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Sample records for active tumor growth

  1. Abrogation of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jonathan D; Valianou, Matthildi; Canutescu, Adrian A; Jaffe, Eileen K; Lee, Hyung-Ok; Wang, Hao; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W; Weiner, Louis M

    2005-03-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts are functionally and phenotypically distinct from normal fibroblasts that are not in the tumor microenvironment. Fibroblast activation protein is a 95 kDa cell surface glycoprotein expressed by tumor stromal fibroblasts, and has been shown to have dipeptidyl peptidase and collagenase activity. Site-directed mutagenesis at the catalytic site of fibroblast activation protein, Ser624 --> Ala624, resulted in an approximately 100,000-fold loss of fibroblast activation protein dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) activity. HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type fibroblast activation protein, enzymatic mutant (S624A) fibroblast activation protein, or vector alone, were inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mouse to assess the contribution of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity to tumor growth. Overexpression of wild-type fibroblast activation protein showed growth potentiation and enhanced tumorigenicity compared with both fibroblast activation protein S624A and vector-transfected HEK293 xenografts. HEK293 cells transfected with fibroblast activation protein S624A showed tumor growth rates and tumorigenicity potential similar only to vector-transfected HEK293. In vivo assessment of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity of these tumors showed enhanced enzymatic activity of wild-type fibroblast activation protein, with only baseline levels of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity in either fibroblast activation protein S624A or vector-only xenografts. These results indicate that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein is necessary for fibroblast activation protein-driven tumor growth in the HEK293 xenograft model system. This establishes the proof-of-principle that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein plays an important role in the promotion of tumor growth, and provides an attractive target for therapeutics designed to alter fibroblast activation protein-induced tumor growth by targeting

  2. Evaluation of ornithine decarboxylase activity as a marker for tumor growth rate in malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Westin, T; Edström, S; Lundholm, K; Gustafsson, B

    1991-10-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of polyamines. Polyamines regulate DNA synthesis by a mechanism that is not fully understood. High levels of polyamines and ODC activity are associated with rapid cell growth, particularly in tumor tissues. The aim of this study was to determine whether ODC activity as a marker for rapid alterations in tumor growth could be used to investigate whether nutritional support in cancer patients stimulates tumor cell proliferation. Weight-losing head and neck cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice (MCG 101, C57/BL) were studied during different feeding regimens. The ODC activity in tumor tissue was investigated in relation to the following variables: (1) histopathologic differentiation; (2) DNA content; and (3) bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation into DNA. After the animals were starved for 24 hours, a significant reduction of tumor growth was demonstrated in the experimental tumor along with a reduction of ODC activity, an accumulation of cells in the G0G1 phase, and a reduction of cells incorporating BrdUrd into DNA. Refeeding after 24 hours generated a response by all variables. Tumor biopsy specimens from patients with head and neck cancer malignancies demonstrated aneuploidy in the cells of 70% of the patients. High ODC activity in tumor tissue was demonstrated mainly among poorly differentiated tumors, and ODC activity was correlated with the compartment size of aneuploidic cells in the tumor. High ODC activity indicated a poor short-term survival (1 year). It was concluded that experimental tumor growth is highly dependent on host feeding. However, there was no evidence supporting the claim that nutritional support to cancer patients stimulates tumor cell proliferation. Determination of ODC activity may be used to monitor rapid changes in DNA synthesis and may have prognostic significance for survival. PMID:1951878

  3. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clément, Geneviève; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  4. Natural History, Growth Kinetics and Outcomes of Untreated Clinically Localized Renal Tumors Under Active Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Crispen, Paul L.; Viterbo, Rosalia; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Chen, David Y.T.; Uzzo, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Background The growth kinetics of untreated solid organ malignancies are not defined. Radiographic active surveillance (AS) of renal tumors in patient unfit or unwilling to undergo intervention provides an opportunity to quantitate the natural history of untreated localized tumors. Here we report the radiographic growth kinetics of renal neoplasms during a period of surveillance. Methods We identified patients with enhancing renal masses who were radiographically observed for at least 12 months. Clinical and pathological records were reviewed to determine tumor growth kinetics and clinical outcomes. Tumor growth kinetics were expressed in terms of absolute and relative linear and volumetric growth. Results We identified 172 renal tumors in 154 patients under AS. Median tumor diameter and volume on presentation was 2.0 cm (mean 2.5, range 0.4 - 12.0) and 4.18 cm3 (mean 20.0, range 0.0033 – 904). Median duration of follow-up was 24 months (mean 31, range 12 – 156). A significant association between presenting tumor size and proportional growth was noted, with smaller tumors growing faster than larger tumors. 39% (68/173) of tumors underwent delayed intervention and 84% (57/68) were pathologically malignant. Progression to metastatic disease was noted in 1.3% (2/154) of patients. Conclusions We demonstrate the association between a tumor’s volume and subsequent growth with smaller tumors exhibiting significantly faster volumetric growth than larger tumors, consistent with Gompertzian kinetics. Surveillance of localized renal tumors is associated with a low rate of disease progression in the intermediate term and suggests potential over-treatment biases in select patients. PMID:19402168

  5. STING Promotes the Growth of Tumors Characterized by Low Antigenicity via IDO Activation.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Henrique; Mohamed, Eslam; Huang, Lei; Ou, Rong; Pacholczyk, Gabriela; Arbab, Ali S; Munn, David; Mellor, Andrew L

    2016-04-15

    Cytosolic DNA sensing is an important process during the innate immune response that activates the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) adaptor and induces IFN-I. STING incites spontaneous immunity during immunogenic tumor growth and accordingly, STING agonists induce regression of therapy-resistant tumors. However DNA, STING agonists, and apoptotic cells can also promote tolerogenic responses via STING by activating immunoregulatory mechanisms such as indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Here, we show that IDO activity induced by STING activity in the tumor microenvironment (TME) promoted the growth of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC). Although STING also induced IDO in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN) during EL4 thymoma growth, this event was insufficient to promote tumorigenesis. In the LLC model, STING ablation enhanced CD8(+) T-cell infiltration and tumor cell killing while decreasing myeloid-derived suppressor cell infiltration and IL10 production in the TME. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells also eliminated the growth disadvantage of LLC tumors in STING-deficient mice, indicating that STING signaling attenuated CD8(+) T-cell effector functions during tumorigenesis. In contrast with native LLC tumors, STING signaling neither promoted growth of neoantigen-expressing LLC, nor did it induce IDO in TDLN. Similarly, STING failed to promote growth of B16 melanoma or to induce IDO activity in TDLN in this setting. Thus, our results show how STING-dependent DNA sensing can enhance tolerogenic states in tumors characterized by low antigenicity and how IDO inhibition can overcome this state by attenuating tumor tolerance. Furthermore, our results reveal a greater complexity in the role of STING signaling in cancer, underscoring how innate immune pathways in the TME modify tumorigenesis in distinct tumor settings, with implications for designing effective immunotherapy trials. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2076-81. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26964621

  6. Physical Activity Counteracts Tumor Cell Growth in Colon Carcinoma C26-Injected Muscles: An Interim Report

    PubMed Central

    Hiroux, Charlotte; Vandoorne, Tijs; Koppo, Katrien; De Smet, Stefan; Hespel, Peter; Berardi, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis. PMID:27478560

  7. Physical Activity Counteracts Tumor Cell Growth in Colon Carcinoma C26-Injected Muscles: An Interim Report.

    PubMed

    Hiroux, Charlotte; Vandoorne, Tijs; Koppo, Katrien; De Smet, Stefan; Hespel, Peter; Berardi, Emanuele

    2016-06-13

    Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis. PMID:27478560

  8. Structural modification of luteolin from Flos Chrysanthemi leads to increased tumor cell growth inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Chen, Hui; Lu, Shihai; Zhang, Meng; Tian, Wei; Wang, Mingping; Zhang, Ling; Song, Yunlong; Shen, Aijun; Zhou, Youjun; Zhu, Ju; Zheng, Canhui

    2016-08-01

    The luteolin from Flos Chrysanthemi was found to directly bind to the Bcl-2 protein and inhibit the tumor cell growth in our previous study. However, it has been shown to possess wide and week biological activities. In this study, a series of derivatives of luteolin were designed and synthesized, and their tumor cell growth inhibitory activities were evaluated against human leukemia cell line HL-60. The results showed that compounds 1B-2, 2A-3, and 2B-5, with hydrophobic substituted benzyl groups introduced to B ring and hydrogen or methyl introduced to 7-OH group of luteolin, exhibited the strongest inhibitory activity with the IC50 lower than 10μM, which were significantly more potent than luteolin. The studies presented here offer a good example for modifications of flavones to improve their tumor cell growth inhibitory activities. PMID:27353532

  9. Decreasing CNPY2 Expression Diminishes Colorectal Tumor Growth and Development through Activation of p53 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Gong, Hui; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Feng, Yi; Wu, Jun; He, Sheng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Xiaoxia; Guo, Rui; Xie, Jun; Li, Ren-Ke

    2016-04-01

    Neovascularization drives tumor development, and angiogenic factors are important neovascularization initiators. We recently identified the secreted angiogenic factor CNPY2, but its involvement in cancer has not been explored. Herein, we investigate CNPY2's role in human colorectal cancer (CRC) development. Tumor samples were obtained from CRC patients undergoing surgery. Canopy 2 (CNPY2) expression was analyzed in tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Stable lines of human HCT116 cells expressing CNPY2 shRNA or control shRNA were established. To determine CNPY2's effects on tumor xenografts in vivo, human CNPY2 shRNA HCT116 cells and controls were injected into nude mice, separately. Cellular apoptosis, growth, and angiogenesis in the xenografts were evaluated. CNPY2 expression was significantly higher in CRC tissues. CNPY2 knockdown in HCT116 cells inhibited growth and migration and promoted apoptosis. In xenografts, CNPY2 knockdown prevented tumor growth and angiogenesis and promoted apoptosis. Knockdown of CNPY2 in the HCT116 CRC cell line reversibly increased p53 activity. The p53 activation increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and decreased cyclin-dependent kinase 2, thereby inhibiting tumor cell growth, inducing cell apoptosis, and reducing angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. CNPY2 may play a critical role in CRC development by enhancing cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis and by inhibiting apoptosis through negative regulation of the p53 pathway. Therefore, CNPY2 may represent a novel CRC therapeutic target and prognostic indicator. PMID:26835537

  10. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α promotes primary tumor growth and tumor-initiating cell activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    . Conclusion These results demonstrate that HIF-1α plays a key role in promoting primary mammary tumor growth and metastasis, in part through regulation of TICs. HIF-1α regulates expression of several members of the Notch pathway, CD133 and markers of the basal lineage in mammary tumors. Our results suggest that CD133, which has not been profiled extensively in breast cancer, may be a useful marker of TICs in the PyMT mouse model. These data reveal for the first time that HIF-1α directly regulates breast TIC activity in vivo. PMID:22225988

  11. Estrogen Represses Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Growth via Inhibiting Alternative Activation of Tumor-associated Macrophages (TAMs)*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiwei; Lu, Yan; Xu, Yichen; Xu, Lizhi; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Yuanyuan; Li, Long; Shen, Pingping

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocarcinoma cancer (HCC), one of the most malignant cancers, occurs significantly more often in men than in women; however, little is known about its underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we identified that 17β-estradiol (E2) could suppress tumor growth via regulating the polarization of macrophages. We showed that E2 re-administration reduced tumor growth in orthotopic and ectopic mice HCC models. E2 functioned as a suppressor for macrophage alternative activation and tumor progression by keeping estrogen receptor β (ERβ) away from interacting with ATP5J (also known as ATPase-coupling factor 6), a part of ATPase, thus inhibiting the JAK1-STAT6 signaling pathway. These studies introduce a novel mechanism for suppressing male-predominant HCC. PMID:22908233

  12. Cytotoxic activity and absence of tumor growth stimulation of standardized mistletoe extracts in human tumor models in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kelter, Gerhard; Schierholz, Jörg M; Fischer, Imma U; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2007-01-01

    Mistletoe extracts are widely used in complementary and alternative cancer therapy in Europe. The extracts possess cytotoxic, as well as immunostimulatory effects. However, some investigators have suggested that low doses of mistletoe extracts could also induce tumor growth. The mistletoe extracts Helixor A, Helixor M and Helixor P were investigated for growth inhibitory and stimulatory effects in a panel of 38 human tumor cell lines in vitro. Mistletoe lectin I (ML-1), adriamycin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were used as reference compounds. All three mistletoe preparations showed cytotoxic activity [T/C (Test/Control) < 30%]: Helixor P was the most potent, followed by Helixor M and Helixor A with IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values of 68.4, 114 and 133 microg/ml, respectively. The IC50 values of ML-1 and adriamycin were 0.026 and 0.069 microg/ml. None of the human tumor cell lines in the panel showed growth stimulation (T/C (Test/Control) > 125%) by the mistletoe extracts or ML-1, apart from two exceptions in the colon carcinoma cell line HCC-2998, in which Helixor M and ML-1 showed a marginal stimulation (TIC 128% and 131%, respectively) at one concentration only. Further investigations into the latter effect of Helixor M and ML-1 in the HCC-2998 line using five different proliferation assays, modified cell culture conditions and the identical production charge of mistletoe extract, as well as a new one, did not confirm the previous observation. It was concluded that the marginal stimulation found in the earlier experiments was a statistical coincidence. Helixor mistletoe preparations and ML-1 have cytotoxic activity and do not stimulate tumor cell proliferation in vitro which is in accordance with previous scientifically based observations on aqueous mistletoe extracts. PMID:17352237

  13. Silencing of Doublecortin-Like (DCL) Results in Decreased Mitochondrial Activity and Delayed Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Carla S.; Elands, Rachel; Cheng, Sou; Saaltink, Dirk-Jan; ter Horst, Judith P.; Alme, Maria N.; Pont, Chantal; van de Water, Bob; Håvik, Bjarte; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.; Vreugdenhil, Erno

    2013-01-01

    Doublecortin-like (DCL) is a microtubule-binding protein crucial for neuroblastoma (NB) cell proliferation. We have investigated whether the anti-proliferative effect of DCL knockdown is linked to reduced mitochondrial activity. We found a delay in tumor development after DCL knockdown in vivo in doxycycline-inducible NB tumor xenografts. To understand the mechanisms underlying this tumor growth retardation we performed a series of in vitro experiments in NB cell lines. DCL colocalizes with mitochondria, interacts with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein OMP25/ SYNJ2BP and DCL knockdown results in decreased expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, DCL knockdown decreases cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. We identified the C-terminal Serine/Proline-rich domain and the second microtubule-binding area as crucial DCL domains for the regulation of cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. Furthermore, DCL knockdown causes a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of NB cells under an energetic challenge induced by low glucose availability. Together with our previous studies, our results corroborate DCL as a key player in NB tumor growth in which DCL controls not only mitotic spindle formation and the stabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, but also regulates mitochondrial activity and energy availability, which makes DCL a promising molecular target for NB therapy. PMID:24086625

  14. Selective expression of constitutively active pro-apoptotic protein BikDD gene in primary mammary tumors inhibits tumor growth and reduces tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Omar M; Nie, Lei; Chan, Li-Chuan; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Jennifer; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that specifically delivering BikDD, a constitutive active mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, to breast cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice has a potent activity against tumor initiating cells (TICs), and that the combination between tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and BikDD gene therapy yielded synergistic effect on EGFR and HER2 positive breast cancer cells in immunodeficient nude mice. Those encouraging results have allowed us to propose a clinical trial using the liposome-complexing plasmid DNA expressing BikDD gene which has been approved by the NIH RAC Advisory committee. However, it is imperative to test whether systemic delivery of BikDD-expressing plasmid DNAs with liposomes into immunocompetent mice has therapeutic efficacy and tolerable side effects as what we observed in the nude mice model. In this study, we investigated the effects of BikDD gene-therapy on the primary mammary tumors, especially on tumor initiating cells (TICs), of a genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse harboring normal microenvironment and immune response. The effects on TIC population in tumors were determined by FACS analysis with different sets of murine specific TIC markers, CD49fhighCD61high and CD24+Jagged1-. First we showed in vitro that ectopic expression of BikDD in murine N202 cells derived from MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mouse tumors induced apoptosis and decreased the number of TICs. Consistently, systemic delivery of VISA-Claudin4-BikDD by liposome complexes significantly inhibited mammary tumor growth and slowed down residual tumor growth post cessation of therapy in MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mice compared to the controls. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of BikDD in vivo were consistent with decreased TIC population assessed by FACS analysis and in vitro tumorsphere formation assay of freshly isolated tumor cells. Importantly, systemic administration of BikDD did not cause significant cytotoxic response in standard

  15. Selective expression of constitutively active pro-apoptotic protein BikDD gene in primary mammary tumors inhibits tumor growth and reduces tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Omar M; Nie, Lei; Chan, Li-Chuan; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Jennifer; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that specifically delivering BikDD, a constitutive active mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, to breast cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice has a potent activity against tumor initiating cells (TICs), and that the combination between tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and BikDD gene therapy yielded synergistic effect on EGFR and HER2 positive breast cancer cells in immunodeficient nude mice. Those encouraging results have allowed us to propose a clinical trial using the liposome-complexing plasmid DNA expressing BikDD gene which has been approved by the NIH RAC Advisory committee. However, it is imperative to test whether systemic delivery of BikDD-expressing plasmid DNAs with liposomes into immunocompetent mice has therapeutic efficacy and tolerable side effects as what we observed in the nude mice model. In this study, we investigated the effects of BikDD gene-therapy on the primary mammary tumors, especially on tumor initiating cells (TICs), of a genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse harboring normal microenvironment and immune response. The effects on TIC population in tumors were determined by FACS analysis with different sets of murine specific TIC markers, CD49f(high)CD61(high) and CD24(+)Jagged1(-). First we showed in vitro that ectopic expression of BikDD in murine N202 cells derived from MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mouse tumors induced apoptosis and decreased the number of TICs. Consistently, systemic delivery of VISA-Claudin4-BikDD by liposome complexes significantly inhibited mammary tumor growth and slowed down residual tumor growth post cessation of therapy in MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mice compared to the controls. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of BikDD in vivo were consistent with decreased TIC population assessed by FACS analysis and in vitro tumorsphere formation assay of freshly isolated tumor cells. Importantly, systemic administration of BikDD did not cause significant cytotoxic response in

  16. Paracrine activation of WNT/β-catenin pathway in uterine leiomyoma stem cells promotes tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masanori; Yin, Ping; Navarro, Antonia; Moravek, Molly B.; Coon, John S.; Druschitz, Stacy A.; Serna, Vanida Ann; Qiang, Wenan; Brooks, David C.; Malpani, Saurabh S.; Ma, Jiajia; Ercan, Cihangir Mutlu; Mittal, Navdha; Monsivais, Diana; Dyson, Matthew T.; Yemelyanov, Alex; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Chakravarti, Debabrata; Kim, J. Julie; Kurita, Takeshi; Gottardi, Cara J.; Bulun, Serdar E.

    2013-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are extremely common estrogen and progesterone-dependent tumors of the myometrium and cause irregular uterine bleeding, severe anemia, and recurrent pregnancy loss in 15–30% of reproductive-age women. Each leiomyoma is thought to arise from a single mutated myometrial smooth muscle stem cell. Leiomyoma side-population (LMSP) cells comprising 1% of all tumor cells and displaying tumor-initiating stem cell characteristics are essential for estrogen- and progesterone-dependent in vivo growth of tumors, although they have remarkably lower estrogen/progesterone receptor levels than mature myometrial or leiomyoma cells. However, how estrogen/progesterone regulates the growth of LMSP cells via mature neighboring cells is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a critical paracrine role of the wingless-type (WNT)/β-catenin pathway in estrogen/progesterone-dependent tumorigenesis, involving LMSP and differentiated myometrial or leiomyoma cells. Estrogen/progesterone treatment of mature myometrial cells induced expression of WNT11 and WNT16, which remained constitutively elevated in leiomyoma tissues. In LMSP cells cocultured with mature myometrial cells, estrogen-progesterone selectively induced nuclear translocation of β-catenin and induced transcriptional activity of its heterodimeric partner T-cell factor and their target gene AXIN2, leading to the proliferation of LMSP cells. This effect could be blocked by a WNT antagonist. Ectopic expression of inhibitor of β-catenin and T-cell factor 4 in LMSP cells, but not in mature leiomyoma cells, blocked the estrogen/progesterone-dependent growth of human tumors in vivo. We uncovered a paracrine role of the WNT/β-catenin pathway that enables mature myometrial or leiomyoma cells to send mitogenic signals to neighboring tissue stem cells in response to estrogen and progesterone, leading to the growth of uterine leiomyomas. PMID:24082114

  17. δ-Catenin Activates Rho GTPase, Promotes Lymphangiogenesis and Growth of Tumor Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, P. Charles

    2015-01-01

    δ-catenin, an adherens junctions protein, is not only involved in early development, cell-cell adhesion and cell motility in neuronal cells, but it also plays an important role in vascular endothelial cell motility and pathological angiogenesis. In this study, we report a new function of δ-catenin in lymphangiogenesis. Consistent with expression of δ-catenin in vascular endothelial cells, we detected expression of the gene in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). Ectopic expression of δ-catenin in LECs increased cell motility and lymphatic vascular network formation in vitro and lymphangiogenesis in vivo in a Matrigel plug assay. Conversely, knockdown of δ-catenin in LECs impaired lymphangiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical analysis shows that δ-catenin regulates activation of Rho family small GTPases, key mediators in cell motility. δ-catenin activates Rac1 and Cdc42 but inhibits RhoA in LECs. Notably, blocking of Rac1 activation impaired δ-catenin mediated lymphangiogenesis in a Matrigel assay. Consistently, loss of δ-catenin in mice inhibited the growth of tumor metastases. Taken together, these findings identify a new function of δ-catenin in lymphangiogenesis and tumor growth/metastasis, likely through modulation of small Rho GTPase activation. Targeting δ-catenin may offer a new way to control tumor metastasis. PMID:25635825

  18. α-Mangostin Reduced ER Stress-mediated Tumor Growth through Autophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Bo-Ra; Park, Moon-Ho; Kim, Ji-Won; Pyun, A-Rim; Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Chang, Sun-Young; Chin, Young-Won

    2012-01-01

    α-Mangostin is a xanthon derivative contained in the fruit hull of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.), and the administration of α-Mangostin inhibited the growth of transplanted colon cancer, Her/CT26 cells which expressed Her-2/neu as tumor antigen. Although α-Mangostin was reported to have inhibitory activity against sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase like thapsigargin, it showed different activity for autophagy regulation. In the current study, we found that α-Mangostin induced autophagy activation in mouse intestinal epithelial cells, as GFP-LC3 transgenic mice were orally administered with 20 mg/kg of α-Mangostin daily for three days. However, the activation of autophagy by α-Mangostin did not significantly increase OVA-specific T cell proliferation. As we assessed ER stress by using XBP-1 reporter system and phosphorylation of eIF2α, thapsigargin-induced ER stress was significantly reduced by α-Mangostin. However, coadministration of thapsigargin with α-Mangostin completely blocked the antitumor activity of α-Mangostin, suggesting ER stress with autophagy blockade accelerated tumor growth in mouse colon cancer model. Thus the antitumor activity of α-Mangostin can be ascribable to the autophagy activation rather than ER stress induction. PMID:23396851

  19. 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Supports the Growth of Aggressive Experimental Human Breast Cancer Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Laderoute, Keith R.; Calaoagan, Joy M.; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [13C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. PMID:24993821

  20. Anticancer activity of MPT0G157, a derivative of indolylbenzenesulfonamide, inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Chia; Huang, Fang-I; Mehndiratta, Samir; Lai, Ssu-Chia; Liou, Jing-Ping; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2015-07-30

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) display multifaceted functions by coordinating the interaction of signal pathways with chromatin structure remodeling and the activation of non-histone proteins; these epigenetic regulations play an important role during malignancy progression. HDAC inhibition shows promise as a new strategy for cancer therapy; three HDAC inhibitors have been approved. We previously reported that N-hydroxy-3-{4-[2-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-ethylsulfamoyl]-phenyl}-acrylamide (MPT0G157), a novel indole-3-ethylsulfamoylphenylacrylamide compound, demonstrated potent HDAC inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we evaluated its anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. MPT0G157 treatment significantly inhibited different tumor growth at submicromolar concentration and was particularly potent in human colorectal cancer (HCT116) cells. Apoptosis and inhibited HDACs activity induced by MPT0G157 was more potent than that by the marketed drugs PXD101 (Belinostat) and SAHA (Vorinostat). In an in vivo model, MPT0G157 markedly inhibited HCT116 xenograft tumor volume and reduced matrigel-induced angiogenesis. The anti-angiogenetic effect of MPT0G157 was found to increase the hyperacetylation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and promote hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) degradation followed by down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Our results demonstrate that MPT0G157 has potential as a new drug candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:26087180

  1. Anticancer activity of MPT0G157, a derivative of indolylbenzenesulfonamide, inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Samir; Lai, Ssu-Chia; Liou, Jing-Ping; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) display multifaceted functions by coordinating the interaction of signal pathways with chromatin structure remodeling and the activation of non-histone proteins; these epigenetic regulations play an important role during malignancy progression. HDAC inhibition shows promise as a new strategy for cancer therapy; three HDAC inhibitors have been approved. We previously reported that N-hydroxy-3-{4-[2-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-ethylsulfamoyl]-phenyl}-acrylamide (MPT0G157), a novel indole-3-ethylsulfamoylphenylacrylamide compound, demonstrated potent HDAC inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we evaluated its anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. MPT0G157 treatment significantly inhibited different tumor growth at submicromolar concentration and was particularly potent in human colorectal cancer (HCT116) cells. Apoptosis and inhibited HDACs activity induced by MPT0G157 was more potent than that by the marketed drugs PXD101 (Belinostat) and SAHA (Vorinostat). In an in vivo model, MPT0G157 markedly inhibited HCT116 xenograft tumor volume and reduced matrigel-induced angiogenesis. The anti-angiogenetic effect of MPT0G157 was found to increase the hyperacetylation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and promote hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) degradation followed by down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Our results demonstrate that MPT0G157 has potential as a new drug candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:26087180

  2. Compartment-specific activation of PPARγ governs breast cancer tumor growth, via metabolic reprogramming and symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Avena, Paola; Anselmo, Wanda; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Wang, Chenguang; Pestell, Richard G; Lamb, Rebecca S; Hulit, James; Casaburi, Ivan; Andò, Sebastiano; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica

    2013-05-01

    The role of PPARγ in cancer therapy is controversial, with studies showing either pro-tumorigenic or antineoplastic effects. This debate is very clinically relevant, because PPARγ agonists are used as antidiabetic drugs. Here, we evaluated if the effects of PPARγ on tumorigenesis are determined by the cell type in which PPARγ is activated. Second, we examined if the metabolic changes induced by PPARγ, such as glycolysis and autophagy, play any role in the tumorigenic process. To this end, PPARγ was overexpressed in breast cancer cells or in stromal cells. PPARγ-overexpressing cells were examined with respect to (1) their tumorigenic potential, using xenograft models, and (2) regarding their metabolic features. In xenograft models, we show that when PPARγ is activated in cancer cells, tumor growth is inhibited by 40%. However, when PPARγ is activated in stromal cells, the growth of co-injected breast cancer cells is enhanced by 60%. Thus, the effect(s) of PPARγ on tumorigenesis are dependent on the cell compartment in which PPARγ is activated. Mechanistically, stromal cells with activated PPARγ display metabolic features of cancer-associated fibroblasts, with increased autophagy, glycolysis and senescence. Indeed, fibroblasts overexpressing PPARγ show increased expression of autophagic markers, increased numbers of acidic autophagic vacuoles, increased production of L-lactate, cell hypertrophy and mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, PPARγ fibroblasts show increased expression of CDKs (p16/p21) and β-galactosidase, which are markers of cell cycle arrest and senescence. Finally, PPARγ induces the activation of the two major transcription factors that promote autophagy and glycolysis, i.e., HIF-1α and NFκB, in stromal cells. Thus, PPARγ activation in stromal cells results in the formation of a catabolic pro-inflammatory microenvironment that metabolically supports cancer growth. Interestingly, the tumor inhibition observed when PPARγ is

  3. Compartment-specific activation of PPARγ governs breast cancer tumor growth, via metabolic reprogramming and symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Avena, Paola; Anselmo, Wanda; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Wang, Chenguang; Pestell, Richard G.; Lamb, Rebecca S.; Hulit, James; Casaburi, Ivan; Andò, Sebastiano; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica

    2013-01-01

    The role of PPARγ in cancer therapy is controversial, with studies showing either pro-tumorigenic or antineoplastic effects. This debate is very clinically relevant, because PPARγ agonists are used as antidiabetic drugs. Here, we evaluated if the effects of PPARγ on tumorigenesis are determined by the cell type in which PPARγ is activated. Second, we examined if the metabolic changes induced by PPARγ, such as glycolysis and autophagy, play any role in the tumorigenic process. To this end, PPARγ was overexpressed in breast cancer cells or in stromal cells. PPARγ-overexpressing cells were examined with respect to (1) their tumorigenic potential, using xenograft models, and (2) regarding their metabolic features. In xenograft models, we show that when PPARγ is activated in cancer cells, tumor growth is inhibited by 40%. However, when PPARγ is activated in stromal cells, the growth of co-injected breast cancer cells is enhanced by 60%. Thus, the effect(s) of PPARγ on tumorigenesis are dependent on the cell compartment in which PPARγ is activated. Mechanistically, stromal cells with activated PPARγ display metabolic features of cancer-associated fibroblasts, with increased autophagy, glycolysis and senescence. Indeed, fibroblasts overexpressing PPARγ show increased expression of autophagic markers, increased numbers of acidic autophagic vacuoles, increased production of L-lactate, cell hypertrophy and mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, PPARγ fibroblasts show increased expression of CDKs (p16/p21) and β-galactosidase, which are markers of cell cycle arrest and senescence. Finally, PPARγ induces the activation of the two major transcription factors that promote autophagy and glycolysis, i.e., HIF-1α and NFκB, in stromal cells. Thus, PPARγ activation in stromal cells results in the formation of a catabolic pro-inflammatory microenvironment that metabolically supports cancer growth. Interestingly, the tumor inhibition observed when PPARγ is

  4. Is Anatomic Complexity Associated with Renal Tumor Growth Kinetics Under Active Surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Mehrazin, Reza; Smaldone, Marc C.; Egleston, Brian; Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J.; Concodora, Charles W.; Ito, Timothy K.; Abbosh, Philip H.; Chen, David Y.T.; Kutikov, Alexander; Uzzo, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Linear growth rate (LGR) is the most commonly employed trigger for definitive intervention in patients with renal masses managed with an initial period of active surveillance (AS). Using our institutional cohort, we explored the association between tumor anatomic complexity at presentation and LGR in patients managed with AS. Methods and Materials Enhancing renal masses managed expectantly for at least 6 months were included for analysis. The association between NS and LGR was assessed using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for age, Charlson score, race, sex, and initial tumor size. Results 346 patients (401 masses) met inclusion criteria (18% ≥cT1b), with a median follow-up of 37 months (range: 6-169). 44% of patients progressed to definitive intervention with a median duration of 27 months (range: 6-130). Comparing patients managed expectantly to those requiring intervention, no difference was seen in median tumor size at presentation (2.2 vs. 2.2 cm), while significant differences in median age (74 vs. 65 years, p<0.001), Charlson co-morbidity score (3 vs. 2, p<0.001), and average LGR (0.23 vs. 0.49 cm/year, p<0.001) were observed between groups. Following adjustment, for each 1-point increase in NS sum, the average tumor LGR increased by 0.037 cm/year (p=0.002). Of the entire cohort, 6 patients (1.7%) progressed to metastatic disease. Conclusions The demonstrated association between anatomic tumor complexity at presentation and LGR of clinical stage 1 renal masses under AS may afford a clinically useful cue to tailor individual patient radiographic surveillance schedules and warrants further evaluation. PMID:25778696

  5. Volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Feng-Feng; Pan, Shi-Shi; Ou, Rong-Ying; Zheng, Zhen-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Xiu; Jian, Meng-Ting; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Yang; Li, Wen-Feng; Shi, Zhi; Yan, Xiao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Volasertib (BI 6727), a highly selective and potent inhibitor of PLK1, has shown broad antitumor activities in the preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of several types of cancers. However, the anticancer effect of volasertib on cervical cancer cells is still unknown. In the present study, we show that volasertib can markedly induce cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis with the decreased protein expressions of PLK1 substrates survivin and wee1 in human cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, volasertib also enhances the intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) levels, and pretreated with ROS scavenger N-acety-L-cysteine totally blocks ROS generation but partly reverses volasertib-induced apoptosis. In addition, volasertib significantly potentiates the activity of cisplatin to inhibit the growth of cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. In brief, volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer, suggesting the combination of volasertib and cisplatin may be a promising strategy for the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. PMID:26885445

  6. Leukemia inhibitory factor promotes tumor growth and metastasis in human osteosarcoma via activating STAT3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Lu, Yi; Li, Jinzhi; Liu, Yanping; Liu, Jian; Wang, Weiguo

    2015-10-01

    The leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) has been demonstrated to be an oncogene and participated in multiple procedures during the initiation and progression of many human malignancies. However, the role of LIF in osteosarcoma is still largely unknown. Here, we performed a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments to investigate the expression and biological functions of LIF in osteosarcoma. Compared to that in the non-cancerous tissues, LIF was significantly overexpressed in a panel of 68 osteosarcoma samples (p < 0.0001). Moreover, the overexpression of LIF was significantly correlated with advanced tumor stage, larger tumor size, and shorter overall survival. In addition, knockdown of LIF notably suppressed the proliferation and invasion of osteosarcoma via blocking the STAT3 signal pathway; in contrast, treatment with the recombinant LIF protein significantly promoted the growth and invasion of osteosarcoma through enhancing the phosphorylation of STAT3, which can be partially neutralized by the STAT3 inhibitor, HO-3867. In conclusion, we demonstrated that LIF was frequently overexpressed in osteosarcoma, which could promote the growth and invasion through activating the STAT3 pathway. Our findings proposed that LIF might be a potent therapeutic target for osteosarcoma. PMID:26271643

  7. JAK kinase inhibition abrogates STAT3 activation and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sen, Malabika; Pollock, Netanya I; Black, John; DeGrave, Kara A; Wheeler, Sarah; Freilino, Maria L; Joyce, Sonali; Lui, Vivian W Y; Zeng, Yan; Chiosea, Simion I; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2015-03-01

    Aberrant activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 has been implicated in cell proliferation and survival of many cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AZD1480, an orally active pharmacologic inhibitor of JAK1/JAK2, has been tested in several cancer models. In the present study, the in vitro and in vivo effects of AZD1480 were evaluated in HNSCC preclinical models to test the potential use of JAK kinase inhibition for HNSCC therapy. AZD1480 treatment decreased HNSCC proliferation in HNSCC cell lines with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values ranging from 0.9 to 4 μM in conjunction with reduction of pSTAT3(Tyr705) expression. In vivo antitumor efficacy of AZD1480 was demonstrated in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models derived from two independent HNSCC tumors. Oral administration of AZD1480 reduced tumor growth in conjunction with decreased pSTAT3(Tyr705) expression that was observed in both PDX models. These findings suggest that the JAK1/2 inhibitors abrogate STAT3 signaling and may be effective in HNSCC treatment approaches. PMID:25810010

  8. DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by blocking VEGF/VEGFR2-activated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyeong Sim; Lee, Kangwook; Kim, Min Kyoung; Lee, Kang Min; Shin, Yong Cheol; Cho, Sung-Gook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth requires a process called angiogenesis, a new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vessels, as newly formed vessels provide tumor cells with oxygen and nutrition. Danggui-Sayuk-Ga-Osuyu-Saenggang-Tang (DSGOST), one of traditional Chinese medicines, has been widely used in treatment of vessel diseases including Raynaud's syndrome in Northeast Asian countries including China, Japan and Korea. Therefore, we hypothesized that DSGOST might inhibit tumor growth by targeting newly formed vessels on the basis of its historical prescription. Here, we demonstrate that DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by inhibiting VEGF-induced angiogenesis. DSGOST inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenic abilities of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo, which resulted from its inhibition of VEGF/VEGFR2 interaction. Furthermore, DSGOST attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in vivo by reducing angiogenic vessel numbers, while not affecting pancreatic tumor cell viability. Thus, our data conclude that DSGOST inhibits VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis, suggesting a new indication for DSGOST in treatment of cancer. PMID:26967562

  9. Supplemental growth hormone increases the tumor cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells in healthy adults with normal growth hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Crist, D M; Kraner, J C

    1990-12-01

    Using double-blind, placebo-controlled procedures, the effects of methionyl-human growth hormone (met-hGH) on the tumor cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells were studied in seven healthy adults using a repeated measures experiment. Subjects were assigned at random to either a placebo (bacteriostatic water) treatment condition or a met-hGH (16.0 mg/wk of Protropin) treatment condition, then crossed-over to the alternative treatment. Treatments were delivered on alternate days (3 d/wk) for 6 weeks. Without bias from the met-hGH treatment, there was no evidence for GH hyposecretion as measured by the peak circulating GH response to exercise stimulation (14.1 +/- 3.1 ng/mL) or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) levels (0.82 +/- 0.09 U/mL). When compared with placebo, met-hGH induced a significant overall increase in the percent specific lysis (%SL) of K562 tumor target cells (placebo 22.2 +/- 1.7 v met-hGH 28.5 +/- 2.1 %SL; P = .008). NK activity was increased within the first week of treatment and this level was maintained throughout the remaining period of supplementation. There was a trend (P = .057) for the met-hGH-induced percent change in NK activity (NK%) to be inversely related to placebo IGF-I levels (r = -.761), while there were significant positive correlations between NK% and the met-hGH-induced percent changes in IGF-I (r = .727; P = .035), the fat-free mass (FFM)/fat mass (FM) ratio derived by hydrodensitometry (r = .792; P = .012), and the endogenous GH response to exercise (r = .469; P = .034).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2246974

  10. AZD1480 delays tumor growth in a melanoma model while enhancing the suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Maenhout, Sarah K; Du Four, Stephanie; Corthals, Jurgen; Neyns, Bart; Thielemans, Kris; Aerts, Joeri L

    2014-08-30

    AZD1480 is a potent, competitive small-molecule inhibitor of JAK1/2 kinase which inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and tumor growth. Here we investigated the effects of AZD1480 on the function of different immune cell populations in a melanoma model. When MO4 tumor-bearing mice were treated with AZD1480 we observed a strong inhibition of tumor growth as well as a prolonged survival. Moreover, a significant decrease in the percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) was observed after treatment with AZD1480. However, AZD1480 enhanced the suppressive capacity of murine MDSCs while at the same time impairing the proliferative as well as the IFN-γ secretion capacity of murine T cells. The addition of AZD1480 to co-cultures of human MDSCs and T cells does not affect the suppressive activity of MDSCs but it does reduce the IFN-γ secretion and the proliferative capacity of T cells. We showed that although AZD1480 has the ability to delay the tumor growth of MO4 tumor-bearing mice, this drug has detrimental effects on several aspects of the immune system. These data indicate that systemic targeting of the JAK/STAT pathway by JAK1/2 inhibition can have divergent effects on tumor growth and anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:25149535

  11. AZD1480 delays tumor growth in a melanoma model while enhancing the suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Maenhout, Sarah K.; Four, Stephanie Du; Corthals, Jurgen; Neyns, Bart; Thielemans, Kris; Aerts, Joeri L.

    2014-01-01

    AZD1480 is a potent, competitive small-molecule inhibitor of JAK1/2 kinase which inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and tumor growth. Here we investigated the effects of AZD1480 on the function of different immune cell populations in a melanoma model. When MO4 tumor-bearing mice were treated with AZD1480 we observed a strong inhibition of tumor growth as well as a prolonged survival. Moreover, a significant decrease in the percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) was observed after treatment with AZD1480. However, AZD1480 enhanced the suppressive capacity of murine MDSCs while at the same time impairing the proliferative as well as the IFN-γ secretion capacity of murine T cells. The addition of AZD1480 to co-cultures of human MDSCs and T cells does not affect the suppressive activity of MDSCs but it does reduce the IFN-γ secretion and the proliferative capacity of T cells. We showed that although AZD1480 has the ability to delay the tumor growth of MO4 tumor-bearing mice, this drug has detrimental effects on several aspects of the immune system. These data indicate that systemic targeting of the JAK/STAT pathway by JAK1/2 inhibition can have divergent effects on tumor growth and anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:25149535

  12. Abalone visceral extract inhibit tumor growth and metastasis by modulating Cox-2 levels and CD8+ T cell activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Abalone has long been used as a valuable food source in East Asian countries. Although the nutritional importance of abalone has been reported through in vitro and in vivo studies, there is little evidence about the potential anti-tumor effects of abalone visceral extract. The aim of the present study is to examine anti-tumor efficacy of abalone visceral extract and to elucidate its working mechanism. Methods In the present study, we used breast cancer model using BALB/c mouse-derived 4T1 mammary carcinoma and investigated the effect of abalone visceral extract on tumor development. Inhibitory effect against tumor metastasis was assessed by histopathology of lungs. Cox-2 productions by primary and secondary tumor were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting (IB). Proliferation assay based on [3H]-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cytokines and effector molecules by RT-PCR were used to confirm tumor suppression efficacy of abalone visceral extract by modulating cytolytic CD8+ T cells. The cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cell was compared by JAM test. Results Oral administration of abalone visceral extract reduced tumor growth (tumor volume and weight) and showed reduced metastasis as confirmed by decreased level of splenomegaly (spleen size and weight) and histological analysis of the lung metastasis (gross analysis and histological staining). Reduced expression of Cox-2 (mRNA and protein) from primary tumor and metastasized lung was also detected. In addition, treatment of abalone visceral extract increased anti-tumor activities of CD8+ T cells by increasing the proliferation capacity and their cytolytic activity. Conclusions Our results suggest that abalone visceral extract has anti-tumor effects by suppressing tumor growth and lung metastasis through decreasing Cox-2 expression level as well as promoting proliferation and cytolytic function of CD8+ T cells. PMID:20961430

  13. Suppression of Tumor Growth in Mice by Rationally Designed Pseudopeptide Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase1

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kenneth W.; Christiansen, Victoria J.; Yadav, Vivek R.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Zhang, Roy R.; McKee, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments (TMEs) are composed of cancer cells, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix, microvessels, and endothelial cells. Two prolyl endopeptidases, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and prolyl oligopeptidase (POP), are commonly overexpressed by epithelial-derived malignancies, with the specificity of FAP expression by cancer stromal fibroblasts suggesting FAP as a possible therapeutic target. Despite overexpression in most cancers and having a role in angiogenesis, inhibition of POP activity has received little attention as an approach to quench tumor growth. We developed two specific and highly effective pseudopeptide inhibitors, M83, which inhibits FAP and POP proteinase activities, and J94, which inhibits only POP. Both suppressed human colon cancer xenograft growth > 90% in mice. By immunohistochemical stains, M83- and J94-treated tumors had fewer microvessels, and apoptotic areas were apparent in both. In response to M83, but not J94, disordered collagen accumulations were observed. Neither M83- nor J94-treated mice manifested changes in behavior, weight, or gastrointestinal function. Tumor growth suppression was more extensive than noted with recently reported efforts by others to inhibit FAP proteinase function or reduce FAP expression. Diminished angiogenesis and the accompanying profound reduction in tumor growth suggest that inhibition of either FAP or POP may offer new therapeutic approaches that directly target TMEs. PMID:25622898

  14. Constitutive NF-κB activation and tumor-growth promotion by Romo1-mediated reactive oxygen species production

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Jin Sil; Lee, Sora; Yoo, Young Do

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Romo1 expression is required for constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. • Romo1 depletion suppresses tumor growth in vivo. • Romo1 presents a potential therapeutic target for diseases. - Abstract: Deregulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and related pathways contribute to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Mechanisms for constitutive NF-κB activation are not fully explained; however, the underlying defects appear to generate and maintain pro-oxidative conditions. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (Romo1) correlates positively with tumor size. In the present study, we showed that Romo1 expression is required to maintain constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB and transcriptional activity through constitutive IκBα phosphorylation. Overexpression of Romo1 promoted p65 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity. We also show that Romo1 depletion suppressed anchorage-independent colony formation by HCC cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Based on these findings, Romo1 may be a principal regulatory factor in the maintenance of constitutive NF-κB activation in tumor cells. In the interest of anti-proliferative treatments for cancer, Romo1 may also present a productive target for drug development.

  15. Persistent STAT3 Activation in Colon Cancer Is Associated with Enhanced Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Corvinus, Florian M; Orth, Carina; Moriggl, Richard; Tsareva, Svetlana A; Wagner, Stefan; Pfitzner, Edith B; Baus, Daniela; Kaufmann, Roland; Huberb, Lukas A; Zatloukal, Kurt; Beug, Hartmut; Öhlschläger, Peter; Schütz, Alexander; Halbhuber, Karl-Jürgen; Friedrich, Karlheinz

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries. It has so far been molecularly defined mainly by alterations of the Wnt pathway. We show here for the first time that aberrant activities of the signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT3 actively contribute to this malignancy and, thus, are a potential therapeutic target for CRC. Constitutive STAT3 activity was found to be abundant in dedifferentiated cancer cells and infiltrating lymphocytes of CRC samples, but not in non-neoplastic colon epithelium. Cell lines derived from malignant colorectal tumors lost persistent STAT3 activity in culture. However, implantation of colon carcinoma cells into nude mice resulted in restoration of STAT3 activity, suggesting a role of an extracellular stimulus within the tumor microenvironment as a trigger for STAT activation. STAT3 activity in CRC cells triggered through interleukin-6 or through a constitutively active STAT3 mutant promoted cancer cell multiplication, whereas STAT3 inhibition through a dominant-negative variant impaired IL-6-driven proliferation. Blockade of STAT3 activation in CRC-derived xenograft tumors slowed down their development, arguing for a contribution of STAT3 to colorectal tumor growth. PMID:16036105

  16. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity prevents anchorage-independent ovarian carcinoma cell growth and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kristy K.; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lawson, Christine; Miller, Nichol L.G.; Jean, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Uryu, Sean; Kim, Josephine; Tarin, David; Stupack, Dwayne G.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence and spread of ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of death for women in the United States. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase located on chromosome 8q24.3 (gene is Ptk2), a site commonly amplified in serous ovarian cancer. Elevated FAK mRNA levels in serous ovarian carcinoma are associated with decreased (logrank P = 0.0007, hazard ratio 1.43) patient overall survival, but how FAK functions in tumor progression remains undefined. We have isolated aggressive ovarian carcinoma cells termed ID8-IP after intraperitoneal (IP) growth of murine ID8 cells in C57Bl6 mice. Upon orthotopic implantation within the periovarian bursa space, ID8-IP cells exhibit greater tumor growth, local and distant metastasis, and elevated numbers of ascites-associated cells compared to parental ID8 cells. ID8-IP cells exhibit enhanced growth under non-adherent conditions with elevated FAK and c-Src tyrosine kinase activation compared to parental ID8 cells. In vitro, the small molecule FAK inhibitor (Pfizer, PF562,271, PF-271) at 0.1 uM selectively prevented anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell growth with the inhibition of FAK tyrosine (Y)397 but not c-Src Y416 phosphorylation. Oral PF-271 administration (30 mg/kg, twice daily) blocked FAK but not c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation in ID8-IP tumors. This was associated with decreased tumor size, prevention of peritoneal metastasis, reduced tumor-associated endothelial cell number, and increased tumor cell-associated apoptosis. FAK knockdown and re-expression assays showed that FAK activity selectively promoted anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell survival. These results support the continued evaluation of FAK inhibitors as a promising clinical treatment for ovarian cancer. PMID:23275034

  17. Forced Activation of Notch in Macrophages Represses Tumor Growth by Upregulating miR-125a and Disabling Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Long; Huang, Fei; He, Fei; Gao, Chun-Chen; Liang, Shi-Qian; Ma, Peng-Fei; Dong, Guang-Ying; Han, Hua; Qin, Hong-Yan

    2016-03-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) contribute greatly to hallmarks of cancer. Notch blockade was shown to arrest TAM differentiation, but the precise role and underlying mechanisms require elucidation. In this study, we employed a transgenic mouse model in which the Notch1 intracellular domain (NIC) is activated conditionally to define the effects of active Notch1 signaling in macrophages. NIC overexpression had no effect on TAM differentiation, but it abrogated TAM function, leading to repressed growth of transplanted tumors. Macrophage miRNA profiling identified a novel downstream mediator of Notch signaling, miR-125a, which was upregulated through an RBP-J-binding site at the first intronic enhancer of the host gene Spaca6A. miR-125a functioned downstream of Notch signaling to reciprocally influence polarization of M1 and M2 macrophages by regulating factor inhibiting hypoxia inducible factor-1α and IRF4, respectively. Notably, macrophages transfected with miR-125a mimetics increased phagocytic activity and repressed tumor growth by remodeling the immune microenvironment. We also identified a positive feedback loop for miR-125a expression mediated by RYBP and YY1. Taken together, our results showed that Notch signaling not only supported the differentiation of TAM but also antagonized their protumorigenic function through miR-125a. Targeting this miRNA may reprogram macrophages in the tumor microenvironment and restore their antitumor potential. PMID:26759236

  18. Lack of correlation between natural killer activity and tumor growth control in nude mice with different immune defects.

    PubMed

    Fodstad, O; Hansen, C T; Cannon, G B; Statham, C N; Lichtenstein, G R; Boyd, M R

    1984-10-01

    To elucidate the in vivo role of natural killer (NK) cells, the growth of several murine and human tumors was studied in four variants of athymic, nude mice with different levels of NK activity. Beige-nude mice, homozygous for both the beige and the nude genes, had very low levels of NK activity, and their response to the B-cell mitogen, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, was lower than that of high-NK, adult NIH nude mice. Young and adult NIH nudes had different NK levels and showed different response in assays for K-cell, T-cell, and B-cell activity. The B-cell-defective NIH-II mice had slightly lower NK levels than adult NIH animals, but much lower response in the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. No correlation was found between host NK activity and the s.c. growth of various human (LOX, CEM, K562) and murine (YAC-1) tumor cells. Low NK activity was not associated with increased lung colony formation in a metastasis model using i.v.-injected human (LOX) and murine (B16F10) melanoma cells. No relationship was found between host NK activity and the rate of elimination of i.v.-injected 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled LOX, B16F10, and YAC-1 cells from lungs, liver, or spleen. The results fail to support the view that NK cells exert significant direct effects on tumor cells in vivo. PMID:6467201

  19. Purification and identification of a polysaccharide from medicinal mushroom Amauroderma rude with immunomodulatory activity and inhibitory effect on tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Honghui; Han, Yuanyuan; Huang, Jiguo; Yu, Xiongtao; Jiao, Chunwei; Yang, Xiaobing; Dhaliwal, Preet; Xie, Yizhen; Yang, Burton B.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms in recent years have been the subject of many experiments searching for anticancer properties. We previously screened thirteen mushrooms for their potential in inhibiting tumor growth, and found that the water extract of Amauroderma rude exerted the highest activity. Previous studies have shown that the polysaccharides contained in the water extract were responsible for the anticancer properties. This study was designed to explore the potential effects of the polysaccharides on immune regulation and tumor growth. Using the crude Amauroderma rude extract, in vitro experiments showed that the capacities of spleen lymphocytes, macrophages, and natural killer cells were all increased. In vivo experiments showed that the extract increased macrophage metabolism, lymphocyte proliferation, and antibody production. In addition, the partially purified product stimulated the secretion of cytokines in vitro, and in vivo. Overall, the extract decreased tumor growth rates. Lastly, the active compound was purified and identified as polysaccharide F212. Most importantly, the purified polysaccharide had the highest activity in increasing lymphocyte proliferation. In summary, this molecule may serve as a lead compound for drug development. PMID:26219260

  20. Geometrical approach to tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-08-01

    Tumor growth has a number of features in common with a physical process known as molecular beam epitaxy. Both growth processes are characterized by the constraint of growth development to the body border, and surface diffusion of cells and particles at the growing edge. However, tumor growth implies an approximate spherical symmetry that makes necessary a geometrical treatment of the growth equations. The basic model was introduced in a former paper [C. Escudero, Phys. Rev. E 73, 020902(R) (2006)], and in the present work we extend our analysis and try to shed light on the possible geometrical principles that drive tumor growth. We present two-dimensional models that reproduce the experimental observations, and analyze the unexplored three-dimensional case, for which interesting conclusions on tumor growth are derived. PMID:17025466

  1. Effect of thyroid hormone-nitric oxide interaction on tumor growth, angiogenesis, and aminopeptidase activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Cortés, Javier; Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Banegas, Inmaculada; García-Lora, Ángel M; Quesada, Andrés; Osuna, Antonio; Vargas, Félix

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of thyroid hormone-NO interaction on tumor development, vascularization, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and aminopeptidase (AP) activity in a murine model of implanted Lewis's carcinoma. Experiments were performed in male CBA-C57 mice. Animals were untreated (controls) or treated with: T4, the antithyroid drug methimazole, the NO inhibitor L-NAME, T4+L-NAME, methimazole+NAME, the αvß3 integrin antagonist tetrac, T4+tetrac, the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG), and T4 + AG; all treatments were for 6 weeks except for tetrac, administered for the last 11 days. Mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 1 × 10(6) exponentially growing Lewis carcinoma 3LL cells into the dorsum. Study variables 9 days later were tumor weight (TW), Hb content, an index of tumor vascularization, VEGF, and AP activity. T4 produced parallel increases in TW and angiogenesis. L-NAME reduced TW and angiogenesis in control, hyperthyroid, and hypothyroid mice, whereas AG had no effect on these variables. Tetrac arrested TW in normal and T4-treated mice but did not decrease angiogenesis in T4-treated animals. Negative correlations were found between TW and AP activity in tumors from control hyper- and hypothyroid groups and an inverse relationship was observed between TW and AP activities in tetrac-treated mice. T4 enhances TW and angiogenesis, in which NO participates, but requires activation of integrin αvß3 to promote carcinogenesis. NO blockade reduces TW, regardless of the thyroid status. Thyroid hormone negatively modulates AP activity in the tumor. Accordingly, blockade of the membrane TH receptor αvß3 integrin reduces TW associated with an increase in AP activity. PMID:24549786

  2. Small molecules, LLL12 and FLLL32, inhibit STAT3 and exhibit potent growth suppressive activity in osteosarcoma cells and tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Onimoe, Grace-Ifeyinwa; Liu, Aiguo; Lin, Li; Wei, Chang-Ching; Schwartz, Eric B; Bhasin, Deepak; Li, Chenglong; Fuchs, James R; Li, Pui-kai; Houghton, Peter; Termuhlen, Amanda; Gross, Thomas; Lin, Jiayuh

    2012-06-01

    Constitutive activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in osteosarcoma, and hence, may serve as a therapeutic target. In order to target STAT3, we tested two new STAT3 inhibitors, LLL12 and FLLL32. LLL12 and FLLL32 inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation and STAT3 downstream targets. LLL12 and FLLL32 also inhibit IL-6 induced STAT3 phosphorylation. The inhibition of STAT3 by LLL12 and FLLL32 resulted in the induction of apoptosis, reduction of plating efficiency, and migration in osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, LLL12 and FLLL32 inhibited SJSA osteosarcoma cells and OS-33 tumor growth in murine xenografts. These results provide evidence that constitutive STAT3 signaling is required for osteosarcoma survival and migration in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Blocking persistent STAT3 signaling by LLL12 and FLLL32 may be a novel therapeutic approach for osteosarcoma. PMID:21340507

  3. Andrographolide suppress tumor growth by inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling activation in insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma. PMID:24719558

  4. Paracrine effect of GTP cyclohydrolase and angiopoietin-1 interaction in stromal fibroblasts on tumor Tie2 activation and breast cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liye; Zeng, Xin; Kleibeuker, Esther; Buffa, Francesca; Barberis, Alessandro; Leek, Russell D; Roxanis, Ioannis; Zhang, Wei; Worth, Andrew; Beech, John S; Harris, Adrian L; Cai, Shijie

    2016-02-23

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a key role in promoting tumor growth, acting through complex paracrine regulation. GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH) expression for tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis in tumor stroma is implicated in angiogenesis and tumor development. However, the clinical significance of GTPCH expression in breast cancer is still elusive and how GTPCH regulates stromal fibroblast and tumor cell communication remains unknown. We found that GTPCH was upregulated in breast CAFs and epithelia, and high GTPCH RNA was significantly correlated with larger high grade tumors and worse prognosis. In cocultures, GTPCH expressing fibroblasts stimulated breast cancer cell proliferation and motility, cancer cell Tie2 phosphorylation and consequent downstream pathway activation. GTPCH interacted with Ang-1 in stromal fibroblasts and enhanced Ang-1 expression and function, which in turn phosphorylated tumor Tie2 and induced cell proliferation. In coimplantation xenografts, GTPCH in fibroblasts enhanced tumor growth, upregulating Ang-1 and alpha-smooth muscle actin mainly in fibroblast-like cells. GTPCH inhibition resulted in the attenuation of tumor growth and angiogenesis. GTPCH/Ang-1 interaction in stromal fibroblasts and activation of Tie2 on breast tumor cells could play an important role in supporting breast cancer growth. GTPCH may be an important mechanism of paracrine tumor growth and hence a target for therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26814432

  5. Paracrine effect of GTP cyclohydrolase and angiopoietin-1 interaction in stromal fibroblasts on tumor Tie2 activation and breast cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Kleibeuker, Esther; Buffa, Francesca; Barberis, Alessandro; Leek, Russell D.; Roxanis, Ioannis; Zhang, Wei; Worth, Andrew; Beech, John S.; Harris, Adrian L.; Cai, Shijie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a key role in promoting tumor growth, acting through complex paracrine regulation. GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH) expression for tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis in tumor stroma is implicated in angiogenesis and tumor development. However, the clinical significance of GTPCH expression in breast cancer is still elusive and how GTPCH regulates stromal fibroblast and tumor cell communication remains unknown. We found that GTPCH was upregulated in breast CAFs and epithelia, and high GTPCH RNA was significantly correlated with larger high grade tumors and worse prognosis. In cocultures, GTPCH expressing fibroblasts stimulated breast cancer cell proliferation and motility, cancer cell Tie2 phosphorylation and consequent downstream pathway activation. GTPCH interacted with Ang-1 in stromal fibroblasts and enhanced Ang-1 expression and function, which in turn phosphorylated tumor Tie2 and induced cell proliferation. In coimplantation xenografts, GTPCH in fibroblasts enhanced tumor growth, upregulating Ang-1 and alpha-smooth muscle actin mainly in fibroblast-like cells. GTPCH inhibition resulted in the attenuation of tumor growth and angiogenesis. GTPCH/Ang-1 interaction in stromal fibroblasts and activation of Tie2 on breast tumor cells could play an important role in supporting breast cancer growth. GTPCH may be an important mechanism of paracrine tumor growth and hence a target for therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26814432

  6. The hypoxia-inducible factor-1α activates ectopic production of fibroblast growth factor 23 in tumor-induced osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Doucet, Michele; Tomlinson, Ryan E; Han, Xiaobin; Quarles, L Darryl; Collins, Michael T; Clemens, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome in which ectopic production of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) by non-malignant mesenchymal tumors causes phosphate wasting and bone fractures. Recent studies have implicated the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in other phosphate wasting disorders caused by elevated FGF23, including X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and autosomal dominant hypophosphatemia. Here we provide evidence that HIF-1α mediates aberrant FGF23 in TIO by transcriptionally activating its promoter. Immunohistochemical studies in phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors resected from patients with documented TIO showed that HIF-1α and FGF23 were co-localized in spindle-shaped cells adjacent to blood vessels. Cultured tumor tissue produced high levels of intact FGF23 and demonstrated increased expression of HIF-1α protein. Transfection of MC3T3-E1 and Saos-2 cells with a HIF-1α expression construct induced the activity of a FGF23 reporter construct. Prior treatment of tumor organ cultures with HIF-1α inhibitors decreased HIF-1α and FGF23 protein accumulation and inhibited HIF-1α-induced luciferase reporter activity in transfected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed binding to a HIF-1α consensus sequence within the proximal FGF23 promoter, which was eliminated by treatment with a HIF-1α inhibitor. These results show for the first time that HIF-1α is a direct transcriptional activator of FGF23 and suggest that upregulation of HIF-1α activity in TIO contributes to the aberrant FGF23 production in these patients. PMID:27468359

  7. Ferulic Acid Exerts Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumor Activity by Targeting Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Song; Lu, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway; however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here, we identified ferulic acid as a novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) inhibitor and a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities. Ferulic acid demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, ferulic acid suppressed FGF1-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of ferulic acid on different molecular components and found that ferulic acid suppressed FGF1-triggered activation of FGFR1 and phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) signaling. Moreover, ferulic acid directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the PI3K-Akt pathway in melanoma cell. In vivo, using a melanoma xenograft model, ferulic acid showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of angiogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that ferulic acid targets the FGFR1-mediated PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of melanoma growth and angiogenesis. PMID:26473837

  8. Accelerated Tumor Growth Mediated by Sub-lytic Levels of Antibody-Induced Complement Activation is Associated with Activation of the PI3K/AKT Survival Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaohong; Ragupathi, Govind; Panageas, Katherine; Hong, Feng; Livingston, Philip O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We addressed the possibility that low levels of tumor cell bound antibodies targeting gangliosides might accelerate tumor growth. Experimental Design To test this hypothesis, we treated mice with a range of mAb doses against GM2, GD2, GD3 and CD20 after challenge with tumors expressing these antigens and tested the activity of the same mAbs in-vitro. We also explored the mechanisms behind the complement-mediated tumor growth acceleration that we observed and an approach to overcome it. Results Serologically detectable levels of IgM-mAb against GM2 are able to delay or prevent tumor growth of high GM2-expressing cell lines both in-vitro and in a SCID mouse model, while very low levels of this mAb resulted in slight but consistent acceleration of tumor growth in both settings. Surprisingly, this is not restricted to IgM antibodies targeting GM2 but consistent against IgG-mAb targeting GD3 as well. These findings were mirrored by in-vitro studies with antibodies against these antigens as well as GD2 and CD20 (with Rituxan), and shown to be complement-dependent in all cases. Complement-mediated accelerated growth of cultured tumor cell lines initiated by low mAb levels was associated with activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway and significantly elevated levels of both p-AKT and p-PRAS40. This complement-mediated PI3K-activation and accelerated tumor growth in-vitro and in-vivo are eliminated by PI3K-inhibitors NVP-BEZ235 and Wortmannin. These PI3K-inhibitors also significantly increased efficacy of high doses of these 4 mAbs. Conclusion Our findings suggest that manipulation of the PI3K/AKT pathway and its signaling network can significantly increase the potency of passively administered mAbs and vaccine-induced-antibodies targeting a variety of tumor-cell-surface-antigens. PMID:23833306

  9. p130Cas Is Required for Mammary Tumor Growth and Transforming Growth Factor-β-mediated Metastasis through Regulation of Smad2/3 Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Michael K.; Smith, Jason A.; Schiemann, William P.

