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Sample records for active uc patients

  1. Mitochondrial activity in XTC.UC1 cells derived from thyroid oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    Savagner, F; Chevrollier, A; Loiseau, D; Morgan, C; Reynier, P; Clark, O; Stepien, G; Malthiery, Y

    2001-04-01

    Thyroid oncocytoma is characterized by the presence of oncocytes containing abnormally large numbers of mitochondria. However, the relationship between the abundance of mitochondria and the pathogenesis of the tumors is unknown. Recently, a new cell line, named XTC.UC1, has been derived from a metastasis of thyroid oncocytoma. We have studied the metabolism and the gene expression profile of the mitochondria in XTC.UC1 cells, using B-CPAP cells as controls. There were no signs of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects or uncoupling between the respiratory chain and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. In XTC.UC1 cells, mtDNA transcripts were increased more than fivefold than in controls, in parallel with a 3.6-fold increase in mtDNA content. Finally, in spite of the glycolytic metabolism induced by the culture medium, the mitochondria of XTC.UC1 cells possess the phenotype of oncocytic cells with hypertrophic mitochondria, higher respiratory enzyme activity and higher mtDNA content than in controls. XTC.UC1 cells may therefore offer a useful model for investigating the coordination of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, in the context of thyroid tumors.

  2. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated uc(l)-Alanine Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of uc(l)-alanine peptides (uc(l)-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) and homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the uc(l)-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+(uc(l)-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of uc(d)-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+(uc(d)-Trp). uc(l)-Ala peptides recognize uc(d)-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+(uc(d)-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas uc(l)-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of uc(l)-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  3. Over-estimation of glucose-6-phosphatase activity in brain in vivo. Apparent difference in rates of (2-TH)glucose and (U- UC)glucose utilization is due to contamination of precursor pool with UC-labeled products and incomplete recovery of UC-labeled metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Dienel, G.A.; Nelson, T.; Cruz, N.F.; Jay, T.; Crane, A.M.; Sokoloff, L.

    1988-12-25

    Significant dephosphorylation of glucose 6-phosphate due to glucose-6-phosphatase activity in rat brain in vivo was recently reported. The evidence was an apparent more rapid TH than UC loss from the glucose pool and faster (2-TH)glucose than (U- UC)glucose utilization following pulse labeling of the brain with (2-TH,U- UC)glucose. Radiochemical purity of the glucose and quantitative recovery of the labeled products of glucose metabolism isolated from the brain were obviously essential requirements of their study, but no evidence for purity and recovery was provided. When we repeated these experiments with the described isolation procedures, we replicated the results, but found that: 1) the precursor glucose pool contained detritiated, UC-labeled contaminants arising from glucose metabolism, particularly 2-pyrrolidone-5-carboxylic acid derived from ( UC)glutamine; 2) ( UC)glucose metabolite were not quantitatively recovered; 3) the procedure used to isolate the glucose itself produced detritiated, UC-labeled derivatives of (2-TH,U-14C)glucose. These deficiencies in the isolation procedures could fully account for the observations that were interpreted as evidence of significant glucose 6-phosphate dephosphorylation by glucose-6-phosphatase activity. When glucose was isolated by more rigorous procedures and its purity verified in the present studies, no evidence for such activity in rat brain was found.

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life in Chinese Patients with Mild and Moderately Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Kai; Zhang, Shengsheng; Wang, Chuijie; Zhao, Wenxia; Shen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Ulcerative colitis (UC) impairs the health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The difference in HRQOL between patients with mild and moderately active UC is not well-defined. Few studies have been conducted to explore the factors that influence HRQOL in Chinese patients. Our study aims were to (1) compare HRQOL of mildly active UC patients with moderate patients; (2) explore the factors that influence HRQOL in Chinese patients with UC; and (3) analyze demographic and disease characteristics of UC in China. Methods A total of 110 mild and 114 moderate patients with UC were enrolled. The demographic and disease characteristics were recorded. HRQOL was measured by the Chinese version of the inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) between mild and moderate patients, male and female patients, and different disease distributions. Stepwise regression analysis was used to assess factors influencing the IBDQ score. Results Patients with moderate UC had significantly lower IBDQ total scores compared to patients with mild UC (P=0.001). The IBDQ total score had a negative correlation with the Mayo score (r=–0.263, P<0.001). Stepwise regression analysis showed that the disease activity index and gender had an influence on the IBDQ total score (P<0.05). The female patients had a lower score than the male patients (P<0.05), especially in the emotional function domain (P=0.002). Different disease distributions were not statistically significant in the IBDQ total score (P=0.183). Conclusions UC has a negative influence on HRQOL. HRQOL in patients with moderate UC was lower than HRQOL in patients with mild UC, as measured by the IBDQ. UC disease activity has a negative correlation with HRQOL. Gender and the disease activity index are important factors involved in the impairment of HRQOL in Chinese patients with UC. Chinese females may benefit from increased psychological care as part of UC therapy. PMID:25915777

  5. UCS protein Rng3p is essential for myosin-II motor activity during cytokinesis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; James, Michael L; Pollard, Luther W; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    UCS proteins have been proposed to operate as co-chaperones that work with Hsp90 in the de novo folding of myosin motors. The fission yeast UCS protein Rng3p is essential for actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we investigated the role of Rng3p in fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) motor activity. Myo2p isolated from an arrested rng3-65 mutant was capable of binding actin, yet lacked stability and activity based on its expression levels and inactivity in ATPase and actin filament gliding assays. Myo2p isolated from a myo2-E1 mutant (a mutant hyper-sensitive to perturbation of Rng3p function) showed similar behavior in the same assays and exhibited an altered motor conformation based on limited proteolysis experiments. We propose that Rng3p is not required for the folding of motors per se, but instead works to ensure the activity of intrinsically unstable myosin-II motors. Rng3p is specific to conventional myosin-II and the actomyosin ring, and is not required for unconventional myosin motor function at other actin structures. However, artificial destabilization of myosin-I motors at endocytic actin patches (using a myo1-E1 mutant) led to recruitment of Rng3p to patches. Thus, while Rng3p is specific to myosin-II, UCS proteins are adaptable and can respond to changes in the stability of other myosin motors.

  6. Differential effects of α4β7 and GPR15 on homing of effector and regulatory T cells from patients with UC to the inflamed gut in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Anika; Zundler, Sebastian; Atreya, Raja; Rath, Timo; Voskens, Caroline; Hirschmann, Simon; López-Posadas, Rocío; Watson, Alastair; Becker, Christoph; Schuler, Gerold; Neufert, Clemens; Atreya, Imke; Neurath, Markus F

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gut homing of lymphocytes via adhesion molecules has recently emerged as new target for therapy in IBDs. We aimed to analyse the in vivo homing of effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T cells to the inflamed gut via α4β7 and G protein receptor GPR15. Design We assessed the expression of homing receptors on T cells in peripheral blood and inflamed mucosa. We studied the migration pattern and homing of Teff and Treg cells to the inflamed gut using intravital confocal microscopy and FACS in a humanised mouse model in dextran sodium sulfate-treated NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid-Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice. Results Expression of GPR15 and α4β7 was significantly increased on Treg rather than Teff cells in peripheral blood of patients with UC as compared with Crohn’s disease and controls. In vivo analysis in a humanised mouse model showed augmented gut homing of UC Treg cells as compared with controls. Moreover, suppression of UC (but not control) Teff and Treg cell homing was noted upon treatment with the α4β7 antibody vedolizumab. In contrast, siRNA blockade of GPR15 had only effects on homing of Teff cells but did not affect Treg homing in UC. Clinical vedolizumab treatment was associated with marked expansion of UC Treg cells in peripheral blood. Conclusions α4β7 rather than GPR15 is crucial for increased colonic homing of UC Treg cells in vivo, while both receptors control UC Teff cell homing. Vedolizumab treatment impairs homing of UC Treg cells leading to their accumulation in peripheral blood with subsequent suppression of systemic Teff cell expansion. PMID:26209553

  7. Interleukin 27 is up-regulated in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Furuzawa Carballeda, Janette; Fonseca Camarillo, Gabriela; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize and quantify tissue gene and protein expression of IL-27 in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) patients. This is an observational and cross-sectional study. Fifty-four patients with IBD were studied: 27 active UC, 12 inactive UC, 10 active CD, and 5 inactive CD. All patients belonged to the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinic at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición. We found that IL-27 gene expression was significantly higher in active UC versus inactive UC group (P = 0.015). The IL-27 mRNA expression was increased in patients with active CD compared with inactive CD disease (P = 0.035). The percentage of IL-27 immunoreactive cells was higher in active UC versus active CD patients and non-inflamed tissue controls. The IL-27 was significantly elevated in active UC and CD patients, and it was associated with disease severity.

  8. Cessna UC-78 Bobcat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1944-01-01

    Cessna UC-78 Bobcat: Known by some as the 'Double-breasted Cub, ' the Cessna UC-78 Bobcat was the Cessna model T-50 produced for the Air Corps during World War II as a light personnel transport. Versions were also ordered to train pilots on multi-engine aircraft. This example served with the NACA at Langley from the summer 1944 until summer 1945.

  9. Disease Severity and Immune Activity Relate to Distinct Interkingdom Gut Microbiome States in Ethnically Distinct Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mar, Jordan S.; LaMere, Brandon J.; Lin, Din L.; Levan, Sophia; Nazareth, Michelle; Mahadevan, Uma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Significant gut microbiota heterogeneity exists among ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, though the clinical implications of this variance are unknown. We hypothesized that ethnically distinct UC patients exhibit discrete gut microbiotas with unique metabolic programming that differentially influence immune activity and clinical status. Using parallel 16S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer 2 sequencing of fecal samples (UC, 30; healthy, 13), we corroborated previous observations of UC-associated bacterial diversity depletion and demonstrated significant Saccharomycetales expansion as characteristic of UC gut dysbiosis. Furthermore, we identified four distinct microbial community states (MCSs) within our cohort, confirmed their existence in an independent UC cohort, and demonstrated their coassociation with both patient ethnicity and disease severity. Each MCS was uniquely enriched for specific amino acid, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism pathways and exhibited significant luminal enrichment of the metabolic products of these pathways. Using a novel ex vivo human dendritic cell and T-cell coculture assay, we showed that exposure to fecal water from UC patients caused significant Th2 skewing in CD4+ T-cell populations compared to that of healthy participants. In addition, fecal water from patients in whom their MCS was associated with the highest level of disease severity induced the most dramatic Th2 skewing. Combined with future investigations, these observations could lead to the identification of highly resolved UC subsets based on defined microbial gradients or discrete microbial features that may be exploited for the development of novel, more effective therapies. PMID:27531910

  10. lncRNA uc009yby.1 promotes renal cell proliferation and is associated with poor survival in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xingfeng; Lan, Tianbiao; Chen, Yan; Shao, Ziyun; Yang, Cheng; Peng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The expression and function of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) remains unclear. The present study measured the expression profiles of three lncRNAs (uc009yby.1, ENST00000514034, and ENST00000450687) using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and assessed their signatures in distinguishing ccRCC from matched normal tissues via analysis of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The expression of uc009yby.1 was inhibited by transfection of renal cells with small interfering RNA, and then the cell proliferation was evaluated by using a Cell Counting Kit-8. The results showed that the expressions of uc009yby.1 and ENST00000514034 were markedly increased in ccRCC compared with the matched normal tissues (P<0.0001 and P=0.0008, respectively), whereas the ENST00000450687 expression was not significantly altered. ROC curves yielded an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.7000 for uc009yby.1, with sensitivity of 54.29% and specificity of 82.86%; and an AUC value of 0.6627 for ENST00000514034, with sensitivity of 60.00% and specificity of 67.14%. Furthermore, knockdown of uc009yby.1 suppressed renal cell proliferation (Day 0, P=0.7844; Day 1, P=0.0018; Day 2, P=0.0001; Day 3, P<0.000; Day 4, P<0.0001). Taken together, these findings suggest that the expression profiles of uc009yby.1 and ENST00000514034 may serve as novel biomarkers for ccRCC detection, and that uc009yby.1 is strongly associated with renal cell proliferation. PMID:27602119

  11. lncRNA uc009yby.1 promotes renal cell proliferation and is associated with poor survival in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xingfeng; Lan, Tianbiao; Chen, Yan; Shao, Ziyun; Yang, Cheng; Peng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The expression and function of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) remains unclear. The present study measured the expression profiles of three lncRNAs (uc009yby.1, ENST00000514034, and ENST00000450687) using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and assessed their signatures in distinguishing ccRCC from matched normal tissues via analysis of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The expression of uc009yby.1 was inhibited by transfection of renal cells with small interfering RNA, and then the cell proliferation was evaluated by using a Cell Counting Kit-8. The results showed that the expressions of uc009yby.1 and ENST00000514034 were markedly increased in ccRCC compared with the matched normal tissues (P<0.0001 and P=0.0008, respectively), whereas the ENST00000450687 expression was not significantly altered. ROC curves yielded an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.7000 for uc009yby.1, with sensitivity of 54.29% and specificity of 82.86%; and an AUC value of 0.6627 for ENST00000514034, with sensitivity of 60.00% and specificity of 67.14%. Furthermore, knockdown of uc009yby.1 suppressed renal cell proliferation (Day 0, P=0.7844; Day 1, P=0.0018; Day 2, P=0.0001; Day 3, P<0.000; Day 4, P<0.0001). Taken together, these findings suggest that the expression profiles of uc009yby.1 and ENST00000514034 may serve as novel biomarkers for ccRCC detection, and that uc009yby.1 is strongly associated with renal cell proliferation.

  12. In vitro batch cultures of gut microbiota from healthy and ulcerative colitis (UC) subjects suggest that sulphate-reducing bacteria levels are raised in UC and by a protein-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Nazeha A; Walton, Gemma E; Gibson, Glenn R; Tuohy, Kieran M; Andrews, Simon C

    2014-02-01

    Imbalances in gut microbiota composition during ulcerative colitis (UC) indicate a role for the microbiota in propagating the disorder. Such effects were investigated using in vitro batch cultures (with/without mucin, peptone or starch) inoculated with faecal slurries from healthy or UC patients; the growth of five bacterial groups was monitored along with short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. Healthy cultures gave two-fold higher growth and SCFA levels with up to ten-fold higher butyrate production. Starch gave the highest growth and SCFA production (particularly butyrate), indicating starch-enhanced saccharolytic activity. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were the predominant bacterial group (of five examined) for UC inocula whereas they were the minority group for the healthy inocula. Furthermore, SRB growth was stimulated by peptone presumably due to the presence of sulphur-rich amino acids. The results suggest raised SRB levels in UC, which could contribute to the condition through release of toxic sulphide.

  13. Spontaneous UC emission from SSTRa

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschera, W.; Ahmad, I.; Armato S.G. III; Friedman, A.M.; Gindler, J.E.; Henning, W.; Ishii, T.; Paul, M.; Rehm, K.E.

    1985-12-01

    The spontaneous emission of UC from SSTRa, recently discovered by Rose and Jones, has been confirmed, and the mass of the emitted particles unambiguously identified. The present measurement was performed with a SSXTh source containing 9.2 mCi of SSTRa. An Enge split-pole magnetic spectrograph was used to suppress the intense alpha radiation and to identify the UC particles. The spectrograph was calibrated with tandem-accelerated beams of UC, TC, and SC. In six days of decay counting, twenty-four UC events were observed yielding a branching ratio of (4.7 +- 1.3) x 10 for the emission of UC from SSTRa relative to that of alpha particles. The value is in fair agreement with the result of Rose and Jones, (8.5 +- 2.5) x 10 , and with more recent measurements from other laboratories.

  14. Countering fear renewal: changes in the UCS representation generalize across contexts.

    PubMed

    Leer, Arne; Engelhard, Iris M

    2015-03-01

    After treatment of anxiety disorders, fear often returns. Analogue studies show that outside the extinction context the conditional stimulus (CS) activates the acquisition memory (CS predicts unconditional stimulus; UCS), rather than the extinction memory (CS does not predict UCS). Conditioning theory postulates that fear also diminishes after a reduction in the subjective cost of the UCS, which can occur in absence of any changes in the CS-UCS association. We hypothesized that fear reduction via "UCS deflation" generalizes across context. Healthy students underwent acquisition in context A with neutral CSs and 100dB white noise as UCS. One group received post-conditioning UCS exposure, in which UCS intensity decreased over time ("ABAdefl"). Another group received UCS presentations at equal intensity ("ABActrl"). Two groups did a filler task ("ABB"; "ABA"). Then, all groups underwent extinction in context B and were retested in context A (ABA-groups) or B (ABB-group). During each CS participants rated UCS expectancy and UCS cost. Results showed the typical increase in UCS expectancy following the context switch from extinction to test phase. In contrast, UCS deflation caused a reduction in cost ratings that was maintained after the context change. Findings suggest that UCS deflation techniques may reduce fear renewal.

