. In total, the results for 755 samples (534 pulmonary and 221 extrapulmonary samples) were compared with the results of smears and cultures. For pulmonary specimens, the sensitivities of the Anyplex assay and acid-fast bacillus smear testing were 86.4% and 75.0%, respectively, and the specificities were 99% and 99.4%. For extrapulmonary specimens, the sensitivities of the Anyplex assay and acid-fast bacillus smear testing were 83.3% and 50.0%, respectively, and the specificities of both were 100%. The negative and positive predictive values of the Anyplex assay for pulmonary specimens were 97% and 100%, respectively, and those for extrapulmonary specimens were 84.6% and 100%. The sensitivities of the Anyplex assay for detecting isoniazid resistance in MTBC strains from pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens were 83.3% and 50%, respectively, while the specificities were 100% for both specimen types. These results demonstrate that the Anyplex MTB/NTM MDR-TB assay is an efficient and rapid method for the diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB and the detection of isoniazid resistance. PMID:26491178

  8. Implementing a successful tuberculosis programme within primary care services in a conflict area using the stop TB strategy: Afghanistan case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Afghanistan has faced health consequences of war including those due to displacement of populations, breakdown of health and social services, and increased risks of disease transmission for over three decades. Yet it was able to restructure its National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTP), integrate tuberculosis treatment into primary health care and achieve most of its targets by the year 2011. What were the processes that enabled the programme to achieve its targets? More importantly, what were the underpinning factors that made this success possible? We addressed these important questions through a case study. Case description We adopted a processes and outcomes framework for this study, which began with examining the change in key programme indicators, followed by backwards tracing of the processes and underlying factors, responsible for this change. Methods included review of the published and grey literature along with in-depth interviews of 15 key informants involved with the care of tuberculosis patients in Afghanistan. Discussion and evaluation TB incidence and mortality per 100,000 decreased from 325 and 92 to 189 and 39 respectively, while case notification and treatment success improved during the decade under study. Efficient programme structures were enabled through high political commitment from the Government, strong leadership from the programme, effective partnership and coordination among stakeholders, and adequate technical and financial support from the development partners. Conclusions The NTP Afghanistan is an example that public health programmes can be effectively implemented in fragile states. High political commitment and strong local leadership are essential factors for such programmes. To ensure long-term effectiveness of the NTP, the international support should be withdrawn in a phased manner, coupled with a sequential increase in resources allocated to the NTP by the Government of Afghanistan. PMID:24507446

  9. Quantiferon-TB Gold in tube assay for the screening of tuberculosis before and during treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The usefulness of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays for tuberculosis screening before tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) antagonists and for monitoring during treatment is a contraversial issue. The aims of this study were to determine whether TNF-α antagonists affect the results of the Quantiferon-TB Gold in-tube assay (QTF); to assess how QTF performs in comparison with the tuberculin skin test (TST) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who are about to start treatment with TNF-α antagonists, RA patients who are not candidates for treatment with TNF-α antagonists, rheumatology patients with confirmed current or past tuberculosis infection, and healthy controls, and to determine the specificity of the QTF test to differentiate leprosy patients, another group of patients infected with mycobacteria. Methods The 38 RA patients who were prescribed TNF-α antagonists, 40 RA patients who were not considered for TNF-α antagonist use, 30 rheumatology patients with a history or new diagnosis of tuberculosis, 23 leprosy patients, and 41 healthy controls were studied. QTF and TST were done on the same day, and both were repeated after a mean of 3.6 ± 0.2 months in patients who used TNF-α antagonists. Results Treatment with TNF-α antagonists did not cause a significant change in the QTF or TST positivity rate (34% versus 42%; P = 0.64; and 24% versus 37%; P = 0.22). Patients with leprosy had a trend for a higher mean IFN-γ level (7.3 ± 8.0) and QTF positivity (61%) than did the other groups; however, the difference was not significant (P = 0.09 and P = 0.43). Conclusions Treatment with TNF-α antagonists does not seem to affect the QTF test to an appreciable degree. The higher IFN-γ levels in leprosy patients deserves further attention. PMID:22709461

  10. Penile tuberculosis associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wilfred C H; Chen, Shyh-Chyan; Hsieh, Ju-Ton; Chen, Jun; Chang, Hong-Chiang

    2006-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) infection of the penis is a rare but serious problem. We report a case of penile TB in a 75-year-old man who presented with fever and dyspnea. No active lung lesions except pleural and pericardial effusion were found on chest X-ray. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance was diagnosed after serum and urine electrophoresis studies, and repeated bone marrow studies. Genital examination showed diffuse papulonecrotic skin ulcers involving the whole penile shaft, extending ventrally to the median raphe of the scrotum. Pus smear showed positive acid-fast stain, and culture yielded M. tuberculosis. Culture of pleural and pericardial effusion was also positive for M. tuberculosis. Anti-TB treatment was given with isoniazid, ethambutol, rifampin and pyrazinamide, and the cutaneous lesion was noted to be healed at follow-up 6 months later. Although rare, the possibility of TB as a cause of genital ulcer should be kept in mind. PMID:16959623

  11. A mathematical representation of the development of Mycobacterium tuberculosis active, latent and dormant stages.

    PubMed

    Magombedze, Gesham; Mulder, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The majority of individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacilli develop latent infection. Mtb becomes dormant and phenotypically drug resistant when it encounters multiple stresses within the host, and expresses a set of genes, known as the dormancy regulon, in vivo. These genes are expressed in vitro in response to nitric oxide (NO), hypoxia (oxygen deprivation), and nutrient starvation. The occurrence and reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB) is not clearly understood. The ability of the pathogen to enter and exit from different states is associated with its ability to cause persistent infection. During infection it is not known whether the organism is in a persistent slow replicating state or a dormant non-replicating state, with the latter ultimately causing a latent infection with the potential to reactivate to active disease. We collected gene expression data for Mtb bacilli under different stress conditions that simulate latency or dormancy. Time course experiments were selected and differentially expressed gene profiles were determined at each time point. A mathematical model was then developed to show the dynamics of Mtb latency based on the profile of differentially expressed genes. Analysis of the time course data show the dynamics of latency occurrence in vitro and the mathematical model reveals all possible scenarios of Mtb latency development with respect to the different conditions that may be produced by the immune response in vivo. The mathematical model provides a biological explanation of how Mtb latency occurs based on observed gene expression changes in in vitro latency models. PMID:21968442

  12. LL-37 immunomodulatory activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Hancock, Robert E W; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  13. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  14. Comparison of the Predicted Population Coverage of Tuberculosis Vaccine Candidates Ag85B-ESAT-6, Ag85B-TB10.4, and Mtb72f via a Bioinformatics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Jose; McNamara, Lucy A.; Yang, Zhenhua

    2012-01-01

    The Bacille-Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine does not provide consistent protection against adult pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) worldwide. As novel TB vaccine candidates advance in studies and clinical trials, it will be critically important to evaluate their global coverage by assessing the impact of host and pathogen variability on vaccine efficacy. In this study, we focus on the impact that host genetic variability may have on the protective effect of TB vaccine candidates Ag85B-ESAT-6, Ag85B-TB10.4, and Mtb72f. We use open-source epitope binding prediction programs to evaluate the binding of vaccine epitopes to Class I HLA (A, B, and C) and Class II HLA (DRB1) alleles. Our findings suggest that Mtb72f may be less consistently protective than either Ag85B-ESAT-6 or Ag85B-TB10.4 in populations with a high TB burden, while Ag85B-TB10.4 may provide the most consistent protection. The findings of this study highlight the utility of bioinformatics as a tool for evaluating vaccine candidates before the costly stages of clinical trials and informing the development of new vaccines with the broadest possible population coverage. PMID:22815851

  15. [Tuberculosis in Asia].

    PubMed

    2002-10-01

    1. Philippines: The development, expansion and maintenance of pilot area activities: Cristina B. Giango (Technical Division, Cebu Provincial Health Office, the Philippines) In 1994, the Department of Health developed the new NTP policies based on WHO recommendations and started a pilot project in Cebu Province in collaboration with the Japan International Cooperation Agency. To test its feasibility and effectiveness, the new NTP policies were pre-tested in one city and one Rural Health Unit. The test showed a high rate of three sputum collection (90%), high positive rate (10%), and high cure rate (80%). Before the new guidelines were introduced, the new policy was briefed, a baseline survey of the facility was conducted, equipment was provided, and intensive training was given. Recording/Reporting forms and procedures were also developed to ensure accurate reporting. Supervision, an important activity to ensure effective performance, was institutionalized. Laboratory services were strengthened, and a quality-control system was introduced in 1995 to ensure the quality of the laboratory services. With the implementation of DOTS strategy, barangay health workers were trained as treatment partners. In partnership with the private sector, the TB Diagnostic Committee was organized to deliberate and assess sputum negative but X-ray positive cases. The implementation of the new NTP guidelines in Cebe Province has reached a satisfactory level, the cure rate and positive rate have increased, and laboratory services have improved. Because of its successful implementation, the new NTP guidelines are now being used nationwide. 2. Nepal: The DOTS Strategy in the area with hard geographic situation: Dirgh Singh Bam (National Tuberculosis Center, Nepal) Three groups of factors characterize the population of Nepal: 1) Socio-cultural factors, e.g. migration, poverty, language; 2) Environmental factors, e.g. geography and climate; and 3) Political factors, prisoners and refugee

  16. Blood Transcriptional Biomarkers for Active Tuberculosis among Patients in the United States: a Case-Control Study with Systematic Cross-Classifier Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mikaela A.; Vasquez, Joshua; Weiner, Marc; Chapman, Adam; Engle, Melissa; Higgins, Michael; Quinones, Amy M.; Rosselli, Vanessa; Canono, Elizabeth; Yoon, Christina; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Davis, J. Lucian; Phang, Tzu; Stearman, Robert S.; Datta, Gargi; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Daley, Charles L.; Strong, Michael; Kechris, Katerina; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Reves, Randall; Geraci, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Blood transcriptional signatures are promising for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis but have not been evaluated among U.S. patients. To be used clinically, transcriptional classifiers need reproducible accuracy in diverse populations that vary in genetic composition, disease spectrum and severity, and comorbidities. In a prospective case-control study, we identified novel transcriptional classifiers for active TB among U.S. patients and systematically compared their accuracy to classifiers from published studies. Blood samples from HIV-uninfected U.S. adults with active TB, pneumonia, or latent TB infection underwent whole-transcriptome microarray. We used support vector machines to classify disease state based on transcriptional patterns. We externally validated our classifiers using data from sub-Saharan African cohorts and evaluated previously published transcriptional classifiers in our population. Our classifier distinguishing active TB from pneumonia had an area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of 96.5% (95.4% to 97.6%) among U.S. patients, but the AUC was lower (90.6% [89.6% to 91.7%]) in HIV-uninfected Sub-Saharan Africans. Previously published comparable classifiers had AUC values of 90.0% (87.7% to 92.3%) and 82.9% (80.8% to 85.1%) when tested in U.S. patients. Our classifier distinguishing active TB from latent TB had AUC values of 95.9% (95.2% to 96.6%) among U.S. patients and 95.3% (94.7% to 96.0%) among Sub-Saharan Africans. Previously published comparable classifiers had AUC values of 98.0% (97.4% to 98.7%) and 94.8% (92.9% to 96.8%) when tested in U.S. patients. Blood transcriptional classifiers accurately detected active TB among U.S. adults. The accuracy of classifiers for active TB versus that of other diseases decreased when tested in new populations with different disease controls, suggesting additional studies are required to enhance generalizability. Classifiers that distinguish active TB from latent TB are accurate and generalizable