    2009-01-01

    During breast cancer progression, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) switches from a tumor suppressor to a pro-metastatic molecule. Several recent studies suggest that this conversion in TGF-β function depends upon fundamental changes in the TGF-β signaling system. We show here that these changes in TGF-β signaling are concomitant with aberrant expression of the focal adhesion protein, p130Cas. Indeed, elevating expression of either the full-length (FL) or just the carboxyl terminus (CT) of p130Cas in mammary epithelial cells (MECs) diminished the ability of TGF-β1 to activate Smad2/3, but increased its coupling to p38 MAPK. This shift in TGF-β signaling evoked (i) resistance to TGF-β-induced growth arrest, and (ii) acinar filling upon three-dimensional organotypic cultures of p130Cas-FL or -CT expressing MECs. Furthermore, rendering metastatic MECs deficient in p130Cas enhanced TGF-β-stimulated Smad2/3 activity, which restored TGF-β-induced growth inhibition both in vitro and in mammary tumors produced in mice. Additionally, whereas elevating TβR-II expression in metastatic MECs had no affect on their phosphorylation of Smad2/3, this event markedly enhanced their activation of p38 MAPK, leading to increased MEC invasion and metastasis. Importantly, depleting p130Cas expression in TβR-II-expressing metastatic MECs significantly increased their activation of Smad2/3, which (i) reestablished the physiologic balance between canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling, and (ii) reversed cellular invasion and early mammary tumor cell dissemination stimulated by TGF-β. Collectively, our findings identify p130Cas as a molecular rheostat that regulates the delicate balance between canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling, a balance that is critical to maintaining the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β during breast cancer progression. PMID:19822523

  10. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  11. HIF-3α1 promotes colorectal tumor cell growth by activation of JAK-STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiang; Jungles, Kylie; Onder, Gunseli; Samhoun, Jalal; Győrffy, Balázs; Hardiman, Karin M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic environment is critical in colorectal cancer (CRC) development. Most studies have mainly focused on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α as the major hypoxic transcription factors in CRC development and progression. However, the role of HIF-3α in CRC is not clear. Here we found that HIF-3α protein was increased in colorectal tumors from both mouse models and human patients. Moreover, increased HIF-3α expression was correlated with decreased survival. Overexpression of a long isoform of HIF-3α, HIF-3α1, increased cell growth in two CRC cell lines. Surprisingly, overexpressed HIF-3α1 was localized to the cytosol and increased phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3). STAT3 inhibition effectively reduced p-STAT3 levels and cell growth induced by HIF-3α1. The activation of p-STAT3 was independent of the transcriptional activity of HIF-3α1. However, the inhibition of the upstream regulator Janus kinase (JAK) abolished HIF-3α1-induced p-STAT3 and cell growth. Together, these results demonstrated that HIF-3α1 promotes CRC cell growth by activation of the JAK-STAT3 signaling pathway through non-canonical transcription-independent mechanisms. PMID:26871465

  12. SIRT3-dependent GOT2 acetylation status affects the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle activity and pancreatic tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Lisha; Shi, Qian; Zhao, Yuzheng; Lin, Huaipeng; Zhang, Mengli; Zhao, Shimin; Yang, Yi; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue; Ye, Dan

    2015-04-15

    The malate-aspartate shuttle is indispensable for the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria to maintain a high rate of glycolysis and to support rapid tumor cell growth. The malate-aspartate shuttle is operated by two pairs of enzymes that localize to the mitochondria and cytoplasm, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminases (GOT), and malate dehydrogenases (MDH). Here, we show that mitochondrial GOT2 is acetylated and that deacetylation depends on mitochondrial SIRT3. We have identified that acetylation occurs at three lysine residues, K159, K185, and K404 (3K), and enhances the association between GOT2 and MDH2. The GOT2 acetylation at these three residues promotes the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria and changes the mitochondrial NADH/NAD(+) redox state to support ATP production. Additionally, GOT2 3K acetylation stimulates NADPH production to suppress ROS and to protect cells from oxidative damage. Moreover, GOT2 3K acetylation promotes pancreatic cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Finally, we show that GOT2 K159 acetylation is increased in human pancreatic tumors, which correlates with reduced SIRT3 expression. Our study uncovers a previously unknown mechanism by which GOT2 acetylation stimulates the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle activity and oxidative protection. PMID:25755250

  13. SIRT3-dependent GOT2 acetylation status affects the malate–aspartate NADH shuttle activity and pancreatic tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Lisha; Shi, Qian; Zhao, Yuzheng; Lin, Huaipeng; Zhang, Mengli; Zhao, Shimin; Yang, Yi; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue; Ye, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The malate–aspartate shuttle is indispensable for the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria to maintain a high rate of glycolysis and to support rapid tumor cell growth. The malate–aspartate shuttle is operated by two pairs of enzymes that localize to the mitochondria and cytoplasm, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminases (GOT), and malate dehydrogenases (MDH). Here, we show that mitochondrial GOT2 is acetylated and that deacetylation depends on mitochondrial SIRT3. We have identified that acetylation occurs at three lysine residues, K159, K185, and K404 (3K), and enhances the association between GOT2 and MDH2. The GOT2 acetylation at these three residues promotes the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria and changes the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ redox state to support ATP production. Additionally, GOT2 3K acetylation stimulates NADPH production to suppress ROS and to protect cells from oxidative damage. Moreover, GOT2 3K acetylation promotes pancreatic cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Finally, we show that GOT2 K159 acetylation is increased in human pancreatic tumors, which correlates with reduced SIRT3 expression. Our study uncovers a previously unknown mechanism by which GOT2 acetylation stimulates the malate–aspartate NADH shuttle activity and oxidative protection. PMID:25755250

  14. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase induced by EGFR/ERK activation promotes tumor growth in pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Yong; Yu, Yun; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Lin

    2015-08-07

    Lipid metabolism is dysregulated in many human diseases including atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key lipogenic enzyme involved in de novo lipid biosynthesis, is significantly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and associates with tumor progression. However, limited data is available to understand underlying biological functions and clinical significance of overexpressed FASN in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here, upregulated FASN was more frequently observed in PDAC tissues compared with normal pancreas in a tissue microarray. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis revealed that high expression level of FASN resulted in a significantly poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Knockdown or inhibition of endogenous FASN decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in HPAC and AsPC-1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that EGFR/ERK signaling accounts for elevated FASN expression in PDAC as ascertained by performing siRNA assays and using specific pharmacological inhibitors. Collectively, our results indicate that FASN exhibits important roles in tumor growth and EGFR/ERK pathway is responsible for upregulated expression of FASN in PDAC. - Highlights: • Increased expression of FASN indicates a poor prognosis in PDAC. • Elevated FASN favors tumor growth in PDAC in vitro. • Activation of EGFR signaling contributes to elevated FASN expression.

  15. The Selective PI3K Inhibitor XL147 (SAR245408) Inhibits Tumor Growth and Survival and Potentiates the Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents in Preclinical Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul; Yamaguchi, Kyoko; Hsu, Pin P; Qian, Fawn; Du, Xiangnan; Wu, Jianming; Won, Kwang-Ai; Yu, Peiwen; Jaeger, Christopher T; Zhang, Wentao; Marlowe, Charles K; Keast, Paul; Abulafia, Wendy; Chen, Jason; Young, Jenny; Plonowski, Artur; Yakes, F Michael; Chu, Felix; Engell, Kelly; Bentzien, Frauke; Lam, Sanh T; Dale, Stephanie; Yturralde, Olivia; Matthews, David J; Lamb, Peter; Laird, A Douglas

    2015-04-01

    Dysregulation of PI3K/PTEN pathway components, resulting in hyperactivated PI3K signaling, is frequently observed in various cancers and correlates with tumor growth and survival. Resistance to a variety of anticancer therapies, including receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents, has been attributed to the absence or attenuation of downregulating signals along the PI3K/PTEN pathway. Thus, PI3K inhibitors have therapeutic potential as single agents and in combination with other therapies for a variety of cancer indications. XL147 (SAR245408) is a potent and highly selective inhibitor of class I PI3Ks (α, β, γ, and δ). Moreover, broad kinase selectivity profiling of >130 protein kinases revealed that XL147 is highly selective for class I PI3Ks over other kinases. In cellular assays, XL147 inhibits the formation of PIP3 in the membrane, and inhibits phosphorylation of AKT, p70S6K, and S6 in multiple tumor cell lines with diverse genetic alterations affecting the PI3K pathway. In a panel of tumor cell lines, XL147 inhibits proliferation with a wide range of potencies, with evidence of an impact of genotype on sensitivity. In mouse xenograft models, oral administration of XL147 results in dose-dependent inhibition of phosphorylation of AKT, p70S6K, and S6 with a duration of action of at least 24 hours. Repeat-dose administration of XL147 results in significant tumor growth inhibition in multiple human xenograft models in nude mice. Administration of XL147 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents results in antitumor activity in xenograft models that is enhanced over that observed with the corresponding single agents. PMID:25637314

  16. The EMT activator ZEB1 promotes tumor growth and determines differential response to chemotherapy in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Tilló, E; Fanlo, L; Siles, L; Montes-Moreno, S; Moros, A; Chiva-Blanch, G; Estruch, R; Martinez, A; Colomer, D; Győrffy, B; Roué, G; Postigo, A

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by a poor response to treatment and prognosis. Constitutive activation of different signaling pathways in subsets of MCLs, through genetic and/or nongenetic alterations, endows tumor cells with enhanced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. The canonical Wnt pathway (β-catenin/TCF-LEF), implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers, is constitutively active in half of MCLs. Here, we show that ZEB1, a transcription factor better known for promoting metastasis in carcinomas, is expressed in primary MCLs with active Wnt signaling. ZEB1 expression in MCL cells depends on Wnt, being downregulated by β-catenin knockdown or blocking of Wnt signaling by salinomycin. Knockdown of ZEB1 reduces in vitro cell viability and proliferation in MCL cells, and, importantly, tumor growth in mouse xenograft models. ZEB1 activates proliferation-associated (HMGB2, UHRF1, CENPF, MYC, MKI67, and CCND1) and anti-apoptotic (MCL1, BCL2, and BIRC5) genes and inhibits pro-apoptotic ones (TP53, BBC3, PMAIP1, and BAX). We show that ZEB1 expression in MCL cells determines differential resistance to chemotherapy drugs and regulates transporters involved in drug influx/efflux. Downregulation of ZEB1 by salinomycin increases the sensitivity of MCL cells to the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin, cytarabine and gemcitabine. Lastly, salinomycin and doxorubicin display a synergistic effect in established and primary MCL cells. These results identify ZEB1 in MCL where it promotes cell proliferation, enhanced tumor growth and a differential response to chemotherapy drugs. ZEB1 could thus potentially become a predictive biomarker and therapeutic target in this lymphoma. PMID:24013721

  17. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2014-09-22

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25250884

  18. JAK Kinase Inhibition Abrogates STAT3 Activation and Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tumor Growth12

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Malabika; Pollock, Netanya I.; Black, John; DeGrave, Kara A.; Wheeler, Sarah; Freilino, Maria L.; Joyce, Sonali; Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Zeng, Yan; Chiosea, Simion I.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 has been implicated in cell proliferation and survival of many cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AZD1480, an orally active pharmacologic inhibitor of JAK1/JAK2, has been tested in several cancer models. In the present study, the in vitro and in vivo effects of AZD1480 were evaluated in HNSCC preclinical models to test the potential use of JAK kinase inhibition for HNSCC therapy. AZD1480 treatment decreased HNSCC proliferation in HNSCC cell lines with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values ranging from 0.9 to 4 μM in conjunction with reduction of pSTAT3Tyr705 expression. In vivo antitumor efficacy of AZD1480 was demonstrated in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models derived from two independent HNSCC tumors. Oral administration of AZD1480 reduced tumor growth in conjunction with decreased pSTAT3Tyr705 expression that was observed in both PDX models. These findings suggest that the JAK1/2 inhibitors abrogate STAT3 signaling and may be effective in HNSCC treatment approaches. PMID:25810010

  19. Autocrine growth factors and solid tumor malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J. H.; Karnes, W. E.; Cuttitta, F.; Walker, A.

    1991-01-01

    The ability of malignant cells to escape the constraint that normally regulate cell growth and differentiation has been a primary focus of attention for investigators of cancer cell biology. An outcome of this attention has been the discovery that the protein products of oncogenes play a role in the activation of growth signal pathways. A second outcome, possibly related to abnormal oncogene expression, has been the discovery that malignant cells frequently show an ability to regulate their own growth by the release of autocrine growth modulatory substances. Most important, the growth of certain malignant cell types has been shown to depend on autocrine growth circuits. A malignant tumor whose continued growth depends on the release of an autocrine growth factor may be vulnerable to treatment with specific receptor antagonists or immunoneutralizing antibodies designed to break the autocrine circuit. Information is rapidly emerging concerning autocrine growth factors in selected human solid tissue malignancy. Images PMID:1926844

  20. Direct inhibition of hexokinase activity by metformin at least partially impairs glucose metabolism and tumor growth in experimental breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Cecilia; Salani, Barbara; Massollo, Michela; Amaro, Adriana; Esposito, Alessia Isabella; Orengo, Anna Maria; Capitanio, Selene; Emionite, Laura; Riondato, Mattia; Bottoni, Gianluca; Massara, Cinzia; Boccardo, Simona; Fabbi, Marina; Campi, Cristina; Ravera, Silvia; Angelini, Giovanna; Morbelli, Silvia; Cilli, Michele; Cordera, Renzo; Truini, Mauro; Maggi, Davide; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Sambuceti, Gianmario

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug, may be useful in the prevention and treatment of different cancers. In the present study, we demonstrate that metformin directly inhibits the enzymatic function of hexokinase (HK) I and II in a cell line of triple-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231). The inhibition is selective for these isoforms, as documented by experiments with purified HK I and II as well as with cell lysates. Measurements of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglycose uptake document that it is dose- and time-dependent and powerful enough to virtually abolish glucose consumption despite unchanged availability of membrane glucose transporters. The profound energetic imbalance activates phosphorylation and is subsequently followed by cell death. More importantly, the “in vivo” relevance of this effect is confirmed by studies of orthotopic xenografts of MDA-MB-231 cells in athymic (nu/nu) mice. Administration of high drug doses after tumor development caused an evident tumor necrosis in a time as short as 48 h. On the other hand, 1 mo metformin treatment markedly reduced cancer glucose consumption and growth. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that HK inhibition contributes to metformin therapeutic and preventive potential in breast cancer. PMID:24240433

  1. Inhibition of STAT3 with orally active JAK inhibitor, AZD1480, decreases tumor growth in Neuroblastoma and Pediatric Sarcomas In vitro and In vivo.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuang; Li, Zhijie; Thiele, Carol J

    2013-03-01

    The IL-6/JAK/STAT pathway is a key signal transduction pathway implicated in the pathogenesis of many human cancers, suggesting that kinase inhibitors targeting JAK/STAT3 may have a broad spectrum of antitumor activity. AZD1480, a pharmacological JAK1/2 inhibitor, exhibits anti-tumor potency in multiple adult malignancies. To evaluate the efficacy of inhibition of JAK/STAT3 signal transduction pathway we assessed the activity of AZD1480 in pediatric malignancies using preclinical models of three highly malignant pediatric solid tumors: neuroblastoma (NB), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and the Ewing Sarcoma Family Tumors (ESFT). In this study, we employed panels of biomedical and biological experiments to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo activity of AZD1480 in NB, RMS and ESFT. Our data indicate that AZD1480 blocks endogenous as well as IL-6 induced STAT3 activation. AZD1480 decreases cell viability in 7/7NB, 7/7RMS and 2/2 ESFT cell lines (median EC50 is 1.5 μM, ranging from 0.36-5.37 μM). AZD1480 induces cell growth inhibition and caspase-dependent apoptosis in vitro and decreases expression of STAT3 target genes, including cell cycle regulators CyclinD1, 3 and CDC25A, anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-2 and survivin, the metastasis-related factor TIMP-1 and c-Myc. In vivo studies showed AZD1480 significantly decreased tumor growth and prolonged overall survival in tumor-bearing mice. Tumors from AZD1480-treated mice showed inhibition of activated STAT3 as well as decreased expression of STAT3 downstream targets. Our study provides strong evidence of the anti-tumor growth potency of JAK inhibitor AZD1480 in pediatric solid tumors, providing proof-of principle that inhibition of the JAK/STAT3 signal transduction could be a promising therapeutic target for high-risk pediatric solid tumors. PMID:23531921

  2. Statistical mechanics model of angiogenic tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, António Luis; Lipowska, Dorota; Lipowski, Adam

    2012-01-01

    We examine a lattice model of tumor growth where the survival of tumor cells depends on the supplied nutrients. When such a supply is random, the extinction of tumors belongs to the directed percolation universality class. However, when the supply is correlated with the distribution of tumor cells, which as we suggest might mimic the angiogenic growth, the extinction shows different critical behavior. Such a correlation affects also the morphology of the growing tumors and drastically raises tumor-survival probability. PMID:22400505

  3. Sulindac sulfide selectively inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of human breast tumor cells by PDE5 inhibition, elevation of cGMP, and activation of PKG

    PubMed Central

    Tinsley, Heather N.; Gary, Bernard D.; Keeton, Adam B.; Zhang, Wei; Abadi, Ashraf H.; Reynolds, Robert C.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulindac displays promising antineoplastic activity, but toxicities from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limit its use for chemoprevention. Previous reports suggest that its anticancer properties may be attributed to a COX-independent mechanism, although alternative targets have not been well defined. Here we show that sulindac sulfide (SS) induces apoptosis and inhibits the growth of human breast tumor cells with IC50 values of 60-85 μM. Within the same concentration range, SS inhibited cGMP hydrolysis in tumor cell lysates, but did not affect cAMP hydrolysis. SS did not induce apoptosis of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), nor did it inhibit PDE activity in HMEC lysates. SS increased intracellular cGMP levels and activated protein kinase G in breast tumor cells, but not HMEC. The guanylyl cyclase (GC) activator, NOR-3, and cGMP PDE inhibitors, trequinsin and MY5445, displayed similar growth inhibitory activity as SS, but the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, and other PDE inhibitors had no effect. Moreover, GC activation increased the sensitivity of tumor cells to SS, while GC inhibition reduced sensitivity. By comparing PDE isozyme profiles in breast tumor cells with HMEC and determining the sensitivity of recombinant PDE isozymes to SS, PDE5 was found to be overexpressed in breast tumor cells and selectively inhibited by SS. The mechanism of SS binding to the catalytic domain of PDE5 was revealed by molecular modeling. These data suggest that PDE5 inhibition is responsible for the breast tumor cell growth inhibitory and apoptosis inducing activity of SS and may contribute to the chemopreventive properties of sulindac. PMID:19996273

  4. Platycodin D Induces Tumor Growth Arrest by Activating FOXO3a Expression in Prostate Cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Lu, Zongliang; Liu, Kai; Guo, Jing; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Jian; Mi, Mantian; Xu, Hongxia

    2014-01-01

    Platycodin D (PD), a major saponin derived from Platycodin grandiflorum, exerted cytotoxicity against prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145 and LNCaP cells) with IC50 values in the range of 11.17 to 26.13μmol/L, whereas RWPE-1cells (a non-malignant human prostate epithelial cell line) were not significantly affected. A further study in these cell lines showed that PD could potently affect cell proliferation (indicated by the bromodeoxyuridine assay), induce cell apoptosis (determined by Annexin V-FITC flow cytometry) and cause cell cycle arrest (indicated by PI staining). After being treated with PD for 48 hours, DU145 and LNCaP cells were arrested in the G0 /G1 phase, and PC3 cells were arrested in the G2/M phase. A Western blotting analysis indicated that PD increased the expression of the FOXO3a transcription factor, decreased the expression of p-FOXO3a and MDM2 and increased the expression of FOXO-responsive genes, p21 and p27. MDM2 silencing (transiently by siRNA-MDM2) increased the PD-induced FOXO3a protein expression, while MDM2 overexpression (in cells transiently transfected with a pcDNA3-MDM2 plasmid) decreased the PD-induced expression of the FOXO3a protein. Moreover, PD dose-dependently inhibited the growth of PC3 xenograft tumors in BALB/c nude mice. A Western blotting analysis of the excised xenograft tumors indicated that similar changes in protein expression also occurred in vivo. These results suggest that PD exhibits significant activity against prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. The FOXO3a transcription factor appears to be involved in the activity of PD. Together, all of these findings provide a basis for the future development of this agent for human prostate cancer therapy. PMID:25431082

  5. Connective tissue growth factor in tumor pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Key roles for connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) are demonstrated in the wound repair process where it promotes myofibroblast differentiation and angiogenesis. Similar mechanisms are active in tumor-reactive stroma where CTGF is expressed. Other potential roles include prevention of hypoxia-induced apoptosis and promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transistion (EMT). CTGF expression in tumors has been associated to both tumor suppression and progression. For example, CTGF expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, breast, pancreas and gastric cancer correlates to worse prognosis whereas the opposite is true for colorectal, lung and ovarian cancer. This discrepancy is not yet understood. High expression of CTGF is a hallmark of ileal carcinoids, which are well-differentiated endocrine carcinomas with serotonin production originating from the small intestine and proximal colon. These tumors maintain a high grade of differentiation and low proliferation. Despite this, they are malignant and most patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis. These tumors demonstrate several phenotypes potentially related to CTGF function namely: cell migration, absent tumor cell apoptosis, as well as, reactive and well vascularised myofibroblast rich stroma and fibrosis development locally and in distal organs. The presence of CTGF in other endocrine tumors indicates a role in the progression of well-differentiated tumors. PMID:23259759

  6. Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Oliver; Onizuka, Shinya; Becker, Christian M; Fannon, Michael; Flynn, Evelyn; D'Amato, Robert; Zetter, Bruce; Folkman, Judah; Ray, Rahul; Swamy, Narasimha; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven

    2003-01-01

    We have isolated a selectively deglycosylated form of vitamin D binding protein (DBP-maf) generated from systemically available DBP by a human pancreatic cancer cell line. DBP-maf is antiproliferative for endothelial cells and antiangiogenic in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. DBP-maf administered daily was able to potently inhibit the growth of human pancreatic cancer in immune compromised mice (T/C=0.09). At higher doses, DBP-maf caused tumor regression. Histological examination revealed that treated tumors had a higher number of infiltrating macrophages as well as reduced microvessel density, and increased levels of apoptosis relative to untreated tumors. Taken together, these data suggest that DBP-maf is an antiangiogenic molecule that can act directly on endothelium as well as stimulate macrophages to attack both the endothelial and tumor cell compartment of a growing malignancy. PMID:12659668

  7. Vitamin D Binding Protein-Macrophage Activating Factor (DBP-maf) Inhibits Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Kisker, Oliver; Onizuka, Shinya; Becker, Christian M; Fannon, Michael; Flynn, Evelyn; D'Amato, Robert; Zetter, Bruce; Folkman, Judah; Ray, Rahul; Swamy, Narasimha; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Abstract We have isolated a selectively deglycosylated form of vitamin D binding protein (DBP-maf) generated from systemically available DBP by a human pancreatic cancer cell line. DBP-maf is antiproliferative for endothelial cells and antiangiogenic in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. DBP-maf administered daily was able to potently inhibit the growth of human pancreatic cancer in immune compromised mice (T/C=0.09). At higher doses, DBP-maf caused tumor regression. Histological examination revealed that treated tumors had a higher number of infiltrating macrophages as well as reduced microvessel density, and increased levels of apoptosis relative to untreated tumors. Taken together, these data suggest that DBP-maf is an antiangiogenic molecule that can act directly on endothelium as well as stimulate macrophages to attack both the endothelial and tumor cell compartment of a growing malignancy. PMID:12659668

  8. Enterohepatic recirculation of bioactive ginger phytochemicals is associated with enhanced tumor growth-inhibitory activity of ginger extract.

    PubMed

    Gundala, Sushma R; Mukkavilli, Rao; Yang, Chunhua; Yadav, Pooja; Tandon, Vibha; Vangala, Subrahmanyam; Prakash, Satya; Aneja, Ritu

    2014-06-01

    Phytochemical complexity of plant foods confers health-promoting benefits including chemopreventive and anticancer effects. Isolating single constituents from complex foods may render them inactive, emphasizing the importance of preserving the natural composition of whole extracts. Recently, we demonstrated in vitro synergy among the most abundant bioactive constituents of ginger extract (GE), viz., 6-gingerol (6G), 8-gingerol (8G), 10-gingerol (10G) and 6-shogaol (6S). However, no study has yet examined the in vivo collaboration among ginger phytochemicals or evaluated the importance, if any, of the natural 'milieu' preserved in whole extract. Here, we comparatively evaluated in vivo efficacy of GE with an artificial quasi-mixture (Mix) formulated by combining four most active ginger constituents at concentrations equivalent to those present in whole extract. Orally fed GE showed 2.4-fold higher tumor growth-inhibitory efficacy than Mix in human prostate tumor xenografts. Pharmacokinetic evaluations and bioavailability measurements addressed the efficacy differences between GE and Mix. Plasma concentration-time profiles revealed multiple peaking phenomenon for ginger constituents when they were fed as GE as opposed to Mix, indicating enterohepatic recirculation. Bioavailability of 6G, 8G, 10G and 6S was 1.6-, 1.1-, 2.5- and 3.4-fold higher, respectively, when dosed with GE compared with Mix. In addition, gingerol glucuronides were detected in feces upon intravenous administration confirming hepatobiliary elimination. These data ascribe the superior in vivo efficacy of GE to higher area under the concentration time curves, greater residence time and enhanced bioavailability, of ginger phytochemicals, when fed as a natural extract compared with artificial Mix, emphasizing the usefulness of consuming whole foods over single agents. PMID:24431413

  9. Anticancer activity of TTAC-0001, a fully human anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2/KDR) monoclonal antibody, is associated with inhibition of tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Geon; Jin, Younggeon; Jin, Juyoun; Yang, Heekyoung; Joo, Kyeung Min; Lee, Weon Sup; Shim, Sang Ryeol; Kim, Sung-Woo; Yoo, Jinsang; Lee, Sang Hoon; Yoo, Jin-San; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors are considered the primary cause of tumor-induced angiogenesis. Specifically, VEGFR-2/kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) is part of the major signaling pathway that plays a significant role in tumor angiogenesis, which is associated with the development of various types of tumor and metastasis. In particular, KDR is involved in tumor angiogenesis as well as cancer cell growth and survival. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of TTAC-0001, a fully human antibody against VEGFR-2/KDR. To assess the efficacy of the antibody and pharmacokinetic (PK) relationship in vivo, we tested the potency of TTAC-0001 in glioblastoma and colorectal cancer xenograft models. Antitumor activity of TTAC-0001 in preclinical models correlated with tumor growth arrest, induction of tumor cell apoptosis, and inhibition of angiogenesis. We also evaluated the combination effect of TTAC-0001 with a chemotherapeutic agent in xenograft models. We were able to determine the relationship between PK and the efficacy of TTAC-0001 through in vivo single-dose PK study. Taken together, our data suggest that targeting VEGFR-2 with TTAC-0001 could be a promising approach for cancer treatment. PMID:26325365

  10. Decreased systemic IGF-1 in response to calorie restriction modulates murine tumor cell growth, nuclear factor-κB activation, and inflammation-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alison E; Lashinger, Laura M; Otto, Glen; Nunez, Nomeli P; Hursting, Stephen D

    2013-12-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) prevents obesity and has potent anticancer effects associated with altered hormones and cytokines. We tested the hypothesis that CR inhibits MC38 mouse colon tumor cell growth through modulation of hormone-stimulated nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and protumorigenic gene expression. Female C57BL/6 mice were randomized (n = 30/group) to receive control diet or 30% CR diet. At 20 wk, 15 mice/group were killed for body composition analysis. At 21 wk, serum was obtained for hormone analysis. At 22 wk, mice were injected with MC38 cells; tumor growth was monitored for 24 d. Gene expression in excised tumors and MC38 cells was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR. In vitro MC38 NF-κB activation (by p65 ELISA and immunofluorescence) were measured in response to varying IGF-1 concentrations (1-400 ng/mL). Relative to controls, CR mice had decreased tumor volume, body weight, body fat, serum IGF-1, serum leptin, and serum insulin, and increased serum adiponectin (P < 0.05, each). Tumors from CR mice, versus controls, had downregulated inflammation- and/or cancer-related gene expression, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-2, S100A9, and F4/80, and upregulated 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression. In MC38 cells in vitro, IGF-1 increased NF-κB activation and NF-κB downstream gene expression (P < 0.05, each). We conclude that CR, in association with reduced systemic IGF-1, modulates MC38 tumor growth, NF-κB activation, and inflammation-related gene expression. Thus, IGF-1 and/or NF-κB inhibition may pharmacologically mimic the anticancer effects of CR to break the obesity-colon cancer link. PMID:22778026

  11. Voluntary physical activity abolishes the proliferative tumor growth microenvironment created by adipose tissue in animals fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Theriau, Christopher F; Shpilberg, Yaniv; Riddell, Michael C; Connor, Michael K

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms behind the obesity-breast cancer association may be regulated via adipokine secretion by white adipose tissue. Specifically, adiponectin and leptin are altered with adiposity and exert antagonistic effects on cancer cell proliferation. We set out to determine whether altering adiposity in vivo via high fat diet (HFD) feeding changed the tumor growth supporting nature of adipose tissue and whether voluntary physical activity (PA) could ameliorate these HFD-dependent effects. We show that conditioned media (CM) created from the adipose tissue of HFD fed animals caused an increase in the proliferation of MCF7 cells compared with cells exposed to CM prepared from the adipose of lean chow diet fed counterparts. This increased proliferation was driven within the MCF7 cells by an HFD-dependent antagonism between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways, decreasing p27 protein levels via reduced phosphorylation at T198 and downregulation of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1). PA can ameliorate these proliferative effects of HFD-CM on MCF7 cells, increasing p27(T198) by AMPK, reducing pAkt(T308), and increasing AdipoR1, resulting in cell cycle withdrawal in a manner that depends on the PA intensity. High physical activity (>3 km/day) completely abolished the effects of HFD feeding. In addition, AdipoR1 overexpression mimics the effects of exercise, abolishing the proliferative effects of the HFD-CM on MCF7 cells and further enhancing the antiproliferative effects of PA on the HFD-CM. Thus voluntary PA represents a means to counteract the proliferative effects of adipose tissue on breast cancers in obese patients. PMID:27150834

  12. Liver tumors escape negative control of proliferation via PI3K/Akt-mediated block of C/EBPα growth inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Li; Iakova, Polina; Wilde, Margie; Awad, Samir; Timchenko, Nikolai A.

    2004-01-01

    Liver tumor cells arise from normal hepatocytes that escape negative control of proliferation. The transcription factor C/EBPα maintains quiescence of hepatocytes through two pathways: inhibition of cdks and repression of E2F. Nevertheless, liver tumors and cultured hepatoma cell lines proliferate in the presence of C/EBPα. In this paper, we present evidence that the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway in liver tumor cells blocks the growth inhibitory activity of C/EBPα through the PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of C/EBPα on Ser 193, leading to a failure of C/EBPα to interact with and inhibit cdks and E2F. Mutation of Ser 193 to Ala also abolishes the ability of C/EBPα to cause growth arrest because of a lack of interactions with cdk2 and E2F–Rb complexes. These data provide a molecular basis for the development of liver tumors in which the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway neutralizes C/EBPα growth inhibitory activity. PMID:15107404

  13. EGCG inhibits the growth and tumorigenicity of nasopharyngeal tumor-initiating cells through attenuation of STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Hung; Chao, Li-Keng; Hung, Peir-Haur; Chen, Yann-Jang

    2014-01-01

    A subset of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) could initiate tumors and are responsible for tumor recurrence and chemotherapeutic resistance. In this study, we enriched TICs in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by the spheres formation and characterized the stem-like signatures such as self-renewal, proliferation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. By this method, we investigated that epigallocathechin gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol in green tea could target TICs and potently inhibit sphere formation, eliminate the stem-like properties and enhance chemosensitivity in NPC through attenuation of STAT3 activation, which could be important in regulating the stemness expression in NPC. Our results demonstrated that STAT3 pathway plays an important role in mediating tumor-initiating capacities in NPC and suggest that inactivation of STAT3 with EGCG may represent a potential preventive and therapeutic approach for NPC. PMID:24966947

  14. R-Ras protein inhibits autophosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 in endothelial cells and suppresses receptor activation in tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Junko; Li, Fangfei; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2015-03-27

    Abnormal angiogenesis is associated with a broad range of medical conditions, including cancer. The formation of neovasculature with functionally defective blood vessels significantly impacts tumor progression, metastasis, and the efficacy of anticancer therapies. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) potently induces vascular permeability and vessel growth in the tumor microenvironment, and its inhibition normalizes tumor vasculature. In contrast, the signaling of the small GTPase R-Ras inhibits excessive angiogenic growth and promotes the maturation of regenerating blood vessels. R-Ras signaling counteracts VEGF-induced vessel sprouting, permeability, and invasive activities of endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-Ras on VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation by VEGF, the key mechanism for angiogenic stimulation. We show that tyrosine phosphorylation of VEGFR2 is significantly elevated in the tumor vasculature and dermal microvessels of VEGF-injected skin in R-Ras knockout mice. In cultured endothelial cells, R-Ras suppressed the internalization of VEGFR2, which is required for full activation of the receptor by VEGF. Consequently, R-Ras strongly suppressed autophosphorylation of the receptor at all five major tyrosine phosphorylation sites. Conversely, silencing of R-Ras resulted in increased VEGFR2 phosphorylation. This effect of R-Ras on VEGFR2 was, at least in part, dependent on vascular endothelial cadherin. These findings identify a novel function of R-Ras to control the response of endothelial cells to VEGF and suggest an underlying mechanism by which R-Ras regulates angiogenesis. PMID:25645912

  15. Suppression of β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity and colon tumor cell growth by dual inhibition of PDE5 and 10

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Bing; Ramírez-Alcántara, Verónica; Canzoneri, Joshua C.; Lee, Kevin; Sigler, Sara; Gary, Bernard; Li, Yonghe; Zhang, Wei; Moyer, Mary P.; Salter, E. Alan; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Keeton, Adam B.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggest the anti-inflammatory drug, sulindac inhibits tumorigenesis by a COX independent mechanism involving cGMP PDE inhibition. Here we report that the cGMP PDE isozymes, PDE5 and 10, are elevated in colon tumor cells compared with normal colonocytes, and that inhibitors and siRNAs can selectively suppress colon tumor cell growth. Combined treatment with inhibitors or dual knockdown suppresses tumor cell growth to a greater extent than inhibition from either isozyme alone. A novel sulindac derivative, ADT-094 was designed to lack COX-1/-2 inhibitory activity but have improved potency to inhibit PDE5 and 10. ADT-094 displayed >500 fold higher potency to inhibit colon tumor cell growth compared with sulindac by activating cGMP/PKG signaling to suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis. Combined inhibition of PDE5 and 10 by treatment with ADT-094, PDE isozyme-selective inhibitors, or by siRNA knockdown also suppresses β-catenin, TCF transcriptional activity, and the levels of downstream targets, cyclin D1 and survivin. These results suggest that dual inhibition of PDE5 and 10 represents novel strategy for developing potent and selective anticancer drugs. PMID:26299804

  16. Biochemomechanical poroelastic theory of avascular tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shi-Lei; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-09-01

    Tumor growth is a complex process involving genetic mutations, biochemical regulations, and mechanical deformations. In this paper, a thermodynamics-based nonlinear poroelastic theory is established to model the coupling among the mechanical, chemical, and biological mechanisms governing avascular tumor growth. A volumetric growth law accounting for mechano-chemo-biological coupled effects is proposed to describe the development of solid tumors. The regulating roles of stresses and nutrient transport in the tumor growth are revealed under different environmental constraints. We show that the mechano-chemo-biological coupling triggers anisotropic and heterogeneous growth, leading to the formation of layered structures in a growing tumor. There exists a steady state in which tumor growth is balanced by resorption. The influence of external confinements on tumor growth is also examined. A phase diagram is constructed to illustrate how the elastic modulus and thickness of the confinements jointly dictate the steady state of tumor volume. Qualitative and quantitative agreements with experimental observations indicate the developed model is capable of capturing the essential features of avascular tumor growth in various environments.

  17. Bioassay and Attributes of a Growth Factor Associated with Crown Gall Tumors 1

    PubMed Central

    Lippincott, Barbara B.; Lippincott, James A.

    1970-01-01

    An improved bioassay is described for a factor that promotes tumor growth which was first obtained from extracts of pinto bean leaves with crown gall tumors. Sixteen primary pinto bean leaves per sample are inoculated with sufficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens to initiate about 5 to 10 tumors per leaf and treated with tumor growth factor at day 3 after inoculation. The diameters of 30 to 48 round tumors (no more than 3 randomly selected per leaf) are measured per test sample at day 6. Mean tumor diameter increased linearly with the logarithm of the concentration of tumor growth factor applied. The tumor growth factor was separated by column chromatography from an ultraviolet light-absorbing compound previously reported to be associated with fractions having maximal tumor growth factor activity. Partly purified tumor growth factor showed no activity in a cytokinin bioassay or an auxin bioassay, and negligible activity in gibberellin bioassays. Representatives of these three classes of growth factors did not promote tumor growth. Extracts from crown gall tumors on primary pinto bean leaves, primary castor bean leaves, Bryophyllum leaves, carrot root slices, and tobacco stems showed tumor growth factor activity, whereas extracts from healthy control tissues did not. Extracts from actively growing parts of healthy pinto beans, Bryophyllum, and tobacco, however, showed tumor growth factor activity. Tumor growth factor is proposed to be a normal plant growth factor associated with rapidly growing tissues. Its synthesis may be activated in nongrowing tissues by infection with Agrobacterium sp. PMID:16657534

  18. Cancer Progression and Tumor Growth Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, Krastan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wilkerson, Julia; Sprinkhuizen, Sara; Song, Yi-Qiao; Bates, Susan; Rosen, Bruce; Fojo, Tito

    2013-03-01

    We present and analyze tumor growth data from prostate and brain cancer. Scaling the data from different patients shows that early stage prostate tumors show non-exponential growth while advanced prostate and brain tumors enter a stage of exponential growth. The scaling analysis points to the existence of cancer stem cells and/or massive apoptosis in early stage prostate cancer and that late stage cancer growth is not dominated by cancer stem cells. Statistical models of these two growth modes are discussed. Work supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health

  19. Tumor-Induced Hyperlipidemia Contributes to Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianfeng; Li, Lena; Lian, Jihong; Schauer, Silvia; Vesely, Paul W.; Kratky, Dagmar; Hoefler, Gerald; Lehner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Summary The known link between obesity and cancer suggests an important interaction between the host lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis. Here, we used a syngeneic tumor graft model to demonstrate that tumor development influences the host lipid metabolism. BCR-Abl-transformed precursor B cell tumors induced hyperlipidemia by stimulating very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) production and blunting VLDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turnover. To assess whether tumor progression was dependent on tumor-induced hyperlipidemia, we utilized the VLDL production-deficient mouse model, carboxylesterase3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/TGH) knockout mice. In Ces3/Tgh–/– tumor-bearing mice, plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels were attenuated. Importantly tumor weight was reduced in Ces3/Tgh–/– mice. Mechanistically, reduced tumor growth in Ces3/Tgh–/– mice was attributed to reversal of tumor-induced PCSK9-mediated degradation of hepatic LDLR and decrease of LDL turnover. Our data demonstrate that tumor-induced hyperlipidemia encompasses a feed-forward loop that reprograms hepatic lipoprotein homeostasis in part by providing LDL cholesterol to support tumor growth. PMID:27050512

  20. Tumor-Induced Hyperlipidemia Contributes to Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianfeng; Li, Lena; Lian, Jihong; Schauer, Silvia; Vesely, Paul W; Kratky, Dagmar; Hoefler, Gerald; Lehner, Richard

    2016-04-12

    The known link between obesity and cancer suggests an important interaction between the host lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis. Here, we used a syngeneic tumor graft model to demonstrate that tumor development influences the host lipid metabolism. BCR-Abl-transformed precursor B cell tumors induced hyperlipidemia by stimulating very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) production and blunting VLDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turnover. To assess whether tumor progression was dependent on tumor-induced hyperlipidemia, we utilized the VLDL production-deficient mouse model, carboxylesterase3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/TGH) knockout mice. In Ces3/Tgh(-/-) tumor-bearing mice, plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels were attenuated. Importantly tumor weight was reduced in Ces3/Tgh(-/-) mice. Mechanistically, reduced tumor growth in Ces3/Tgh(-/-) mice was attributed to reversal of tumor-induced PCSK9-mediated degradation of hepatic LDLR and decrease of LDL turnover. Our data demonstrate that tumor-induced hyperlipidemia encompasses a feed-forward loop that reprograms hepatic lipoprotein homeostasis in part by providing LDL cholesterol to support tumor growth. PMID:27050512

  1. Decorin: A Growth Factor Antagonist for Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A. H.; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is the best characterized member of the extracellular small leucine-rich proteoglycan family present in connective tissues, typically in association with or “decorating” collagen fibrils. It has substantial interest to clinical medicine owing to its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Studies on DCN knockout mice have established that a lack of DCN is permissive for tumor development and it is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. A reduced expression or a total disappearance of DCN has been reported to take place in various forms of human cancers during tumor progression. Furthermore, when used as a therapeutic molecule, DCN has been shown to inhibit tumor progression and metastases in experimental cancer models. DCN affects the biology of various types of cancer by targeting a number of crucial signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The active sites for the neutralization of different growth factors all reside in different parts of the DCN molecule. An emerging concept that multiple proteases, especially those produced by inflammatory cells, are capable of cleaving DCN suggests that native DCN could be inactivated in a number of pathological inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we review the role of DCN in cancer. PMID:26697491

  2. Inhibition of Vascularization in Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Sansone, B. Capogrosso

    2002-11-01

    The transition to a vascular phase is a prerequisite for fast tumor growth. During the avascular phase, the neoplasm feeds only from the (relatively few) existing nearby blood vessels. During angiogenesis, the number of capillaries surrounding and infiltrating the tumor increases dramatically. A model which includes physical and biological mechanisms of the interactions between the tumor and vascular growth describes the avascular-vascular transition. Numerical results agree with clinical observations and predict the influence of therapies aiming to inhibit the transition.

  3. Frizzled-7 promoter is highly active in tumors and promoter-driven Shiga-like toxin I inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yanyan; Qu, Lili; Li, Qiwen; Pang, Lu; Si, Jin; Li, Zhiyang

    2015-01-01

    Frizzled-7 protein plays a significant role in the formation of several malignant tumors. Up regulation of the Frizzled-7 in cancer cell lines is associated with nuclear accumulation of wild-type β-catenin from the Wnt/β-catenin pathway which is frequently activated in tumors. To analyze activity of the Frizzled-7 promoter in tumor cells, we constructed two recombinant plasmid vectors in which the Frizzled-7 promoter was used to drive the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Shiga-like toxin I (Stx1) (pFZD7-GFP/Stx1) genes. The Frizzled-7 protein was found to be expressed in the cancer cell lines but not in the normal cell lines. The GFP expression was restricted to the cancer cell lines and xenografts in the BALB/C mice but not to normal cell lines. Moreover, cell proliferation and tumor growth decreased significantly after transfection with the pFZD7-Stx1. Results from this study will help determine a highly effective strategy for gene therapy of tumors. PMID:26498690

  4. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy. PMID:26305547

  5. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy. PMID:26305547

  6. The Universal Dynamics of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Brú, Antonio; Albertos, Sonia; Luis Subiza, José; García-Asenjo, José López; Brú, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    Scaling techniques were used to analyze the fractal nature of colonies of 15 cell lines growing in vitro as well as of 16 types of tumor developing in vivo. All cell colonies were found to exhibit exactly the same growth dynamics—which correspond to the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) universality class. MBE dynamics are characterized by 1), a linear growth rate, 2), the constraint of cell proliferation to the colony/tumor border, and 3), surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. These characteristics were experimentally verified in the studied colonies. That these should show MBE dynamics is in strong contrast with the currently established concept of tumor growth: the kinetics of this type of proliferation rules out exponential or Gompertzian growth. Rather, a clear linear growth regime is followed. The importance of new cell movements—cell diffusion at the tumor border—lies in the fact that tumor growth must be conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and not for nutrients or other factors. Strong experimental evidence is presented for 16 types of tumor, the growth of which cell surface diffusion may be the main mechanism responsible in vivo. These results explain most of the clinical and biological features of colonies and tumors, offer new theoretical frameworks, and challenge the wisdom of some current clinical strategies. PMID:14581197

  7. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  8. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  9. Targeting of TGF-β-activated protein kinase 1 inhibits chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 expression, tumor growth and metastasis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Wen-Chun; Hou, Ming-Feng

    2015-01-01

    TGF-β-activated protein kinase 1 (TAK1) is a critical mediator in inflammation, immune response and cancer development. Our previous study demonstrated that activation of TAK1 increases the expression of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7) and promotes lymphatic invasion ability of breast cancer cells. However, the expression and association of activated TAK1 and CCR7 in breast tumor tissues is unknown and the therapeutic effect by targeting TAK1 is also unclear. We showed that activated TAK1 (as indicated by phospho-TAK1) and its binding protein TAB1 are strongly expressed in breast tumor tissues (77% and 74% respectively). In addition, increase of phospho-TAK1 or TAB1 is strongly associated with over-expression of CCR7. TAK1 inhibitor 5Z-7-Oxozeaenol (5Z-O) inhibited TAK1 activity, suppressed downstream signaling pathways including p38, IκB kinase (IKK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and reduced CCR7 expression in metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, 5Z-O repressed NF-κB- and c-JUN-mediated transcription of CCR7 gene. Knockdown of TAB1 attenuated CCR7 expression and tumor growth in an orthotopic animal study. More importantly, lymphatic invasion and lung metastasis were suppressed. Collectively, our results demonstrate that constitutive activation of TAK1 is frequently found in human breast cancer and this kinase is a potential therapeutic target for this cancer. PMID:25557171

  10. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-κB signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming; Wang, Chaoyuan; Su, Hanwen; Xiang, Meixian

    2013-06-15

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-κB p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-κB-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: • Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. • Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. • Gastrodin activates NF-κB activity in CD4 + T cells.

  11. The Role of Complement in Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Ruben; Corrales, Leticia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a central part of the immune system that has developed as a first defense against non-self cells. Neoplastic transformation is accompanied by an increased capacity of the malignant cells to activate complement. In fact, clinical data demonstrate complement activation in cancer patients. On the basis of the use of protective mechanisms by malignant cells, complement activation has traditionally been considered part of the body's immunosurveillance against cancer. Inhibitory mechanisms of complement activation allow cancer cells to escape from complement-mediated elimination and hamper the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody–based cancer immunotherapies. To overcome this limitation, many strategies have been developed with the goal of improving complement-mediated effector mechanisms. However, significant work in recent years has identified new and surprising roles for complement activation within the tumor microenvironment. Recent reports suggest that complement elements can promote tumor growth in the context of chronic inflammation. This chapter reviews the data describing the role of complement activation in cancer immunity, which offers insights that may aid the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to control cancer. PMID:24272362

  12. A Novel Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-3 Activator (Alda-89) Protects Submandibular Gland Function from Irradiation without Accelerating Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nan; Cao, Hongbin; Chen, Che-Hong; Kong, Christina S.; Ali, Rehan; Chan, Cato; Sirjani, Davud; Graves, Edward; Koong, Albert; Giaccia, Amato; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of Alda-89 (an ALDH3 activitor) on (1) the function of irradiated (RT) submandibular gland (SMG) in mice, (2) its toxicity profile and (3) its effect on the growth of head and neck cancer (HNC) in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design Adult mice were infused with Alda-89 or vehicle before, during and after RT. Saliva secretion was monitored weekly. Hematology, metabolic profile and post-mortem evaluation for toxicity were examined at the time of sacrifice. Alda-89 or vehicle was applied to HNC cell lines in vitro, and SCID mice transplanted with HNC in vivo with or without radiation; HNC growth was monitored. The ALDH3A1 and ALDH3A2 protein expression was evaluated in 89 HNC patients and correlated to freedom from relapse (FFR) and overall survival (OS). Results Alda-89 infusion significantly resulted in more whole saliva production and a higher percentage of preserved acini after RT compared to vehicle control. There was no difference in the complete blood count, metabolic profile, and major organ morphology between the Alda-89 and vehicle groups. Compared to vehicle control, Alda-89 treatment did not accelerate HNC cell proliferation in vitro, nor did it affect tumor growth in vivo with or without RT. Higher expression of ALDH3A1 or ALDH3A2 was not significantly associated with worse FFR or OS in either HPV-positive or HPV-negative group. Conclusion Alda-89 preserves salivary function after RT without affecting HNC growth or causing measurable toxicity in mice. It is a promising candidate to mitigate RT-related xerostomia. PMID:23812668

  13. Growth hormone activation of human monocytes for superoxide production but not tumor necrosis factor production, cell adherence, or action against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Warwick-Davies, J; Lowrie, D B; Cole, P J

    1995-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that growth hormone (GH) is a human macrophage-activating factor which primes monocytes for enhanced production of H2O2 in vitro. This report extends our observations to other monocyte functions relevant to infection. We find that GH also primes monocytes for O2- production, to a degree similar to the effect of gamma interferon. Neither macrophage-activating factor alone stimulates monocytes to release bioactive tumor necrosis factor. However, GH, unlike gamma interferon, does not synergize with endotoxin for enhanced tumor necrosis factor production. In further contrast, GH does not alter monocyte adherence or morphology, while phagocytosis and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by GH-treated monocytes are also unaffected. Therefore, despite the multiplicity of the effects of GH on the immune system in vivo, its effects on human monocytes in vitro appear to be limited to priming for the release of reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:7591064

  14. EGCG, a major green tea catechin suppresses breast tumor angiogenesis and growth via inhibiting the activation of HIF-1α and NFκB, and VEGF expression.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jian-Wei; Makey, Kristina L; Tucker, Kevan B; Chinchar, Edmund; Mao, Xiaowen; Pei, Ivy; Thomas, Emily Y; Miele, Lucio

    2013-01-01

    The role of EGCG, a major green tea catechin in breast cancer therapy is poorly understood. The present study tests the hypothesis that EGCG can inhibit the activation of HIF-1α and NFκB, and VEGF expression, thereby suppressing tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer progression. Sixteen eight-wk-old female mice (C57BL/6 J) were inoculated with 10^6 E0771 (mouse breast cancer) cells in the left fourth mammary gland fat pad. Eight mice received EGCG at 50-100 mg/kg/d in drinking water for 4 weeks. 8 control mice received drinking water only. Tumor size was monitored using dial calipers. At the end of the experiment, blood samples, tumors, heart and limb muscles were collected for measuring VEGF expression using ELISA and capillary density (CD) using CD31 immunohistochemistry. EGCG treatment significantly reduced tumor weight over the control (0.37 ± 0.15 vs. 1.16 ± 0.30 g; P < 0.01), tumor CD (109 ± 20 vs. 156 ± 12 capillary #/mm^2; P < 0.01), tumor VEGF expression (45.72 ± 1.4 vs. 59.03 ± 3.8 pg/mg; P < 0.01), respectively. But, it has no effects on the body weight, heart weight, angiogenesis and VEGF expression in the heart and skeletal muscle of mice. EGCG at 50 μg/ml significantly inhibited the activation of HIF-1α and NFκB as well as VEGF expression in cultured E0771 cells, compared to the control, respectively. These findings support the hypothesis that EGCG, a major green tea catechin, directly targets both tumor cells and tumor vasculature, thereby inhibiting tumor growth, proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis of breast cancer, which is mediated by the inhibition of HIF-1α and NFκB activation as well as VEGF expression. PMID:23638734

  15. EGCG, a major green tea catechin suppresses breast tumor angiogenesis and growth via inhibiting the activation of HIF-1α and NFκB, and VEGF expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The role of EGCG, a major green tea catechin in breast cancer therapy is poorly understood. The present study tests the hypothesis that EGCG can inhibit the activation of HIF-1α and NFκB, and VEGF expression, thereby suppressing tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer progression. Sixteen eight-wk-old female mice (C57BL/6 J) were inoculated with 10^6 E0771 (mouse breast cancer) cells in the left fourth mammary gland fat pad. Eight mice received EGCG at 50–100 mg/kg/d in drinking water for 4 weeks. 8 control mice received drinking water only. Tumor size was monitored using dial calipers. At the end of the experiment, blood samples, tumors, heart and limb muscles were collected for measuring VEGF expression using ELISA and capillary density (CD) using CD31 immunohistochemistry. EGCG treatment significantly reduced tumor weight over the control (0.37 ± 0.15 vs. 1.16 ± 0.30 g; P < 0.01), tumor CD (109 ± 20 vs. 156 ± 12 capillary #/mm^2; P < 0.01), tumor VEGF expression (45.72 ± 1.4 vs. 59.03 ± 3.8 pg/mg; P < 0.01), respectively. But, it has no effects on the body weight, heart weight, angiogenesis and VEGF expression in the heart and skeletal muscle of mice. EGCG at 50 μg/ml significantly inhibited the activation of HIF-1α and NFκB as well as VEGF expression in cultured E0771 cells, compared to the control, respectively. These findings support the hypothesis that EGCG, a major green tea catechin, directly targets both tumor cells and tumor vasculature, thereby inhibiting tumor growth, proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis of breast cancer, which is mediated by the inhibition of HIF-1α and NFκB activation as well as VEGF expression. PMID:23638734

  16. The pro-oxidant buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) reduces tumor growth of implanted Lewis lung carcinoma in mice associated with increased protein carbonyl, tubulin abundance, and aminopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Carmona-Cortés, Javier; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Vargas-Tendero, Pablo; Banegas, Inmaculada; Quesada, Andrés; García-Lora, Angel M; Vargas, Félix

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the pro-oxidant buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and of the interaction between BSO and TETRAC, an antagonist of αvß3 integrin, on tumor development and aminopeptidase (AP) activity in a murine model of implanted Lewis's carcinoma. Male CBA-C57 mice were untreated (controls) or treated with BSO (222 mg/100 mL in drinking water), TETRAC (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.), or BSO + TETRAC. BSO for 28 days and TETRAC were given for the last 20 days. Mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 1 × 10(6) Lewis carcinoma 3LL cells into the dorsum. Study variables were tumor weight (TW); Hb, as index of tumor-mediated angiogenesis; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein abundance; protein carbonyl content; α-tubulin abundance; and GluAp, AlaAp, and AspAp activities. BSO produced a major decrease in TW (203 ± 18 mg) with respect to controls (365 ± 26) and a reduction in Hb content. The TETRAC group also showed marked reductions in TW (129 ± 15) and Hb concentration associated with a reduced VEGF content. The BSO + TETRAC group showed a major TW reduction (125 ± 13); although, the difference with the TETRAC group was not significant. BSO treatment increased protein carbonyl and tubulin abundance in comparison to controls. The activity of all APs was increased in the three experimental groups and was strongly and negatively correlated with TW. In conclusion, administration of BSO reduced the TW, which inversely correlated with protein carbonyl content, suggesting a loss of microtubule polymerization. The finding of a negative correlation between TW and AP activity opens up new perspectives for the study of APs as tumor growth modulators. PMID:24816945

  17. Myoglobin tames tumor growth and spread.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Dang, Chi V

    2009-04-01

    Tumor growth is accompanied by tissue hypoxia, but does this reduced oxygen availability promote further tumor expansion, resulting in a vicious cycle? In this issue of the JCI, Galluzzo et al. report that increasing oxygen tension in tumor cells by ectopically expressing the oxygen-binding hemoprotein myoglobin indeed affects tumorigenesis (see the related article beginning on page 865). Tumors derived from cells transfected with myoglobin grew more slowly, were less hypoxic, and were less metastatic. These results will spur further mechanistic inquiry into the role of hypoxia in tumor expansion. PMID:19348046

  18. Simulating tumor growth in confined heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevertz, Jana L.; Gillies, George T.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-09-01

    The holy grail of computational tumor modeling is to develop a simulation tool that can be utilized in the clinic to predict neoplastic progression and propose individualized optimal treatment strategies. In order to develop such a predictive model, one must account for many of the complex processes involved in tumor growth. One interaction that has not been incorporated into computational models of neoplastic progression is the impact that organ-imposed physical confinement and heterogeneity have on tumor growth. For this reason, we have taken a cellular automaton algorithm that was originally designed to simulate spherically symmetric tumor growth and generalized the algorithm to incorporate the effects of tissue shape and structure. We show that models that do not account for organ/tissue geometry and topology lead to false conclusions about tumor spread, shape and size. The impact that confinement has on tumor growth is more pronounced when a neoplasm is growing close to, versus far from, the confining boundary. Thus, any clinical simulation tool of cancer progression must not only consider the shape and structure of the organ in which a tumor is growing, but must also consider the location of the tumor within the organ if it is to accurately predict neoplastic growth dynamics.

  19. Growth Factor–dependent Activation of αvβ3 Integrin in Normal Epithelial Cells: Implications for Tumor Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Trusolino, Livio; Serini, Guido; Cecchini, Germana; Besati, Cristina; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Marchisio, Pier Carlo; De Filippi, Rosaria

    1998-01-01

    Integrin activation is a multifaceted phenomenon leading to increased affinity and avidity for matrix ligands. To investigate whether cytokines produced during stromal infiltration of carcinoma cells activate nonfunctional epithelial integrins, a cellular system of human thyroid clones derived from normal glands (HTU-5) and papillary carcinomas (HTU-34) was employed. In HTU-5 cells, αvβ3 integrin was diffused all over the membrane, disconnected from the cytoskeleton, and unable to mediate adhesion. Conversely, in HTU-34 cells, αvβ3 was clustered at focal contacts (FCs) and mediated firm attachment and spreading. αvβ3 recruitment at FCs and ligand-binding activity, essentially identical to those of HTU-34, occurred in HTU-5 cells upon treatment with hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). The HTU-34 clone secreted HGF/SF and its receptor was constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated suggesting an autocrine loop responsible for αvβ3 activated state. Antibody-mediated inhibition of HGF/SF function in HTU-34 cells disrupted αvβ3 enrichment at FCs and impaired adhesion. Accordingly, activation of αvβ3 in normal cells was produced by HTU-34 conditioned medium on the basis of its content of HGF/SF. These results provide the first example of a growth factor–driven integrin activation mechanism in normal epithelial cells and uncover the importance of cytokine-based autocrine loops for the physiological control of integrin activation. PMID:9722624

  20. Reversible LSD1 inhibition interferes with global EWS/ETS transcriptional activity and impedes Ewing sarcoma tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Savita; Theisen, Emily R.; Bearss, Jared; Mulvihill, Timothy; Hoffman, Laura M.; Sorna, Venkataswamy; Beckerle, Mary C.; Sharma, Sunil; Lessnick, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ewing sarcoma is a pediatric bone tumor which absolutely relies on the transcriptional activity of the EWS/ETS family of fusion oncoproteins. While the most common fusion, EWS/FLI, utilizes lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) to repress critical tumor suppressors, small molecule blockade of LSD1 has not yet been thoroughly explored as a therapeutic approach for Ewing sarcoma. We therefore evaluated the translational potential of potent and specific LSD1 inhibition with HCI2509 on the transcriptional program of both EWS/FLI and EWS/ERG as well as the downstream oncogenic phenotypes driven by EWS/ETS fusions in both in vitro and in vivo models of Ewing sarcoma. Experimental Design RNA-seq was used to compare the transcriptional profiles of EWS/FLI, EWS/ERG, and treatment with HCI-2509 in both EWS/FLI and EWS/ERG containing cell lines. We then evaluated morphological phenotypes of treated cells with immunofluorescence. The induction of apoptosis was evaluated using caspase 3/7 activation and TUNEL staining. Colony forming assays were used to test oncogenic transformation and xenograft studies with patient-derived cell lines were used to evaluate the effects of HCI-2509 on tumorigenesis. Results HCI2509 caused a dramatic reversal of both the up- and down-regulated transcriptional profiles of EWS/FLI and EWS/ERG accompanied by the induction of apoptosis, and disruption of morphological and oncogenic phenotypes modulated by EWS/FLI. Importantly, HCI2509 displayed single-agent efficacy in multiple xenograft models. Conclusions These data support epigenetic modulation with HCI2509 as a therapeutic strategy for Ewing sarcoma, and highlight a critical dual role for LSD1 in the oncogenic transcriptional activity of EWS/ETS proteins. PMID:24963049

  1. Fluence Rate Differences in Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy and Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor after Treatment of the Tumor-Involved Murine Thoracic Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Craig E.; Carter, Shirron L.; Czupryna, Julie; Wang, Le; Putt, Mary E.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the thoracic cavity can be performed in conjunction with surgery to treat cancers of the lung and its pleura. However, illumination of the cavity results in tissue exposure to a broad range of fluence rates. In a murine model of intrathoracic PDT, we studied the efficacy of 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH; Photochlor®)-mediated PDT in reducing the burden of non-small cell lung cancer for treatments performed at different incident fluence rates (75 versus 150 mW/cm). To better understand a role for growth factor signaling in disease progression after intrathoracic PDT, the expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was evaluated in areas of post-treatment proliferation. The low fluence rate of 75 mW/cm produced the largest reductions in tumor burden. Bioluminescent imaging and histological staining for cell proliferation (anti-Ki-67) identified areas of disease progression at both fluence rates after PDT. However, increased EGFR activation in proliferative areas was detected only after treatment at the higher fluence rate of 150 mW/cm. These data suggest that fluence rate may affect the activation of survival factors, such as EGFR, and weaker activation at lower fluence rate could contribute to a smaller tumor burden after PDT at 75 mW/cm. PMID:26784170

  2. Tumor growth in a defined microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Christofferson, R H; Sköldenberg, E G; Nilsson, B O

    1997-06-01

    The fate of human tumor cells deposited in rat uteri was investigated by light microscopy of histological sections, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy of microvascular corrosion casts. The human colonic tumor cell line LS 174 T was used as graft since it can be detected by CEA immunohistochemistry, and spayed nude rats (PVG rnu/rnu) were used as hosts, subjected to different hormonal regimens (no exogenous hormones, medroxyprogesterone acetate, 17-beta-estradiol, or the last two regimens in combination). Intrauterine deposition of a suspension of 2 x 10(6) tumor cells resulted in tumor take in 72% (21/29) of the nude rats. Endometrial growth was verified in only three animals (14%, 3/21). Extraendometrial growth, however, was found in all animals with tumor take. These observations suggest that the endometrium is comparatively resistant to growth of xenografted human colonic tumor cells. The tumor microcirculation consisted of new vessels, giving morphological evidence that tumor growth is dependent on angiogenesis and not on invasion of preexisting vessels. PMID:9236867

  3. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  4. ROLE OF CHEMOKINES IN TUMOR GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Baugher, Paige J.; Thu, Yee Mon; Richmond, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines play a paramount role in the tumor progression. Chronic inflammation promotes tumor formation. Both tumor cells and stromal cells elaborate chemokines and cytokines. These act either by autocrine or paracrine mechanisms to sustain tumor cell growth, induce angiogenesis and facilitate evasion of immune surveillance through immunoediting. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 and its ligands promote tumor angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration into the tumor microenvironment. In harsh acidic and hypoxic microenvironmental conditions tumor cells up-regulate their expression of CXCR4, which equips them to migrate up a gradient of CXCL12 elaborated by carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to a normoxic microenvironment. The CXCL12-CXCR4 axis facilitates metastasis to distant organs and the CCL21-CCR7 chemokine ligand-receptor pair favors metastasis to lymph nodes. These two chemokine ligand-receptor systems are common key mediators of tumor cell metastasis for several malignancies and as such provide key targets for chemotherapy. In this paper, the role of specific chemokines/chemokine receptor interactions in tumor progression, growth and metastasis and the role of chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions in the stromal compartment as related to angiogenesis, metastasis, and immune response to the tumor are reviewed. PMID:17629396

  5. Thymidine Phosphorylase is Angiogenic and Promotes Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Amir; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Fan, Tai-Ping D.; Hu, De-En; Lees, Vivien C.; Turley, Helen; Fox, Stephen B.; Gatter, Kevin C.; Harris, Adrian L.; Bicknell, Roy

    1995-02-01

    Platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor was previously identified as the sole angiogenic activity present in platelets; it is now known to be thymidine phosphorylase (TP). The effect of TP on [methyl-^3H]thymidine uptake does not arise from de novo DNA synthesis and the molecule is not a growth factor. Despite this, TP is strongly angiogenic in a rat sponge and freeze-injured skin graft model. Neutralizing antibodies and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that the enzyme activity of TP is a condition for its angiogenic activity. The level of TP was found to be elevated in human breast tumors compared to normal breast tissue (P < 0.001). Overexpression of TP in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells had no effect on growth in vitro but markedly enhanced tumor growth in vivo. These data and the correlation of expression in tumors with malignancy identify TP as a target for antitumor strategies.