  15. Countering fear renewal: changes in the UCS representation generalize across contexts.

    PubMed

    Leer, Arne; Engelhard, Iris M

    2015-03-01

    After treatment of anxiety disorders, fear often returns. Analogue studies show that outside the extinction context the conditional stimulus (CS) activates the acquisition memory (CS predicts unconditional stimulus; UCS), rather than the extinction memory (CS does not predict UCS). Conditioning theory postulates that fear also diminishes after a reduction in the subjective cost of the UCS, which can occur in absence of any changes in the CS-UCS association. We hypothesized that fear reduction via "UCS deflation" generalizes across context. Healthy students underwent acquisition in context A with neutral CSs and 100dB white noise as UCS. One group received post-conditioning UCS exposure, in which UCS intensity decreased over time ("ABAdefl"). Another group received UCS presentations at equal intensity ("ABActrl"). Two groups did a filler task ("ABB"; "ABA"). Then, all groups underwent extinction in context B and were retested in context A (ABA-groups) or B (ABB-group). During each CS participants rated UCS expectancy and UCS cost. Results showed the typical increase in UCS expectancy following the context switch from extinction to test phase. In contrast, UCS deflation caused a reduction in cost ratings that was maintained after the context change. Findings suggest that UCS deflation techniques may reduce fear renewal. PMID:25645174

  16. The Correlation of Serum IL-12B Expression With Disease Activity in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Chung, Sook Hee; Moon, Chang Mo; Che, Xiumei; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Genetic variants in IL12B, encoding the p40 subunit common in interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-23, were identified as the susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study aimed to identify the correlation of serum IL-12B expression with disease activity in patients with IBD and evaluate the possibility of IL-12B as a biomarker for assessing inflammatory status in IBD. A total of 102 patients with IBD, including 38, 32, and 32 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and intestinal Behçet's disease (intestinal BD), respectively, were included. The clinical and laboratory data from the patients were collected at the time of serum IL-12B measurement. Serum IL-12B levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The median IL-12B levels in patients with CD, UC, and intestinal BD were significantly higher than those in controls (1.87, 2.74, and 2.73 pg/mL, respectively, vs. 1.42 pg/mL, all P <0.05). IL-12B concentrations were associated with disease activity in patients with UC and intestinal BD but not in those with CD. IL-12B levels were increased with increasing disease activity in patients with UC (P <0.001). Likewise, patients with active intestinal BD had higher IL-12B levels than those without active disease (P = 0.008). IL-12B levels were correlated with the endoscopic disease activity of UC (P = 0.002) and intestinal BD (P = 0.001) but not that of CD. Serum IL-12B levels were significantly correlated with clinical and endoscopic disease activity in patients with UC and intestinal BD, suggesting its potential use as a biomarker for assessing disease activity in these patients. PMID:27281077

  17. Exercise Decreases Risk of Future Active Disease in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patricia D.; Kappelman, Michael D.; Martin, Christopher F.; Chen, Wenli; Sandler, Robert S.; Long, Millie D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although exercise impacts quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), little is known about its role in disease activity. Among IBD patients in remission, we aimed to evaluate the association between exercise and subsequent active disease. Methods We performed a prospective study using the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) Partners Internet-based cohort of individuals with self-reported IBD. We identified participants in remission, defined as short Crohn's disease activity index (sCDAI) <150 or simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI) ≤2. The primary exposure was exercise status, measured using the validated Godin leisure time activity index. The primary study outcome, assessed after six months, was active disease defined using the above disease activity index thresholds. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to describe the independent association between exercise and risk of active disease. Results We identified 1308 patients with Crohn's Disease (CD) and 549 with ulcerative or indeterminate colitis (UC/IC) in remission, of whom 227(17.4%) with CD and 135 (24.6%) with UC/IC developed active disease after 6 months. Higher exercise level was associated with decreased risk of active disease for CD (adjusted RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.55-0.94) and UC/IC (adjusted RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.54-1.13). Conclusions In patients with CD in remission, those with higher exercise levels were significantly less likely to develop active disease at six months. In patients with UC/IC in remission, patients with higher exercise levels were less likely to develop active disease at six months, however this was not statistically significant. PMID:25723616

  18. Ulcerative Colitis Activity Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin, in a Patient with Longstanding Disease under Continuous Treatment with Mesalazine.

    PubMed

    Voukelatou, Panagiota; Sfendouraki, Elissavet; Karianos, Theodoros; Saranti, Sofia; Tsitsimelis, Dimitrios; Vrettos, Ioannis; Kalliakmanis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background. The presence of ulcerative colitis (UC) with no bowel symptoms, as fever of unknown origin (FUO), is uncommon. Objective. To describe the case of an 80-year-old woman who presented with fever, with a history of UC under treatment with mesalazine. Case Presentation. She was admitted due to fever lasting for 12 days with no associated symptoms. Seven years earlier, she was diagnosed with UC. After an extended workup for FUO that failed to reach the diagnosis, she underwent a gallium-67 scintigraphy. This revealed a persistent diffuse concentration of gallium-67 in the ascending colon at 24-hour imaging that remained stable at 48- and 72-hour imaging without any topographic change after the use of laxatives. Considering the results and in the absence of another diagnosis, the patient was treated with 30 mg prednisone daily and mesalazine, as treatment of active UC. Subsequently, the patient's condition improved markedly and the fever retreated. One month later, she was reevaluated with a gallium-67 scintigraphy with total absence of gallium-67 concentration in the ascending colon. Conclusion. UC activity must be included in the differential diagnosis of FUO in patients with longstanding disease, since fever may present alone, with no other manifestations. PMID:27504121

  19. Ulcerative Colitis Activity Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin, in a Patient with Longstanding Disease under Continuous Treatment with Mesalazine

    PubMed Central

    Sfendouraki, Elissavet; Karianos, Theodoros; Saranti, Sofia; Tsitsimelis, Dimitrios; Vrettos, Ioannis; Kalliakmanis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background. The presence of ulcerative colitis (UC) with no bowel symptoms, as fever of unknown origin (FUO), is uncommon. Objective. To describe the case of an 80-year-old woman who presented with fever, with a history of UC under treatment with mesalazine. Case Presentation. She was admitted due to fever lasting for 12 days with no associated symptoms. Seven years earlier, she was diagnosed with UC. After an extended workup for FUO that failed to reach the diagnosis, she underwent a gallium-67 scintigraphy. This revealed a persistent diffuse concentration of gallium-67 in the ascending colon at 24-hour imaging that remained stable at 48- and 72-hour imaging without any topographic change after the use of laxatives. Considering the results and in the absence of another diagnosis, the patient was treated with 30 mg prednisone daily and mesalazine, as treatment of active UC. Subsequently, the patient's condition improved markedly and the fever retreated. One month later, she was reevaluated with a gallium-67 scintigraphy with total absence of gallium-67 concentration in the ascending colon. Conclusion. UC activity must be included in the differential diagnosis of FUO in patients with longstanding disease, since fever may present alone, with no other manifestations. PMID:27504121

  20. Long noncoding RNA uc.338 promotes cell proliferation through association with BMI1 in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bo, Changwen; Li, Na; Li, Xiuli; Liang, Xianwei; An, Yonghui

    2016-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common human cancers all over the world. Increasing evidences have demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in malignant transformation, tumor growth and metastasis in HCC. Among lncRNAs, ultraconserved RNAs (ucRNAs) containing an ultraconserved region have been report to contribute to human cancers. lncRNA ultraconserved element 338 (uc.338) was first found to be upregulated in HCC and promote cell growth. However, the exact mechanism by which uc.338 modulates cell growth remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that uc.338 promotes HCC cell proliferation and induces cell cycle progression. RNA-immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assays showed that uc.338 associated with BMI1. We found that uc.338 promotes HCC cell proliferation and induces cell cycle progression through association with BMI1. uc.338 also modulated the transcription of CDKN1A. The oncogenic activity of uc.338 is partially due to its repression of p21. uc.338 may be a potential target for HCC therapy.

  1. Evaluation of Remedial Programs at UC Davis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunziker, Celeste M.

    Efforts at the University of California, Davis, (UC Davis) to develop standard evaluation models for remedial programs are described, and three UC Davis evaluation studies are considered. A standard evaluation model entails a formal orientation, a singular values perspective, and a primary audience of program funders and oversight agencies. The…

  2. Assessment of Disease‐Related Therapeutic Protein Drug‐Drug Interaction for Etrolizumab in Patients With Moderately to Severely Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaohui; Kenny, Jane R.; Dickmann, Leslie; Maciuca, Romeo; Looney, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The efficacy and safety of etrolizumab, a humanized IgG1 mAb, were evaluated in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) in a phase 2 study (EUCALYPTUS). The current study assessed the risk of therapeutic protein drug‐drug interaction (TP‐DDI) of etrolizumab on CYP3A activity in patients with UC. Literature review was performed to compare serum proinflammatory cytokine levels and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of CYP3A substrate drugs between patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and healthy subjects. Treatment effect of etrolizumab on CYP3A activity was evaluated by measuring colonic CYP3A4 mRNA expression and serum C‐reactive protein (CRP) in EUCALYPTUS patients. Literature data suggested similar levels between IBD patients and healthy subjects for serum proinflammatory cytokines and PK parameters of CYP3A substrate drugs. Additionally, treatment with etrolizumab did not change colonic CYP3A4 mRNA expression or serum CRP levels in UC patients. In conclusion, our results indicate a low TP‐DDI risk for etrolizumab in UC patients, particularly on medications metabolized by CYP3A. PMID:26412221

  3. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are associated with intestinal inflammation in patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh C.; Halkjaer, Sofie Ingdam; Mortensen, Esben Munk; Lydolph, Magnus C.; Nordgaard-Lassen, Inge; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Petersen, Andreas Munk

    2016-01-01

    E. coli of the phylogenetic group B2 harbouring Extra intestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) genes are frequently seen as colonizers of the intestine in patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC). In this study, we describe the influence of E. coli Nissle (EcN) B2 as add-on treatment to conventional therapies in patients with active UC. For this study one hundred active UC patients were randomized to ciprofloxacin or placebo for 1 week followed by EcN or placebo for 7 weeks. Stool samples were collected at weeks 0, 1, 8, 12, where E. coli were characterized and fecal calprotectin was measured. We showed that in the active UC patient group receiving Placebo/EcN, fewer patients reached remission, in comparison to the patient group receiving Placebo/placebo (p < 0.05). Active UC patients initially colonized with E. coli B2 had increased fecal calprotectin values and Colitis Activity Index scores in comparison to patients colonized with E. coli A and D (p < 0.05*). In conclusion, treatment of UC patients with E. coli Nissle (B2) does not promote clinical remission and active UC patients colonized with E. coli B2 have an increased intestinal inflammation. PMID:27686530

  4. C. Judson King of UC Berkeley

    SciTech Connect

    Prausnitz, John

    2005-06-01

    In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Tombunodavirus UC1

    PubMed Central

    DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of tombunodavirus UC1 assembled from metagenomic sequencing of organisms in San Francisco wastewater. This virus shares hallmarks of members of the Tombusviridae and the nodavirus-like Plasmopara halstedii and Sclerophthora macrospora viruses. PMID:26139709

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Tombunodavirus UC1.

    PubMed

    Greninger, Alexander L; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of tombunodavirus UC1 assembled from metagenomic sequencing of organisms in San Francisco wastewater. This virus shares hallmarks of members of the Tombusviridae and the nodavirus-like Plasmopara halstedii and Sclerophthora macrospora viruses. PMID:26139709

  7. Efficacy and safety of glycosylated undenatured type-II collagen (UC-II) in therapy of arthritic dogs.

    PubMed

    Deparle, L A; Gupta, R C; Canerdy, T D; Goad, J T; D'Altilio, M; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2005-08-01

    DeParle L. A., Gupta R. C., Canerdy T. D., Goad J. T., D'Altilio M., Bagchi M., Bagchi D. Efficacy and safety of glycosylated undenatured type-II collagen (UC-II) in therapy of arthritic dogs. J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap.28, 385-390. In large breed dogs, arthritis is very common because of obesity, injury, aging, immune disorder, or genetic predispositions. This study was therefore undertaken to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety of undenatured type-II collagen (UC-II) in obese-arthritic dogs. Fifteen dogs in three groups received either no UC-II (Group I) or UC-II with 1 mg/day (Group II) or 10 mg/day (Group III) for 90 days. Lameness and pain were measured on a weekly basis for 120 days (90 days treatment plus 30 days post-treatment). Blood samples were assayed for creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (markers of renal injury); and alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (evidence of hepatic injury). Dogs receiving 1 mg or 10 mg UC-II/day for 90 days showed significant declines in overall pain and pain during limb manipulation and lameness after physical exertion, with 10 mg showed greater improvement. At either dose of UC-II, no adverse effects were noted and no significant changes were noted in serum chemistry, suggesting that UC-II was well tolerated. In addition, dogs receiving UC-II for 90 days showed increased physical activity level. Following UC-II withdrawal for a period of 30 days, all dogs experienced a relapse of overall pain, exercise-associated lameness, and pain upon limb manipulation. These results suggest that daily treatment of arthritic dogs with UC-II ameliorates signs and symptoms of arthritis, and UC-II is well tolerated as no adverse effects were noted. PMID:16050819

  8. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) and... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS....25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  9. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) and... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS....25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  10. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) and... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS....25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  11. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) and... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS....25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  12. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vessel type cargo tanks operating at ambient temperatures and constructed of materials listed in Table... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS....25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  13. Psychological status in Iranian patients with ulcerative colitis and its relation to disease activity and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaeian, Mahshid; Afshar, Hamid; Roohafza, Hamid Reza; Daghaghzadeh, Hamed; Feizi, Awat; Sharbafchi, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaeian, Maryam; Naji, Fateme; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychological profile of inflammatory bowel disease patients is not well studied in Iran. We investigated the psychological status of Iranian patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and its relationship with disease activity and quality of life (QOL). Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on adult UC patients. The Lichtiger Colitis Activity Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, General Health Questionnaire-12, and WHOQOL-BREF, were completed by the patients. Results: From 120 studied patients, 35 (29.2%), 48 (40.0%), and 46 (38.3%) had significant anxiety, depression, and psychological distress, respectively. Anxiety, depression, and psychological distress were strongly correlated with disease activity (r = 0.357 to 0.439, P < 0.01). Disease activity was negatively correlated with all QOL dimensions (r = −0.245 to −0.550, P < 0.01). Anxiety, depression, and psychological distress were also negatively correlated with all QOL domains (r = −0.356 to −0.789, P < 0.01). In the regression models, anxiety was independently associated with active disease (β = 4.150, P = 0.049). Furthermore, disease activity was associated with the physical health (β = −0.371, P < 0.001). For almost all of the QOL domains, depression and psychological distress were independent predictors (β = −0.296 to −0.453, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Anxiety, depression, and psychological distress are highly frequent in UC patients of our society and are strongly associated with disease activity. Depression and psychological distress are important predictors of poor QOL in these patients. Further prospective studies, as well as clinical trials, are warranted in this regard. PMID:26600833

  14. Specific immunotherapy plus Clostridium butyricum alleviates ulcerative colitis in patients with food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Bin Lan, B; Yang, Fan; Lu, Dong; Lin, Zhenlv

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant T cell activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation, such as ulcerative colitis (UC). C. butyricum (Cb) is a probiotic and has been employed in the treatment of immune diseases. This study tests a hypothesis that specific immunotherapy (SIT) plus oral Cb (an over-the-counter probiotic) alleviates the UC symptoms. In this study, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, clinical study at our hospital. A total of 80 patients with relapsing-remitting ulcerative colitis and high levels of specific IgE antibody was randomly divided into 4 groups, and were treated with SIT or/and Cb, or placebo, respectively for 1 year. The results showed that a food antigen-specific Th2 polarization immune response was observed in UC patients with food allergy (FA). The frequency of regulatory B cells was significantly less in UC patients with FA as compared with healthy subjects. The UC patients with FA were treated with SIT and Cb showed significant amelioration of UC clinical symptoms, reduction of using UC-control medicines, and suppression of the skewed Th2 polarization, which did not occur in those treated with either SIT alone, or Cb alone, or placebo. In conclusion, combination of SIT and Cb efficiently alleviates a fraction of UC patients. PMID:27167186

  15. Genetic characterization of the UCS and Kex1 loci of Pneumocystis jirovecii.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Tavares, A; Costa, M C; Gaspar, J; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2009-02-01

    Nucleotide variation in the Pneumocystis jirovecii upstream conserved sequence (UCS) and kexin-like serine protease (Kex1) loci was studied in pulmonary specimens from Portuguese HIV-positive patients. DNA was extracted and used for specific molecular sequence analysis. The number of UCS tandem repeats detected in 13 successfully sequenced isolates ranged from three (9 isolates, 69%) to four (4 isolates, 31%). A novel tandem repeat pattern and two novel polymorphisms were detected in the UCS region. For the Kex1 gene, the wild-type (24 isolates, 86%) was the most frequent sequence detected among the 28 sequenced isolates. Nevertheless, a nonsynonymous (1 isolate, 3%) and three synonymous (3 isolates, 11%) polymorphisms were detected and are described here for the first time.