  17. Combined Expression of IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-4 mRNA by Recall PBMCs Moderately Discriminates Active Tuberculosis from Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Patients with Miscellaneous Inflammatory Underlying Conditions.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Laura E; Kantele, Anu; Knuuttila, Aija; Pusa, Liana; Karttunen, Riitta; Valleala, Heikki; Tuuminen, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    New biomarkers are needed for discriminating active tuberculosis (TB) from latent TB infection (LTBI), especially in vulnerable groups representing the major diagnostic challenge. This pilot study was carried out to explore the diagnostic potential of selected genes, IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-4, and FoxP3, associated with TB immunity and immunopathology. IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-4, and FoxP3 mRNA expression levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) from antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with active TB (n = 25); patients with miscellaneous inflammatory disorders and concomitant LTBI (n = 20), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) being the most predominant in the group (n = 11); and in healthy Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccinees (n = 8). While the levels of FoxP3 mRNA did not differ between the tested groups, the cumulative expression levels of purified protein derivative-stimulated IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-4 mRNAs were found to distinguish active TB from the whole group of LTBI with 48% sensitivity and 85% specificity. When restricting the LTBI group to RA cases only, the sensitivity was 56% and specificity 100%. When interpreting the result as positive in at least one of the mRNAs IFN-γ, IL-17, or IL-4, sensitivity of 64% and specificities of 75% (heterogeneous group of LTBI) or 100% (LTBI with RA) were achieved. Moderate discrimination of active TB from LTBI with miscellaneous inflammatory underlying conditions by using combined quantitative expression of IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-4 mRNA seems not to be of high diagnostic potential. PMID:27379100

  18. Combined Expression of IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-4 mRNA by Recall PBMCs Moderately Discriminates Active Tuberculosis from Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Patients with Miscellaneous Inflammatory Underlying Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Savolainen, Laura E.; Kantele, Anu; Knuuttila, Aija; Pusa, Liana; Karttunen, Riitta; Valleala, Heikki; Tuuminen, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    New biomarkers are needed for discriminating active tuberculosis (TB) from latent TB infection (LTBI), especially in vulnerable groups representing the major diagnostic challenge. This pilot study was carried out to explore the diagnostic potential of selected genes, IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-4, and FoxP3, associated with TB immunity and immunopathology. IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-4, and FoxP3 mRNA expression levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) from antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with active TB (n = 25); patients with miscellaneous inflammatory disorders and concomitant LTBI (n = 20), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) being the most predominant in the group (n = 11); and in healthy Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccinees (n = 8). While the levels of FoxP3 mRNA did not differ between the tested groups, the cumulative expression levels of purified protein derivative-stimulated IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-4 mRNAs were found to distinguish active TB from the whole group of LTBI with 48% sensitivity and 85% specificity. When restricting the LTBI group to RA cases only, the sensitivity was 56% and specificity 100%. When interpreting the result as positive in at least one of the mRNAs IFN-γ, IL-17, or IL-4, sensitivity of 64% and specificities of 75% (heterogeneous group of LTBI) or 100% (LTBI with RA) were achieved. Moderate discrimination of active TB from LTBI with miscellaneous inflammatory underlying conditions by using combined quantitative expression of IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-4 mRNA seems not to be of high diagnostic potential. PMID:27379100

  19. Latent Tuberculosis Infection and the Risk of Subsequent Cancer.

    PubMed

    Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Yen, Yung-Feng; Pan, Sheng-Wei; Chuang, Pei-Hung; Feng, Jia-Yih; Chou, Kun-Ta; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Su, Wei-Juin

    2016-01-01

    The association of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) with subsequent cancer remains unclear. We investigated the risk of future cancer among tuberculosis (TB) contacts with or without subsequent TB activation. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we conducted a nationwide population-based study. TB contacts during 1997 to 2012 were included as the study cohort. Patients with antecedent cancer and TB were excluded. Data from 11,522 TB contacts and 46,088 age-, sex-, and enrollment date-matched subjects during 1997 to 2012 were analyzed. The 2 cohorts were monitored until December 31, 2012 for incidence of cancer and TB infection. LTBI was defined as a TB contact with subsequent TB activation. The primary endpoint was occurrence of newly diagnosed cancer. There was no difference in cancer development between the TB contact cohort and comparison cohort (log-rank test, P = 0.714). After multivariate adjustment, the hazard ratio (HR) for cancer among the LTBI patients was 2.29 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.26-4.17; P = 0.007]. There was increase in cancer incidences for several specific cancer types, including multiple myeloma (HR 340.28), lung (HR 2.69), kidney and bladder (HR 6.16), hepatobiliary (HR 2.36), and gastrointestinal (HR 2.99) cancers. None of the 136 TB contacts who received isoniazid prophylaxis developed cancer. LTBI patients had a higher risk of future cancer. PMID:26825880

  20. Reactivation tuberculosis: role of surveillance.

    PubMed

    DiNardo, Andrew R; Guy, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    The incidence and death rates from tuberculosis (TB) have declined through concerted efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of active disease. Despite this, 9.6 million new cases and 1.1 million deaths in 2014 are unacceptably high. To decrease the rates of TB further, the huge number of persons with latent TB infection (LTBI) from whom new cases will arise has to be addressed with a sense of priority. Identifying the highest risk groups and providing effective treatment has been shown to decrease active TB. Further research to refine the predictors of reactivation and shorter effective treatments are urgently needed. Implementing intensified case finding, testing and treatment for LTBI will require continued investment in health care capacity at multiple levels. PMID:27042967

  1. Challenges from Tuberculosis Diagnosis to Care in Community-Based Active Case Finding among the Urban Poor in Cambodia: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Shelly; Koeut, Pichenda; Thai, Sopheak; Khun, Kim Eam; Colebunders, Robert; Lynen, Lut

    2015-01-01

    Background While community-based active case finding (ACF) for tuberculosis (TB) holds promise for increasing early case detection among hard-to-reach populations, limited data exist on the acceptability of active screening. We aimed to identify barriers and explore facilitators on the pathway from diagnosis to care among TB patients and health providers. Methods Mixed-methods study. We administered a survey questionnaire to, and performed in-depth interviews with, TB patients identified through ACF from poor urban settlements in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Additionally, we conducted focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with community and public health providers involved in ACF, respectively. Results Acceptance of home TB screening was strong among key stakeholders due to perceived reductions in access barriers and in direct and indirect patient costs. Privacy and stigma were not an issue. To build trust and facilitate communication, the participation of community representatives alongside health workers was preferred. Most health providers saw ACF as complementary to existing TB services; however, additional workload as a result of ACF was perceived as straining operating capacity at public sector sites. Proximity to a health facility and disease severity were the strongest determinants of prompt care-seeking. The main reasons reported for delays in treatment-seeking were non-acceptance of diagnosis, high indirect costs related to lost income/productivity and transportation expenses, and anticipated side-effects from TB drugs. Conclusions TB patients and health providers considered home-based ACF complementary to facility-based TB screening. Strong engagement with community representatives was believed critical in gaining access to high risk communities. The main barriers to prompt treatment uptake in ACF were refusal of diagnosis, high indirect costs, and anticipated treatment side-effects. A patient-centred approach and community involvement were essential

  2. How human immunodeficiency virus voluntary testing can contribute to tuberculosis control.

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey-Faussett, Peter; Maher, Dermot; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Nunn, Paul; Perriëns, Joseph; Raviglione, Mario

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is fueling the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. However, despite their close epidemiological links, the public health responses have largely been separate. WHO has set out a strategy to decrease the burden of HIV-related TB, comprising interventions against both TB and HIV. Voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) for HIV can link TB and HIV programme activities. The benefits of VCT for HIV to TB patients include referral for appropriate clinical care and support for those testing HIV-positive. Likewise, people attending a centre for VCT can benefit from TB screening: those found to be both HIV-positive and with active TB need referral for TB treatment; those without active TB should be offered TB preventive treatment with isoniazid. To explore how VCT for HIV can contribute to a more coherent response to TB, WHO is coordinating the ProTEST Initiative. The name "ProTEST" is derived from the Promotion of voluntary testing as an entry point for access to the core interventions of intensified TB case-finding and isoniazid preventive treatment. Other interventions may be added to provide finally a comprehensive range of HIV and TB prevention and care interventions. Under the ProTEST Initiative, pilot districts are establishing links between centres for VCT for HIV and TB prevention and care. This will pave the way for large-scale operationalization of the comprehensive range of interventions needed to control TB in settings with high HIV prevalence. PMID:12571721

  3. Bioassay-Guided Isolation and Structural Modification of the Anti-TB Resorcinols from Ardisia gigantifolia.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yi-Fu; Song, Xun; Qiu, Ming-Hua; Luo, Shi-Hong; Wang, Bao-Jie; Van Hung, Nguyen; Cuong, Nguyen M; Soejarto, Djaja Doel; Fong, Harry H S; Franzblau, Scott G; Li, Sheng-Hong; He, Zhen-Dan; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a highly contagious disease mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 RV . Antitubercular (anti-TB) bioassay-guided isolation of the CHCl3 extract of the leaves and stems of the medicinal plant Ardisia gigantifolia led to the isolation of two anti-TB 5-alkylresorcinols, 5-(8Z-heptadecenyl) resorcinol (1) and 5-(8Z-pentadecenyl) resorcinol (2). We further synthesized 15 derivatives based on these two natural products. These compounds (natural and synthetic) were evaluated for their anti-TB activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 RV . Resorcinols 1 and 2 exhibited anti-TB activity with MIC values at 34.4 and 79.2 μm in MABA assay, respectively, and 91.7 and 168.3 μm in LORA assay, respectively. Among these derivatives, compound 8 was found to show improved anti-TB activity than its synthetic precursor (2) with MIC values at 42.0 μm in MABA assay and 100.2 μm in LORA assay. The active compounds should be regarded as new hits for further study as a novel class of anti-TB agents. The distinct structure-activity correlations of the parent compound were elucidated based on these derivatives. PMID:26992112

  4. Comparison of the Sensitivity of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB According to Patient Age.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Eun Young; Kim, Se Joong; Lee, Yeon Joo; Park, Jong Sun; Cho, Young-Jae; Yoon, Ho Il; Yim, Jae-Joon; Lee, Choon-Taek; Lee, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are two types of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) in use for the detection of tuberculosis (TB) infection, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (GFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB. Owing to contradictory reports regarding whether the results of these IGRAs are affected by the age of the patient, we aimed to determine if these two tests have age-related differences in sensitivity. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of diagnosed TB patients who were tested using either QFT-GIT or T-SPOT.TB from February 2008 to December 2013. The positivity of the two tests was analyzed and compared with true TB infection, which was defined as active TB based on either a positive Mycobacterium culture or a positive TB polymerase chain reaction. The QFT-GIT group included 192 TB patients, and the T-SPOT.TB group included 212 TB patients. Of the patients with pulmonary TB, 76 (39.6%) were in the QFT-GIT group and 143 (67.5%) in the T-SPOT.TB group. The overall sensitivity was 80.2% for QFT-GIT and 91.0% for T.SPOT.TB. The sensitivities of QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB according to age group were as follows: <29 years, 93.3% and 96.7%; 30-49 years, 86.5% and 94.7%; 50-69 years, 76.8% and 87.5%; and >70 years, 68.3% and 85.7%, respectively. The trend of age-related changes in sensitivity was significant for both QFT-GIT (p = 0.004) and T.SPOT.TB (p = 0.039). However, only QFT-GIT was significantly related to age in the multivariate analysis. QFT-GIT, but not T-SPOT.TB, was significantly affected by patient age. PMID:27258377