  6. Motif mimetic of epsin perturbs tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yunzhou; Wu, Hao; Rahman, H.N. Ashiqur; Liu, Yanjun; Pasula, Satish; Tessneer, Kandice L.; Cai, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiaolei; Chang, Baojun; McManus, John; Hahn, Scott; Dong, Jiali; Brophy, Megan L.; Yu, Lili; Song, Kai; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Saunders, Debra; Njoku, Charity; Song, Hoogeun; Mehta-D’Souza, Padmaja; Towner, Rheal; Lupu, Florea; McEver, Rodger P.; Xia, Lijun; Boerboom, Derek; Srinivasan, R. Sathish; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical for cancer progression. In multiple murine models, endothelium-specific epsin deficiency abrogates tumor progression by shifting the balance of VEGFR2 signaling toward uncontrolled tumor angiogenesis, resulting in dysfunctional tumor vasculature. Here, we designed a tumor endothelium–targeting chimeric peptide (UPI) for the purpose of inhibiting endogenous tumor endothelial epsins by competitively binding activated VEGFR2. We determined that the UPI peptide specifically targets tumor endothelial VEGFR2 through an unconventional binding mechanism that is driven by unique residues present only in the epsin ubiquitin–interacting motif (UIM) and the VEGFR2 kinase domain. In murine models of neoangiogenesis, UPI peptide increased VEGF-driven angiogenesis and neovascularization but spared quiescent vascular beds. Further, in tumor-bearing mice, UPI peptide markedly impaired functional tumor angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis, resulting in a notable increase in survival. Coadministration of UPI peptide with cytotoxic chemotherapeutics further sustained tumor inhibition. Equipped with localized tumor endothelium–specific targeting, our UPI peptide provides potential for an effective and alternative cancer therapy. PMID:26571402

  7. Panaxydol, a component of Panax ginseng, induces apoptosis in cancer cells through EGFR activation and ER stress and inhibits tumor growth in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Suk; Lim, Jang Mi; Kim, Joo Young; Kim, Yongjin; Park, Serkin; Sohn, Jeongwon

    2016-03-15

    We reported previously that panaxydol, a component of Panax ginseng roots, induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis preferentially in transformed cells. This study demonstrates that EGFR activation and the resulting ER stress mediate panaxydol-induced apoptosis, and that panaxydol suppresses in vivo tumor growth in syngeneic and xenogeneic mouse tumor models. In addition, we elucidated that CaMKII and TGF-β-activated kinase (TAK1) participate in p38/JNK activation by elevated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c). In MCF-7 cells, EGFR was activated immediately after exposure to panaxydol, and this activation was necessary for induction of apoptosis, suggesting that panaxydol might be a promising anticancer candidate, especially for EGFR-addicted cancer. Activation of PLCγ followed EGFR activation, resulting in Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via inositol triphosphate and ryanodine receptors. ER Ca(2+) release triggered mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake indirectly through oxidative stress and ensuing ER stress. Elevated [Ca(2+)]c triggered sequential activation of calmodulin/CaMKII, TAK1 and p38/JNK. As shown previously, p38 and JNK activate NADPH oxidase. Here, it was shown that the resulting oxidative stress triggered ER stress. Among the three signaling branches of the unfolded protein response, protein kinase R-like ER kinase (PERK), but not inositol-requiring enzyme 1 or activating transcription factor 6, played a role in transmitting the apoptosis signal. PERK induced C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and CHOP elevated Bim expression, initiating mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and apoptosis. In summary, we identified roles of EGFR, the CAMKII-TAK1-p38/JNK pathway, and ER stress in panaxydol-induced apoptosis and demonstrated the in vivo anticancer effect of panaxydol. PMID:26421996

  8. Ontogenetic growth of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, C. A.; Menchón, S. A.

    2006-11-01

    In ontogenetic growth models, the basal metabolic rate is usually assumed to depend on the individual mass following a power law. Here it is shown that, in the case of multicellular tumor spheroids, the emergence of a necrotic core invalidates this assumption. The implications of this result for spheroid growth are discussed, and a procedure to determine the growth parameters using macroscopic measurements is proposed.

  9. Inhibition of COP9-signalosome (CSN) deneddylating activity and tumor growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas by doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Pulvino, Mary; Chen, Luojing; Oleksyn, David; Li, Jing; Compitello, George; Rossi, Randy; Spence, Stephen; Balakrishnan, Vijaya; Jordan, Craig; Poligone, Brian; Casulo, Carla; Burack, Richard; Shapiro, Joel L.; Bernstein, Steven; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Deshaies, Raymond J.; Land, Hartmut; Zhao, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    In searching for small-molecule compounds that inhibit proliferation and survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells and may, therefore, be exploited as potential therapeutic agents for this disease, we identified the commonly used and well-tolerated antibiotic doxycycline as a strong candidate. Here, we demonstrate that doxycycline inhibits the growth of DLBCL cells both in vitro and in mouse xenograft models. In addition, we show that doxycycline accumulates in DLBCL cells to high concentrations and affects multiple signaling pathways that are crucial for lymphomagenesis. Our data reveal the deneddylating activity of COP-9 signalosome (CSN) as a novel target of doxycycline and suggest that doxycycline may exert its effects in DLBCL cells in part through a CSN5-HSP90 pathway. Consistently, knockdown of CSN5 exhibited similar effects as doxycycline treatment on DLBCL cell survival and HSP90 chaperone function. In addition to DLBCL cells, doxycycline inhibited growth of several other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells in vitro. Together, our results suggest that doxycycline may represent a promising therapeutic agent for DLBCL and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas subtypes. PMID:26142707

  10. Powerful anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity of a new anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 peptide in colorectal cancer models.

    PubMed

    Cicatiello, Valeria; Apicella, Ivana; Tudisco, Laura; Tarallo, Valeria; Formisano, Luigi; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Kim, Younghee; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Orlandi, Augusto; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Ruvo, Menotti; Bianco, Roberto; De Falco, Sandro

    2015-04-30

    To assess the therapeutic outcome of selective block of VEGFR1, we have evaluated the activity of a new specific antagonist of VEGFR1, named iVR1 (inhibitor of VEGFR1), in syngenic and xenograft colorectal cancer models, in an artificial model of metastatization, and in laser-induced choroid neovascularization. iVR1 inhibited tumor growth and neoangiogenesis in both models of colorectal cancer, with an extent similar to that of bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody anti-VEGF-A. It potently inhibited VEGFR1 phosphorylation in vivo, determining a strong inhibition of the recruitment of monocyte-macrophages and of mural cells as confirmed, in vitro, by the ability to inhibit macrophages migration. iVR1 was able to synergize with irinotecan determining a shrinkage of tumors that became undetectable after three weeks of combined treatment. Such treatment induced a significant prolongation of survival similar to that observed with bevacizumab and irinotecan combination. iVR1 also fully prevented lung invasion by HCT-116 cells injected in mouse tail vein. Also, iVR1 impressively inhibited choroid neovascularization after a single intravitreal injection. Collectively, data showed the strong potential of iVR1 peptide as a new anti-tumor and anti-metastatic agent and demonstrate the high flexibility of VEGFR1 antagonists as therapeutic anti-angiogenic agents in different pathological contexts. PMID:25868854

  11. Blood porphyrin luminescence and tumor growth correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrol, Lilia Coronato; Silva, Flávia Rodrigues de Oliveira; Bellini, Maria Helena; Mansano, Ronaldo Domingues; Schor, Nestor; Vieira, Nilson Dias, Jr.

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescence technique appears very important for the diagnosis of cancer. Fluorescence detection has advantages over other light-based investigation methods: high sensitivity, high speed, and safety. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3% of new cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. Unfortunately many RCC masses remain asymptomatic and nonpalpable until they are advanced. Diagnosis and localization of early carcinoma play an important role in the prevention and curative treatment of RCC. Certain drugs or chemicals such as porphyrin derivatives accumulate substantially more in tumors than normal tissues. The autofluorescence of blood porphyrin of healthy and tumor induced male SCID mice was analyzed using fluorescence and excitation spectroscopy. A significant contrast between normal and tumor blood could be established. Blood porphyrin fluorophore showed enhanced fluorescence band (around 630 nm) in function of the tumor growth. This indicates that either the autofluorescence intensity of the blood fluorescence may provide a good parameter for the "first approximation" characterization of the tumor stage.

  12. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Lim; Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-03-30

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (1-5 μg/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-κB inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25730901

  13. Targeting activating mutations of EZH2 leads to potent cell growth inhibition in human melanoma by derepression of tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Tiffen, Jessamy C.; Gunatilake, Dilini; Gallagher, Stuart J.; Gowrishankar, Kavitha; Heinemann, Anja; Cullinane, Carleen; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Pupo, Gulietta M.; Strbenac, Dario; Yang, Jean Y.; Madore, Jason; Mann, Graham J.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; McArthur, Grant A.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Hersey, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic modifier EZH2 is part of the polycomb repressive complex that suppresses gene expression via histone methylation. Activating mutations in EZH2 are found in a subset of melanoma that contributes to disease progression by inactivating tumor suppressor genes. In this study we have targeted EZH2 with a specific inhibitor (GSK126) or depleted EZH2 protein by stable shRNA knockdown. We show that inhibition of EZH2 has potent effects on the growth of both wild-type and EZH2 mutant human melanoma in vitro particularly in cell lines harboring the EZH2Y646 activating mutation. This was associated with cell cycle arrest, reduced proliferative capacity in both 2D and 3D culture systems, and induction of apoptosis. The latter was caspase independent and mediated by the release of apoptosis inducing factor (AIFM1) from mitochondria. Gene expression arrays showed that several well characterized tumor suppressor genes were reactivated by EZH2 inhibition. This included activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) that was validated as an EZH2 target gene by ChIP-qPCR. These results emphasize a critical role for EZH2 in the proliferation and viability of melanoma and highlight the potential for targeted therapy against EZH2 in treatment of patients with melanoma. PMID:26304929

  14. Heparanase 2 Attenuates Head and Neck Tumor Vascularity and Growth.

    PubMed

    Gross-Cohen, Miriam; Feld, Sari; Doweck, Ilana; Neufeld, Gera; Hasson, Peleg; Arvatz, Gil; Barash, Uri; Naroditsky, Inna; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2016-05-01

    The endoglycosidase heparanase specifically cleaves the heparan sulfate (HS) side chains on proteoglycans, an activity that has been implicated strongly in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Heparanase-2 (Hpa2) is a close homolog of heparanase that lacks intrinsic HS-degrading activity but retains the capacity to bind HS with high affinity. In head and neck cancer patients, Hpa2 expression was markedly elevated, correlating with prolonged time to disease recurrence and inversely correlating with tumor cell dissemination to regional lymph nodes, suggesting that Hpa2 functions as a tumor suppressor. The molecular mechanism associated with favorable prognosis following Hpa2 induction is unclear. Here we provide evidence that Hpa2 overexpression in head and neck cancer cells markedly reduces tumor growth. Restrained tumor growth was associated with a prominent decrease in tumor vascularity (blood and lymph vessels), likely due to reduced Id1 expression, a transcription factor highly implicated in VEGF-A and VEGF-C gene regulation. We also noted that tumors produced by Hpa2-overexpressing cells are abundantly decorated with stromal cells and collagen deposition, correlating with a marked increase in lysyl oxidase expression. Notably, heparanase enzymatic activity was unimpaired in cells overexpressing Hpa2, suggesting that reduced tumor growth is not caused by heparanase regulation. Moreover, growth of tumor xenografts by Hpa2-overexpressing cells was unaffected by administration of a mAb that targets the heparin-binding domain of Hpa2, implying that Hpa2 function does not rely on heparanase or heparan sulfate. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2791-801. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27013193

  15. The Tumor Suppressor Activity of the Transmembrane Protein with Epidermal Growth Factor and Two Follistatin Motifs 2 (TMEFF2) Correlates with Its Ability to Modulate Sarcosine Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaofei; Overcash, Ryan; Green, Thomas; Hoffman, Donald; Asch, Adam S.; Ruiz-Echevarría, Maria J.

    2011-01-01

    The type I transmembrane protein with epidermal growth factor and two follistatin motifs 2 (TMEFF2) is expressed in brain and prostate and overexpressed in prostate cancer, but its role in this disease is unclear. Several studies have suggested that TMEFF2 plays a role in suppressing the growth and invasive potential of human cancer cells, whereas others suggest that the shed portion of TMEFF2, which lacks the cytoplasmic region, has a growth-promoting activity. Here we show that TMEFF2 has a dual mode of action. Ectopic expression of wild-type full-length TMEFF2 inhibits soft agar colony formation, cellular invasion, and migration and increases cellular sensitivity to apoptosis. However, expression of the ectodomain portion of TMEFF2 increases cell proliferation. Using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identify sarcosine dehydrogenase (SARDH), the enzyme that converts sarcosine to glycine, as a TMEFF2-interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analysis confirms the interaction of SARDH with full-length TMEFF2. The ectodomain does not bind to SARDH. Moreover, expression of the full-length TMEFF2 but not the ectodomain results in a decreased level of sarcosine in the cells. These results suggest that the tumor suppressor activity of TMEFF2 requires the cytoplasmic/transmembrane portion of the protein and correlates with its ability to bind to SARDH and to modulate the level of sarcosine. PMID:21393249

  16. Effects of anatomical constraints on tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capogrosso Sansone, B.; Delsanto, P. P.; Magnano, M.; Scalerandi, M.

    2001-08-01

    Competition for available nutrients and the presence of anatomical barriers are major determinants of tumor growth in vivo. We extend a model recently proposed to simulate the growth of neoplasms in real tissues to include geometrical constraints mimicking pressure effects on the tumor surface induced by the presence of rigid or semirigid structures. Different tissues have different diffusivities for nutrients and cells. Despite the simplicity of the approach, based on a few inherently local mechanisms, the numerical results agree qualitatively with clinical data (computed tomography scans of neoplasms) for the larynx and the oral cavity.

  17. EGCG Inhibits Proliferation, Invasiveness and Tumor Growth by Up-Regulation of Adhesion Molecules, Suppression of Gelatinases Activity, and Induction of Apoptosis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chih-Yeu; Wu, Chung-Chun; Hsu, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Hsin-Ying; Huang, Sheng-Yen; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Chang, Yao; Tsao, George Sai-Wah; Chen, Chi-Long; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2015-01-01

    (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major green tea polyphenol, has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells. Epidemiological studies have shown that drinking green tea can reduce the incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), yet the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In this study, the inhibitory effect of EGCG was tested on a set of Epstein Barr virus-negative and -positive NPC cell lines. Treatment with EGCG inhibited the proliferation of NPC cells but did not affect the growth of a non-malignant nasopharyngeal cell line, NP460hTert. Moreover, EGCG treated cells had reduced migration and invasive properties. The expression of the cell adhesion molecules E-cadherin and β-catenin was found to be up-regulated by EGCG treatment, while the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were found to be mediated by suppression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and AP-1 and Sp1 transactivation. Spheroid formation by NPC cells in suspension was significantly inhibited by EGCG. Oral administration of EGCG was capable of suppressing tumor growth in xenografted mice bearing NPC tumors. Treatment with EGCG was found to elevate the expression of p53 and p21, and eventually led to apoptosis of NPC cells via caspase 3 activation. The nuclear translocation of NF-κB and β-catenin was also suppressed by EGCG treatment. These results indicate that EGCG can inhibit the proliferation and invasiveness, and induce apoptosis, of NPC cells, making it a promising agent for chemoprevention or adjuvant therapy of NPC. PMID:25625511

  18. Ascorbate as a Co-Factor for Fe- and 2-Oxoglutarate Dependent Dioxygenases: Physiological Activity in Tumor Growth and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Caroline; Vissers, Margreet C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Ascorbate is a specific co-factor for a large family of enzymes known as the Fe- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are found throughout biology and catalyze the addition of a hydroxyl group to various substrates. The proline hydroxylase that is involved in collagen maturation is well known, but in recent times many new enzymes and functions have been uncovered, including those involved in epigenetic control and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) regulation. These discoveries have provided crucial mechanistic insights into how ascorbate may affect tumor biology. In particular, there is growing evidence that HIF-1-dependent tumor progression may be inhibited by increasing tumor ascorbate levels. However, rigorous clinical intervention studies are lacking. This review will explore the physiological role of ascorbate as an enzyme co-factor and how this mechanism relates to cancer biology and treatment. The use of ascorbate in cancer should be informed by clinical studies based on such mechanistic hypotheses. PMID:25540771

  19. Blocking Wnt signaling by SFRP-like molecules inhibits in vivo cell proliferation and tumor growth in cells carrying active β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Elise; Hendaoui, Ismaïl; Coulouarn, Cédric; Ribault, Catherine; Leseur, Julie; Eliat, Pierre-Antoine; Mebarki, Sihem; Corlu, Anne; Clément, Bruno; Musso, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer results from mutations in pathway components, which frequently coexist with autocrine Wnt signaling or epigenetic silencing of extracellular Wnt antagonists. Among the extracellular Wnt inhibitors, the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are decoy receptors that contain soluble Wnt-binding frizzled domains. In addition to SFRPs, other endogenous molecules harboring frizzled motifs bind to and inhibit Wnt signaling. One of such molecules is V3Nter, a soluble SFRP-like frizzled polypeptide that binds to Wnt3a and inhibits Wnt signaling and expression of the β-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and c-myc. V3Nter is derived from the cell surface extracellular matrix component collagen XVIII. Here, we used HCT116 human colon cancer cells carrying the ΔS45 activating mutation in one of the alleles of β-catenin to show that V3Nter and SFRP-1 decrease baseline and Wnt3a-induced β-catenin stabilization. Consequently, V3Nter reduces the growth of human colorectal cancer xenografts by specifically controlling cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, without affecting angiogenesis or apoptosis, as shown by decreased [3H] thymidine (in vitro) or BrdU (in vivo) incorporation, clonogenesis assays, cell cycle analysis and magnetic resonance imaging in living mice. Additionally, V3Nter switches off the β-catenin target gene expression signature in vivo. Moreover, experiments with β-catenin allele-targeted cells showed that the ΔS45 β-catenin allele hampers, but does not abrogate inhibition of Wnt signaling by SFRP-1 or by the SFRP-like frizzled domain. Finally, neither SFRP-1 nor V3Nter affect β-catenin signaling in SW480 cells carrying non functional APC. Thus, SFRP-1 and the SFRP-like molecule V3Nter can inhibit tumor growth of β-catenin-activated tumor cells in vivo. PMID:20856206

  20. Blocking Wnt signaling by SFRP-like molecules inhibits in vivo cell proliferation and tumor growth in cells carrying active β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, E; Hendaoui, I; Coulouarn, C; Ribault, C; Leseur, J; Eliat, P-A; Mebarki, S; Corlu, A; Clément, B; Musso, O

    2011-01-27

    Constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer results from mutations in pathway components, which frequently coexist with autocrine Wnt signaling or epigenetic silencing of extracellular Wnt antagonists. Among the extracellular Wnt inhibitors, the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are decoy receptors that contain soluble Wnt-binding frizzled domains. In addition to SFRPs, other endogenous molecules harboring frizzled motifs bind to and inhibit Wnt signaling. One of such molecules is V3Nter, a soluble SFRP-like frizzled polypeptide that binds to Wnt3a and inhibits Wnt signaling and expression of the β-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and c-myc. V3Nter is derived from the cell surface extracellular matrix component collagen XVIII. Here, we used HCT116 human colon cancer cells carrying the ΔS45 activating mutation in one of the alleles of β-catenin to show that V3Nter and SFRP-1 decrease baseline and Wnt3a-induced β-catenin stabilization. Consequently, V3Nter reduces the growth of human colorectal cancer xenografts by specifically controlling cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, without affecting angiogenesis or apoptosis, as shown by decreased [(3)H]-thymidine (in vitro) or BrdU (in vivo) incorporation, clonogenesis assays, cell cycle analysis and magnetic resonance imaging in living mice. Additionally, V3Nter switches off the β-catenin target gene expression signature in vivo. Moreover, experiments with β-catenin allele-targeted cells showed that the ΔS45 β-catenin allele hampers, but does not abrogate, inhibition of Wnt signaling by SFRP-1 or by the SFRP-like frizzled domain. Finally, neither SFRP-1 nor V3Nter affect β-catenin signaling in SW480 cells carrying nonfunctional Adenomatous polyposis coli. Thus, SFRP-1 and the SFRP-like molecule V3Nter can inhibit tumor growth of β-catenin-activated tumor cells in vivo. PMID:20856206

  1. Heparanase-neutralizing antibodies attenuate lymphoma tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, Marina; Arvatz, Gil; Horowitz, Netanel; Feld, Sari; Naroditsky, Inna; Zhang, Yi; Ng, Mary; Hammond, Edward; Nevo, Eviatar; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans, resulting in disassembly of the extracellular matrix underlying endothelial and epithelial cells and associating with enhanced cell invasion and metastasis. Heparanase expression is induced in carcinomas and sarcomas, often associating with enhanced tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. In contrast, the function of heparanase in hematological malignancies (except myeloma) was not investigated in depth. Here, we provide evidence that heparanase is expressed by human follicular and diffused non-Hodgkin's B-lymphomas, and that heparanase inhibitors restrain the growth of tumor xenografts produced by lymphoma cell lines. Furthermore, we describe, for the first time to our knowledge, the development and characterization of heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that inhibit cell invasion and tumor metastasis, the hallmark of heparanase activity. Using luciferase-labeled Raji lymphoma cells, we show that the heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies profoundly inhibit tumor load in the mouse bones, associating with reduced cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Notably, we found that Raji cells lack intrinsic heparanase activity, but tumor xenografts produced by this cell line exhibit typical heparanase activity, likely contributed by host cells composing the tumor microenvironment. Thus, the neutralizing monoclonal antibodies attenuate lymphoma growth by targeting heparanase in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26729870

  2. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Santagiuliana, R; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, B A

    2015-01-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution. PMID:25427284

  3. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Santagiuliana, R.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution.

  4. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors. PMID:19845874

  5. Neuropilin-1 stimulates tumor growth by increasing fibronectin fibril assembly in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Yaqoob, Usman; Cao, Sheng; Shergill, Uday; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Geng, Zhimin; Yin, Meng; de Assuncao, Thiago M; Cao, Ying; Szabolcs, Anna; Thorgeirsson, Snorri; Schwartz, Martin; Yang, Ju Dong; Ehman, Richard; Roberts, Lewis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Shah, Vijay H.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal myofibroblasts and associated matrix proteins, regulates cancer cell invasion and proliferation. Here we report that neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) orchestrates communications between myofibroblasts and soluble fibronectin (FN) that promote α5β1 integrin-dependent FN fibril assembly, matrix stiffness, and tumor growth. Tumor growth and FN fibril assembly was reduced by genetic depletion or antibody neutralization of NRP-1 from stromal myofibroblasts in vivo. Mechanistically, the increase in FN fibril assembly required glycosylation of serine 612 of the extracellular domain of NRP-1, an intact intracellular NRP-1 SEA domain, and intracellular associations between NRP-1, the scaffold protein GIPC, and the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl, that augmented α5β1 FN fibril assembly activity. Analysis of human cancer specimens established an association between tumoral NRP-1 levels and clinical outcome. Our findings indicate that NRP-1 activates the tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting tumor growth. These results not only identify new molecular mechanisms of FN fibril assembly but also have important implications for therapeutic targeting of the myofibroblast in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22738912

  6. The DEK oncogene activates VEGF expression and promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in HIF-1α-dependent and -independent manners.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Shibin; Luo, Xiaoli; Li, Yang; Lv, Zhaohui; Zhu, Jie; Lin, Jing; Ding, Lihua; Ye, Qinong

    2016-04-26

    The DEK oncogene is overexpressed in various cancers and overexpression of DEK correlates with poor clinical outcome. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the most important regulator of tumor angiogenesis, a process essential for tumor growth and metastasis. However, whether DEK enhances tumor angiogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that DEK is a key regulator of VEGF expression and tumor angiogenesis. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we found that DEK promoted VEGF transcription in breast cancer cells (MCF7, ZR75-1 and MDA-MB-231) by directly binding to putative DEK-responsive element (DRE) of the VEGF promoter and indirectly binding to hypoxia response element (HRE) upstream of the DRE through its interaction with the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), a master regulator of tumor angiogenesis and growth. DEK is responsible for recruitment of HIF-1α and the histone acetyltransferase p300 to the VEGF promoter. DEK-enhanced VEGF increases vascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation as well as angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane. DEK promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in nude mice in HIF-1α-dependent and -independent manners. Immunohistochemical staining showed that DEK expression positively correlates with the expression of VEGF and microvessel number in 58 breast cancer patients. Our data establish DEK as a sequence-specific binding transcription factor, a novel coactivator for HIF-1α in regulation of VEGF transcription and a novel promoter of angiogenesis. PMID:26988756

  7. Review of Growth Inhibitory Peptide as a biotherapeutic agent for tumor growth, adhesion, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Muehlemann, M; Miller, K D; Dauphinee, M; Mizejewski, G J

    2005-09-01

    This review surveys the biological activities of an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) derived peptide termed the Growth Inhibitory Peptide (GIP), which is a synthetic 34 amino acid segment produced from the full length 590 amino acid AFP molecule. The GIP has been shown to be growth-suppressive in both fetal and tumor cells but not in adult terminally-differentiated cells. The mechanism of action of this peptide has not been fully elucidated; however, GIP is highly interactive at the plasma membrane surface in cellular events such as endocytosis, cell contact inhibition and cytoskeleton-induced cell shape changes. The GIP was shown to be growth-suppressive in nine human tumor types and to suppress the spread of tumor infiltrates and metastases in human and mouse mammary cancers. The AFP-derived peptide and its subfragments were also shown to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and to block platelet aggregation; thus it was expected that the GIP would inhibit cell spreading/migration and metastatic infiltration into host tissues such as lung and pancreas. It was further found that the cyclic versus linear configuration of GIP determined its biological and anti-cancer efficacy. Genbank amino acid sequence identities with a variety of integrin alpha/beta chain proteins supported the GIP's linkage to inhibition of tumor cell adhesion and platelet aggregation. The combined properties of tumor growth suppression, prevention of tumor cell-to-ECM adhesion, and inhibition of platelet aggregation indicate that tumor-to-platelet interactions present promising targets for GIP as an anti-metastatic agent. Finally, based on cholinergic studies, it was proposed that GIP could influence the enzymatic activity of membrane acetylcholinesterases during tumor growth and metastasis. It was concluded that the GIP derived from full-length AFP represents a growth inhibitory motif possessing instrinsic properties that allow it to interfere in cell surface events such

  8. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer. PMID:27237321

  9. LincRNA-ROR promotes invasion, metastasis and tumor growth in pancreatic cancer through activating ZEB1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Han-Xiang; Wang, Yao; Li, Ce; Xu, Jian-Wei; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Han, Hai-Feng; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yun-Shan; Hu, San-Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the most lethal malignant tumors; early distant metastasis commonly results in poor prognosis. Recent studies confirmed the pivotal role of the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in tumorigenesis and metastasis of malignant tumors, including PC. However, little is known about the role of LincRNA-ROR (linc-ROR) in PC. In the present study, we found that linc-ROR was upregulated in PC tissues. Overexpression of linc-ROR promoted cells proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis both in vitro and in a mouse model. Contrarily, knockdown of linc-ROR attenuated proliferation, invasion and distant metastasis. Mechanistically, we confirmed that linc-ROR up-regulates ZEB1 and then induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which promotes the aggressive biological behaviors of PC. Together, these results indicate that linc-ROR acts as an important regulator of ZEB1, can promote invasion and metastasis in PC, and may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:26898939

  10. Key roles of necroptotic factors in promoting tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjian; Zhou, Min; Mei, Ling; Ruan, Jiaying; Hu, Qian; Peng, Jing; Su, Hang; Liao, Hong; Liu, Shanling; Liu, WeiPing; Wang, He; Huang, Qian; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-04-19

    Necroptotic factors are generally assumed to play a positive role in tumor therapy by eliminating damaged tumor cells. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, necroptotic factors RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL promote tumor growth. We demonstrate that genetic knockout of necroptotic genes RIPK1, RIPK3, or MLKL in cancer cells significantly attenuated their abilities to grow in an anchorage-independent manner. In addition, they exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity. The knockout cells also showed greatly reduced ability to form tumors in mice. Moreover, necrosulfonamide (NSA), a previously identified chemical inhibitor of necroptosis, could significantly delay tumor growth in a xenograft model. Mechanistically, we show that necroptoic factors play a significant role in maintaining the activity of NF-κB. Finally, we found that high levels of phosphorylated MLKL in human esophageal and colon cancers are associated with poor overall survival. Taken together, we conclude that pro-necroptic factors such as RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL may play a role in supporting tumor growth, and MLKL may be a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:26959742

  11. Key roles of necroptotic factors in promoting tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinjian; Zhou, Min; Mei, Ling; Ruan, Jiaying; Hu, Qian; Peng, Jing; Su, Hang; Liao, Hong; Liu, Shanling; Liu, WeiPing; Wang, He; Huang, Qian; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Necroptotic factors are generally assumed to play a positive role in tumor therapy by eliminating damaged tumor cells. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, necroptotic factors RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL promote tumor growth. We demonstrate that genetic knockout of necroptotic genes RIPK1, RIPK3, or MLKL in cancer cells significantly attenuated their abilities to grow in an anchorage-independent manner. In addition, they exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity. The knockout cells also showed greatly reduced ability to form tumors in mice. Moreover, necrosulfonamide (NSA), a previously identified chemical inhibitor of necroptosis, could significantly delay tumor growth in a xenograft model. Mechanistically, we show that necroptoic factors play a significant role in maintaining the activity of NF-κB. Finally, we found that high levels of phosphorylated MLKL in human esophageal and colon cancers are associated with poor overall survival. Taken together, we conclude that pro-necroptic factors such as RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL may play a role in supporting tumor growth, and MLKL may be a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:26959742

  12. ATXN7L3 and ENY2 Coordinate Activity of Multiple H2B Deubiquitinases Important for Cellular Proliferation and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Atanassov, Boyko S; Mohan, Ryan D; Lan, Xianjiang; Kuang, Xianghong; Lu, Yue; Lin, Kevin; McIvor, Elizabeth; Li, Wenqian; Zhang, Ying; Florens, Laurence; Byrum, Stephanie D; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Koutelou, Evangelia; Wang, Li; Tang, Dean G; Tackett, Alan J; Washburn, Michael P; Workman, Jerry L; Dent, Sharon Y R

    2016-05-19

    Histone H2B monoubiquitination (H2Bub1) is centrally involved in gene regulation. The deubiquitination module (DUBm) of the SAGA complex is a major regulator of global H2Bub1 levels, and components of this DUBm are linked to both neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Unexpectedly, we find that ablation of USP22, the enzymatic center of the DUBm, leads to a reduction, rather than an increase, in global H2bub1 levels. In contrast, depletion of non-enzymatic components, ATXN7L3 or ENY2, results in increased H2Bub1. These observations led us to discover two H2Bub1 DUBs, USP27X and USP51, which function independently of SAGA and compete with USP22 for ATXN7L3 and ENY2 for activity. Like USP22, USP51 and USP27X are required for normal cell proliferation, and their depletion suppresses tumor growth. Our results reveal that ATXN7L3 and ENY2 orchestrate activities of multiple deubiquitinating enzymes and that imbalances in these activities likely potentiate human diseases including cancer. PMID:27132940

  13. Stochastic model for tumor growth with immunization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Thomas; Trimper, Steffen

    2009-05-01

    We analyze a stochastic model for tumor cell growth with both multiplicative and additive colored noises as well as nonzero cross correlations in between. Whereas the death rate within the logistic model is altered by a deterministic term characterizing immunization, the birth rate is assumed to be stochastically changed due to biological motivated growth processes leading to a multiplicative internal noise. Moreover, the system is subjected to an external additive noise which mimics the influence of the environment of the tumor. The stationary probability distribution Ps is derived depending on the finite correlation time, the immunization rate, and the strength of the cross correlation. Ps offers a maximum which becomes more pronounced for increasing immunization rate. The mean-first-passage time is also calculated in order to find out under which conditions the tumor can suffer extinction. Its characteristics are again controlled by the degree of immunization and the strength of the cross correlation. The behavior observed can be interpreted in terms of a biological model of tumor evolution.

  14. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) inhibits human colon tumor growth by promoting apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuguang; Li, Bingji; Liu, Jie; He, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has recently been suggested in several epithelial cancers, either pro-tumor or anti-tumor. However, the role of TSLP in colon cancer remains unknown. We here found significantly decreased TSLP levels in tumor tissues compared with tumor-surrounding tissues of patients with colon cancer and TSLP levels negatively correlated with the clinical staging score of colon cancer. TSLPR, the receptor of TSLP, was expressed in all three colon cancer cell lines investigated and colon tumor tissues. The addition of TSLP significantly enhanced apoptosis of colon cancer cells in a TSLPR-dependent manner. Interestingly, TSLP selectively induced the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, but not normal colonic epithelial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TSLP induced JNK and p38 activation and initiated apoptosis mainly through the extrinsic pathway, as caspase-8 inhibitor significantly reversed the apoptosis-promoting effect of TSLP. Finally, using a xenograft mouse model, we demonstrated that peritumoral administration of TSLP greatly reduced tumor growth accompanied with extensive tumor apoptotic response, which was abolished by tumor cell-specific knockdown of TSLPR. Collectively, our study reveals a novel anti-tumor effect of TSLP via direct promotion of the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, and suggests that TSLP could be of value in treating colon cancer. PMID:26919238

  15. Arsenic trioxide inhibits tumor cell growth in malignant rhabdoid tumors in vitro and in vivo by targeting overexpressed Gli1.

    PubMed

    Kerl, Kornelius; Moreno, Natalia; Holsten, Till; Ahlfeld, Julia; Mertins, Julius; Hotfilder, Marc; Kool, Marcel; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Schleicher, Sabine; Handgretinger, Rupert; Schüller, Ulrich; Meisterernst, Michael; Frühwald, Michael C

    2014-08-15

    Rhabdoid tumors are highly aggressive tumors occurring in infants and very young children. Despite multimodal and intensive therapy prognosis remains poor. Molecular analyses have uncovered several deregulated pathways, among them the CDK4/6-Rb-, the WNT- and the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathways. The SHH pathway is activated in rhabdoid tumors by GLI1 overexpression. Here, we demonstrate that arsenic trioxide (ATO) inhibits tumor cell growth of malignant rhabdoid tumors in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model by suppressing Gli1. Our data uncover ATO as a promising therapeutic approach to improve prognosis for rhabdoid tumor patients. PMID:24420698

  16. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  17. Tumoral expression of IL-33 inhibits tumor growth and modifies the tumor microenvironment through CD8+ T and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuefeng; Yang, Qianting; Zhao, Xin; Wen, Wen; Li, Gang; Lu, Junfeng; Qin, Wenxin; Qi, Yuan; Xie, Fang; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping; Zhang, Xueguang; Chen, Xinchun; Turnquist, Heth; Zhu, Yibei; Lu, Binfeng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has shown great promise as a new standard cancer therapeutic modality. However, the response rates are limited for current approach that depends on enhancing spontaneous antitumor immune responses. Therefore, increasing tumor immunogenicity by expressing appropriate cytokines should further improve the current immunotherapy. IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines and is released by necrotic epithelial cells or activated innate immune cells and is thus considered a "danger" signal. The role of IL-33 in promoting type 2 immune responses and tissue inflammation has been well established. However, whether IL-33 drives antitumor immune responses is controversial. Our previous work established that IL-33 promoted the function of CD8(+) T cells. In this study, we showed that the expression of IL-33 in two types of cancer cells potently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis. Mechanistically, IL-33 increased numbers and IFN-γ production by CD8(+) T and NK cells in tumor tissues, thereby inducing a tumor microenvironment favoring tumor eradication. Importantly, IL-33 greatly increased tumor Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, both NK and CD8(+) T cells were required for the antitumor effect of IL-33. Moreover, depletion of regulatory T cells worked synergistically with IL-33 expression for tumor elimination. Our studies established "alarmin" IL-33 as a promising new cytokine for tumor immunotherapy through promoting cancer-eradicating type 1 immune responses. PMID:25429071

  18. Tumoral expression of IL-33 inhibits tumor growth and modifies the tumor microenvironment through CD8+ T and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuefeng; Yang, Qianting; Zhao, Xin; Wen, Wen; Li, Gang; Lu, Junfeng; Qin, Wenxin; Qi, Yuan; Xie, Fang; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping; Zhang, Xueguang; Chen, Xinchun; Turnquist, Heth; Zhu, Yibei; Lu, Binfeng

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has shown great promise as a new standard cancer therapeutic modality. However, the response rates are limited for current approach that depends on enhancing spontaneous antitumor immune responses. Therefore, increasing tumor immunogenicity by expressing appropriate cytokines should further improve the current immunotherapy. Interleukin-33 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines and is released by necrotic epithelial cells or activated innate immune cells and is thus considered a “danger” signal. The role of IL-33 in promoting type 2 immune responses and tissue inflammation has been well established. However, whether IL-33 drives antitumor immune responses is controversial. Our previous work established that IL-33 promoted the function of CD8+ T cells. Here, we showed that the expression of IL-33 in two types of cancer cells potently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis. Mechanistically, IL-33 increased numbers and IFNγ production by CD8+ T and NK cells in tumor tissues, thereby inducing a tumor microenvironment favoring tumor eradication. Importantly, IL-33 greatly increased tumor-antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, both NK and CD8+ T cells were required for the antitumor effect of IL-33. Moreover, depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg) worked synergistically with IL-33 expression for tumor elimination. Our studies established “alarmin” IL-33 as a promising new cytokine for tumor immunotherapy through promoting cancer-eradicating type 1 immune responses. PMID:25429071

  19. Blocking Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Inhibits Tumor Growth, Lymphangiogenesis, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu-Lahargue, Frédéric; Welm, Alana L.; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Alitalo, Kari; Li, Dean Y.; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Auguste, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor (FGFR) activity plays crucial roles in tumor growth and patient survival. However, FGF (Fibroblast Growth Factor) signaling as a target for cancer therapy has been under-investigated compared to other receptor tyrosine kinases. Here, we studied the effect of FGFR signaling inhibition on tumor growth, metastasis and lymphangiogenesis by expressing a dominant negative FGFR (FGFR-2DN) in an orthotopic mouse mammary 66c14 carcinoma model. We show that FGFR-2DN-expressing 66c14 cells proliferate in vitro slower than controls. 66c14 tumor outgrowth and lung metastatic foci are reduced in mice implanted with FGFR-2DN-expressing cells, which also exhibited better overall survival. We found 66c14 cells in the lumen of tumor lymphatic vessels and in lymph nodes. FGFR-2DN-expressing tumors exhibited a decrease in VEGFR-3 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3) or podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels, an increase in isolated intratumoral lymphatic endothelial cells and a reduction in VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C) mRNA expression. FGFs may act in an autocrine manner as the inhibition of FGFR signaling in tumor cells suppresses VEGF-C expression in a COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) or HIF1-α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α) independent manner. FGFs may also act in a paracrine manner on tumor lymphatics by inducing expression of pro-lymphangiogenic molecules such as VEGFR-3, integrin α9, prox1 and netrin-1. Finally, in vitro lymphangiogenesis is impeded in the presence of FGFR-2DN 66c14 cells. These data confirm that both FGF and VEGF signaling are necessary for the maintenance of vascular morphogenesis and provide evidence that targeting FGFR signaling may be an interesting approach to inhibit tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastatic spread. PMID:22761819

  20. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L; Dal Zotto, Valeria; Carter, James E; Singh, Seema

    2015-05-10

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity. PMID:25868978

  1. Foxo3 activity promoted by non-coding effects of circular RNA and Foxo3 pseudogene in the inhibition of tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Du, W W; Li, X; Yee, A J; Yang, B B

    2016-07-28

    It has recently been shown that the upregulation of a pseudogene specific to a protein-coding gene could function as a sponge to bind multiple potential targeting microRNAs (miRNAs), resulting in increased gene expression. Similarly, it was recently demonstrated that circular RNAs can function as sponges for miRNAs, and could upregulate expression of mRNAs containing an identical sequence. Furthermore, some mRNAs are now known to not only translate protein, but also function to sponge miRNA binding, facilitating gene expression. Collectively, these appear to be effective mechanisms to ensure gene expression and protein activity. Here we show that expression of a member of the forkhead family of transcription factors, Foxo3, is regulated by the Foxo3 pseudogene (Foxo3P), and Foxo3 circular RNA, both of which bind to eight miRNAs. We found that the ectopic expression of the Foxo3P, Foxo3 circular RNA and Foxo3 mRNA could all suppress tumor growth and cancer cell proliferation and survival. Our results showed that at least three mechanisms are used to ensure protein translation of Foxo3, which reflects an essential role of Foxo3 and its corresponding non-coding RNAs. PMID:26657152

  2. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P.; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L.; Zotto, Valeria Dal; Carter, James E.; Singh, Seema

    2015-01-01

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity. PMID:25868978

  3. Thrombin Induces Tumor Cell Cycle Activation and Spontaneous Growth by Down-regulation of p27Kip1, in Association with the Up-regulation of Skp2 and MiR-222

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang; Ibrahim, Sherif; Liu, Cynthia; Skaar, Jeffrey; Pagano, Michele; Karpatkin, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The effect of thrombin on tumor cell cycle activation and spontaneous growth was examined in synchronized serum-starved tumor cell lines and a model of spontaneous prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice. BrdUrd incorporation and propidium iodide staining of prostate LNCaP cells arrested in G0 and treated with thrombin or serum revealed a 48- and 29-fold increase in S phase cells, respectively, at 8 hours. Similar results were obtained with TRAMP cells and a glioblastoma cell line, T98G. Cell cycle kinases and inhibitors in synchronized tumor cells revealed high levels of p27Kip1 and low levels of Skp2 and cyclins D1 and A. Addition of thrombin, TFLLRN, or serum down-regulated p27Kip1 with concomitant induction of Skp2, Cyclin D1, and Cyclin A with similar kinetics. LNCaP p27Kip1-transfected cells or Skp2 knockdown cells were refractory to thrombin-induced cell cycle activation. MicroRNA 222, an inhibitor of p27Kip1, was robustly up-regulated by thrombin. The in vitro observations were tested in vivo with transgenic TRAMP mice. Repetitive thrombin injection enhanced prostate tumor volume 6- to 8-fold (P < 0.04). Repetitive hirudin, a specific potent antithrombin, decreased tumor volume 13- to 24-fold (P < 0.04). Thus, thrombin stimulates tumor cell growth in vivo by down-regulation of p27Kip1. PMID:19351827

  4. Tumor-specific activation of the C-JUN/MELK pathway regulates glioma stem cell growth in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunyu; Banasavadi-Siddegowda, Yeshavanth K; Joshi, Kaushal; Nakamura, Yuko; Kurt, Habibe; Gupta, Snehalata; Nakano, Ichiro

    2013-05-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that glioma stem cells (GSCs) may contribute to therapy resistance in high-grade glioma (HGG). Although recent studies have shown that the serine/threonine kinase maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) is abundantly expressed in various cancers, the function and mechanism of MELK remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that MELK depletion by shRNA diminishes the growth of GSC-derived mouse intracranial tumors in vivo, induces glial fibrillary acidic protein (+) glial differentiation of GSCs leading to decreased malignancy of the resulting tumors, and prolongs survival periods of tumor-bearing mice. Tissue microarray analysis with 91 HGG tumors demonstrates that the proportion of MELK (+) cells is a statistically significant indicator of postsurgical survival periods. Mechanistically, MELK is regulated by the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling and forms a complex with the oncoprotein c-JUN in GSCs but not in normal progenitors. MELK silencing induces p53 expression, whereas p53 inhibition induces MELK expression, indicating that MELK and p53 expression are mutually exclusive. Additionally, MELK silencing-mediated GSC apoptosis is partially rescued by both pharmacological p53 inhibition and p53 gene silencing, indicating that MELK action in GSCs is p53 dependent. Furthermore, irradiation of GSCs markedly elevates MELK mRNA and protein expression both in vitro and in vivo. Clinically, recurrent HGG tumors following the failure of radiation and chemotherapy exhibit a statistically significant elevation of MELK protein compared with untreated newly diagnosed HGG tumors. Together, our data indicate that GSCs, but not normal cells, depend on JNK-driven MELK/c-JUN signaling to regulate their survival, maintain GSCs in an immature state, and facilitate tumor radioresistance in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:23339114

  5. Downregulated MicroRNA-200a in Meningiomas Promotes Tumor Growth by Reducing E-Cadherin and Activating the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway▿

    PubMed Central

    Saydam, Okay; Shen, Yiping; Würdinger, Thomas; Senol, Ozlem; Boke, Elvan; James, Marianne F.; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M.; Fraefel, Cornel; Gusella, James F.; Krichevsky, Anna M.; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    2009-01-01

    Meningiomas, one of the most common human brain tumors, are derived from arachnoidal cells associated with brain meninges, are usually benign, and are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 2. Here, we define a typical human meningioma microRNA (miRNA) profile and characterize the effects of one downregulated miRNA, miR-200a, on tumor growth. Elevated levels of miR-200a inhibited meningioma cell growth in culture and in a tumor model in vivo. Upregulation of miR-200a decreased the expression of transcription factors ZEB1 and SIP1, with consequent increased expression of E-cadherin, an adhesion protein associated with cell differentiation. Downregulation of miR-200a in meningiomas and arachnoidal cells resulted in increased expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1 involved in cell proliferation. miR-200a was found to directly target β-catenin mRNA, thereby inhibiting its translation and blocking Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which is frequently involved in cancer. A direct correlation was found between the downregulation of miR-200a and the upregulation of β-catenin in human meningioma samples. Thus, miR-200a appears to act as a multifunctional tumor suppressor miRNA in meningiomas through effects on the E-cadherin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. This reveals a previously unrecognized signaling cascade involved in meningioma tumor development and highlights a novel molecular interaction between miR-200a and Wnt signaling, thereby providing insights into novel therapies for meningiomas. PMID:19703993

  6. Cellular Potts Modeling of Tumor Growth, Tumor Invasion, and Tumor Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, András; Merks, Roeland M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a growing wealth of available molecular data, the growth of tumors, invasion of tumors into healthy tissue, and response of tumors to therapies are still poorly understood. Although genetic mutations are in general the first step in the development of a cancer, for the mutated cell to persist in a tissue, it must compete against the other, healthy or diseased cells, for example by becoming more motile, adhesive, or multiplying faster. Thus, the cellular phenotype determines the success of a cancer cell in competition with its neighbors, irrespective of the genetic mutations or physiological alterations that gave rise to the altered phenotype. What phenotypes can make a cell “successful” in an environment of healthy and cancerous cells, and how? A widely used tool for getting more insight into that question is cell-based modeling. Cell-based models constitute a class of computational, agent-based models that mimic biophysical and molecular interactions between cells. One of the most widely used cell-based modeling formalisms is the cellular Potts model (CPM), a lattice-based, multi particle cell-based modeling approach. The CPM has become a popular and accessible method for modeling mechanisms of multicellular processes including cell sorting, gastrulation, or angiogenesis. The CPM accounts for biophysical cellular properties, including cell proliferation, cell motility, and cell adhesion, which play a key role in cancer. Multiscale models are constructed by extending the agents with intracellular processes including metabolism, growth, and signaling. Here we review the use of the CPM for modeling tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor progression. We argue that the accessibility and flexibility of the CPM, and its accurate, yet coarse-grained and computationally efficient representation of cell and tissue biophysics, make the CPM the method of choice for modeling cellular processes in tumor development. PMID:23596570

  7. Lymphatic endothelial cells support tumor growth in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor lymphatic vessels (LV) serve as a conduit of tumor cell dissemination, due to their leaky nature and secretion of tumor-recruiting factors. Though lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) lining the LV express distinct factors (also called lymphangiocrine factors), these factors and their roles in the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here we employ LEC, microvascular endothelial cells (MEC), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 tumor-conditioned media (TCM) to determine the factors that may be secreted by various EC in the MDA-MB-231 breast tumor. These factors will serve as endothelium derived signaling molecules in the tumor microenvironment. We co-injected these EC with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells into animals and showed that LEC support tumor growth, HUVEC have no significant effect on tumor growth, whereas MEC suppress it. Focusing on LEC-mediated tumor growth, we discovered that TCM-treated LEC (‘tumor-educated LEC') secrete high amounts of EGF and PDGF-BB, compared to normal LEC. LEC-secreted EGF promotes tumor cell proliferation. LEC-secreted PDGF-BB induces pericyte infiltration and angiogenesis. These lymphangiocrine factors may support tumor growth in the tumor microenvironment. This study shows that LV serve a novel role in the tumor microenvironment apart from their classical role as conduits of metastasis. PMID:25068296

  8. Tumor-host interactions in the gallbladder suppress distal angiogenesis and tumor growth: involvement of transforming growth factor beta1.

    PubMed

    Gohongi, T; Fukumura, D; Boucher, Y; Yun, C O; Soff, G A; Compton, C; Todoroki, T; Jain, R K

    1999-10-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors produced by a primary tumor can create a systemic anti-angiogenic environment and maintain metastatic tumor cells in a state of dormancy. We show here that the gallbladder microenvironment modulates the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, a multifunctional cytokine that functions as an endogenous anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor factor in a cranial window preparation. We found that a wide variety of human gallbladder tumors express TGF-beta1 irrespective of histologic type. We implanted a gel impregnated with basic fibroblast growth factor or Mz-ChA-2 tumor in the cranial windows of mice without tumors or mice with subcutaneous or gallbladder tumors to study angiogenesis and tumor growth at a secondary site. Angiogenesis, leukocyte-endothelial interaction in vessels and tumor growth in the cranial window were substantially inhibited in mice with gallbladder tumors. The concentration of TGF-beta1 in the plasma of mice with gallbladder tumors was 300% higher than that in the plasma of mice without tumors or with subcutaneous tumors. In contrast, there was no difference in the plasma levels of other anti- and pro-angiogenic factors. Treatment with neutralizing antibody against TGF-beta1 reversed both angiogenesis suppression and inhibition of leukocyte rolling induced by gallbladder tumors. TGF-beta1 also inhibited Mz-ChA-2 tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the production of anti-angiogenesis/proliferation factors is regulated by tumor-host interactions. PMID:10502827

  9. Cathepsin S from both tumor and tumor-associated cells promote cancer growth and neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Small, Donna M; Burden, Roberta E; Jaworski, Jakub; Hegarty, Shauna M; Spence, Shaun; Burrows, James F; McFarlane, Cheryl; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; McCarthy, Helen O; Johnston, James A; Walker, Brian; Scott, Christopher J

    2013-11-01

    Recent murine studies have demonstrated that tumor-associated macrophages in the tumor microenvironment are a key source of the pro-tumorigenic cysteine protease, cathepsin S. We now show in a syngeneic colorectal carcinoma murine model that both tumor and tumor-associated cells contribute cathepsin S to promote neovascularization and tumor growth. Cathepsin S depleted and control colorectal MC38 tumor cell lines were propagated in both wild type C57Bl/6 and cathepsin S null mice to provide stratified depletion of the protease from either the tumor, tumor-associated host cells, or both. Parallel analysis of these conditions showed that deletion of cathepsin S inhibited tumor growth and development, and revealed a clear contribution of both tumor and tumor-associated cell derived cathepsin S. The most significant impact on tumor development was obtained when the protease was depleted from both sources. Further characterization revealed that the loss of cathepsin S led to impaired tumor vascularization, which was complemented by a reduction in proliferation and increased apoptosis, consistent with reduced tumor growth. Analysis of cell types showed that in addition to the tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages and endothelial cells can produce cathepsin S within the microenvironment. Taken together, these findings clearly highlight a manner by which tumor-associated cells can positively contribute to developing tumors and highlight cathepsin S as a therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:23629809

  10. HDAC6 inhibition restores ciliary expression and decreases tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Gradilone, Sergio A; Radtke, Brynn N; Bogert, Pamela S; Huang, Bing Q; Gajdos, Gabriella B; LaRusso, Nicholas F

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia are multisensory organelles recently found to be absent in some tumor cells, but the mechanisms of deciliation and the role of cilia in tumor biology remain unclear. Cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining the biliary tree, normally express primary cilia and their interaction with bile components regulates multiple processes, including proliferation and transport. Utilizing cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) as a model, we found primary cilia are reduced in CCA by a mechanism involving histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). The experimental deciliation of normal cholangiocyte cells increased the proliferation rate and induced anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, deciliation induced the activation of MAPK and Hedgehog signaling, two important pathways involved in CCA development. We found HDAC6 is overexpressed in CCA and overexpression of HDAC6 in normal cholangiocytes induced deciliation, and increased both proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. To evaluate the effect of cilia restoration on tumor cells, we targeted HDAC6 by shRNA or by the pharmacologic inhibitor, tubastatin-A. Both approaches restored the expression of primary cilia in CCA cell lines and decreased cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. The effects of tubastatin-A were abolished when CCA cells were rendered unable to regenerate cilia by stable transfection of IFT88-shRNA. Finally, inhibition of HDAC6 by tubastatin-A also induced a significant decrease in tumor growth in a CCA animal model. Our data support a key role for primary cilia in malignant transformation, provide a plausible mechanism for their involvement, and suggest that restoration of primary cilia in tumor cells by HDAC6 targeting may be a potential therapeutic approach for CCA. PMID:23370327

  11. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197160

  12. Anti-tumor effect of SLPI on mammary but not colon tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Amiano, Nicolás O; Costa, María J; Reiteri, R Macarena; Payés, Cristian; Guerrieri, Diego; Tateosian, Nancy L; Sánchez, Mercedes L; Maffia, Paulo C; Diament, Miriam; Karas, Romina; Orqueda, Andrés; Rizzo, Miguel; Alaniz, Laura; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Klein, Slobodanka; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Chuluyan, H Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is a serine protease inhibitor that was related to cancer development and metastasis dissemination on several types of tumors. However, it is not known the effect of SLPI on mammary and colon tumors. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of SLPI on mammary and colon tumor growth. The effect of SLPI was tested on in vitro cell apoptosis and in vivo tumor growth experiments. SLPI over-expressing human and murine mammary and colon tumor cells were generated by gene transfection. The administration of murine mammary tumor cells over-expressing high levels of SLPI did not develop tumors in mice. On the contrary, the administration of murine colon tumor cells over-expressing SLPI, developed faster tumors than control cells. Intratumoral, but not intraperitoneal administration of SLPI, delayed the growth of tumors and increased the survival of mammary but not colon tumor bearing mice. In vitro culture of mammary tumor cell lines treated with SLPI, and SLPI producer clones were more prone to apoptosis than control cells, mainly under serum deprivation culture conditions. Herein we demonstrated that SLPI induces the apoptosis of mammary tumor cells in vitro and decreases the mammary but not colon tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, SLPI may be a new potential therapeutic tool for certain tumors, such as mammary tumors. PMID:22767220

  13. [Inhibitory effect of tumor growth by methionine-enkephalin].

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, G; Quirico-Santos, T

    1992-03-01

    Methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk) is an endogenous opioid pentapeptide derived from the prohormone proenkephalin A, present in neuroendocrine and hematopoietic cells. Enkephalins are known to play an important role on the processes of induction, activation and control of immunomodulatory events. Met-Enk has been considered a potent antitumoral agent. The present study shows that Met-Enk exerts an inhibitory effect on the growth of a macrophage derived fibrous histiocytoma (MC-II) inoculated intradermally into BALB/cJ mice. Such effect was mainly influenced by the protocol, route of administration and concentration of Met-Enk used for treatment. Neither higher doses of Met-Enk injected intracerebrally or subcutaneously, nor the use of various protocols of treatment, did modify the process of tumorigenesis. In contrast, low dose (0.25 mg/kg) of Met-Enk injected intracerebrally together with tumor inoculation, significantly reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival rate. PMID:1339154

  14. Does nutrition support stimulate tumor growth in humans?

    PubMed

    Bossola, Maurizio; Pacelli, Fabio; Rosa, Fausto; Tortorelli, Antonio; Doglietto, Giovan Battista

    2011-04-01

    Many studies have been conducted to ascertain if nutrition support (NS), either as parenteral nutrition (PN) or enteral nutrition (EN), stimulates tumor growth and causes cancer progression, but after almost 30 years, the question remains at least in part unresolved. In this study, previous studies were reviewed to evaluate the effect of NS on tumor growth, tumor proliferation, tumor apoptosis, and cancer-related survival in humans. MEDLINE and PubMed were searched using combinations of the following keywords: PN, EN, tumor growth, tumor proliferation, tumor apoptosis, arginine, ω-3 fatty acids, and glutamine. Unfortunately, the effect of nutrition support on tumor growth has been assessed only in terms of tumor proliferation, whereas the interferences on tumor apoptosis have never been determined. Overall, the results seem conflicting and inconclusive. Similarly, it remains unknown if PN or EN enriched with specific nutrients such as arginine, ω-3 fatty acids, and glutamine can affect tumor growth in humans. It is hoped that further studies will elucidate if NS with conventional or specific nutrients stimulates tumor proliferation, interferes with tumor apoptosis, and causes cancer progression. PMID:21447771

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor Cell Growth and Immune System Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Fathalla A.; Safan, Muntaser; Abdeen, Mohamed A.; Abdel-Rahman, Duaa H.

    In this paper, we provide a family of ordinary and delay differential equations to describe the dynamics of tumor-growth and immunotherapy interactions. We explore the effects of adoptive cellular immunotherapy on the model and describe under what circumstances the tumor can be eliminated. The possibility of clearing the tumor, with a strategy, is based on two parameters in the model: the rate of influx of the effector cells, and the rate of influx of IL2. The critical tumor-growth rate, below which endemic tumor does not exist, has been found. One can use the model to make predictions about tumor-dormancy.

  16. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-01

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity. PMID:26739427

  17. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qingwen; Jiang, Songmin; Han, Baohui; Sun, Tongwen; Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Jialin

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  18. Predicting mechanism of biphasic growth factor action on tumor growth using a multi-species model with feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Konstorum, Anna; Sprowl, Stephanie A.; Waterman, Marian L.; Lander, Arthur D.; Lowengrub, John S.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of growth factors and drugs are known to act in a biphasic manner: at lower concentrations they cause increased division of target cells, whereas at higher concentrations the mitogenic effect is inhibited. Often, the molecular details of the mitogenic effect of the growth factor are known, whereas the inhibitory effect is not. Hepatoctyte Growth Factor, HGF, has recently been recognized as a strong mitogen that is present in the microenvironment of solid tumors. Recent evidence suggests that HGF acts in a biphasic manner on tumor growth. We build a multi-species model of HGF action on tumor cells using different hypotheses for high dose-HGF activation of a growth inhibitor and show that the shape of the dose-response curve is directly related to the mechanism of inhibitor activation. We thus hypothesize that the shape of a dose-response curve is informative of the molecular action of the growth factor on the growth inhibitor. PMID:25075381

  19. Stable binding to E2F is not required for the retinoblastoma protein to activate transcription, promote differentiation, and suppress tumor cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, William R.; Novitch, Bennett G.; Miyake, Satoshi; Heith, Agnieszka; Otterson, Gregory A.; Kaye, Frederic J.; Lassar, Andrew B.; Kaelin, William G.