  16. Clinical value of fecal calprotectin in determining disease activity of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jun-Ying; Ouyang, Qin; Li, Guo-Dong; Xiao, Nan-Ping

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate possibility and clinical application of fecal calprotectin in determining disease activity of ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the concentrations of calprotectin in feces obtained from 66 patients with UC and 20 controls. C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), acid glycoprotein (AGP) were also measured and were compared with calprotectin in determining disease activity of UC. The disease activity of UC was also determined by the Sutherland criteria. RESULTS: The fecal calprotectin concentration in the patients with active UC was significantly higher than that in the inactive UC and in the controls (402.16 ± 48.0 μg/g vs 35.93 ± 3.39 μg/g, 11.5 ± 3.42 μg/g, P < 0.01). The fecal calprotectin concentration in the inactive UC group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.05). A significant difference was also found in the patients with active UC of mild, moderate and severe degrees. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristics (AUCROC) was 0.975, 0.740, 0.692 and 0.737 for fecal calprotectin, CRP, ESR and AGP, respectively. There was a strong correlation between the fecal calprotectin concentration and the endoscopic gradings for UC (r = 0.866, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Calprotectin in the patient’s feces can reflect the disease activity of UC and can be used as a rational fecal marker for intestinal inflammation in clinical practice. This kind of marker is relatively precise, simple and noninvasive when compared with other commonly-used markers such as CRP, ESR and AGP. PMID:18176961

  17. Creating an Engaging Library Orientation: First Year Experience Courses at UC San Diego

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Crystal; Turnbow, Dominique; Roth, Amanda; Friedman, Lia; Heskett, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the development of an engaging library orientation module for UC San Diego First Year Experience (FYE) courses. The library module included a brief in-class presentation about research concepts and library services, an online interactive library scavenger hunt given as an in-class activity, and a homework assignment where…

  18. Linking academic and clinical missions: UC Davis' integrated AHC.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Claire; Rice, Ann; McGowan, William; Osburn, Nathan

    2008-09-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) rely on cross-subsidization of education and research programs by the clinical enterprise, but this is becoming more challenging as clinical reimbursements decline. These new realities provide an important opportunity to reevaluate the relationships between medical schools and academic medical centers. The authors examine the benefits of their ongoing commitment to create a fully integrated AHC at the University of California (UC) Davis, discussing strategies that serve as catalysts for continued growth. They explore how investments of proceeds from the clinical enterprise directly enhance educational and research initiatives, which, in turn, increase the success of patient-care programs. This has created a cycle of excellence that leads to an enhanced reputation for the entire health system. One strategy involves using clinical margins to "prime the pump" in anticipation of major research initiatives, resulting in rapid increases in external research funding and academic recognition. In turn, this facilitates recruitment of high-quality faculty and staff, improving the ability to deliver expert clinical care. The overall enhanced institutional reputation positions both the clinical and academic programs for further success. The authors posit that such approaches require executive-level commitment to a single strategic vision, unified leadership, and collaborative financial and operational decision making. Adopting such changes is not without challenges, which are discussed, but the authors suggest that an integrated AHC fosters optimized operations, enhanced reputation, and stronger performance across all mission areas. They also provide examples of how the UC Davis Health System has thus attracted philanthropists and investments from the private sector.

  19. Establishing an active patient partnership.

    PubMed

    Herrier, R N; Boyce, R W

    1995-04-01

    Pharmacists face many changes in the coming decade, some of which threaten their professional survival. Although uncertainty may currently prevail, one of these changes, the shift in the patient-health care professional relationship from the patient taking a passive role to an active partnering role, provides pharmacists with many opportunities to realize the vision of patient-centered care that has been advocated by pharmacy innovators and leaders for almost three decades. To take advantage of these changes, pharmacists must modify their practice paradigms and use their existing strengths, such as easy patient access and high levels of patient trust, to help develop a new model of pharmaceutical care. The concern that the magnitude of these changes will prevent successful practice transformations may be exaggerated. In reality, these proposed "new" roles have been in existence for much of this century. Most pharmacists can expand and enhance their traditional roles as self-care advisors and patient educators simply by incremental improvements in interpersonal and clinical skills. Rather than a Star Trek approach to "go where no man has gone before," the profession needs only a pharmaceutical sequel to Back to the Future.

  20. Glycosylation and sulphation of colonic mucus glycoproteins in patients with ulcerative colitis and in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Morita, H; Kettlewell, M G; Jewell, D P; Kent, P W

    1993-01-01

    Studies have been made of mucus glycoprotein biosynthesis in different regions of the lower gastrointestinal tract in normal patients and those with ulcerative colitis (UC), active or inactive, by means of 3H-glucosamine (3H-GlcNH2)--35S-sulphate double labelling of epithelial biopsy specimens under culture conditions. The time based rate of 3H-GlcNH2 labelling of mucus in rectal tissue was similar to that in active or inactive UC whereas the rate of 35SO4(2) labelling was significantly increased in active disease. The 3H specific activities measuring the amount of isotopic incorporation into surface and tissue mucus glycoproteins were increased in patients with active UC compared with normal or inactive subjects. The 35S specific activities did not differ significantly between patients with active UC and those in remission. In the rectum, glycosylation of mucus glycoproteins decreases with the increasing age of the patient. Regional differences in 3H-labelling of mucus components are reported for ascending colon, transverse colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum. Sulphation (35S-labelling) was higher in all parts of the colon in left sided UC. Results point to accelerated glycosylation of core proteins in the active phase of UC. PMID:8344580

  1. Usefulness of sulfasalazine for patients with refractory-ulcerative colits

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Takuya; Sono, Makoto; Yazumi, Shujiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with refractory-ulcerative colitis (UC) require therapy escalation. Sulfasalazine (SASP) could deliver a high concentration of 5-aminosalicylic acid to the colon. The usefulness of SASP for refractory-UC patients, however, is unclear. Aim The aim was to evaluate the usefulness of SASP for refractory-UC patients. Method We retrospectively analysed 36 (11.4%) of 316 patients with refractory-UC who had been treated with SASP. Clinical and endoscopic activities were evaluated with Lichtiger index and Mayo score, respectively. We analysed the induction-remission rate, predictive factors for the efficacy of SASP, and adverse events. Results Of 36 refractory-UC patients, 14 (38.9%) were treated with concomitant mesalazine enemas, 10 (27.8%) with azathiopurine, 4 (11.1%) with tacrolimus and 6 (16.7%) with an antitumour necrosis factor-α agent. After initiating SASP treatment, 25 patients (69.4%) achieved clinical remission. In 9 (64.3%) of 14 patients with UC treated with mesalazine enemas, mesalazine enemas could be discontinued with SASP. In all patients treated with tacrolimus, tacrolimus could be discontinued with SASP. Clinical activity score upon the initiation of SASP was significantly lower (p=0.024) and the number of patients treated with thiopurine was significantly higher (p=0.016) in the clinical remission group than in the non-clinical remission group. These factors might be predictive for the efficacy of SASP, although multivariate analysis demonstrated no statistically significant effect. Adverse events occurred in 7 patients (19.4%), and reduction or discontinuation of SASP led to improvement. Conclusions SASP appears to be more effective for refractory-UC patients with low clinical-activity and/or thiopurine-use. Trial registration number UMIN000021615; Results. PMID:27648296

  2. Usefulness of sulfasalazine for patients with refractory-ulcerative colits

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Takuya; Sono, Makoto; Yazumi, Shujiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with refractory-ulcerative colitis (UC) require therapy escalation. Sulfasalazine (SASP) could deliver a high concentration of 5-aminosalicylic acid to the colon. The usefulness of SASP for refractory-UC patients, however, is unclear. Aim The aim was to evaluate the usefulness of SASP for refractory-UC patients. Method We retrospectively analysed 36 (11.4%) of 316 patients with refractory-UC who had been treated with SASP. Clinical and endoscopic activities were evaluated with Lichtiger index and Mayo score, respectively. We analysed the induction-remission rate, predictive factors for the efficacy of SASP, and adverse events. Results Of 36 refractory-UC patients, 14 (38.9%) were treated with concomitant mesalazine enemas, 10 (27.8%) with azathiopurine, 4 (11.1%) with tacrolimus and 6 (16.7%) with an antitumour necrosis factor-α agent. After initiating SASP treatment, 25 patients (69.4%) achieved clinical remission. In 9 (64.3%) of 14 patients with UC treated with mesalazine enemas, mesalazine enemas could be discontinued with SASP. In all patients treated with tacrolimus, tacrolimus could be discontinued with SASP. Clinical activity score upon the initiation of SASP was significantly lower (p=0.024) and the number of patients treated with thiopurine was significantly higher (p=0.016) in the clinical remission group than in the non-clinical remission group. These factors might be predictive for the efficacy of SASP, although multivariate analysis demonstrated no statistically significant effect. Adverse events occurred in 7 patients (19.4%), and reduction or discontinuation of SASP led to improvement. Conclusions SASP appears to be more effective for refractory-UC patients with low clinical-activity and/or thiopurine-use. Trial registration number UMIN000021615; Results.

  3. UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Paul

    2012-05-31

    This is the final report of the UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence which spanned from 2005-2012. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program, to provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills to create advanced automotive technologies. The UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence established in 2005 is focused on research, education, industrial collaboration and outreach within automotive technology. UC Davis has had two independent GATE centers with separate well-defined objectives and research programs from 1998. The Fuel Cell Center, administered by ITS-Davis, has focused on fuel cell technology. The Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Design Center (HEV Center), administered by the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, has focused on the development of plug-in hybrid technology using internal combustion engines. The merger of these two centers in 2005 has broadened the scope of research and lead to higher visibility of the activity. UC Davis's existing GATE centers have become the campus's research focal points on fuel cells and hybrid-electric vehicles, and the home for graduate students who are studying advanced automotive technologies. The centers have been highly successful in attracting, training, and placing top-notch students into fuel cell and hybrid programs in both industry and government.

  4. Investigation of the diffusion of atomic fission products in UC by density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bévillon, Émile; Ducher, Roland; Barrachin, Marc; Dubourg, Roland

    2013-03-01

    Activation energies of U and C atoms self-diffusion in UC, as well as activation energies of hetero-diffusion of fission products (FPs) are investigated by first-principles calculations. According to a previous study which showed a likely U site occupation was favoured for all the FPs, their diffusion is restricted to the uranium sublattice of UC in the present study. In this framework, long-range displacements are only possible through a concerted mechanism with a surrounding uranium vacancy. Using the apparent formation energies of the uranium vacancy defect calculated in our previous study and the classical approach used in UO2 by Andersson et al., the activation energies of the main fission products in the various stoichiometric domains have been calculated. The results are compared to those obtained with the five frequency model applied to two representative fission products, Xe and Zr. Interestingly, despite strong differences of formalism, both models provided similar activation energies.

  5. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    DOE PAGES

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Samolyuk, German D.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nagler, Stephen E.

    2016-01-19

    High energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreementmore » with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Lastly, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.« less

  6. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Samolyuk, German D.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nagler, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    High energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreement with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Lastly, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.

  7. Disposition of ( UC)methyl bromide in rats after inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.A.; Dutcher, J.S.; Medinsky, M.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the disposition and metabolism of ( UC)methyl bromide in rats after inhalation. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed nose only to a vapor concentration of 337 nmol ( UC)methyl bromide/liter air (9.0 ppm, 25C, 620 torr) for 6 hr. Urine, feces, expired air, and tissues were collected for up to 65 hr after exposure. Elimination of UC as UCO2 was the major route of excretion with about 47% (3900 nmol/rat) of the total ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed excreted by this route. CO2 excretion exhibited a biphasic elimination pattern with 85% of the UCO2 being excreted with a half-time of 3.9 +/- 0.1 hr (anti x +/- SE) and 15% excreted with a half-time of 11.4 +/- 0.2 hr. Half-times for elimination of UC in urine and feces were 9.6 +/- 0.1 and 16.1 +/- 0.1 hr, respectively. By 65 hr after exposure, about 75% of the initial radioactivity had been excreted with 25% remaining in the body. Radioactivity was widely distributed in tissues immediately following exposure with lung (250 nmol equivalents/g), adrenal (240 nmol equivalents/g), and nasal turbinates (110 nmol equivalents/g) containing the highest concentrations of UC. Radioactivity in livers immediately after exposure accounted for about 17% of the absorbed methyl bromide. Radioactivity in all other tissues examined accounted for about 10% of the absorbed methyl bromide. Elimination half-times of UC from tissues were on the order of 1.5 to 8 hr. In all tissues examined, over 90% of the UC in the tissues was methyl bromide metabolities. The data from this study indicate that after inhalation methyl bromide is rapidly metabolized in tissues and readily excreted. 22 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Rotational Rehybridization and the High Temperature Phase of UC2

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiaodong; Rudin, Sven P.; Batista, Enrique R.; Clark, David L.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Martin, Richard L.

    2012-12-03

    The screened hybrid approximation (HSE) of density functional theory (DFT) is used to examine the structural, optical, and electronic properties of the high temperature phase, cubic UC(2). This phase contains C(2) units with a computed C-C distance of 1.443 Å which is in the range of a CC double bond; U is formally 4+, C(2) 4-. The closed shell paramagnetic state (NM) was found to lie lowest. Cubic UC(2) is found to be a semiconductor with a narrow gap, 0.4 eV. Interestingly, the C(2) units connecting two uranium sites can rotate freely up to an angle of 30°, indicating a hindered rotational solid. Ab-initio molecular dynamic simulations (HSE) show that the rotation of C(2) units in the low temperature phase (tetragonal UC(2)) occurs above 2000 K, in good agreement with experiment. The computed energy barrier for the phase transition from tetragonal UC(2) to cubic UC(2) is around 1.30 eV per UC(2). What is fascinating about this system is that at high temperature, the phase transformation to the cubic phase is associated with a rehybridization of the C atoms from sp to sp(3).

  9. Evidence of trace conditioning in comatose patients revealed by the reactivation of EEG responses to alerting sounds.

    PubMed

    Juan, Elsa; Nguepnjo Nguissi, Nathalie Ata; Tzovara, Athina; Viceic, Dragana; Rusca, Marco; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O; De Lucia, Marzia

    2016-11-01

    Trace conditioning refers to a learning process occurring after repeated presentation of a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS+) and a salient unconditioned stimulus (UCS) separated by a temporal gap. Recent studies have reported that trace conditioning can occur in humans in reduced levels of consciousness by showing a transfer of the unconditioned autonomic response to the CS+ in healthy sleeping individuals and in vegetative state patients. However, no previous studies have investigated the neural underpinning of trace conditioning in the absence of consciousness in humans. In the present study, we recorded the EEG activity of 29 post-anoxic comatose patients while presenting a trace conditioning paradigm using neutral tones as CS+ and alerting sounds as UCS. Most patients received therapeutic hypothermia and all were deeply unconscious according to standardized clinical scales. After repeated presentation of the CS+ and UCS couple, learning was assessed by measuring the EEG activity during the period where the UCS is omitted after CS+ presentation. Specifically we assessed the 'reactivation' of the neural response to UCS omission by applying a decoding algorithm derived from the statistical model of the EEG activity in response to the UCS presentation. The same procedure was used in a group of 12 awake healthy controls. We found a reactivation of the UCS response in absence of stimulation in eight patients (five under therapeutic hypothermia) and four healthy controls. Additionally, the reactivation effect was temporally specific within trials since it manifested primarily at the specific latency of UCS presentation and significantly less before or after this period. Our results show for the first time that trace conditioning may manifest as a reactivation of the EEG activity related to the UCS and even in the absence of consciousness.