  5. Comparison of the Sensitivity of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB According to Patient Age

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Won; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Eun Young; Kim, Se Joong; Lee, Yeon Joo; Park, Jong Sun; Cho, Young-Jae; Yoon, Ho Il; Yim, Jae-Joon; Lee, Choon-Taek; Lee, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are two types of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) in use for the detection of tuberculosis (TB) infection, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (GFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB. Owing to contradictory reports regarding whether the results of these IGRAs are affected by the age of the patient, we aimed to determine if these two tests have age-related differences in sensitivity. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of diagnosed TB patients who were tested using either QFT-GIT or T-SPOT.TB from February 2008 to December 2013. The positivity of the two tests was analyzed and compared with true TB infection, which was defined as active TB based on either a positive Mycobacterium culture or a positive TB polymerase chain reaction. The QFT-GIT group included 192 TB patients, and the T-SPOT.TB group included 212 TB patients. Of the patients with pulmonary TB, 76 (39.6%) were in the QFT-GIT group and 143 (67.5%) in the T-SPOT.TB group. The overall sensitivity was 80.2% for QFT-GIT and 91.0% for T.SPOT.TB. The sensitivities of QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB according to age group were as follows: <29 years, 93.3% and 96.7%; 30–49 years, 86.5% and 94.7%; 50–69 years, 76.8% and 87.5%; and >70 years, 68.3% and 85.7%, respectively. The trend of age-related changes in sensitivity was significant for both QFT-GIT (p = 0.004) and T.SPOT.TB (p = 0.039). However, only QFT-GIT was significantly related to age in the multivariate analysis. QFT-GIT, but not T-SPOT.TB, was significantly affected by patient age. PMID:27258377

  6. Tuberculosis Contact Investigations--United States, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    Young, Kai H; Ehman, Melissa; Reves, Randall; Peterson Maddox, Brandy L; Khan, Awal; Chorba, Terence L; Jereb, John

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is transmitted through the air from an infectious patient (index patient) to other persons (contacts) who share space. Exposure to M. tuberculosis can result in tuberculosis (TB) disease or latent TB infection (LTBI), which has no clinical symptoms or radiologic evidence of disease. The cycle of transmission can be ended by isolating and treating patients with TB disease, examining contacts, and treating LTBI to prevent progression to TB disease. CDC systematically collects aggregate data on contact investigations from the 50 states, the District of Columbia (DC), and Puerto Rico. Data from 2003-2012 were analyzed for trends in yields from contact investigations, in terms of numbers of contacts elicited and examined and the estimated number of TB cases averted through treatment of LTBI among contacts in 2012. During 2003-2012, the number of TB cases decreased, while the number of contacts listed per index patient with contacts elicited increased. In 2012, U.S. public health authorities reported 9,945 cases of TB disease (1) and 105,100 contacts. Among these contacts, 84,998 (80.9%) were examined; TB was diagnosed in 532 (0.6%) and LTBI in 15,411 (18.1%). Among contacts with LTBI, 10,137 (65.8%) started treatment, and 6,689 (43.4% of all contacts with LTBI) completed treatment. By investigating contacts in 2012, an estimated 128 TB cases (34% of all potential cases) over the initial 5 years were averted, but an additional 248 cases (66%) might have been averted if all potentially contagious TB patients had contacts elicited, all contacts were examined, and all infected contacts completed treatment. Enhancing contact investigation activities, particularly by ensuring completion of treatment by contacts recently infected with M. tuberculosis, is essential to achieve the goal of TB elimination. PMID:26720627

  7. Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: A Genetic Analysis Using Online Bioinformatics Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jessica M.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Strong, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a serious global health problem, resulting in >1.4 million deaths each year. Of increasing concern is the evolution of antibiotic resistant strains of the bacterium that causes TB. Using this real-world scenario, we created a 90-minute activity for high school or undergraduate students to use online…

  8. Transcriptional Profiling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Replicating Ex vivo in Blood from HIV- and HIV+ Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhengyu; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Li, Hualin; Meng, Lu; Laal, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Hematogenous dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) occurs during both primary and reactivated tuberculosis (TB). Although hematogenous dissemination occurs in non-HIV TB patients, in ∼80% of these patients, TB manifests exclusively as pulmonary disease. In contrast, extrapulmonary, disseminated, and/or miliary TB is seen in 60–70% of HIV-infected TB patients, suggesting that hematogenous dissemination is likely more common in HIV+ patients. To understand M. tb adaptation to the blood environment during bacteremia, we have studied the transcriptome of M. tb replicating in human whole blood. To investigate if M. tb discriminates between the hematogenous environments of immunocompetent and immunodeficient individuals, we compared the M. tb transcriptional profiles during replication in blood from HIV- and HIV+ donors. Our results demonstrate that M. tb survives and replicates in blood from both HIV- and HIV+ donors and enhances its virulence/pathogenic potential in the hematogenous environment. The M. tb blood-specific transcriptome reflects suppression of dormancy, induction of cell-wall remodeling, alteration in mode of iron acquisition, potential evasion of immune surveillance, and enhanced expression of important virulence factors that drive active M. tb infection and dissemination. These changes are accentuated during bacterial replication in blood from HIV+ patients. Furthermore, the expression of ESAT-6, which participates in dissemination of M. tb from the lungs, is upregulated in M. tb growing in blood, especially during growth in blood from HIV+ patients. Preliminary experiments also demonstrate that ESAT-6 promotes HIV replication in U1 cells. These studies provide evidence, for the first time, that during bacteremia, M. tb can adapt to the blood environment by modifying its transcriptome in a manner indicative of an enhanced-virulence phenotype that favors active infection. Additionally, transcriptional modifications in HIV+ blood may

  9. Feasibility, Yield, and Cost of Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Linked to a Mobile HIV Service in Cape Town, South Africa: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kranzer, Katharina; Lawn, Stephen D.; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Vassall, Anna; Raditlhalo, Eudoxia; Govindasamy, Darshini; van Schaik, Nienke; Wood, Robin; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2012-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization is currently developing guidelines on screening for tuberculosis disease to inform national screening strategies. This process is complicated by significant gaps in knowledge regarding mass screening. This study aimed to assess feasibility, uptake, yield, treatment outcomes, and costs of adding an active tuberculosis case-finding program to an existing mobile HIV testing service. Methods and Findings The study was conducted at a mobile HIV testing service operating in deprived communities in Cape Town, South Africa. All HIV-negative individuals with symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis, and all HIV-positive individuals regardless of symptoms were eligible for participation and referred for sputum induction. Samples were examined by microscopy and culture. Active tuberculosis case finding was conducted on 181 days at 58 different sites. Of the 6,309 adults who accessed the mobile clinic, 1,385 were eligible and 1,130 (81.6%) were enrolled. The prevalence of smear-positive tuberculosis was 2.2% (95% CI 1.1–4.0), 3.3% (95% CI 1.4–6.4), and 0.4% (95% CI 1.4 015–6.4) in HIV-negative individuals, individuals newly diagnosed with HIV, and known HIV, respectively. The corresponding prevalence of culture-positive tuberculosis was 5.3% (95% CI 3.5–7.7), 7.4% (95% CI 4.5–11.5), 4.3% (95% CI 2.3–7.4), respectively. Of the 56 new tuberculosis cases detected, 42 started tuberculosis treatment and 34 (81.0%) completed treatment. The cost of the intervention was US$1,117 per tuberculosis case detected and US$2,458 per tuberculosis case cured. The generalisability of the study is limited to similar settings with comparable levels of deprivation and TB and HIV prevalence. Conclusions Mobile active tuberculosis case finding in deprived populations with a high burden of HIV and tuberculosis is feasible, has a high uptake, yield, and treatment success. Further work is now required to examine cost-effectiveness and affordability and

  10. Time-series analysis of monthly age-specific numbers of newly registered cases of active tuberculosis in Japan from 1998 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Kohei, Y; Sumi, A; Kobayashi, N

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the seasonality of age-specific tuberculosis (TB) in Japan. To allow the development of TB control strategies for different age groups we used a time-series analysis, including a spectral analysis and least squares method, to analyse the monthly age-specific numbers of newly registered cases of all forms of active TB in Japan from January 1998 to December 2013. The time-series data are reported in 10-year age groups: 0-9, 10-19, …, 70-79, and ⩾80 years. We defined the contribution ratio of the 1-year cycle, Q 1, as the contribution of the amplitude of a 1-year cycle to the whole amplitude of the time-series data. The Q 1 values in the age groups corresponding to adolescence and middle life (10-39 years) and old age (⩾70 years) were high. The peaks in the active TB epidemics for the ⩾70 years age group occurred in August and September, 1-2 months behind the peaks for the 10-39 years age group (June and July). An active TB epidemic might be attributable to travel by public transport and irregular employment in the 10-39 years age group and immune system suppression by low winter temperatures in the ⩾70 years age group. PMID:26979927

  11. Autophagy in the Fight Against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Carla F.; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease mainly caused by the tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest diseases that has afflicted humanity since ancient times. Although the number of people falling ill with TB each year is declining, its incidence in many developing countries is still a major cause of concern. Upon invading host cells by phagocytosis, M. tuberculosis can replicate within infected cells by arresting the maturation of the phagosome whose function is to target the pathogen for elimination. Host cells have mechanisms of controlling this evasion by inducing autophagy, an elaborate cellular process that targets bacteria for progressive elimination, decreasing bacterial loads within infected cells. In addition, autophagy activation also aids in the control of inflammation, contributing to a more efficient innate immune response against M. tuberculosis. Several innovative TB therapies have been envisaged based on autophagy manipulation, with some of them revealing high potential for future clinical trials and eventual implementation in healthcare systems. Thus, this review highlights the recent advances on the innate immune response regulation by autophagy upon M. tuberculosis infection and the promising new autophagy-based therapies for TB. PMID:25607549

  12. [Spanish Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on tuberculosis in pregnant women and neonates (i): Epidemiology and diagnosis. Congenital tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Baquero-Artigao, F; Mellado Peña, M J; Del Rosal Rabes, T; Noguera Julián, A; Goncé Mellgren, A; de la Calle Fernández-Miranda, M; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) screening in pregnancy using tuberculin skin test (TST) is recommended in case of symptoms of TB disease, close contact with a patient with infectious TB, or high risk of developing active disease. The new interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) tests are recommended in BCG-vaccinated pregnant women with positive TST and no known risk factors for TB, and in those immunocompromised, with clinical suspicion of TB but negative TST. TB diagnosis is difficult due to the non-specific symptoms, the increased frequency of extrapulmonary disease, the delay in radiological examinations, and the high rate of tuberculin anergy. Neonatal TB can be acquired in utero (congenital TB), or through airborne transmission after delivery (postnatal TB). Congenital TB is extremely rare and does not cause fetal malformations. It may be evident at birth, although it usually presents after the second week of life. In newborns with no family history of TB, the disease should be considered in cases of miliary pneumonia, hepatosplenomegaly with focal lesions, or lymphocytic meningitis with hypoglycorrhachia, especially in those born to immigrants from high TB-burden countries. TST is usually negative, and IGRAs have lower sensitivity than in older children. However, the yield of acid-fast smear and culture is higher, mostly in congenital TB. Molecular diagnosis techniques enable early diagnosis and detection of drug resistance mutations. There is a substantial risk of disseminated disease and death. PMID:25754313

  13. LAG3 Expression in Active Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Bonnie L.; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus–induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4+ T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response. PMID:25549835

  14. Cytokine and Antibody Based Diagnostic Algorithms for Sputum Culture-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Joy; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yunxia; Li, Haicheng; Guo, Huixin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Xunxun; Chen, Yuhui; Liao, Qinghua; Shu, Yang; Tan, Yaoju; Yu, Meiling; Li, Guozhou; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Qiu; Bi, Lijun; Guo, Lina; Zhao, Meigui