    1998-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRB) can inhibit cell cycle progression and promote differentiation. pRB interacts with a variety of transcription factors, including members of the E2F and C-EBP protein families and MyoD, and can either repress or activate transcription depending on the promoter under study. These biological and biochemical activities of pRB have been mapped previously to a core domain, referred to as the pRB pocket. Using a panel of synthetic pRB pocket mutants, we found that the acute induction of a G1/S block by pRB is linked to its ability to both bind to E2F and to repress transcription. In contrast, these functions were not required for pRB to promote differentiation, which correlated with its ability to activate transcription in concert with fate-determining proteins such as MyoD. All tumor-derived pRB mutants tested to date failed to bind to E2F and did not repress transcription. Despite an inability to bind to E2F, pRB mutants associated with a low risk of retinoblastoma, unlike high-risk mutants, retained the ability to activate transcription and promote differentiation. Thus, the pRB pocket participates in dual tumor suppressor functions, one linked to cell cycle progression and the other to differentiation control, and these functions can be genetically and mechanistically dissociated. PMID:9420334

  20. Cyclooxygenase-Dependent Tumor Growth through Evasion of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zelenay, Santiago; van der Veen, Annemarthe G.; Böttcher, Jan P.; Snelgrove, Kathryn J.; Rogers, Neil; Acton, Sophie E.; Chakravarty, Probir; Girotti, Maria Romina; Marais, Richard; Quezada, Sergio A.; Sahai, Erik; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which melanoma and other cancer cells evade anti-tumor immunity remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that the growth of tumors formed by mutant BrafV600E mouse melanoma cells in an immunocompetent host requires their production of prostaglandin E2, which suppresses immunity and fuels tumor-promoting inflammation. Genetic ablation of cyclooxygenases (COX) or prostaglandin E synthases in BrafV600E mouse melanoma cells, as well as in NrasG12D melanoma or in breast or colorectal cancer cells, renders them susceptible to immune control and provokes a shift in the tumor inflammatory profile toward classic anti-cancer immune pathways. This mouse COX-dependent inflammatory signature is remarkably conserved in human cutaneous melanoma biopsies, arguing for COX activity as a driver of immune suppression across species. Pre-clinical data demonstrate that inhibition of COX synergizes with anti-PD-1 blockade in inducing eradication of tumors, implying that COX inhibitors could be useful adjuvants for immune-based therapies in cancer patients. PMID:26343581

  1. Cyclooxygenase-Dependent Tumor Growth through Evasion of Immunity.

    PubMed

    Zelenay, Santiago; van der Veen, Annemarthe G; Böttcher, Jan P; Snelgrove, Kathryn J; Rogers, Neil; Acton, Sophie E; Chakravarty, Probir; Girotti, Maria Romina; Marais, Richard; Quezada, Sergio A; Sahai, Erik; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-09-10

    The mechanisms by which melanoma and other cancer cells evade anti-tumor immunity remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that the growth of tumors formed by mutant Braf(V600E) mouse melanoma cells in an immunocompetent host requires their production of prostaglandin E2, which suppresses immunity and fuels tumor-promoting inflammation. Genetic ablation of cyclooxygenases (COX) or prostaglandin E synthases in Braf(V600E) mouse melanoma cells, as well as in Nras(G12D) melanoma or in breast or colorectal cancer cells, renders them susceptible to immune control and provokes a shift in the tumor inflammatory profile toward classic anti-cancer immune pathways. This mouse COX-dependent inflammatory signature is remarkably conserved in human cutaneous melanoma biopsies, arguing for COX activity as a driver of immune suppression across species. Pre-clinical data demonstrate that inhibition of COX synergizes with anti-PD-1 blockade in inducing eradication of tumors, implying that COX inhibitors could be useful adjuvants for immune-based therapies in cancer patients. PMID:26343581

  2. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K

    2015-12-22

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  3. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B.; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B.; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M. Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  4. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  5. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  6. Tumor growth and angiogenesis are dependent on the presence of immature dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fainaru, Ofer; Almog, Nava; Yung, Chong Wing; Nakai, Kei; Montoya-Zavala, Martin; Abdollahi, Amir; D'Amato, Robert; Ingber, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs)—immunomodulatory cells that initiate adaptive immune responses—have recently been shown to exert proangiogenic effects when infiltrating the tumor microenvironment. As tumors that escape immune surveillance inhibit DC maturation, we explored whether maturation status determines their ability to promote angiogenesis and whether angiogenesis depends on the presence of DCs. Using mouse xenograft models of human tumors, we show that fast-growing “angiogenic” tumors are infiltrated by a more immature DC population than respective dormant avascular tumors. Accordingly, supplementation of immature DCs, but not mature DCs, enhanced tumor growth. When DCs were mixed with Matrigel and injected subcutaneously into mice, only immature DCs promoted the ingrowth of patent blood vessels. Notably, depletion of DCs in a transgenic mouse model that allows for their conditional ablation completely abrogated basic fibroblast growth factor-induced angiogenesis in Matrigel plugs, and significantly inhibited tumor growth in these mice. Because immature DCs actively promote angiogenesis and tumor growth, whereas DC maturation or ablation suppresses this response, we conclude that angiogenesis is dependent on the presence of immature DCs. Thus, cancer immunotherapies that promote DC maturation may act by both augmenting the host immune response to the tumor and by suppressing tumor angiogenesis.—Fainaru, O., Almog, N., Yung, C. W., Nakai, K., Montoya-Zavala, M., Abollahi, A., D’Amato, R., Ingber, D. E. Tumor growth and angiogenesis are dependent on the presence of immature dendritic cells. PMID:20008545

  7. Combined Treatment of Herbal Mixture Extract H9 with Trastuzumab Enhances Anti-tumor Growth Effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunyi; Han, Sora; Jeong, Ae Lee; Park, Jeong Su; Jung, Seung Hyun; Choi, Kang-Duk; Yang, Young

    2015-07-01

    Extracts from Asian medicinal herbs are known to be successful therapeutic agents against cancer. In this study, the effects of three types of herbal extracts on anti-tumor growth were examined. Among the three types of herbal extracts, H9 showed stronger anti-tumor growth effects than H5 and H11 in vivo. To find the molecular mechanism by which H9 inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cell lines, the levels of apoptotic markers were examined. Proapoptotic markers, including cleaved PARP and cleaved caspases 3 and 9, were increased, whereas the anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 was decreased by H9 treatment. Next, the combined effect of H9 with the chemotherapeutic drugs doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (AC) on tumor growth was examined using 4T1-tumor-bearing mice. The combined treatment of H9 with AC did not show additive or synergetic anti-tumor growth effects. However, when tumor-bearing mice were co-treated with H9 and the targeted anti-tumor drug trastuzumab, a delay in tumor growth was observed. The combined treatment of H9 and trastuzumab caused an increase of natural killer (NK) cells and a decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). Taken together, H9 induces the apoptotic death of tumor cells while increasing anti-tumor immune activity through the enhancement of NK activity and diminishment of MDSC. PMID:25791851

  8. Functional screen analysis reveals miR-26b and miR-128 as central regulators of pituitary somatomammotrophic tumor growth through activation of the PTEN-AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, T; Faucz, F R; Azevedo, M; Xekouki, P; Iliopoulos, D; Stratakis, C A

    2013-03-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been involved in the pathogenesis of different types of cancer; however, their function in pituitary tumorigenesis remains poorly understood. Cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase-defective pituitaries occasionally form aggressive growth-hormone (GH)-producing pituitary tumors in the background of hyperplasia caused by haploinsufficiency of the protein kinase's main regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A. The molecular basis for this development remains unknown. We have identified a 17-miRNA signature of pituitary tumors formed in the background of hyperplasia (caused in half of the cases by PRKAR1A-mutations). We selected two miRNAs on the basis of their functional screen analysis: inhibition of miR-26b expression and upregulation of miR-128 suppressed the colony formation ability and invasiveness of pituitary tumor cells. Furthermore, we identified that miR-26b and miR-128 affected pituitary tumor cell behavior through regulation of their direct targets, PTEN and BMI1, respectively. In addition, we found that miR-128 through BMI1 direct binding on the PTEN promoter affected PTEN expression levels and AKT activity in the pituitary tumor cells. Our in vivo data revealed that inhibition of miR-26b and overexpression of miR-128 could suppress pituitary GH3 tumor growth in xenografts. Taken together, we have identified a miRNA signature for GH-producing pituitary tumors and found that miR-26b and miR-128 regulate the activity of the PTEN-AKT pathway in these tumors. This is the first suggestion of the possible involvement of miRNAs regulating the PTEN-AKT pathway in GH-producing pituitary tumor formation in the context of hyperplasia or due to germline PRKAR1A defects. MiR-26b suppression and miR-128 upregulation could have therapeutic potential in GH-producing pituitary tumor patients. PMID:22614013

  9. A cellular automaton model for tumor growth in heterogeneous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Sal

    2011-03-01

    Cancer is not a single disease: it exhibits heterogeneity on different spatial and temporal scales and strongly interacts with its host environment. Most mathematical modeling of malignant tumor growth has assumed a homogeneous host environment. We have developed a cellular automaton model for tumor growth that explicitly incorporates the structural heterogeneity of the host environment such as tumor stroma. We show that these structural heterogeneities have non-trivial effects on the tumor growth dynamics and prognosis. Y. J. is supported by PSOC, NCI.

  10. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Berridge, Jon Casey; Mallon, Zachary; Kreis, Mark; Athos, Brian; Nuccitelli, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT) to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth. PMID:26231031

  11. Inhibition of rate of tumor growth by creatine and cyclocreatine.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, E E; Evans, A E; Cohn, M

    1993-01-01

    Growth rate inhibition of subcutaneously implanted tumors results from feeding rats and athymic nude mice diets containing 1% cyclocreatine or 1%, 2%, 5%, or 10% creatine. The tumors studied included rat mammary tumors (Ac33tc in Lewis female rats and 13762A in Fischer 344 female rats), rat sarcoma MCI in Lewis male rats, and tumors resulting from the injection of two human neuroblastoma cell lines, IMR-5 and CHP-134, in athymic nude mice. Inhibition was observed regardless of the time experimental diets were administered, either at the time of tumor implantation or after the appearance of palpable tumors. For mammary tumor Ac33tc, the growth inhibition during 24 days after the implantation was approximately 50% for both 1% cyclocreatine and 1% creatine, and inhibition increased as creatine was increased from 2% to 10% of the diet. For the other rat mammary tumor (13762A), there was approximately 35% inhibition by both 1% cyclocreatine and 2% creatine. In the case of the MCI sarcoma, the inhibitory effect appeared more pronounced at earlier periods of growth, ranging from 26% to 41% for 1% cyclocreatine and from 30% to 53% for 1% creatine; there was no significant difference in growth rate between the tumors in the rats fed 1% and 5% creatine. The growth rate of tumors in athymic nude mice, produced by implantation of the human neuroblastoma IMR-5 cell line, appeared somewhat more effectively inhibited by 1% cyclocreatine than by 1% creatine, and 5% creatine feeding was most effective. For the CHP-134 cell line, 33% inhibition was observed for the 1% cyclocreatine diet and 71% for the 5% creatine diet. In several experiments, a delay in appearance of tumors was observed in animals on the experimental diets. In occasional experiments, neither additive inhibited tumor growth rate for the rat tumors or the athymic mouse tumors. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8475072

  12. Absence of tumor growth stimulation in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines by mistletoe extracts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maier, Gerhard; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2002-04-01

    Extracts of Viscum album (mistletoe) are widely used as complementary cancer therapies in Europe. The mistletoe lectins have been identified as the main active principle of mistletoe extracts. They have been shown to exhibit cytotoxic effects as well as immunomodulatory activities. The latter is exemplified by induction of cytokine secretion and increased activity of natural killer cells. Recent reports, however, indicated possible tumor growth stimulation by mistletoe extracts. Therefore, the three aqueous mistletoe extracts (Iscador M special, Iscador Qu special and Iscador P) were evaluated for antiproliferative and/or stimulatory effects in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines in vitro using a cellular proliferation assay. The results show no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth by any of the three Iscador preparations, comprising central nervous system, gastric, non-small cell lung, mammary, prostate, renal and uterine cancer cell lines, as well as cell lines from hematological malignancies and melanomas. On the contrary, Iscador preparations containing a high lectin concentration (Iscador M special and Iscador Qu special) showed antitumor activity in the mammary cancer cell line MAXF 401NL at the 15 microg/ml dose level with a more than 70% growth inhibition compared to untreated control cells. In addition, a slight antitumor activity (growth inhibition 30-70%) was found in three tumor cell lines for Iscador M special and in seven tumor cell lines for Iscador Qu special, respectively. Iscador P, which contains no mistletoe lectin I, showed no antiproliferative activity. PMID:11984083

  13. Structure-Activity Relationship and in Vivo Anti-Tumor Evaluations of Dictyoceratin-A and -C, Hypoxia-Selective Growth Inhibitors from Marine Sponge

    PubMed Central

    Sumii, Yuji; Kotoku, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Akinori; Kawachi, Takashi; Arai, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2015-01-01

    Oral dictyoceratin-C (1) and A (2), hypoxia-selective growth inhibitors, showed potent in vivo antitumor effects in mice subcutaneously inoculated with sarcoma S180 cells. Structurally modified analogs were synthesized to assess the structure–activity relationship of the natural compounds 1 and 2 isolated from a marine sponge. Biological evaluation of these analogs showed that the exo-olefin and hydroxyl and methyl ester moieties were important for the hypoxia-selective growth inhibitory activities of 1 and 2. Thus far, only substitution of the methyl ester with propargyl amide in 1 was found to be effective for the synthesis of probe molecules for target identification. PMID:26694423

  14. Tumor growth suppression by the combination of nanobubbles and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Omata, Daiki; Nishiie, Norihito; Koshima, Risa; Shiono, Yasuyuki; Sawaguchi, Yoshikazu; Unga, Johan; Naoi, Tomoyuki; Negishi, Yoichi; Kawakami, Shigeru; Hashida, Mitsuru; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We previously developed novel liposomal nanobubbles (Bubble liposomes [BL]) that oscillate and collapse in an ultrasound field, generating heat and shock waves. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of cancer therapy using the combination of BL and ultrasound. In addition, we investigated the anti-tumor mechanism of this cancer therapy. Colon-26 cells were inoculated into the flank of BALB/c mice to induce tumors. After 8 days, BL or saline was intratumorally injected, followed by transdermal ultrasound exposure of tumor tissue (1 MHz, 0-4 W/cm2 , 2 min). The anti-tumor effects were evaluated by histology (necrosis) and tumor growth. In vivo cell depletion assays were performed to identify the immune cells responsible for anti-tumor effects. Tumor temperatures were significantly higher when treated with BL + ultrasound than ultrasound alone. Intratumoral BL caused extensive tissue necrosis at 3-4 W/cm2 of ultrasound exposure. In addition, BL + ultrasound significantly suppressed tumor growth at 2-4 W/cm2 . In vivo depletion of CD8+ T cells (not NK or CD4+ T cells) completely blocked the effect of BL + ultrasound on tumor growth. These data suggest that CD8+ T cells play a critical role in tumor growth suppression. Finally, we concluded that BL + ultrasound, which can prime the anti-tumor cellular immune system, may be an effective hyperthermia strategy for cancer treatment. PMID:26707839

  15. Rapid decrease in tumor perfusion following VEGF blockade predicts long-term tumor growth inhibition in preclinical tumor models.

    PubMed

    Eichten, Alexandra; Adler, Alexander P; Cooper, Blerta; Griffith, Jennifer; Wei, Yi; Yancopoulos, George D; Lin, Hsin Chieh; Thurston, Gavin

    2013-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key upstream mediator of tumor angiogenesis, and blockade of VEGF can inhibit tumor angiogenesis and decrease tumor growth. However, not all tumors respond well to anti-VEGF therapy. Despite much effort, identification of early response biomarkers that correlate with long-term efficacy of anti-VEGF therapy has been difficult. These difficulties arise in part because the functional effects of VEGF inhibition on tumor vessels are still unclear. We therefore assessed rapid molecular, morphologic and functional vascular responses following treatment with aflibercept (also known as VEGF Trap or ziv-aflibercept in the United States) in preclinical tumor models with a range of responses to anti-VEGF therapy, including Colo205 human colorectal carcinoma (highly sensitive), C6 rat glioblastoma (moderately sensitive), and HT1080 human fibrosarcoma (resistant), and correlated these changes to long-term tumor growth inhibition. We found that an overall decrease in tumor vessel perfusion, assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US), and increases in tumor hypoxia correlated well with long-term tumor growth inhibition, whereas changes in vascular gene expression and microvessel density did not. Our findings support previous clinical studies showing that decreased tumor perfusion after anti-VEGF therapy (measured by DCE-US) correlated with response. Thus, measuring tumor perfusion changes shortly after treatment with VEGF inhibitors, or possibly other anti-angiogenic therapies, may be useful to predict treatment efficacy. PMID:23238831

  16. Resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carletto, Bruna; Berton, Juliana; Ferreira, Tamara Nascimento; Dalmolin, Luciana Facco; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Favero, Giovani Marino

    2016-08-01

    In this study, resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were developed and its antitumor activity tested on a melanoma mice model. These nanocapsules were spherically-shaped and presented suitable size, negative charge and high encapsulation efficiency for their use as a modified-release system of resveratrol. Nanoencapsulation leads to the drug amorphization. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles reduced cell viability of murine melanoma cells. There was a decrease in tumor volume, an increase in the necrotic area and inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma when resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were compared to free resveratrol in treated mice. Nanoencapsulation of resveratrol also prevented metastasis and pulmonary hemorrhage. This modified-release technology containing resveratrol can be used as a feasible approach in order to inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth. PMID:27070053

  17. Activity of nintedanib in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Steinemann, Gustav; Jacobsen, Christine; Gerwing, Mirjam; Hauschild, Jessica; von Amsberg, Gunhild; Höpfner, Michael; Nitzsche, Bianca; Honecker, Friedemann

    2016-02-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most frequent malignancy in male patients between 15 and 45 years of age. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy shows excellent cure rates, but patients with cisplatin-resistant GCTs have a poor prognosis. Nintedanib (BIBF 1120, Vargatef) inhibits the receptor classes vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet derived growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor, and has shown activity against many tumors, as well as in idiopathic lung fibrosis and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Here, we investigated the antineoplastic and antiangiogenic properties of nintedanib in cisplatin-resistant and cisplatin-sensitive GCT cells, both alone and in combination with classical cytotoxic agents such as cisplatin, etoposide, and bleomycin. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of nintedanib was 4.5 ± 0.43 μmol/l, 3.1 ± 0.45 μmol/l, and 3.6 ± 0.33 μmol/l in cisplatin-sensitive NTERA2, 2102Ep, and NCCIT cells, whereas the IC50 doses of the cisplatin-resistant counterparts were 6.6 ± 0.37 μmol/l (NTERA2-R), 4.5 ± 0.83 μmol/l (2102Ep-R), and 6.1 ± 0.41 μmol/l (NCCIT-R), respectively. Single treatment with nintedanib induced apoptosis and resulted in a sustained reduction in the capacity of colony formation in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant GCT cells. Cell cycle analysis showed that nintedanib induced a strong G0/G1-phase arrest in all investigated cell lines. Combination treatment with cisplatin did not result in additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effects. The in-vivo activity was studied using the chorioallantoic membrane assay and indicated the antiangiogenic potency of nintedanib with markedly reduced microvessel density. Topical treatment of inoculated tumor plaques resulted in a significant reduction of the tumor size. This indicates that nintedanib might be a promising substance in the treatment of GCT. PMID:26479145

  18. Inhibition of vacuolar ATPase subunit in tumor cells delays tumor growth by decreasing the essential macrophage population in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Katara, G K; Kulshrestha, A; Jaiswal, M K; Pamarthy, S; Gilman-Sachs, A; Beaman, K D

    2016-02-25

    In cancer cells, vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a multi-subunit enzyme, is expressed on the plasma as well as vesicular membranes and critically influences metastatic behavior. The soluble, cleaved N-terminal domain of V-ATPase a2 isoform is associated with in vitro induction of tumorigenic characteristics in macrophages. This activity led us to further investigate its in vivo role in cancer progression by inhibition of a2 isoform (a2V) in tumor cells and the concomitant effect on tumor microenvironment in the mouse 4T-1 breast cancer model. Results showed that macrophages cocultivated with a2V knockdown (sh-a2) 4T-1 cells produce lower amounts of tumorigenic factors in vitro and have reduced ability to suppress T-cell activation and proliferation compared with control 4T-1 cells. Data analysis showed a delayed mammary tumor growth in Balb/c mice inoculated with sh-a2 4T-1 cells compared with control. The purified CD11b(+) macrophages from sh-a2 tumors showed a reduced expression of mannose receptor-1 (CD206), interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-β, arginase-1, matrix metalloproteinase and vascular endothelial growth factor. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor-infiltrated macrophages showed a significantly low number of F4/80(+)CD11c(+)CD206(+) macrophages in sh-a2 tumors compared with control. In sh-a2 tumors, most of the macrophages were F4/80(+)CD11c(+) (antitumor M1 macrophages) suggesting it to be the reason behind delayed tumor growth. Additionally, tumor-infiltrating macrophages from sh-a2 tumors showed a reduced expression of CD206 compared with control whereas CD11c expression was unaffected. These findings demonstrate that in the absence of a2V in tumor cells, the resident macrophage population in the tumor microenvironment is altered which affects in vivo tumor growth. We suggest that by involving the host immune system, tumor growth can be controlled through targeting of a2V on tumor cells. PMID:25961933

  19. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Shelton, S; Gray, WG; Miller, CT; Hussain, F; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, BA

    2014-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behaviour of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT). A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TC), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HC); and an interstitial fluid (IF) for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a Finite Element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behaviour: initially, the rapidly growing tumor cells tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable tumor cells whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case – mostly due to the relative adhesion of the tumor and healthy cells to the ECM, and the less favourable transport of nutrients. In particular, for tumor cells adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced

  20. Tumor-secreted miR-214 induces regulatory T cells: a major link between immune evasion and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuan; Cai, Xing; Chen, Xi; Liang, Hongwei; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Jing; Wang, Zuoyun; Chen, Xiulan; Zhang, Wen; Yokoyama, Seiji; Wang, Cheng; Li, Liang; Li, Limin; Hou, Dongxia; Dong, Lei; Xu, Tao; Hiroi, Takachika; Yang, Fuquan; Ji, Hongbin; Zhang, Junfeng; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2014-10-01

    An increased population of CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the tumor-associated microenvironment plays an important role in cancer immune evasion. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed an increased secretion of miR-214 in various types of human cancers and mouse tumor models. Tumor-secreted miR-214 was sufficiently delivered into recipient T cells by microvesicles (MVs). In targeted mouse peripheral CD4(+) T cells, tumor-derived miR-214 efficiently downregulated phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and promoted Treg expansion. The miR-214-induced Tregs secreted higher levels of IL-10 and promoted tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, in vivo studies indicated that Treg expansion mediated by cancer cell-secreted miR-214 resulted in enhanced immune suppression and tumor implantation/growth in mice. The MV delivery of anti-miR-214 antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) into mice implanted with tumors blocked Treg expansion and tumor growth. Our study reveals a novel mechanism through which cancer cell actively manipulates immune response via promoting Treg expansion. PMID:25223704

  1. Tumor-secreted miR-214 induces regulatory T cells: a major link between immune evasion and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuan; Cai, Xing; Chen, Xi; Liang, Hongwei; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Jing; Wang, Zuoyun; Chen, Xiulan; Zhang, Wen; Yokoyama, Seiji; Wang, Cheng; Li, Liang; Li, Limin; Hou, Dongxia; Dong, Lei; Xu, Tao; Hiroi, Takachika; Yang, Fuquan; Ji, Hongbin; Zhang, Junfeng; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2014-01-01

    An increased population of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the tumor-associated microenvironment plays an important role in cancer immune evasion. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed an increased secretion of miR-214 in various types of human cancers and mouse tumor models. Tumor-secreted miR-214 was sufficiently delivered into recipient T cells by microvesicles (MVs). In targeted mouse peripheral CD4+ T cells, tumor-derived miR-214 efficiently downregulated phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and promoted Treg expansion. The miR-214-induced Tregs secreted higher levels of IL-10 and promoted tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, in vivo studies indicated that Treg expansion mediated by cancer cell-secreted miR-214 resulted in enhanced immune suppression and tumor implantation/growth in mice. The MV delivery of anti-miR-214 antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) into mice implanted with tumors blocked Treg expansion and tumor growth. Our study reveals a novel mechanism through which cancer cell actively manipulates immune response via promoting Treg expansion. PMID:25223704

  2. Destruction of tumor vasculature and abated tumor growth upon VEGF blockade is driven by proapoptotic protein Bim in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Naik, Edwina; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse; Merino, Delphine; Lin, Ann; Cook, Michele; Coultas, Leigh; Bouillet, Philippe; Adams, Jerry M; Strasser, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    For malignant growth, solid cancers must stimulate the formation of new blood vessels by producing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), which is required for the survival of tumor-associated vessels. Novel anticancer agents that block VEGF-A signaling trigger endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis and vascular regression preferentially within tumors, but how the ECs die is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that VEGF-A deprivation, provoked either by drug-induced tumor shrinkage or direct VEGF-A blockade, up-regulates the proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3)-only Bcl-2 family member Bim in ECs. Importantly, the tumor growth inhibitory activity of a VEGF-A antagonist required Bim-induced apoptosis of ECs. These findings thus reveal the mechanism by which VEGF-A blockade induces EC apoptosis and impairs tumor growth. They also indicate that drugs mimicking BH3-only proteins may be exploited to kill tumor cells not only directly but also indirectly by ablating the tumor vasculature. PMID:21646395

  3. Reduced growth factor requirement of keloid-derived fibroblasts may account for tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, S.B.; Trupin, K.M.; Rodriguez-Eaton, S.; Russell, J.D.; Trupin, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Keloids are benign dermal tumors that form during an abnormal wound-healing process is genetically susceptible individuals. Although growth of normal and keloid cells did not differ in medium containing 10% (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum, keloid culture grew to significantly higher densities than normal cells in medium containing 5% (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum, keloid cultures grew to significantly higher densities than normal cells in medium containing 5% (vol/vol) plasma or 1% fetal bovine serum. Conditioned medium from keloid cultures did not stimulate growth of normal cells in plasma nor did it contain detectable platelet-derived growth factor or epidermal growth factor. Keloid fibroblasts responded differently than normal adult fibroblasts to transforming growth factor ..beta... Whereas transforming growth factor ..beta.. reduced growth stimulation by epidermal growth factor in cells from normal adult skin or scars, it enhanced the activity of epidermal growth factor in cells from normal adult skin or scars, it enhanced the activity of epidermal growth factor in cells from keloids. Normal and keloid fibroblasts also responded differently to hydrocortisone: growth was stimulated in normal adult cells and unaffected or inhibited in keloid cells. Fetal fibroblasts resembled keloid cells in their ability to grow in plasma and in their response to hydrocortisone. The ability of keloid fibroblasts to grow to higher cell densities in low-serum medium than cells from normal adult skin or from normal early or mature scars suggests that a reduced dependence on serum growth factors may account for their prolonged growth in vivo. Similarities between keloid and fetal cells suggest that keloids may result from the untimely expression of growth-control mechanism that is developmentally regulated.

  4. Natural history of tumor growth and immune modulation in common spontaneous murine mammary tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren; Slota, Meredith; Koehnlein, Marlese; Treuting, Piper M.; Dang, Yushe; Stanton, Sasha; Disis, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies in patients with breast cancer suggest the immune microenvironment influences response to therapy. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between growth rates of tumors in common spontaneous mammary tumor models and immune biomarkers evaluated in the tumor and blood. Methods TgMMTV-neu and C3(1)-Tag transgenic mice were followed longitudinally from birth, and MPA-DMBA treated mice from the time of carcinogen administration, for the development of mammary tumors. Tumor infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Serum cytokines were evaluated in subsets of mice. Fine needle aspirates of tumors were collected and RNA isolated to determine levels of immune and proliferation markers. Results Age of tumor onset and kinetics of tumor growth were significantly different among the models. Mammary tumors from TgMMTV-neu contained a lower CD8/CD4 ratio than other models (p<0.05). MPA-DMBA induced tumors contained a higher percentage of FOXP3+ CD4+ T-cells (p<0.01) and MDSC (p<0.001) as compared to the other models. Individuals with significantly slower tumor growth demonstrated higher levels of Type I serum cytokines prior to the development of lesions as compared to those with rapid tumor growth. Moreover, the tumors of animals with more rapid tumor growth demonstrated a significant increase in expression of genes associated with Type II immunity than those with slower progressing tumors. Conclusions These data provide a foundation for the development of in vivo models to explore the relationship between endogenous immunity and response to standard therapies for breast cancer. PMID:25395320

  5. Radiation-guided drug delivery to tumor blood vessels results in improved tumor growth delay.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ling; Osusky, Katherine; Konjeti, Sekhar; Fu, Allie; Hallahan, Dennis

    2004-10-19

    Tumor blood vessels are biological targets for cancer therapy. In this study, a tumor vasculature targeting system that consisted of liposomes and lectin (WGA) was built. Liposomes were used to carry a number of liposome-friendly anti-tumoral agents along with WGA, a lectin which posseses a specific affinity for binding to inflamed endothelial cells. In order to target tumor vasculature, inflammation of endothelial cells was induced by radiation. Because ionizing radiation induces an inflammatory response in tumor vasculature, lectin-conjugates were utilized to determine whether radiation can be used to target drug delivery to tumor vessels. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is one such lectin that binds to inflamed microvasculature. WGA was conjugated to liposomes containing cisplatin and administered to tumor bearing mice. Tumor growth delay was used to analyze the efficacy of cytotoxicity. FITC-conjugated WGA accumulated within irradiated tumor microvasculature. WGA was conjugated to liposomes and labeled with 111In. This demonstrated radiation-inducible tumor-selective binding. WGA-liposome-conjugates were loaded with Cisplatin and administered to mice bearing irradiated tumors. Tumors treated with a combination of liposome encapsulated cisplatin together with radiation showed a significant increase in tumor growth delay as compared to radiation alone. These findings demonstrate that ionizing radiation can be used to guide drug delivery to tumor microvasculature. PMID:15451595

  6. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  7. A two-phase mixture model of avascular tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Deniz; Burcin Unlu, M.; Yonucu, Sirin; Cetiner, Ugur

    2012-02-01

    Interactions with biological environment surrounding a growing tumor have major influence on tumor invasion. By recognizing that mechanical behavior of tumor cells could be described by biophysical laws, the research on physical oncology aims to investigate the inner workings of cancer invasion. In this study, we introduce a mathematical model of avascular tumor growth using the continuum theory of mixtures. Mechanical behavior of the tumor and physical interactions between the tumor and host tissue are represented by biophysically founded relationships. In this model, a solid tumor is embedded in inviscid interstitial fluid. The tumor has viscous mechanical properties. Interstitial fluid exhibits properties of flow through porous medium. Associated with the mixture saturation constraint, we introduce a Lagrange multiplier which represents hydrostatic pressure of the interstitial fluid. We solved the equations using Finite Element Method in two-dimensions. As a result, we have introduced a two-phase mixture model of avascular tumor growth that provided a flexible mathematical framework to include cells' response to mechanical aspects of the tumor microenvironment. The model could be extended to capture tumor-ECM interactions which would have profound influence on tumor invasion.

  8. Platelets Promote Tumor Growth and Metastasis via Direct Interaction between Aggrus/Podoplanin and CLEC-2

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Satoshi; Sato, Shigeo; Oh-hara, Tomoko; Takami, Miho; Koike, Sumie; Mishima, Yuji; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Fujita, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    The platelet aggregation-inducing factor Aggrus, also known as podoplanin, is frequently upregulated in several types of tumors and enhances hematogenous metastasis by interacting with and activating the platelet receptor CLEC-2. Thus, Aggrus–CLEC-2 binding could be a therapeutic molecular mechanism for cancer therapy. We generated a new anti-human Aggrus monoclonal antibody, MS-1, that suppressed Aggrus–CLEC-2 binding, Aggrus-induced platelet aggregation, and Aggrus-mediated tumor metastasis. Interestingly, the MS-1 monoclonal antibody attenuated the growth of Aggrus-positive tumors in vivo. Moreover, the humanized chimeric MS-1 antibody, ChMS-1, also exhibited strong antitumor activity against Aggrus-positive lung squamous cell carcinoma xenografted into NOD-SCID mice compromising antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic and complement-dependent cytotoxic activities. Because Aggrus knockdown suppressed platelet-induced proliferation in vitro and tumor growth of the lung squamous cell carcinoma in vivo, Aggrus may be involved in not only tumor metastasis but also tumor growth by promoting platelet-tumor interaction, platelet activation, and secretion of platelet-derived factors in vivo. Our results indicate that molecular target drugs inhibiting specific platelet–tumor interactions can be developed as antitumor drugs that suppress both metastasis and proliferation of tumors such as lung squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:23991201

  9. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  10. Tumor-secreted Hsp90 Subverts Polycomb Function to Drive Prostate Tumor Growth and Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Krystal D.; Franco, Omar E.; Hance, Michael W.; Hayward, Simon W.; Isaacs, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the second highest contributor to male cancer-related lethality. The transition of a subset of tumors from indolent to invasive disease is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Activation of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) genetic program is a major risk factor for cancer progression. We recently reported that secreted extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) initiates EMT in prostate cancer cells, coincident with its enhanced expression in mesenchymal models. Our current work substantially extended these findings in defining a pathway linking eHsp90 signaling to EZH2 function, a methyltransferase of the Polycomb repressor complex. EZH2 is also implicated in EMT activation, and its up-regulation represents one of the most frequent epigenetic alterations during prostate cancer progression. We have now highlighted a novel epigenetic function for eHsp90 via its modulation of EZH2 expression and activity. Mechanistically, eHsp90 initiated sustained activation of MEK/ERK, a signal critical for facilitating EZH2 transcriptional up-regulation and recruitment to the E-cadherin promoter. We further demonstrated that an eHsp90-EZH2 pathway orchestrates an expanded repertoire of EMT-related events including Snail and Twist expression, tumor cell motility, and anoikis resistance. To evaluate the role of eHsp90 in vivo, eHsp90 secretion was stably enforced in a prostate cancer cell line resembling indolent disease. Remarkably, eHsp90 was sufficient to induce tumor growth, suppress E-cadherin, and initiate localized invasion, events that are exquisitely dependent upon EZH2 function. In summary, our findings illuminate a hitherto unknown epigenetic function for eHsp90 and support a model wherein tumor eHsp90 functions as a rheostat for EZH2 expression and activity to orchestrate mesenchymal properties and coincident aggressive behavior. PMID:25670862

  11. Reduced Tumor Growth after Low-Dose Irradiation or Immunization against Blastic Suppressor T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilkin, A. F.; Schaaf-Lafontaine, N.; van Acker, A.; Boccadoro, M.; Urbain, J.

    1981-03-01

    Suppressor T cells have been shown to be much more radiosensitive than other lymphoid cells, and we have tried to reduce tumor growth by low-dose irradiation. Syngeneic DBA/2 mice received whole-body irradiation (150 rads; 1 rad = 0.01 J/kg) 6 days after P815 tumor inoculation. Tumor growth is significantly reduced in mildly irradiated mice. We also attempted to reduce syngeneic tumor growth by raising immunity against suppressor T cells in two different systems. DBA/2 mice were immunized against splenic T cells collected after disappearance of cytotoxicity and then injected with P815 tumor cells. These mice develop a very high primary cytotoxicity against P815 cells. C57BL/6 mice were immunized against blastic suppressor T cells, before injection of T2 tumor cells. Some of these mice reject the tumor and others develop smaller tumors than control mice. These results could be explained by the induction of antiidiotypic activity directed against the immunological receptors of suppressor T lymphocytes, because immunization with blastic suppressor T cells from mice bearing the T2 tumor does not modify the growth of another tumor, T10.

  12. BMP4/Thrombospondin-1 loop paracrinically inhibits tumor angiogenesis and suppresses the growth of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, R; Osawa, T; Wang, F; Nishii, R; Das, B; Tsuchida, S; Muramatsu, M; Takahashi, T; Inoue, T; Wada, Y; Minami, T; Yuasa, Y; Shibuya, M

    2014-07-17

    Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has potential as an anticancer agent. Recent studies have suggested that BMP4 inhibits the survival of cancer stem cells (CSCs) of neural and colon cancers. Here, we showed that BMP4 paracrinically inhibited tumor angiogenesis via the induction of Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), and consequently suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Although HeLa (human cervical cancer), HCI-H460-LNM35 (highly metastatic human lung cancer) and B16 (murine melanoma) cells did not respond to the BMP4 treatment in vitro, the growth of xeno- and allografts of these cells was suppressed via reductions in tumor angiogenesis after intraperitoneal treatment with BMP4. When we assessed the mRNA expression of major angiogenesis-related factors in grafted tumors, we found that the expression of TSP1 was significantly upregulated by BMP4 administration. We then confirmed that BMP4 was less effective in suppressing the tumor growth of TSP1-knockdown cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that BMP4 reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vivo in a TSP1-dependent manner, which indicates that BMP4 interfered with the stabilization of tumor angiogenesis. In conclusion, the BMP4/TSP1 loop paracrinically suppressed tumor angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment, which subsequently reduced the growth of tumors. BMP4 may become an antitumor agent and open a new field of antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:24013228

  13. Tumor-Derived CXCL1 Promotes Lung Cancer Growth via Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ha; Xu, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils have a traditional role in inflammatory process and act as the first line of defense against infections. Although their contribution to tumorigenesis and progression is still controversial, accumulating evidence recently has demonstrated that tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) play a key role in multiple aspects of cancer biology. Here, we detected that chemokine CXCL1 was dramatically elevated in serum from 3LL tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, 3LL cells constitutively expressed and secreted higher level of CXCL1. Furthermore, knocking down CXCL1 expression in 3LL cells significantly hindered tumor growth by inhibiting recruitment of neutrophils from peripheral blood into tumor tissues. Additionally, tumor-infiltrated neutrophils expressed higher levels of MPO and Fas/FasL, which may be involved in TAN-mediated inhibition of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results demonstrate that tumor-derived CXCL1 contributes to TANs infiltration in lung cancer which promotes tumor growth. PMID:27446967

  14. Modeling of Tumor Growth Based on Adomian Decomposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahiddin, Norhasimah; Ali, Siti Aishah Hashim

    2008-01-01

    Modeling of a growing tumor over time is extremely difficult. This is due to the complex biological phenomena underlying cancer growth. Existing models mostly based on numerical methods and could describe spherically-shaped avascular tumors but they cannot match the highly heterogeneous and complex shaped tumors seen in cancer patients. We propose a new technique based on decomposition method to solve analytically cancer model.

  15. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-06-01

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  16. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-01-01

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs. PMID:27125980

  17. Penfluridol suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Alok; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors exhibit enhanced autophagy as compared to any other cancer, making it resistant to chemotherapy. We evaluated the effect of penfluridol against pancreatic cancer. Penfluridol treatment induced apoptosis and inhibited the growth of Panc-1, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1, pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 ranging between 6–7 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by penfluridol treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Punctate LC3B and autophagosomes staining confirmed autophagy. Inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, bafilomycin, 3-methyladenine or LC3BsiRNA, significantly blocked penfluridol-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy lead to apoptosis in our model. Penfluridol treatment suppressed the growth of BxPC-3 tumor xenografts by 48% as compared to 17% when treated in combination with chloroquine. Similarly, penfluridol suppressed the growth of AsPC-1 tumors by 40% versus 16% when given in combination with chloroquine. TUNEL staining and caspase-3 cleavage revealed less apoptosis in the tumors from mice treated with penfluridol and chloroquine as compared to penfluridol alone. Penfluridol treatment also suppressed the growth of orthotopically implanted Panc-1 tumors by 80% by inducing autophagy-mediated apoptosis in the tumors. These studies established that penfluridol inhibits pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Since penfluridol is already in clinic, positive findings from our study will accelerate its clinical development. PMID:27189859

  18. Small molecule PZL318: forming fluorescent nanoparticles capable of tracing their interactions with cancer cells and activated platelets, slowing tumor growth and inhibiting thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Wang, Yuji; Wang, Feng; Wang, Yaonan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Ming; Feng, Qiqi; Wu, Jianhui; Zhao, Shurui; Wu, Wei; Peng, Shiqi

    2015-01-01

    Low selectivity of chemotherapy correlates with poor outcomes of cancer patients. To improve this issue, a novel agent, N-(1-[3-methoxycarbonyl-4-hydroxyphenyl]-β-carboline-3-carbonyl)-Trp-Lys-OBzl (PZL318), was reported here. The transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy images demonstrated that PZL318 can form nanoparticles. Fluorescent and confocal images visualized that PZL318 formed fluorescent nanoparticles capable of targeting cancer cells and tracing their interactions with cancer cells. In vitro, 40 μM of PZL318 inhibited the proliferation of tumorigenic cells, but not nontumorigenic cells. In vivo, 10 nmol/kg of PZL318 slowed the tumor growth of S180 mice and alleviated the thrombosis of ferric chloride-treated ICR mice, while 100 μmol/kg of PZL318 did not injure healthy mice and they exhibited no liver toxicity. By analyzing Fourier transform–mass spectrometry and rotating-frame Overhauser spectroscopy (ROESY) two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, the chemical mechanism of PZL318-forming trimers and nanoparticles was explored. By using mesoscale simulation, a nanoparticle of 3.01 nm in diameter was predicted containing 13 trimers. Scavenging free radicals, downregulating sP-selectin expression and intercalating toward DNA were correlated with the antitumor mechanism of PZL318. PMID:26345234

  19. Small molecule PZL318: forming fluorescent nanoparticles capable of tracing their interactions with cancer cells and activated platelets, slowing tumor growth and inhibiting thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Wang, Yuji; Wang, Feng; Wang, Yaonan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Ming; Feng, Qiqi; Wu, Jianhui; Zhao, Shurui; Wu, Wei; Peng, Shiqi

    2015-01-01

    Low selectivity of chemotherapy correlates with poor outcomes of cancer patients. To improve this issue, a novel agent, N-(1-[3-methoxycarbonyl-4-hydroxyphenyl]-β-carboline-3-carbonyl)-Trp-Lys-OBzl (PZL318), was reported here. The transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy images demonstrated that PZL318 can form nanoparticles. Fluorescent and confocal images visualized that PZL318 formed fluorescent nanoparticles capable of targeting cancer cells and tracing their interactions with cancer cells. In vitro, 40 μM of PZL318 inhibited the proliferation of tumorigenic cells, but not nontumorigenic cells. In vivo, 10 nmol/kg of PZL318 slowed the tumor growth of S180 mice and alleviated the thrombosis of ferric chloride-treated ICR mice, while 100 μmol/kg of PZL318 did not injure healthy mice and they exhibited no liver toxicity. By analyzing Fourier transform-mass spectrometry and rotating-frame Overhauser spectroscopy (ROESY) two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, the chemical mechanism of PZL318-forming trimers and nanoparticles was explored. By using mesoscale simulation, a nanoparticle of 3.01 nm in diameter was predicted containing 13 trimers. Scavenging free radicals, downregulating sP-selectin expression and intercalating toward DNA were correlated with the antitumor mechanism of PZL318. PMID:26345234

  20. A Mathematical Model Coupling Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for vascular tumor growth. We use phase fields to model cellular growth and reaction-diffusion equations for the dynamics of angiogenic factors and nutrients. The model naturally predicts the shift from avascular to vascular growth at realistic scales. Our computations indicate that the negative regulation of the Delta-like ligand 4 signaling pathway slows down tumor growth by producing a larger density of non-functional capillaries. Our results show good quantitative agreement with experiments. PMID:26891163

  1. Phase transition in tumor growth: I avascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Rebelo, I.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular tumor growth based on a simple chemical network. This model presents a logistic behavior and shows a “second order” phase transition. We prove the fractal origin of the empirical logistics and Gompertz constant and its relation to mitosis and apoptosis rate. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates the entropy production rate as a Lyapunov function during avascular tumor growth.

  2. Mice lacking NCF1 exhibit reduced growth of implanted melanoma and carcinoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Kelkka, Tiina; Pizzolla, Angela; Laurila, Juha Petteri; Friman, Tomas; Gustafsson, Renata; Källberg, Eva; Olsson, Olof; Leanderson, Tomas; Rubin, Kristofer; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2013-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) complex is a professional producer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is mainly expressed in phagocytes. While the activity of the NOX2 complex is essential for immunity against pathogens and protection against autoimmunity, its role in the development of malignant tumors remains unclear. We compared wild type and Ncf1 (m1J) mutated mice, which lack functional NOX2 complex, in four different tumor models. Ncf1 (m1J) mutated mice developed significantly smaller tumors in two melanoma models in which B16 melanoma cells expressing a hematopoietic growth factor FLT3L or luciferase reporter were used. Ncf1 (m1J) mutated mice developed significantly fewer Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumors, but the tumors that did develop, grew at a pace that was similar to the wild type mice. In the spontaneously arising prostate carcinoma model (TRAMP), tumor growth was not affected. The lack of ROS-mediated protection against tumor growth was associated with increased production of immunity-associated cytokines. A significant increase in Th2 associated cytokines was observed in the LLC model. Our present data show that ROS regulate rejection of the antigenic B16-luc and LLC tumors, whereas the data do not support a role for ROS in growth of intrinsically generated tumors. PMID:24358335

  3. Carbon Monoxide Expedites Metabolic Exhaustion to Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Barbara; Gallo, David; Csizmadia, Eva; Harris, Clair; Belcher, John; Vercellotti, Gregory M.; Penacho, Nuno; Seth, Pankaj; Sukhatme, Vikas; Ahmed, Asif; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Helczynski, Leszek; Bjartell, Anders; Persson, Jenny Liao; Otterbein, Leo E

    2013-01-01

    One classical feature of cancer cells is their metabolic acquisition of a highly glycolytic phenotype. Carbon monoxide (CO), one of the products of the cytoprotective molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in cancer cells, has been implicated in carcinogenesis and therapeutic resistance. However, the functional contributions of CO and HO-1 to these processes are poorly defined. In human prostate cancers, we found that HO-1 was nuclear localized in malignant cells, with low enzymatic activity in moderately differentiated tumors correlating with relatively worse clinical outcomes. Exposure to CO sensitized prostate cancer cells but not normal cells to chemotherapy, with growth arrest and apoptosis induced in vivo in part through mitotic catastrophe. CO targeted mitochondria activity in cancer cells as evidenced by higher oxygen consumption, free radical generation and mitochondrial collapse. Collectively, our findings indicated that CO transiently induces an anti-Warburg effect by rapidly fueling cancer cell bioenergetics, ultimately resulting in metabolic exhaustion. PMID:24121491

  4. PP2A mediates diosmin p53 activation to block HA22T cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenografted nude mice through PI3K-Akt-MDM2 signaling suppression.

    PubMed

    Dung, Tran Duc; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Binh, Truong Viet; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Su, Cheng-Chuan; Lin, Yueh-Min; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Chen, Li-Mien; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2012-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a common type of cancer with poor prognosis. This study examines the in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of diosmin on human hepato-cellular carcinoma HA22T cell proliferation inhibition. HA22T cells were treated with different diosmin concentrations and analyzed with Western blot analysis, MTT assay, wound healing, flow cytometry, siRNA transfection assays and co-immuno-precipitation assay. The HA22T-implanted xeno-graft nude mice model was applied to confirm the cellular effects. Diosmin showed strong HA22T cell viability inhibition in a dose dependent manner and significantly reduced the cell proliferative proteins as well as inducing cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase through p53 activation and PI3K-Akt-MDM2 signaling pathway inhibition. However, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) siRNA or PP2A inhibitor totally reversed the diosmin effects. The HA22T-implanted nude mice model further confirmed that diosmin inhibited HA22T tumor cell growth and down regulated the PI3K-Akt-MDM2 signaling and cell cycle regulating proteins, as well as activating PP2A and p53 proteins. Our findings indicate that HA22T cell proliferation inhibition and tumor growth suppression by diosmin are mediated through PP2A activation. PMID:22289577

  5. IL-33 activates tumor stroma to promote intestinal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Maywald, Rebecca L; Doerner, Stephanie K; Pastorelli, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Benton, Susan M; Dawson, Emily P; Lanza, Denise G; Berger, Nathan A; Markowitz, Sanford D; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Nadeau, Joseph H; Pizarro, Theresa T; Heaney, Jason D

    2015-05-12

    Tumor epithelial cells develop within a microenvironment consisting of extracellular matrix, growth factors, and cytokines produced by nonepithelial stromal cells. In response to paracrine signals from tumor epithelia, stromal cells modify the microenvironment to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we identify interleukin 33 (IL-33) as a regulator of tumor stromal cell activation and mediator of intestinal polyposis. In human colorectal cancer, IL-33 expression was induced in the tumor epithelium of adenomas and carcinomas, and expression of the IL-33 receptor, IL1RL1 (also referred to as IL1-R4 or ST2), localized predominantly to the stroma of adenoma and both the stroma and epithelium of carcinoma. Genetic and antibody abrogation of responsiveness to IL-33 in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and suppressed angiogenesis in adenomatous polyps, which reduced both tumor number and size. Similar to human adenomas, IL-33 expression localized to tumor epithelial cells and expression of IL1RL1 associated with two stromal cell types, subepithelial myofibroblasts and mast cells, in Apc(Min/+) polyps. In vitro, IL-33 stimulation of human subepithelial myofibroblasts induced the expression of extracellular matrix components and growth factors associated with intestinal tumor progression. IL-33 deficiency reduced mast cell accumulation in Apc(Min/+) polyps and suppressed the expression of mast cell-derived proteases and cytokines known to promote polyposis. Based on these findings, we propose that IL-33 derived from the tumor epithelium promotes polyposis through the coordinated activation of stromal cells and the formation of a protumorigenic microenvironment. PMID:25918379

  6. IL-33 activates tumor stroma to promote intestinal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Maywald, Rebecca L.; Doerner, Stephanie K.; Pastorelli, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Benton, Susan M.; Dawson, Emily P.; Lanza, Denise G.; Berger, Nathan A.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Nadeau, Joseph H.; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Heaney, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor epithelial cells develop within a microenvironment consisting of extracellular matrix, growth factors, and cytokines produced by nonepithelial stromal cells. In response to paracrine signals from tumor epithelia, stromal cells modify the microenvironment to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we identify interleukin 33 (IL-33) as a regulator of tumor stromal cell activation and mediator of intestinal polyposis. In human colorectal cancer, IL-33 expression was induced in the tumor epithelium of adenomas and carcinomas, and expression of the IL-33 receptor, IL1RL1 (also referred to as IL1-R4 or ST2), localized predominantly to the stroma of adenoma and both the stroma and epithelium of carcinoma. Genetic and antibody abrogation of responsiveness to IL-33 in the ApcMin/+ mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and suppressed angiogenesis in adenomatous polyps, which reduced both tumor number and size. Similar to human adenomas, IL-33 expression localized to tumor epithelial cells and expression of IL1RL1 associated with two stromal cell types, subepithelial myofibroblasts and mast cells, in ApcMin/+ polyps. In vitro, IL-33 stimulation of human subepithelial myofibroblasts induced the expression of extracellular matrix components and growth factors associated with intestinal tumor progression. IL-33 deficiency reduced mast cell accumulation in ApcMin/+ polyps and suppressed the expression of mast cell-derived proteases and cytokines known to promote polyposis. Based on these findings, we propose that IL-33 derived from the tumor epithelium promotes polyposis through the coordinated activation of stromal cells and the formation of a protumorigenic microenvironment. PMID:25918379

  7. Deletion of the endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase decreases tumor angiogenesis and growth.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Tanja; López-Alpuche, Vanessa; Zheng, Wei; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Jones, Dennis; He, Yun; Tvorogov, Denis; D'Amico, Gabriela; Wiener, Zoltan; Andersson, Leif C; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Min, Wang; Alitalo, Kari

    2012-07-15

    Bmx, [corrected] also known as Etk, is a member of the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Bmx is expressed mainly in arterial endothelia and in myeloid hematopoietic cells. Bmx regulates ischemia-mediated arteriogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, but its role in tumor angiogenesis is not known. In this study, we characterized the function of Bmx in tumor growth using both Bmx knockout and transgenic mice. Isogenic colon, lung, and melanoma tumor xenotransplants showed reductions in growth and tumor angiogenesis in Bmx gene-deleted ((-/-)) mice, whereas developmental angiogenesis was not affected. In addition, growth of transgenic pancreatic islet carcinomas and intestinal adenomas was also slower in Bmx(-/-) mice. Knockout mice showed high levels of Bmx expression in endothelial cells of tumor-associated and peritumoral arteries. Moreover, endothelial cells lacking Bmx showed impaired phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) upon VEGF stimulation, indicating that Bmx contributes to the transduction of vascular endothelial growth factor signals. In transgenic mice overexpressing Bmx in epidermal keratinocytes, tumors induced by a two-stage chemical skin carcinogenesis treatment showed increased growth and angiogenesis. Our findings therefore indicate that Bmx activity contributes to tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:22593188

  8. Functional analysis of tumor cell growth and clearance in living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Thomas J.; Mailaender, V.; Tucker, Amanda A.; Olomu, A. B.; Zhang, Weisheng; Negrin, Robert S.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    Evaluation of antineoplastic therapies would be enhanced by sensitive methods that noninvasively asses both tumor location and neoplastic growth kinetics in living animals. Since light is transmitted through mammalian tissues, it was possible to externally monitor growth and regression of luciferase labeled murine tumor cells engrafted into immunodeficient mice. External quantification of tumor burden revealed the biological impact of the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide on the kinetics of tumor growth in living animals. Therapeutic activity was apparent but this drug did not eliminate the NIH 3T3 cell signal over the 28 d time course. This novel, noninvasive system allowed sensitive, real time spatiotemporal analyses of neoplastic cell growth and may facilitate rapid optimization of effective therapeutic treatment regimes.

  9. A small-molecule antagonist of CXCR4 inhibits intracranial growth of primary brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Joshua B.; Kung, Andrew L.; Klein, Robyn S.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Sun, Yanping; Schmidt, Karl; Kieran, Mark W.; Luster, Andrew D.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2003-11-01

    The vast majority of brain tumors in adults exhibit glial characteristics. Brain tumors in children are diverse: Many have neuronal characteristics, whereas others have glial features. Here we show that activation of the Gi protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 is critical for the growth of both malignant neuronal and glial tumors. Systemic administration of CXCR4 antagonist AMD 3100 inhibits growth of intracranial glioblastoma and medulloblastoma xenografts by increasing apoptosis and decreasing the proliferation of tumor cells. This reflects the ability of AMD 3100 to reduce the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt, all of which are pathways downstream of CXCR4 that promote survival, proliferation, and migration. These studies (i) demonstrate that CXCR4 is critical to the progression of diverse brain malignances and (ii) provide a scientific rationale for clinical evaluation of AMD 3100 in treating both adults and children with malignant brain tumors.

  10. Endothelial Jagged1 promotes solid tumor growth through both pro-angiogenic and angiocrine functions

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Ana-Rita; Trindade, Alexandre; Carvalho, Catarina; Graça, José; Carvalho, Sandra; Peleteiro, Maria C.; Adams, Ralf H.; Duarte, António

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process required for tumor growth and progression. The Notch signaling pathway has been identified as a key regulator of the neo-angiogenic process. Jagged-1 (Jag1) is a Notch ligand required for embryonic and retinal vascular development, which direct contribution to the regulation of tumor angiogenesis remains to be fully characterized. The current study addresses the role of endothelial Jagged1-mediated Notch signaling in the context of tumoral angiogenesis in two different mouse tumor models: subcutaneous Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor transplants and the autochthonous Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP). The role of endothelial Jagged1 in tumor growth and neo-angiogenesis was investigated with endothelial-specific Jag1 gain- and loss-of-function mouse mutants (eJag1OE and eJag1cKO). By modulating levels of endothelial Jag1, we observed that this ligand regulates tumor vessel density, branching, and perivascular maturation, thus affecting tumor vascular perfusion. The pro-angiogenic function is exerted by its ability to positively regulate levels of Vegfr-2 while negatively regulating Vegfr-1. Additionally, endothelial Jagged1 appears to exert an angiocrine function possibly by activating Notch3/Hey1 in tumor cells, promoting proliferation, survival and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), potentiating tumor development. These findings provide valuable mechanistic insights into the role of endothelial Jagged1 in promoting solid tumor development and support the notion that it may constitute a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:26213336

  11. Endothelial Jagged1 promotes solid tumor growth through both pro-angiogenic and angiocrine functions.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Ana-Rita; Trindade, Alexandre; Carvalho, Catarina; Graça, José; Carvalho, Sandra; Peleteiro, Maria C; Adams, Ralf H; Duarte, António

    2015-09-15

    Angiogenesis is an essential process required for tumor growth and progression. The Notch signaling pathway has been identified as a key regulator of the neo-angiogenic process. Jagged-1 (Jag1) is a Notch ligand required for embryonic and retinal vascular development, which direct contribution to the regulation of tumor angiogenesis remains to be fully characterized. The current study addresses the role of endothelial Jagged1-mediated Notch signaling in the context of tumoral angiogenesis in two different mouse tumor models: subcutaneous Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor transplants and the autochthonous Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP). The role of endothelial Jagged1 in tumor growth and neo-angiogenesis was investigated with endothelial-specific Jag1 gain- and loss-of-function mouse mutants (eJag1OE and eJag1cKO). By modulating levels of endothelial Jag1, we observed that this ligand regulates tumor vessel density, branching, and perivascular maturation, thus affecting tumor vascular perfusion. The pro-angiogenic function is exerted by its ability to positively regulate levels of Vegfr-2 while negatively regulating Vegfr-1. Additionally, endothelial Jagged1 appears to exert an angiocrine function possibly by activating Notch3/Hey1 in tumor cells, promoting proliferation, survival and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), potentiating tumor development. These findings provide valuable mechanistic insights into the role of endothelial Jagged1 in promoting solid tumor development and support the notion that it may constitute a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:26213336

  12. A novel temozolomide-perillyl alcohol conjugate exhibits superior activity against breast cancer cells in vitro and intracranial triple-negative tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Thomas C; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Wang, Weijun; Barath, Manasi; Sharma, Natasha; Hofman, Florence M; Schönthal, Axel H

    2014-05-01

    There is no effective therapy for breast cancer that has spread to the brain. A major roadblock is the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which prevents the usual breast cancer drugs from effectively reaching intracranial metastases. The alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) is able to penetrate the BBB and has become the gold standard for chemotherapeutic treatment of glioblastoma. However, when it was tested in clinical trials for activity against brain metastases of breast cancer, the results were mixed and ranged from "encouraging activity" to "no objective responses." In an effort to generate an agent with greater activity against intracranial breast metastases, we synthesized a TMZ analog where the natural product perillyl alcohol (POH) was covalently linked to TMZ's amide functionality. The resulting novel compound, called TMZ-POH (T-P), displayed greatly increased anticancer activity in a variety of breast cancer cell lines, inclusive of TMZ-resistant ones. It caused DNA damage and cell death much more efficiently than its parental compound TMZ, because linkage with POH increased its biologic half-life and thus provided greater opportunity for placement of cytotoxic DNA lesions. In an intracranial mouse tumor model with triple-negative breast cancer, T-P revealed considerably greater therapeutic efficacy than TMZ, where a single cycle of treatment extended median survival benefit from 6 days (in the case of TMZ) to 28 days. At the same time, T-P seemed to be well tolerated by the animals. Thus, T-P may have potential as a novel therapy for brain-targeted breast cancer metastases. PMID:24623736

  13. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  14. Glucocorticoid Receptor as a Potential Target to Decrease Aromatase Expression and Inhibit Leydig Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Panza, Salvatore; Malivindi, Rocco; Chemi, Francesca; Rago, Vittoria; Giordano, Cinzia; Barone, Ines; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Gelsomino, Luca; Giordano, Francesca; Andò, Sebastiano; Catalano, Stefania

    2016-05-01

    Leydig cell tumors are the most frequent interstitial neoplasms of the testis with increased incidence in recent years. They are hormonally active and are considered one of the steroid-secreting tumors. Although usually benign, the malignant phenotype responds poorly to conventional chemotherapy or radiation, highlighting the need to identify new therapeutic targets for treatment. Here, we identified a novel glucocorticoid-mediated mechanism that controls cell growth in Leydig cell tumors. We found that a synthetic glucocorticoid receptor agonist, dexamethasone, reduces cell proliferation in rat Leydig tumor cells by decreasing the expression and the enzymatic activity of the estrogen-producing enzyme aromatase. This inhibitory effect relies on the ability of activated glucocorticoid receptor to regulate the aromatase gene transcriptional activity through the recruitment of nuclear receptor corepressor protein and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors to a newly identified putative glucocorticoid responsive element within the aromatase promoter II. Our in vivo studies reveal a reduction of tumor growth, after dexamethasone treatment, in animal xenografts. Tumors from dexamethasone-treated mice exhibit a decrease in the expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 and the aromatase enzyme. Our data demonstrate that activated glucocorticoid receptor, decreasing aromatase expression, induces Leydig tumor regression both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that glucocorticoid receptor might be a potential target for the therapy of Leydig cell tumors. PMID:26968343

  15. Near-criticality underlies the behavior of early tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Remy, Guillaume; Cluzel, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The controlling factors that underlie the growth of tumors have often been hard to identify because of the presence in this system of a large number of intracellular biochemical parameters. Here, we propose a simplifying framework to identify the key physical parameters that govern the early growth of tumors. We model growth by means of branching processes where cells of different types can divide and differentiate. First, using this process that has only one controlling parameter, we study a one cell type model and compute the probability for tumor survival and the time of tumor extinction. Second, we show that when cell death and cell division are perfectly balanced, stochastic effects dominate the growth dynamics and the system exhibits a near-critical behavior that resembles a second-order phase transition. We show, in this near-critical regime, that the time interval before tumor extinction is power-law distributed. Finally, we apply this branching formalism to infer, from experimental growth data, the number of different cell types present in the observed tumor. PMID:27043180

  16. Near-criticality underlies the behavior of early tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remy, Guillaume; Cluzel, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The controlling factors that underlie the growth of tumors have often been hard to identify because of the presence in this system of a large number of intracellular biochemical parameters. Here, we propose a simplifying framework to identify the key physical parameters that govern the early growth of tumors. We model growth by means of branching processes where cells of different types can divide and differentiate. First, using this process that has only one controlling parameter, we study a one cell type model and compute the probability for tumor survival and the time of tumor extinction. Second, we show that when cell death and cell division are perfectly balanced, stochastic effects dominate the growth dynamics and the system exhibits a near-critical behavior that resembles a second-order phase transition. We show, in this near-critical regime, that the time interval before tumor extinction is power-law distributed. Finally, we apply this branching formalism to infer, from experimental growth data, the number of different cell types present in the observed tumor.