  10. Associations between diet and disease activity in ulcerative colitis patients using a novel method of data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Magee, Elizabeth A; Edmond, Laurie M; Tasker, Shiona M; Kong, San Choon; Curno, Richard; Cummings, John H

    2005-01-01

    Background The relapsing nature and varying geographical prevalence of ulcerative colitis (UC) implicates environmental factors such as diet in its aetiology. Methods In order to determine which foods might be related to disease activity in UC a new method of dietary analysis was developed and applied. Eighty-one UC patients were recruited at all stages of the disease process. Following completion of a 7 d diet diary, clinical assessment including a sigmoidoscopic examination (scale 0 (normal mucosa) to 6 (very active disease)) was conducted. Food weights for each person were adjusted (divided) by the person's calorific intake for the week. Each food consumed was given a food sigmoidoscopy score (FSS) calculated by summing the products of the (adjusted) weight of food consumed and sigmoidoscopy score for each patient and occurrence of food and dividing by the total (adjusted) weight of the food consumed by all 81 patients. Thus, foods eaten in large quantities by patients with very active disease have high FSSs and vice versa. Foods consumed by <10 people or weighing <1 kg for the whole group were excluded, leaving 75 foods. Results High FSS foods were characterized by high levels of the anti-thiamin additive sulfite (Mann-Whitney, p < 0.001), i.e. bitter, white wine, burgers, soft drinks from concentrates, sausages, lager and red wine. Caffeine also has anti-thiamin properties and decaffeinated coffee was associated with a better clinical state than the caffeine containing version. Beneficial foods (average intake per week) included pork (210 g), breakfast cereals (200 g), lettuce (110 g), apples and pears (390 g), milk (1250 ml), melon (350 g), bananas (350 g), bacon (120 g), beef and beef products (500 g), tomatoes (240 g), soup (700 g), citrus fruits (300 g), fish (290 g), yogurt (410 g), cheese (110 g), potatoes (710 g) and legumes (120 g). Conclusions The dietary analysis method described provides a new tool for establishing relationships between diet and

  11. Leukocyte Activation in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Minervino, Daniele; Gumiero, Daniela; Nicolazzi, Maria Anna; Carnicelli, Annamaria; Fuorlo, Mariella; Guidone, Caterina; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Fattorossi, Andrea; Mingrone, Geltrude; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The rising prevalence of obesity is a major global health problem. In severe obesity, bariatric surgery (BS) allows to obtain a significant weight loss and comorbidities improvement, among them one of the factors is the thrombotic risk. In this observational study, we measured indices of leukocyte activation in severely obese patients as markers of increased thrombotic risk in relation with serum markers of inflammation before and after BS. Frequency of polymorphonuclear neutrophil-platelet (PLT) and monocyte (MONO)-PLT aggregates as well as of tissue factor (TF) expressing MONOs was measured in the peripheral blood of 58 consecutive obese patients and 30 healthy controls. In 31 of the 58 obese patients, data obtained at the enrollment were compared with those obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months after BS. Compared with healthy controls, obese patients showed a higher frequency of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL)-PLT aggregates (7.47 ± 2.45 [6.82–8.11]% vs 5.85 ± 1.89 [5.14–6.55]%, P = 0.001), MONO-PLT aggregates (12.31 ± 7.33 [10.38–14.24]% vs 8.14 ± 2.22 [7.31–8.97]%, P < 0.001), and TF expressing MONOs (4.01 ± 2.11 [3.45–4.56]% vs 2.64 ± 1.65 [2.02–3.25]%, P = 0.002). PMNL-PLT and MONO-PLT aggregate frequency was positively correlated with TF expressing MONOs (R2 = 0.260, P = 0.049 and R2 = 0.318, P = 0.015, respectively). BS was performed in 31 patients and induced a significant reduction of the body mass index, and waist and hip circumferences. These effects were associated with a significant decrease of PMNL-PLT aggregates at 12 months (7.58 ± 2.27 [6.75–8.42]% vs 4.47 ± 1.11 [3.93–5.01]%, P < 0.001), and a reduction of TF expressing MONOs at 6 (3.82 ± 2.04 [3.07–4.57]% vs 1.60 ± 1.69 [0.30–2.90]%, P = 0.008) and 12 months (3.82 ± 2.04 [3.07–4.57]% vs 1.71 ± 0.54 [1.45–1.97]%, P = 0.001) after BS. These data suggest that leukocyte

  12. 78 FR 23969 - In the Matter of UC Hub Group, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... Act, that trading in the securities of UC Hub is suspended for the period from 9:30 a.m. EDT on April... COMMISSION In the Matter of UC Hub Group, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading April 19, 2013. It appears to... concerning the securities of UC Hub Group, Inc. (``UC Hub'') because it has not filed a periodic report...

  13. Rectal budesonide and mesalamine formulations in active ulcerative proctosigmoiditis: efficacy, tolerance, and treatment approach

    PubMed Central

    Christophi, George P; Rengarajan, Arvind; Ciorba, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an immune-mediated disease of the colon that is characterized by diffuse and continuous inflammation contiguous from the rectum. Half of UC patients have inflammation limited to the distal colon (proctitis or proctosigmoiditis) that primarily causes symptoms of bloody diarrhea and urgency. Mild-to-moderate distal UC can be effectively treated with topical formulations (rectal suppositories, enemas, or foam) of mesalamine or steroids to reduce mucosal inflammation and alleviate symptoms. Enemas or foam formulations adequately reach up to the splenic flexure, have a minimal side-effect profile, and induce remission alone or in combination with systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Herein, we compare the efficacy, cost, patient tolerance, and side-effect profiles of steroid and mesalamine rectal formulations in distal UC. Patients with distal mild-to-moderate UC have a remission rate of approximately 75% (NNT =2) after treatment for 6 weeks with mesalamine enemas. Rectal budesonide foam induces remission in 41.2% of patients with mild-to-moderate active distal UC compared to 24% of patient treated with placebo (NNT =5). However, rectal budesonide has better patient tolerance profile compared to enema formulations. Despite its favorable efficacy, safety, and cost profiles, patients and physicians significantly underuse topical treatments for treating distal colitis. This necessitates improved patient education and physician familiarity regarding the indications, effectiveness, and potential financial and tolerability barriers in using rectal formulations. PMID:27274301

  14. Telomere length in non-neoplastic colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC) and its relationship to the severe clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Sumi, Kazuya; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Masakatsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Hirata, Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Telomere shortening occurs with human aging in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by rapid cell turnover and oxidative injury. To clarify the clinical importance of telomere shortening in colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC), we measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in non-neoplastic colonic mucosa in UC patients and assessed its relationship to various clinical subtypes. Relative telomere length in genomic DNA was measured in colonic biopsies obtained from rectal inflammatory mucosa from 86 UC patients as well as paired non-inflammatory proximal colonic mucosae from 10 patients. Data were correlated with various clinical phenotypes. In paired samples, average relative telomere length of rectal inflammatory mucosa was shortened compared to normal appearing proximal colon in eight out of ten cases (p = 0.01). Telomere length shortening was significantly associated with more severe Mayo endoscopic subscore (p < 0.0001) and cases needing surgery due to toxic megacolon or cancer occurrence (p = 0.043). When the severe clinical phenotype was defined as having at least one of following phenotypes, more than two times of hospitalization, highest Mayo endoscopic subscore, steroid dependent, refractory, or needing operation, average relative telomere length was significantly shortened in the same phenotypes than the others (p = 0.003). Telomere shortening is associated with more severe clinical phenotypes of UC, reflecting severe inflammatory state in the colonic mucosa.

  15. ChE at UC Santa Barbara.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seborg, Dale E.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the chemical engineering program at the University of California, Santa Barbara, including history of the department, faculty research interests and professional activities, graduate and undergraduate programs, and research in nuclear engineering. (SK)

  16. UCS-PROMOVE: The Engineer of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villas-Boas, V.

    2010-01-01

    The Universidade de Caxias do Sul (UCS) elaborated the cooperative project called "The engineer of the future", with the objective of promoting science and engineering among high school teachers and students. This project aims to improve the quality of the teaching and to increase the interest of students in technological areas, leading to a…

  17. Patient Activation: Public Libraries and Health Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malachowski, Margot

    2011-01-01

    Patient activation is a new term for a perennial problem. People know what they need to do for their health: exercise, eat right, and get enough rest--but how are they motivated to actually do these things? This is what patient activation is. From this author's vantage point as a medical librarian, public libraries are well-placed to be part of…

  18. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

  19. The UC-LLNL Regional Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; Kim, Jinwon

    1996-09-01

    The UC-LLNL Regional Climate System Model has been under development since 1991. The unique system simulates climate from the global scale down to the watershed catchment scale, and consists of data pre- and post- processors, and four model components. The four model components are (1) a mesoscale atmospheric simulation model, (2) a soil-plant-snow model, (3) a watershed hydrology-riverflow model, and (4) a suite of crop response models. The first three model components have been coupled, and the system includes two-way feedbacks between the soil-plant-snow model and the mesoscale atmospheric simulation model. This three-component version of RCSM has been tested, validated, and successfully used for operational quantitative precipitation forecasts and seasonal water resource studies over the southwestern US. We are currently implementation and validating the fourth component, the Decision Support system for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT). A description of the UC-LLNL RCSM and some recent results are presented.

  20. 20 CFR 603.4 - What is the confidentiality requirement of Federal UC law?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirement of Federal UC law? (a) Statute. Section 303(a)(1) of the SSA (42 U.S.C. 503(a)(1)) provides that... Federal UC law? 603.4 Section 603.4 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE...

  1. 20 CFR 603.4 - What is the confidentiality requirement of Federal UC law?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... requirement of Federal UC law? (a) Statute. Section 303(a)(1) of the SSA (42 U.S.C. 503(a)(1)) provides that... Federal UC law? 603.4 Section 603.4 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE...

  2. 20 CFR 603.4 - What is the confidentiality requirement of Federal UC law?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... requirement of Federal UC law? (a) Statute. Section 303(a)(1) of the SSA (42 U.S.C. 503(a)(1)) provides that... Federal UC law? 603.4 Section 603.4 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE...

  3. 20 CFR 603.4 - What is the confidentiality requirement of Federal UC law?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirement of Federal UC law? (a) Statute. Section 303(a)(1) of the SSA (42 U.S.C. 503(a)(1)) provides that... Federal UC law? 603.4 Section 603.4 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE...

  4. 20 CFR 603.4 - What is the confidentiality requirement of Federal UC law?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... requirement of Federal UC law? (a) Statute. Section 303(a)(1) of the SSA (42 U.S.C. 503(a)(1)) provides that... Federal UC law? 603.4 Section 603.4 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE...

  5. The UC2-x - Carbon eutectic: A laser heating study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, D.; Boboridis, K.; Morel, S.; De Bruycker, F.

    2015-11-01

    The UC2-x - carbon eutectic has been studied by laser heating and fast multi-wavelength pyrometry under inert atmosphere. The study has been carried out on three compositions, two of which close to the phase boundary of the UC2-x - C miscibility gap (with C/U atomic ratios 2 and 2.1), and one, more crucial, with a large excess of carbon (C/U = 2.82). The first two compositions were synthesised by arc-melting. This synthesis method could not be applied to the last composition, which was therefore completed directly by laser irradiation. The U - C - O composition of the samples was checked by using a combustion method in an ELTRA® analyser. The eutectic temperature, established to be 2737 K ± 20 K, was used as a radiance reference together with the cubic - tetragonal (α → β) solid state transition, fixed at 2050 K ± 20 K. The normal spectral emissivity of the carbon-richer compounds increases up to 0.7, whereas the value 0.53 was established for pure hypostoichiometric uranium dicarbide at the limit of the eutectic region. This increase is analysed in the light of the demixing of excess carbon, and used for the determination of the liquidus temperature (3220 K ± 50 K for UC2.82). Due to fast solid state diffusion, also fostered by the cubic - tetragonal transition, no obvious signs of a lamellar eutectic structure could be observed after quenching to room temperature. The eutectic surface C/UC2-x composition could be qualitatively, but consistently, followed during the cooling process with the help of the recorded radiance spectra. Whereas the external liquid surface is almost entirely constituted by uranium dicarbide, it gets rapidly enriched in demixed carbon upon freezing. Demixed carbon seems to quickly migrate towards the inner bulk during further cooling. At the α → β transition, uranium dicarbide covers again the almost entire external surface.

  6. UC Merced Center for Computational Biology Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Michael; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2010-11-30

    Final report for the UC Merced Center for Computational Biology. The Center for Computational Biology (CCB) was established to support multidisciplinary scientific research and academic programs in computational biology at the new University of California campus in Merced. In 2003, the growing gap between biology research and education was documented in a report from the National Academy of Sciences, Bio2010 Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists. We believed that a new type of biological sciences undergraduate and graduate programs that emphasized biological concepts and considered biology as an information science would have a dramatic impact in enabling the transformation of biology. UC Merced as newest UC campus and the first new U.S. research university of the 21st century was ideally suited to adopt an alternate strategy - to create a new Biological Sciences majors and graduate group that incorporated the strong computational and mathematical vision articulated in the Bio2010 report. CCB aimed to leverage this strong commitment at UC Merced to develop a new educational program based on the principle of biology as a quantitative, model-driven science. Also we expected that the center would be enable the dissemination of computational biology course materials to other university and feeder institutions, and foster research projects that exemplify a mathematical and computations-based approach to the life sciences. As this report describes, the CCB has been successful in achieving these goals, and multidisciplinary computational biology is now an integral part of UC Merced undergraduate, graduate and research programs in the life sciences. The CCB began in fall 2004 with the aid of an award from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), under its Genomes to Life program of support for the development of research and educational infrastructure in the modern biological sciences. This report to DOE describes the research and academic programs

  7. Medical nutrition therapy for hypercholesterolemia positively affects patient satisfaction and quality of life outcomes.

    PubMed

    Delahanty, Linda M; Hayden, Doug; Ammerman, Alice; Nathan, David M

    2002-01-01

    Following a heart-healthy diet to lower cholesterol levels is often assumed to be difficult, to be burdensome, and to have a negative impact on quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of medical nutrition therapy (MNT) versus usual care (UC) for hypercholesterolemia on patient satisfaction and QOL. Ninety ambulatory care patients (60 men and 30 women), age 28 to 66, were randomly assigned to receive either MNT from dietitians using a National Cholesterol Education Program-based protocol or UC from their physicians. Patients who received MNT reported no difference in QOL related to the taste or enjoyment of food compared with UC patients. However, the MNT group reported initial improvements in QOL related to the convenience and cost of following a low-fat diet when compared with the UC group. The MNT group also reported significant and lasting improvements in perceived QOL related to self-care compared with the UC group. MNT patients were more satisfied with the interaction at visits, knowledge and ability to manage their cholesterol, eating habits, appearance, time spent exercising, and life in general. Moreover, MNT patients did not report any negative impact related to following a low-fat diet in regard to feeling restricted by diet; interference with lifestyle activities; or difficulty planning, purchasing, or preparing meals or eating away from home. Contrary to popular belief there is no apparent reduction but rather an improvement in some measures of QOL and patient satisfaction with MNT for hypercholesterolemia.

  8. Design for learning: deconstructing virtual patient activities.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Davies, David

    2011-01-01

    Digital technologies are used in almost every aspect of contemporary health professional education (HPE) but our understanding of their true potential as instructional tools rather than administrative tools has not significantly advanced in the last decade. One notable exception to this has been the rise of the 'virtual patient' as an educational intervention in HPE. This article attempts to deconstruct the virtual patient concept by developing a model of virtual patients as artifacts with intrinsic encoded properties and emergent constructed properties that build on the core concept of 'activity'.