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most serious infectious diseases globally and has high mortality rates. A variety of diagnostic tests are available, yet none are wholly reliable. Serum cytokines, although significantly and frequently induced by different diseases and thus good biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis, are not sufficiently disease-specific. TB-specific antibody detection, on the other hand, has been reported to be highly specific but not sufficiently sensitive. In this study, our aim was to improve the sensitivity and specificity of TB diagnosis by combining detection of TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies in peripheral blood samples. Methods TB-related serum cytokines were screened using a human cytokine array. TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies were detected in parallel with microarray technology. The diagnostic performance of the new protocol for active TB was systematically compared with other traditional methods. Results Here, we show that cytokines I-309, IL-8 and MIG are capable of distinguishing patients with active TB from healthy controls, patients with latent TB infection, and those with a range of other pulmonary diseases, and that these cytokines, and their presence alongside antibodies for TB-specific antigens Ag14-16kDa, Ag32kDa, Ag38kDa and Ag85B, are specific markers for active TB. The diagnostic protocol for active TB developed here, which combines the detection of three TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies, is highly sensitive (91.03%), specific (90.77%) and accurate (90.87%). Conclusions Our results show that combining detection of TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies significantly enhances diagnostic accuracy for active TB, providing greater accuracy than conventional diagnostic methods such as interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), TB antibody Colloidal Gold Assays and microbiological culture, and suggest that this diagnostic protocol has potential for clinical

  15. [Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2006-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR) and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology (SPP) have developed guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (AT) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD), namely rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists. Due to the high risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with IJD, LTBI and AT screening should be performed as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis. Even if TB screening was performed at the beginning of the disease, the evaluation should be repeated before starting anti-TNF-alpha therapy. When TB (LTBI orAT) treatment is indicated, it should be performed before the beginning of anti-TNF-alpha therapy. If the IJD activity requires urgent anti-TNF-alpha therapy, these drugs can be started after two months of antituberculosis therapy in AT cases, or after one month in LTBI cases. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If abnormal, e.g. Gohn complex, the patient should be treated as LTBI; residual lesions require the exclusion of AT and patients with history of untreated or incomplete TB treatment should be treated as LTBI. In cases of suspected active lesions, AT diagnosis should be confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test (TST), with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If induration is less than 5 mm, the test should be repeated after 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and should be considered negative if the result is again inferior to 5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment. IfTST is performed in immunosupressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test. PMID:17094335

  16. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors: March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFalpha therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn s complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk/benefit assessment. PMID:18344925

  17. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors - March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFα therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFα therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFα therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn's complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions, ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-α therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk / benefit assessment. Rev Port Pneumol 2007; XIV (2): 271-283. PMID:25966834

  18. Cohort for Tuberculosis Research by the Indo-US Medical Partnership (CTRIUMPH): protocol for a multicentric prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Akshay; Padmapriyadarsini, Chandrasekaran; Mave, Vidya; Kadam, Dileep; Suryavanshi, Nishi; Shivakumar, Shri Vijay Bala Yogendra; Kohli, Rewa; Gupte, Nikhil; Thiruvengadam, Kannan; Kagal, Anju; Meshram, Sushant; Bharadwaj, Renu; Khadse, Sandhya; Ramachandran, Geetha; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Pradhan, Neeta; Gomathy, N S; DeLuca, Andrea; Gupta, Amita; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis disease (TB) remains an important global health threat. An evidence-based response, tailored to local disease epidemiology in high-burden countries, is key to controlling the global TB epidemic. Reliable surrogate biomarkers that predict key active disease and latent TB infection outcomes are vital to advancing clinical research necessary to ‘End TB’. Well executed longitudinal studies strengthening local research capacity for addressing TB research priorities and advancing biomarker discovery are urgently needed. Methods and analysis The Cohort for Tuberculosis Research by the Indo-US Medical Partnership (CTRIUMPH) study conducted in Byramjee Jeejeebhoy Government Medical College (BJGMC), Pune and National Institute for Research in Tuberculosis (NIRT), Chennai, India, will establish and maintain three prospective cohorts: (1) an Active TB Cohort comprising 800 adults with pulmonary TB, 200 adults with extrapulmonary TB and 200 children with TB; (2) a Household Contact Cohort of 3200 adults and children at risk of developing active disease; and (3) a Control Cohort consisting of 300 adults and 200 children with no known exposure to TB. Relevant clinical, sociodemographic and psychosocial data will be collected and a strategic specimen repository established at multiple time points over 24 months of follow-up to measure host and microbial factors associated with (1) TB treatment outcomes; (2) progression from infection to active TB disease; and (3) Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission among Indian adults and children. We anticipate CTRIUMPH to serve as a research platform necessary to characterise some relevant aspects of the TB epidemic in India, generate evidence to inform local and global TB control strategies and support novel TB biomarker discovery. Ethics and dissemination This study is approved by the Institutional Review Boards of NIRT, BJGMC and Johns Hopkins University, USA. Study results will be disseminated through peer

  19. Synthetic Long Peptide Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latency Antigen Rv1733c Protects against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Wilson, Louis; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Responsible for 9 million new cases of active disease and nearly 2 million deaths each year, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of overwhelming dimensions. Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine available, fails to confer lifelong protection and to prevent reactivation of latent infection. Although 15 new vaccine candidates are now in clinical trials, an effective vaccine against TB remains elusive, and new strategies for vaccination are vital. BCG vaccination fails to induce immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency antigens. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) combined with adjuvants have been studied mostly for therapeutic cancer vaccines, yet not for TB, and proved to induce efficient antitumor immunity. This study investigated an SLP derived from Rv1733c, a major M. tuberculosis latency antigen which is highly expressed by “dormant” M. tuberculosis and well recognized by T cells from latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. In order to assess its in vivo immunogenicity and protective capacity, Rv1733c SLP in CpG was administered to HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Immunization with Rv1733c SLP elicited gamma interferon-positive/tumor necrosis factor-positive (IFN-γ+/TNF+) and IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells and Rv1733c-specific antibodies and led to a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-challenged mice. This was observed both in a pre- and in a post-M. tuberculosis challenge setting. Moreover, Rv1733c SLP immunization significantly boosted the protective efficacy of BCG, demonstrating the potential of M. tuberculosis latency antigens to improve BCG efficacy. These data suggest a promising role for M. tuberculosis latency antigen Rv1733c-derived SLPs as a novel TB vaccine approach, both in a prophylactic and in a postinfection setting. PMID:26202436

  20. Treatment outcome among cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in Western India: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sangita V; Nimavat, Kapil B; Alpesh, Patel B; Shukla, Lipy K; Shringarpure, Kalpita S; Mehta, Kedar G; Joshi, Chakshu C

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant TB has become a significant public health problem in a number of countries and an obstacle to effective TB control. Therefore, the present study sought to determine the treatment outcome in patients with MDR TB in seven districts and to examine the factors affecting the treatment outcome. A prospective cohort study was carried out by enrolling all the registered patients in DOTs Plus center of Vadodara district from February 2010 to December 2010. A total of 142 patients were interviewed using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire at the DOTS centers of seven districts of Gujarat or at their homes in cases of defaulters/death. After 24 months, of those 145 patients, 48 (33.10%) were declared cured, 8 (5.50%) had completed their treatment, 43 (29.70%) patients died during the treatment, and 32 (21.10%) patients defaulted during treatment. Factors associated with a significant difference in the outcomes were income, marital status, and education. Only education significantly affected treatment outcome upon applying logistic regression. Therefore, proper counseling on drug adherence should be applied at the programmatic level. PMID:26724262

  1. Novel approaches to tuberculosis prevention: DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R

    2014-03-01

    It is estimated that there are approximately eight million new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) worldwide annually. There is only 1 vaccine available for prevention: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). This has variable efficacy and is only protective for certain extrapulmonary TB cases in children, therefore new strategies for the creation of novel vaccines have emerged. One of the promising approaches is the DNA vaccine, used as a direct vaccination or as a prime-boost vaccine. This review describes the experimental data obtained during the design of DNA vaccines for TB. PMID:24450840

  2. The role of delamanid in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Joseph M; Sloan, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant cause of death worldwide, and emergence of drug-resistant TB requires lengthy treatments with toxic drugs that are less effective than their first-line equivalents. New treatments are urgently needed. Delamanid, previously OPC-67863, is a novel drug of the dihydro-nitroimidazole class with potent anti-TB activity and great promise to be effective in the treatment of drug-resistant TB. This review examines the preclinical and clinical development of delamanid, reviews current guidance on its use and evaluates the opportunities and challenges for its future role in TB management. PMID:25999726

  3. Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Three Zoo Elephants and a Human Contact - Oregon, 2013.

    PubMed

    Zlot, Amy; Vines, Jennifer; Nystrom, Laura; Lane, Lindsey; Behm, Heidi; Denny, Justin; Finnegan, Mitch; Hostetler, Trevor; Matthews, Gloria; Storms, Tim; DeBess, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, public health officials in Multnomah County, Oregon, started an investigation of a tuberculosis (TB) outbreak among elephants and humans at a local zoo. The investigation ultimately identified three bull elephants with active TB and 118 human contacts of the elephants. Ninety-six (81%) contacts were evaluated, and seven close contacts were found to have latent TB infection. The three bulls were isolated and treated (elephants with TB typically are not euthanized) to prevent infection of other animals and humans, and persons with latent infection were offered treatment. Improved TB screening methods for elephants are needed to prevent exposure of human contacts. PMID:26741355

  4. Autocrine IL-10 induces hallmarks of alternative activation in macrophages and suppresses anti-tuberculosis effector mechanisms without compromising T cell immunity1

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Tanja; Ehlers, Stefan; Heitmann, Lisa; Rausch, Alexandra; Mages, Jörg; Murray, Peter J.; Lang, Roland; Hölscher, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Elevated IL-10 has been implicated in reactivation tuberculosis (TB). Since macrophages rather than T cells were reported to be the major source of IL-10 in TB, we analyzed the consequences of a macrophage-specific overexpression of IL-10 in transgenic mice (macIL-10-transgenic) after aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). MacIL-10-transgenic mice were more susceptible to chronic Mtb infection than non-transgenic littermates, exhibiting higher bacterial loads in the lung after 12 weeks of infection and dying significantly earlier than controls. The differentiation, recruitment and activation of TH1 cells as well as the induction of IFN-gamma-dependent effector genes against Mtb were not affected by macrophage-derived IL-10. However, microarray analysis of pulmonary gene expression revealed patterns characteristic of alternative macrophage activation that were overrepresented in Mtb-infected macIL-10-transgenic mice. Importantly, arginase-1 gene expression and activity were strikingly enhanced in transgenic mice accompanied by a reduced production of reactive nitrogen intermediates. Moreover, IL-10-dependent arginase-1 induction diminished anti-mycobacterial effector mechanisms in macrophages. Together, macrophage-derived IL-10 triggers aspects of alternative macrophage activation and promotes Mtb recrudescence independent of overt effects on anti-TB T cell immunity. PMID:19561100

  5. Improvement in Plasma Drug Activity during the Early Treatment Interval among Tanzanian Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ndusilo, Norah D.; Heysell, Scott K.; Mpagama, Stellah G.; Gratz, Jean; Segesela, Farida H.; Pazia, Saumu J.; Wang, Xin-Qun; Houpt, Eric R.; Kibiki, Gibson S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Individual pharmacokinetic variability may be common in patients treated for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) but data are sparse from resource-limited settings and across the early treatment interval. Methods Plasma drug activity, as measured by the TB Drug Activity (TDA) assay at 2 and 4 weeks of treatment with a standardized MDR-TB regimen was performed in patients with pulmonary MDR-TB from Tanzania. TDA values were correlated with measures of early treatment outcome including every two week collection of sputum for time-to-positivity (TTP) in liquid culture from the MGIT 960 automated system. Patients were evaluated at 24 weeks and those surviving without delayed sputum culture conversion (>8 weeks), culture reversion after previously negative, or weight loss were defined as having a favorable outcome. Results Twenty-five patients were enrolled with a mean age of 37 ±12 years. All were culture positive from the pretreatment sputum sample with a mean TTP in MGIT of 257 ±134 hours, and the median time to culture conversion on treatment was 6 weeks. Twenty patients (80%) had an increase in TDA, with the overall mean TDA at 2 weeks of 2.1 ±0.7 compared to 2.4 ±0.8 at 4 weeks (p = 0.005). At 2 weeks 13 subjects (52%) had a TDA value > 2-log killing against their own M. tuberculosis isolate compared to 17 subjects (68%) at 4 weeks (McNemar’s exact test p = 0.29). An interim treatment outcome was able to be determined in 23 patients (92%), of whom 7 had a poor outcome (30%). An increase in TDA from week 2 to week 4 was associated with favorable outcome, [unadjusted OR = 20.0, 95% CI: 1.61–247.98, exact p = 0.017 and adjusted OR = 19.33, 95% CI: 1.55–241.5, exact p = 0.023]. Conclusions The majority of patients with MDR-TB in Tanzania had an increase in plasma drug activity from week 2 to week 4 of treatment as measured by the TDA assay. Understanding the etiology and full impact of this dynamic may inform therapeutic intervention. PMID