  17. Liposome-mediated delivery of the p21 activated kinase-1 (PAK-1) inhibitor IPA-3 limits prostate tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Missaoui, Wided N; Cummings, Brian S; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2016-07-01

    P21 activated kinases-1 (PAK-1) is implicated in various diseases. It is inhibited by the small molecule 'inhibitor targeting PAK1 activation-3' (IPA-3), which is highly specific but metabolically unstable. To address this limitation we encapsulated IPA-3 in sterically stabilized liposomes (SSL). SSL-IPA-3 averaged 139nm in diameter, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.05, and a zeta potential of -28.1, neither of which changed over 14days; however, the PDI increased to 0.139. Analysis of liposomal IPA-3 levels demonstrated good stability, with 70% of IPA-3 remaining after 7days. SSL-IPA-3 inhibited prostate cancer cell growth in vitro with comparable efficacy to free IPA-3. Excitingly, only a 2day/week dose of SSL-IPA-3 was needed to inhibit the growth of prostate xenografts in vivo, while a similar dose of free IPA-3 was ineffective. These data demonstrate the development and clinical utility of a novel liposomal formulation for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26949163

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Branching Morphogenesis and Vascular Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huaming

    Feedback regulation of cell lineages is known to play an important role in tissue size control, but the effect in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. We first use a non-spatial model to show that a combination of positive and negative feedback on stem and/or progenitor cell self-renewal leads to bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors and ultrasensitivity to external growth cues. Next, a spatiotemporal model is used to demonstrate spatial patterns such as local budding and branching arise in this setting, and are not consequences of Turing-type instabilities. We next extend the model to a three-dimensional hybrid discrete-continuum model of tumor growth to study the effects of angiogenesis, tumor progression and cancer therapies. We account for the crosstalk between the vasculature and cancer stem cells (CSCs), and CSC transdifferentiation into vascular endothelial cells (gECs), as observed experimentally. The vasculature stabilizes tumor invasiveness but considerably enhances growth. A gEC network structure forms spontaneously within the hypoxic core, consistent with experimental findings. The model is then used to study cancer therapeutics. We demonstrate that traditional anti-angiogenic therapies decelerate tumor growth, but make the tumor highly invasive. Chemotherapies help to reduce tumor sizes, but cannot control the invasion. Anti-CSC therapies that promote differentiation or disturb the stem cell niche effectively reduce tumor invasiveness. However, gECs inherit mutations present in CSCs and are resistant to traditional therapies. We show that anti-gEC treatments block the support on CSCs by gECs, and reduce both tumor size and invasiveness. Our study suggests that therapies targeting the vasculature, CSCs and gECs, when combined, are highly synergistic and are capable of controlling both tumor size and shape.

  19. Heparanase Enhances Tumor Growth and Chemoresistance by Promoting Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shteingauz, Anna; Boyango, Ilanit; Naroditsky, Inna; Hammond, Edward; Gruber, Maayan; Doweck, Ilana; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2015-09-15

    Heparanase is the only enzyme in mammals capable of cleaving heparan sulfate, an activity implicated in tumor inflammation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Heparanase is secreted as a latent enzyme that is internalized and subjected to proteolytic processing and activation in lysosomes. Its role under normal conditions has yet to be understood. Here, we provide evidence that heparanase resides within autophagosomes, where studies in heparanase-deficient or transgenic mice established its contributions to autophagy. The protumorigenic properties of heparanase were found to be mediated, in part, by its proautophagic function, as demonstrated in tumor xenograft models of human cancer and through use of inhibitors of the lysosome (chloroquine) and heparanase (PG545), both alone and in combination. Notably, heparanase-overexpressing cells were more resistant to stress and chemotherapy in a manner associated with increased autophagy, effects that were reversed by chloroquine treatment. Collectively, our results establish a role for heparanase in modulating autophagy in normal and malignant cells, thereby conferring growth advantages under stress as well as resistance to chemotherapy. Cancer Res; 75(18); 3946-57. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26249176

  20. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Shelton, S.; Gray, W. G.; Miller, C. T.; Hussain, F.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behavior of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory. A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TCs), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HCs); and an interstitial fluid for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a finite element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTSs) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behavior: initially, the rapidly growing TCs tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable TCs whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case—mostly due to the relative adhesion of the TCs and HCs to the ECM, and the less favorable transport of nutrients. In particular, for HCs adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced as the malignant mass grows, whereas TC

  1. Immunostimulatory early phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages does not predict tumor growth outcome in an HLA-DR mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, Vladimir; Kim, David; Chhina, Surmeet; Alexander, Richard B; Klyushnenkova, Elena N

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were shown to support the progression of many solid tumors. However, anti-tumor properties of TAM were also reported in several types of cancer. Here, we investigated the phenotype and functions of TAM in two transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer that display striking differences in tumor growth outcome. Mice expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a self-antigen specifically in prostate (PSAtg mice) rejected PSA-expressing transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) tumors. However, the introduction of HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b) transgene presenting PSA-derived peptides in a MHC class II-restricted manner exacerbated the growth of TRAMP-PSA tumors in DR2bxPSA F 1 mice. Despite the difference in tumor growth outcome, tumors in both strains were equally and intensively infiltrated by macrophages on the first week after tumor challenge. TAM exhibited mixed M1/M2 polarization and simultaneously produced pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IL1β) and anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines. TAM from both mouse strains demonstrated antigen-presenting potential and pronounced immunostimulatory activity. Moreover, they equally induced apoptosis of tumor cells. In vivo depletion of macrophages in DR2bxPSA F 1 but not PSAtg mice aggravated tumor growth suggesting that macrophages more strongly contribute to anti-tumor immunity when specific presentation of PSA to CD4+ T cells is possible. In summary, we conclude that in the early stages of tumor progression, the phenotype and functional properties of TAM did not predict tumor growth outcome in two transgenic prostate cancer models. Furthermore, we demonstrated that during the initial stage of prostate cancer development, TAM have the potential to activate T cell immunity and mediate anti-tumor effects. PMID:25893810

  2. Regulation of osteoprotegerin pro- or anti-tumoral activity by bone tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, F; Moriceau, G; Picarda, G; Rousseau, J; Trichet, V; Rédini, F

    2010-01-01

    Tumor development in bone is often associated with fractures, bone loss and bone pain, and improvement is still needed in therapeutic approaches. Bone tumors are related to the existence of a vicious cycle between bone resorption and tumor proliferation in which the molecular triad osteoprotegerin (OPG)/receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK)/RANK ligand (RANKL) plays a pivotal role. RANKL, a member of the TNF superfamily, is one of the main inducers of bone resorption. Its soluble receptor OPG represents a promising therapeutic candidate as it prevents bone lesions and inhibits associated tumor growth. However, its therapeutic use in bone tumors remains controversial due to its ability to bind and inhibit another member of the TNF superfamily, TNF related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), which is a potent inducer of tumor cell apoptosis. Through its heparin binding domain, OPG is also able to bind proteoglycans present in the bone matrix. This paper is an overview of the involvement of the micro-environment, as represented by the balance of RANKL/TRAIL and the presence of proteoglycans in the regulation of OPG biological activity in bone tumors. PMID:19733222

  3. Marked inhibition of tumor growth in a malignant glioma tumor model by a novel synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor AG3340.

    PubMed

    Price, A; Shi, Q; Morris, D; Wilcox, M E; Brasher, P M; Rewcastle, N B; Shalinsky, D; Zou, H; Appelt, K; Johnston, R N; Yong, V W; Edwards, D; Forsyth, P

    1999-04-01

    Synthetic matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors have activity against a variety of tumors in preclinical models but have not been studied in gliomas. We determined the effect of AG3340, a novel synthetic MMP inhibitor with Ki values against gelatinases in the low picomolar range, on the growth of a human malignant glioma cell line (U87) in SCID-NOD mice. Mice were injected s.c. with U87 cells. Tumors were allowed to grow to a size of approximately 0.5 x 0.5 cm (after about 3 weeks), and the mice were randomized to receive either: (a) 100 mg/kg AG3340 in vehicle; or (b) vehicle control (0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose, 0.1% pluronic F68), both given daily i.p. Tumor area was measured twice weekly, and animals were sacrificed when moribund, or earlier if premorbid histology was examined. In vivo inhibition of tumor growth was profound, with AG3340 decreasing tumor size by 78% compared with controls after 31 days (when controls were sacrificed; P < 0.01, Wilcoxon test). Control animals survived 31 days after the i.p. injections began, and AG3340 mice survived 71 days, representing a >2-fold increase in survival associated with tumor growth delay. Histological examination found that AG3340-treated tumors were smaller, had lower rates of proliferation, and significantly less invasion than control-treated tumors. Hepatic or pulmonary metastases were not seen in either group. In a separate experiment, the tumors were smaller and sampled after a shorter duration of treatment; the changes in proliferation were more marked and occurred earlier than differences in tumor invasion between the two groups. Furthermore, in vitro cell growth was not inhibited at AG3340 concentrations of <1 mM. AG3340 plasma concentrations in vivo, 1 h after administration, ranged from 67 to 365 nM. Thus, AG3340 produced a profound inhibition of glioma tumor growth and invasion. AG3340 markedly increased survival in this in vivo glioma model. Treatment with AG3340 may be potentially useful in

  4. Activating transcription factor 2 in mesenchymal tumors.

    PubMed

    Endo, Makoto; Su, Le; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2014-02-01

    Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) is a member of activator protein 1 superfamily, which can heterodimerize with other transcription factors regulating cell differentiation and survival. ATF2 assembles into a complex with the synovial sarcoma translocation, chromosome 18 (SS18)-synovial sarcoma, X breakpoint (SSX) fusion oncoprotein, and the transducin-like enhancer of split 1 (TLE1) corepressor, driving oncogenesis in synovial sarcoma. The fusion oncoproteins in many other translocation-associated sarcomas incorporate transcription factors from the ATF/cAMP response element binding or E26 families, which potentially form heterodimers with ATF2 to regulate transcription. ATF2 may therefore play an important role in the oncogenesis of many mesenchymal tumors, but as yet, little is known about its protein expression in patient specimens. Herein we perform immunohistochemical analyses using a validated specific antibody for ATF2 expression and intracellular localization on a cohort of 594 malignant and 207 benign mesenchymal tumors representing 47 diagnostic entities. Melanoma served as a positive control for nuclear and cytoplasmic staining. High nuclear ATF2 expression was mainly observed in translocation-associated and/or spindle cell sarcomas including synovial sarcoma, desmoplastic small round cell tumor, endometrial stromal sarcoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and solitary fibrous tumor. Cytoplasmic ATF2 expression was less frequently seen than nuclear expression in malignant mesenchymal tumors. Benign mesenchymal tumors mostly showed much lower nuclear and cytoplasmic ATF2 expression. PMID:24289970

  5. FEM-Based 3-D Tumor Growth Prediction for Kidney Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinjian; Summers, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    It is important to predict the tumor growth so that appropriate treatment can be planned in the early stage. In this letter, we propose a finite-element method (FEM)-based 3-D tumor growth prediction system using longitudinal kidney tumor images. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first kidney tumor growth prediction system. The kidney tissues are classified into three types: renal cortex, renal medulla, and renal pelvis. The reaction–diffusion model is applied as the tumor growth model. Different diffusion properties are considered in the model: the diffusion for renal medulla is considered as anisotropic, while those of renal cortex and renal pelvis are considered as isotropic. The FEM is employed to solve the diffusion model. Themodel parameters are estimated by the optimization of an objective function of overlap accuracy using a hybrid optimization parallel search package. The proposed method was tested on two longitudinal studies with seven time points on five tumors. The average true positive volume fraction and false positive volume fraction on all tumors is 91.4% and 4.0%, respectively. The experimental results showed the feasibility and efficacy of the proposed method. PMID:21342810

  6. The Role of Oxygen in Avascular Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, David Robert; Kannan, Pavitra; McIntyre, Alan; Kavanagh, Anthony; Siddiky, Abul; Wigfield, Simon; Harris, Adrian; Partridge, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen status of a tumor has significant clinical implications for treatment prognosis, with well-oxygenated subvolumes responding markedly better to radiotherapy than poorly supplied regions. Oxygen is essential for tumor growth, yet estimation of local oxygen distribution can be difficult to ascertain in situ, due to chaotic patterns of vasculature. It is possible to avoid this confounding influence by using avascular tumor models, such as tumor spheroids, a much better approximation of realistic tumor dynamics than monolayers, where oxygen supply can be described by diffusion alone. Similar to in situ tumours, spheroids exhibit an approximately sigmoidal growth curve, often approximated and fitted by logistic and Gompertzian sigmoid functions. These describe the basic rate of growth well, but do not offer an explicitly mechanistic explanation. This work examines the oxygen dynamics of spheroids and demonstrates that this growth can be derived mechanistically with cellular doubling time and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) being key parameters. The model is fitted to growth curves for a range of cell lines and derived values of OCR are validated using clinical measurement. Finally, we illustrate how changes in OCR due to gemcitabine treatment can be directly inferred using this model. PMID:27088720

  7. The Role of Oxygen in Avascular Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David Robert; Kannan, Pavitra; McIntyre, Alan; Kavanagh, Anthony; Siddiky, Abul; Wigfield, Simon; Harris, Adrian; Partridge, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen status of a tumor has significant clinical implications for treatment prognosis, with well-oxygenated subvolumes responding markedly better to radiotherapy than poorly supplied regions. Oxygen is essential for tumor growth, yet estimation of local oxygen distribution can be difficult to ascertain in situ, due to chaotic patterns of vasculature. It is possible to avoid this confounding influence by using avascular tumor models, such as tumor spheroids, a much better approximation of realistic tumor dynamics than monolayers, where oxygen supply can be described by diffusion alone. Similar to in situ tumours, spheroids exhibit an approximately sigmoidal growth curve, often approximated and fitted by logistic and Gompertzian sigmoid functions. These describe the basic rate of growth well, but do not offer an explicitly mechanistic explanation. This work examines the oxygen dynamics of spheroids and demonstrates that this growth can be derived mechanistically with cellular doubling time and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) being key parameters. The model is fitted to growth curves for a range of cell lines and derived values of OCR are validated using clinical measurement. Finally, we illustrate how changes in OCR due to gemcitabine treatment can be directly inferred using this model. PMID:27088720

  8. [Kinetic patterns in the growth of transplantable mouse tumor RShM-1].

    PubMed

    Svinogeeva, T P; Konopliannikov, A G; Shtein, L V

    1976-01-01

    Under study was the kinetics of growth of cervical cancer (CCM-1) transplanted on mice CBA, also the mitotic cycle and diurnal activity of tumor cells division. The tumor growth can well be described with the Hompertz equation, the constants of acceleration and retardation being equal to 0.34 day-1 and 0.004 day-1 accordingly. A linear dependence between the size, weight and number of CCM-1 celos is shown. In the tumor under study a persistant diurnal rhythm of the cell division was found with the maximum at 7 and 19 hours and the minimum at 13. The basis parameters of the mitotic cycle of tumor cells were determined: Tc=17.8 hr., G2 approximately 40 min.; S=9 hr., M approximately 24 min., G1 approximately 18.4 hr. The time of tumor doubling was 48.7 hr. The cell loss factor is as much as 42.1 per cent. PMID:1034368

  9. Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Forghani, Parvin; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-04-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC)s increase in blood and accumulate in the tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing animals, contributing to immune suppression in cancer. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been developed as an anti-inflammatory agent and supportive care agent to reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of silibinin on MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and antitumor activity of silibinin in a mouse model of breast cancer. 4T1 luciferase-transfected mammary carcinoma cells were injected into in the mammary fat pad female BALB/c mice, and female CB17-Prkdc Scid/J mice. Silibinin treatment started on day 4 or day 14 after tumor inoculation continued every other day. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging (BLI) measuring total photon flux. Flow cytometry measured total leukocytes, CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) MDSC, and T cells in the blood and tumors of tumor-bearing mice. The effects of silibinin on 4T1 cell viability in vitro were measured by BLI. Treatment with silibinin increased overall survival in mice harboring tumors derived from the 4T1-luciferase breast cancer cell line, and reduced tumor volumes and numbers of CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) MDSCs in the blood and tumor, and increased the content of T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Silibinin failed to inhibit tumor growth in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency mice, supporting the hypothesis that anticancer effect of silibinin is immune-mediated. The antitumor activity of silibinin requires an intact host immune system and is associated with decreased accumulation of blood and tumor-associated MDSCs. PMID:24574320

  10. [Role of proteins of the macroglobulin family in regulation of tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Zorin, N A; Zorina, V N; Zorina, R M

    2006-01-01

    Proteins of the macroglobulin family are an ancient and evolutionarily conservative link of the immune system, which is actively involved in both inhibition of tumor growth cells and proliferation of tumor cells. Two basically different binding sites and a great conformational plasticity of all representatives of the macroglobulin family, as well as the presence of two to four representatives of the family in the blood of most species allow them to transport diverse substances and exert various regulatory influences on both the tumor and the entire organism. For example, the capacity of macroglobulins for binding hydrolases makes it possible to inhibit enzyme mediated tumor invasion. At the same time, an excess of macroglobulin/hydrolase complexes can activate apoptosis. The tumor is able of using macroglobulins, especially pregnancy-associated proteins, for its own protection. Specifically, pregnancy-associated alpha2-glycoprotein, which is actively produced by human tumor cells, blocks the histocompatibility complex antigens. On the contrary, the capacity of binding zinc stimulates the thymulin-dependent activation of natural killer cells. Nevertheless, the actively growing tumor expresses many receptors to macroglobulins, which are the main carriers of some cytokines and growth factors essential for proliferation. PMID:16523653

  11. Dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine inhibits tumor growth in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; He, Sisi; Shen, Guobo; Ye, Tinghong; Guo, Fuchun; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological factors have been shown to influence tumor progression and therapeutic response. The present study investigated the effect of the dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine on murine breast cancer. The anti‑tumor efficacy of thioridazine was assessed using a murine breast cancer model. Cell apoptosis and proliferation were analyzed in vitro using flow cytometry (FCM) and the MTT assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess Akt, phosphorylated (p)‑Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, p‑STAT3 and p‑p65 in tumor cells following treatment with thioridazine. The Ki67 index and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)‑positive apoptotic cells were assessed in the tumor sections. Thioridazine was found to reduce tumor growth, inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner in vitro. Thioridazine was also found to markedly inhibit tumor proliferation and induce tumor cell apoptosis in vivo as shown by the lower Ki67 index and increase in TUNEL‑positive cells. In addition, thioridazine was observed to inhibit the activation of the canonical nuclear factor κ‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells pathway and exert anti‑tumor effects by remodeling the tumor stroma, as well as inhibit angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In conclusion, thioridazine was found to significantly inhibit breast tumor growth and the potential for thioridazine to be used in cancer therapy may be re‑evaluated and investigated in clinical settings. PMID:26095429

  12. Second hand smoke stimulates tumor angiogenesis and growth.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo-qing; Heeschen, Christopher; Sievers, Richard E; Karliner, Joel S; Parmley, William W; Glantz, Stanton A; Cooke, John P

    2003-09-01

    Exposure to second hand smoke (SHS) is believed to cause lung cancer. Pathological angiogenesis is a requisite for tumor growth. Lewis lung cancer cells were injected subcutaneously into mice, which were then exposed to sidestream smoke (SHS) or clean room air and administered vehicle, cerivastatin, or mecamylamine. SHS significantly increased tumor size, weight, capillary density, VEGF and MCP-1 levels, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Cerivastatin (an inhibitor of HMG-coA reductase) or mecamylamine (an inhibitor of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors) suppressed the effect of SHS to increase tumor size and capillary density. Cerivastatin reduced MCP-1 levels, whereas mecamylamine reduced VEGF levels and EPC. These studies reveal that SHS promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth. These effects of SHS are associated with increases in plasma VEGF and MCP-1 levels, and EPC, mediated in part by isoprenylation and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:14522253

  13. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor enhances bone tumor growth in mice in an osteoclast-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hirbe, Angela C.; Uluçkan, Özge; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Eagleton, Mark C.; Prior, Julie L.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Apicelli, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of osteoclast (OC) activity has been associated with decreased tumor growth in bone in animal models. Increased recognition of factors that promote osteoclastic bone resorption in cancer patients led us to investigate whether increased OC activation could enhance tumor growth in bone. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to treat chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, but is also associated with increased markers of OC activity and decreased bone mineral density (BMD). We used G-CSF as a tool to investigate the impact of increased OC activity on tumor growth in 2 murine osteolytic tumor models. An 8-day course of G-CSF alone (without chemotherapy) significantly decreased BMD and increased OC perimeter along bone in mice. Mice administered G-CSF alone demonstrated significantly increased tumor growth in bone as quantitated by in vivo bioluminescence imaging and histologic bone marrow tumor analysis. Short-term administration of AMD3100, a CXCR4 inhibitor that mobilizes neutrophils with little effect on bone resorption, did not lead to increased tumor burden. However, OC-defective osteoprotegerin transgenic (OPGTg) mice and bisphosphonate-treated mice were resistant to the effects of G-CSF administration upon bone tumor growth. These data demonstrate a G-CSF–induced stimulation of tumor growth in bone that is OC dependent. PMID:17192391

  14. Molecular Cochaperones: Tumor Growth and Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular chaperones play important roles in all cellular organisms by maintaining the proteome in an optimally folded state. They appear to be at a premium in cancer cells whose evolution along the malignant pathways requires the fostering of cohorts of mutant proteins that are employed to overcome tumor suppressive regulation. To function at significant rates in cells, HSPs interact with cochaperones, proteins that assist in catalyzing individual steps in molecular chaperoning as well as in posttranslational modification and intracellular localization. We review current knowledge regarding the roles of chaperones such as heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and Hsp70 and their cochaperones in cancer. Cochaperones are potential targets for cancer therapy in themselves and can be used to assess the likely prognosis of individual malignancies. Hsp70 cochaperones Bag1, Bag3, and Hop play significant roles in the etiology of some cancers as do Hsp90 cochaperones Aha1, p23, Cdc37, and FKBP1. Others such as the J domain protein family, HspBP1, TTC4, and FKBPL appear to be associated with more benign tumor phenotypes. The key importance of cochaperones for many pathways of protein folding in cancer suggests high promise for the future development of novel pharmaceutical agents. PMID:24278769

  15. Semiautomatic growth analysis of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rodday, Bjoern; Hirschhaeuser, Franziska; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are routinely employed as three-dimensional in vitro models to study tumor biology. Cultivation of MCTS in spinner flasks provides better growing conditions, especially with regard to the availability of nutrients and oxygen, when compared with microtiter plates. The main endpoint of drug response experiments is spheroid size. It is common practice to analyze spheroid size manually with a microscope and an ocular micrometer. This requires removal of some spheroids from the flask, which entails major limitations such as loss of MCTS and the risk of contamination. With this new approach, the authors present an efficient and highly reproducible method to analyze the size of complete MCTS populations in culture containers with transparent, flat bottoms. MCTS sediments are digitally scanned and spheroid volumes are calculated by computerized image analysis. The equipment includes regular office hardware (personal computer, flatbed scanner) and software (Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Excel, ImageJ). The accuracy and precision of the method were tested using industrial precision steel beads with known diameter. In summary, in comparison with other methods, this approach provides benefits in terms of semiautomation, noninvasiveness, and low costs. PMID:21908797

  16. Hybrid models of cell and tissue dynamics in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yangjin; Othmer, Hans G

    2015-12-01

    Hybrid models of tumor growth, in which some regions are described at the cell level and others at the continuum level, provide a flexible description that allows alterations of cell-level properties and detailed descriptions of the interaction with the tumor environment, yet retain the computational advantages of continuum models where appropriate. We review aspects of the general approach and discuss applications to breast cancer and glioblastoma. PMID:26775860

  17. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  18. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Michael S.; Shipman, Emilie P.; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T.; Pioli, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  19. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ball, Michael S; Shipman, Emilie P; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T; Pioli, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  20. Directional entropy based model for diffusivity-driven tumor growth.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcelo E; Neto, Luiz M G

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present and investigate a multiscale model to simulate 3D growth of glioblastomas (GBMs) that incorporates features of the tumor microenvironment and derives macroscopic growth laws from microscopic tissue structure information. We propose a normalized version of the Shannon entropy as an alternative measure of the directional anisotropy for an estimation of the diffusivity tensor in cases where the latter is unknown. In our formulation, the tumor aggressiveness and morphological behavior is tissue-type dependent, i.e. alterations in white and gray matter regions (which can e.g. be induced by normal aging in healthy individuals or neurodegenerative diseases) affect both tumor growth rates and their morphology. The feasibility of this new conceptual approach is supported by previous observations that the fractal dimension, which correlates with the Shannon entropy we calculate, is a quantitative parameter that characterizes the variability of brain tissue, thus, justifying the further evaluation of this new conceptual approach. PMID:27105991

  1. The Influence of Liver Resection on Intrahepatic Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Hannes H; Nißler, Valérie; Croner, Roland S

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of tumor recurrence after resection of metastatic liver lesions remains an unsolved problem. Small tumor cell deposits, which are not detectable by routine clinical imaging, may be stimulated by hepatic regeneration factors after liver resection. It is not entirely clear, however, which factors are crucial for tumor recurrence. The presented mouse model may be useful to explore the mechanisms that play a role in the development of recurrent malignant lesions after liver resection. The model combines the easy-to-perform and reproducible techniques of defined amounts of liver tissue removal and tumor induction (by injection) in mice. The animals were treated with either a single laparotomy, a 30% liver resection, or a 70% liver resection. All animals subsequently received a tumor cell injection into the remaining liver tissue. After two weeks of observation, the livers and tumors were evaluated for size and weight and examined by immunohistochemistry. After a 70% liver resection, the tumor volume and weight were significantly increased compared to a laparotomy alone (p <0.05). In addition, immunohistochemistry (Ki67) showed an increased tumor proliferation rate in the resection group (p <0.05). These findings demonstrate the influence of hepatic regeneration mechanisms on intrahepatic tumor growth. Combined with methods like histological workup or RNA analysis, the described mouse model could serve as foundation for a close examination of different factors involved in tumor growth and metastatic disease recurrence within the liver. A considerable number of variables like the length of postoperative observation, the cell line used for injection or the timing of injection and liver resection offer multiple angles when exploring a specific question in the context of post-hepatectomy metastases. The limitations of this procedure are the authorization to perform the procedure on animals, access to an appropriate animal testing facility and acquisition

  2. Nav1.5 regulates breast tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michaela; Yang, Ming; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Brackenbury, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) mediate action potential firing and regulate adhesion and migration in excitable cells. VGSCs are also expressed in cancer cells. In metastatic breast cancer (BCa) cells, the Nav1.5 α subunit potentiates migration and invasion. In addition, the VGSC-inhibiting antiepileptic drug phenytoin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional activity of Nav1.5 and its specific contribution to tumor progression in vivo has not been delineated. Here, we found that Nav1.5 is up-regulated at the protein level in BCa compared with matched normal breast tissue. Na+ current, reversibly blocked by tetrodotoxin, was retained in cancer cells in tumor tissue slices, thus directly confirming functional VGSC activity in vivo. Stable down-regulation of Nav1.5 expression significantly reduced tumor growth, local invasion into surrounding tissue, and metastasis to liver, lungs and spleen in an orthotopic BCa model. Nav1.5 down-regulation had no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis within the in tumors, but increased apoptosis. In vitro, Nav1.5 down-regulation altered cell morphology and reduced CD44 expression, suggesting that VGSC activity may regulate cellular invasion via the CD44-src-cortactin signaling axis. We conclude that Nav1.5 is functionally active in cancer cells in breast tumors, enhancing growth and metastatic dissemination. These findings support the notion that compounds targeting Nav1.5 may be useful for reducing metastasis. PMID:26452220

  3. Effect of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor growth dynamics modeled by correlated colored noises with colored cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Ibrahim Mu'awiyya; Abu Bakar, Mohd Rizam

    2016-07-01

    The effect of non-immunogenic tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor growth dynamics modeled by correlated additive and multiplicative colored noises is investigated. Using the Novikov theorem, Fox approach and Ansatz of Hanggi, an approximate Fokker-Planck equation for the system is obtained and analytic expression for the steady state distribution Pst(x) is derived. Based on the numerical results, we find that fluctuations of microenvironmental factors within the tumor site with parameter θ have a diffusive effect on the tumor growth dynamics, and the tumor response to the microenvironmental factors with parameter α inhibits growth at weak correlation time τ. Moreover, at increasing correlation time τ the inhibitive effect of tumor response α is suppressed and instead a systematic growth promotion is noticed. The result also reveals that the strength of the correlation time τ has a strong influence on the growth effects exerted by the non-immunogenic component of tumor microenvironment on tumor growth.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan F.; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L.; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M.; Castaño, Justo P.; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human acromegaly including gigantism and visceromegaly. However, GC tumors remain poorly characterized at a molecular level. In the present work, we report a detailed histological and molecular characterization of GC tumors using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and imaging techniques. GC tumors display histopathological and molecular features of human GH-producing tumors, including hormone production, cell architecture, senescence activation and alterations in cell cycle gene expression. Furthermore, GC tumors cells displayed sensitivity to somatostatin analogues, drugs that are currently used in the treatment of human GH-producing adenomas, thus supporting the GC tumor model as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic agents. The information obtained would help to maximize the usefulness of the GC rat model for research and preclinical studies in GH-secreting tumors. PMID:26549306

  5. Modulation of tumor growth by inhibitory Fcγ receptor expressed by human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Cohen-Solal, Joël F.G.; Galinha, Annie; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Mathiot, Claire; Galon, Jérôme; Dorval, Thierry; Bernheim, Alain; Fridman, Wolf H.; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-tumor IgG reflects the balance between opposing signals mediated by activating and inhibitory Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) expressed by effector cells. Here, we show that human malignant melanoma cells express the inhibitory low-affinity Fcγ receptor FcγRIIB1 in 40% of tested metastases. When melanoma cells were grafted in nude mice, a profound inhibition of FcγRIIB1 tumor growth that required the intracytoplasmic region of the receptor was observed. IgG immune complexes (ICs) may be required for this inhibition, since sera from nude mice bearing tumors contained IgG that decreased the proliferation of FcγRIIB1-positive cells in vitro, and tumor development of FcγRIIB1-positive melanoma lines was not inhibited in antibody-defective severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Passive immunization of SCID mice with anti–ganglioside GD2 antibody resulted in significant inhibition of growth of FcγRIIB1-positive tumors in an intracytoplasmic-dependent manner. Altogether, these data suggest that human melanoma cells express biologically active inhibitory FcγRIIB1, which regulates their development upon direct interaction with anti-tumor antibodies. Therefore, FcγR expression on human tumors may be one component of the efficacy of antibody-mediated therapies, and FcγR-positive tumors could be the most sensitive candidates for such treatments. PMID:12438452

  6. Promotion of lung tumor growth by interleukin-17

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Beibei; Guenther, James F.; Pociask, Derek A.; Wang, Yu; Kolls, Jay K.; You, Zongbing; Chandrasekar, Bysani; Shan, Bin; Sullivan, Deborah E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate that inhaled cigarette smoke, the predominant lung carcinogen, elicits a T helper 17 (Th17) inflammatory phenotype. Interleukin-17A (IL-17), the hallmark cytokine of Th17 inflammation, displays pro- and antitumorigenic properties in a manner that varies according to tumor type and assay system. To investigate the role of IL-17 in lung tumor growth, we used an autochthonous tumor model (K-RasLA1 mice) with lung delivery of a recombinant adenovirus that expresses IL-17A. Virus-mediated expression of IL-17A in K-RasLA1 mice at 8–10 wk of age doubled lung tumor growth in 3 wk relative to littermates that received a green fluorescent protein-expressing control adenovirus. IL-17 induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in vivo and in vitro. In accord with this finding, selective and specific inhibitors of MMP-9 repressed the increased motility and invasiveness of IL-17-treated lung tumor cells in culture. Knockdown or mutation of p53 promoted the motility of murine lung tumor cells and abrogated the promigratory role of IL-17. Coexpression of siRNA-resistant wild-type, but not mutant, human p53 rescued both IL-17-mediated migration and MMP-9 mRNA induction in p53 knockdown lung tumor cells. IL-17 increased MMP-9 mRNA stability by reducing interaction with the mRNA destabilizing serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1). Taken together, our results indicate that IL-17 stimulates lung tumor growth and regulates MMP-9 mRNA levels in a p53- and SRSF1-dependent manner. PMID:25038189

  7. RAS/MAPK Activation Drives Resistance to Smo Inhibition, Metastasis, and Tumor Evolution in Shh Pathway-Dependent Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E; Chan, Jennifer A; Kelleher, Joseph F; Segal, Rosalind A

    2015-09-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy, and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS-MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway dependency, drives tumor growth, and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together, these findings reveal a critical role of the RAS-MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors. PMID:26130651

  8. RAS/MAPK activation drives resistance to Smo inhibition, metastasis and tumor evolution in Shh pathway-dependent tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J.; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K.; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS/MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway-dependency, drives tumor growth and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together these findings reveal a critical role of RAS/MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors. PMID:26130651

  9. [Effect of soy products on graft tumor growth in rats].

    PubMed

    Zalietok, S P; Orlovs'kyĭ, O A; Hohol', S V; Klenov, O A; Samoĭlenko, O A; Anisimova, Iu M; Borovs'kyĭ, V P; Chekhun, V F

    2006-01-01

    Moderate consumption of a curd-like product made of thermally-treated soy (SPT) led to the retardation of hormone-dependent (Walker W 256 carcinosarcoma in females) and some less hormone-independent (Guerin's carcinoma in males) tumor growth in rats. Excessive (ad libitum) consumption of the same product led to accelaration of W 256 tumor growth. A similar product made of raw soy (SPR) accelerated the growth of W-256 carcinosarcoma and made not any effect on the growth of Guerin's carcinoma. Moderate SPT consumption corrected erythropoesis, decreased lipids peroxidation, retarded peritumoral inflammation, decreased or not changed the content of direct bilirubin in blood serum. SPRconsumption did not lead to those positive effects but sometimes deteriorated those indices. Our experiments have also shown the express-test validity based on dynamical variant of cancerolysis reaction to be practical for evaluation of food quality for cancer patients. PMID:17312888

  10. Retraction: "Concurrent inhibition of NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, and epidermal growth factor receptor leads to greater anti-tumor activity in pancreatic cancer" by Ali et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on March 8, 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figures 2A, 4, 6A, and 6C to be inappropriately manipulated. REFERENCE Ali S, Banerjee S, Schaffert JM, El-Rayes BF, Philip PA, Sarkar FH. 2010. Concurrent inhibition of NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, and epidermal growth factor receptor leads to greater anti-tumor activity in pancreatic cancer. J Cell Biochem 110:171-181; doi: 10.1002/jcb.22523. PMID:27301888

  11. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  12. Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by photoimmunotherapy targeting tumor-associated macrophage in a sorafenib-resistant tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenran; Gao, Liquan; Cai, Yuehong; Liu, Hao; Gao, Duo; Lai, Jianhao; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play essential roles in tumor invasion and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. Clinical evidence suggests that TAM levels are correlated with local tumor relapse, distant metastasis, and poor prognosis in patients. In this study, we synthesized a TAM-targeted probe (IRD-αCD206) by conjugating a monoclonal anti-CD206 antibody with a near-infrared phthalocyanine dye. We then investigated the potential application of the IRD-αCD206 probe to near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of tumors resistant to treatment with the kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Sorafenib treatment had no effect on tumor growth in a 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer, but induced M2 macrophage polarization in tumors. M2 macrophage recruitment by sorafenib-treated 4T1 tumors was noninvasively visualized by in vivo NIRF imaging of IRD-αCD206. Small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and intratumoral microdistribution analysis indicated TAM-specific localization of the IRD-αCD206 probe in 4T1 tumors after several rounds of sorafenib treatment. Upon light irradiation, IRD-αCD206 suppressed the growth of sorafenib-resistant tumors. In vivo CT imaging and ex vivo histological analysis confirmed the inhibition of lung metastasis in mice by IRD-αCD206 PIT. These results demonstrate the utility of the IRD-αCD206 probe for TAM-targeted diagnostic imaging and treatment of tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutics. PMID:26803407

  13. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    What happens in the early, still undetectable human malignancy is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a “Big Bang” model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed sub-clones that are not subject to stringent selection, and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors revealed the absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), and sub-clone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations, and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear born-to-be-bad, with sub-clone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH with significant clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  14. Absence of tumor growth stimulation in a panel of 26 human tumor cell lines by mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts Iscador in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kelter, Gerhard; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2006-06-01

    Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts exhibit antitumor activity based on direct inhibition of tumor growth as well as modulation of immune response. Recent reports suggested potential stimulation of tumor growth at low doses of mistletoe extracts, particularly in hematological tumors and tumors responding to immunotherapy. Therefore, the direct effect of the three mistletoe extracts Iscador M Spezial, Iscador Qu Spezial and Iscador P on tumor growth was investigated in a panel of 26 human tumor cell lines in vitro using cellular proliferation assays. Antitumor activity of the three preparations at high concentrations was investigated in a panel of 12 cell lines. The results showed no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth by any of the three extracts, in particular the five tumor cell lines previously reported to be sensitive to direct mistletoe lectin stimulation. On the contrary, the lectin containing preparations Iscador M Spezial and Iscador Qu Spezial expressed a pronounced antitumor activity exhibiting a nearly identical antitumor profile compared to isolated mistletoe lectin 1. PMID:16927523

  15. Development, Selection, and Validation of Tumor Growth Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Lima, Ernesto; Oden, J. Tinsley

    In recent years, a multitude of different mathematical approaches have been taken to develop multiscale models of solid tumor growth. Prime successful examples include the lattice-based, agent-based (off-lattice), and phase-field approaches, or a hybrid of these models applied to multiple scales of tumor, from subcellular to tissue level. Of overriding importance is the predictive power of these models, particularly in the presence of uncertainties. This presentation describes our attempt at developing lattice-based, agent-based and phase-field models of tumor growth and assessing their predictive power through new adaptive algorithms for model selection and model validation embodied in the Occam Plausibility Algorithm (OPAL), that brings together model calibration, determination of sensitivities of outputs to parameter variances, and calculation of model plausibilities for model selection. Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences.

  16. Joint fitting reveals hidden interactions in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Barberis, L; Pasquale, M A; Condat, C A

    2015-01-21

    Tumor growth is often the result of the simultaneous development of two or more cancer cell populations. Crucial to the system evolution are the interactions between these populations. To obtain information about these interactions we apply the recently developed vector universality (VUN) formalism to various instances of competition between tumor populations. The formalism allows us (a) to quantify the growth mechanisms of a HeLa cell colony, describing the phenotype switching responsible for its fast expansion, (b) to reliably reconstruct the evolution of the necrotic and viable fractions in both in vitro and in vivo tumors using data for the time dependences of the total masses alone, and (c) to show how the shedding of cells leading to subspheroid formation is beneficial to both the spheroid and subspheroid populations, suggesting that shedding is a strong positive influence on cancer dissemination. PMID:25451531

  17. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth by targeted delivery of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Hyoudou, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yuki; Umeyama, Yukari; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2005-12-01

    To develop effective anti-metastatic therapy, targeted or sustained delivery of catalase was examined in mice. We found that mouse lung with metastatic colonies of adenocarcinoma colon26 cells exhibited reduced catalase activity. The interaction of the tumor cells with macrophages or hepatocytes generated detectable amounts of ROS, and increased the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. Hepatocyte-targeted delivery of catalase was successfully achieved by galactosylation, which was highly effective in inhibiting the hepatic metastasis of colon26 cells. PEGylation, which increased the retention of catalase in the circulation, effectively inhibited the pulmonary metastasis of the cells. To examine which processes in tumor metastasis are inhibited by catalase derivatives, the tissue distribution and proliferation of tumor cells in mice was quantitatively analyzed using firefly luciferase-expressing tumor cells. An injection of PEG-catalase just before the inoculation of melanoma B16-BL6/Luc cells significantly reduced the number of the tumor cells in the lung at 24 h. Daily dosing of PEG-catalase greatly inhibited the proliferation of the tumor cells, and increased the survival rate of the tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that targeted or sustained delivery of catalase to sites where tumor cells metastasize is a promising approach for inhibiting metastatic tumor growth. PMID:16256238

  18. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  19. Drugs Which Inhibit Osteoclast Function Suppress Tumor Growth through Calcium Reduction in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Liao, Jinhui; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J; Sadler, William D; Pienta, Kenneth J; Rosol, Thomas J; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma frequently metastasizes to bone where the microenvironment facilitates its growth. Inhibition of bone resorption is effective in reducing tumor burden and bone destruction in prostate cancer. However, whether drugs that inhibit osteoclast function inhibit tumor growth independent of inhibition of bone resorption is unclear. Calcium is released during bone resorption and the calcium sensing receptor is an important regulator of cancer cell proliferation. The goal of this investigation was to elucidate the role of calcium released during bone resorption and to determine the impact of drugs which suppress bone resorption on tumor growth in bone. To compare tumor growth in a skeletal versus non-skeletal site, equal numbers of canine prostate cancer cells expressing luciferase (ACE-1luc) prostate cancer cells were inoculated into a simple collagen matrix, neonatal mouse vertebrae (vossicles), human de-proteinized bone, or a mineralized collagen matrix. Implants were placed subcutaneously into athymic mice. Luciferase activity was used to track tumor growth weekly and at one month tumors were dissected for histologic analysis. Luciferase activity and tumor size were greater in vossicles, de-proteinized bone and mineralized collagen matrix versus non-mineralized collagen implants. The human osteoblastic prostate carcinoma cell line C4-2b also grew better in a mineral rich environment with a greater proliferation of C4-2b cells reflected by Ki-67 staining. Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate, and recombinant OPG-Fc, a RANKL inhibitor, were administered to mice bearing vertebral implants (vossicles) containing ACE-1 osteoblastic prostate cancer cells. Vossicles or collagen matrices were seeded with ACE-1luc cells subcutaneously in athymic mice (2 vossicles, 2 collagen implants/mouse). Mice received ZA (5μg/mouse, twice/week), (OPG-Fc at 10mg/kg, 3 times/week) or vehicle, and luciferase activity was measured weekly. Histologic analysis of the tumors

  20. Hemostatic Disorders in Hormonally Active Pituitary Tumors.

    PubMed

    Świątkowska-Stodulska, R; Babińska, A; Mital, A; Stodulski, D; Sworczak, K

    2015-10-01

    Endocrinopathies encompass heterogeneous diseases that can lead to hemostasis disorders at various stages over their clinical course. Normal hemostasis requires an equilibrium between the processes of coagulation and fibrinolysis, which depend on multiple activators and inhibitors. To date, the influence of various hormonal disorders on the hemostatic system has been assessed many times. The aim of this review was to analyze hemostasis abnormalities that occur in patients with hormonally active pituitary tumors: corticotropinoma, somatotropinoma, prolactinoma, gonadotropinoma and thyrotropinoma. Authors discuss studies that examined coagulation and hemostasis parameters among patients with these tumors, as well as analyze antithrombotic prophylaxis approach for endogenous hypercortisolemia subjects in particular. PMID:26285071

  1. Pancreatic Tumor Growth Prediction with Multiplicative Growth and Image-Derived Motion.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken C L; Summers, Ronald M; Kebebew, Electron; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are abnormal growths of hormone-producing cells in the pancreas. Different from the brain in the skull, the pancreas in the abdomen can be largely deformed by the body posture and the surrounding organs. In consequence, both tumor growth and pancreatic motion attribute to the tumor shape difference observable from images. As images at different time points are used to personalize the tumor growth model, the prediction accuracy may be reduced if such motion is ignored. Therefore, we incorporate the image-derived pancreatic motion to tumor growth personalization. For realistic mechanical interactions, the multiplicative growth decomposition is used with a hyperelastic constitutive law to model tumor mass effect, which allows growth modeling without compromising the mechanical accuracy. With also the FDG-PET and contrast-enhanced CT images, the functional, structural, and motion data are combined for a more patient-specific model. Experiments on synthetic and clinical data show the importance of image-derived motion on estimating physiologically plausible mechanical properties and the promising performance of our framework. From six patient data sets, the recall, precision, Dice coefficient, relative volume difference, and average surface distance were 89.8 ± 3.5%, 85.6 ± 7.5%, 87.4 ± 3.6%, 9.7 ± 7.2%, and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm, respectively. PMID:26221698

  2. RALBP1/RLIP76 depletion in mice suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting tumor neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghyung; Wurtzel, Jeremy G.T.; Singhal, Sharad S.; Awasthi, Sanjay; Goldfinger, Lawrence E.

    2012-01-01

    RalBP1/RLIP76 is a widely expressed multifunctional protein that binds the Ral and R-Ras small GTPases. In the mouse, RLIP76 is non-essential but its depletion or blockade promotes tumorigenesis and heightens the sensitivity of normal and tumor cells to radiation and cytotoxic drugs. However, its pathobiological functions which support tumorigenesis are not well understood. Here we show that RLIP76 is required for angiogenesis and for efficient neovascularization of primary solid tumors. Tumor growth from implanted melanoma or carcinoma cells was blunted in RLIP76−/− mice. An X-ray microCT-based method to model tumor vascular structures revealed defects in both the extent and form of tumor angiogenesis in RLIP76−/− mice. Specifically, tumor vascular volumes were diminished and vessels were fewer in number, shorter, and narrower in RLIP76−/− mice than in wild-type mice. Moreover, we found that angiogenesis was blunted in mutant mice in the absence of tumor cells, with endothelial cells isolated from these animals exhibiting defects in migration, proliferation and cord formation in vitro. Taken together, our results establish that RLIP76 is required for efficient endothelial cell function and angiogenesis in solid tumors. PMID:22902412

  3. In vivo Cytokine Gene Transfer by Gene Gun Reduces Tumor Growth in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenn H.; Burkholder, Joseph K.; Sun, Jian; Culp, Jerilyn; Turner, Joel; Lu, Xing G.; Pugh, Thomas D.; Ershler, William B.; Yang, Ning-Sun

    1995-03-01

    Implantation of tumor cells modified by in vitro cytokine gene transfer has been shown by many investigators to result in potent in vivo antitumor activities in mice. Here we describe an approach to tumor immunotherapy utilizing direct transfection of cytokine genes into tumorbearing animals by particle-mediated gene transfer. In vivo transfection of the human interleukin 6 gene into the tumor site reduced methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma growth, and a combination of murine tumor necrosis factor α and interferon γ genes inhibited growth of a renal carcinoma tumor model (Renca). In addition, treatment with murine interleukin 2 and interferon γ genes prolonged the survival of Renca tumor-bearing mice and resulted in tumor eradication in 25% of the test animals. Transgene expression was demonstrated in treated tissues by ELISA and immunohistochemical analysis. Significant serum levels of interleukin 6 and interferon γ were detected, demonstrating effective secretion of transgenic proteins from treated skin into the bloodstream. This in vivo cytokine gene therapy approach provides a system for evaluating the antitumor properties of various cytokines in different tumor models and has potential utility for human cancer gene therapy.

  4. The Methanol Extract of Angelica sinensis Induces Cell Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Human Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wen-Lin; Harn, Horng-jyh; Hung, Pei-Hsiu; Hsieh, Ming-Chang; Chang, Kai-Fu; Huang, Xiao-Fan; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Lee, Ming-Shih; Tsai, Nu-Man

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly vascularized and invasive neoplasm. The methanol extract of Angelica sinensis (AS-M) is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat several diseases, such as gastric mucosal damage, hepatic injury, menopausal symptoms, and chronic glomerulonephritis. AS-M also displays potency in suppressing the growth of malignant brain tumor cells. The growth suppression of malignant brain tumor cells by AS-M results from cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. AS-M upregulates expression of cyclin kinase inhibitors, including p16, to decrease the phosphorylation of Rb proteins, resulting in arrest at the G0-G1 phase. The expression of the p53 protein is increased by AS-M and correlates with activation of apoptosis-associated proteins. Therefore, the apoptosis of cancer cells induced by AS-M may be triggered through the p53 pathway. In in vivo studies, AS-M not only suppresses the growth of human malignant brain tumors but also significantly prolongs patient survival. In addition, AS-M has potent anticancer effects involving cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and antiangiogenesis. The in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects of AS-M indicate that this extract warrants further investigation and potential development as a new antibrain tumor agent, providing new hope for the chemotherapy of malignant brain cancer. PMID:24319475

  5. Formononetin, a novel FGFR2 inhibitor, potently inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhen Feng; Chen, Che; Liu, Jia Yun; Wu, Guan Nan; Yao, Xue Quan; Liu, Fu Kun; Li, Gang; Shen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated in clinical trials target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other potential therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here we identified formononetin as a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities. Formononetin demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, formononetin suppressed FGF2-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of formononetin on different molecular components in treated endothelial cell, and found that formononetin suppressed FGF2-triggered activation of FGFR2 and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling. Moreover, formononetin directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the oncogenic signaling pathways in breast cancer cell. In vivo, using xenograft models of breast cancer, formononetin showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, formononetin enhanced the effect of VEGFR2 inhibitor sunitinib on tumor growth inhibition. Taken together, our results indicate that formononetin targets the FGFR2-mediated Akt signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis. PMID:26575424

  6. The Host Defense Peptide Cathelicidin Is Required for NK Cell-Mediated Suppression of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Büchau, Amanda S.; Morizane, Shin; Trowbridge, Janet; Schauber, Jürgen; Kotol, Paul; Bui, Jack D.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor surveillance requires the interaction of multiple molecules and cells that participate in innate and the adaptive immunity. Cathelicidin was initially identified as an antimicrobial peptide, although it is now clear that it fulfills a variety of immune functions beyond microbial killing. Recent data have suggested contrasting roles for cathelicidin in tumor development. Because its role in tumor surveillance is not well understood, we investigated the requirement of cathelicidin in controlling transplantable tumors in mice. Cathelicidin was observed to be abundant in tumor-infiltrating NK1.1+ cells in mice. The importance of this finding was demonstrated by the fact that cathelicidin knockout mice (Camp−/−) permitted faster tumor growth than wild type controls in two different xenograft tumor mouse models (B16.F10 and RMA-S). Functional in vitro analyses found that NK cells derived from Camp−/− versus wild type mice showed impaired cytotoxic activity toward tumor targets. These findings could not be solely attributed to an observed perforin deficiency in freshly isolated Camp−/− NK cells, because this deficiency could be partially restored by IL-2 treatment, whereas cytotoxic activity was still defective in IL-2-activated Camp−/− NK cells. Thus, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of cathelicidin in NK cell antitumor function. PMID:19949065

  7. Doxorubicin loaded silica nanorattles actively seek tumors with improved anti-tumor effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fuping; Li, Linlin; Liu, Tianlong; Hao, Nanjing; Liu, Huiyu; Tan, Longfei; Li, Hongbo; Huang, Xinglu; Peng, Bo; Yan, Chuanmiao; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiaoli; Chen, Dong; Tang, Fangqiong

    2012-05-01

    Silica nanorattles (SNs) have proven to be promising vehicles for drug delivery. In order to further enhance efficacy and minimize adverse effects, active targeted delivery to tumors is necessary. In this work, SNs modified with a tumor specific targeting ligand, folic acid (FA), was used as carrier of doxorubicin (DOX) (DOX-FA-SNs). Drug loading, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of DOX-FA-SNs in vitro in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) were evaluated. DOX-FA-SNs showed a higher cytotoxicity in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) than DOX loaded carboxyl (-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) modified SNs (DOX-COOH-SNs and DOX-PEG-SNs, respectively). However, DOX-FA-SNs showed lower cytotoxicity in folate receptor negative normal mouse fibroblast cells (L929 cells) compared with free DOX. In vivo tumor-targeted fluorescence imaging indicated specific tumor targeting and uptake of FA-SNs in nude mice bearing subcutaneous HeLa cell-derived xenograft tumors. In vivo anti-tumor experiments demonstrated that DOX-FA-SNs (10 mg kg-1 of DOX) significantly regressed the tumor growth and reduced toxicity compared with free DOX. These results have great significance in developing and optimizing SNs as effective intracellular delivery and specific tumor targeting vehicles.Silica nanorattles (SNs) have proven to be promising vehicles for drug delivery. In order to further enhance efficacy and minimize adverse effects, active targeted delivery to tumors is necessary. In this work, SNs modified with a tumor specific targeting ligand, folic acid (FA), was used as carrier of doxorubicin (DOX) (DOX-FA-SNs). Drug loading, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of DOX-FA-SNs in vitro in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) were evaluated. DOX-FA-SNs showed a higher cytotoxicity in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) than DOX loaded carboxyl (-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) modified SNs (DOX-COOH-SNs and DOX-PEG-SNs, respectively). However, DOX

  8. Baseline tumor growth and immune control in laboratory mice are significantly influenced by subthermoneutral housing temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kokolus, Kathleen M.; Capitano, Maegan L.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Eng, Jason W.-L.; Waight, Jeremy D.; Hylander, Bonnie L.; Sexton, Sandra; Hong, Chi-Chen; Gordon, Christopher J.; Abrams, Scott I.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that fundamental aspects of antitumor immunity in mice are significantly influenced by ambient housing temperature. Standard housing temperature for laboratory mice in research facilities is mandated to be between 20–26 °C; however, these subthermoneutral temperatures cause mild chronic cold stress, activating thermogenesis to maintain normal body temperature. When stress is alleviated by housing at thermoneutral ambient temperature (30–31 °C), we observe a striking reduction in tumor formation, growth rate and metastasis. This improved control of tumor growth is dependent upon the adaptive immune system. We observe significantly increased numbers of antigen-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes and CD8+ T cells with an activated phenotype in the tumor microenvironment at thermoneutrality. At the same time there is a significant reduction in numbers of immunosuppressive MDSCs and regulatory T lymphocytes. Notably, in temperature preference studies, tumor-bearing mice select a higher ambient temperature than non-tumor-bearing mice, suggesting that tumor-bearing mice experience a greater degree of cold-stress. Overall, our data raise the hypothesis that suppression of antitumor immunity is an outcome of cold stress-induced thermogenesis. Therefore, the common approach of studying immunity against tumors in mice housed only at standard room temperature may be limiting our understanding of the full potential of the antitumor immune response. PMID:24248371

  9. Growth-inhibitory activity of the D-mannan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae X2180-1A-5 mutant strain against mouse-implanted sarcoma 180 and Ehrlich-carcinoma solid tumor.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Takanohashi, M; Okubo, Y; Suzuki, M; Suzuki, S

    1980-08-15

    The D-mannan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae X2180-1A-5 mutant strain, which possesses a main chain composed of alpha-(1 yields 6) linked D-mannopyranosyl residues and a small proportion of branches composed of alpha-(1 yields 2)- and alpha-(1 yields 3)-linked D-mannopyranosyl residues, showed strong growth-inhibitory activity against mouse-implanted Sarcoma 180 and Ehrlich-carcinoma solid tumor. The observation that the level of this activity was nearly identical with that of the D-mannan of a wild-type strain of bakers' yeast, which possesses a high proportion of branches composed of alpha-(1 yields 2)-and alpha-(1 yields 3)-linked D-mannopyranosyl residues, suggests that the branches are not essential for antitumor activity. The partial acid-degradation products of both D-mannans, the molecular weight of which was one-third of that of each parent D-mannan, had only one half of the antitumor activity of the parent D-mannans. This suggests that molecular size is the most important factor for the differences in acitvity of the polysaccharides of wild and mutant strains. PMID:6996813

  10. Recombinant epoetins do not stimulate tumor growth in erythropoietin receptor-positive breast carcinoma models.

    PubMed

    LaMontagne, Kenneth R; Butler, Jeannene; Marshall, Deborah J; Tullai, Jennifer; Gechtman, Ze'ev; Hall, Chassidy; Meshaw, Alan; Farrell, Francis X

    2006-02-01

    We investigated the significance of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression following treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO; epoetin alpha) and the effect of recombinant epoetins (epoetin alpha, epoetin beta, and darbepoetin alpha) alone or in combination with anticancer therapy on tumor growth in two well-established preclinical models of breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell lines). Expression and localization of EPOR under hypoxic and normoxic conditions in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells were evaluated by immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry. EPOR binding was evaluated using [125I]rHuEPO. Proliferation, migration, and signaling in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells following treatment with rHuEPO were evaluated. Tumor growth was assessed following administration of recombinant epoetins alone and in combination with paclitaxel (anticancer therapy) in orthotopically implanted MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast carcinoma xenograft models in athymic mice. EPOR expression was detected in both tumor cell lines. EPOR localization was found to be exclusively cytosolic and no specific [125I]rHuEPO binding was observed. There was no stimulated migration, proliferation, or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT following rHuEPO treatment. In mice, treatment with recombinant epoetins alone and in combination with paclitaxel resulted in equivalent tumor burdens compared with vehicle-treated controls. Results from our study suggest that although EPOR expression was observed in two well-established breast carcinoma cell lines, it was localized to a cytosolic distribution and did not transduce a signaling cascade in tumors that leads to tumor growth. The addition of recombinant epoetins to paclitaxel did not affect the outcome of paclitaxel therapy in breast carcinoma xenograft models. These results show that recombinant epoetins do not evoke a physiologic response on EPOR-bearing tumor cells as assessed by numerous variables

  11. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tiffen, Jessamy C; Bailey, Charles G; Ng, Cynthia; Rasko, John E J; Holst, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7) and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10) cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments. PMID:21092230

  12. Modulation of the Leptin Receptor Mediates Tumor Growth and Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chalfant, Madeleine C.; Gorden, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration. PMID:25919692

  13. Pyruvate Kinase M2 in Blood Circulation Facilitates Tumor Growth by Promoting Angiogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangwei; Zhang, Yinwei; Qiao, Jingjuan; Yang, Jenny J.; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    It is long known that pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is released into the circulation of cancer patients. The PKM2 levels in patients have been suggested as a diagnostic marker for many types of cancers. However, it is not known how PKM2 is released in the blood, and whether the circulating PKM2 has any physiological function(s) in tumor progression. In this report, we demonstrate that PKM2 in the blood facilitates tumor growth by promoting tumor angiogenesis. Our experiments show that PKM2 promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and cell-ECM adhesion. Only the dimeric PKM2 possess the activity in promoting tumor angiogenesis, which is consistent with the observations that PKM2 in circulation of cancer patients is a dimer form. PMID:25070887

  14. Effects of Marsdenia tenacissima polysaccharide on the immune regulation and tumor growth in H22 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuang; Qiu, Limin; Li, Yiquan; Li, Lu; Wang, Xingyun; Liu, Zhi; Guo, Yan; Wang, Haotian

    2016-02-10

    One water-soluble polysaccharide (Marsdenia tenacissima polysaccharide, MTP), with an average molecular weight of 4.9 × 10(4) Da, was isolated from the dried rattan of M. tenacissima. MTP contained 93.8% carbohydrates, 5.6% proteins and 21.3% uronic acid, and were composed of arabinose, mannose, galactose, xylose, glucuronic acid at a molar ratio of 9.1, 17.7, 30.2, 22.4 and 20.6. The experiments on the animals showed that MTP could increase the serum hemolysin, promote the formation of antibody-forming cells and improve the phagocytosis of mononuclear macrophage in normal mice. Meanwhile, MTP could also inhibit the growth of tumor in H22 tumor-bearing mice dose-dependently, and increase the spleen index, thymus index and serum albumin level in the mice. In addition, MTP could elevate the serum level of TNF-α and IL-2, increase the activity of GSH-Px, CAT and SOD in the liver tissue, and reduce the content of VEGF and MDA. These results suggest that MTP can regulate the immune function in mice and suppress the growth of tumor in H22 tumor-bearing mice, and its antitumor activity may be related to its antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:26686104

  15. Lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 expression in cancer cells attenuates tumor growth and metastasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyun; Benesch, Matthew G K; Dewald, Jay; Zhao, Yuan Y; Patwardhan, Neeraj; Santos, Webster L; Curtis, Jonathan M; McMullen, Todd P W; Brindley, David N

    2014-11-01

    Lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 (LPP1) degrades lysophosphatidate (LPA) and attenuates receptor-mediated signaling. LPP1 expression is low in many cancer cells and tumors compared with normal tissues. It was hypothesized from studies with cultured cells that increasing LPP1 activity would decrease tumor growth and metastasis. This hypothesis has never been tested in vivo. To do this, we inducibly expressed LPP1 or a catalytically inactive mutant in cancer cells. Expressing active LPP1 increased extracellular LPA degradation by 5-fold. It also decreased the stimulation of Ca(2+) transients by LPA, a nondephosphorylatable LPA1/2 receptor agonist and a protease-activated receptor-1 peptide. The latter results demonstrate that LPP1 has effects downstream of receptor activation. Decreased Ca(2+) mobilization and Rho activation contributed to the effects of LPP1 in attenuating the LPA-induced migration of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and their growth in 3D culture. Increasing LPP1 expression in breast and thyroid cancer cells decreased tumor growth and the metastasis by up to 80% compared with expression of inactive LPP1 or green fluorescent protein in syngeneic and xenograft mouse models. The present work demonstrates for the first time that increasing the LPP1 activity in three lines of aggressive cancer cells decreases their abilities to produce tumors and metastases in mice. PMID:25210149

  16. Emodin Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth by Blocking the Tumor-Promoting Feedforward Loop between Cancer Cells and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iwanowycz, Stephen; Wang, Junfeng; Hodge, Johnie; Wang, Yuzhen; Yu, Fang; Fan, Daping

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage infiltration correlates with severity in many types of cancer. Tumor cells recruit macrophages and educate them to adopt an M2-like phenotype through the secretion of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP1 and CSF1. Macrophages in turn promote tumor growth through supporting angiogenesis, suppressing antitumor immunity, modulating extracellular matrix remodeling, and promoting tumor cell migration. Thus, tumor cells and macrophages interact to create a feedforward loop supporting tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, we tested the ability of emodin, a Chinese herb-derived compound, to inhibit breast cancer growth in mice and examined the underlying mechanisms. Emodin was used to treat mice bearing EO771 or 4T1 breast tumors. It was shown that emodin attenuated tumor growth by inhibiting macrophage infiltration and M2-like polarization, accompanied by increased T-cell activation and reduced angiogenesis in tumors. The tumor inhibitory effects of emodin were lost in tumor-bearing mice with macrophage depletion. Emodin inhibited IRF4, STAT6, and C/EBPβ signaling and increased inhibitory histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27m3) on the promoters of M2-related genes in tumor-associated macrophages. In addition, emodin inhibited tumor cell secretion of MCP1 and CSF1, as well as expression of surface anchoring molecule Thy-1, thus suppressing macrophage migration toward and adhesion to tumor cells. These results suggest that emodin acts on both breast cancer cells and macrophages and effectively blocks the tumor-promoting feedforward loop between the two cell types, thereby inhibiting breast cancer growth and metastasis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1931-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196773

  17. Dietary rice component, Oryzanol, inhibits tumor growth in tumor-bearing Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scope: We investigated the effects of rice bran and components on tumor growth in mice. Methods and results: Mice fed standard diets supplemented with rice bran, '-oryzanol, Ricetrienol®, ferulic acid, or phytic acid for 2 weeks were inoculated with CT-26 colon cancer cells and fed the same diet fo...