  9. Computer-Aided Prediction of Long-Term Prognosis of Patients with Ulcerative Colitis after Cytoapheresis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Tetsuro; Okamoto, Susumu; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Naganuma, Makoto; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Mizuno, Shinta; Bessho, Rieko; Hibi, Toshifumi; Kanai, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Cytoapheresis (CAP) therapy is widely used in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with moderate to severe activity in Japan. The aim of this study is to predict the need of operation after CAP therapy of UC patients on an individual level using an artificial neural network system (ANN). Ninety UC patients with moderate to severe activity were treated with CAP. Data on the patients’ demographics, medication, clinical activity index (CAI) and efficacy of CAP were collected. Clinical data were divided into training data group and validation data group and analyzed using ANN to predict individual outcomes. The sensitivity and specificity of predictive expression by ANN were 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. Events of admission, operation, and use of immunomodulator, and efficacy of CAP were significantly correlated to the outcome. Requirement of operation after CAP therapy was successfully predicted by using ANN. This newly established ANN strategy would be used as powerful support of physicians in the clinical practice. PMID:26111148

  10. Gamma-N activation of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Meek, A.G.; Moskowitz, M.; Cohn, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    High energy gamma radiation (8 to 30 MeV) is gaining acceptance for radiation therapy of patients with deep cancers. This radiation is of sufficient energy to induce photonuclear activation of the elements in the human body. Our results of measurements of nitrogen and phosphorus in an anthropomorphic phantom, a cadaver, and a cancer patient with bremsstrahlung radiation from 15 MeV electrons demonstrate the feasibility of a method to monitor these two elements in the human body in vivo by measuring the radioactivity induced in these targets by photonuclear reactions. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Molecular structure of uranium carbides: isomers of UC3.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, M Fernanda; Rayón, Víctor M; Largo, Antonio

    2013-03-21

    In this article, the most relevant isomers of uranium tricarbide are studied through quantum chemical methods. It is found that the most stable isomer has a fan geometry in which the uranium atom is bonded to a quasilinear C3 unit. Both, a rhombic and a ring CU(C2) structures are found about 104-125 kJ/mol higher in energy. Other possible isomers including linear geometries are located even higher. For each structure, we provide predictions for those molecular properties (vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, dipole moments) that could eventually help in their experimental detection. We also discuss the possible routes for the formation of the different UC3 isomers as well as the bonding situation by means of a topological analysis of the electron density.

  12. Asymmetric ( UC)albumin transport across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; LeBon, T.R.; Shinbane, J.S.; Crandall, E.D.

    1985-10-01

    Bullfrog lungs were prepared as planar sheets and bathed with Ringer solution in Ussing chambers. In the presence of a constant electrical gradient (20, 0, or -20 mV) across the tissue, UC-labeled bovine serum albumin or inulin was instilled into the upstream reservoir and the rate of appearance of the tracer in the downstream reservoir was monitored. Two lungs from the same animal were used to determine any directional difference in tracer fluxes. An apparent permeability coefficient was estimated from a relationship between normalized downstream radioactivities and time. Results showed that the apparent permeability of albumin in the alveolar to pleural direction across the alveolar epithelial barrier is 2.3 X 10(-7) cm/s, significantly greater (P less than 0.0005) than that in the pleural to alveolar direction (5.3 X 10(-8) cm/s) when the tissue was short circuited. Permeability of inulin, on the other hand, did not show any directional dependence and averaged 3.1 X 10(-8) cm/s in both directions. There was no effect on radiotracer fluxes permeabilities of different electrical gradients across the tissue. Gel electrophoretograms and corresponding radiochromatograms suggest that the large and asymmetric isotope fluxes are not primarily due to digestion or degradation of labeled molecules. Inulin appears to traverse the alveolar epithelial barrier by simple diffusion through hydrated paracellular pathways. On the other hand, ( UC)albumin crosses the alveolar epithelium more rapidly than would be expected by simple diffusion. These asymmetric and large tracer fluxes suggest that a specialized mechanism is present in alveolar epithelium that may be capable of helping to remove albumin from the alveolar space.

  13. Functionality and Safety of an Ultra-Congruent Rotating Platform Knee Prosthesis at 5.6 Years: More than 5- Year Follow-Up of the e.motion® UC-TKA

    PubMed Central

    Chavoix, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mobile bearing TKA prostheses were designed to minimize polyethylene wear by increasing implant conformity and reducing stresses between the articulating prosthesis components. It is the purpose of this study to assess the mid-term functionality and clinical outcome associated with a highly congruent mobile platform design, the e.motion® UC total knee prosthesis. Material and Methods: Functional and clinical outcomes were assessed after an average of 5.6 years (5.1 – 6.0 years) after total knee arthroplasty in 28 patients (24 women), aged 77.8±7.5 years. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was assessed. Secondary outcomes included the Knee Society Score (KSS), radiological evaluation of radiolucent lines and recording of adverse events. Results: The average KOOS subscore for the activities of daily life was 77.8 points after 5.6 years. Both the clinical and functional KSS improved at 2.4 and 5.6 years. Two patients showed radiolucent lines at 5.6 years. Adverse events over 5.6 years included 3 subluxations, 1 tilting and 1 misalignment of the patella. None of the prostheses were revised. Conclusion: This pilot study shows promising outcomes for the e.motion® UC prosthesis. In the small sample, the implant performed comparably to the LCS prosthesis (the gold standard). There were no loosenings or revisions observed at 5.6 years. PMID:23730378

  14. Alteration of T cell maturation and proliferation in the mouse thymus induced by serum factors from patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M; Aiso, S; Hibi, T; Watanabe, N; Iwao, Y; Yoshida, T; Asakura, H; Tsuru, S; Tsuchiya, M

    1987-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) often have thymus abnormalities, although the precise mechanisms which induce those abnormalities remain unclear. We have examined the effect of serum fractions from patients with UC and other colonic diseases on mouse thymus to clarify the possible existence of factors which have thymus growth activity. These fractions were separated from sera of patients with UC by gel filtration and anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography. In mice given UC serum fractions; (i) remarkable increases in weight and total cell number of the thymus were observed from day 4 to day 9; (ii) a significant increase in the number of peanut agglutinin (PNA)+ thymus cells was demonstrated using flow cytometry on day 9; (iii) on quantitative analysis of surface antigens the percentage of Lyt-2+ thymus cells decreased and that of L3T4+ thymus cells increased remarkably on day 13; the number of bright Thy-1.2+ cells and of dull Lyt-1+ cells increased. In contrast, the serum fractions from patients with other colonic diseases and from normal persons caused little change in mouse thymus throughout the study. The results suggest that factors fractionated from the serum of patients with UC disturb intra-thymic T cell maturation and enhance the proliferation of thymus cells. PMID:3498579

  15. LLNL/UC (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)/(University of California) AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) facility and research program

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Proctor, I.D.; Southon, J.R.; Caffee, M.W.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Roberts, M.L.; Moore, T.L.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Nelson, D.E.; Loyd, D.H.; Vogel, J.S.

    1990-04-18

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California (UC) now have in operation a large AMS spectrometer built as part of a new multiuser laboratory centered on an FN tandem. AMS measurements are expected to use half of the beam time of the accelerator. LLNL use of AMS is in research on consequences of energy usage. Examples include global warming, geophysical site characterization, radiation biology and dosimetry, and study of mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. UC research activities are in clinical applications, archaeology and anthropology, oceanography, and geophysical and geochemical research. Access is also possible for researchers outside the UC system. The technological focus of the laboratory is on achieving high rates of sample through-put, unattended operation, and advances in sample preparation methods. Because of the expected growth in the research programs and the other obligations of the present accelerator, we are designing a follow-on dedicated facility for only AMS and microprobe analysis that will contain at least two accelerators with multiple spectrometers. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Sympathetic overactivity in active ulcerative colitis: effects of clonidine.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Raffaello; Ardizzone, Sandro; Palazzolo, Laura; Rimoldi, Alexandra; Perego, Francesca; Barbic, Franca; Bevilacqua, Maurizio; Vago, Luca; Bianchi Porro, Gabriele; Malliani, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Previous reports suggest that inflammatory bowel diseases may be accompanied by abnormalities in the neural autonomic profile. We tested the hypotheses that 1) an exaggerated sympathetic activity characterizes active ulcerative colitis (UC) and 2) a reduction of sympathetic activity by clonidine would be associated with clinical changes of UC. In 23 patients with UC and 20 controls, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), ECG, blood pressure, and respiration were continuously recorded, and plasma catecholamine was evaluated both at rest and during a 75 degrees head-up tilt. Autonomic profile was assessed by MSNA, norepinephrine, epinephrine, spectral markers of low-frequency (LF) cardiac sympathetic (LF(RR); normalized units) and high-frequency (HF) parasympathetic (HF(RR); normalized units) modulation and sympathetic vasomotor control (LF systolic arterial pressure; LF(SAP)), obtained by spectrum analysis of the R-R interval and systolic pressure variability. Among UC patients, 16 agreed to be randomly assigned to 8-wk transdermal clonidine (15 mg/wk, 9 subjects), or placebo (7 patients). An autonomic profile, Disease Activity Index (DAI), and endoscopic pattern were compared before and after clonidine/placebo. At rest, MSNA, heart rate (HR), LF(RR), LF/HF, and LF(SAP) were higher and HF(RR) was lower in patients than in controls. Tilt decreased HF(RR) and increased MSNA and LF(RR) less in patients than in controls. Clonidine decreased HR, MSNA, epinephrine, LF(RR), and increased HF(RR), whereas placebo had no effects. Changes of the autonomic profile after clonidine were associated with reduction of DAI score. An overall increase of sympathetic activity characterized active UC. Normalization of the autonomic profile by clonidine was accompanied by an improvement of the disease.

  17. Disposition and metabolism of 2,3-( UC)dichloropropene in rats after inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.A.; Medinsky, M.A.; Dutcher, J.S.; Henderson, R.F.; Cheng, Y.S.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    2,3-Dichloropropene (2,3-DCP) is a constituent of some commercially available preplant soil fumigants for the control of plant parasitic nematodes. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the disposition and metabolism of 2,3-( UC)DCP in rats after inhalation. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed nose-only to a vapor concentration of 250 nmol 2,3-( UC)DCP/liter air (7.5 ppm; 25C, 620 Torr) for 6 hr. Blood samples were taken during exposure, and urine, feces, expired air, and tissues were collected for up to 65 hr after exposure. Urinary excretion was the major route of elimination of UC (55% of estimated absorbed 2,3-DCP). Half-time for elimination of UC in urine was 9.8 +/- 0.05 hr (anti x +/- SE). Half-time for elimination of UC feces (17% of absorbed 2,3-DCP) was 12.9 +/- 0.14 hr (anti x +/- SE). Approximately 1 and 3% of the estimated absorbed 2,3-( UC)DCP were exhaled as either 2,3-( UC)DCP or UCO2, respectively. Concentrations of UC in blood increased during 240 min of exposure, after which no further increases in blood concentration of UC were seen. UC was widely distributed in tissues analyzed after a 6-hr exposure of rats to 2,3-( UC)DCP. Urinary bladder (150 nmol/g), nasal turbinates (125 nmol/g), kidneys (84 nmol/g), small intestine (61 nmol/g), and liver (35 nmol/g) were tissues with the highest concentrations of UC immediately after exposure. Over 90% of the UC in tissues analyzed was 2,3-DCP metabolites. Half-times for elimination of UC from tissues examined ranged from 3 to 11 hr. The data from this study indicate that after inhalation 2,3-DCP is metabolized in tissues and readily excreted. 21 references. 2 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Immunohistochemical Studies on Galectin Expression in Colectomised Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Block, Mattias; Mölne, Johan; Leffler, Hakon; Börjesson, Lars; Breimer, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aetiology and pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC) are essentially unknown. Galectins are carbohydrate-binding lectins involved in a large number of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Little is known about the role of galectins in human UC. In this immunohistochemical exploratory study, both epithelial and inflammatory cell galectin expression were studied in patients with a thoroughly documented clinical history and were correlated with inflammatory activity. Material and Methods. Surgical whole intestinal wall colon specimens from UC patients (n = 22) and controls (n = 10) were studied. Clinical history, pharmacological treatment, and modified Mayo-score were recorded. Tissue inflammation was graded, and sections were stained with antibodies recognizing galectin-1, galectin-2, galectin-3, and galectin-4. Results. Galectin-1 was undetectable in normal and UC colonic epithelium, while galectin-2, galectin-3, and galectin-4 were strongly expressed. A tendency towards diminished epithelial expression with increased inflammatory grade for galectin-2, galectin-3, and galectin-4 was also found. In the inflammatory cells, a strong expression of galectin-2 and a weak expression of galectin-3 were seen. No clear-cut correlation between epithelial galectin expression and severity of the disease was found. Conclusion. Galectin expression in patients with UC seems to be more dependent on disease focality and individual variation than on degree of tissue inflammation. PMID:26885508

  19. Successful Use of Tocilizumab in a Patient with Coexisting Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Yalçın, Metin Devrim; Khan, Abdul; Piotrowicz, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Tocilizumab is an interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor licensed for moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report a case of Tocilizumab monotherapy for severe active RA in a patient with coexisting ulcerative colitis (UC). The patient was intolerant to multiple disease-modifying drugs, so Tocilizumab monotherapy was commenced. We found clinical improvement in both RA and UC. There was no major adverse event after 2 years. Manufacturer advised caution in using Tocilizumab in patient with gastrointestinal ulceration due to an increased risk of bowel perforation. However, alternative treatments such as glucocorticoid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may carry a higher bowel perforation risk. The presence of gastrointestinal ulceration therefore should not constitute an absolute contraindication for Tocilizumab therapy. Future studies of registry data will inform clinician of the Tocilizumab-related risk of gastrointestinal toxicity in “real-life” settings. Contrary to previous case report, we found Tocilizumab therapy to have a positive effect on UC. Laboratory studies supported a role for interleukin-6 in the pathophysiology of UC. Further clinical trial to evaluate the therapeutic role of Tocilizumab in UC would be warranted.

  20. Soluble ST2: A new and promising activity marker in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Jiménez, David; Núñez, Lucía E; Beltrán, Caroll J; Candia, Enzo; Suazo, Cristóbal; Álvarez-Lobos, Manuel; González, María-Julieta; Hermoso, Marcela A; Quera, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To correlate circulating soluble ST2 (sST2) levels with the severity of ulcerative colitis (UC) and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and to demonstrate the predictive power of sST2 levels for differentiation between active and inactive UC. METHODS: We recruited 153 patients: 82 with UC, 26 with Crohn’s disease (CD) and 43 disease controls [non-inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)]. Subjects were excluded if they had diagnosis of asthma, autoimmune diseases or hypertension. The serum levels of sST2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines [pg/mL; median (25th-75th)] as well as clinical features, endoscopic and histological features, were subjected to analyses. The sST2 performance for discrimination between active and inactive UC, non-IBD and healthy controls (HC) was determined with regard to sensitivity and specificity, and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (r). To validate the method, the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) was determined (AUC, 95% CI) and the total ST2 content of the colonic mucosa in UC patients was correlated with circulating levels of sST2. RESULTS: The serum sST2 value was significantly higher in patients with active [235.80 (90.65-367.90) pg/mL] rather than inactive UC [33.19 (20.04-65.32) pg/mL], based on clinical, endoscopic and histopathological characteristics, as well as compared with non-IBD and HC (P < 0.001). The median level of sST2 in CD patients was 54.17 (35.02-122.0) pg/mL, significantly higher than that of the HC group only (P < 0.01). The cutoff was set at 74.87 pg/mL to compare active with inactive UC in a multicenter cohort of patients. Values of sensitivity, specificity, and ability to correctly classify UC, according to activity, were 83.33%, 83.33% and 83.33%, respectively. The AUC of the ROC curve to assess the ability of this molecule to discriminate between active vs inactive UC was 0.92 (0.86-0.97, P < 0.0001). The serum levels of sST2 in patients with UC significantly

  1. Characterization of regulatory T cell (Treg) function in patients infected with Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diego L; Guimarães, Luiz H; Cardoso, Thiago M; Queiroz, Adriano; Lago, Ednaldo; Roselino, Ana M; Bacellar, Olívia; Carvalho, Edgar M; Silva, João S

    2013-12-01

    Th1 immune responses are crucial for eliminating Leishmania parasites. However, despite strong Th1 responses, cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) patients infected with Leishmania braziliensis develop the disease, while milder Th1 responses are found in sub-clinical (SC) infections. Therefore, CL patients may experience impaired regulatory T cell (Treg) function, causing excessive Th1 responses and tissue damage. To address this hypothesis, we characterized the function of circulating Tregs in L. braziliensis infected CL patients and compared them to Tregs from uninfected controls (UC) and SC subjects. The frequency of circulating Tregs was similar in CL patients, UC and SC subjects. Moreover, CL patients Tregs suppressed lymphocyte proliferation and PBMC pro-inflammatory cytokine production more efficiently than UC Tregs, and also produced higher levels of IL-10 than UC and SC Tregs. Furthermore, PBMC and mononuclear cells from lesions of CL patients responded normally to Treg-induced suppression. Therefore, the lesion development in CL patients infected with L. braziliensis is not associated with impairment in Treg function or failure of cells to respond to immunomodulation. Rather, the increased Treg activation in CL patients may impair parasite elimination, resulting in establishment of chronic infection. Thus, immunological strategies that interfere with this response may improve leishmaniasis treatment.