  6. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mani Kant; Kumar, Prashant; Singh, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 2.3 million (26% of global burden) cases of tuberculosis (TB) in India the accurate diagnosis of childhood TB remains a major challenge. Children with TB usually have paucibacillary disease and contribute little to disease transmission within the community. Consequently the treatment of children with TB is often not considered a priority by TB control programmes. Adequate and timely assessment of TB infection in childhood could diminish epidemiological burden as underdiagnosed pediatric patients can eventually evolve in to an active state and have the potential to disseminate the etiological agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, notably increasing this worldwide public health problem. In this review we discuss the most important recent advances in the diagnosis of childhood TB: (1) Symptom-based approaches, (2) novel immune-based approaches, including in vitro interferon-γ IGRA release assays IGRA tests; and (3) bacteriological and molecular methods that are more rapid and/or less expensive than conventional culture techniques for TB diagnosis and/or drug-resistance testing. Recent advances have improved our ability to diagnose latent infection and active TB in children, nevertheless establishing a diagnosis of either latent infection or active disease in HIV-infected children remains a major challenge. PMID:26283820

  7. Turning off the tap: stopping tuberculosis transmission through active case-finding and prompt effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Courtney M; Amanullah, Farhana; Dharmadhikari, Ashwin; Nardell, Edward A; Seddon, James A; Vasilyeva, Irina; Zhao, Yanlin; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2015-12-01

    To halt the global tuberculosis epidemic, transmission must be stopped to prevent new infections and new cases. Identification of individuals with tuberculosis and prompt initiation of effective treatment to rapidly render them non-infectious is crucial to this task. However, in settings of high tuberculosis burden, active case-finding is often not implemented, resulting in long delays in diagnosis and treatment. A range of strategies to find cases and ensure prompt and correct treatment have been shown to be effective in high tuberculosis-burden settings. The population-level effect of targeted active case-finding on reducing tuberculosis incidence has been shown by studies and projected by mathematical modelling. The inclusion of targeted active case-finding in a comprehensive epidemic-control strategy for tuberculosis should contribute substantially to a decrease in tuberculosis incidence. PMID:26515675

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of a pyrazinoic acid prodrug in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, João Paulo-dos Santos; Pavan, Fernando Rogerio; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Felli, Veni Maria Andres

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused mainly by infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis affecting more than ten million people around the world. Despite TB can be treated, the rise of MDR-TB and XDR-TB cases put the disease in a worrying status. As pyrazinamide-resistant strains exhibit low or none pyrazinamidase activity, it is proposed that the active form of pyrazinamide (PZA) is pyrazinoic acid (POA), although this acid has poor penetration in mycobacteria. In this work, we present a convenient one-pot synthesis of 2-chloroethyl pyrazinoate, and its activity in M. tuberculosis H37Rv (ATCC27294) in MIC assay using the MABA technique. The obtained MIC of the compound was 3.96 g/mL, and discussion about the activity profile of some previously evaluated pyrazinoates is also performed. PMID:25161383

  9. Tuberculosis control activities before and after Hurricane Sandy--northeast and mid-Atlantic states, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-03-22

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck the U.S. northeast and mid-Atlantic seaboard; the effects of the storm extended to southeastern and midwestern states and to eastern Canada. At the time, 1,899 residents in the most affected areas were undergoing treatment for tuberculosis (TB) disease or infection. To ascertain the operational abilities of state and local TB programs during and after the storm and to determine whether lessons learned from a previous hurricane were effective in ensuring continuity of TB patient care, CDC interviewed staff members at all of the affected state and city TB control programs, including those in areas with power outages and flooded streets, tunnels, and subway lines. The interviews determined that continuity of care for TB patients in programs affected by Hurricane Sandy was better preserved than it had been during and after Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. This improvement might be attributed to 1) preparedness measures learned from Hurricane Katrina (e.g., preparing line lists of patients, providing patients with as-needed medications, and making back-up copies of patient records in advance of the storm) and 2) less widespread displacement of persons after Hurricane Sandy than occurred after Hurricane Katrina. Maintaining readiness among clinicians and TB control programs to respond to natural disasters remains essential to protecting public health and preserving TB patients' continuity of care. PMID:23515057

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Automated Digital Microscopy for Diagnosis of Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Swati; Ismail, Nazir; Clark, David; Lewis, James J.; Omar, Shaheed; Dreyer, Andries; Chihota, Violet; Churchyard, Gavin; Dowdy, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Automated digital microscopy has the potential to improve the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), particularly in settings where molecular testing is too expensive to perform routinely. The cost-effectiveness of TB diagnostic algorithms using automated digital microscopy remains uncertain. Methods Using data from a demonstration study of an automated digital microscopy system (TBDx, Applied Visual Systems, Inc.), we performed an economic evaluation of TB diagnosis in South Africa from the health system perspective. The primary outcome was the incremental cost per new TB diagnosis made. We considered costs and effectiveness of different algorithms for automated digital microscopy, including as a stand-alone test and with confirmation of positive results with Xpert MTB/RIF (‘Xpert’, Cepheid, Inc.). Results were compared against both manual microscopy and universal Xpert testing. Results In settings willing to pay $2000 per incremental TB diagnosis, universal Xpert was the preferred strategy. However, where resources were not sufficient to support universal Xpert, and a testing volume of at least 30 specimens per day could be ensured, automated digital microscopy with Xpert confirmation of low-positive results could facilitate the diagnosis of 79–84% of all Xpert-positive TB cases, at 50–60% of the total cost. The cost-effectiveness of this strategy was $1280 per incremental TB diagnosis (95% uncertainty range, UR: $340-$3440) in the base case, but improved under conditions likely reflective of many settings in sub-Saharan Africa: $677 per diagnosis (95% UR: $450-$935) when sensitivity of manual smear microscopy was lowered to 0.5, and $956 per diagnosis (95% UR: $40-$2910) when the prevalence of multidrug-resistant TB was lowered to 1%. Conclusions Although universal Xpert testing is the preferred algorithm for TB diagnosis when resources are sufficient, automated digital microscopy can identify the majority of cases and halve the cost of diagnosis and

  11. Isoniazid@Fe2 O3 Nanocontainers and Their Antibacterial Effect on Tuberculosis Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leidinger, Peter; Treptow, Jens; Hagens, Kristine; Eich, Jacqueline; Zehethofer, Nicole; Schwudke, Dominik; Oehlmann, Wulf; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Goldmann, Oliver; Schaible, Ulrich E; Dittmar, Kurt E J; Feldmann, Claus

    2015-10-19

    Isoniazid-filled Fe2 O3 hollow nanospheres (INH@Fe2 O3 , diameter <30 nm, 48 wt % INH-load) are prepared for the first time and suggested for tuberculosis therapy. After dextran-functionalization, the INH@Fe2 O3 @DEX nanocontainers show strong activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb.) and M.tb.-infected macrophages. The nanocontainers can be considered as "Trojan horses" and show efficient, active uptake into both M.tb.-infected macrophages and even into mycobacterial cells. PMID:26332072

  12. Performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test and Tuberculin Skin Test for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in BCG vaccinated health care workers

    PubMed Central

    Babayigit, Cenk; Ozer, Burcin; Inandi, Tacettin; Ozer, Cahit; Duran, Nizami; Gocmen, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculin skin test (TST) has been used for years as an aid in diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) but it suffers from a number of well-documented performance and logistic problems. Quantiferon-TB Gold In Tube test (QFT-GIT) has been reported to have better sensitivity and specifity than TST. In this study, it was aimed to compare the performance of a commercial IFN-γ release assay (QFT-GIT) with TST in the diagnosis of HCWs at risk for latent TB infection in BCG vaccinated population. Material/Methods Hundred healthy volunteer health care workers were enrolled. All were subjected to TST and QFT-GIT. Results were compared among Health Care Workers (HCWs) groups in terms of profession, workplace, working duration. Results TST is affected by previous BCG vaccinations and number of cases with QFT-GIT positivity is increased in accordance with the TST induration diameter range. QFT-GIT result was negative in 17 of 32 TST positive (≥15 mm) cases and positive in 4 of 61 cases whose TST diameters are between 6–14 mm, that is attritutable to previous BCG vaccination(s). It was negative in all cases with TST diameters between 0–5 mm. HCWs with positive QFT-GIT results were significantly older than the ones with negative results. Furthermore duration of work was significantly longer in QFT-GIT positive than in negative HCWs. Conclusions There was a moderate concordance between QFT-GIT and TST, when TST result was defined as positive with a ≥15 mm diameter of induration. We suggest that QFT-GIT can be used as an alternative to TST for detection of LTBI, especially in groups with high risk of LTBI and in population with routine BCG vaccination program. PMID:24681806

  13. Predominance of modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and active transmission of Beijing sublineage in Jayapura, Indonesia Papua.

    PubMed

    Chaidir, Lidya; Sengstake, Sarah; de Beer, Jessica; Oktavian, Antonius; Krismawati, Hana; Muhapril, Erfin; Kusumadewi, Inri; Annisa, Jessi; Anthony, Richard; van Soolingen, Dick; Achmad, Tri Hanggono; Marzuki, Sangkot; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotype distribution is different between West and Central Indonesia, but there are no data on the most Eastern part, Papua. We aimed to identify the predominant genotypes of M. tuberculosis responsible for tuberculosis in coastal Papua, their transmission, and the association with patient characteristics. A total of 199 M. tuberculosis isolates were collected. Spoligotyping was applied to describe the population structure of M. tuberculosis, lineage identification was performed using a combination of lineage-specific markers, and genotypic clusters were identified using a combination of 24-locus-MIRU-VNTR and spoligotyping. A high degree of genetic diversity was observed among isolates based on their spoligopatterns. Strains from modern lineage 4 made up almost half of strains (46.9%), being more abundant than the ancient lineage 1 (33.7%), and modern lineage 2 (19.4%). Thirty-five percent of strains belonged to genotypic clusters, especially strains in the Beijing genotype. Previous TB treatment and mutations associated with drug resistance were more common in patients infected with strains of the Beijing genotype. Papua shows a different distribution of M. tuberculosis genotypes compared to other parts of Indonesia. Clustering and drug resistance of modern strains recently introduced to Papua may contribute to the high tuberculosis burden in this region. PMID:26825253