  18. Non-diffeomorphic registration of brain tumor images by simulating tissue loss and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zacharaki, Evangelia I; Hogea, Cosmina S; Shen, Dinggang; Biros, George; Davatzikos, Christos

    2009-07-01

    Although a variety of diffeomorphic deformable registration methods exist in the literature, application of these methods in the presence of space-occupying lesions is not straightforward. The motivation of this work is spatial normalization of MR images from patients with brain tumors in a common stereotaxic space, aiming to pool data from different patients into a common space in order to perform group analyses. Additionally, transfer of structural and functional information from neuroanatomical brain atlases into the individual patient's space can be achieved via the inverse mapping, for the purpose of segmenting brains and facilitating surgical or radiotherapy treatment planning. A method that estimates the brain tissue loss and replacement by tumor is applied for achieving equivalent image content between an atlas and a patient's scan, based on a biomechanical model of tumor growth. Automated estimation of the parameters modeling brain tissue loss and displacement is performed via optimization of an objective function reflecting feature-based similarity and elastic stretching energy, which is optimized in parallel via APPSPACK (Asynchronous Parallel Pattern Search). The results of the method, applied to 21 brain tumor patients, indicate that the registration accuracy is relatively high in areas around the tumor, as well as in the healthy portion of the brain. Also, the calculated deformation in the vicinity of the tumor is shown to correlate highly with expert-defined visual scores indicating the tumor mass effect, thereby potentially leading to an objective approach to quantification of mass effect, which is commonly used in diagnosis. PMID:19408350

  19. A recombinant decoy comprising EGFR and ErbB-4 inhibits tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lindzen, Moshit; Carvalho, Silvia; Starr, Alex; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Pradeep, Chaluvally-Raghavan; Köstler, Wolfgang J.; Rabinkov, Aaron; Lavi, Sara; Bacus, Sarah S.; Yarden, Yosef

    2011-01-01

    EGF-like growth factors control tumor progression, as well as evasion from the toxic effects of chemotherapy. Accordingly, antibodies targeting the cognate receptors, such as EGFR/ErbB-1 and the co-receptor HER2/ErbB-2, are widely used to treat cancer patients, but agents that target the EGF-like growth factors are not available. To circumvent the existence of 11 distinct ErbB ligands, we constructed a soluble fusion protein (hereinafter: TRAP-Fc) comprising truncated extracellular domains of EGFR/ErbB-1 and ErbB-4. The recombinant TRAP-Fc retained high affinity ligand binding to EGF-like growth factors and partially inhibited growth of a variety of cultured tumor cells. Consistently, TRAP-Fc displayed an inhibitory effect in xenograft models of human cancer, as well as synergy with chemotherapy. Additionally, TRAP-Fc inhibited invasive growth of mammary tumor cells and reduced their metastatic seeding in the lungs of animals. Taken together, the activities displayed by TRAP-Fc reinforce critical roles of EGF-like growth factors in tumor progression, and they warrant further tests of TRAP-Fc in pre-clinical models. PMID:22105361

  20. APRIL promotes breast tumor growth and metastasis and is associated with aggressive basal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    García-Castro, Araceli; Zonca, Manuela; Florindo-Pinheiro, Douglas; Carvalho-Pinto, Carla E; Cordero, Alex; Gutiérrez del Fernando, Burgo; García-Grande, Aránzazu; Mañes, Santos; Hahne, Michael; González-Suárez, Eva; Planelles, Lourdes

    2015-05-01

    APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) is a cytokine of the tumor necrosis factor family associated mainly with hematologic malignancies. APRIL is also overexpressed in breast carcinoma tissue lesions, although neither its role in breast tumorigenesis nor the underlying molecular mechanism is known. Here, we show that several breast cancer cell lines express APRIL and both its receptors, B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) and transmembrane activator and CAML-interactor (TACI), independently of luminal or basal tumor cell phenotype, and that the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38, ERK1/2, and JNK1/2 are activated in response to APRIL. The inflammatory stimulus poly I:C, a toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 ligand, enhanced APRIL secretion. Silencing experiments decreased cell proliferation, demonstrating that APRIL is a critical autocrine factor for breast tumor growth. Studies of 4T1 orthotopic breast tumors in APRIL transgenic mice showed that an APRIL-enriched environment increased tumor growth and promoted lung metastasis associated with enhanced tumor cell proliferation; BCMA and TACI expression suggests that both participate in these processes. We detected APRIL, BCMA and TACI in human luminal, triple-negative breast carcinomas and HER2 breast carcinomas, with increased levels in more aggressive basal tumors. APRIL was observed near Ki67(+) nuclei and was distributed heterogeneously in the cancer cells, in the leukocyte infiltrate, and in the myoepithelial layer adjacent to the tumor area; these results imply that APRIL provides proliferation signals to tumor cells through paracrine and autocrine signaling. Our study identifies participation of APRIL signaling in breast cancer promotion; we propose impairment of this pathway as a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:25750171

  1. RPA inhibition increases replication stress and suppresses tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Glanzer, Jason G; Liu, Shengqin; Wang, Ling; Mosel, Adam; Peng, Aimin; Oakley, Greg G

    2014-09-15

    The ATR/Chk1 pathway is a critical surveillance network that maintains genomic integrity during DNA replication by stabilizing the replication forks during normal replication to avoid replication stress. One of the many differences between normal cells and cancer cells is the amount of replication stress that occurs during replication. Cancer cells with activated oncogenes generate increased levels of replication stress. This creates an increased dependency on the ATR/Chk1 pathway in cancer cells and opens up an opportunity to preferentially kill cancer cells by inhibiting this pathway. In support of this idea, we have identified a small molecule termed HAMNO ((1Z)-1-[(2-hydroxyanilino)methylidene]naphthalen-2-one), a novel protein interaction inhibitor of replication protein A (RPA), a protein involved in the ATR/Chk1 pathway. HAMNO selectively binds the N-terminal domain of RPA70, effectively inhibiting critical RPA protein interactions that rely on this domain. HAMNO inhibits both ATR autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of RPA32 Ser33 by ATR. By itself, HAMNO treatment creates DNA replication stress in cancer cells that are already experiencing replication stress, but not in normal cells, and it acts synergistically with etoposide to kill cancer cells in vitro and slow tumor growth in vivo. Thus, HAMNO illustrates how RPA inhibitors represent candidate therapeutics for cancer treatment, providing disease selectivity in cancer cells by targeting their differential response to replication stress. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5165-72. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25070753

  2. RPA Inhibition increases Replication Stress and Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Liu, Shengqin; Wang, Ling; Mosel, Adam; Peng, Aimin; Oakley, Greg G.

    2014-01-01

    The ATR/Chk1 pathway is a critical surveillance network that maintains genomic integrity during DNA replication by stabilizing the replication forks during normal replication to avoid replication stress. One of the many differences between normal cells and cancer cells is the amount of replication stress that occurs during replication. Cancer cells with activated oncogenes generate increased levels of replication stress. This creates an increased dependency on the ATR/Chk1 pathway in cancer cells and opens up an opportunity to preferentially kill cancer cells by inhibiting this pathway. In support of this idea, we have identified a small molecule termed HAMNO ((1Z)-1-[(2-hydroxyanilino)methylidene]naphthalen-2-one), a novel protein interaction inhibitor of replication protein A (RPA), a protein involved in the ATR/Chk1 pathway. HAMNO selectively binds the N-terminal domain of RPA70, effectively inhibiting critical RPA protein interactions which rely on this domain. HAMNO inhibits both ATR autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of RPA32 Ser33 by ATR. By itself, HAMNO treatment creates DNA replication stress in cancer cells that are already experiencing replication stress, but not in normal cells, and it acts synergistically with etoposide to kill cancer cells in vitro and slow tumor growth in vivo. Thus, HAMNO illustrates how RPA inhibitors represent candidate therapeutics for cancer treatment, providing disease selectivity in cancer cells by targeting their differential response to replication stress. PMID:25070753

  3. Multi-targeted inhibition of tumor growth and lung metastasis by redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles loading disulfiram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaopin; Xiao, Jisheng; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Yu, Haijun; Mao, Shirui; Li, Yaping

    2014-03-01

    Metastasis, the main cause of cancer related deaths, remains the greatest challenge in cancer treatment. Disulfiram (DSF), which has multi-targeted anti-tumor activity, was encapsulated into redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles to achieve intracellular targeted delivery and finally inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The crosslinked micelles demonstrated good stability in circulation and specifically released DSF under a reductive environment that mimicked the intracellular conditions of tumor cells. As a result, the DSF-loaded redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles (DCMs) dramatically inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis and suppressed cell invasion, as well as impairing tube formation of HMEC-1 cells. In addition, the DCMs could accumulate in tumor tissue and stay there for a long time, thereby causing significant inhibition of 4T1 tumor growth and marked prevention in lung metastasis of 4T1 tumors. These results suggested that DCMs could be a promising delivery system in inhibiting the growth and metastasis of breast cancer.

  4. Dual HER/VEGF receptor targeting inhibits in vivo ovarian cancer tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Becker, Marc A; Farzan, Thahir; Harrington, Sean C; Krempski, James W; Weroha, S John; Hou, Xiaonan; Kalli, Kimberly R; Wong, Tai W; Haluska, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Ovarian cancer mortality ranks highest among all gynecologic cancers with growth factor pathways playing an integral role in tumorigenesis, metastatic dissemination, and therapeutic resistance. The HER and VEGF receptor (VEGFR) are both overexpressed and/or aberrantly activated in subsets of ovarian tumors. While agents targeting either the HER or VEGF pathways alone have been investigated, the impact of these agents have not led to overall survival benefit in ovarian cancer. We tested the hypothesis that cotargeting HER and VEGFR would maximize antitumor efficacy at tolerable doses. To this end, ovarian cancer xenografts grown intraperitoneally in athymic nude mice were tested in response to AC480 (pan-HER inhibitor, "HERi"), cediranib (pan-VEGFR inhibitor "VEGFRi"), or BMS-690514 (combined HER/VEGFR inhibitor "EVRi"). EVRi was superior to both HERi and VEGFRi in terms of tumor growth, final tumor weight, and progression-free survival. Correlative tumor studies employing phosphoproteomic antibody arrays revealed distinct agent-specific alterations, with EVRi inducing the greatest overall effect on growth factor signaling. These data suggest that simultaneous inhibition of HER and VEGFR may benefit select subsets of ovarian cancer tumors. To this end, we derived a novel HER/VEGF signature that correlated with poor overall survival in high-grade, late stage, serous ovarian cancer patient tumors. PMID:24130056

  5. Bone marrow adipocytes promote tumor growth in bone via FABP4-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Herroon, Mackenzie K; Rajagurubandara, Erandi; Hardaway, Aimalie L; Powell, Katelyn; Turchick, Audrey; Feldmann, Daniel; Podgorski, Izabela

    2013-11-01

    Incidence of skeletal metastases and death from prostate cancer greatly increases with age and obesity, conditions which increase marrow adiposity. Bone marrow adipocytes are metabolically active components of bone metastatic niche that modulate the function of neighboring cells; yet the mechanisms of their involvement in tumor behavior in bone have not been explored. In this study, using experimental models of intraosseous tumor growth and diet-induced obesity, we demonstrate the promoting effects of marrow fat on growth and progression of skeletal prostate tumors. We reveal that exposure to lipids supplied by marrow adipocytes induces expression of lipid chaperone FABP4, pro-inflammatory interleukin IL-1β, and oxidative stress protein HMOX-1 in metastatic tumor cells and stimulates their growth and invasiveness. We show that FABP4 is highly overexpressed in prostate skeletal tumors from obese mice and in bone metastasis samples from prostate cancer patients. In addition, we provide results suggestive of bi-directional interaction between FABP4 and PPARγ pathways that may be driving aggressive tumor cell behavior in bone. Together, our data provide evidence for functional relationship between bone marrow adiposity and metastatic prostate cancers and unravel the FABP4/IL-1β axis as a potential therapeutic target for this presently incurable disease. PMID:24240026

  6. Extract of Cordyceps militaris inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Putranto, Endy Widya; Kondo, Eisaku; Watanabe, Risayo; Saito, Ken; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Susumu; Kaihata, Masaji; Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development and metastasis. Among several angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF) is important for tumor-derived angiogenesis and commonly overexpressed in solid tumors. Thus, many antitumor strategies targeting VEGF have been developed to inhibit cancer angiogenesis, offering insights into the successful treatment of solid cancers. However, there are a number of issues such as harmful effects on normal vascularity in clinical trials. Taking this into consideration, we employed Cordyceps militaris as an antitumor approach due to its biological safety in vivo. The herbal medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has been reported to show potential anticancer properties including anti-angiogenic capacity; however, its concrete properties have yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the biological role of Cordyceps militaris extract in tumor cells, especially in regulating angiogenesis and tumor growth of a human malignant melanoma cell line. We demonstrated that Cordyceps militaris extract remarkably suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptotic cell death in culture that links to the abrogation of VEGF production in melanoma cells. This was followed by mitigation of Akt1 and GSK-3β activation, while p38α phosphorylation levels were increased. Extract treatment in mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect with down-regulation of VEGF expression. The results suggest that suppression of tumor growth by Cordyceps militaris extract is, at least, mediated by its anti-angiogenicity and apoptosis induction capacities. Cordyceps militaris extract may be a potent antitumor herbal drug for solid tumors. PMID:24789042

  7. The role of mechanical forces in tumor growth and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rakesh K.; Martin, John D.; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2014-01-01

    Tumors generate physical forces during growth and progression. These physical forces are able to compress blood and lymphatic vessels, reducing perfusion rates and creating hypoxia. When exerted directly on cancer cells, they can increase their invasive and metastatic potential. Tumor vessels - while nourishing the tumor - are usually leaky and tortuous, which further decreases perfusion. Hypo-perfusion and hypoxia contribute to immune-evasion, promote malignant progression and metastasis, and reduce the efficacy of a number of therapies, including radiation. In parallel, vessel leakiness together with vessel compression cause a uniformly elevated interstitial fluid pressure that hinders delivery of blood-borne therapeutic agents, lowering the efficacy of chemo- and nano-therapies. In addition, shear stresses exerted by flowing blood and interstitial fluid modulate the behavior of cancer and a variety of host cells. Taming these physical forces can improve therapeutic outcomes in many cancers. PMID:25014786

  8. Endostatin: an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, M S; Boehm, T; Shing, Y; Fukai, N; Vasios, G; Lane, W S; Flynn, E; Birkhead, J R; Olsen, B R; Folkman, J

    1997-01-24

    We previously identified the angiogenesis inhibitor angiostatin. Using a similar strategy, we have identified endostatin, an angiogenesis inhibitor produced by hemangioendothelioma. Endostatin is a 20 kDa C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII. Endostatin specifically inhibits endothelial proliferation and potently inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. By a novel method of sustained release, E. coli-derived endostatin was administered as a nonrefolded suspension. Primary tumors were regressed to dormant microscopic lesions. Immunohistochemistry revealed blocked angiogenesis accompanied by high proliferation balanced by apoptosis in tumor cells. There was no toxicity. Together with angiostatin data, these findings validate a strategy for identifying endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors, suggest a theme of fragments of proteins as angiogenesis inhibitors, and demonstrate dormancy therapy. PMID:9008168

  9. Inhibition of mammary tumor growth and metastases to bone and liver by dietary grape polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M; Martínez, Joel E; Wall, Kristin M; Cubano, Luis A; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2009-01-01

    The cancer preventive properties of grape products such as red wine have been attributed to polyphenols enriched in red wine. However, much of the studies on cancer preventive mechanisms of grape polyphenols have been conducted with individual compounds at concentrations too high to be achieved via dietary consumption. We recently reported that combined grape polyphenols at physiologically relevant concentrations are more effective than individual compounds at inhibition of ERalpha(-), ERbeta(+) MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and primary mammary tumor growth (Schlachterman et al., Transl Oncol 1:19-27, 2008). Herein, we show that combined grape polyphenols induce apoptosis and are more effective than individual resveratrol, quercetin, or catechin at inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cell migration in the highly metastatic ER (-) MDA-MB-435 cell line. The combined effect of dietary grape polyphenols (5 mg/kg each resveratrol, quercetin, and catechin) was tested on progression of mammary tumors in nude mice created from green fluorescent protein-tagged MDA-MB-435 bone metastatic variant. Fluorescence image analysis of primary tumor growth demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in tumor area by dietary grape polyphenols. Molecular analysis of excised tumors demonstrated that reduced mammary tumor growth may be due to upregulation of FOXO1 (forkhead box O1) and NFKBIA (IkappaBalpha), thus activating apoptosis and potentially inhibiting NfkappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) activity. Image analysis of distant organs for metastases demonstrated that grape polyphenols reduced metastasis especially to liver and bone. Overall, these results indicate that combined dietary grape polyphenols are effective at inhibition of mammary tumor growth and site-specific metastasis. PMID:19294520

  10. Liver-Tumor Hybrid Organoids for Modeling Tumor Growth and Drug Response In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Skardal, Aleksander; Devarasetty, Mahesh; Rodman, Christopher; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay

    2015-01-01

    Current in vitro models for tumor growth and metastasis are poor facsimiles of in vivo cancer physiology and thus, are not optimal for anti-cancer drug development. Three dimensional (3D) tissue organoid systems, which utilize human cells in a tailored microenvironment, have the potential to recapitulate in vivo conditions and address the drawbacks of current tissue culture dish 2D models. In this study, we created liver-based cell organoids in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor. The organoids were further inoculated with colon carcinoma cells in order to create liver-tumor organoids for in vitro modeling of liver metastasis. Immunofluorescent staining revealed notable phenotypic differences between tumor cells in 2D and inside the organoids. In 2D they displayed an epithelial phenotype, and only after transition to the organoids did the cells present with a mesenchymal phenotype. The cell surface marker expression results suggested that WNT pathway might be involved in the phenotypic changes observed between cells in 2D and organoid conditions, and may lead to changes in cell proliferation. Manipulating the WNT pathway with an agonist and antagonist showed significant changes in sensitivity to the anti-proliferative drug 5-fluoruracil. Collectively, the results show the potential of in vitro 3D liver-tumor organoids to serve as a model for metastasis growth and for testing the response of tumor cells to current and newly discovered drugs. PMID:25777294

  11. Dietary selenium supplementation modifies breast tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Prabhu, K Sandeep; Das, Arunangshu; Mastro, Andrea M

    2013-11-01

    The survival rate for breast cancer drops dramatically once the disease progresses to the metastatic stage. Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient credited with having high anticancer and chemopreventive properties. In our study, we investigated if dietary Se supplementation modified breast cancer development in vivo. Three diets supplemented with sodium selenite, methylseleninic acid (MSA) or selenomethionine (SeMet), as well as a Se-deficient and a Se-adequate diet were fed to mice before mammary gland inoculation of 4T1.2 cells. The primary tumor growth, the numbers of cancer cells present in lungs, hearts, livers, kidneys and femurs and several proinflammatory cytokines were measured. We found that inorganic selenite supplementation provided only short-term delay of tumor growth, whereas the two organic SeMet and MSA supplements provided more potent growth inhibition. These diets also affected cancer metastasis differently. Mice fed selenite developed the most extensive metastasis and had an increased incidence of kidney and bone metastasis. On the other hand, mice fed the SeMet diet showed the least amount of cancer growth at metastatic sites. The MSA diet also provided some protection against breast cancer metastasis although the effects were less significant than those of SeMet. The cytokine profiles indicated that serum levels of interlukin-2, interleukin-6, interferon γ and vascular endothelial growth factor were elevated in SeMet-supplemented mice. There was no significant difference in tumor growth and the patterns of metastasis between the Se-deficient and Se-adequate groups. Our data suggest that organic Se supplementation may reduce/delay breast cancer metastasis, while selenite may exacerbate it. PMID:23613334

  12. Tumor growth and its effect on Magnetic Resonance Imaging signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cersosimo, Homero; Colon, Jorge; Ramos, Elio; Zypman, Fredy

    2000-03-01

    The goal of this project is twofold. On one hand, we have developed computer code based on simple probabilistic rules to model the growth (or shrinking) of cancerigenous tissue. We assume that initially there exists a differentiated cell, which has a time- dependent probability of reproducing. If it did reproduce, then we assume that it has a finite probability of dying before reproducing again. This simple model falls into the Eden-type kind, and presents appropriate bulk growth characteristics, as it follows Gompert observational law. We propose new methods of geometrical characterization of the tumor. Besides its total mass, we also consider higher multipolar order of mass distribution and surface fractal dimension. In addition, we study how the geometrical properties of the tumor affect the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) signal. To this end, we consider a human brain in the presence of radiofrequency fields. We calculate the MRI image of this object. Then, we introduce a tumor in the white-gray matter region and reobtain the MRI image. We associate the signal changes with the geometrical properties of the tumor.

  13. Integrative models of vascular remodeling during tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Heiko; Welter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Malignant solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth, and gain of metastatic potential. Angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), vessel cooption (the integration of existing blood vessels into the tumor vasculature), and vessel regression remodel the healthy vascular network into a tumor-specific vasculature that is in many respects different from the hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network of the host tissues. Integrative models based on detailed experimental data and physical laws implement in silico the complex interplay of molecular pathways, cell proliferation, migration, and death, tissue microenvironment, mechanical and hydrodynamic forces, and the fine structure of the host tissue vasculature. With the help of computer simulations high-precision information about blood flow patterns, interstitial fluid flow, drug distribution, oxygen and nutrient distribution can be obtained and a plethora of therapeutic protocols can be tested before clinical trials. In this review, we give an overview over the current status of integrative models describing tumor growth, vascular remodeling, blood and interstitial fluid flow, drug delivery, and concomitant transformations of the microenvironment. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808551

  14. The role of the microenvironment in tumor growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yangjin; Stolarska, Magdalena A.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computational analysis are essential for understanding the dynamics of the complex gene networks that control normal development and homeostasis, and can help to understand how circumvention of that control leads to abnormal outcomes such as cancer. Our objectives here are to discuss the different mechanisms by which the local biochemical and mechanical microenvironment, which is comprised of various signaling molecules, cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM), affects the progression of potentially-cancerous cells, and to present new results on two aspects of these effects. We first deal with the major processes involved in the progression from a normal cell to a cancerous cell at a level accessible to a general scientific readership, and we then outline a number of mathematical and computational issues that arise in cancer modeling. In Section 2 we present results from a model that deals with the effects of the mechanical properties of the environment on tumor growth, and in Section 3 we report results from a model of the signaling pathways and the tumor microenvironment (TME), and how their interactions affect the development of breast cancer. The results emphasize anew the complexities of the interactions within the TME and their effect on tumor growth, and show that tumor progression is not solely determined by the presence of a clone of mutated immortal cells, but rather that it can be ‘community-controlled’. It Takes a Village – Hilary Clinton PMID:21736894

  15. TNF Neutralization Results in the Delay of Transplantable Tumor Growth and Reduced MDSC Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Atretkhany, Kamar-Sulu N.; Nosenko, Maxim A.; Gogoleva, Violetta S.; Zvartsev, Ruslan V.; Qin, Zhihai; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells (IMCs) that, under normal conditions, may differentiate into mature macrophages, granulocytes, and dendritic cells. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation, cancer, or infection, such differentiation is inhibited leading to IMC expansion. Under the influence of inflammatory cytokines, these cells become MDSCs, acquire immunosuppressive phenotype, and accumulate in the affected tissue, as well as in the periphery. Immune suppressive activity of MDSCs is partly due to upregulation of arginase 1, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. These suppressive factors can enhance tumor growth by repressing T-cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. TNF is a critical factor for the induction, expansion, and suppressive activity of MDSCs. In this study, we evaluated the effects of systemic TNF ablation on tumor-induced expansion of MDSCs in vivo using TNF humanized (hTNF KI) mice. Both etanercept and infliximab treatments resulted in a delayed growth of MCA 205 fibrosarcoma in hTNF KI mice, significantly reduced tumor volume, and also resulted in less accumulated MDSCs in the blood 3 weeks after tumor cell inoculation. Thus, our study uncovers anti-tumor effects of systemic TNF ablation in vivo. PMID:27148266

  16. TNF Neutralization Results in the Delay of Transplantable Tumor Growth and Reduced MDSC Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Atretkhany, Kamar-Sulu N; Nosenko, Maxim A; Gogoleva, Violetta S; Zvartsev, Ruslan V; Qin, Zhihai; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Drutskaya, Marina S

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells (IMCs) that, under normal conditions, may differentiate into mature macrophages, granulocytes, and dendritic cells. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation, cancer, or infection, such differentiation is inhibited leading to IMC expansion. Under the influence of inflammatory cytokines, these cells become MDSCs, acquire immunosuppressive phenotype, and accumulate in the affected tissue, as well as in the periphery. Immune suppressive activity of MDSCs is partly due to upregulation of arginase 1, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. These suppressive factors can enhance tumor growth by repressing T-cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. TNF is a critical factor for the induction, expansion, and suppressive activity of MDSCs. In this study, we evaluated the effects of systemic TNF ablation on tumor-induced expansion of MDSCs in vivo using TNF humanized (hTNF KI) mice. Both etanercept and infliximab treatments resulted in a delayed growth of MCA 205 fibrosarcoma in hTNF KI mice, significantly reduced tumor volume, and also resulted in less accumulated MDSCs in the blood 3 weeks after tumor cell inoculation. Thus, our study uncovers anti-tumor effects of systemic TNF ablation in vivo. PMID:27148266

  17. NOS Inhibition Modulates Immune Polarization and Improves Radiation-Induced Tumor Growth Delay.

    PubMed

    Ridnour, Lisa A; Cheng, Robert Y S; Weiss, Jonathan M; Kaur, Sukhbir; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Basudhar, Debashree; Heinecke, Julie L; Stewart, C Andrew; DeGraff, William; Sowers, Anastasia L; Thetford, Angela; Kesarwala, Aparna H; Roberts, David D; Young, Howard A; Mitchell, James B; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Wiltrout, Robert H; Wink, David A

    2015-07-15

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are important mediators of progrowth signaling in tumor cells, as they regulate angiogenesis, immune response, and immune-mediated wound healing. Ionizing radiation (IR) is also an immune modulator and inducer of wound response. We hypothesized that radiation therapeutic efficacy could be improved by targeting NOS following tumor irradiation. Herein, we show enhanced radiation-induced (10 Gy) tumor growth delay in a syngeneic model (C3H) but not immunosuppressed (Nu/Nu) squamous cell carcinoma tumor-bearing mice treated post-IR with the constitutive NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). These results suggest a requirement of T cells for improved radiation tumor response. In support of this observation, tumor irradiation induced a rapid increase in the immunosuppressive Th2 cytokine IL10, which was abated by post-IR administration of L-NAME. In vivo suppression of IL10 using an antisense IL10 morpholino also extended the tumor growth delay induced by radiation in a manner similar to L-NAME. Further examination of this mechanism in cultured Jurkat T cells revealed L-NAME suppression of IR-induced IL10 expression, which reaccumulated in the presence of exogenous NO donor. In addition to L-NAME, the guanylyl cyclase inhibitors ODQ and thrombospondin-1 also abated IR-induced IL10 expression in Jurkat T cells and ANA-1 macrophages, which further suggests that the immunosuppressive effects involve eNOS. Moreover, cytotoxic Th1 cytokines, including IL2, IL12p40, and IFNγ, as well as activated CD8(+) T cells were elevated in tumors receiving post-IR L-NAME. Together, these results suggest that post-IR NOS inhibition improves radiation tumor response via Th1 immune polarization within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25990221

  18. Discovery of colon tumor cell growth inhibitory agents through a combinatorial approach

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Ashraf H.; Abouel-Ella, Dalal A.; Lehmann, Jochen; Tinsley, Heather N.; Gary, Bernard D.; Piazza, Gary A.; Abdel-Fattah, Mohammed A.O.

    2016-01-01

    Two series with the general formula of 4,6-diaryl-2-oxo-1,2 dihydropyridine-3-carbonitriles and their isosteric 4,6-diaryl-2-imino-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile were synthesized through one pot reaction of the appropriate acetophenone, aldehyde, ammonium acetate with ethyl cyanoacetate or malononitrile, respectively. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their tumor cell growth inhibitory activity against the human HT-29 colon tumor cell line, as well as their PDE3 inhibitory activity. Compound 4-(2-Ethoxyphenyl)-2-oxo-6-thiophen-3-yl-1,2-dihydropyridine-3 carbonitrile (21) showed tumor cell growth inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 1.25 μM. Meanwhile, 4-(4-Ethoxyphenyl)-2-imino-6-(thiophen-3-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile (26) showed inhibitory effect upon PDE3 using cAMP or cGMP as substrate. No correlation exists between PDE3 inhibition and the tumor cell growth inhibitory activity. Docking compound 21 to other possible molecular targets showed the potential to bind PIM1 Kinase. PMID:19836860

  19. Itraconazole inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Blake T.; Dobromilskaya, Irina; Liu, Jun O.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic agent bevacizumab has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, although the survival benefit associated with this agent is marginal, and toxicities and cost are substantial. A recent screen for selective inhibitors of endothelial cell proliferation identified the oral anti-fungal drug itraconazole as a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic activity. Here we define and characterize the anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities of itraconazole in relevant preclinical models of angiogenesis and lung cancer. Itraconazole consistently demonstrated potent, specific, and dose-dependent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)- and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-mediated angiogenic stimulation. In vivo, using primary xenograft models of human non-small cell lung cancer, oral itraconazole showed single agent growth-inhibitory activity associated with induction of tumor HIF1α expression and marked inhibition of tumor vascularity. Itraconazole significantly enhanced the anti-tumor efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin in the same model systems. Taken together, these data suggest that itraconazole has potent and selective inhibitory activity against multiple key aspects of tumor-associated angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and strongly support clinical translation of its use. Based on these observations we have initiated a randomized phase II study comparing the efficacy of standard cytotoxic therapy with or without daily oral itraconazole in patients with recurrent metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:21896639

  20. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; DeWitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  1. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; Dewitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-10-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models.

  2. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Sano, Michael B; Arena, Christopher B; Bittleman, Katelyn R; DeWitt, Matthew R; Cho, Hyung J; Szot, Christopher S; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W; Davalos, Rafael V

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  3. Dll4 Inhibition plus Aflibercept Markedly Reduces Ovarian Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Hu, Wei; Hu, Limin; Previs, Rebecca A; Dalton, Heather J; Yang, Xiao-Yun; Sun, Yunjie; McGuire, Michael; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Nagaraja, Archana S; Kang, Yu; Liu, Tao; Nick, Alpa M; Jennings, Nicholas B; Coleman, Robert L; Jaffe, Robert B; Sood, Anil K

    2016-06-01

    Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4), one of the Notch ligands, is overexpressed in ovarian cancer, especially in tumors resistant to anti-VEGF therapy. Here, we examined the biologic effects of dual anti-Dll4 and anti-VEGF therapy in ovarian cancer models. Using Dll4-Fc blockade and anti-Dll4 antibodies (murine REGN1035 and human REGN421), we evaluated the biologic effects of Dll4 inhibition combined with aflibercept or chemotherapy in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian cancer. We also examined potential mechanisms by which dual Dll4 and VEGF targeting inhibit tumor growth using immunohistochemical staining for apoptosis and proliferation markers. Reverse-phase protein arrays were used to identify potential downstream targets of Dll4 blockade. Dual targeting of VEGF and Dll4 with murine REGN1035 showed superior antitumor effects in ovarian cancer models compared with either monotherapy. In the A2780 model, REGN1035 (targets murine Dll4) or REGN421 (targets human Dll4) reduced tumor weights by 62% and 82%, respectively; aflibercept alone reduced tumor weights by 90%. Greater therapeutic effects were observed for Dll4 blockade (REGN1035) combined with either aflibercept or docetaxel (P < 0.05 for the combination vs. aflibercept). The superior antitumor effects of REGN1035 and aflibercept were related to increased apoptosis in tumor cells compared with the monotherapy. We also found that GATA3 expression was significantly increased in tumor stroma from the mice treated with REGN1035 combined with docetaxel or aflibercept, suggesting an indirect effect of these combination treatments on the tumor stroma. These findings identify that dual targeting of Dll4 and VEGF is an attractive therapeutic approach. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1344-52. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27009216

  4. Interfacial properties in a discrete model for tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglia, Belén; Guisoni, Nara; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-03-01

    We propose and study, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations, a minimal discrete model for avascular tumor growth, which can also be applied for the description of cell cultures in vitro. The interface of the tumor is self-affine and its width can be characterized by the following exponents: (i) the growth exponent β=0.32(2) that governs the early time regime, (ii) the roughness exponent α=0.49(2) related to the fluctuations in the stationary regime, and (iii) the dynamic exponent z=α/β≃1.49(2), which measures the propagation of correlations in the direction parallel to the interface, e.g., ξ∝t1/z, where ξ is the parallel correlation length. Therefore, the interface belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, in agreement with recent experiments of cell cultures in vitro. Furthermore, density profiles of the growing cells are rationalized in terms of traveling waves that are solutions of the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. In this way, we achieved excellent agreement between the simulation results of the discrete model and the continuous description of the growth front of the culture or tumor.

  5. Splenectomy inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by modulating anti-tumor adaptive and innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Liran; Mishalian, Inbal; Bayuch, Rachel; Zolotarov, Lida; Michaeli, Janna; Fridlender, Zvi G

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that inhibitors of the immune system reside in the spleen and inhibit the endogenous antitumor effects of the immune system. We hypothesized that splenectomy would inhibit the growth of relatively large non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors by modulating the systemic inhibition of the immune system, and in particular Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC). The effect of splenectomy was evaluated in several murine lung cancer models. We found that splenectomy reduces tumor growth and the development of lung metastases, but only in advanced tumors. In immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth and metastatic spread disappeared. Splenectomy significantly reduced the presence of MDSC, and especially monocytic-MDSC in the circulation and inside the tumor. Specific reduction of the CCR2+ subset of monocytic MDSC was demonstrated, and the importance of the CCL2-CCR2 axis was further shown by a marked reduction in CCL2 following splenectomy. These changes were followed by changes in the macrophages contents of the tumors to become more antitumorigenic, and by increased activation of CD8+ Cytotoxic T-cells (CTL). By MDSC depletion, and adoptive transfer of MDSCs, we demonstrated that the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth was substantially mediated by MDSC cells. We conclude that the spleen is an important contributor to tumor growth and metastases, and that splenectomy can blunt this effect by depletion of MDSC, changing the amount and characteristics of myeloid cells and enhancing activation of CTL. PMID:26137413

  6. Activation of mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 normalizes tumor vasculature and improves cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Adapala, R K; Thoppil, R J; Ghosh, K; Cappelli, H C; Dudley, A C; Paruchuri, S; Keshamouni, V; Klagsbrun, M; Meszaros, J G; Chilian, W M; Ingber, D E; Thodeti, C K

    2016-01-21

    Tumor vessels are characterized by abnormal morphology and hyperpermeability that together cause inefficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Although vascular endothelial growth factor has been established as a critical regulator of tumor angiogenesis, the role of mechanical signaling in the regulation of tumor vasculature or tumor endothelial cell (TEC) function is not known. Here we show that the mechanosensitive ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) regulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor vessel maturation via modulation of TEC mechanosensitivity. We found that TECs exhibit reduced TRPV4 expression and function, which is correlated with aberrant mechanosensitivity towards extracellular matrix stiffness, increased migration and abnormal angiogenesis by TEC. Further, syngeneic tumor experiments revealed that the absence of TRPV4 induced increased vascular density, vessel diameter and reduced pericyte coverage resulting in enhanced tumor growth in TRPV4 knockout mice. Importantly, overexpression or pharmacological activation of TRPV4 restored aberrant TEC mechanosensitivity, migration and normalized abnormal angiogenesis in vitro by modulating Rho activity. Finally, a small molecule activator of TRPV4, GSK1016790A, in combination with anticancer drug cisplatin, significantly reduced tumor growth in wild-type mice by inducing vessel maturation. Our findings demonstrate TRPV4 channels to be critical regulators of tumor angiogenesis and represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic and vascular normalization therapies. PMID:25867067

  7. Texaphyrins: Tumor Localizing Redox Active Expanded Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Arambula, Jonathan F.; Preihs, Christian; Borthwick, Derric; Magda, Darren; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2011-01-01

    Texaphyrins, a class of tumor selective expanded porphyrins capable of coordinating large metals, have been found to act as redox mediators within biological systems. This review summarizes studies involving their experimentaluse in cancer chemotherapy. Mechanistic insights involving their presumed mode of action are also described, as well as certain structure activity relationships. Finally, newer texaphyrin-based applications associated with targeted drug delivery are presented. PMID:21355841

  8. Temozolomide/PLGA microparticles plus vatalanib inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in an orthotopic glioma model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Yue, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, He; Tang, Gu-Sheng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Jian-Min

    2010-11-01

    Temozolomide (TM) has anti-tumor activity in patients with malignant glioma. Implantable poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles of TM (TM-MS) have been developed, enhancing the cytotoxicity of TM to Glioma C6 cells. Vatalanib, as anti-angiogenic agent, has also shown anti-tumor activity with malignant gliomas. We examined the combined effects of TM-MS and vatalanib in a rat orthotopic glioma model and found TM-MS offered a greater tumor inhibition than TM, and combination treatment with both of them improved the survival time versus single agent therapy. The combination treatment also demonstrated an inhibition to rat glioma tumors, a significant decrease in cell proliferation, an increase in apoptosis, and a lower microvessel density within the glioma tumors. The results suggest that TM-MS can more effectively inhibit tumor than TM, and combination treatment with TM-MS and vatalanib inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis and may prove to be a promising therapy for malignant gliomas. PMID:20816959

  9. A nanoparticle system specifically designed to deliver short interfering RNA inhibits tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Nobuhiro; Manabe, Ichiro; Tottori, Tsuneaki; Ishihara, Atsushi; Ogata, Fusa; Kim, Jong Heon; Nishimura, Satoshi; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Oishi, Yumiko; Itaka, Keiji; Kato, Yasuki; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Nagai, Ryozo

    2009-08-15

    Use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising new approach thought to have a strong potential to lead to rapid development of gene-oriented therapies. Here, we describe a newly developed, systemically injectable siRNA vehicle, the "wrapsome" (WS), which contains siRNA and a cationic lipofection complex in a core that is fully enveloped by a neutral lipid bilayer and hydrophilic polymers. WS protected siRNA from enzymatic digestion, providing a long half-life in the systemic circulation. Moreover, siRNA/WS leaked from blood vessels within tumors into the tumor tissue, where it accumulated and was subsequently transfected into the tumor cells. Because the transcription factor KLF5 is known to play a role in tumor angiogenesis, we designed KLF5-siRNA to test the antitumor activity of siRNA/WS. KLF5-siRNA/WS exhibited significant antitumor activity, although neither WS containing control scrambled-siRNA nor saline containing KLF5-siRNA affected tumor growth. KLF5-siRNA/WS inhibited Klf5 expression within tumors at both mRNA and protein levels, significantly reducing angiogenesis, and we detected no significant acute or long-term toxicity. Our findings support the idea that siRNA/WS can be used to knock down specific genes within tumors and thereby exert therapeutic effects against cancers. PMID:19654315

  10. Selective GPER activation decreases proliferation and activates apoptosis in tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Chimento, A; Casaburi, I; Bartucci, M; Patrizii, M; Dattilo, R; Avena, P; Andò, S; Pezzi, V; Sirianni, R

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogens binding to estrogen receptor (ER) α increase proliferation of Leydig tumor cells. Estrogens can also bind to G protein-coupled ER (GPER) and activation of this receptor can either increase or decrease cell proliferation of several tumor types. The aim of this study was to investigate GPER expression in R2C rat tumor Leydig cells, evaluate effects of its activation on Leydig tumor cell proliferation and define the molecular mechanisms triggered in response to its activation. R2C cells express GPER and its activation, using the specific ligand G-1, is associated with decreased cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis. Apoptosis after G-1 treatment was asserted by appearance of DNA condensation and fragmentation, decrease in Bcl-2 and increase in Bax expression, cytochrome c release, caspase and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation. These effects were dependent on GPER activation because after silencing of the gene, using a specific small interfering RNA, cyt c release, PARP-1 activation and decrease in cell proliferation were abrogated. These events required a rapid, however, sustained extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 activation. G-1 was able to decrease the growth of R2C xenograft tumors in CD1 nude mice while increasing the number of apoptotic cells. In addition, in vivo administration of G-1 to male CD1 mice did not cause any alteration in testicular morphology, while cisplatin, the cytotoxic drug currently used for the therapy of Leydig tumors, severely damaged testicular structure, an event associated with infertility in cisplatin-treated patients. These observations indicate that GPER targeting for the therapy of Leydig cell tumor may represent a good alternative to cisplatin to preserve fertility in Leydig tumor patients. PMID:23907461

  11. Selective GPER activation decreases proliferation and activates apoptosis in tumor Leydig cells

    PubMed Central

    Chimento, A; Casaburi, I; Bartucci, M; Patrizii, M; Dattilo, R; Avena, P; Andò, S; Pezzi, V; Sirianni, R

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogens binding to estrogen receptor (ER) α increase proliferation of Leydig tumor cells. Estrogens can also bind to G protein-coupled ER (GPER) and activation of this receptor can either increase or decrease cell proliferation of several tumor types. The aim of this study was to investigate GPER expression in R2C rat tumor Leydig cells, evaluate effects of its activation on Leydig tumor cell proliferation and define the molecular mechanisms triggered in response to its activation. R2C cells express GPER and its activation, using the specific ligand G-1, is associated with decreased cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis. Apoptosis after G-1 treatment was asserted by appearance of DNA condensation and fragmentation, decrease in Bcl-2 and increase in Bax expression, cytochrome c release, caspase and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation. These effects were dependent on GPER activation because after silencing of the gene, using a specific small interfering RNA, cyt c release, PARP-1 activation and decrease in cell proliferation were abrogated. These events required a rapid, however, sustained extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 activation. G-1 was able to decrease the growth of R2C xenograft tumors in CD1 nude mice while increasing the number of apoptotic cells. In addition, in vivo administration of G-1 to male CD1 mice did not cause any alteration in testicular morphology, while cisplatin, the cytotoxic drug currently used for the therapy of Leydig tumors, severely damaged testicular structure, an event associated with infertility in cisplatin-treated patients. These observations indicate that GPER targeting for the therapy of Leydig cell tumor may represent a good alternative to cisplatin to preserve fertility in Leydig tumor patients. PMID:23907461

  12. Design, synthesis, anti-tumor activity, and molecular modeling of quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ju; Wan, Shanhe; Wang, Guangfa; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Zhonghuang; Tian, Yuanxin; Yu, Yonghuan; Wu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Jiajie

    2016-08-01

    Three series of novel quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit EGFR tyrosine kinase and a panel of five human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, A549, BT-474, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231). Bioassay results indicated that five of these prepared compounds (12c-12e and 13c-13d) exhibited remarkably higher inhibitory activities against EGFR and SK-BR-3 cell line. Compounds 12c and 12e displayed the most potent EGFR inhibitory activity (IC50 = 2.97 nM and 3.58 nM, respectively) and good anti-proliferative effect against SK-BR-3 cell with the IC50 values of 3.10 μM and 5.87 μM, respectively. Furthermore, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies verified that compound 12c and 12e shared similar binding pattern with gefitinib in the binding pocket of EGFR. MM-GBSA binding free energy revealed that the compound 12c and 12e have almost the same inhibitory activity against EGFR as gefitinib, and that the dominating effect of van der Waals interactions drives the binding process. PMID:27132165

  13. Vascular tumors have increased p70 S6-kinase activation and are inhibited by topical rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Du, Wa; Gerald, Damien; Perruzzi, Carole A; Rodriguez-Waitkus, Paul; Enayati, Ladan; Krishnan, Bhuvaneswari; Edmonds, Joseph; Hochman, Marcelo L; Lev, Dina C; Phung, Thuy L

    2013-10-01

    Vascular tumors are endothelial cell neoplasms whose cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to tumor formation, are poorly understood, and current therapies have limited efficacy with significant side effects. We have investigated mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in benign and malignant vascular tumors, and the effects of mTOR kinase inhibitor as a potential therapy for these lesions. Human vascular tumors (infantile hemangioma and angiosarcoma) were analyzed by immunohistochemical stains and western blot for the phosphorylation of p70 S6-kinase (S6K) and S6 ribosomal protein (S6), which are activated downstream of mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1). To assess the function of S6K, tumor cells with genetic knockdown of S6K were analyzed for cell proliferation and migration. The effects of topical rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, on mTORC1 and mTOR complex-2 (mTORC2) activities, as well as on tumor growth and migration, were determined. Vascular tumors showed increased activation of S6K and S6. Genetic knockdown of S6K resulted in reduced tumor cell proliferation and migration. Rapamycin fully inhibited mTORC1 and partially inhibited mTORC2 activities, including the phosphorylation of Akt (serine 473) and PKCα, in vascular tumor cells. Rapamycin significantly reduced vascular tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. As a potential localized therapy for cutaneous vascular tumors, topically applied rapamycin effectively reduced tumor growth with limited systemic drug absorption. These findings reveal the importance of mTOR signaling pathways in benign and malignant vascular tumors. The mTOR pathway is an important therapeutic target in vascular tumors, and topical mTOR inhibitors may provide an alternative and well-tolerated therapy for the treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions. PMID:23938603

  14. Effect of soy isoflavones on the growth of human breast tumors: findings from preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and many women with breast cancer live more than 5 years after their diagnosis. Breast cancer patients and survivors have a greater interest in taking soy foods and isoflavone supplements. However, the effect of isoflavones on breast cancer remains controversial. Thus, it is critical to determine if and when isoflavones are beneficial or detrimental to breast cancer patients. According to the available preclinical data, high concentrations of isoflavones inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cells, regardless of their estrogen receptor (ER) status. In comparison, genistein, a major isoflavone, has stimulated tumor growth at low concentrations and mitigated tamoxifen efficacy in ER-positive breast cancer. Studies have indicated that the relative levels of genistein and estrogen at the target site are important to determine the genistein effect on the ER-positive tumor growth. However, studies using ovariectomized mice and subcutaneous xenograft models might not truly reflect estrogen concentrations in human breast tumors. Moreover, it may be an oversimplification that isoflavones stimulate hormone-dependent tumor growth due to their potential estrogenic effect since studies also suggest nonestrogenic anticancer effects of isoflavones and ER-independent anticancer activity of tamoxifen. Therefore, the concentrations of isoflavones and estrogen in human breast tumors should be considered better in future preclinical studies and the parameters that can estimate those levels in breast tumors are required in human clinical/epidemiological investigation. In addition, it will be important to identify the molecular mechanisms that either inhibit or promote the growth of breast cancer cells by soy isoflavones, and use those molecules to evaluate the relevance of the preclinical findings to the human disease and to predict the health effects of isoflavones in human breast tumors. PMID:25493176

  15. The c-Met Inhibitor MSC2156119J Effectively Inhibits Tumor Growth in Liver Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Bladt, Friedhelm; Friese-Hamim, Manja; Ihling, Christian; Wilm, Claudia; Blaukat, Andree

    2014-01-01

    The mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met) is a receptor tyrosine kinase with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) as its only high-affinity ligand. Aberrant activation of c-Met is associated with many human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We investigated the in vivo antitumor and antimetastatic efficacy of the c-Met inhibitor MSC2156119J (EMD 1214063) in patient-derived tumor explants. BALB/c nude mice were inoculated with MHCC97H cells or with tumor fragments of 10 patient-derived primary liver cancer explants selected according to c-Met/HGF expression levels. MSC2156119J (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) and sorafenib (50 mg/kg) were administered orally as single-agent treatment or in combination, with vehicle as control. Tumor response, metastases formation, and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels were measured. MSC2156119J inhibited tumor growth and induced complete regression in mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic MHCC97H tumors. AFP levels were undetectable after 5 weeks of MSC2156119J treatment, and the number of metastatic lung foci was reduced. Primary liver explant models with strong c-Met/HGF activation showed increased responsiveness to MSC2156119J, with MSC2156119J showing similar or superior activity to sorafenib. Tumors characterized by low c-Met expression were less sensitive to MSC2156119J. MSC2156119J was better tolerated than sorafenib, and combination therapy did not improve efficacy. These findings indicate that selective c-Met/HGF inhibition with MSC2156119J is associated with marked regression of c-Met high-expressing tumors, supporting its clinical development as an antitumor treatment for HCC patients with active c-Met signaling. PMID:25256830

  16. Correlations between antitumor activities of fluoropyrimidines and DPD activity in lung tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Teiji; Okabe, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazumasa; Fujioka, Akio; Nakagawa, Fumio; Ohshimo, Hideyuki; Kitazato, Kenji; Fukushima, Masakazu

    2005-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the antitumor activity of S-1 (1 M tegafur, 0.4 M 5-chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine and 1 M potassium oxonate) on human lung tumor xenografts, as compared with other fluoro-pyrimidines, and to investigate the relationships between fluoropyrimidine antitumor activities and four distinct enzymatic activities involved in the phosphorylation and degradation pathways of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism. S-1, UFT (1 M tegafur-4 M uracil), 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-DFUR), capecitabine and 5-FU were administered for 14 consecutive days to nude mice bearing lung tumor xenografts. S-1 showed stronger tumor growth inhibition in four of the seven tumors than the other drugs. Cluster analysis, on the basis of antitumor activity, indicated that S-1/UFT and 5'-DFUR/capecitabine/5-FU could be classified into another group. We investigated tumor thymidylate synthase content, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity, thymidine phosphorylase (TP) activity and orotate phosphoribosyl transferase activity in seven human lung tumor xenografts and performed regression analyses for the antitumor activities of fluoropyrimidines. There were inverse correlations between antitumor and DPD activities for 5'-DFUR (r=-0.79, P=0.034), capecitabine (r=-0.56, P=0.19) and 5-FU (r=-0.86, P=0.013). However, no such correlations were observed for S-1 and UFT. These findings suggest that S-1 containing a potent DPD inhibitor may have an antitumor effect on lung tumors, with high basal DPD activity, superior to those of other fluoropyrimidines. PMID:15944764

  17. Melanoma Cell-Intrinsic PD-1 Receptor Functions Promote Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Kleffel, Sonja; Posch, Christian; Barthel, Steven R; Mueller, Hansgeorg; Schlapbach, Christoph; Guenova, Emmanuella; Elco, Christopher P; Lee, Nayoung; Juneja, Vikram R; Zhan, Qian; Lian, Christine G; Thomi, Rahel; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Cozzio, Antonio; Dummer, Reinhard; Mihm, Martin C; Flaherty, Keith T; Frank, Markus H; Murphy, George F; Sharpe, Arlene H; Kupper, Thomas S; Schatton, Tobias

    2015-09-10

    Therapeutic antibodies targeting programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) activate tumor-specific immunity and have shown remarkable efficacy in the treatment of melanoma. Yet, little is known about tumor cell-intrinsic PD-1 pathway effects. Here, we show that murine and human melanomas contain PD-1-expressing cancer subpopulations and demonstrate that melanoma cell-intrinsic PD-1 promotes tumorigenesis, even in mice lacking adaptive immunity. PD-1 inhibition on melanoma cells by RNAi, blocking antibodies, or mutagenesis of melanoma-PD-1 signaling motifs suppresses tumor growth in immunocompetent, immunocompromised, and PD-1-deficient tumor graft recipient mice. Conversely, melanoma-specific PD-1 overexpression enhances tumorigenicity, as does engagement of melanoma-PD-1 by its ligand, PD-L1, whereas melanoma-PD-L1 inhibition or knockout of host-PD-L1 attenuate growth of PD-1-positive melanomas. Mechanistically, the melanoma-PD-1 receptor modulates downstream effectors of mTOR signaling. Our results identify melanoma cell-intrinsic functions of the PD-1:PD-L1 axis in tumor growth and suggest that blocking melanoma-PD-1 might contribute to the striking clinical efficacy of anti-PD-1 therapy. PMID:26359984

  18. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L; Hill, Richard P; Jones, Russell G; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O; Thompson, Craig B; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W

    2011-05-15

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  19. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T.; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K.; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D.; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L.; Hill, Richard P.; Jones, Russell G.; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O.; Thompson, Craig B.; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  20. Mo polyoxometalate nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjing; Yang, Licong; Liu, Ying; Qin, Xiuying; Zhou, Yanhui; Zhou, Yunshan; Liu, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Tumor growth depends on angiogenesis, which can furnish the oxygen and nutrients that proliferate tumor cells. Thus, blocking angiogenesis can be an effective strategy to inhibit tumor growth. In this work, three typical nanoparticles based on polyoxometalates (POMs) have been prepared; we investigated their capability as antitumor and anti-angiogenesis agents. We found that Mo POM nanoparticles, especially complex 3, inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) through cellular reactive oxygen species levels’ elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential damage. Complex 3 also suppressed the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and chicken chorioallantoic membrane development ex vivo. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cell signaling molecules indicated that Mo POMs blocked the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways in endothelial cells. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated their cellular uptake and localization within the cytoplasm of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that, owing to the extraordinary physical and chemical properties, Mo POM nanoparticles can significantly inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis, which makes them potential drug candidates in anticancer and anti-angiogenesis therapies.

  1. Differential growth and responsiveness to cancer therapy of tumor cells in different environments.

    PubMed

    Alsaggar, Mohammad; Yao, Qian; Cai, Houjian; Liu, Dexi

    2016-02-01

    Tumor metastasis often confers poor prognosis for cancer patients due to lack of comprehensive strategy in dealing with cells growing in different environment. Current anticancer therapies have incomplete effectiveness because they were designed assuming metastatic tumors behave similarly in different organs. We hypothesize that tumors growing in different sites are biologically heterogeneous in growth potential, as well as in tumor response to anti-cancer therapies. To test this hypothesis, we have developed a multi-organ tumor growth model using the hydrodynamic cell delivery method to establish simultaneous and quantifiable tumor growth in the liver, lungs and kidneys of mice. We demonstrated that growth rate of melanoma tumor in the liver is higher than that of the lungs and kidneys. Tumors in the lungs and kidneys grew minimally at the early stage and aggressively thereafter. Tumors in different organs were also heterogeneous in response to chemotherapy and immune gene therapy using dacarbazine and interferon beta gene, respectively. Lung tumors responded to chemotherapy better than tumors in the liver, but showed minimal response to interferon beta gene therapy, compared to tumors in the liver and kidneys. We also confirmed differential tumor growth of the metastatic colon cancer in mice. Our results point out the importance of a better understanding of the differences in tumor growing in diverse environments. The biological heterogeneity of metastatic tumors demonstrated in this study necessitates establishing new drug screening strategies that take into account the environmental difference at the sites of tumor growth. PMID:26476830

  2. Resorbing bone stimulates tumor cell growth. A role for the host microenvironment in bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Manishen, W J; Sivananthan, K; Orr, F W

    1986-04-01

    Demineralized extracts of bone matrix and conditioned media from cultured fetal rat calvaria have been reported to contain growth stimulatory activity for bone cells. To investigate the potential role of these local bone growth factors in the development of bone metastases, we chose the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma, a rat mammary tumor which causes osteolytic bone metastases and hypercalcemia. 45Ca-labeled, 19-day fetal Sprague-Dawley rat calvaria were cultured for 96 hours in BGJb medium. Walker cells from ascites tumors or cultures were grown in unconditioned media or in conditioned media harvested from the bone cultures, in the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. Media were changed every 2 days, cells were counted daily for 5 days, and 3H-thymidine uptake into acid insoluble residues was measured. The growth of tumor cells was 5-6-fold greater in conditioned media than in unconditioned media and the effect was dose dependent. Cells cultured in conditioned media demonstrated a approximately 3-fold enhancement of 3H-thymidine incorporation. Generation of growth stimulatory activity correlated with the extent of bone resorption, measured by release of 45Ca from the fetal parietal bones (r = 0.85; P less than 0.001). Conditioned media from bones cultured with 10(-7) M prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contained greater amounts of growth stimulatory activity than untreated conditioned media, but PGE2 itself did not stimulate tumor cell growth. Addition of 3.5 mM PO4 to bone cultures blocked bone resorption and the generation of growth factors. Growth stimulatory activity was stable to heat (56 C for 30 minutes) and trypsin digestion, with an apparent molecular weight of less than 17,000 daltons by high-performance liquid chromatography. Conditioned medium also stimulated the growth of 13762 rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells, MB-MDA-231 human breast carcinoma cells, TE-85 osteosarcoma cells, a murine fibrosarcoma and rat embryonic fibroblasts, with the most potent effects noted for

  3. [Therapeutic activity of gemcitabine in intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Stukov, A N; Filatova, L V; Latipova, D Kh; Bespalov, V G; Belyaeva, O A; Kireeva, G S; Vasilieva, I N; Alexandrov, V A; Maidin, M A; Semenov, A L; Vershinina, S F; Markochev, A B; Abduloeva, N Kh; Chubenko, V A; Semiglazova, T Yu

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is known to exert a therapeutic effect on brain tumors despite the limited permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In our experimental research single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of gemcitabine 25 mg/kg provided increase in median survival of mice with intracranially transplanted Ehrlich carcinoma by 41-89% (p < 0.001). In this experimental model i.p. administration of gemcitabine (permeability of the BBB of less than 10%), carmustine (good permeability of the BBB), cyclophosphamide (poor permeability of the BBB) and cisplatin (doesn't penetrate through the BBB) increased median survival of mice by 88% (p < 0.001), 59% (p = 0.001), 35% (p = 0.005) and 18% (p = 0.302) respectively. Considering strong correlation between antitumor activity of the drugs (carmustine, cyclophosphamide and cisplatin) and their permeability of the BBB, efficacy of gemcitabine in intracranial tumors could be due to its wide range of therapeutic doses. PMID:26087611

  4. Influence of Anti-Mouse Interferon Serum on the Growth and Metastasis of Tumor Cells Persistently Infected with Virus and of Human Prostatic Tumors in Athymic Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lola M.; Minato, Nagahiro; Gresser, Ion; Holland, John; Kadish, Anna; Bloom, Barry R.

    1981-02-01

    Baby hamster kidney or HeLa cells form tumors in 100% of athymic nude mice. When such cells are persistently infected (PI) with RNA viruses, such as mumps or measles virus, the tumor cells either fail to grow or form circumscribed benign nodules. Neither the parental nor the virus PI tumor cells form invasive or metastatic lesions in nude mice. Previous studies have indicated a correlation between the susceptibility of virus-PI tumor cells in vitro and the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and their failure to grow in vivo. Because interferon (IF) is the principal regulatory molecule governing the differentiation of NK cells, it was possible to test the relevance of the IF--NK cell system in vivo to restriction of tumor growth by treatment of nude mice with anti-IF globulin. This treatment was shown to reduce both IF production and NK activity in spleen cells. Both parental and virus-PI tumor cells grew and formed larger tumors in nude mice treated with anti-IF globulin than in control nude mice. The viral-PI tumor cells and the uninfected parental cells formed tumors in treated mice that were highly invasive and often metastatic. Some human tumor types have been notoriously difficult to establish as tumor lines in nude mice (e.g., primary human prostatic carcinomas). When transplanted into nude mice treated either with anti-IF globulin or anti-lymphocyte serum, two prostatic carcinomas grew and produced neoplasms with local invasiveness and some metastases. The results are consistent with the view that interferon may be important in restricting the growth, invasiveness, and metastases of tumor cells by acting indirectly through components of the immune system, such as NK cells.

  5. Ku80 cooperates with CBP to promote COX-2 expression and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yu; Xuan, Yang; Jia, Yunlu; Hu, Wenxian; Yu, Wendan; Dai, Meng; Li, Zhenglin; Yi, Canhui; Zhao, Shilei; Li, Mei; Du, Sha; Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Wu, Taihua; Meng, Songshu; Yuan, Yuhui; Liu, Quentin; Huang, Wenlin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shusen; Deng, Wuguo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in lung cancer development and progression. Using streptavidin-agarose pulldown and proteomics assay, we identified and validated Ku80, a dimer of Ku participating in the repair of broken DNA double strands, as a new binding protein of the COX-2 gene promoter. Overexpression of Ku80 up-regulated COX-2 promoter activation and COX-2 expression in lung cancer cells. Silencing of Ku80 by siRNA down-regulated COX-2 expression and inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. Ku80 knockdown suppressed phosphorylation of ERK, resulting in an inactivation of the MAPK pathway. Moreover, CBP, a transcription co-activator, interacted with and acetylated Ku80 to co-regulate the activation of COX-2 promoter. Overexpression of CBP increased Ku80 acetylation, thereby promoting COX-2 expression and cell growth. Suppression of CBP by a CBP-specific inhibitor or siRNA inhibited COX-2 expression as well as tumor cell growth. Tissue microarray immunohistochemical analysis of lung adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between levels of Ku80 and COX-2 and clinicopathologic variables. Overexpression of Ku80 was associated with poor prognosis in patients with lung cancers. We conclude that Ku80 promotes COX-2 expression and tumor growth and is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:25797267

  6. [BETA-III TUBULIN AS A POTENTIAL TARGET FOR BLOCKING INVASIVE GROWTH OF MALIGNANT EPITHELIAL TUMORS].