  2. Impact analysis of the UC-609 shipping package

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    The inner containment vessel of the UC-609 shipping container must remain intact and sealed after undergoing a thirty foot drop onto an unyielding surface. The drop scenarios which were considered in this study included top corner down and top down drops. Results of the calculations performed for this study predict structural damage, as measured by accumulated effective plastic strains, but no failure of the inner primary containment vessel for both drop configurations. The top down impact is predicted to produce a higher-impact deceleration in the payload but the amount of damage to the primary containment vessel is predicted to be greater for the top corner impact configuration. The critical damage region for both drop scenarios is confined to the containment canister flange region. Verification of the analysis methodology was accomplished by comparing measured top corner crashes with calculated top corner crushes. Acceptable damage levels in this study were determined from calculated damage comparisons between the top corner drop, which reed intact during a top corner impact test, and the calculated top down impact damages. Comparisons were also made on the calculated maximum shear stress levels, which remained near or within NRC regulatory guidelines for both scenarios.

  3. Mo uc(v) Energy Levels and f values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lin; Beck, Donald R.

    2004-05-01

    Relativistic Configuration Interaction (RCI) calculations have been done for the lowest 12 J=0 even parity levels, and the lowest 30 J=1 odd parity levels of Mo uc(v.) For the J=0 4d^2 and 4d 5d energy differences, the average error is 229 cm-1 ( M. I. Cabeza, F. G. Meijer, and L. Iglesias, Phys. Scr. 34), 223 (1986). For the other J=0 levels, the average difference with experiment (A. Tauheed, M. S. Z. Chaghtai, and K. Rahimullah, Phys. Scr. 31), 369 (1985) is considerably greater. Our average energy errors for the 11 known ^2 J=1 levels is 233 cm-1, excluding the 5s 5p ^1 P level, which is 1580 cm-1 higher than observed ^2. We predict positions of 19 4p^5 4d^3 levels, as well as f values for the 360 transitions between the calculated levels. Gauge agreements are good for transitions with f > .01. Details of the methodology have been published elsewhere (D. R. Beck and L. Pan, Phys. Scr. 69), 91 (2004).

  4. Primary Care Provider Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Two Self-Management Support Programs for Vulnerable Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ratanawongsa, Neda; Bhandari, Vijay K; Handley, Margaret; Rundall, Thomas; Hammer, Hali; Schillinger, Dean

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care providers (PCPs) in safety net settings face barriers to optimizing care for patients with diabetes. We conducted this study to assess PCPs' perspectives on the effectiveness of two language-concordant diabetes self-management support programs. Methods One year postintervention, we surveyed PCPs whose patients with diabetes participated in a three-arm multiclinic randomized controlled trial comparing usual care (UC), weekly automated telephone self-management (ATSM) support with nurse care management, and monthly group medical visits (GMVs). We compared PCP perspectives on patient activation to create and achieve goals, quality of care, and barriers to care using regression models accounting for within-PCP clustering. Results Of 113 eligible PCPs caring for 330 enrolled patients, 87 PCPs (77%) responded to surveys about 245 (74%) enrolled patients. Intervention patients were more likely to be perceived by PCPs as activated to create and achieve goals for chronic care when compared with UC patients (standardized effect size, ATSM vs UC, +0.41, p = 0.01; GMV vs UC, +0.31, p = 0.05). Primary care providers rated quality of care as higher for patients exposed to ATSM compared to UC (odds ratio 3.6, p < 0.01). Compared with GMV patients, ATSM patients were more likely to be perceived by PCPs as overcoming barriers related to limited English proficiency (82% ATSM vs 44% GMV, p = 0.01) and managing medications (80% ATSM vs 53% GMV, p = 0.01). Conclusions Primary care providers perceived that patients receiving ATSM support had overcome barriers, participated more actively, and received higher quality diabetes care. These views of clinician stakeholders lend additional evidence for the potential to upscale ATSM more broadly to support PCPs in their care of diverse, multilinguistic populations. PMID:22401329

  5. Adalimumab in Patients with Active Noninfectious Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Glenn J; Dick, Andrew D; Brézin, Antoine P; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Thorne, Jennifer E; Kestelyn, Philippe; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin; Franco, Pablo; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Scales, David; Chu, David S; Camez, Anne; Kwatra, Nisha V; Song, Alexandra P; Kron, Martina; Tari, Samir; Suhler, Eric B

    2016-09-01

    Background Patients with noninfectious uveitis are at risk for long-term complications of uncontrolled inflammation, as well as for the adverse effects of long-term glucocorticoid therapy. We conducted a trial to assess the efficacy and safety of adalimumab as a glucocorticoid-sparing agent for the treatment of noninfectious uveitis. Methods This multinational phase 3 trial involved adults who had active noninfectious intermediate uveitis, posterior uveitis, or panuveitis despite having received prednisone treatment for 2 or more weeks. Investigators and patients were unaware of the study-group assignments. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive adalimumab (a loading dose of 80 mg followed by a dose of 40 mg every 2 weeks) or matched placebo. All patients received a mandatory prednisone burst followed by tapering of prednisone over the course of 15 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was the time to treatment failure occurring at or after week 6. Treatment failure was a multicomponent outcome that was based on assessment of new inflammatory lesions, best corrected visual acuity, anterior chamber cell grade, and vitreous haze grade. Nine ranked secondary efficacy end points were assessed, and adverse events were reported. Results The median time to treatment failure was 24 weeks in the adalimumab group and 13 weeks in the placebo group. Among the 217 patients in the intention-to-treat population, those receiving adalimumab were less likely than those in the placebo group to have treatment failure (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 0.70; P<0.001). Outcomes with regard to three secondary end points (change in anterior chamber cell grade, change in vitreous haze grade, and change in best corrected visual acuity) were significantly better in the adalimumab group than in the placebo group. Adverse events and serious adverse events were reported more frequently among patients who received adalimumab (1052.4 vs. 971.7 adverse events

  6. {sup 1}H NMR-based spectroscopy detects metabolic alterations in serum of patients with early-stage ulcerative colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Lin, Lianjie; Xu, Yanbin; Lin, Yan; Jin, Yu; Zheng, Changqing

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Twenty ulcerative colitis patients and nineteen healthy controls were enrolled. •Increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, phenylalanine, and decreased lipid were found. •We report early stage diagnosis of ulcerative colitis using NMR-based metabolomics. -- Abstract: Ulcerative colitis (UC) has seriously impaired the health of citizens. Accurate diagnosis of UC at an early stage is crucial to improve the efficiency of treatment and prognosis. In this study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR)-based metabolomic analysis was performed on serum samples collected from active UC patients (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 19), respectively. The obtained spectral profiles were subjected to multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that consistent metabolic alterations were present between the two groups. Compared to healthy controls, UC patients displayed increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, β-glucose, α-glucose, and phenylalanine, but decreased lipid in serum. These findings highlight the possibilities of NMR-based metabolomics as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for UC.

  7. 20 CFR 603.22 - What information must State UC agencies disclose for purposes of an IEVS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Mandatory Disclosure for Income and Eligibility Verification System...

  8. 20 CFR 603.23 - What information must State UC agencies obtain from other agencies, and crossmatch with wage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies... UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Mandatory Disclosure for Income and Eligibility Verification System (IEVS) § 603.23 What information must State...

  9. 20 CFR 603.22 - What information must State UC agencies disclose for purposes of an IEVS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Mandatory Disclosure for Income and Eligibility Verification System...

  10. 20 CFR 603.22 - What information must State UC agencies disclose for purposes of an IEVS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Mandatory Disclosure for Income and Eligibility Verification System...

  11. 20 CFR 603.23 - What information must State UC agencies obtain from other agencies, and crossmatch with wage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies... UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Mandatory Disclosure for Income and Eligibility Verification System (IEVS) § 603.23 What information must State...

  12. 20 CFR 603.22 - What information must State UC agencies disclose for purposes of an IEVS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Mandatory Disclosure for Income and Eligibility Verification System...

  13. 20 CFR 603.23 - What information must State UC agencies obtain from other agencies, and crossmatch with wage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies... UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Mandatory Disclosure for Income and Eligibility Verification System (IEVS) § 603.23 What information must State...

  14. 20 CFR 603.22 - What information must State UC agencies disclose for purposes of an IEVS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Mandatory Disclosure for Income and Eligibility Verification System...

  15. 20 CFR 603.23 - What information must State UC agencies obtain from other agencies, and crossmatch with wage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies... UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Mandatory Disclosure for Income and Eligibility Verification System (IEVS) § 603.23 What information must State...

  16. 20 CFR 603.23 - What information must State UC agencies obtain from other agencies, and crossmatch with wage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies... UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Mandatory Disclosure for Income and Eligibility Verification System (IEVS) § 603.23 What information must State...

  17. Evolution of spatial resolution in breast CT at UC Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Anthony Seibert, J.; Boone, John M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) technology for the purpose of breast cancer screening has been a focus of research at UC Davis since the late 1990s. Previous studies have shown that improvement in spatial resolution characteristics of this modality correlates with greater microcalcification detection, a factor considered a potential limitation of bCT. The aim of this study is to improve spatial resolution as characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) via changes in the scanner hardware components and operational schema. Methods: Four prototypes of pendant-geometry, cone-beam breast CT scanners were designed and developed spanning three generations of design evolution. To improve the system MTF in each bCT generation, modifications were made to the imaging components (x-ray tube and flat-panel detector), system geometry (source-to-isocenter and detector distance), and image acquisition parameters (technique factors, number of projections, system synchronization scheme, and gantry rotational speed). Results: Characterization of different generations of bCT systems shows these modifications resulted in a 188% improvement of the limiting MTF properties from the first to second generation and an additional 110% from the second to third. The intrinsic resolution degradation in the azimuthal direction observed in the first generation was corrected by changing the acquisition from continuous to pulsed x-ray acquisition. Utilizing a high resolution detector in the third generation, along with modifications made in system geometry and scan protocol, resulted in a 125% improvement in limiting resolution. An additional 39% improvement was obtained by changing the detector binning mode from 2 × 2 to 1 × 1. Conclusions: These results underscore the advancement in spatial resolution characteristics of breast CT technology. The combined use of a pulsed x-ray system, higher resolution flat-panel detector and changing the scanner geometry and image

  18. Evolution of spatial resolution in breast CT at UC Davis

    PubMed Central

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Anthony Seibert, J.; Boone, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) technology for the purpose of breast cancer screening has been a focus of research at UC Davis since the late 1990s. Previous studies have shown that improvement in spatial resolution characteristics of this modality correlates with greater microcalcification detection, a factor considered a potential limitation of bCT. The aim of this study is to improve spatial resolution as characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) via changes in the scanner hardware components and operational schema. Methods: Four prototypes of pendant-geometry, cone-beam breast CT scanners were designed and developed spanning three generations of design evolution. To improve the system MTF in each bCT generation, modifications were made to the imaging components (x-ray tube and flat-panel detector), system geometry (source-to-isocenter and detector distance), and image acquisition parameters (technique factors, number of projections, system synchronization scheme, and gantry rotational speed). Results: Characterization of different generations of bCT systems shows these modifications resulted in a 188% improvement of the limiting MTF properties from the first to second generation and an additional 110% from the second to third. The intrinsic resolution degradation in the azimuthal direction observed in the first generation was corrected by changing the acquisition from continuous to pulsed x-ray acquisition. Utilizing a high resolution detector in the third generation, along with modifications made in system geometry and scan protocol, resulted in a 125% improvement in limiting resolution. An additional 39% improvement was obtained by changing the detector binning mode from 2 × 2 to 1 × 1. Conclusions: These results underscore the advancement in spatial resolution characteristics of breast CT technology. The combined use of a pulsed x-ray system, higher resolution flat-panel detector and changing the scanner geometry and image

  19. Four-Year Maintenance Treatment With Adalimumab in Patients with Moderately to Severely Active Ulcerative Colitis: Data from ULTRA 1, 2, and 3

    PubMed Central

    Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sandborn, William J; Ghosh, Subrata; Wolf, Douglas C; Panaccione, Remo; Feagan, Brian; Reinisch, Walter; Robinson, Anne M; Lazar, Andreas; Kron, Martina; Huang, Bidan; Skup, Martha; Thakkar, Roopal B

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The safety and efficacy of adalimumab for patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) has been reported up to week 52 from the placebo-controlled trials ULTRA (Ulcerative Colitis Long-Term Remission and Maintenance with Adalimumab) 1 and 2. Up to 4 years of data for adalimumab-treated patients from ULTRA 1, 2, and the open-label extension ULTRA 3 are presented. METHODS: Remission per partial Mayo score, remission per Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ) score, and mucosal healing rates were assessed in adalimumab-randomized patients from ULTRA 1 and 2 up to week 208. Corticosteroid-free remission was assessed in adalimumab-randomized patients who used corticosteroids at lead-in study baseline. Maintenance of remission per partial Mayo score and mucosal healing was assessed in patients who entered ULTRA 3 in remission per full Mayo score and with mucosal healing, respectively. As observed, last observation carried forward (LOCF) and nonresponder imputation (NRI) were used to report efficacy. Adverse events were reported for any adalimumab-treated patient. RESULTS: A total of 600/1,094 patients enrolled in ULTRA 1 or 2 were randomized to receive adalimumab and included in the intent-to-treat analyses of the studies. Of these, 199 patients remained on adalimumab after 4 years of follow-up. Rates of remission per partial Mayo score, remission per IBDQ score, mucosal healing, and corticosteroid discontinuation at week 208 were 24.7%, 26.3%, 27.7% (NRI), and 59.2% (observed), respectively. Of the patients who were followed up in ULTRA 3 (588/1,094), a total of 360 patients remained on adalimumab 3 years later. Remission per partial Mayo score and mucosal healing after ULTRA 1 or 2 to year 3 of ULTRA 3 were maintained by 63.6% and 59.9% of patients, respectively (NRI). Adverse event rates were stable over time. CONCLUSIONS: Remission, mucosal healing, and improved quality of life were maintained in patients with moderately to

  20. High Intestinal and Systemic Levels of Interleukin-23/T-Helper 17 Pathway in Chinese Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Huang, Sha; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Shufang; Yi, Fengming; Xia, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-23/T-helper 17 (IL-23/Th17) pathway plays a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but little is known about its expression in Chinese population. In this study, we investigated the mRNA and protein levels of IL-12p40, tumor necrosis factor-like cytokine 1A (TL1A), Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), and IL-23R both locally and systemically in Chinese IBD patients. Our results indicated that the mRNA levels of IL-12p40 and TL1A were increased in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. Furthermore, serum IL-12p40 and TL1A levels were higher in active UC patients, especially in patients with disease course less than 1.25 years or initial onset. No correlation was found between the genotype and serum levels of IL-12p40 or TL1A in UC patients. Additionally, the mRNA and protein expression of JAK2 and IL-23R were increased in UC and Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Taken together, our results provided evidence that IL-23/Th17 pathway genes may represent important biomarkers of active stage of IBD and serve as novel therapeutic targets for IBD in Chinese population. PMID:24382939

  1. Undenatured type II collagen (UC-II®) for joint support: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background UC-II contains a patented form of undenatured type II collagen derived from chicken sternum. Previous preclinical and clinical studies support the safety and efficacy of UC-II in modulating joint discomfort in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of UC-II in moderating joint function and joint pain due to strenuous exercise in healthy subjects. Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in healthy subjects who had no prior history of arthritic disease or joint pain at rest but experienced joint discomfort with physical activity. Fifty-five subjects who reported knee pain after participating in a standardized stepmill performance test were randomized to receive placebo (n = 28) or the UC-II (40 mg daily, n = 27) product for 120 days. Joint function was assessed by changes in degree of knee flexion and knee extension as well as measuring the time to experiencing and recovering from joint pain following strenuous stepmill exertion. Results After 120 days of supplementation, subjects in the UC-II group exhibited a statistically significant improvement in average knee extension compared to placebo (81.0 ± 1.3º vs 74.0 ± 2.2º; p = 0.011) and to baseline (81.0 ± 1.3º vs 73.2 ± 1.9º; p = 0.002). The UC-II cohort also demonstrated a statistically significant change in average knee extension at day 90 (78.8 ± 1.9º vs 73.2 ± 1.9º; p = 0.045) versus baseline. No significant change in knee extension was observed in the placebo group at any time. It was also noted that the UC-II group exercised longer before experiencing any initial joint discomfort at day 120 (2.8 ± 0.5 min, p = 0.019), compared to baseline (1.4 ± 0.2 min). By contrast, no significant changes were seen in the placebo group. No product related adverse events were observed during the study. At study conclusion, five

  2. 46 CFR 54.25-3 - Steel plates (modifies UCS-6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) will be allowed only in Class III pressure vessels (see Table 54.01-5(b)). ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). 54.25-3 Section 54.25-3... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-3 Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). The...