  14. TB drug development: immunology at the table

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Carl; Barry, Clifton E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our understanding of the host-pathogen relationship in tuberculosis can help guide tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery in at least two ways. First, the recognition that host immunopathology affects lesional TB drug distribution means that pharmacokinetic evaluation of drug candidates needs to move beyond measurements of drug levels in blood, whole lungs or alveolar epithelial lining fluid to include measurements in specific types of lesions. Second, by restricting the replication of M. tuberculosis (Mtb) subpopulations in latent TB infection and in active disease, the host immune response puts Mtb into a state associated with phenotypic tolerance to TB drugs selected for their activity against replicating Mtb. This has spurred a major effort to conduct high throughput screens in vitro for compounds that can kill Mtb when it is replicating slowly if at all. Each condition used in vitro to slow Mtb’s replication and thereby model the phenotypically drug-tolerant state has advantages and disadvantages. Lead candidates emerging from such in vitro studies face daunting challenges in the design of proof-of-concept studies in animal models. Moreover, some non-replicating subpopulations of Mtb fail to resume replication when plated on agar, although their viability is demonstrable by other means. There is as yet no widely replicated assay in which to screen compounds for their ability to kill this ‘viable but non-culturable’ subpopulation. Despite these hurdles, drugs that can kill slowly replicating or non-replicating Mtb may offer our best hope for treatment-shortening combination chemotherapy of TB. PMID:25703568

  15. HIV-Associated TB Syndemic: A Growing Clinical Challenge Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Montales, Maria Theresa; Chaudhury, Arun; Beebe, Alexandria; Patil, Sowmya; Patil, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    The association of tuberculosis (TB) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome over the past several years has become an emerging syndemic. Approximately 10% of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with latent TB infection will develop active TB disease each year. In this review, we highlight that this phenomenon is not limited to high endemic regions, such as Afro-Asian nations, but globalization/migration is causing increased case detection even in developed nations, such as the United States. Active screening should be performed for TB in PLHIV. A high degree of clinical suspicion for TB is warranted in PLHIV presenting with fever, cough, and unintentional weight loss. HIV-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) coinfection is often paucibacillary, precluding diagnosis by conventional diagnostics and/or smear microscopy/culture. Improved detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB is now possible by incorporation of the GeneXPERT MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). The World Health Organization recommends instituting immediate therapy for MTB, in conjunction with ongoing or newly introduced anti-retroviral therapy. Vigilance is required to detect drug-induced organ injuries, and early-treatment-induced immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Collaborating MTB and HIV activities in concentrated HIV epidemic settings should become a high public health priority. PMID:26779470

  16. HIV-Associated TB Syndemic: A Growing Clinical Challenge Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Montales, Maria Theresa; Chaudhury, Arun; Beebe, Alexandria; Patil, Sowmya; Patil, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    The association of tuberculosis (TB) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome over the past several years has become an emerging syndemic. Approximately 10% of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with latent TB infection will develop active TB disease each year. In this review, we highlight that this phenomenon is not limited to high endemic regions, such as Afro-Asian nations, but globalization/migration is causing increased case detection even in developed nations, such as the United States. Active screening should be performed for TB in PLHIV. A high degree of clinical suspicion for TB is warranted in PLHIV presenting with fever, cough, and unintentional weight loss. HIV–Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) coinfection is often paucibacillary, precluding diagnosis by conventional diagnostics and/or smear microscopy/culture. Improved detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB is now possible by incorporation of the GeneXPERT MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). The World Health Organization recommends instituting immediate therapy for MTB, in conjunction with ongoing or newly introduced anti-retroviral therapy. Vigilance is required to detect drug-induced organ injuries, and early-treatment-induced immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Collaborating MTB and HIV activities in concentrated HIV epidemic settings should become a high public health priority. PMID:26779470

  17. Facing multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Giovanni; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-06-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to at least two of the most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs (i.e., isoniazid and rifampicin). Therapeutic regimens based on second- and third-line anti-tuberculosis medicines showed poor efficacy, safety, and tolerability profiles. It was estimated that in 2012 the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis incidence ranged from 300,000 to 600,000 cases, mainly diagnosed in the Eastern European and Central Asian countries. The highest proportion of cases is among individuals previously exposed to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Three main conditions can favour the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis: the poor implementation of the DOTS strategy, the shortage or the poor quality of the anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the poor therapeutic adherence of the patients to the prescribed regimens. Consultation with tuberculosis experts (e.g., consilium) is crucial to tailor the best anti-tuberculosis therapy. New therapeutic options are necessary: bedaquiline and delamanid seem promising drugs; in particular, during the development phase they demonstrated a protective effect against the emergence of further resistances towards the backbone drugs. In the recent past, other antibiotics have been administered off-label: the most relevant efficacy, safety, and tolerability profile was proved in linezolid-, meropenem/clavulanate-, cotrimoxazole-containing regimens. New research and development activities are needed in the diagnostic, therapeutic, preventive fields. PMID:24792579

  18. The in vivo expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (IVE-TB) antigen Rv2034 induces CD4⁺ T-cells that protect against pulmonary infection in HLA-DR transgenic mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Commandeur, Susanna; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Dijkman, Karin; Clark, Simon O; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Wilson, Louis; Franken, Kees L M C; Williams, Ann; Christensen, Dennis; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Geluk, Annemieke

    2014-06-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a life-threatening infectious disease of global proportions with serious negative health and economic consequences. The lack of sufficient protection induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine for TB, as well as the impact of HIV co-infection and the emergence of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains all urge for improved vaccines against TB. A minimal requirement for Mtb vaccine antigens is their in vivo expression during Mtb infection and ability to trigger significant immune responses. Recently we identified a new class of Mtb antigens, designated IVE-TB (in vivo expressed) antigens. These included Rv2034, a protein that was expressed during pulmonary infection and strongly recognized by human T-cells. Here, the in vivo immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Rv2034 was further analyzed using HLA-DR transgenic mice that lack endogenous murine MHC class II molecules. The Rv2034 protein indeed was highly immunogenic in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice and induced HLA-DR3 restricted IFN-γ(+)/TNF(+) and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) T-cells, specific for an epitope encoded in peptide 31-50. CD4(+) T-cell responses were optimally induced when using TLR9- and TLR3-ligand-adjuvants or CAF09. Rv2034-specific antibodies were observed following immunization with either TLR2-, TLR3-, TLR4-, TLR5-, TLR7- or TLR9-ligands or CAF09. Importantly, immunization with Rv2034 or the hybrid-protein Ag85B-ESAT6-Rv2034 adjuvanted with CpG or CAF09, induced over one log reduction, relative to unvaccinated controls, in the number of bacilli in the lungs of Mtb challenged HLA-DR3 transgenic mice and guinea pigs. These data demonstrate the potential of Rv2034 as a novel, IVE-TB antigen for future TB vaccination. PMID:24837764

  19. Diagnostic performance of interferon-γ release assay for lymph node tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongyan; Pan, Liping; Du, Boping; Sun, Qi; Wei, Rongrong; Xing, Aiying; Du, Fengjiao; Sun, Huishan; Zhang, Zongde

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA) (T-SPOT.TB) for patients with suspected lymph node tuberculosis (TB). Of the 405 patients with suspected lymph node TB, enrolled from Beijing Chest Hospital between July 2011 and April 2015, 83 (20.5%) were microbiologically/histopathologically confirmed lymph node TB, and 282 (69.6%) did not have active TB. The remaining 21 inconclusive TB and 19 clinical TB were excluded from the final analysis (9.9%). T-SPOT.TB using peripheral blood mononuclear cells was performed to examine the IFN-γ response to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens early secretory antigenic target 6 and culture filtrate protein 10. The overall sensitivity and specificity for T-SPOT.TB were 90.4% and 70.5%, respectively. Spot-forming cells in the lymph node TB group (184 [48-596/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells {PBMCs}]) were significantly higher than that in the nonactive TB group (0 [0-41]/10(6) PBMCs) (P<0.001). These results suggest that the IGRA assay could be a useful aid in the diagnosis of lymph node TB. PMID:26971638

  20. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh, C Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R; Sterling, Timothy R; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3-4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3-4 month rifampicin alone. PMID:26405286

  1. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries

    PubMed Central

    Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D. Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh Jr, C. Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J.; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K.; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3–4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3–4 month rifampicin alone. PMID:26405286

  2. Immunoglobulin G response to mammalian cell entry 1A (Mce1A) protein as biomarker of active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Takenami, Iukary; de Oliveira, Carolina C; Lima, Filipe R; Soares, Jéssica; Machado, Almério; Riley, Lee W; Arruda, Sérgio

    2016-09-01

    Cell wall components are major determinants of virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and they contribute to the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immune response. The mammalian cell entry protein 1A (Mce1A), in the cell wall of M. tuberculosis, mediates entry of the pathogen into mammalian cells. Here, we examined serum immunoglobulin levels (IgA, IgM and total IgG) against Mce1A as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and monitoring tuberculosis (TB) treatment response. Serum samples of 39 pulmonary TB patients and 65 controls (15 healthy household contacts, 19 latently infected household contacts, 13 non-TB and 18 leprosy patients) were screened by ELISA. The median levels of all immunoglobulin classes were significantly higher in TB patients when compared with control groups. The positive test results for IgA, IgM and total IgG were 62, 54 and 82%, respectively. For comparison, routine sputum smear examination diagnosed only 26 (67%) of 39 TB cases. Sensitivities of IgA, IgM and IgG test were 59, 51.3 and 79.5%, respectively, while the specificities observed were 77.3, 83.3 and 84.4%, respectively. A significant decrease compared with baseline was also shown after TB treatment. These results suggest that circulating total IgG antibody to Mce1A could be a complementary tool to diagnosis pulmonary TB. PMID:27553414

  3. Study of Genetic Evolution in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the Iran and Belarus

    PubMed Central

    Bostanabad, Saeed Zaker; Shekarabei, Mehdi; Nojoumi, Seyed Ali; Jabbarzadeh, Esmaeil; Ghalami, Mostafa; Kazemi, Vahid Molla; Beigdeli, Mostafa Gholi; Karim Rahimi, Mohammad; Bossak, Mohammad; Sagalchyk, Evgeni Romanovich; Konstantina Surkova, Larisa; Mikhaelovna Zalutska, Aksana; Slizen, Veronika; Petrovich Titov, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This is the new comparative geogenetic molecular evolution research of M. tuberculosis in Iran and Belarus. Thus, we researched the genetic patterns of samples collected in the first survey of anti-tuberculosis drug-resistance by gene coding of RNA polymerase as part of the international project of on tuberculosis. Method: DNA extraction and amplification of rpoB gene was performed. All PCR products of gene were sequenced using the Amersham auto sequencer. For analysing phenogram has been demonstrated by method UPGMA and Neighbour-Joining. Clinical isolates (70/473) were analyzed by using sequencing gene rpoB and genotyped by program DNAMAN and MEGA. Results: The all data were compared with the international database of national center for biotechnology information website. Multi drug resistant of tuberculosis patient (MDR-TB) was 92% in never treated and 8% in previously treated. Mutations in rpoB gene and katG genes were showed in 95% and 84% of the MDR isolates, respectively. Two clusters were found to be identical by the four different analysis methods, presumably representing cases of recent transmission of MDR tuberculosis. The other isolates are divided in Iran into 2 groups: group A – similar to the Eastern strains (China, Taiwan) and group B – strains of another genotype. And 3 groups in Belarus: group A - Strains of the first group are more similar to the standard European and Eastern ones China and Taiwan) which diverged in the last 10 years (Genetic evolution rate), i.e. they are relatively new ones, and that is confirmed by the mutations, group B - Strains of the second group diverged earlier; they are older than the strains of the first group (16 years old- time and rate of evolution) and group C - Strains of the third group are similar to European strains and only circulate in Brest region. They are grouped separately on the phenogram and became prevalent in Iran (they are called Iranian residential strains and also is genetic analogy

  4. Augmented photocatalytic activity and luminescence response of Tb³⁺ doped nanoscale titania systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Nibedita; Deka, Amrita; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2014-10-14

    The present work reports on the effect of Tb³⁺ doping on the luminescence and photocatalytic performance of nano-structured titania derived through a sol-gel route. X-ray diffraction patterns have revealed the existence of anatase phase with and without Tb³⁺ doping and with an improved orientation factor along (004) and (200) planes. Transmission electron microscopy and selective area electron diffraction studies, while exhibiting ample poly-crystallinity feature, have predicted an average particle size of ~9 nm and ~6 nm for the un-doped and 5% Tb³⁺ doped nano-titania samples; respectively. Apart from emissions accompanied by different types of defects, Tb³⁺ related transitions, such as, ⁵D₃ → ⁷F₅, ⁵D₃ → ⁷F₄, and ⁵D₄ → ⁷F₆ were identified in the photoluminescence spectra. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis, as carried out on a Tb³⁺ doped nano-titania system, has demonstrated a more-open hysteretic loop owing to significant difference of N₂ adsorption/desorption rates. The photocatalytic activity of nano-titania, as evaluated from the nature of degradation of methyl orange under UV illumination, exhibited the highest efficiency for a Tb³⁺ doping level of 2.5%. The augmented photocatalytic degradation has also been discussed in the light of a model based on pseudo first-order kinetics.