    PubMed

    Portyanko, A S; Akalovich, S T; Doroshenko, T M

    2015-01-01

    Invasive growth is the first step of metastatic cascade in the growth of malignant tumors. The mobility of cells, which is a necessary factor of the invasive growth of malignant tumors, is closely linked to the dynamic structure of cytoskeleton. An important role in cell motility is played by microtubules and actin microfilaments. Microtubules consist of tubulin--a heterodimer comprising α and β subunits, which can be represented by different isotypes. The appearance of beta-III tubulin in a tumor is essential for chemoresistance and prognosis of some tumors in humans. This study focuses on determining the possibility of using beta-III tubulin as a target molecule for the suppression of invasive growth. It is established that blocking of the beta-III tubulin expression in colorectal cancer cells does not affect their viability, but reduces the cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix by 40% for HT-29 (∂ = 0.0044) and by 15% (p = 0.0436) for HCT 116) and produces a four-fold decrease in the invasive activity (p = 0.0000 and 0.0001, respectively). These facts allow considering beta-III tubulin as a target molecule in the development of antitumor drugs. PMID:26591579

  7. Inhibition of tumor growth, vascularization, and collagenolysis in the rabbit cornea by medroxyprogesterone.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, J; Azizkhan, R G; Biswas, C; Bruns, R R; Hsieh, D S; Folkman, J

    1981-01-01

    Medroxyprogesterone, dexamethasone, or cortisone, locally applied in sustained release polymer to rabbit V2 carcinoma implanted in the rabbit cornea, blocked neovascularization and three-dimensional growth of the tumor. These hormones similarly prevented the vascular proliferative response to implants in the rabbit cornea of mouse B-16 melanoma and also the response to implants of polymer containing tumor extract with angiogenesis activity. The inhibitory responses were accompanied by considerable reduction in collagenolytic activity released into culture medium by explants of the two tumors and of the corneal region containing angiogenic hepatoma extract. Morphologic studies revealed extensive three-dimensional disruption of the compact laminated collagenous structure of the cornea by untreated V2 carcinoma. In the presence of hormone the tumor grew slowly as a noninvasive two-dimensional plaque limited to the narrow region of the insertion pocket in the cornea, with no obvious disturbance of structure elsewhere. Cortisone was much les effective than medroxyprogesterone or dexamethasone. Testosterone and estradiol had no effect on the three measured properties. The data suggest that local hormonal interference with neovascularization, collagenase production, and tumor growth can prevent neoplastic invasion and destruction of a dense collagenous connective tissue. Images PMID:6262756

  8. Erythropoietin Stimulates Tumor Growth via EphB4.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Sunila; Huang, Jie; Mora, Edna M; Nick, Alpa M; Cho, Min Soon; Wu, Sherry Y; Noh, Kyunghee; Pecot, Chad V; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Stein, Martin A; Brock, Stephan; Wen, Yunfei; Xiong, Chiyi; Gharpure, Kshipra; Hansen, Jean M; Nagaraja, Archana S; Previs, Rebecca A; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo; Han, Hee Dong; Hu, Wei; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Zand, Behrouz; Stagg, Loren J; Ladbury, John E; Ozpolat, Bulent; Alpay, S Neslihan; Nishimura, Masato; Stone, Rebecca L; Matsuo, Koji; Armaiz-Peña, Guillermo N; Dalton, Heather J; Danes, Christopher; Goodman, Blake; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Kruger, Carola; Schneider, Armin; Haghpeykar, Shyon; Jaladurgam, Padmavathi; Hung, Mien-Chie; Coleman, Robert L; Liu, Jinsong; Li, Chun; Urbauer, Diana; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Jackson, David B; Sood, Anil K

    2015-11-01

    While recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo) has been widely used to treat anemia in cancer patients, concerns about its adverse effects on patient survival have emerged. A lack of correlation between expression of the canonical EpoR and rhEpo's effects on cancer cells prompted us to consider the existence of an alternative Epo receptor. Here, we identified EphB4 as an Epo receptor that triggers downstream signaling via STAT3 and promotes rhEpo-induced tumor growth and progression. In human ovarian and breast cancer samples, expression of EphB4 rather than the canonical EpoR correlated with decreased disease-specific survival in rhEpo-treated patients. These results identify EphB4 as a critical mediator of erythropoietin-induced tumor progression and further provide clinically significant dimension to the biology of erythropoietin. PMID:26481148

  9. Osteogenic BMPs promote tumor growth of human osteosarcomas that harbor differentiation defects.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoji; Chen, Jin; Song, Wen-Xin; Tang, Ni; Luo, Jinyong; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Sharff, Katie A; He, Gary; Bi, Yang; He, Bai-Cheng; Bennett, Erwin; Huang, Jiayi; Kang, Quan; Jiang, Wei; Su, Yuxi; Zhu, Gao-Hui; Yin, Hong; He, Yun; Wang, Yi; Souris, Jeffrey S; Chen, Liang; Zuo, Guo-Wei; Montag, Anthony G; Reid, Russell R; Haydon, Rex C; Luu, Hue H; He, Tong-Chuan

    2008-12-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignancy of bone. Here, we investigated a possible role of defective osteoblast differentiation in OS tumorigenesis. We found that basal levels of the early osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were low in OS lines. Osteogenic regulators Runx2 and OSX, and the late marker osteopontin (OPN) expressed at low levels in most OS lines, indicating that most OS cells fail to undergo terminal differentiation. Furthermore, OS cells were refractory to osteogenic BMP-induced increases in ALP activity. Osteogenic BMPs were shown to upregulate early target genes, but not late osteogenic markers OPN and osteocalcin (OC). Furthermore, osteogenic BMPs failed to induce bone formation from human OS cells, rather effectively promoted OS tumor growth in an orthotopic OS model. Exogenous expression of early target genes enhanced BMP-stimulated OS tumor growth, whereas osteogenic BMP-promoted OS tumor growth was inhibited by exogenous Runx2 expression. These results suggest that alterations in osteoprogenitors may disrupt osteogenic differentiation pathway. Thus, identifying potential differentiation defects in OS tumors would allow us to reconstruct the tumorigenic events in osteoprogenitors and to develop rational differentiation therapies for clinical OS management. PMID:18838962

  10. Mediastinal Desmoid Tumor With Remarkably Rapid Growth: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Hyung; Jeong, Jae Seok; Kim, So Ri; Jin, Gong Yong; Chung, Myoung Ja; Kuh, Ja Hong; Lee, Yong Chul

    2015-12-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are a group of rare and benign soft tissue tumors that result from monoclonal proliferation of well-differentiated fibroblasts. Since DTs tend to infiltrate and compress adjacent structures, the location of DTs is one of the most crucial factors for determining the severity of the disease. Furthermore, DTs can further complicate the clinical course of patients when the growth is remarkably rapid, especially for DTs occurring in anatomically critical compartments, including the thoracic cavity.The authors report a case of a 71-year-old man with a known mediastinal mass incidentally detected 4 months ago, presenting dyspnea with right-sided atelectasis and massive pleural effusion. Imaging studies revealed a 16.4 × 9.4-cm fibrous mass with high glucose metabolism in the anterior mediastinum. The mass infiltrated into the chest wall and also displaced the mediastinum contralaterally. Interestingly, the tumor had an extremely rapid doubling time of 31.3 days.En bloc resection of the tumor was performed as a curative as well as a diagnostic measure. Histopathologic examination showed spindle cells with low cellularity and high collagen deposition in the stroma. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for nuclear β-catenin. Based on these pathologic findings, the mass was diagnosed as DT. After surgery, there has been no evidence of recurrence of disease in the patient.This patient presents a mediastinal DT with extremely rapid growth. Notably, the doubling time of DT in our case was the shortest among reported cases of DT. Our experience also highlights the benefits of early interventional strategy, especially for rapidly growing DTs in the thoracic cavity. PMID:26717381

  11. The LKB1-AMPK pathway: metabolism and growth control in tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, David B.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, studies of the human tumor suppressor LKB1 have uncovered a novel signaling pathway that links cell metabolism to growth control and cell polarity. LKB1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase that directly phosphorylates and activates AMPK, a central metabolic sensor. AMPK regulates lipid, cholesterol and glucose metabolism in specialized metabolic tissues such as liver, muscle, and adipose, a function that has made it a key therapeutic target in patients with diabetes. The connection of AMPK with several tumor suppressors suggests that therapeutic manipulation of this pathway with established diabetes drugs warrants further investigation in patients with cancer. PMID:19629071

  12. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  13. Growth Hormone Protects the Intestine Preserving Radiotherapy Efficacy on Tumors: A Short-Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Caz, Victor; Elvira, Marcos; Tabernero, Maria; Grande, Antonio G.; Lopez-Plaza, Bricia; de Miguel, Enrique; Largo, Carlota; Santamaria, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy on tumors is hampered by its devastating adverse effects on healthy tissue, particularly that of the gastrointestinal tract. These effects cause acute symptoms that are so disruptive to patients that they can lead to interruption of the radiotherapy program. These adverse effects could limit the intensity of radiation received by the patient, resulting in a sublethal dose to the tumor, thus increasing the risk of tumor resistance. The lack of an effective treatment to protect the bowel during radiation therapy to allow higher radiation doses that are lethal to the tumor has become a barrier to implementing effective therapy. In this study, we present a comparative analysis of both intestinal and tumor tissue in regard to the efficacy and the preventive impact of a short-term growth hormone (GH) treatment in tumor-bearing rats as a protective agent during radiotherapy. Our data show that the exogenous administration of GH improved intestinal recovery after radiation treatment while preserving the therapeutic effect against the tumor. GH significantly increased proliferation in the irradiated intestine but not in the irradiated tumors, as assessed by Positron Emission Tomography and the proliferative markers Ki67, cyclin D3, and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen. This proliferative effect was consistent with a significant increase in irradiated intestinal villi and crypt length. Furthermore, GH significantly decreased caspase-3 activity in the intestine, whereas GH did not produce this effect in the irradiated tumors. In conclusion, short-term GH treatment protects the bowel, inducing proliferation while reducing apoptosis in healthy intestinal tissue and preserving radiotherapy efficacy on tumors. PMID:26670463

  14. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-dependent Rac Exchanger 1 (PREX1) Rac-Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) Activity Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth via Activation of Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng-Jia; Ooms, Lisa M; Srijakotre, Nuthasuda; Man, Joey; Vieusseux, Jessica; Waters, JoAnne E; Feng, Yue; Bailey, Charles G; Rasko, John E J; Price, John T; Mitchell, Christina A

    2016-08-12

    PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-dependent Rac exchanger 1 (PREX1) is a Rac-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) overexpressed in a significant proportion of human breast cancers that integrates signals from upstream ErbB2/3 and CXCR4 membrane surface receptors. However, the PREX1 domains that facilitate its oncogenic activity and downstream signaling are not completely understood. We identify that ERK1/2 MAPK acts downstream of PREX1 and contributes to PREX1-mediated anchorage-independent cell growth. PREX1 overexpression increased but its shRNA knockdown decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to EGF/IGF-1 stimulation, resulting in induction of the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and p21(WAF1/CIP1) PREX1-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, anchorage-independent cell growth, and cell migration were suppressed by inhibition of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling. PREX1 overexpression reduced staurosporine-induced apoptosis whereas its shRNA knockdown promoted apoptosis in response to staurosporine or the anti-estrogen drug tamoxifen. Expression of wild-type but not GEF-inactive PREX1 increased anchorage-independent cell growth. In addition, mouse xenograft studies revealed that expression of wild-type but not GEF-dead PREX1 resulted in the formation of larger tumors that displayed increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 but not AKT. The impaired anchorage-independent cell growth, apoptosis, and ERK1/2 signaling observed in stable PREX1 knockdown cells was restored by expression of wild-type but not GEF-dead-PREX1. Therefore, PREX1-Rac-GEF activity is critical for PREX1-dependent anchorage-independent cell growth and xenograft tumor growth and may represent a possible therapeutic target for breast cancers that exhibit PREX1 overexpression. PMID:27358402

  15. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  16. Kinetics of some immunological and biochemical changes of immunocompetent cells during tumor growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Hrivnáková, A; Babusíková, O

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of lymphocyte response in peripheral blood, the tumor draining lymph node, spleen and thymus, was followed in a model system of syngeneically transplanted rat MC-1 tumor. Electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of lymphoid cells was determined by the automatic mode of measurement. The results revealed a two-phase pattern of EPM changes during the course of cancer growth. The first phase (day 3 to 6 following intramuscular injection of tumor cells) was characterized by a prevalence of high-mobility cells, while in the second phase (day 14 to 20), depletion of high-mobility cells was compensated for by an increased number of low-mobility cells. The mean EPM value was found to be increased only in the thymus at that time. Changes in the adenosine deaminase activity proved to be most expressive in the tumor draining lymph node and in the second phase also in splenic and thymic lymphocytes. An increased percentage of active lymphocytes with compact nucleoli with nucleolonemas became evident already on the 3rd day in all the lymphoid organs followed. The response was two-phasic only in the lymphocyte population of the peripheral blood, while their percentage in the other organs remained higher even on day 20. Changes in the proportion of high- and low-mobility cells in the lymphoid organs followed here, in correlation with the adenosine deaminase activity and the percentage of active lymphocytes, were interpreted as a response of immunocompetent cells in animals with a growing tumor. PMID:3785465

  17. Activation of mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 normalizes tumor vasculature and improves cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adapala, Ravi K.; Thoppil, Roslin J.; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Cappelli, Holly; Dudley, Andrew C.; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar; Klagsbrun, Michael; Meszaros, J. Gary; Chilian, William M.; Ingber, Donald E.; Thodeti, Charles K.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor vessels are characterized by abnormal morphology and hyper-permeability that together cause inefficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Although VEGF has been established as a critical regulator of tumor angiogenesis, the role of mechanical signaling in the regulation of tumor vasculature or tumor endothelial cell (TEC) function is not known. Here, we show that the mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 regulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor vessel maturation via modulation of TEC mechanosensitivity. We found that TEC exhibit reduced TRPV4 expression and function, which is correlated with aberrant mechanosensitivity towards ECM stiffness, increased migration and abnormal angiogenesis by TEC. Further, syngeneic tumor experiments revealed that the absence of TRPV4 induced increased vascular density, vessel diameter and reduced pericyte coverage resulting in enhanced tumor growth in TRPV4 KO mice. Importantly, overexpression or pharmacological activation of TRPV4 restored aberrant TEC mechanosensitivity, migration and normalized abnormal angiogenesis in vitro by modulating Rho activity. Finally, a small molecule activator of TRPV4, GSK1016790A, in combination with anti-cancer drug Cisplatin, significantly reduced tumor growth in WT mice by inducing vessel maturation. Our findings demonstrate TRPV4 channels to be critical regulators of tumor angiogenesis and represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic and vascular normalization therapies. PMID:25867067

  18. Anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities of an exopolysaccharide from Rhizopus nigricans on CT26 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Cao, Jianfeng; Chen, Guochuang; Xu, Yanghui; Lu, Jingbo; Fang, Fang; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) from Rhizopus nigricans. Our results showed EPS could significantly inhibit the tumor growth and increase the immune organs index of CT26 tumor-bearing mice. EPS treatment increased the productions of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in serum. The increase of percentage of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells among total spleen T lymphocyte was also observed. Furthermore, EPS remarkably stimulate spleen lymphocytes proliferation in the absence or presence of mitogens. In addition, we found that EPS had synergistic effect with chemotherapy and improved immunosuppressive effect induced by 5-Fu. In summary, these findings indicated that the antitumor effects of EPS might be partly due to immune function activation and it might have potential to be used in the treatment for colorectal cancer. PMID:27163210

  19. Hypoxia induced HMGB1 and mitochondrial DNA interactions mediate tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through Toll Like Receptor 9

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Yan, Wei; Tohme, Samer; Chen, Man; Fu, Yu; Tian, Dean; Lotze, Michael; Tang, Daolin; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The mechanisms of hypoxia-induced tumor growth remain unclear. Hypoxia induces intracellular translocation and release of a variety of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as nuclear HMGB1 and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In inflammation, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9 activation by DNA-containing immune complexes has been shown to be mediated by HMGB1. We thus hypothesize that HMGB1 binds mtDNA in the cytoplasm of hypoxic tumor cells and promotes tumor growth through activating TLR9 signaling pathways. Methods C57BL6 mice were injected with Hepa1-6 cancer cells. TLR9 and HMGB1 were inhibited using shRNA or direct antagonists. Huh7 and Hepa1-6 cancer cells were investigated in vitro to investigate how the interaction of HMGB1 and mtDNA activates TLR9 signaling pathways. Results During hypoxia, HMGB1 translocates from the nucleus to the cytosol and binds to mtDNA released from damaged mitochondria. This complex subsequently activates TLR9 signaling pathways to promote tumor cell proliferation. Loss of HMGB1 or mtDNA leads to a defect in TLR9 signaling pathways in response to hypoxia, resulting in decreased tumor cell proliferation. Also, the addition of HMGB1 and mtDNA leads to the activation of TLR-9 and subsequent tumor cell proliferation. Moreover, TLR9 is overexpressed in both hypoxic tumor cells in vitro and in human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) specimens; and, knockdown of either HMGB1 or TLR9 from HCC cells suppressed tumor growth in vivo after injection in mice. Conclusions Our data reveals a novel mechanism by which the interactions of HMGB1 and mtDNA activate TLR9 signaling during hypoxia to induce tumor growth. PMID:25681553

  20. Anti-tumor activity of a polysaccharide from blueberry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiyun; Liu, Ning; Wu, Zhaoxia; Feng, Ying; Meng, Xianjun

    2015-01-01

    Blueberries (Vaccinium spp.) are rich in bioactive compounds. However, the biological activity of polysaccharides from blueberry has not been reported so far. This study evaluated the anti-tumor and immunological activities of a polysaccharide (BBP3-1) from blueberry in S180-bearing mice. The experimental results indicated that BBP3-1 (100 mg·kg-1·d-1) inhibited the tumor growth rate by 73.4%. Moreover, this group, compared with the model control, had shown an effect of increasing both the spleen and thymus indices (p < 0.05), increasing phagocytosis by macrophages (p < 0.05), boosting the proliferation and transformation of lymphocytes (p < 0.01), promoting the secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-2 (p < 0.05) and improving NK cell activity (p < 0.01). From this study, we could easily conclude that BBP3-1 has the ability to inhibit tumor progression and could act as a good immunomodulator. PMID:25734419

  1. Lactate Activates HIF-1 in Oxidative but Not in Warburg-Phenotype Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Copetti, Tamara; Porporato, Paolo E.; Verrax, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can be envisioned as a metabolic disease driven by pressure selection and intercellular cooperativeness. Together with anaerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, formally corresponding to uncoupling glycolysis from oxidative phosphorylation, directly participates in cancer aggressiveness, supporting both tumor progression and dissemination. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key contributor to glycolysis. It stimulates the expression of glycolytic transporters and enzymes supporting high rate of glycolysis. In this study, we addressed the reverse possibility of a metabolic control of HIF-1 in tumor cells. We report that lactate, the end-product of glycolysis, inhibits prolylhydroxylase 2 activity and activates HIF-1 in normoxic oxidative tumor cells but not in Warburg-phenotype tumor cells which also expressed lower basal levels of HIF-1α. These data were confirmed using genotypically matched oxidative and mitochondria-depleted glycolytic tumor cells as well as several different wild-type human tumor cell lines of either metabolic phenotype. Lactate activates HIF-1 and triggers tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo, an activity that we found to be under the specific upstream control of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expressed in tumor cells. Because MCT1 also gates lactate-fueled tumor cell respiration and mediates pro-angiogenic lactate signaling in endothelial cells, MCT1 inhibition is confirmed as an attractive anticancer strategy in which a single drug may target multiple tumor-promoting pathways. PMID:23082126

  2. Inhibition of Receptor Signaling and of Glioblastoma-derived Tumor Growth by a Novel PDGFRβ Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Camorani, Simona; Esposito, Carla L; Rienzo, Anna; Catuogno, Silvia; Iaboni, Margherita; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Cerchia, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) is a cell-surface tyrosine kinase receptor implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. It represents a compelling therapeutic target in many human tumors, including glioma. A number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors under development as antitumor agents have been found to inhibit PDGFRβ. However, they are not selective as they present multiple tyrosine kinase targets. Here, we report a novel PDGFRβ-specific antagonist represented by a nuclease-resistant RNA-aptamer, named Gint4.T. This aptamer is able to specifically bind to the human PDGFRβ ectodomain (Kd: 9.6 nmol/l) causing a strong inhibition of ligand-dependent receptor activation and of downstream signaling in cell lines and primary cultures of human glioblastoma cells. Moreover, Gint4.T aptamer drastically inhibits cell migration and proliferation, induces differentiation, and blocks tumor growth in vivo. In addition, Gint4.T aptamer prevents PDGFRβ heterodimerization with and resultant transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor. As a result, the combination of Gint4.T and an epidermal growth factor receptor–targeted aptamer is better at slowing tumor growth than either single aptamer alone. These findings reveal Gint4.T as a PDGFRβ-drug candidate with translational potential. PMID:24566984

  3. Puberty and Plexiform Neurofibroma Tumor Growth in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type I

    PubMed Central

    Dagalakis, Urania; Lodish, Maya; Dombi, Eva; Sinaii, Ninet; Sabo, Jessica; Baldwin, Andrea; Steinberg, Seth M.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Widemann, Brigitte C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between pubertal progression and change in PN burden over time in pediatric and young adult patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and plexiform neurofibromas (PN). Study design Analyses accounted for sex, age, race, and chemotherapy. Forty-one patients with NF1 (15 female, 26 male) were studied at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Tanner stage, testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, insulin-like growth factor −1, luteinizing hormone, and follicle stimulating hormone were assessed. Tumor volume was measured using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and lesion detection software developed at NIH. Patients were divided into two groups based upon whether they were actively progressing through puberty (n=16) or peri pubertal (n=25), and were followed for an average of 20 months. Tumor growth rates in the puberty and peri pubertal group were analyzed for a subset of patients. Results There was no statistically significant difference in tumor burden change over time (cc/kg/month) between the pubertal and peri pubertal group (−0.16 ± 0.34 vs. 0.03 ± 1.8, p=0.31), and in the PN growth rates pre and during puberty (p=0.90). Change in tumor volume/patient weight/time did not correlate with testosterone change/time in males or estradiol change/time in females. Conclusion These findings support that hormonal changes of puberty do not accelerate PN growth. Additional long-term follow up of patients is necessary to further characterize the interaction between puberty and tumor growth. PMID:24321536

  4. Withaferin-A suppress AKT induced tumor growth in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P.; Sirimulla, Suman; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K.; Damodaran, Chendil

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic activation of AKT gene has emerged as a key determinant of the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC); hence, research has focused on targeting AKT signaling for the treatment of advanced stages of CRC. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic effects of withaferin A (WA) on CRC cells overexpressing AKT in preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) models. Our results indicated that WA, a natural compound, resulted in significant inhibition of AKT activity and led to the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion by downregulating the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers in CRC cells overexpressing AKT. The oral administration of WA significantly suppressed AKT-induced aggressive tumor growth in a xenograft model. Molecular analysis revealed that the decreased expression of AKT and its downstream pro-survival signaling molecules may be responsible for tumor inhibition. Further, significant inhibition of some important EMT markers, i.e., Snail, Slug, β-catenin and vimentin, was observed in WA-treated human CRC cells overexpressing AKT. Significant inhibition of micro-vessel formation and the length of vessels were evident in WA-treated tumors, which correlated with a low expression of the angiogenic marker RETIC. In conclusion, the present study emphasizes the crucial role of AKT activation in inducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis and EMT in CRC cells and suggests that WA may overcome AKT-induced cell proliferation and tumor growth in CRC. PMID:26883103

  5. Withaferin-A suppress AKT induced tumor growth in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P; Sirimulla, Suman; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2016-03-22

    The oncogenic activation of AKT gene has emerged as a key determinant of the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC); hence, research has focused on targeting AKT signaling for the treatment of advanced stages of CRC. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic effects of withaferin A (WA) on CRC cells overexpressing AKT in preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) models. Our results indicated that WA, a natural compound, resulted in significant inhibition of AKT activity and led to the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion by downregulating the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers in CRC cells overexpressing AKT. The oral administration of WA significantly suppressed AKT-induced aggressive tumor growth in a xenograft model. Molecular analysis revealed that the decreased expression of AKT and its downstream pro-survival signaling molecules may be responsible for tumor inhibition. Further, significant inhibition of some important EMT markers, i.e., Snail, Slug, β-catenin and vimentin, was observed in WA-treated human CRC cells overexpressing AKT. Significant inhibition of micro-vessel formation and the length of vessels were evident in WA-treated tumors, which correlated with a low expression of the angiogenic marker RETIC. In conclusion, the present study emphasizes the crucial role of AKT activation in inducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis and EMT in CRC cells and suggests that WA may overcome AKT-induced cell proliferation and tumor growth in CRC. PMID:26883103

  6. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models.

    PubMed

    Chauviere, Arnaud; Hatzikirou, Haralambos; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Lowengrub, John S; Cristini, Vittorio

    2012-03-01

    Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT) extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth. PMID:22489279

  7. Macrophages From Irradiated Tumors Express Higher Levels of iNOS, Arginase-I and COX-2, and Promote Tumor Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.-S.; Chen, F.-H.; Wang, C.-C.; Huang, H.-L.; Jung, Shih-Ming; Wu, C.-J.; Lee, C.-C.; McBride, William H.; Chiang, C.-S.; Hong, J.-H. . E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of single and fractionated doses of radiation on tumors and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and to elucidate the potential of TAMs to influence tumor growth. Methods and Materials: A murine prostate cell line, TRAMP-C1, was grown in C57Bl/6J mice to 4-mm tumor diameter and irradiated with either 25 Gy in a single dose, or 60 Gy in 15 fractions. The tumors were removed at the indicated times and assessed for a variety of markers related to TAM content, activation status, and function. Results: In tumors receiving a single radiation dose, arginase (Arg-I), and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression increased as a small transient wave within 24 h and a larger persistent wave starting after 3 days. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA was elevated only after 3 days and continued to increase up to 3 weeks. After fractionated irradiation, Arg-1 and COX-2 mRNA levels increased within 5 days, whereas iNOS was increased only after 10 fractions of irradiation had been given. Increased levels of Arg-I, COX-2, and, to a lesser extent, iNOS protein were found to associate with TAMs 1-2 weeks after tumor irradiation. Function of TAMs were compared by mixing them with TRAMP-C1 cells and injecting them into mice; TRAMP-C1 cells mixed with TAMs from irradiated tumors appeared earlier and grew significantly faster than those mixed with TAMs from unirradiated tumors or TRAMP-C1 alone. Conclusions: Tumor-associated macrophages in the postirradiated tumor microenvironment express higher levels of Arg-1, COX-2, and iNOS, and promote early tumor growth in vivo.

  8. Repeated Administration of Inhibitors for Ion Pumps Reduce Markedly Tumor Growth in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hrgovic, Igor; Glavic, Zeljko; Kovacic, Zeljko; Mulic, Smaila; Zunic, Lejla; Hrgovic, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Measurements of extracellular pH show that the micro environment of malignant tumors is more acidic than that of normal cells, whereas pH does not differ appreciable in normal and malignant cells. The acid micro environment of tumors is created by the secretion of tumor factors and ATP hydrolysis in hypoxic tumor tissue. In order to survive in a low pH-environment tumor cells develop regulatory mechanisms which keep their intracellular pH stable. Two of the most important systems are the Na+/H+ ion pump and the Na-dependent HCO3-/Cl- pump of stilbenian derivatives. Material and methods: Experiments were carried out on DBA mice of both sexes at the age of 4 month. Laboratory animals were grown in our institute and supplied with food and aqua ad libitum. Results: After termination of the experiments the mean tumor diameter in the control group was 12.4±0.8mm, in group A it was 6.9±0.6mm, and in group B we measured 6.6±3.1mm. At the final day the tumor size in treated animals was twice as small as in the control group. In addition we observed the rate of survival. In the control group only 18% of the animals were still alive at day 18. Considering the rate of survival a statistically significant difference between treated and untreated animals was observed. The survival of tumor cells is dependent on the function of these ion pumps which keep their intracellular pH values constant in the setting of an acid extracellular environment. Conclusion: The activity of the ion pump is especially important at the beginning of cell division and in cell proliferation. Our in vivo experiments demonstrate that prolonged administration of intratumoral ion pump inhibitors suppresses tumor growth as well as enhances survival of tumor-bearing animals. Research of inhibitors of ion pumps and their action in tumor growth opens new perspectives into pathophysiology of malignant tumors and may create new therapeutic options. PMID:24937925

  9. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram encapsulated PLGA NPs on tumor growth: Different administration routes.

    PubMed

    Fasehee, Hamidreza; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Ghaffari, Seyed Hamidollah; Faghihi, Shahab

    2016-06-01

    The strong anticancer activity of disulfiram is hindered by its rapid degradation in blood system. A novel folate-receptor-targeted poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) nanoparticle (NP) is developed for encapsulation and delivery of disulfiram into breast cancer tumor using passive (EPR effect) and active (folate receptor) targeting. The anticancer activity of disulfiram and its effect on caspase-3 activity and cell cycle are studied. The administration of encapsulated PLGA NPs using intra-peritoneal, intravenous and intra-tumor routes is investigated using animal model. Disulfiram shows strong cytotoxicity against MCF7 cell line. The activity of caspase-3 inhibited with disulfiram via dose dependent manner while the drug causes cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 and S phase time-dependently. The encapsulated disulfiram shows higher activity in apoptosis induction as compared to free drug. In nontoxic dose of encapsulated disulfiram, the highest and lowest efficacy of NPs in tumor growth inhibition is observed for intravenous injection and intraperitoneal injection. It is suggested that administration of disulfiram by targeted PLGA nanoparticles using intravenous injection would present an alternative therapeutic approach for solid tumor treatment. PMID:27040254

  10. Cabozantinib inhibits prostate cancer growth and prevents tumor-induced bone lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinlu; Zhang, Honglai; Karatsinides, Andreas; Keller, Jill M.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Aftab, Dana T.; Schimmoller, Frauke; Keller, Evan T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cabozantinib, an orally available multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against MET and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), induces resolution of bone scan lesions in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cabozantinib elicited a direct anti-tumor effect, an indirect effect through modulating bone, or both. Experimental Design Using human prostate cancer xenograft studies in mice we determined cabozantinib's impact on tumor growth in soft tissue and bone. In vitro studies with cabozantinib were performed using (1) prostate cancer cell lines to evaluate its impact on cell growth, invasive ability and MET and (2) osteoblast cell lines to evaluate its impact on viability and differentiation and VEGFR2. Results Cabozantinib inhibited progression of multiple prostate cancer cell lines (Ace-1,C4-2B, and LuCaP 35) in bone metastatic and soft tissue murine models of prostate cancer, except for PC-3 prostate cancer cells in which it inhibited only subcutaneous growth. Cabozantinib directly inhibited prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo and inhibited cell invasion in vitro. Cabozantinib had a dose-dependent biphasic effect on osteoblast activity and inhibitory effect on osteoclast production in vitro, that was reflected in vivo. It blocked MET and VEGFR2 phosphorylation in prostate cancer cells and osteoblast-like cells, respectively. Conclusion These data indicate that cabozantinib has direct anti-tumor activity; and that its ability to modulate osteoblast activity may contribute to its anti-tumor efficacy. PMID:24097861

  11. Tumor-promoting functions of transforming growth factor-β in progression of cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) elicits both tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting functions during cancer progression. Here, we describe the tumor-promoting functions of TGF-β and how these functions play a role in cancer progression. Normal epithelial cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through the action of TGF-β, while treatment with TGF-β and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 results in transdifferentiation into activated fibroblastic cells that are highly migratory, thereby facilitating cancer invasion and metastasis. TGF-β also induces EMT in tumor cells, which can be regulated by oncogenic and anti-oncogenic signals. In addition to EMT promotion, invasion and metastasis of cancer are facilitated by TGF-β through other mechanisms, such as regulation of cell survival, angiogenesis, and vascular integrity, and interaction with the tumor microenvironment. TGF-β also plays a critical role in regulating the cancer-initiating properties of certain types of cells, including glioma-initiating cells. These findings thus may be useful for establishing treatment strategies for advanced cancer by inhibiting TGF-β signaling. PMID:22111550

  12. AMPK is a negative regulator of the Warburg Effect and suppresses tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Faubert, Brandon; Boily, Gino; Izreig, Said; Griss, Takla; Samborska, Bozena; Dong, Zhifeng; Dupuy, Fanny; Chambers, Christopher; Fuerth, Benjamin J.; Viollet, Benoit; Mamer, Orval A.; Avizonis, Daina; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Siegel, Peter M.; Jones, Russell G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary AMPK is a metabolic sensor that helps maintain cellular energy homeostasis. Despite evidence linking AMPK with tumor suppressor functions, the role of AMPK in tumorigenesis and tumor metabolism is unknown. Here we show that AMPK negatively regulates aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer cells, and suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Genetic ablation of the α1 catalytic subunit of AMPK accelerates Myc-induced lymphomagenesis. Inactivation of AMPKα in both transformed and non-transformed cells promotes a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis, increased allocation of glucose carbon into lipids, and biomass accumulation. These metabolic effects require normoxic stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), as silencing HIF-1α reverses the shift to aerobic glycolysis and the biosynthetic and proliferative advantages conferred by reduced AMPKα signaling. Together our findings suggest that AMPK activity opposes tumor development, and its loss fosters tumor progression in part by regulating cellular metabolic pathways that support cell growth and proliferation. PMID:23274086

  13. Ethanol extract of Chaenomeles speciosa Nakai induces apoptosis in cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    YAO, GENDONG; LIU, CHAOQI; HUO, HONGQI; LIU, AIMIN; LV, BAIRUI; ZHANG, CAN; WANG, HAIDONG; LI, JINNONG; LIAO, LIANMING

    2013-01-01

    Chaenomeles speciosa Nakai is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine for a variety of health-promoting effects. The present study aimed to investigate the antitumor effects of Chaenomeles speciosa Nakai. The tumor-inhibitory activity of the ethanol extract of Chaenomeles speciosa Nakai (EEC) was evaluated by in vitro growth assays of tumor cells and in vivo H22 tumor formation assays in mice. Mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA ladder assays were used to detect tumor cell apoptosis in the presence of EEC. To investigate the cellular targets of EEC, the immunomodulatory genes PD-L1, Foxp3 and TGF-β were detected in the tumor tissue using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immune responses were determined by hemolysis and lymphocyte proliferation assays. EEC markedly inhibited the proliferation of the H22 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, it induced DNA fragmentation and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential. In vivo, EEC inhibited tumor growth and enhanced the immune responses in mice, while the expression of PD-L1, Foxp3 and TGF-β was inhibited in the tumor tissue. These results provide the first evidence that EEC may inhibit tumor growth by directly killing tumor cells and enhancing immune function. Thus, it is a natural source for safe anticancer medicine. PMID:23946814

  14. Silibinin-mediated metabolic reprogramming attenuates pancreatic cancer-induced cachexia and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Surendra K.; Dasgupta, Aneesha; Mehla, Kamiya; Gunda, Venugopal; Vernucci, Enza; Souchek, Joshua; Goode, Gennifer; King, Ryan; Mishra, Anusha; Rai, Ibha; Nagarajan, Sangeetha; Chaika, Nina V.; Yu, Fang; Singh, Pankaj K.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the US. Cancer-associated cachexia is present in up to 80% of PDAC patients and is associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. In the present studies we evaluated an anti-cancer natural product silibinin for its effectiveness in targeting pancreatic cancer aggressiveness and the cachectic properties of pancreatic cancer cells and tumors. Our results demonstrate that silibinin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner and reduces glycolytic activity of cancer cells. Our LC-MS/MS based metabolomics data demonstrates that silibinin treatment induces global metabolic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer cells. Silibinin treatment diminishes c-MYC expression, a key regulator of cancer metabolism. Furthermore, we observed reduced STAT3 signaling in silibinin-treated cancer cells. Overexpression of constitutively active STAT3 was sufficient to substantially revert the silibinin-induced downregulation of c-MYC and the metabolic phenotype. Our in vivo investigations demonstrate that silibinin reduces tumor growth and proliferation in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer and prevents the loss of body weight and muscle. It also improves physical activity including grip strength and latency to fall in tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, silibinin-induced metabolic reprogramming diminishes cell growth and cachectic properties of pancreatic cancer cells and animal models. PMID:26510913

  15. Cutting Edge: Engineering Active IKKβ in T Cells Drives Tumor Rejection.

    PubMed

    Evaristo, César; Spranger, Stefani; Barnes, Sarah E; Miller, Michelle L; Molinero, Luciana L; Locke, Frederick L; Gajewski, Thomas F; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Acquired dysfunction of tumor-reactive T cells is one mechanism by which tumors can evade the immune system. Identifying and correcting pathways that contribute to such dysfunction should enable novel anticancer therapy design. During cancer growth, T cells show reduced NF-κB activity, which is required for tumor rejection. Impaired T cell-intrinsic NF-κB may create a vicious cycle conducive to tumor progression and further T cell dysfunction. We hypothesized that forcing T cell-intrinsic NF-κB activation might break this cycle and induce tumor elimination. NF-κB was activated in T cells by inducing the expression of a constitutively active form of the upstream activator IκB kinase β (IKKβ). T cell-restricted constitutively active IKKβ augmented the frequency of functional tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells and improved tumor control. Transfer of constitutively active IKKβ-transduced T cells also boosted endogenous T cell responses that controlled pre-established tumors. Our results demonstrate that driving T cell-intrinsic NF-κB can result in tumor control, thus identifying a pathway with potential clinical applicability. PMID:26903482

  16. Importance of viability and attachment to an ascites tumor in the release of plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Q.; Zhou, M.; Subbarao, V.; Ts'ao, C.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor plasminogen activator (PA) has been alleged to play a role in the growth and metastasis of tumors. Before such a role can be realized, PA first must be released from tumor cells. Having determined intra- and extracellular PA and PA-inhibitor activities in an experimental pancreatic ascites tumor grown in hamsters, the release of PA from these cells was investigated. No PA activity was detected in the suspension medium of freshly isolated tumor cells; inclusion of plasminogen, fibrinogen, or collagen in the medium yielded similar negative results. On the other hand, PA activity was demonstrated to be released in a time-dependent manner from these tumor cells embedded in fibrin clots. Plasminogen activator activity also was not found in the suspension medium of frozen-thawed tumor cells, despite the fact that most of them had breaks on their cell membrane. Unlike freshly isolated tumor cells, PA was not released from frozen-thawed cells embedded in fibrin clots. Full PA activity was demonstrated in frozen-thawed cells treated with Triton X-100, however. Frozen-thawed cells exhibited signs of severe damage, and more than 80% of them failed to exclude trypan blue. Obviously PA is released from viable tumor cells embedded in fibrin clots but not suspended in artificial medium. The PA-release mechanism, not PA itself, is destroyed in cells rendered nonviable by freeze thawing. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1902626

  17. CBL enhances breast tumor formation by inhibiting tumor suppressive activity of TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Kang, J M; Park, S; Kim, S J; Hong, H Y; Jeong, J; Kim, H-S; Kim, S-J

    2012-12-13

    Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (CBL) protein family functions as multifunctional adaptor proteins and E3 ubiquitin ligases that are implicated as regulators of signaling in various cell types. Recent discovery revealed mutations of proto-oncogenic CBL in the linker region and RING finger domain in human acute myeloid neoplasm, and these transforming mutations induced carcinogenesis. However, the adaptor function of CBL mediated signaling pathway during tumorigenesis has not been well characterized. Here, we show that CBL is highly expressed in breast cancer cells and significantly inhibits transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) tumor suppressive activity. Knockdown of CBL expression resulted in the increased expression of TGF-β target genes, PAI-I and CDK inhibitors such as p15(INK4b) and p21(Cip1). Furthermore, we demonstrate that CBL is frequently overexpressed in human breast cancer tissues, and the loss of CBL decreases the tumorigenic activity of breast cancer cells in vivo. CBL directly binds to Smad3 through its proline-rich motif, thereby preventing Smad3 from interacting with Smad4 and blocking nuclear translocation of Smad3. CBL-b, one of CBL protein family, also interacted with Smad3 and knockdown of both CBL and CBL-b further enhanced TGF-β transcriptional activity. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which oncogenic CBL can block TGF-β tumor suppressor activity. PMID:22310290

  18. VCC-1, a novel chemokine, promotes tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Edward J.; Head, Richard; Griggs, David W.; Sun Duo; Evans, Robert J.; Swearingen, Michelle L.; Westlin, Marisa M.; Mazzarella, Richard . E-mail: richard.a.mazzarella@pfizer.com

    2006-11-10

    We have identified a novel human gene by transcriptional microarray analysis, which is co-regulated in tumors and angiogenesis model systems with VEGF expression. Isolation of cDNA clones containing the full-length VCC-1 transcript from both human and mouse shows a 119 amino acid protein with a 22 amino acid cleavable signal sequence in both species. Comparison of the protein product of this gene with hidden Markov models of all known proteins shows weak but significant homology with two known chemokines, SCYA17 and SCYA16. Northern analysis of human tissues detects a 1 kb band in lung and skeletal muscle. Murine VCC-1 expression can also be detected in lung as well as thyroid, submaxillary gland, epididymis, and uterus tissues by slot blot analysis. By quantitative real time RT-PCR 71% of breast tumors showed 3- to 24-fold up-regulation of VCC-1. In situ hybridization of breast carcinomas showed strong expression of the gene in both normal and transformed mammary gland ductal epithelial cells. In vitro, human microvascular endothelial cells grown on fibronectin increase VCC-1 expression by almost 100-fold. In addition, in the mouse angioma endothelial cell line PY4.1 the gene was over-expressed by 28-fold 6 h after induction of tube formation while quiescent and proliferating cells showed no change. VCC-1 expression is also increased by VEGF and FGF treatment, about 6- and 5-fold, respectively. Finally, 100% of mice injected with NIH3T3 cells over-expressing VCC-1 develop rapidly progressing tumors within 21 days while no growth is seen in any control mice injected with NIH3T3 cells containing the vector alone. These results strongly suggest that VCC-1 plays a role in angiogenesis and possibly in the development of tumors in some tissue types.

  19. Gastrointestinal hormones stimulate growth of Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors by transactivating the EGF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Di Florio, Alessia; Sancho, Veronica; Moreno, Paola; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Jensen, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors[NETs] usually pursuit a benign course, but some show aggressive behavior. The treatment of patients with advanced NETs is marginally effective and new approaches are needed. In other tumors, transactivation of the EGF receptor(EGFR) by growth factors, gastrointestinal(GI) hormones and lipids can stimulate growth, which has led to new treatments. Recent studies show a direct correlation between NET malignancy and EGFR expression, EGFR inhibition decreases basal NET growth and an autocrine growth effect exerted by GI hormones, for some NETs. To determine if GI hormones can stimulate NET growth by inducing transactivation of EGFR, we examined the ability of EGF, TGFα and various GI hormones to stimulate growth of the human foregut carcinoid, BON, the somatostatinoma QGP-1 and the rat islet tumor, Rin-14B-cell lines. The EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, AG1478 strongly inhibited EGF and the GI hormones stimulated cell growth, both in BON and QGP-1 cells. In all the three neuroendocrine cell lines studied, we found EGF, TGFα and the other growth-stimulating GI hormones increased Tyr1068 EGFR phosphorylation. In BON cells, both the GI hormones neurotensin and a bombesin analogue caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in EGFR phosphorylation, which was strongly inhibited by AG1478. Moreover, we found this stimulated phosphorylation was dependent on Src kinases, PKCs, matrix metalloproteinase activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. These results raise the possibility that disruption of this signaling cascade by either EGFR inhibition alone or combined with receptor antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of foregut NETs/PETs. PMID:23220008

  20. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue; Yang, Guifang; Cai, Xiaojun; Falck, John R.; Yang, Jing

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  1. Immunoglobulin Fc-fused, neuropilin-1-specific peptide shows efficient tumor tissue penetration and inhibits tumor growth via anti-angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Jin; Bae, Jeomil; Shin, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Se Hun; Jeong, Moonkyoung; Han, Yunho; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-10-28

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor, involved in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis, is targeted by peptides that bind to its VEGF-binding site. However, these peptides also cross-react with the structurally related receptor, NRP2. Here, we describe an immunoglobulin Fc-fused peptide, Fc-TPP11, which specifically binds to the VEGF-binding site of NRP1 with approximately 2nM affinity, but negligibly to that of NRP2. Fc-TPP11 triggered NRP1-dependent signaling, enhanced vascular permeability via vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin downregulation, and increased paracellular permeability via E-cadherin downregulation in tumor tissues. Fc-TPP11 also significantly enhanced the tumor penetration of co-injected anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, leading to the improved in vivo anti-tumor efficacy. Fc-TPP11 was easily adapted to the full-length anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (mAb) cetuximab (Erbitux), cetuximab-TPP11, exhibiting more than 2-fold improved tumor penetration than the parent cetuximab. Fc-TPP11 exhibited a similar whole-body half-life to that of intact Fc in tumor bearing mice. In addition to the tumor-penetrating activity, Fc-TPP11 suppressed VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by blocking VEGF binding to NRP1, thereby inhibiting tumor growth without promoting metastasis in the mouse model. Our results show that NRP1-specific, high-affinity binding of Fc-TPP11, is useful to validate NRP1 signaling, independent of NRP2. Thus, Fc-TPP11 can be used as a tumor penetration-promoting agent with anti-angiogenic activity or directly adapted to mAb-TPP11 format for more potent anti-cancer antibody therapy. PMID:26260451

  2. Biodegradable polymeric micelles encapsulated JK184 suppress tumor growth through inhibiting Hedgehog signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Ning; Deng, Senyi; Song, Linjiang; Wu, Qinjie; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Xie, Yongmei; Gong, Changyang

    2015-01-01

    JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in vitro release behavior and had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of HUVECs than free JK184. Furthermore, JK184 micelles had stronger tumor growth inhibiting effects in subcutaneous Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor models. Histological analysis showed that JK184 micelles improved anti-tumor activity by inducing more apoptosis, decreasing microvessel density and reducing expression of CD31, Ki67, and VEGF in tumor tissues. JK184 micelles showed a stronger inhibition of Gli expression in Hh signaling, which played an important role in pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore, circulation time of JK184 in blood was prolonged after entrapment in polymeric micelles. Our results suggested that JK184 micelles are a promising drug candidate for treating pancreatic tumors with a highly inhibitory effect on Hh activity.JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in

  3. Sphingosine Kinase Activity Is Not Required for Tumor Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew L.; Carlson, Timothy; Coxon, Angela; Fajardo, Flordeliza; Frank, Brendon; Gustin, Darin; Kamb, Alexander; Kassner, Paul D.; Li, Shyun; Li, Yihong; Morgenstern, Kurt; Plant, Matthew; Quon, Kim; Ruefli-Brasse, Astrid; Schmidt, Joanna; Swearingen, Elissa; Walker, Nigel; Wang, Zhulun; Watson, J. E. Vivienne; Wickramasinghe, Dineli; Wong, Mariwil; Xu, Guifen; Wesche, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases (SPHKs) are enzymes that phosphorylate the lipid sphingosine, leading to the formation of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). In addition to the well established role of extracellular S1P as a mitogen and potent chemoattractant, SPHK activity has been postulated to be an important intracellular regulator of apoptosis. According to the proposed rheostat theory, SPHK activity shifts the intracellular balance from the pro-apoptotic sphingolipids ceramide and sphingosine to the mitogenic S1P, thereby determining the susceptibility of a cell to apoptotic stress. Despite numerous publications with supporting evidence, a clear experimental confirmation of the impact of this mechanism on tumor cell viability in vitro and in vivo has been hampered by the lack of suitable tool reagents. Utilizing a structure based design approach, we developed potent and specific SPHK1/2 inhibitors. These compounds completely inhibited intracellular S1P production in human cells and attenuated vascular permeability in mice, but did not lead to reduced tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo. In addition, siRNA experiments targeting either SPHK1 or SPHK2 in a large panel of cell lines failed to demonstrate any statistically significant effects on cell viability. These results show that the SPHK rheostat does not play a major role in tumor cell viability, and that SPHKs might not be attractive targets for pharmacological intervention in the area of oncology. PMID:23861887

  4. Picropodophyllin inhibits tumor growth of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shu-Cheng; Guo, Wei; Tao, Ze-Zhang

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •We identified that PPP inhibits IGF-1R/Akt pathway in NPC cells. •PPP dose-dependently inhibits NPC cell proliferation in vitro. •PPP suppresses tumor growth of NPC in nude mice. •PPP have little effect on microtubule assembly. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a cell membrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity and plays important roles in cell transformation, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a selective IGF-1R inhibitor and shows promising antitumor effects for several human cancers. However, its antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of PPP in NPC using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. We found that PPP dose-dependently decreased the IGF-induced phosphorylation and activity of IGF-1R and consequently reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, one downstream target of IGF-1R. In addition, PPP inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PPP for NPC cell line CNE-2 was ⩽1 μM at 24 h after treatment and ⩽0.5 μM at 48 h after treatment, respectively. Moreover, administration of PPP by intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the tumor growth of xenografted NPC in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest targeting IGF-1R by PPP may represent a new strategy for treatment of NPCs with positive IGF-1R expression.

  5. Involvement of estrogen-related receptors in transcriptional response to hypoxia and growth of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Ao, Ada; Wang, Heiman; Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Lu, Jianrong

    2008-06-01

    The development of intratumoral hypoxia is a universal hallmark of rapidly growing solid tumors. Adaptation to the hypoxic environment, which is critical for tumor cell survival and growth, is mediated primarily through a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent transcriptional program. HIF activates genes that facilitate crucial adaptive mechanisms including increased glucose uptake and glycolysis and tumor angiogenesis, making it an important therapeutic target. However, the HIF-dependent transcriptional mechanism remains incompletely understood, and targeting HIF is a difficult endeavor. Here, we show that the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) physically interact with HIF and stimulate HIF-induced transcription. Importantly, ERRs appear to be essential for HIF's function. Transcriptional activation of hypoxic genes in cells cultured under hypoxia is largely blocked by suppression of ERRs through expression of a dominant negative form of ERR or treatment with a pharmacological ERR inhibitor, diethylstilbestrol. Systematic administration of diethylstilbestrol severely diminished growth and angiogenesis of tumor xenografts in vivo. Because nuclear receptors are outstanding targets for drug discovery, the findings not only may offer mechanistic insights into HIF-mediated transcription but also may open new avenues for targeting the HIF pathway for cancer therapy. PMID:18509053

  6. Restoration of XAF1 expression induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tu, Shui Ping; Liston, Peter; Cui, Jian Tao; Lin, Marie C M; Jiang, Xiao Hua; Yang, Yi; Gu, Qing; Jiang, Shi Hu; Lum, Ching Tung; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Korneluk, Robert G; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu

    2009-08-01

    XAF1 (XIAP-associated factor 1) is a novel XIAP binding protein that can antagonize XIAP and sensitize cells to other cell death triggers. Our previous results have shown that aberrant hypermethylation of the CpG sites in XAF1 promoter is strongly associated with lower expression of XAF1 in gastric cancers. In our study, we investigated the effect of restoration of XAF1 expression on growth of gastric cancers. We found that the restoration of XAF1 expression suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth and increased sensitivity to TRAIL and drug-induced apoptosis. Stable cell clones expressing XAF1 exhibited delayed tumor initiation in nude mice. Restoration of XAF1 expression mediated by adenovirus vector greatly increased apoptosis in gastric cancer cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner and sensitized cancer cells to TRAIL and drugs-induced apoptosis. Adeno-XAF1 transduction induced cell cycle G2/M arrest and upregulated the expression of p21 and downregulated the expression of cyclin B1 and cdc2. Notably, adeno-XAF1 treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth, strongly enhanced the antitumor activity of TRAIL in a gastric cancer xenograft model in vivo, and significantly prolonged the survival time of animals bearing tumor xenografts. Complete eradication of established tumors was achieved on combined treatment with adeno-XAF1 and TRAIL. Our results document that the restoration of XAF1 inhibits gastric tumorigenesis and tumor growth and that XAF1 is a promising candidate for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19358264

  7. Fragmented sleep accelerates tumor growth and progression through recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages and TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fahed; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shelley XL; Zheng, Jiamao; Yolcu, Esma S.; Carreras, Alba; Khlayfa, Abdelnaby; Shirwan, Haval; Almendros, Isaac; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Fragmented sleep (SF) is a highly prevalent condition and a hallmark of sleep apnea, a condition that has been associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that SF promotes tumor growth and progression through pro-inflammatory TLR4 signaling. In the design, we compared mice that were exposed to SF one week before engraftment of syngeneic TC1 or LL3 tumor cells and tumor analysis three weeks later. We also compared host contributions through the use of mice genetically deficient in TLR4 or its effector molecules MYD88 or TRIF. We found that SF enhanced tumor size and weight compared to control mice. Increased invasiveness was apparent in SF tumors, which penetrated the tumor capsule into surrounding tissues including adjacent muscle. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were more numerous in SF tumors where they were distributed in a relatively closer proximity to the tumor capsule, compared to control mice. Although tumors were generally smaller in both MYD88−/− and TRIF−/− hosts, the more aggressive features produced by SF persisted. In contrast, these more aggressive features produced by SF were abolished completely in TLR4−/− mice. Our findings offer mechanistic insights into how sleep perturbations can accelerate tumor growth and invasiveness through TAM recruitment and TLR4 signaling pathways. PMID:24448240

  8. Hypoxia-directed and activated theranostic agent: Imaging and treatment of solid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Kim, Eun-Joong; Han, Jiyou; Lee, Hyunseung; Shin, Weon Sup; Kim, Hyun Min; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia, a distinguished feature of various solid tumors, has been considered as a key marker for tumor progression. Inadequate vasculature and high interstitial pressures result in relatively poor drug delivery to these tumors. Herein, we developed an antitumor theranostic agent, 4, which is activated in hypoxic conditions and can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors. Compound 4, bearing biotin, a tumor-targeting unit, and SN38, an anticancer drug, proved to be an effective theranostic agent for solid tumors. SN38 plays a dual role: as an anticancer drug for therapy and as a fluorophore for diagnosis, thus avoids an extra fluorophore and limits cytotoxicity. Compound 4, activated in the hypoxic environment, showed high therapeutic activity in A549 and HeLa cells and spheroids. In vivo imaging of solid tumors confirmed the tumor-specific localization, deep tissue penetration and activation of compound 4, as well as the production of a strong anticancer effect through the inhibition of tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model validating it as a promising strategy for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:27449948

  9. Olig2-Dependent Reciprocal Shift in PDGF and EGF Receptor Signaling Regulates Tumor Phenotype and Mitotic Growth in Malignant Glioma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fanghui; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Chuntao; Wang, Haibo; He, Danyang; Xu, Lingli; Wang, Jincheng; He, Xuelian; Deng, Yaqi; Lu, Ellen E; Liu, Xue; Verma, Ravinder; Bu, Hong; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Burns, Dennis; Xin, Mei; Rubin, Joshua B; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Canoll, Peter; Holland, Eric C; Lu, Q Richard

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas exhibit extensive heterogeneity and poor prognosis. Here we identify mitotic Olig2-expressing cells as tumor-propagating cells in proneural gliomas, elimination of which blocks tumor initiation and progression. Intriguingly, deletion of Olig2 resulted in tumors that grow, albeit at a decelerated rate. Genome occupancy and expression profiling analyses reveal that Olig2 directly activates cell-proliferation machinery to promote tumorigenesis. Olig2 deletion causes a tumor phenotypic shift from an oligodendrocyte precursor-correlated proneural toward an astroglia-associated gene expression pattern, manifest in downregulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α and reciprocal upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Olig2 deletion further sensitizes glioma cells to EGFR inhibitors and extends the lifespan of animals. Thus, Olig2-orchestrated receptor signaling drives mitotic growth and regulates glioma phenotypic plasticity. Targeting Olig2 may circumvent resistance to EGFR-targeted drugs. PMID:27165742

  10. The Tetraspanin CD151 Is Required for Met-dependent Signaling and Tumor Cell Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Mélanie; Muratori, Claudia; Corso, Simona; Tenaglia, Enrico; Bertotti, Andrea; Capparuccia, Lorena; Trusolino, Livio; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Tamagnone, Luca

    2010-01-01

    CD151, a transmembrane protein of the tetraspanin family, is implicated in the regulation of cell-substrate adhesion and cell migration through physical and functional interactions with integrin receptors. In contrast, little is known about the potential role of CD151 in controlling cell proliferation and survival. We have previously shown that β4 integrin, a major CD151 partner, not only acts as an adhesive receptor for laminins but also as an intracellular signaling platform promoting cell proliferation and invasive growth upon interaction with Met, the tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Here we show that RNAi-mediated silencing of CD151 expression in cancer cells impairs HGF-driven proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, protection from anoikis, and tumor progression in xenograft models in vivo. Mechanistically, we found that CD151 is crucially implicated in the formation of signaling complexes between Met and β4 integrin, a known amplifier of HGF-induced tumor cell growth and survival. CD151 depletion hampered HGF-induced phosphorylation of β4 integrin and the ensuing Grb2-Gab1 association, a signaling pathway leading to MAPK stimulation and cell growth. Accordingly, CD151 knockdown reduced HGF-triggered activation of MAPK but not AKT signaling cascade. These results indicate that CD151 controls Met-dependent neoplastic growth by enhancing receptor signaling through β4 integrin-mediated pathways, independent of cell-substrate adhesion. PMID:20937830

  11. Neutrophil-Derived Proteases in the Microenvironment of Pancreatic Cancer -Active Players in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Klaus; Gaida, Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fibro-inflammatory microenvironment, consisting of activated pancreatic stellate cells, extracellular matrix proteins, and a variety of inflammatory cells, such as T cells, macrophages, or neutrophils. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells, which are found in nearly all cancers, including PDAC, often fail to eliminate the tumor, but conversely can promote its progression by altering the tumor microenvironment. Pancreatic cancer cells are able to attract polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) via tumor secreted chemokines and in human PDAC, PMN infiltrates can be observed in the vicinity of tumor cells and in the desmoplastic tumor stroma, which correlate with undifferentiated tumor growth and poor prognosis. The behavior of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils in the tumor micromilieu is not yet understood at a mechanistic level. It has been shown that PMN have the potential to kill tumor cells, either directly or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, but on the other side various adverse effects of PMN, such as promotion of aggressive tumor growth with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and increased metastatic potential, have been described. Recent therapeutic approaches for PDAC focus not only the tumor cell itself, but also elements of the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, the role of PMN and their derived products (e.g. cytokines, proteases) as a new vein for a therapeutic target should be critically evaluated in this context. This review summarizes the current understanding of the interplay between proteases of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils and pancreatic tumor cells and elements of the desmoplastic stroma. PMID:26929737

  12. Role of Constitutive Behavior and Tumor-Host Mechanical Interactions in the State of Stress and Growth of Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgis, Panagiotis; Odysseos, Andreani D.; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces play a crucial role in tumor patho-physiology. Compression of cancer cells inhibits their proliferation rate, induces apoptosis and enhances their invasive and metastatic potential. Additionally, compression of intratumor blood vessels reduces the supply of oxygen, nutrients and drugs, affecting tumor progression and treatment. Despite the great importance of the mechanical microenvironment to the pathology of cancer, there are limited studies for the constitutive modeling and the mechanical properties of tumors and on how these parameters affect tumor growth. Also, the contribution of the host tissue to the growth and state of stress of the tumor remains unclear. To this end, we performed unconfined compression experiments in two tumor types and found that the experimental stress-strain response is better fitted to an exponential constitutive equation compared to the widely used neo-Hookean and Blatz-Ko models. Subsequently, we incorporated the constitutive equations along with the corresponding values of the mechanical properties - calculated by the fit - to a biomechanical model of tumor growth. Interestingly, we found that the evolution of stress and the growth rate of the tumor are independent from the selection of the constitutive equation, but depend strongly on the mechanical interactions with the surrounding host tissue. Particularly, model predictions - in agreement with experimental studies - suggest that the stiffness of solid tumors should exceed a critical value compared with that of the surrounding tissue in order to be able to displace the tissue and grow in size. With the use of the model, we estimated this critical value to be on the order of 1.5. Our results suggest that the direct effect of solid stress on tumor growth involves not only the inhibitory effect of stress on cancer cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis, but also the resistance of the surrounding tissue to tumor expansion. PMID:25111061

  13. Tumor suppressor activity of RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Yang; Guo, He-Zhou; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I), named for the observation that its mRNA expression is highly upregulated in the progression of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced maturation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells, has been well documented as a pivotal virus-associated molecular pattern recognition receptor (PRR) responsible for triggering innate immunity. Upon recognizing viral RNA ligands, RIG-I experiences a series of programmed conformational changes and modifications that unleash its activity through the formation of complexes with various binding partners. Such partners include the mitochondria membrane-anchored protein IPS-1 (also named MAVS/VISA/Cardif) that activates both the IRF3/7 and NF-κB pathways. These partnerships and resulting pathway activations underlie the synthesis of type I interferon and other inflammatory factors. Recent studies have demonstrated that RIG-I is also involved in the regulation of basic cellular processes outside of innate immunity against viral infections, such as hematopoietic proliferation and differentiation, maintenance of leukemic stemness, and tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, we will highlight recent studies leading up to the recognition that RIG-I performs an essential function as a tumor suppressor and try to reconcile this activity of RIG-I with its well-known role in protecting cells against viral infection. PMID:27308362

  14. Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction-Mediated Delivery of a Transcription Factor Decoy Inhibits STAT3 Signaling and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Carson, Andrew R.; McTiernan, Charles F.; Chen, Xucai; Hasjim, Bima; Lavery, Linda; Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in many cancers where it acts to promote tumor progression. A STAT3-specific transcription factor decoy has been developed to suppress STAT3 downstream signaling, but a delivery strategy is needed to improve clinical translation. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) has been shown to enhance image-guided local delivery of molecular therapeutics to a target site. The objective of this study was to deliver STAT3 decoy to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors using UTMD to disrupt STAT3 signaling and inhibit tumor growth. Studies performed demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles inhibited STAT3 signaling in SCC cells in vitro. Studies performed in vivo demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles induced significant tumor growth inhibition (31-51% reduced tumor volume vs. controls, p < 0.05) in mice bearing SCC tumors. Furthermore, expression of STAT3 downstream target genes (Bcl-xL and cyclin D1) was significantly reduced (34-39%, p < 0.05) in tumors receiving UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles compared to controls. In addition, the quantity of radiolabeled STAT3 decoy detected in tumors eight hours after treatment was significantly higher with UTMD treatment compared to controls (70-150%, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that UTMD can increase delivery of a transcription factor decoy to tumors in vivo and that the decoy can inhibit STAT3 signaling and tumor growth. These results suggest that UTMD treatment holds potential for clinical use to increase the concentration of a transcription factor signaling inhibitor in the tumor. PMID:26681983

  15. Guidance Molecule SEMA3A Restricts Tumor Growth by Differentially Regulating the Proliferation of Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wallerius, Majken; Wallmann, Tatjana; Bartish, Margarita; Östling, Jeanette; Mezheyeuski, Artur; Tobin, Nicholas P; Nygren, Emma; Pangigadde, Pradeepa; Pellegrini, Paola; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Pontén, Fredrik; Hartman, Johan; Bergh, Jonas; De Milito, Angelo; De Palma, Michele; Östman, Arne; Andersson, John; Rolny, Charlotte

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) correlates with malignant progression, immune suppression, and poor prognosis. In this study, we defined a critical role for the cell-surface guidance molecule SEMA3A in differential proliferative control of TAMs. Tumor cell-derived SEMA3A restricted the proliferation of protumoral M2 macrophages but increased the proliferation of antitumoral M1, acting through the SEMA3A receptor neuropilin 1. Expansion of M1 macrophages in vivo enhanced the recruitment and activation of natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells to tumors, inhibiting their growth. In human breast cancer specimens, we found that immunohistochemical levels of SEMA3A correlated with the expression of genes characteristic of M1 macrophages, CD8(+) T cells, and NK cells, while inversely correlating with established characters of malignancy. In summary, our results illuminate a mechanism whereby the TAM phenotype is controlled and identify the cell-surface molecule SEMA3A as a candidate for therapeutic targeting. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3166-78. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197153

  16. Initial description of a tumor enhancing activity produced by murine splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, W H; Stebler, B; Ershler, W B

    1991-08-30

    We have shown that certain murine tumors grow more slowly and spread less readily in immune deficient animals. We have also demonstrated that immunologic factors explain certain aspects of this difference. In the work presented we demonstrate that a subpopulation of splenocytes produce a factor(s) that enhances tumor cell proliferation in vitro. We also describe an in vitro model to determine the level of tumor stimulatory activity. We found that the tumor cell growth-enhancing activity (TEA) is heat stable but sensitive to trypsin digestion, low pH and beta-mercaptoethanol. TEA production is found to be insensitive to mitogen stimulation such as concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, and phytohemagglutinin. Among the known growth factors and interleukins we have tested (interleukin 1-7, basic FGF, EGF, TGF-beta PDGF, GM-CSF, and MCSF), none appear to account for TEA activity. PMID:1883389

  17. Adjuvant Cationic Liposomes Presenting MPL and IL-12 Induce Cell Death, Suppress Tumor Growth, and Alter the Cellular Phenotype of Tumors in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) process and present antigens to T lymphocytes, inducing potent immune responses when encountered in association with activating signals, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Using the 4T1 murine model of breast cancer, cationic liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and interleukin (IL)-12 were administered by intratumoral injection. Combination multivalent presentation of the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand MPL and cytotoxic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trmethylammonium-propane lipids induced cell death, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased serum levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The addition of recombinant IL-12 further suppressed tumor growth and increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. IL-12 also increased the percentage of cytolytic T cells, DC, and F4/80+ macrophages in the tumor. While single agent therapy elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase 3-fold above basal levels in the tumor, combination therapy with MPL cationic liposomes and IL-12 stimulated a 7-fold increase, supporting the observed cell cycle arrest (loss of Ki-67 expression) and apoptosis (TUNEL positive). In mice bearing dual tumors, the growth of distal, untreated tumors mirrored that of liposome-treated tumors, supporting the presence of a systemic immune response. PMID:25179345

  18. FEM-based simulation of tumor growth in medical image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shuqian; Nie, Ying

    2004-05-01

    Brain model has found wide applications in areas including surgical-path planning, image-guided surgery systems, and virtual medical environments. In comparison with the modeling of normal brain anatomy, the modeling of anatomical abnormalities appears to be rather weak. Particularly, there are considerable differences between abnormal brain images and normal brain images, due to the growth of brain tumor. In order to find the correspondence between abnormal brain images and normal ones, it is necessary to make an estimation or simulation of the brain deformation. In this paper, a deformable model of brain tissue with both geometric and physical nonlinear properties based on finite element method is presented. It is assumed that the brain tissue are nonlinearly elastic solids obeying the equations of an incompressible nonlinearly elastics neo-Hookean model. we incorporate the physical inhomogeneous of brain tissue into our FEM model. The non-linearity of the model needs to solve the deformation of the model using an iteration method. The Updated Lagrange for iteration is used. To assure the convergence of iteration, we adopt the fixed arc length method. This model has advantages over those linear models in its more real tissue properties and its capability of simulating more serious brain deformation. The inclusion of second order displacement items into the balance and geometry functions allows for the estimation of more serious brain deformation. We referenced the model presented by Stelios K so as to ascertain the initial position of tumor as well as our tumor model definition. Furthermore, we expend it from 2-D to 3-D and simplify the calculation process.