  3. 46 CFR 54.25-3 - Steel plates (modifies UCS-6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) will be allowed only in Class III pressure vessels (see table 54.01-5(b)). ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). 54.25-3 Section 54.25-3... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-3 Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). The...

  4. 46 CFR 54.25-3 - Steel plates (modifies UCS-6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) will be allowed only in Class III pressure vessels (see Table 54.01-5(b)). ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). 54.25-3 Section 54.25-3... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-3 Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). The...

  5. 46 CFR 54.25-3 - Steel plates (modifies UCS-6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) will be allowed only in Class III pressure vessels (see Table 54.01-5(b)). ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). 54.25-3 Section 54.25-3... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-3 Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). The...

  6. 46 CFR 54.25-3 - Steel plates (modifies UCS-6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) will be allowed only in Class III pressure vessels (see table 54.01-5(b)). ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). 54.25-3 Section 54.25-3... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-3 Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). The...

  7. Experimental study of UC polycrystals in the prospect of improving the as-fabricated sample purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveu, Gaëlle; Martin, Guillaume; Fiquet, Olivier; Garcia, Philippe; Carlot, Gaëlle; Palancher, Hervé; Bonnin, Anne; Khodja, Hicham; Raepsaet, Caroline; Sauvage, Thierry; Barthe, Marie-France

    2014-12-01

    Uranium and plutonium carbides are candidate fuels for Generation IV nuclear reactors. This study is focused on the characterization of uranium monocarbide samples. The successive fabrication steps were carried out under atmospheres containing low oxygen and moisture concentrations (typically less than 100 ppm) but sample transfers occurred in air. Six samples were sliced from four pellets elaborated by carbothermic reaction under vacuum. Little presence of UC2 is expected in these samples. The α-UC2 phase was indeed detected within one of these UC samples during an XRD experiment performed with synchrotron radiation. Moreover, oxygen content at the surface of these samples was depth profiled using a recently developed nuclear reaction analysis method. Large oxygen concentrations were measured in the first micron below the sample surface and particularly in the first 100-150 nm. UC2 inclusions were found to be more oxidized than the surrounding matrix. This work points out to the fact that more care must be given at each step of UC fabrication since the material readily reacts with oxygen and moisture. A new glovebox facility using a highly purified atmosphere is currently being built in order to obtain single phase UC samples of better purity.

  8. Contamination and harm relevant UCS-expectancy bias in spider phobic individuals: influence of treatment.

    PubMed

    van Overveld, Mark; de Jong, Peter J; Huijding, Jorg; Peters, Madelon L

    2010-01-01

    Phobic individuals expect aversive UCS's following encounters with phobic stimuli. Previous research using a thought-experiment procedure showed that contamination rather than harm-related outcome expectancies differentiated best between high and low spider fearful undergraduates. This study investigated the alleged role of these UCS-expectancy biases in the maintenance of phobic complaints. First, this study sought to replicate these earlier findings in a community sample of high spider fearful individuals who applied for treatment (n = 60) and a sample of low spider fear controls (n = 30). Second, the present study tested if UCS-expectancies disappear following successful treatment and whether there were any differences between harm and contamination-related UCS expectancies in this respect. If contamination- and/or harm-related UCS-expectancy biases play a critical role in the maintenance of spider fear, these biases should be substantially reduced after successful treatment. The results showed that spider fearful individuals associated spiders relatively strongly with both harm- and contamination-related outcomes. Consistent with the alleged reciprocal relationship between phobic fear and UCS expectancy bias, both types of biased expectancies were effectively reduced following treatment.

  9. Exploring Contextual Factors and Patient Activation: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of Patients with Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie; Mortensen, Karoline; Bloodworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Patient activation has been considered as a "blockbuster drug of the century." Patients with mental disorders are less activated compared to patients with other chronic diseases. Low activation due to mental disorders can affect the efficiency of treatment of other comorbidities. Contextual factors are significantly associated with…

  10. Comparative therapeutic efficacy and safety of type-II collagen (UC-II), glucosamine and chondroitin in arthritic dogs: pain evaluation by ground force plate.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R C; Canerdy, T D; Lindley, J; Konemann, M; Minniear, J; Carroll, B A; Hendrick, C; Goad, J T; Rohde, K; Doss, R; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2012-10-01

    The investigation was conducted on client-owned moderately arthritic dogs with two objectives: (i) to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of type-II collagen (UC-II) alone or in combination with glucosamine hydrochloride (GLU) and chondroitin sulphate (CHO), and (ii) to determine their tolerability and safety. Dogs in four groups (n = 7-10), were treated daily for a period of 150 days with placebo (Group-I), 10 mg active UC-II (Group-II), 2000 mg GLU + 1600 mg CHO (Group-III), and UC-II + GLU + CHO (Group-IV). On a monthly basis, dogs were evaluated for observational pain (overall pain, pain upon limb manipulation, and pain after physical exertion) using different numeric scales. Pain level was also measured objectively using piezoelectric sensor-based GFP for peak vertical force and impulse area. Dogs were also examined every month for physical, hepatic (ALP, ALT and bilirubin) and renal (BUN and creatinine) functions. Based on observations, significant (p < 0.05) reduction in pain was noted in Group-II, III, and IV dogs. Using GFP, significant increases in peak vertical force (N/kg body wt) and impulse area (N s/kg body wt), indicative of a decrease in arthritis associated pain, were observed in Group-II dogs only. None of the dogs in any group showed changes in physical, hepatic or renal functions. In conclusion, based on GFP data, moderately arthritic dogs treated with UC-II (10 mg) showed a marked reduction in arthritic pain with maximum improvement by day 150. UC-II, GLU and CHO operate through different mechanisms of action, and were well tolerated over a period of 150 days. PMID:21623931

  11. UNC-45/CRO1/She4p (UCS) protein forms elongated dimer and joins two myosin heads near their actin binding region

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hang; Blobel, Günter

    2010-01-01

    UNC-45/CRO1/She4p (UCS) proteins have variously been proposed to affect the folding, stability, and ATPase activity of myosins. They are the only proteins known to interact directly with the motor domain. To gain more insight into UCS function, we determined the atomic structure of the yeast UCS protein, She4p, at 2.9 Å resolution. We found that 16 helical repeats are organized into an L-shaped superhelix with an amphipathic N-terminal helix dangling off the short arm of the L-shaped molecule. In the crystal, She4p forms a 193-Å-long, zigzag-shaped dimer through three distinct and evolutionary conserved interfaces. We have identified She4p’s C-terminal region as a ligand for a 27-residue-long epitope on the myosin motor domain. Remarkably, this region consists of two adjacent, but distinct, binding epitopes localized at the nucleotide-responsive cleft between the nucleotide- and actin-filament-binding sites. One epitope is situated inside the cleft, the other outside the cleft. After ATP hydrolysis and Pi ejection, the cleft narrows at its base from 20 to 12 Å thereby occluding the inside the cleft epitope, while leaving the adjacent, outside the cleft binding epitope accessible to UCS binding. Hence, one cycle of higher and lower binding affinity would accompany one ATP hydrolysis cycle and a single step in the walk on an actin filament rope. We propose that a UCS dimer links two myosins at their motor domains and thereby functions as one of the determinants for step size of myosin on actin filaments. PMID:21115842

  12. Alterations of pulmonary function in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiao-Qing; Ji, Yan-Bo; Wang, Shan-Xin; Zhang, Cai-Qing; Lu, De-Gan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and their relationship with disease activity in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). METHODS: Sixty-four IBD patients (31 Crohn's disease [CD] and 33 ulcerative colitis [UC]) and thirty healthy individuals (controls) were studied with regard to the following parameters of PFTs: Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), their ratio, mid-forced expiratory flow of 25–75% (FEF 25–75), residual volume, total lung capacity, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO). The disease activity was calculated using the Crohn's Disease Activity Index for CD and Mayo Clinic Score for UC. Correlation analysis was performed between disease activity and sputum cytology and PFTs. RESULTS: Nineteen of the 31 CD patients (61.29%) and 17 of the 33 UC patients (51.52%) but none of the controls showed at least one abnormal PFTs (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, both CD and UC patients exhibited a significant reduction in FEV1 (P < 0.05), FVC (P < 0.05), FEF 25–75 (P < 0.05), and DLCO (P < 0.05). The majority with decreased measurements of PFTs were in the active phase of diseases (P < 0.05). IBD activity scores correlated negatively with some parameters of PFTs and positively with lymphocytosis and eosinophilia of sputum (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary function disorders are significantly common in IBD patients. The impairment in active disease is significantly greater than in remission. PMID:27803750

  13. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose–response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-only groups as often as desired). Results add to the growing literature documenting better health care experiences among more activated patients, and suggest that patient activation may play an important role in promoting engagement with mental health care. PMID:25917224

  14. Bilberry-Derived Anthocyanins Modulate Cytokine Expression in the Intestine of Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Gottier, Claudia; Biedermann, Luc; Zeitz, Jonas; Lang, Silvia; Weber, Achim; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims We previously demonstrated that anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract (ARBE) inhibits IFN-γ-induced signalling and downstream effects in human monocytic cells and ameliorates disease activity in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms of ARBE-mediated effects in vitro and by analysing colonic tissue and serum samples of UC patients treated with an oral anthocyanin-rich bilberry preparation during an open label clinical trial. Methods Colon specimens obtained during an open pilot study using ARBE for the treatment of mild-to-moderate UC were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Cytokine levels in patients’ serum were quantified by ELISA. Cell culture experiments were performed using THP-1 monocytic cells. Results ARBE treatment inhibited the expression of IFN-γ-receptor 2 in human THP-1 monocytic cells. Colon biopsies of UC patients who responded to the 6-week long ARBE treatment revealed reduced amounts of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α. Levels of phosphorylated (activated) p65-NF-κB were reduced in these patients. Further, patients with successful ARBE treatment featured enhanced levels of Th17-cell specific cytokine IL-22 and immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10 as well as reduced serum levels of TNF-α and MCP-1, but enhanced levels of IL-17A, in contrast to patients that did not reach remission after ARBE treatment. Conclusions Our data suggest a molecular mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of ARBE treatment in UC patients by modulating T-cell cytokine signalling and inhibiting IFN-γ signal transduction. These data are of particular interest, since ARBE is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of IBD. PMID:27152519

  15. Uptake and excretion of ( UC)methyl bromide as influenced by exposure concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Dutcher, J.S.; Bond, J.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Snipes, M.B.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Cheng, Y.S.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Uptake of methyl bromide and pathways for excretion of UC were investigated in male Fischer-344 rats after nose-only inhalation of 50, 300, 5700, or 10,400 nmol (1.6 to 310 ppm) of ( UC)methyl bromide/liter of air for 6 hr. Fractional uptake of methyl bromide decreased at the highest concentrations, 5700 and 10,400 nmol/liter, with 37 and 27% of the inhaled methyl bromide absorbed, respectively, compared to 48% at the lower levels. Total methyl bromide absorbed was 9 or 40 mol/kg body wt after exposure to 50 or 300 nmol/liter, respectively. Elimination of UC was linearly related to the amount of methyl bromide absorbed as determined from urine, feces, expired CO2, and parent compound collected for 66 hr after the end of exposure. Exhaled UCO2 was the dominant route of excretion, with from 1.2 to 110 mol (50% of amount absorbed) exhaled, and was described by a two-component negative exponential function; 85% was exhaled with t1/2 of 4 hr, and the remaining 15% was exhaled with a t1/2 of 17 hr. The rate of exhalation of UCO2 was not affected by the amount of ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed. From 0.4 to 54 mol was excreted in urine (20% of amount absorbed). The half-time for excretion of UC in urine was approximately 10 hr, and the rate of excretion was not dependent on the amount of ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed. Little UC was exhaled as methyl bromide (<4% of the dose) or excreted in feces (<2%). At the end of 66 hr, 25% of the UC absorbed remained in the rats. Liver, kidneys, adrenals, lungs, thymus, and turbinates (maxilloturbinates, ethmoturbinates, and nasal epithelial membrane) contained the highest concentrations of UC. Results indicated that uptake of inhaled methyl bromide could be saturated. Any ( UC)methyl bromide equivalents absorbed, however, would be excreted by concentration-independent mechanisms. 20 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Decreased total and corrected antioxidant capacity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Koutroubakis, Ioannis E; Malliaraki, Niki; Dimoulios, Philippos D; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Castanas, Elias; Kouroumalis, Elias A

    2004-09-01

    Oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidants may play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related intestinal damage. A new automated assay for the determination of blood total antioxidant capacity (TAC), based on the crocin bleaching method, has been used for the measurement of TAC and corrected TAC (cTAC) in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in comparison to healthy controls (HC). Ninety-four patients with UC, 97 patients with CD, and 72 HC were included in this study. Serum TAC was measured in all patients and controls on an Olympus AU-600 chemistry analyzer using a TAC kit. cTAC was calculated from TAC after subtraction of the interactions due to endogenous uric acid, bilirubin and albumin. Mean serum TAC as well as cTAC levels were significantly lower in both UC and CD patients compared with HC (P < 0.0001). Patients with active UC had no different TAC and cTAC compared to those with inactive disease. Patients with active CD had significantly lower mean TAC compared to those with inactive disease but cTAC was not different between the two phases of disease activity. Patients with proctitis had significantly higher TAC and cTAC compared to patients with left-sided colitis and total colitis. In CD patients no association between disease localization and these markers was found. TAC and cTAC are significantly reduced in IBD patients compared with controls irrespective of disease activity. The decreased antioxidant defenses may be a primary phenomenon severely compromising the mucosa and therefore increase susceptibility to oxidative tissue damage.