  5. [Evaluation of the tuberculosis control program through tuberculosis surveillance].

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Masako

    2008-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) surveillance has involved three main functions: (1) data collection, (2) data analysis, and (3) feedback. There is now one more important function: (4) a new action plan based on the results of feedback. If all four functions are operating smoothly, the result will be effective so-called "program surveillance". In Japan, the first nationwide computerized TB surveillance system was established in 1987 and it was revised in 1992, 1998 and 2007. Treatment outcomes have been decided automatically in this system since 1998, based on data concerning treatment status, bacteriological test results and so on. Two optional systems, the recording of DOTS and managing of contact tracing, were added to this system in 2007. Since we can thus obtain and use a large amount of surveillance data, we have developed assessment indicators and methods of evaluating the national or regional TB control programs (Fig. 1). However, the accuracy of surveillance data entered into computers at public health centers has been inadequate. Therefore, one of the objectives of evaluating regional TB control program activities is to improve the quality of surveillance data. As regional governments have responsibility for TB control programs in Japan, TB control is generally evaluated at the regional level; i.e. prefecture and designated city. This evaluation process should be done in the cycle of "Plan-Do-See" (planning, execution, evaluation). However, the priority of "See" in this cycle seems to be low, because of the heavy workload of TB control activities. Nevertheless, the evaluation of TB control is very important, so I have introduced some examples of evaluation methods in WHO and Osaka city, and propose the optimum approach to evaluating TB control programs at the regional level. This approach is: (1) to observe the correct epidemiological situation, (2) to set a clear goal, (3) to announce the strategy, and (4) to carry out an annual evaluation. It might also be possible to

  6. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of fungus Phomopsis stipata

    PubMed Central

    de Prince, Karina Andrade; Sordi, Renata; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Barreto Santos, Adolfo Carlos; Araujo, Angela R.; Leite, Sergio R.A.; Leite, Clarice Q. F.

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine the anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of the metabolites produced by the endophitic fungus Phomopsis stipata (Lib.) B. Sutton, (Diaporthaceae), cultivated in different media. The antimycobacterial activity was assessed through the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA) and the cytotoxicity test performed on macrophage cell line. The extracts derived from fungi grown on Corn Medium and Potato Dextrose Broth presented the smallest values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and low cytotoxicity, which implies a high selectivity index. This is the first report on the chemical composition and antitubercular activity of metabolites of P. stipata, as well as the influence of culture medium on these properties. PMID:24031821

  7. Descriptive review of tuberculosis surveillance systems across the circumpolar regions

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Annie-Claude; Zulz, Tammy; Soborg, Bolette; Koch, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is highly prevalent in many Arctic areas. Members of the International Circumpolar Surveillance Tuberculosis (ICS-TB) Working Group collaborate to increase knowledge about tuberculosis in Arctic regions. Objective To establish baseline knowledge of tuberculosis surveillance systems used by ICS-TB member jurisdictions. Design Three questionnaires were developed to reflect the different surveillance levels (local, regional and national); all 3 were forwarded to the official representative of each of the 15 ICS-TB member jurisdictions in 2013. Respondents self-identified the level of surveillance conducted in their region and completed the applicable questionnaire. Information collected included surveillance system objectives, case definitions, data collection methodology, storage and dissemination. Results Thirteen ICS-TB jurisdictions [Canada (Labrador, Northwest Territories, Nunavik, Nunavut, Yukon), Finland, Greenland, Norway, Sweden, Russian Federation (Arkhangelsk, Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug, Yakutia (Sakha Republic), United States (Alaska)] voluntarily completed the survey – representing 2 local, 7 regional and 4 national levels. Tuberculosis reporting is mandatory in all jurisdictions, and case definitions are comparable across regions. The common objectives across systems are to detect outbreaks, and inform the evaluation/planning of public health programmes and policies. All jurisdictions collect data on confirmed active tuberculosis cases and treatment outcomes; 11 collect contact tracing results. Faxing of standardized case reporting forms is the most common reporting method. Similar core data elements are collected; 8 regions report genotyping results. Data are stored using customized programmes (n=7) and commercial software (n=6). Nine jurisdictions provide monthly, bi-annual or annual reports to principally government and/or scientific/medical audiences. Conclusion This review successfully establishes baseline knowledge

  8. The impact of migration on tuberculosis epidemiology and control in high-income countries: a review.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Manish; Greenaway, Christina; Noori, Teymur; Munoz, Jose; Zenner, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity and mortality in high-income countries with foreign-born individuals bearing a disproportionate burden of the overall TB case burden in these countries. In this review of tuberculosis and migration we discuss the impact of migration on the epidemiology of TB in low burden countries, describe the various screening strategies to address this issue, review the yield and cost-effectiveness of these programs and describe the gaps in knowledge as well as possible future solutions.The reasons for the TB burden in the migrant population are likely to be the reactivation of remotely-acquired latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) following migration from low/intermediate-income high TB burden settings to high-income, low TB burden countries.TB control in high-income countries has historically focused on the early identification and treatment of active TB with accompanying contact-tracing. In the face of the TB case-load in migrant populations, however, there is ongoing discussion about how best to identify TB in migrant populations. In general, countries have generally focused on two methods: identification of active TB (either at/post-arrival or increasingly pre-arrival in countries of origin) and secondly, conditionally supported by WHO guidance, through identifying LTBI in migrants from high TB burden countries. Although health-economic analyses have shown that TB control in high income settings would benefit from providing targeted LTBI screening and treatment to certain migrants from high TB burden countries, implementation issues and barriers such as sub-optimal treatment completion will need to be addressed to ensure program efficacy. PMID:27004556

  9. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) for the screening of latent tuberculosis in recent immigrants to Italy.

    PubMed

    Saracino, Annalisa; Scotto, Gaetano; Fornabaio, Chiara; Martinelli, Domenico; Faleo, Giuseppina; Cibelli, Donatella; Tartaglia, Alessandra; Di Tullio, Rocco; Fazio, Vincenzina; Prato, Rosa; Monno, Laura; Angarano, Gioacchino

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the agreement between QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) and tuberculin skin test (TST) for the screening of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in recent immigrants to Italy, 279 subjects were submitted to concomitant TST and QFT-GIT. The agreement was analyzed using k statistics. A total of 72/279 (25.8%) individuals were TST positive, while 107/279 (38.3%) were QFT-GIT positive. The overall agreement between QFT-GIT and TST was 70.9%, with k statistic of 0.35. Using different TST and QFT-GIT cut-offs, the best concordance value was obtained for QFT-GIT at > 2.64 IU/ml and TST at > 10mm (k = 0.409). Discordant results were found for 58 subjects (21%) with QFT-GIT positive/TST negative and 23 (8%) with QFT-GIT negative/TST positive. A high amount of discordance QFT-GIT+/TST- was described. QFT-GIT might increase the identification of LTBI cases among recent immigrants. PMID:20128443

  10. Achievements in and Challenges of Tuberculosis Control in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Han

    2015-01-01

    After the Korean War (1950–1953), nearly 6.5% of South Korea’s population had active tuberculosis (TB). In response, South Korea implemented the National Tuberculosis Program in 1962. From 1965 to 1995, the prevalence of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB in South Korea decreased from 940 to 219 cases per 100,000 population. Astounding economic growth might have contributed to this result; however, TB incidence in South Korea remains the highest among high-income countries. The rate of decrease in TB incidence seems to have slowed over the past 15 years. A demographic shift toward an older population, many of whom have latent TB and various concurrent conditions, is challenging TB control efforts in South Korea. The increasing number of immigrants also plays a part in the prolonged battle against TB. A historical review of TB in South Korea provides an opportunity to understand national TB control efforts that are applicable to other parts of the world. PMID:26485188

  11. Serial testing for latent tuberculosis using QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: A Markov model.

    PubMed

    Moses, Mark W; Zwerling, Alice; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Denkinger, Claudia M; Banaei, Niaz; Kik, Sandra V; Metcalfe, John; Pai, Madhukar; Dowdy, David

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) in low-incidence settings are often serially tested for latent TB infection (LTBI) with the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) assay, which exhibits frequent conversions and reversions. The clinical impact of such variability on serial testing remains unknown. We used a microsimulation Markov model that accounts for major sources of variability to project diagnostic outcomes in a simulated North American HCW cohort. Serial testing using a single QFT with the recommended conversion cutoff (IFN-g > 0.35 IU/mL) resulted in 24.6% (95% uncertainty range, UR: 23.8-25.5) of the entire population testing false-positive over ten years. Raising the cutoff to >1.0 IU/mL or confirming initial positive results with a (presumed independent) second test reduced this false-positive percentage to 2.3% (95%UR: 2.0-2.6%) or 4.1% (95%UR: 3.7-4.5%), but also reduced the proportion of true incident infections detected within the first year of infection from 76.5% (95%UR: 66.3-84.6%) to 54.8% (95%UR: 44.6-64.5%) or 61.5% (95%UR: 51.6-70.9%), respectively. Serial QFT testing of HCWs in North America may result in tremendous over-diagnosis and over-treatment of LTBI, with nearly thirty false-positives for every true infection diagnosed. Using higher cutoffs for conversion or confirmatory tests (for initial positives) can mitigate these effects, but will also diagnose fewer true infections. PMID:27469388

  12. Serial testing for latent tuberculosis using QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: A Markov model

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Mark W.; Zwerling, Alice; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Denkinger, Claudia M.; Banaei, Niaz; Kik, Sandra V.; Metcalfe, John; Pai, Madhukar; Dowdy, David

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) in low-incidence settings are often serially tested for latent TB infection (LTBI) with the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) assay, which exhibits frequent conversions and reversions. The clinical impact of such variability on serial testing remains unknown. We used a microsimulation Markov model that accounts for major sources of variability to project diagnostic outcomes in a simulated North American HCW cohort. Serial testing using a single QFT with the recommended conversion cutoff (IFN-g > 0.35 IU/mL) resulted in 24.6% (95% uncertainty range, UR: 23.8–25.5) of the entire population testing false-positive over ten years. Raising the cutoff to >1.0 IU/mL or confirming initial positive results with a (presumed independent) second test reduced this false-positive percentage to 2.3% (95%UR: 2.0–2.6%) or 4.1% (95%UR: 3.7–4.5%), but also reduced the proportion of true incident infections detected within the first year of infection from 76.5% (95%UR: 66.3–84.6%) to 54.8% (95%UR: 44.6–64.5%) or 61.5% (95%UR: 51.6–70.9%), respectively. Serial QFT testing of HCWs in North America may result in tremendous over-diagnosis and over-treatment of LTBI, with nearly thirty false-positives for every true infection diagnosed. Using higher cutoffs for conversion or confirmatory tests (for initial positives) can mitigate these effects, but will also diagnose fewer true infections. PMID:27469388