  19. Genetically engineered endostatin-lidamycin fusion proteins effectively inhibit tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endostatin (ES) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation. It also shows antiangiogenesis and antitumor activities in several animal models. Endostatin specifically targets tumor vasculature to block tumor growth. Lidamycin (LDM), which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a non-covalently bound apo-protein (LDP), is a member of chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics with extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Therefore, we reasoned that endostatin-lidamycin (ES-LDM) fusion proteins upon energizing with enediyne chromophore may obtain the combined capability targeting tumor vasculature and tumor cell by respective ES and LDM moiety. Methods In this study, we designed and obtained two new endostatin-based fusion proteins, endostatin-LDP (ES-LDP) and LDP-endostatin (LDP-ES). In vitro, the antiangiogenic effect of fusion proteins was determined by the wound healing assay and tube formation assay and the cytotoxicity of their enediyne-energized analogs was evaluated by CCK-8 assay. Tissue microarray was used to analyze the binding affinity of LDP, ES or ES-LDP with specimens of human lung tissue and lung tumor. The in vivo efficacy of the fusion proteins was evaluated with human lung carcinoma PG-BE1 xenograft and the experimental metastasis model of 4T1-luc breast cancer. Results ES-LDP and LDP-ES disrupted the formation of endothelial tube structures and inhibited endothelial cell migration. Evidently, ES-LDP accumulated in the tumor and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. ES-LDP and ES show higher binding capability than LDP to lung carcinoma; in addition, ES-LDP and ES share similar binding capability. Furthermore, the enediyne-energized fusion protein ES-LDP-AE demonstrated significant efficacy against lung carcinoma xenograft in athymic mice. Conclusions The ES-based fusion protein therapy provides some fundamental information for further drug development. Targeting both tumor

  20. CSR1 suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoying; Tseng, George C; Yu, Yan Ping; Gavel, Tim; Nelson, Joel; Wells, Alan; Michalopoulos, George; Kokkinakis, Demetrius; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2006-02-01

    Prostate cancer is frequent among men over 45 years of age, but it generally only becomes lethal with metastasis. In this study, we identified a gene called cellular stress response 1 (CSR1) that was frequently down-regulated and methylated in prostate cancer samples. Survival analysis indicated that methylation of the CSR1 promoter, and to a lesser extent down-regulation of CSR1 protein expression, was associated with a high rate of prostate cancer metastasis. Forced expression of CSR1 in prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 resulted in a two- to threefold decrease in colony formation and a 10-fold reduction in anchorage-independent growth. PC3 cells stably expressing CSR1 had an average threefold decrease in their ability to invade in vitro. Expression of CSR1 in PC3 cell xenografts produced a dramatic reduction (>8-fold) in tumor size, rate of invasion (0 versus 31%), and mortality (13 versus 100%). The present findings suggest that CSR1 is a potent tumor sup-pressor gene. PMID:16436673

  1. ARNT2 Regulates Tumoral Growth in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yasushi; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Nakashima, Dai; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Fushimi, Kazuaki; Higo, Morihiro; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) 2 is a transcriptional factor related to adaptive responses against cellular stress from a xenobiotic substance. Recent evidence indicates ARNT is involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression; however, little is known about the relevance of ARNT2 in the behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the current study, we evaluated the ARNT2 mRNA and protein expression levels in OSCC in vitro and in vivo and the clinical relationship between ARNT2 expression levels in primary OSCCs and their clinicopathologic status by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Using ARNT2 overexpression models, we performed functional analyses to investigate the critical roles of ARNT2 in OSCC. ARNT2 mRNA and protein were down-regulated significantly (P < 0.05 for both comparisons) in nine OSCC-derived cells and primary OSCC (n=100 patients) compared with normal counterparts. In addition to the data from exogenous experiments that ARNT2-overexpressed cells showed decreased cellular proliferation, ARNT2-positive OSCC cases were correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Since von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1)-α, is a downstream molecule of ARNT2, we speculated that HIF1-α and its downstream molecules would have key functions in cellular growth. Consistent with our hypothesis, overexpressed ARNT2 cells showed down-regulation of HIF1-α, which causes hypofunctioning of glucose transporter 1, leading to decreased cellular growth. Our results proposed for the first time that the ARNT2 level is an indicator of cellular proliferation in OSCCs. Therefore, ARNT2 may be a potential therapeutic target against progression of OSCCs. PMID:27076852

  2. ARNT2 Regulates Tumoral Growth in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasushi; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Nakashima, Dai; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Fushimi, Kazuaki; Higo, Morihiro; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) 2 is a transcriptional factor related to adaptive responses against cellular stress from a xenobiotic substance. Recent evidence indicates ARNT is involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression; however, little is known about the relevance of ARNT2 in the behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the current study, we evaluated the ARNT2 mRNA and protein expression levels in OSCC in vitro and in vivo and the clinical relationship between ARNT2 expression levels in primary OSCCs and their clinicopathologic status by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Using ARNT2 overexpression models, we performed functional analyses to investigate the critical roles of ARNT2 in OSCC. ARNT2 mRNA and protein were down-regulated significantly (P < 0.05 for both comparisons) in nine OSCC-derived cells and primary OSCC (n=100 patients) compared with normal counterparts. In addition to the data from exogenous experiments that ARNT2-overexpressed cells showed decreased cellular proliferation, ARNT2-positive OSCC cases were correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Since von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1)-α, is a downstream molecule of ARNT2, we speculated that HIF1-α and its downstream molecules would have key functions in cellular growth. Consistent with our hypothesis, overexpressed ARNT2 cells showed down-regulation of HIF1-α, which causes hypofunctioning of glucose transporter 1, leading to decreased cellular growth. Our results proposed for the first time that the ARNT2 level is an indicator of cellular proliferation in OSCCs. Therefore, ARNT2 may be a potential therapeutic target against progression of OSCCs. PMID:27076852

  3. Growth hormone and risk for cardiac tumors in Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Bandettini, W Patricia; Karageorgiadis, Alexander S; Sinaii, Ninet; Rosing, Douglas R; Sachdev, Vandana; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Gourgari, Evgenia; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Keil, Meg F; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Carney, J Aidan; Arai, Andrew E; Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-09-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is a multiple neoplasia syndrome that is caused mostly by PRKAR1A mutations. Cardiac myxomas are the leading cause of mortality in CNC patients who, in addition, often develop growth hormone (GH) excess. We studied patients with CNC, who were observed for over a period of 20 years (1995-2015) for the development of both GH excess and cardiac myxomas. GH secretion was evaluated by standard testing; dedicated cardiovascular imaging was used to detect cardiac abnormalities. Four excised cardiac myxomas were tested for the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). A total of 99 CNC patients (97 with a PRKAR1A mutation) were included in the study with a mean age of 25.8 ± 16.6 years at presentation. Over an observed mean follow-up of 25.8 years, 60% of patients with GH excess (n = 46) developed a cardiac myxoma compared with only 36% of those without GH excess (n = 54) (P = 0.016). Overall, patients with GH excess were also more likely to have a tumor vs those with normal GH secretion (OR: 2.78, 95% CI: 1.23-6.29; P = 0.014). IGF-1 mRNA and protein were higher in CNC myxomas than in normal heart tissue. We conclude that the development of cardiac myxomas in CNC may be associated with increased GH secretion, in a manner analogous to the association between fibrous dysplasia and GH excess in McCune-Albright syndrome, a condition similar to CNC. We speculate that treatment of GH excess in patients with CNC may reduce the likelihood of cardiac myxoma formation and/or recurrence of this tumor. PMID:27535175

  4. A soluble form of GAS1 inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in a triple negative breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Adriana; López-Ornelas, Adolfo; Estudillo, Enrique; González-Mariscal, Lorenza; González, Rosa O; Segovia, José

    2014-10-01

    We previously demonstrated the capacity of GAS1 (Growth Arrest Specific 1) to inhibit the growth of gliomas by blocking the GDNF-RET signaling pathway. Here, we show that a soluble form of GAS1 (tGAS1), decreases the number of viable MDA MB 231 human breast cancer cells, acting in both autocrine and paracrine manners when secreted from producing cells. Moreover, tGAS1 inhibits the growth of tumors implanted in female nu/nu mice through a RET-independent mechanism which involves interfering with the Artemin (ARTN)-GFRα3-(GDNF Family Receptor alpha 3) mediated intracellular signaling and the activation of ERK. In addition, we observed that the presence of tGAS1 reduces the vascularization of implanted tumors, by preventing the migration of endothelial cells. The present results support a potential adjuvant role for tGAS1 in the treatment of breast cancer, by detaining tumor growth and inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:24992044

  5. Luteolin and its inhibitory effect on tumor growth in systemic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, Shailendra

    2013-04-01

    Lamy et al have provided interesting data in their recent article in your esteemed journal. Luteolin augments apoptosis in a number of systemic malignancies. Luteolin reduces tumor growth in breast carcinomas. Luteolin mediates this effect by up-regulating the expression of Bax and down-regulating the expression of Bcl-xL. EGFR-induced MAPK activation is also attenuated. As a result there is increased G2/ M phase arrest. These effects have been seen both in vivo as well as in vitro. It also reduces ERα expression and causes inhibition of IGF-1 mediated PI3K–Akt pathway. Luteolin also activates p38 resulting in nuclear translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor. Simultaneously it also activates ERK. As a result there is increased intra-tumoral apoptosis which is caspase dependent as well as caspase independent. - Highlights: ► Luteolin and tumor growth in breast carcinomas. ► Luteolin and pulmonary cancer. ► Luteolin and colon cancer.

  6. Moxifloxacin increases anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity of irinotecan in human xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Debby; Halperin, Drora; Fabian, Ina; Tsarfaty, Galia; Askenasy, Nadir; Shalit, Itamar

    2010-04-15

    Camptothecins (CPTs) are topoisomerase I inhibitors chemotherapeutic agents used in combination chemotherapy. We showed previously that combination of moxifloxacin (MXF) and CPT induced inhibitory effects on topoisomerase I activity, on proliferation of HT-29 cells in vitro and enhanced apoptosis, compared to CPT alone. Analysis of secretion of the pro-angiogenic factors IL-8 and VEGF showed significant reduction by MXF. Using a murine model of human colon carcinoma xenograft, we compared the effects of MXF/CPT in vitro to MXF/irinotecan combination in vivo. We show that the MXF/CPT inhibitory effects observed in vitro are reflected in the inhibition of the progressive growth of HT-29 cells implanted in SCID mice. Using caliper measurements, Doppler ultrasonography, image analyses and immunohistochemistry of nuclear proteins (Ki-67) and vascular endothelial cells (CD-31) we show that addition of MXF (45mg/kg) to a relatively ineffective dose of irinotecan (20mg/kg), results in a 50% and 30% decrease, respectively, in tumor size and a decrease in Ki-67 staining. Power Doppler Ultrasound showed a significant, pronounced decrease in the number of blood vessels, as did CD-31 staining, indicating decreased blood flow in tumors in mice treated with MXF alone or MXF/irinotecan compared to irinotecan. These results suggest that the combination of MXF/irinotecan may result in enhanced anti-neoplastic/anti-angiogenic activity. PMID:20025849

  7. Nitroxoline impairs tumor progression in vitro and in vivo by regulating cathepsin B activity.

    PubMed

    Mirković, Bojana; Markelc, Boštjan; Butinar, Miha; Mitrović, Ana; Sosič, Izidor; Gobec, Stanislav; Vasiljeva, Olga; Turk, Boris; Čemažar, Maja; Serša, Gregor; Kos, Janko

    2015-08-01

    Cathepsin B is a ubiquitously expressed lysosomal cysteine protease that participates in protein turnover within lysosomes. However, its protein and activity levels have been shown to be increased in cancer. Cathepsin B endopeptidase activity is involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix, a process that promotes tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Previously, we reported an established antibiotic nitroxoline as a potent and selective inhibitor of cathepsin B. In the present study, we elucidated its anti-tumor properties in in vitro and in vivo tumor models. Tumor and endothelial cell lines with high levels of active cathepsin B were selected for functional analysis of nitroxoline in vitro. Nitroxoline significantly reduced extracellular DQ-collagen IV degradation by all evaluated cancer cell lines using spectrofluorimetry. Nitroxoline also markedly decreased tumor cell invasion monitored in real time and reduced the invasive growth of multicellular tumor spheroids, used as a 3D in vitro model of tumor invasion. Additionally, endothelial tube formation was significantly reduced by nitroxoline in an in vitro angiogenesis assay. Finally, nitroxoline significantly abrogated tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis in vivo in LPB fibrosarcoma and MMTV-PyMT breast cancer mouse models. Overall, our results designate nitroxoline as a promising drug candidate for anti-cancer treatment. PMID:25848918

  8. Energy balance modulates colon tumor growth: Interactive roles of insulin and estrogen.

    PubMed

    Rondini, Elizabeth A; Harvey, Alison E; Steibel, Juan P; Hursting, Stephen D; Fenton, Jenifer I

    2011-05-01

    Obesity increases colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and progression. However, the impact of obesity on CRC in women is dependent on ovarian hormone status. The purpose of this study was to determine the interactive roles of obesity and ovarian hormones on serum markers of inflammation, cell signaling, and transplanted colon tumor growth. Female C57BL/6 mice (6 wk) were either ovariectomized (OVX) or ovaries left intact (nonovariectomized, NOVX) and randomized to receive a (1) control, (2) 30% calorie-restricted (CR), or (3) diet-induced obese (DIO) diet regimen for 20 wk to induce differing levels of adiposity. Serum was collected and inflammatory and metabolic markers were measured using an antibody array (62 proteins) and ELISAs. Mice were subcutaneously injected with syngeneic MC38 colon cancer cells after 20 wk and sacrificed 4 wk later. CR mice had the smallest tumors irrespective of hormone status, whereas the largest tumors were observed in DIO-OVX mice. Glucose tolerance was impaired in OVX mice, being most severe in the DIO-OVX group. Cytokine arrays suggested that in CR animals, inhibition of tumor growth paralleled insulin sensitivity and associated changes in leptin, adiponectin, and IGF-BPs. Conversely, in DIO-OVX animals, tumor growth was associated with insulin and leptin resistance as well as higher levels of pro-inflammatory proteins. In vitro, leptin and adiponectin had no effect, whereas insulin induced MC38 cell proliferation and MAPK activation. Co-treatment with estrogen blocked the stimulatory effects of insulin. Thus, our in vitro and in vivo data indicate female reproductive hormones have a modulating effect on obesity-induced insulin resistance and inflammation, which may directly or indirectly influence CRC progression. PMID:21480390

  9. Recombinant TIMP-1-GPI inhibits growth of fibrosarcoma and enhances tumor sensitivity to doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Bao, Q; Niess, H; Djafarzadeh, R; Zhao, Y; Schwarz, B; Angele, M K; Jauch, K-W; Nelson, P J; Bruns, C J

    2014-09-01

    Fibrosarcomas show a high incidence of recurrence and general resistance to apoptosis. Limiting tumor regrowth and increasing their sensitivity to chemotherapy and apoptosis represent key issues in developing more effective treatments of these tumors. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) broadly blocks matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and can moderate tumor growth and metastasis. We previously described generation of a recombinant fusion protein linking TIMP-1 to glycosylphophatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (TIMP-1-GPI) that efficiently directs the inhibitor to cell surfaces. In the present report, we examined the effect of TIMP-1-GPI treatment on fibrosarcoma biology. Exogenously applied TIMP-1-GPI efficiently incorporated into surface membranes of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. It inhibited their proliferation, migration, suppressed cancer cell clone formation, and enhanced apoptosis. Doxorubicin, the standard chemotherapeutic drug for fibrosarcoma, was tested alone or in combination with TIMP-1-GPI. In parallel, the influence of treatment on HT1080 side population cells (exhibiting tumor stem cell-like characteristics) was investigated using Hoechst 33342 staining. The sequential combination of TIMP-1-GPI and doxorubicin showed more than additive effects on apoptosis, while TIMP-1-GPI treatment alone effectively decreased "stem-cell like" side population cells of HT1080. TIMP-1-GPI treatment was validated using HT1080 fibrosarcoma murine xenografts. Growing tumors treated with repeated local injections of TIMP-1-GPI showed dramatically inhibited fibrosarcoma growth and reduced angiogenesis. Intraoperative peritumoral application of GPI-anchored TIMP-1 as an adjuvant to surgery may help maintain tumor control by targeting microscopic residual fibrosarcoma cells and increasing their sensitivity to chemotherapy. PMID:23934106

  10. Kidney Tumor Growth Prediction by Coupling Reaction-Diffusion and Biomechanical Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinjian; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    It is desirable to predict the tumor growth rate so that appropriate treatment can be planned in the early stage. Previously, we proposed a finite element method (FEM)-based 3D kidney tumor growth prediction system using longitudinal images. A reaction-diffusion model was applied as the tumor growth model. In this paper, we not only improve the tumor growth model by coupling the reaction-diffusion model with a biomechanical model, but also take the surrounding tissues into account. Different diffusion and biomechanical properties are applied for different tissue types. FEM is employed to simulate the coupled tumor growth model. Model parameters are estimated by optimizing an objective function of overlap accuracy using a hybrid optimization parallel search package (HOPSPACK). The proposed method was tested with kidney CT images of eight tumors from five patients with seven time points. The experimental results showed the performance of the proposed method improved greatly compared to our previous work. PMID:23047857

  11. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  12. Oridonin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Anti-Angiogenesis by Blocking the Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjie; Deng, Huayun; Song, Yajuan; Zhai, Dong; Peng, Yi; Lu, Xiaoling; Liu, Mingyao; Zhao, Yongxiang; Yi, Zhengfang

    2014-01-01

    While significant progress has been made in understanding the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects of the natural diterpenoid component Oridonin on tumor cells, little is known about its effect on tumor angiogenesis or metastasis and on the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, Oridonin significantly suppressed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) proliferation, migration, and apillary-like structure formation in vitro. Using aortic ring assay and mouse corneal angiogenesis model, we found that Oridonin inhibited angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo. In our animal experiments, Oridonin impeded tumor growth and metastasis. Immunohistochemistry analysis further revealed that the expression of CD31 and vWF protein in xenografts was remarkably decreased by the Oridonin. Furthermore, Oridonin reinforced endothelial cell-cell junction and impaired breast cancer cell transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, Oridonin not only down-regulated Jagged2 expression and Notch1 activity but also decreased the expression of their target genes. In conclusion, our results demonstrated an original role of Oridonin in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and propose a mechanism. This study also provides new evidence supporting the central role of Notch in tumor angiogenesis and suggests that Oridonin could be a potential drug candidate for angiogenesis related diseases. PMID:25485753

  13. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors increase growth rate with time

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Alexander T.; Finkel, Kelsey A.; Warner, Kristy A.; Nör, Felipe; Tice, David; Martins, Manoela D.; Jackson, Trachette L.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are frequently used for translational cancer research, and are assumed to behave consistently as the tumor ages. However, growth rate constancy as a function of time is unclear. Notably, variable PDX growth rates over time might have implications for the interpretation of translational studies. We characterized four PDX models through several in vivo passages from primary human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma. We developed a mathematical approach to merge growth data from different passages into a single measure of relative tumor volume normalized to study initiation size. We analyzed log-relative tumor volume increase with linear mixed effect models. Two oral pathologists analyzed the PDX tissues to determine if histopathological feature changes occurred over in vivo passages. Tumor growth rate increased over time. This was determined by repeated measures linear regression statistical analysis in four different PDX models. A quadratic statistical model for the temporal effect predicted the log-relative tumor volume significantly better than a linear time effect model. We found a significant correlation between passage number and histopathological features of higher tumor grade. Our mathematical treatment of PDX data allows statistical analysis of tumor growth data over long periods of time, including over multiple passages. Non-linear tumor growth in our regression models revealed the exponential growth rate increased over time. The dynamic tumor growth rates correlated with quantifiable histopathological changes that related to passage number in multiple types of cancer. PMID:26783960

  14. Metformin inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration, and tumor growth through upregulation of PEDF expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowan; Li, Chenli; He, Tiantian; Mao, Jiating; Li, Chunmei; Lyu, Jianxin; Meng, Qing H

    2016-05-01

    Metformin has been reported to inhibit the growth of various types of cancers, including prostate cancer. Yet the mode of anti-cancer action of metformin and the underlying mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. We hypothesized that the antitumorigenic effects of metformin are mediated through upregulation of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) expression in prostate cancer cells. In this report, metformin treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of prostate cancer cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, Metformin markedly suppressed migration and invasion and induced apoptosis of both LNCaP and PC3 cancer cells. Metformin also reduced PC3 tumor growth in BALB/c nude mice in vivo. Furthermore, metformin treatment was associated with higher PEDF expression in both prostate cancer cells and tumor tissue. Taken together, metformin inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tumor growth, and these activities are mediated by upregulation of PEDF expression. These findings provide a novel insight into the molecular functions of metformin as an anticancer agent. PMID:26987032

  15. Dual mTOR inhibitor MLN0128 suppresses Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) xenograft tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Aarthi; Lin, Zhenyu; Shao, Qiang; Zhao, Stephanie; Fang, Bin; Moreno, Mauricio A.; Vural, Emre; Stack, Brendan C.; Suen, James Y.; Kannan, Krishnaswamy; Gao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Pathologic activation of PI3K/mTOR pathway and elevated expression of c-Myc are frequently detected in MCC. Yet, there is no targeted therapy presently available for this lethal disease. Recently, MLN0128, a second-generation dual TORC1/2 inhibitor is shown to have therapeutic efficacy in preclinical studies. MLN0128 is currently in clinical trials as a potential therapy for advanced cancers. Here we characterize the therapeutic efficacy of MLN0128 in the preclinical setting of MCC and delineate downstream targets of mTORC1/2 in MCC cellular systems. MLN0128 significantly attenuates xenograft MCC tumor growth independent of Merkel cell polyomavirus. Moreover, MLN0128 markedly diminishes MCC cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Further investigations indicate that senescence does not contribute to MLN0128-mediated repression of xenograft MCC tumor growth. Finally, we also observe robust antitumor effects of MLN0128 when administered as a dual therapy with JQ1, a bromodomain protein BRD4 inhibitor. These results suggest dual blockade of PI3K/mTOR pathway and c-Myc axis is effective in the control of MCC tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that MLN0128 is potent as monotherapy or as a member of combination therapy with JQ1 for advanced MCC. PMID:26536665

  16. The H19 Non-Coding RNA Is Essential for Human Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Matouk, Imad J.; DeGroot, Nathan; Mezan, Shaul; Ayesh, Suhail; Abu-lail, Rasha; Hochberg, Abraham; Galun, Eithan

    2007-01-01

    Background Mutations and epigenetic aberrant signaling of growth factors pathways contribute to carcinogenesis. Recent studies reveal that non-coding RNAs are controllers of gene expression. H19 is an imprinted gene that demonstrates maternal monoallelic expression without a protein product; although its expression is shut off in most tissues postnatally, it is re-activated during adult tissue regeneration and tumorigenesis. Moreover, H19 is highly expressed in liver metastasis derived from a range of carcinomas. The objective of this study is to explore the role of H19 in carcinogenesis, and to determine its identification as an anti-tumor target. Methodology/ Principle Findings By controlling oxygen pressure during tumor cell growth and H19 expression levels, we investigated the role of H19 expression in vitro and in vivo in hepatocellular (HCC) and bladder carcinoma. Hypoxia upregulates the level of H19 RNA. Ablations of tumorigenicity of HCC and bladder carcinomas in vivo are seen by H19 knockdown which also significantly abrogates anchorage-independent growth after hypoxia recovery, while ectopic H19 expression enhances tumorigenic potential of carcinoma cells in vivo. Knocking-down H19 message in hypoxic stress severely diminishes p57kip2 induction. We identified a number of potential downstream targets of H19 RNA, including angiogenin and FGF18. Conclusions H19 RNA harbors pro-tumorigenic properties, thus the H19 gene behaves as an oncogene and may serve as a potential new target for anti-tumor therapy. PMID:17786216

  17. Dietary fat modulation of mammary tumor growth and metabolism demonstrated by /sup 31/P-nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, K.L.; Buckman, D.K.; Hubbard, N.E.; Ross, B.

    1986-03-05

    The relationship of dietary fat concentration and saturation on the growth and metabolic activity of line 168 was studied using syngeneic mice fed 6 experimental diets before and during tumor growth. Tumor latency was significantly greater for mice fed a diet containing the minimum of essential fatty acids (EFA, 0.5% corn oil) or 8% coconut oil (SF) than for mice fed 8 or 20% safflower oil (PUF) or 20% SF. Changes in dietary fat resulted in alterations of tumor cell and serum fatty acid composition but not the number of inflammatory cells infiltrating the tumor. /sup 31/P-surface coil NMR was used to measure possible changes in tumor metabolism in vivo. Although pH decreased from 7.2 to 6.6 as the tumor volume increased, there was no difference in pH among dietary groups. There was an inverse relationship between both sugar phosphate (SP)/Pi and ATP/Pi ratios and tumor volume; those ratios for mice fed an EFA deficient or minimal EFA diet decreased at a different rate than ratios for mice fed diets with additional fat. Tumors of mice fed diets containing no or a low level (0.3%) of 18:2 had higher SP/ATP ratios than mice fed diets containing a moderate level (approx. 4%) of 18:2. Thus, high levels of dietary fat had a significant effect on promotion of mammary tumors during early stages of tumor growth. Differences in tumor volume associated with dietary fat may be related to changes in the levels of high energy phosphate metabolites.

  18. Activation of mesenchymal stem cells by macrophages promotes tumor progression through immune suppressive effects

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiao-hua; Feng, Guo-wei; Wang, Zhong-liang; Du, Yang; Shen, Chen; Hui, Hui; Peng, Dong; Li, Zong-jin; Kong, De-ling; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development and progression is linked to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Distinct TAMs subsets perform either protective or pathogenic effects in cancer. A protective role in carcinogenesis has been described for M1 macrophages, which activate antitumor mechanisms. By comparison, TAMs isolated from solid and metastatic tumors have a suppressive M2-like phenotype, which could support multiple aspects of tumor progression. Currently, it has not been clearly understood how macrophages in tumor-associated stroma could be hijacked to support tumor growth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) actively interact with components of the innate immune system and display both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory effects. Here, we tested whether MSCs could favor the tumor to escape from immunologic surveillance in the presence of M1 macrophages. We found that MSCs educated by M1 condition medium (cMSCs) possessed a greatly enhanced ability in promoting tumor growth in vivo. Examination of cytokines/chemokines showed that the cMSCs acquired a regulatory profile, which expressed high levels of iNOS and MCP1. Consistent with an elevated MCP1 expression in cMSCs, the tumor-promoting effect of the cMSCs depended on MCP1 mediated macrophage recruitment to tumor sites. Furthermore, IL-6 secreted by the cMSCs could polarize infiltrated TAMs into M2-like macrophages. Therefore, when macrophages changed into M1 pro-inflammation type in tumor microenvironment, the MSCs would act as poor sensors and switchers to accelerate tumor growth. PMID:26988913

  19. Paracrine expression of a native soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibits tumor growth, metastasis, and mortality rate

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Corey K.; Kendall, Richard L.; Cabrera, Gustavo; Soroceanu, Liliana; Heike, Yuji; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Siegal, Gene P.; Mao, Xianzhi; Bett, Andrew J.; Huckle, William R.; Thomas, Kenneth A.; Curiel, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and selective vascular endothelial cell mitogen and angiogenic factor. VEGF expression is elevated in a wide variety of solid tumors and is thought to support their growth by enhancing tumor neovascularization. To block VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, tumor cells were transfected with cDNA encoding the native soluble FLT-1 (sFLT-1) truncated VEGF receptor which can function both by sequestering VEGF and, in a dominant negative fashion, by forming inactive heterodimers with membrane-spanning VEGF receptors. Transient transfection of HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cells with a gene encoding sFLT-1 significantly inhibited their implantation and growth in the lungs of nude mice following i.v. injection and their growth as nodules from cells injected s.c. High sFLT-1 expressing stably transfected HT-1080 clones grew even slower as s.c. tumors. Finally, survival was significantly prolonged in mice injected intracranially with human glioblastoma cells stably transfected with the sflt-1 gene. The ability of sFLT-1 protein to inhibit tumor growth is presumably attributable to its paracrine inhibition of tumor angiogenesis in vivo, since it did not affect tumor cell mitogenesis in vitro. These results not only support VEGF receptors as antiangiogenic targets but also demonstrate that sflt-1 gene therapy might be a feasible approach for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:9671758

  20. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mice lacking mucin 1 have a profound defect in tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Besmer, Dahlia M; Curry, Jennifer M; Roy, Lopamudra D; Tinder, Teresa L; Sahraei, Mahnaz; Schettini, Jorge; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Yong Y; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-07-01

    MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in more than 60% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The functional role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has yet to be fully elucidated due to a dearth of appropriate models. In this study, we have generated mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (KC), which are either Muc1-null (KCKO) or express human MUC1 (KCM). We show that KCKO mice have significantly slower tumor progression and rates of secondary metastasis, compared with both KC and KCM. Cell lines derived from KCKO tumors have significantly less tumorigenic capacity compared with cells from KCM tumors. Therefore, mice with KCKO tumors had a significant survival benefit compared with mice with KCM tumors. In vitro, KCKO cells have reduced proliferation and invasion and failed to respond to epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, or matrix metalloproteinase 9. Further, significantly less KCKO cells entered the G(2)-M phase of the cell cycle compared with the KCM cells. Proteomics and Western blotting analysis revealed a complete loss of cdc-25c expression, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as well as a significant decrease in nestin and tubulin-α2 chain expression in KCKO cells. Treatment with a MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, abrogated the enhanced proliferation of the KCM cells but had minimal effect on KCKO cells, suggesting that MUC1 is necessary for MAPK activity and oncogenic signaling. This is the first study to utilize a Muc1-null PDA mouse to fully elucidate the oncogenic role of MUC1, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:21558393

  1. A novel spider peptide toxin suppresses tumor growth through dual signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Deng, M; Xiang, J; Ma, H; Hu, W; Zhao, Y; Li, D W-C; Liang, S

    2012-12-01

    Spider venom is a large pharmacological repertoire containing many biologically active peptides, which may have a potent therapeutic implication. Here we investigated a peptide toxin, named lycosin-I, isolated from the venom of the spider Lycosa singoriensis. In contrast to most spider peptide toxins adopting inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) motif, lycosin-I shows a linear amphipathic alpha-helical conformation, common to α-helical host defense peptides. Lycosin-I displays strong ability to inhibit cancer cell growth in vitro and can effectively suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Mechanistically, it activates the mitochondrial death pathway to sensitize cancer cells for apoptosis, as well as up-regulates p27 to inhibit cell proliferation. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that a spider toxin can effectively suppress tumorigenesis through activation of dual signaling pathways. In addition, lycosin-I may be a useful structural lead for the development of novel anticancer drugs. PMID:22882120

  2. Nerve growth factor receptor negates the tumor suppressor p53 as a feedback regulator

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Peng; Luo, Shiwen; Zhang, Minhong; Hu, Guohui; Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Yiwei; Cao, Bo; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik K; Zeng, Shelya X; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer develops and progresses often by inactivating p53. Here, we unveil nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR, p75NTR or CD271) as a novel p53 inactivator. p53 activates NGFR transcription, whereas NGFR inactivates p53 by promoting its MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and by directly binding to its central DNA binding domain and preventing its DNA-binding activity. Inversely, NGFR ablation activates p53, consequently inducing apoptosis, attenuating survival, and reducing clonogenic capability of cancer cells, as well as sensitizing human cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that induce p53 and suppressing mouse xenograft tumor growth. NGFR is highly expressed in human glioblastomas, and its gene is often amplified in breast cancers with wild type p53. Altogether, our results demonstrate that cancers hijack NGFR as an oncogenic inhibitor of p53. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15099.001 PMID:27282385

  3. Suppression of tumor growth by designed dimeric epidithiodiketopiperazine targeting hypoxia-inducible transcription factor complex.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Ramin; Levin, Michael D; Szabo, Lajos Z; Laszlo, Csaba F; Kushal, Swati; Singh, Jason B; Oh, Philip; Schnitzer, Jan E; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z

    2013-03-20

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumors, is associated with local invasion, metastatic spread, resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and is an independent, negative prognostic factor for a diverse range of malignant neoplasms. The cellular response to hypoxia is primarily mediated by a family of transcription factors, among which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) plays a major role. Under normoxia, the oxygen-sensitive α subunit of HIF1 is rapidly and constitutively degraded but is stabilized and accumulates under hypoxia. Upon nuclear translocation, HIF1 controls the expression of over 100 genes involved in angiogenesis, altered energy metabolism, antiapoptotic, and pro-proliferative mechanisms that promote tumor growth. A designed transcriptional antagonist, dimeric epidithiodiketopiperazine (ETP 2), selectively disrupts the interaction of HIF1α with p300/CBP coactivators and downregulates the expression of hypoxia-inducible genes. ETP 2 was synthesized via a novel homo-oxidative coupling of the aliphatic primary carbons of the dithioacetal precursor. It effectively inhibits HIF1-induced activation of VEGFA, LOX, Glut1, and c-Met genes in a panel of cell lines representing breast and lung cancers. We observed an outstanding antitumor efficacy of both (±)-ETP 2 and meso-ETP 2 in a fully established breast carcinoma model by intravital microscopy. Treatment with either form of ETP 2 (1 mg/kg) resulted in a rapid regression of tumor growth that lasted for up to 14 days. These results suggest that inhibition of HIF1 transcriptional activity by designed dimeric ETPs could offer an innovative approach to cancer therapy with the potential to overcome hypoxia-induced tumor growth and resistance. PMID:23448368

  4. Inhibition of endothelial Cdk5 reduces tumor growth by promoting non-productive angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Merk, Henriette; Zhang, Siwei; Lehr, Thorsten; Müller, Christoph; Ulrich, Melanie; Bibb, James A.; Adams, Ralf H.; Bracher, Franz; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M.; Liebl, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic success of VEGF-based anti-angiogenic tumor therapy is limited due to resistance. Thus, new strategies for anti-angiogenic cancer therapy based on novel targets are urgently required. Our previous in vitro work suggested that small molecule Cdk5 inhibitors affect angiogenic processes such as endothelial migration and proliferation. Moreover, we recently uncovered a substantial role of Cdk5 in the development of lymphatic vessels. Here we pin down the in vivo impact of endothelial Cdk5 inhibition in angiogenesis and elucidate the underlying mechanism in order to judge the potential of Cdk5 as a novel anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer target. By the use of endothelial-specific Cdk5 knockout mouse models and various endothelial and tumor cell based assays including human tumor xenograft models, we show that endothelial-specific knockdown of Cdk5 results in excessive but non-productive angiogenesis during development but also in tumors, which subsequently leads to inhibition of tumor growth. As Cdk5 inhibition disrupted Notch function by reducing the generation of the active Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and Cdk5 modulates Notch-dependent endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting, we propose that the Dll4/Notch driven angiogenic signaling hub is an important and promising mechanistic target of Cdk5. In fact, Cdk5 inhibition can sensitize tumors to conventional anti-angiogenic treatment as shown in tumor xenograft models. In summary our data set the stage for Cdk5 as a drugable target to inhibit Notch-driven angiogenesis condensing the view that Cdk5 is a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:26755662

  5. Altered tumor growth in vivo after immunization of mice with antitumor antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczynski, R.M.; Kennedy, M.; Polidoulis, I.; Price, G.B.

    1984-08-01

    A comparison has been made between the growth patterns of two spontaneously appearing mammary adenocarcinomas in murine bone marrow radiation chimeras and in mice preimmunized with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) detecting embryo-associated antigenic determinants. A correlation was seen between the ability of the embryo-immunized chimeras to produce cytotoxic antibody to the tumors, as assessed by an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic assay, and the permissiveness of the mice for growth of a tumor transplant. In addition, mice deliberately preimmunized with cytotoxic MAb (antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic assay) allowed more rapid growth specifically of that tumor earlier found to be most sensitive to the MAb used for immunization. By comparing the changing antigenic phenotype of tumor cells serially passaged through different immunized, nonimmunized mice, evidence was found suggesting that immunization could cause either antigen modulation of transferred tumor cells or a (transient) selective advantage to antigenically discrete subpopulations within the heterogeneous tumor population. Finally, a study has been made of the growth pattern of tumor cells transplanted into mice immunized with rabbit antibodies directed against the murine MAb. In this case, tumor growth was slowed preferentially for the tumor reactive with the specific MAb, and again, predictable changes in the antigenic spectrum of tumor cells harvested from these animals were observed. Our overall findings are interpreted in terms of the involvement of networks of antibodies reacting with embryo-associated antigens in the regulation of growth of the murine mammary adenocarcinomas studied.

  6. NFAT1 Directly Regulates IL8 and MMP3 to Promote Melanoma Tumor Growth and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Einav; Braeuer, Russell R; Kamiya, Takafumi; Mobley, Aaron K; Huang, Li; Vasquez, Mayra E; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Chakravarti, Nitin; Ivan, Cristina; Prieto, Victor; Villares, Gabriel J; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT1, NFATC2) is a transcription factor that binds and positively regulates IL2 expression during T-cell activation. NFAT1 has important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses, but its involvement in cancer is not completely understood. We previously demonstrated that NFAT1 contributes to melanoma growth and metastasis by regulating the autotaxin gene (Enpp2). Here, we report a strong correlation between NFAT1 expression and metastatic potential in melanoma cell lines and tumor specimens. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying NFAT1 overexpression during melanoma progression, we conducted a microarray on a highly metastatic melanoma cell line in which NFAT1 expression was stably silenced. We identified and validated two downstream targets of NFAT1, IL8, and MMP3. Accordingly, NFAT1 depletion in metastatic melanoma cell lines was associated with reduced IL8 and MMP3 expression, whereas NFAT1 overexpression in a weakly metastatic cell line induced expression of these targets. Restoration of NFAT1 expression recovered IL8 and MMP3 expression levels back to baseline, indicating that both are direct targets of NFAT1. Moreover, in vivo studies demonstrated that NFAT1 and MMP3 promoted melanoma tumor growth and lung metastasis. Collectively, our findings assign a new role for NFAT1 in melanoma progression, underscoring the multifaceted functions that immunomodulatory factors may acquire in an unpredictable tumor microenvironment. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3145-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27013197

  7. Impact of Stroma on the Growth, Microcirculation, and Metabolism of Experimental Prostate Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zechmann, Christian M; Woenne, Eva C; Brix, Gunnar; Radzwill, Nicole; Ilg, Martin; Bachert, Peter; Peschke, Peter; Kirsch, Stefan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Delorme, Stefan; Semmler, Wolfhard; Kiessling, Fabian

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In prostate cancers (PCa), the formation of malignant stroma may substantially influence tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. Thus, the impact of the orthotopic and subcutaneous implantations of hormone-sensitive (H), hormone-insensitive (HI), and anaplastic (AT1) Dunning PCa in rats on growth, microcirculation, and metabolism was investigated. For this purpose, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([1H]MRS) were applied in combination with histology. Consistent observations revealed that orthotopic H tumors grew significantly slower compared to subcutaneous ones, whereas the growth of HI and AT1 tumors was comparable at both locations. Histologic analysis indicated that glandular differentiation and a close interaction of tumor cells and smooth muscle cells (SMC) were associated with slow tumor growth. Furthermore, there was a significantly lower SMC density in subcutaneous H tumors than in orthotopic H tumors. Perfusion was observed to be significantly lower in orthotopic H tumors than in subcutaneous H tumors. Regional blood volume and permeability-surface area product showed no significant differences between tumor models and their implantation sites. Differences in growth between subcutaneous and orthotopic H tumors can be attributed to tumor-stroma interaction and perfusion. Here, SMC, may stabilize glandular structures and contribute to the maintenance of differentiated phenotype. PMID:17325744

  8. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Inititation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Shweta; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma. PMID:26808375

  9. TCF7L1 Modulates Colorectal Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Expression of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene EPHB3.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Matthew; Chatterjee, Sujash S; Jain, Sidharth; Katari, Manpreet; DasGupta, Ramanuj

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the Wnt pathway leading to accumulation of β-catenin (CTNNB1) is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC). Nuclear CTNNB1 acts as a transcriptional coactivator with TCF/LEF transcription factors, promoting expression of a broad set of target genes, some of which promote tumor growth. However, it remains poorly understood how CTNNB1 interacts with different transcription factors in different contexts to promote different outcomes. While some CTNNB1 target genes are oncogenic, others regulate differentiation. Here, we found that TCF7L1, a Wnt pathway repressor, buffers CTNNB1/TCF target gene expression to promote CRC growth. Loss of TCF7L1 impaired growth and colony formation of HCT116 CRC cells and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. We identified a group of CTNNB1/TCF target genes that are activated in the absence of TCF7L1, including EPHB3, a marker of Paneth cell differentiation that has also been implicated as a tumor suppressor in CRC. Knockdown of EPHB3 partially restores growth and normal cell cycle progression of TCF7L1-Null cells. These findings suggest that while CTNNB1 accumulation is critical for CRC progression, activation of specific Wnt target genes in certain contexts may in fact inhibit tumor growth. PMID:27333864

  10. The analysis of feasibility and effectiveness of vascular targeting radiotherapy based on a model of tumor growth and angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yihong

    Targeting cytotoxic agents to tumor angiogenesis, instead of the tumor itself, is an attractive new approach in Radiation Oncology. Unlike tumor cells, endothelial cells are less likely to develop radio-resistance. Investigations have shown that radiation can cause a definite increase in cell permeability. Permeability changes in the tumor capillary endothelium can contribute to circulatory failure and serve as a site for clot formation. Therefore, radiation could initiate platelet aggregation and blood coagulation locally within the tumor vasculature, leading to tumor cell killing through depletion of oxygen and nutrients. In order to analyze the efficacy of a potential 90Y-labeled compound for vascular targeting radiotherapy and to evaluate the factors that may affect targets' absorbed dose, a tumor vasculature model including its angiogenesis process as a function of time and tumor growth are adopted and improved from the Liotta model. Its output is used to estimate targets' absorbed doses by Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the effectiveness of vascular targeting therapy depends on the existence of available tumor endothelial cells and target expression. The alphavbeta3 antagonist model compound is less effective in the early stage tumors, which have very few vessels. Although a high administered dose, such as injecting of 2.1 mCi/kg to saturate all available binding sites, can destroy tumor endothelium network, the toxicity to bone marrow makes it impossible to inject such a dose. To a vascularized tumor, after giving one maximum allowable administered activity, 0.83 mCi/kg for the 90Y-labeled model compound, an average of 9.8%, 27.3%, 34.7% and 37.8% of endothelial cells would be killed when treatment starts at day 4, 7, 9 and 12 after tumor development, respectively. Therefore, recurrent treatment by vascular targeting therapy to well-vascularized tumor has the potential to slow down tumor growth or may even cause tumor regression at the primary

  11. TCF7L1 Modulates Colorectal Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Expression of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene EPHB3

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Matthew; Chatterjee, Sujash S.; Jain, Sidharth; Katari, Manpreet; DasGupta, Ramanuj

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the Wnt pathway leading to accumulation of β-catenin (CTNNB1) is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC). Nuclear CTNNB1 acts as a transcriptional coactivator with TCF/LEF transcription factors, promoting expression of a broad set of target genes, some of which promote tumor growth. However, it remains poorly understood how CTNNB1 interacts with different transcription factors in different contexts to promote different outcomes. While some CTNNB1 target genes are oncogenic, others regulate differentiation. Here, we found that TCF7L1, a Wnt pathway repressor, buffers CTNNB1/TCF target gene expression to promote CRC growth. Loss of TCF7L1 impaired growth and colony formation of HCT116 CRC cells and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. We identified a group of CTNNB1/TCF target genes that are activated in the absence of TCF7L1, including EPHB3, a marker of Paneth cell differentiation that has also been implicated as a tumor suppressor in CRC. Knockdown of EPHB3 partially restores growth and normal cell cycle progression of TCF7L1-Null cells. These findings suggest that while CTNNB1 accumulation is critical for CRC progression, activation of specific Wnt target genes in certain contexts may in fact inhibit tumor growth. PMID:27333864

  12. Preliminary investigation of the inhibitory effects of mechanical stress in tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Ishita; Miga, Michael I.

    2008-03-01

    In the past years different models have been formulated to explain the growth of gliomas in the brain. The most accepted model is based on a reaction-diffusion equation that describes the growth of the tumor as two separate components- a proliferative component and an invasive component. While many improvements have been made to this basic model, the work exploring the factors that naturally inhibit growth is insufficient. It is known that stress fields affect the growth of normal tissue. Due to the rigid skull surrounding the brain, mechanical stress might be an important factor in inhibiting the growth of gliomas. A realistic model of glioma growth would have to take that inhibitory effect into account. In this work a mathematical model based on the reaction-diffusion equation was used to describe tumor growth, and the affect of mechanical stresses caused by the mass effect of tumor cells was studied. An initial tumor cell concentration with a Gaussian distribution was assumed and tumor growth was simulated for two cases- one where growth was solely governed by the reaction-diffusion equation and second where mechanical stress inhibits growth by affecting the diffusivity. All the simulations were performed using the finite difference method. The results of simulations show that the proposed mechanism of inhibition could have a significant affect on tumor growth predictions. This could have implications for varied applications in the imaging field that use growth models, such as registration and model updated surgery.

  13. Tumor cell-activated CARD9 signaling contributes to metastasis-associated macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Shao, J-H; Miao, Y-J; Cui, W; Qi, Y-F; Han, J-H; Lin, X; Du, J

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages are critical immune effector cells of the tumor microenvironment that promote seeding, extravasation and persistent growth of tumor cells in primary tumors and metastatic sites. Tumor progression and metastasis are affected by dynamic changes in the specific phenotypes of macrophage subpopulations; however, the mechanisms by which tumor cells modulate macrophage polarization remain incompletely understood. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is a central adaptor protein of innate immune responses to extracellular pathogens. We report that increased CARD9 expression is primarily localized in infiltrated macrophages and significantly associated with advanced histopathologic stage and the presence of metastasis. Using CARD9-deficient (CARD9(-/-)) mice, we show that bone marrow-derived CARD9 promotes liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Mechanistic studies reveal that CARD9 contributes to tumor metastasis by promoting metastasis-associated macrophage polarization through activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that tumor cell-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor facilitates spleen tyrosine kinase activation in macrophages, which is necessary for formation of the CARD9-B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10-mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 complex. Taken together, our results indicating that CARD9 is a regulator of metastasis-associated macrophages will lead to new insights into evolution of the microenvironments supporting tumor metastasis, thereby providing targets for anticancer therapies. PMID:24722209

  14. The novel Aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibitor biseugenol inhibits gastric tumor growth and peritoneal dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Lai, De-Wei; Karlsson, Anna Isabella; Wang, Keh-Bin; Chen, Yi-Ching; Shen, Chin-Chang; Wu, Sheng-Mao; Liu, Chia-Yu; Tien, Hsing-Ru; Peng, Yen-Chun; Jan, Yee-Jee; Chao, Te-Hsin; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Arbiser, Jack L.; Sheu, Meei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Biseugenol (Eug) is known to antiproliferative of cancer cells; however, to date, the antiperitoneal dissemination effects have not been studied in any mouse cancer model. In this study, Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression was associated with lymph node and distant metastasis in patients with gastric cancer and was correlated with clinicolpathological pattern. We evaluated the antiperitoneal dissemination potential of knockdown AhR and Biseugenol in cancer mouse model and assessed mesenchymal characteristics. Our results demonstrate that tumor growth, peritoneal dissemination and peritoneum or organ metastasis implanted MKN45 cells were significantly decreased in shAhR and Biseugenol-treated mice and that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was caused. Biseugenol-exposure tumors showed acquired epithelial features such as phosphorylation of E-cadherin, cytokeratin-18 and loss mesenchymal signature Snail, but not vimentin regulation. Snail expression, through AhR activation, is an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) determinant. Moreover, Biseugenol enhanced Calpain-10 (Calp-10) and AhR interaction resulted in Snail downregulation. The effect of shCalpain-10 in cancer cells was associated with inactivation of AhR/Snail promoter binding activity. Inhibition of Calpain-10 in gastric cancer cells by short hairpin RNA or pharmacological inhibitor was found to effectively reduced growth ability and vessel density in vivo. Importantly, knockdown of AhR completed abrogated peritoneal dissemination. Herein, Biseugenol targeting ER stress provokes Calpain-10 activity, sequentially induces reversal of EMT and apoptosis via AhR may involve the paralleling processes. Taken together, these data suggest that Calpain-10 activation and AhR inhibition by Biseugenol impedes both gastric tumor growth and peritoneal dissemination by inducing ER stress and inhibiting EMT. PMID:25226618

  15. 1,1-Bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-substituted phenyl)methanes inhibit colon cancer cell and tumor growth through activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ping; Abdelrahim, Maen; Cho, Sung Dae; Liu, Shengxi; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Safe, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    1,1-Bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-substituted phenyl)methanes (C-DIMs) activate the orphan receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and Nur77 and induce receptor-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways in colon and other cancer cells. Structure-activity studies show that the p-bromo (DIM-C-pPhBr) and p-fluoro (DIM-C-pPhF) analogs, which exhibit minimal activation of Nur77 and PPARγ, induce expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP/GADD153) in colon cancer cells. Moreover, among a series of bromo and fluoro C-DIM analogs, their induction of CHOP was dependent on the position of the phenyl substituents (para ≥ meta ≥ ortho) and required a free indole group. DIM-C-pPhBr and DIM-C-pPhF not only induced CHOP but also activated death receptor 5 (CHOP dependent), cleavage of caspase 8 and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) that is consistent with activation of the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. These responses were associated with the activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway since inhibition of JNK inhibited induction of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway by these C-DIMs. However, in contrast to classical inducers of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress such as tunicamycin and thapsigargin, the C-DIM compounds did not induce glucose-related protein 78 that is a marker of ER stress. Proapoptotic and anticarcinogenic effects were also observed in athymic nude mice bearing RKO cell xenografts and treated with 30 mg/kg/day DIM-C-pPhBr and this was accompanied by increased JNK phosphorylation in the tumors. Thus, the anticarcinogenic activity of DIM-C-pPhBr in colon cancer cells and tumors is related to a novel ER stress-independent activation of JNK. PMID:18460448

  16. Action of hexachlorobenzene on tumor growth and metastasis in different experimental models

    SciTech Connect

    Pontillo, Carolina Andrea; Rojas, Paola; Chiappini, Florencia; Sequeira, Gonzalo; Cocca, Claudia; Crocci, Máximo; Colombo, Lucas; Lanari, Claudia; and others

    2013-05-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread organochlorine pesticide, considered a possible human carcinogen. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have found that HCB activates c-Src/HER1/STAT5b and HER1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and cell migration, in an AhR-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 μM) on cell invasion and metalloproteases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we examined in vivo the effect of HCB (0.3, 3, 30 mg/kg b.w.) on tumor growth, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and metastasis using MDA-MB-231 xenografts and two syngeneic mouse breast cancer models (spontaneous metastasis using C4-HI and lung experimental metastasis using LM3). Our results show that HCB (5 μM) enhances MMP2 expression, as well as cell invasion, through AhR, c-Src/HER1 pathway and MMPs. Moreover, HCB increases MMP9 expression, secretion and activity through a HER1 and AhR-dependent mechanism, in MDA-MB-231 cells. HCB (0.3 and 3 mg/kg b.w.) enhances subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. In vivo, using MDA-MB-231 model, the pesticide (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg b.w.) activated c-Src, HER1, STAT5b, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and increased MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels. Furthermore, we observed that HCB stimulated lung metastasis regardless the tumor hormone-receptor status. Our findings suggest that HCB may be a risk factor for human breast cancer progression. - Highlights: ► HCB enhances MMP2 and MMP9 expression and cell invasion in MDA-MB-231, in vitro. ► HCB-effects are mediated through AhR, HER1 and/or c-Src. ► HCB increases subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. ► HCB activates c-Src/HER1 pathway and increases MMPs levels in MDA-MB-231 tumors. ► HCB stimulates lung metastasis in C4-HI and LM3 in vivo models.

  17. Protein kinase C is differentially regulated by thrombin, insulin, and epidermal growth factor in human mammary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.L.; Tellez-Inon, M.T. ); Medrano, E.E.; Cafferatta, E.G.A. )

    1988-03-01

    The exposure of serum-deprived mammary tumor cells MCF-7 and T-47D to insulin, thrombin, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) resulted in dramatic modifications in the activity and in the translocation capacity of protein kinase C from cytosol to membrane fractions. Insulin induces a 600% activation of the enzyme after 5 h of exposure to the hormone in MCF-7 cells; thrombin either activates (200% in MCF-7) or down-regulates (in T-47D), and EGF exerts only a moderate effect. Thus, the growth factors studied modulate differentially the protein kinase C activity in human mammary tumor cells. The physiological significance of the results obtained are discussed in terms of the growth response elicited by insulin, thrombin, and EGF.

  18. Impact of metabolic heterogeneity on tumor growth, invasion, and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Robertson-Tessi, Mark; Gillies, Robert J; Gatenby, Robert A; Anderson, Alexander RA

    2015-01-01

    Histopathological knowledge that extensive heterogeneity exists between and within tumors has been confirmed and deepened recently by molecular studies. However, the impact of tumor heterogeneity on prognosis and treatment remains as poorly understood as ever. Using a hybrid multi-scale mathematical model of tumor growth in vascularized tissue, we investigated the selection pressures exerted by spatial and temporal variations in tumor microenvironment and the resulting phenotypic adaptations. A key component of this model is normal and tumor metabolism and its interaction with microenvironmental factors. The metabolic phenotype of tumor cells is plastic, and microenvironmental selection leads to increased tumor glycolysis and decreased pH. Once this phenotype emerges, the tumor dramatically changes its behavior due to acid-mediated invasion, an effect that depends on both variations in the tumor cell phenotypes and their spatial distribution within the tumor. In early stages of growth, tumors are stratified, with the most aggressive cells developing within the interior of the tumor. These cells then grow to the edge of the tumor and invade into the normal tissue using acidosis. Simulations suggest that diffusible cytotoxic treatments such as chemotherapy may increase the metabolic aggressiveness of a tumor due to drug-mediated selection. Chemotherapy removes the metabolic stratification of the tumor and allows more aggressive cells to grow towards blood vessels and normal tissue. Anti-angiogenic therapy also selects for aggressive phenotypes due to degradation of the tumor microenvironment, ultimately resulting in a more invasive tumor. In contrast, pH buffer therapy slows down the development of aggressive tumors, but only if administered when the tumor is still stratified. Overall, findings from this model highlight the risks of cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic treatments in the context of tumor heterogeneity resulting from a selection for more aggressive behaviors

  19. Dual inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase synergistically suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Panigrahy, Dipak; Hwang, Sung Hee; Yang, Jun; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Wettersten, Hiromi I.; Liu, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yanru; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Tam, Sarah; Kieran, Mark W.; Weiss, Robert H.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins derived from the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) from the cytochrome P450/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway are important eicosanoids that regulate angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. COX-2 inhibitors, which block the formation of prostaglandins, suppress tumor growth, whereas sEH inhibitors, which increase endogenous EETs, stimulate primary tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional interactions of these two pathways in cancer are unknown. Using pharmacological inhibitors as probes, we show here that dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH synergistically inhibits primary tumor growth and metastasis by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. COX-2/sEH dual pharmacological inhibitors also potently suppress primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis via selective inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical interaction of these two lipid metabolism pathways on tumorigenesis and suggest dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25024195

  20. Intertissue Flow of Glutathione (GSH) as a Tumor Growth-promoting Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, Elena; Benlloch, María; Pellicer, José A.; Asensi, Miguel; Estrela, José M.

    2011-01-01

    B16 melanoma F10 (B16-F10) cells with high glutathione (GSH) content show high metastatic activity in vivo. An intertissue flow of GSH, where the liver is the main reservoir, can increase GSH content in metastatic cells and promote their growth. We have studied here possible tumor-derived molecular signals that could activate GSH release from hepatocytes. GSH efflux increases in hepatocytes isolated from mice bearing liver or lung metastases, thus suggesting a systemic mechanism. Fractionation of serum-free conditioned medium from cultured B16-F10 cells and monoclonal antibody-induced neutralization techniques facilitated identification of interleukin (IL)-6 as a tumor-derived molecule promoting GSH efflux in hepatocytes. IL-6 activates GSH release through a methionine-sensitive/organic anion transporter polypeptide 1- and multidrug resistance protein 1-independent channel located on the sinusoidal site of hepatocytes. Specific siRNAs were used to knock down key factors in the main signaling pathways activated by IL-6, which revealed a STAT3-dependent mechanism. Our results show that IL-6 (mainly of tumor origin in B16-F10-bearing mice) may facilitate GSH release from hepatocytes and its interorgan transport to metastatic growing foci. PMID:21393247

  1. CDDO-Me inhibits tumor growth and prevents recurrence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GAO, XIAOHUA; DEEB, DORRAH; LIU, YONGBO; LIU, PATRICIA; ZHANG, YIGUAN; SHAW, JIAJIU; GAUTAM, SUBHASH C.

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) has shown potent antitumorigenic activity against a wide range of cancer cell lines in vitro and inhibited the growth of liver, lung and prostate cancer in vivo. In the present study, we examined the antitumor activity of CDDO-Me for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells with and without activating K-ras mutations. Treatment of K-ras mutant MiaPaCa-2 and K-ras normal BxPC-3 cells with CDDO-Me elicited strong antiproliferative and proapop-topic responses in both cell lines in culture. The inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis was accompanied by the inhibition of antiapoptotic/prosurvival p-Akt, NF-κB and p-mTOR signaling proteins. For testing efficacy of CDDO-Me in vivo heterotopic and orthotopic xenografts were generated by implanting BxPC-3 and MiaPaCa-2 cells subcutaneously and in the pancreatic tail, respectively. Treatment with CDDO-Me significantly inhibited the growth of BxPC-3 xenografts and reduced the levels of p-Akt and p-mTOR in tumor tissue. In mice with orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 xenografts, treatment with CDDO-Me prolonged the survival of mice when administered following the surgical resection of tumors. The latter was attributed to the eradication of residual PDAC remaining after resection of tumors. These preclinical data demonstrate the potential of CDDO-Me for treating primary PDAC tumors and for preventing relapse/recurrence through the destruction of residual disease. PMID:26497549