  13. Quantifying Isoniazid Levels in Small Hair Samples: A Novel Method for Assessing Adherence during the Treatment of Latent and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gerona, Roy; Wen, Anita; Chin, Aaron T.; Koss, Catherine A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Metcalfe, John; Gandhi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death from an infectious pathogen worldwide and the most prevalent opportunistic infection in people living with HIV. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) reduces the incidence of active TB and reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients independently of antiretroviral therapy. However, treatment of latent or active TB is lengthy and inter-patient variability in pharmacokinetics and adherence common. Current methods of assessing adherence to TB treatment using drug levels in plasma or urine assess short-term exposure and pose logistical challenges. Drug concentrations in hair assess long-term exposure and have demonstrated pharmacodynamic relevance in HIV. Methods A large hair sample from a patient with active TB was obtained for assay development. Methods to pulverize hair and extract isoniazid were optimized and then the drug detected by liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS). The method was validated for specificity, accuracy, precision, recovery, linearity and stability to establish the assay’s suitability for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Hair samples from patients on directly-observe isoniazid-based latent or active TB therapy from the San Francisco Department of Public Health TB clinic were then tested. Results Our LC/MS-MS-based assay detected isoniazid in quantities as low as 0.02ng/mg using 10–25 strands hair. Concentrations in spiked samples demonstrated linearity from 0.05–50ng/mg. Assay precision and accuracy for spiked quality-control samples were high, with an overall recovery rate of 79.5%. In 18 patients with latent or active TB on treatment, isoniazid was detected across a wide linear dynamic range. Conclusions An LC-MS/MS-based assay to quantify isoniazid levels in hair with performance characteristics suitable for TDM was developed and validated. Hair concentrations of isoniazid assess long-term exposure and may be useful for monitoring adherence to

  14. CCL2 Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Are Associated with Disease Severity in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zahra; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Jamil, Bushra; Irfan, Muhammad; Ashraf, Mussarat; Hussain, Rabia

    2009-01-01

    Background Leucocyte activating chemokines such as CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL8 together with proinflammatory IFNγ, TNFα and downmodulatory IL10 play a central role in the restriction of M. tuberculosis infections, but is unclear whether these markers are indicative of tuberculosis disease severity. Methodology We investigated live M. tuberculosis- and M. bovis BCG- induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses in patients with tuberculosis (TB) and healthy endemic controls (ECs, n = 36). TB patients comprised pulmonary (PTB, n = 34) and extrapulmonary groups, subdivided into those with less severe localized extrapulmonary TB (L-ETB, n = 16) or severe disseminated ETB (D-ETB, n = 16). Secretion of CCL2, IFNγ, IL10 and CCL3, and mRNA expression of CCL2, TNFα, CCL3 and CXCL8 were determined. Results M. tuberculosis- and BCG- induced CCL2 secretion was significantly increased in both PTB and D-ETB (p<0.05, p<0.01) as compared with L-ETB patients. CCL2 secretion in response to M. tuberculosis was significantly greater than to BCG in the PTB and D-ETB groups. M. tuberculosis-induced CCL2 mRNA transcription was greater in PTB than L-ETB (p = 0.023), while CCL2 was reduced in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB (p = 0.005) patients. M. tuberculosis –induced IFNγ was greater in L-ETB than PTB (p = 0.04), while BCG-induced IFNγ was greater in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB patients (p = 0.036). TNFα mRNA expression was raised in PTB as compared with L-ETB group in response to M. tuberculosis (p = 0.02) and BCG (p = 0.03). Mycobacterium-induced CCL3 and CXCL8 was comparable between TB groups. Conclusions The increased CCL2 and TNFα in PTB patients may support effective leucocyte recruitment and M. tuberculosis localization. CCL2 alone is associated with severity of TB, possibly due to increased systemic inflammation found in severe disseminated TB or due to increased monocyte infiltration to lung parenchyma in pulmonary disease. PMID

  15. Tuberculosis in Tropical Areas and Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Bartalesi, Filippo; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    About 95% of cases and 98% of deaths due to tuberculosis (TB) occur in tropical countries while, in temperate low incidence countries, a disproportionate portion of TB cases is diagnosed in immigrants. Urbanization, poverty, poor housing conditions and ventilation, poor nutritional status, low education level, the HIV co-epidemic, the growing impact of chronic conditions such as diabetes are the main determinants of the current TB epidemiology in tropical areas. TB care in these contests is complicated by several barriers such as geographical accessibility, educational, cultural, sociopsychological and gender issues. High quality microbiological and radiological facilities are not widely available, and erratic supply of anti-TB drugs may affect tropical areas from time to time. Nevertheless in recent years, TB control programs reached major achievements in tropical countries as demonstrated by several indicators. Migrants have a high risk of acquire TB before migration. Moreover, after migration, they are exposed to additional risk factors for acquiring or reactivating TB infection, such as poverty, stressful living conditions, social inequalities, overcrowded housing, malnutrition, substance abuse, and limited access to health care. TB mass screening programs for migrants have been implemented in low endemic countries but present several limitations. Screening programs should not represent a stand-alone intervention, but a component of a wider approach integrated with other healthcare activities to ensure the health of migrants. PMID:24959340

  16. Towards new TB vaccines: What are the challenges?

    PubMed

    Dockrell, Hazel M

    2016-06-01

    New and effective tuberculosis (TB) vaccines are urgently needed to control pulmonary TB, and in particular to prevent the spread of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These drug-resistant strains can range from those resistant to first-line drugs to those that are almost impossible to treat. To develop new and effective vaccines for HIV and malaria has been difficult and it is proving to be just as challenging for TB. TB is a complicated disease with a spectrum from apparently controlled latent infection to active clinical disease and so different types of preventive or post-exposure vaccine may be needed. Identifying the most promising vaccine candidates to move into clinical trials is difficult, as we lack biomarker signatures that can predict protective efficacy. There is a risk that the failure of the MVA-85A vaccine to show efficacy when given to previously BCG-vaccinated South African infants will impact on the resources available for the development and trials of other candidate TB vaccines. Continued support for the development of new TB vaccines should remain a priority as an effective vaccine would bring huge public health benefits. PMID:26960944

  17. High IFN-γ Release and Impaired Capacity of Multi-Cytokine Secretion in IGRA Supernatants Are Associated with Active Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Pisoni, Amandine; Bendriss, Sophie; Marin, Grégory; Peries, Marianne; Bolloré, Karine; Terru, Dominique; Godreuil, Sylvain; Bourdin, Arnaud; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection regardless of the active (ATB) or latent (LTBI) forms of tuberculosis (TB). In this study, Mtb-specific T cell response against region of deletion 1 (RD1) antigens were explored by a microbead multiplex assay performed in T-SPOT TB assay (T-SPOT) supernatants from 35 patients with ATB and 115 patients with LTBI. T-SPOT is positive when over 7 IFN-γ secreting cells (SC)/250 000 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are enumerated. However, over 100 IFN-γ SC /250 000 PBMC were more frequently observed in the ATB group compared to the LTBI group. By contrast, lower cytokine concentrations and lower cytokine productions relative to IFN-γ secretion were observed for IL 4, IL-12, TNF-α, GM-CSF, Eotaxin and IFN-α when compared to LTBI. Thus, high IFN-γ release and low cytokine secretions in relation with IFN-γ production appeared as signatures of ATB, corroborating that multicytokine Mtb-specific response against RD1 antigens reflects host capacity to contain TB reactivation. In this way, testing cytokine profile in IGRA supernatants would be helpful to improve ATB screening strategy including immunologic tests. PMID:27603919

  18. New 2-Thiopyridines as Potential Candidates for Killing both Actively Growing and Dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryabova, Olga; Kaprelyants, Arseny; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    From in vivo observations, a majority of M. tuberculosis cells in latently infected individuals are in a dormant and probably nonculturable state, display little metabolic activity, and are phenotypically resistant to antibiotics. Despite many attempts, no specific antimicrobials effective against latent tuberculosis have yet been found, partly because of a lack of reliable and adequate in vitro models for screening of drug candidates. We propose here a novel in vitro model of M. tuberculosis dormancy that meets the important criteria of latency, namely, nonculturability of cells, considerable reduction of metabolic activity, and significant phenotypic resistance to the first-line antibiotics rifampin and isoniazid. Using this model, we found a new group of 2-thiopyridine derivatives that had potent antibacterial activity against both actively growing and dormant M. tuberculosis cells. By means of the model of M. tuberculosis nonculturability, several new 2-thiopyridine derivatives were found to have potent antitubercular activity. The compounds are effective against both active and dormant M. tuberculosis cells. The bactericidal effects of compounds against dormant M. tuberculosis was confirmed by using three different in vitro models of tuberculosis dormancy. The model of nonculturability could be used as a reliable tool for screening drug candidates, and 2-thiopyridine derivatives may be regarded as prominent compounds for further development of new drugs for curing latent M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:24126578

  19. On Combining Multiple-Instance Learning and Active Learning for Computer-Aided Detection of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Jaime; van Ginneken, Bram; Maduskar, Pragnya; Philipsen, Rick H H M; Ayles, Helen; Sanchez, Clara I

    2016-04-01

    The major advantage of multiple-instance learning (MIL) applied to a computer-aided detection (CAD) system is that it allows optimizing the latter with case-level labels instead of accurate lesion outlines as traditionally required for a supervised approach. As shown in previous work, a MIL-based CAD system can perform comparably to its supervised counterpart considering complex tasks such as chest radiograph scoring in tuberculosis (TB) detection. However, despite this remarkable achievement, the uncertainty inherent to MIL can lead to a less satisfactory outcome if analysis at lower levels (e.g., regions or pixels) is needed. This issue may seriously compromise the applicability of MIL to tasks related to quantification or grading, or detection of highly localized lesions. In this paper, we propose to reduce uncertainty by embedding a MIL classifier within an active learning (AL) framework. To minimize the labeling effort, we develop a novel instance selection mechanism that exploits the MIL problem definition through one-class classification. We adapt this mechanism to provide meaningful regions instead of individual instances for expert labeling, which is a more appropriate strategy given the application domain. In addition, and contrary to usual AL methods, a single iteration is performed. To show the effectiveness of our approach, we compare the output of a MIL-based CAD system trained with and without the proposed AL framework. The task is to detect textural abnormalities related to TB. Both quantitative and qualitative evaluations at the pixel level are carried out. Our method significantly improves the MIL-based classification. PMID:26660889

  20. Natural Killer cell activation distinguishes M. tuberculosis-mediated Immune reconstitution syndrome (IRIS) from chronic HIV and HIV-MTB co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Conradie, F.; Foulkes, A.S.; Ive, P.; Yin, X.; Roussos, K.; Glencross, D.K.; Lawrie, D.; Stevens, W.; Montaner, L.J.; Sanne; Azzoni, L.

    2011-01-01

    Background With increased access to antiretroviral treatment (ART), Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-infected populations remains a clinical challenge. We studied a cross-sectional cohort of HIV-infected subjects in Johannesburg (South Africa) to help define the immune correlates that best distinguish IRIS from ongoing MTB cases. Methods We studied HIV+ subjects developing MTB-related unmasking IRIS (u-TB-IRIS) after ART initiation; control groups were HIV subjects and HIV-TB co-infected subjects with comparable ART treatment. Testing was conducted with whole blood-based 4-color flow cytometry and plasma-based Luminex cytokine assessment. Results NK cell activation, C-reactive protein and IL-8 serum concentration were significantly higher in u-TB-IRIS subjects as compared to both control groups. In addition, all MTB co-infected subjects, independent of clinical presentation, had higher neutrophils and T cell activation, together with lower lymphocytes, CD4+ T cell and myeloid DC counts. Using conditional inference tree analysis we show that elevated NK cell activation in combination with lymphocyte count characterizes the immunological profile of u-TB-IRIS. Conclusions Our results support a role for innate immune effectors in the immunopathogenesis of unmasking MTB-related IRIS, and identify new immune parameters defining this pathology. PMID:21826013