  17. Narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy for Peyer's patches is useful in predicting the recurrence of remissive patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hiyama, Satoshi; Kawai, Syoichiro; Mukai, Akira; Shiraishi, Eri; Iwatani, Shuko; Yamaguchi, Toshio; Araki, Manabu; Hayashi, Yoshito; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Peyer's patches (PPs) are aggregates of lymphoid follicles that are mainly located in the distal ileum; they play a major role in mucosal immunity. We recently reported that patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have alterations in PPs that can be detected using narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME). However, the usefulness of NBI-ME in UC treatment as a whole is still unknown. Methods We collected NBI-ME images of PPs from 67 UC patients who had undergone ileocolonoscopy. We evaluated changes in the villi using the "villi index," which is based on three categories: irregular formation, hyperemia, and altered vascular network pattern. The patients were divided into two groups on the basis of villi index: low (L)- and high (H)-types. We then determined the correlation between morphological alteration of the PPs and various clinical characteristics. In 52 patients who were in clinical remission, we also analyzed the correlation between NBI-ME findings of PPs and clinical recurrence. Results The time to clinical recurrence was significantly shorter in remissive UC patients with H-type PPs than in those with L-type PPs (P<0.01). Moreover, PP alterations were not correlated with age, sex, disease duration, clinical activity, endoscopic score, or extent of disease involvement. Multivariate analysis revealed that the existence of H-type PPs was an independent risk factor for clinical recurrence (hazard ratio, 3.3; P<0.01). Conclusions UC patients with morphological alterations in PPs were at high risk of clinical relapse. Therefore, to predict the clinical course of UC, it may be useful to evaluate NBI-ME images of PPs. PMID:27799882

  18. Long-term alteration of intestinal microbiota in patients with ulcerative colitis by antibiotic combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Kajiura, Takayuki; Shinozaki, Junko; Suzuki, Manabu; Saito, Keisuke; Takakura, Kazuki; Tsukinaga, Shintaro; Odahara, Shunichi; Yukawa, Toyokazu; Mitobe, Jimi; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that intestinal bacteria, such as Fusobacterium varium (F. varium), contribute to the clinical activity in ulcerative colitis (UC); thus, an antibiotic combination therapy (amoxicillin, tetracycline, and metronidazole (ATM)) against F. varium can induce and maintain UC remission. Therefore, we investigated whether ATM therapy induces a long-term alteration of intestinal microbiota in patients with UC. Patients with UC were enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Biopsy samples at the beginning of the trial and again at 3 months after treatment completion were randomly obtained from 20 patients. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) in mucosa-associated bacterial components was examined to assess the alteration of the intestinal microbiota. Profile changes of T-RFLP in mucosa-associated bacterial components were found in 10 of 12 patients in the treatment group and in none of 8 in the placebo group. Dice similarity coefficients using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages (Dice-UPGMA) confirmed that the similarity of mucosal microbiota from the descending colon was significantly decreased after the ATM therapy, and this change was maintained for at least 3 months. Moreover, at 3 months after treatment completion, the F. varium/β-actin ratio, examined by real-time PCR using nested PCR products from biopsy samples, was reduced less than 40% in 8 of 12 treated patients, which was higher, but not significantly, than in 4 of 8 patients in the placebo group. Together, these results suggest that ATM therapy induces long-term alterations in the intestinal microbiota of patients with UC, which may be associated, at least in part, with clinical effects of the therapy. PMID:24489770

  19. Long-Term Alteration of Intestinal Microbiota in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis by Antibiotic Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Kajiura, Takayuki; Shinozaki, Junko; Suzuki, Manabu; Saito, Keisuke; Takakura, Kazuki; Tsukinaga, Shintaro; Odahara, Shunichi; Yukawa, Toyokazu; Mitobe, Jimi; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that intestinal bacteria, such as Fusobacterium varium (F. varium), contribute to the clinical activity in ulcerative colitis (UC); thus, an antibiotic combination therapy (amoxicillin, tetracycline, and metronidazole (ATM)) against F. varium can induce and maintain UC remission. Therefore, we investigated whether ATM therapy induces a long-term alteration of intestinal microbiota in patients with UC. Patients with UC were enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Biopsy samples at the beginning of the trial and again at 3 months after treatment completion were randomly obtained from 20 patients. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) in mucosa-associated bacterial components was examined to assess the alteration of the intestinal microbiota. Profile changes of T-RFLP in mucosa-associated bacterial components were found in 10 of 12 patients in the treatment group and in none of 8 in the placebo group. Dice similarity coefficients using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages (Dice-UPGMA) confirmed that the similarity of mucosal microbiota from the descending colon was significantly decreased after the ATM therapy, and this change was maintained for at least 3 months. Moreover, at 3 months after treatment completion, the F. varium/β-actin ratio, examined by real-time PCR using nested PCR products from biopsy samples, was reduced less than 40% in 8 of 12 treated patients, which was higher, but not significantly, than in 4 of 8 patients in the placebo group. Together, these results suggest that ATM therapy induces long-term alterations in the intestinal microbiota of patients with UC, which may be associated, at least in part, with clinical effects of the therapy. PMID:24489770

  20. Correlation Between Sunspot Number and Ca uc(ii) K Emission Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, Luca; Pevtsov, Alexei; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-06-01

    Long-term synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca uc(ii) K constitute a fundamental database for a variety of retrospective analyses of the state of the solar magnetism. Synoptic Ca uc(ii) K observations began in late 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory in India. In the early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca uc(ii) K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility. These different data sets can be combined into a single disk-integrated Ca uc(ii) K index time series that describes the average properties of the chromospheric emission over several solar cycles. We present such a Ca uc(ii) K composite and discuss its correlation with the new entirely revised sunspot number data series. For this preliminary investigation, the scaling factor between pairs of time series was determined assuming a simple linear model for the relationship between the monthly mean values during the duration of overlapping observations.

  1. Paraoxonase-1 and arylesterase activities in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Cigdem Usul; Gunaldı, Meral; Okuturlar, Yıldız; Gedikbası, Asuman; Tiken, Elif Eda; Kahraman, Sibel; Karaca, Feryal; Ercolak, Vehbi; Karabulut, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and arylesterase (ARE) activities and oxidative stress status in patients with colorectal carcinomas (CRC). Materials and methods: Thirty-three patients (20 male, 13 female) with CRC and 30 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were obtained from the CRC patients before adjuvant therapy. Serum samples from CRC patients and healthy controls were analyzed for PON1 and ARE activities. Results: The PON1 and ARE activities of the patients with CRC were significantly higher compared to those of the control group (PON1 activity is 125.35±20.07 U/L for CRC patients and 1.22±0.48 U/L for control group, P<0.001; ARE activity is 160.76±10.79 U/L for CRC patients). ARE levels showed a positive correlation with smoking status (P=0.04). PON1 activity was higher in colon carcinoma patients (135.95±19.3 U/L) rather than rectal carcinoma patients (97.08±5.24 U/L) but it was not statistically significant (P=0.72). Conclusion: Serum PON1 activity is increased in patients with CRC, and serum ARE levels showed a positive correlation with smoking status. PON1 activity was higher in colon carcinoma patients. There is no other study in literature investigating these activities for CRC patients. It should be reevaluated by larger clinical trials. PMID:26885111

  2. Exploring Patient Activation in the Clinic: Measurement from Three Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Christy J. W.; Ledford, Christopher C.; Childress, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To further conceptualize and operationalize patient activation (PA), using measures from patient, physician, and researcher perspectives. Data Source/Study Setting. Multimethod observation in 2010 within a family medicine clinic. Study Design. Part of an intervention with 130 patients with type 2 diabetes, this observational study…

  3. Heart disease and physical activity: looking beyond patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Chris M

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) adherence is a problem that has plagued cardiovascular disease patients for years. Because of this, researchers have advocated for the identification of key theoretical correlates that can be used to guide PA intervention development. The present review will identify key PA correlates for these patients and provide subsequent recommendations to look beyond patient-level correlates.

  4. Commercial filming of patient care activities in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Geiderman, Joel M; Larkin, Gregory L

    2002-07-17

    Commercial filming of patient care activities is common in hospital settings. This article reviews common circumstances in which patients are commercially filmed, explores the potential positive and negative aspects of filming, and considers the ethical and legal issues associated with commercial filming of patients in hospital settings. We examine the competing goals of commercial filming and the duties of journalists vs the rights of patients to privacy. Current standards and recommendations for commercial filming of patient care activities are reviewed and additional recommendations are offered.

  5. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs.

  6. Uridine Composition of the Poly-U/UC Tract of HCV RNA Defines Non-Self Recognition by RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Gretja; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Gale, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Viral infection of mammalian cells triggers the innate immune response through non-self recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in viral nucleic acid. Accurate PAMP discrimination is essential to avoid self recognition that can generate autoimmunity, and therefore should be facilitated by the presence of multiple motifs in a PAMP that mark it as non-self. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA is recognized as non-self by RIG-I through the presence of a 5′-triphosphate (5′-ppp) on the viral RNA in association with a 3′ poly-U/UC tract. Here we define the HCV PAMP and the criteria for RIG-I non-self discrimination of HCV by examining the RNA structure-function attributes that impart PAMP function to the poly-U/UC tract. We found that the 34 nucleotide poly-uridine “core” of this sequence tract was essential for RIG-I activation, and that interspersed ribocytosine nucleotides between poly-U sequences in the RNA were required to achieve optimal RIG-I signal induction. 5′-ppp poly-U/UC RNA variants that stimulated strong RIG-I activation efficiently bound purified RIG-I protein in vitro, and RNA interaction with both the repressor domain and helicase domain of RIG-I was required to activate signaling. When appended to 5′-ppp RNA that lacks PAMP activity, the poly-U/UC U-core sequence conferred non-self recognition of the RNA and innate immune signaling by RIG-I. Importantly, HCV poly-U/UC RNA variants that strongly activated RIG-I signaling triggered potent anti-HCV responses in vitro and hepatic innate immune responses in vivo using a mouse model of PAMP signaling. These studies define a multi-motif PAMP signature of non-self recognition by RIG-I that incorporates a 5′-ppp with poly-uridine sequence composition and length. This HCV PAMP motif drives potent RIG-I signaling to induce the innate immune response to infection. Our studies define a basis of non-self discrimination by RIG-I and offer insights into the antiviral therapeutic

  7. Sports, Physical Activity and Patient-Reported Outcomes After Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty in Young Patients.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tilman; Streit, Julia; Gotterbarm, Tobias; Bruckner, Thomas; Merle, Christian; Streit, Marcus R

    2015-11-01

    One hundred-and-one patients age 60 or younger following medial mobile bearing UKA were reviewed retrospectively with a minimum follow-up of 2 years using the Schulthess activity score, Tegner, UCLA and SF-36 score to assess their level of physical activity and quality of life. Patients showed a rapid recovery and resumption of their activities with a return-to-activity rate of 93%. Most common activities were low impact, whereas high-impact activities showed a significant decrease. Precaution was found to be the main reason for a decrease in the level of activity. The results of this study demonstrate that patients age 60 or younger following medial UKA were able to return to regular physical activities with almost two-thirds of the patients reaching a high activity level (UCLA≥7).

  8. Circulating levels of non-phosphorylated undercarboxylated matrix Gla protein are associated with disease severity in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ueland, Thor; Dahl, Christen P; Gullestad, Lars; Aakhus, Svend; Broch, Kaspar; Skårdal, Rita; Vermeer, Cees; Aukrust, Pål; Schurgers, Leon J

    2011-08-01

    We recently demonstrated that circulating MGP [matrix Gla (γ-carboxylated glutamate) protein] levels were associated with left ventricular dysfunction and increased mortality in patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis. We hypothesized that patients with chronic HF (heart failure) would have dysregulated MGP levels. We examined plasma dp-cMGP (non-phosphorylated carboxylated MGP) and dp-ucMGP (non-phosphorylated undercarboxylated MGP) in 179 patients with chronic HF and matched healthy controls as well as the relationship between MGP and cardiac dysfunction as assessed by echocardiographic measurements, inflammation [CRP (C-reactive protein)] and neurohormonal activation [NT-proBNP (N-terminal proB-type natriuretic peptide)] and the prognostic value of MGP levels in relation to mortality in these patients. We found markedly enhanced plasma dp-cMGP and, in particular, of dp-ucMGP in chronic HF with increasing levels with disease severity. Elevated MGP species were associated with ischaemic aetiology, increased CRP and NT-proBNP levels, as well as systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Finally, dp-ucMGP was associated with long-term heart transplant-free survival (n=48) in univariate, but not in multivariate, analysis. However, plasma dp-ucMGP was markedly higher in patients who died because of progression of HF (n=12) and gave prognostic information also in multivariate analysis. In conclusion, a dysregulated MGP system could be involved in left ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic HF.

  9. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A+B+ strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  10. Effects of an Individualized Activity Program on Elderly Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Carlota de Lerma; Salter, Charles A.

    1975-01-01

    A combined program of Reality Orientation, Activities of Daily Living, and Recreational Activities, together with environmental stimulation, was applied on an individualized basis to 21 elderly patients suffering from both psychological disorders and long-term physical illness. The motivation to participate in the available activities increased…

  11. Selenoprotein expression in Hürthle cell carcinomas and in the human Hürthle cell carcinoma line XTC.UC1.

    PubMed

    Menth, Marianne; Schmutzler, Cornelia; Mentrup, Birgit; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Honjoh, Tsutomu; Köhrle, Josef

    2005-05-01

    Hürthle cell carcinomas (HTC) are characterized by mitochondrial amplification and enhanced oxygen metabolism. To clarify if defects in enzymes scavenging reactive oxygen species are involved in the pathogenesis of HTC, we analyzed selenium (Se)-dependent expression of various detoxifying selenoproteins in the HTC cell line XTC.UC1. Glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase activity was found both in cell lysates and conditioned media of XTC.UC1 cells and was increased by Na(2)SeO(3). Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of thioredoxin reductase both in cell lysates and conditioned media and of glutathione peroxidase 3 in conditioned media. Type I 5'-deiodinase, another selenoprotein that catalyzes thyroid hormone metabolism, was detectable only in cell lysates by enzyme assay and Western blot, and responded to stimulation by both Na(2)SeO(3) and retinoic acid. A selenoprotein P signal was detected in conditioned media by Western blot, but was not enhanced by Na(2)SeO(3) treatment. In situ hybridization revealed glutathione peroxidase mRNAs in HTC specimen; glutathione peroxidase 3 mRNA levels were reduced. These data suggest adequate expression and Se-dependent regulation of a couple of selenoproteins involved in antioxidant defense and thyroid hormone metabolism in XTC.UC1 cells, so far giving no evidence of a role of these proteins in the pathogenesis of HTCs.

  12. Recommendations for physical activity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Petajan, J H; White, A T

    1999-03-01

    For many years, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, have been advised to avoid exercise. MS is believed to be autoimmune in origin, mediated by activated T cells which penetrate the blood-brain barrier and attack myelin. The pathophysiology, with respect to function is an impairment of saltatory conduction, specifically, slowing of conduction speed and/or conduction block. Symptoms can temporarily worsen on exposure to heat or during physical exercise. Exercise programmes must be designed to activate working muscles but avoid overload that results in conduction block. Fatigue, often severe, affects about 85% of MS patients and, along with motor and sensory symptoms, results in decreased mobility and reduced quality of life. Physical activity and recreation are reduced in patients with MS. Before developing recommendations, physical activity patterns and the physical effects of MS should be assessed in individual patients. Patients may then be functionally classified. Physical activity can also be classified in a pyramid structure, with the most basic functions forming the base and the most integrated functions on top. The muscular fitness pyramid progresses through passive range of motion, active resistive, specific strengthening and integrated strength exercises Overall physical activity may be increased according to functional level by performing activities of daily living, incorporating inefficiencies into daily living, pursuing more active recreation and eventually developing a structured exercise programme. The importance of the proper exercise environment, balance and coordination issues and factors related to adherence are discussed. PMID:10222541

  13. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior…

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sporogenes Strain UC9000 Isolated from Raw Milk

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, Angela; Zotta, Teresa; Orrù, Luigi; Lamontanara, Antonella; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a causative agent of food spoilage and is often used as the nontoxigenic surrogate for Clostridium botulinum. Here, we described the draft genome sequence and annotation of C. sporogenes strain UC9000 isolated from raw milk. PMID:27081128

  15. The Graduates of 1983 and 1973: Their Postgraduate Studies, Occupations, and Impressions of UC Davis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunziker, Celeste M.

    Postgraduate education, employment, and attitudes of 1973 and 1983 graduates of the University of California, Davis, (UC Davis) were surveyed in 1984. Responses were received from 60% of 1983 bachelor's degree recipients and 48% of 1973 graduates. Findings include: one-third of baccalaureate degree holders enrolled immediately in a postgraduate…

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sporogenes Strain UC9000 Isolated from Raw Milk.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Angela; Bassi, Daniela; Zotta, Teresa; Orrù, Luigi; Lamontanara, Antonella; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenesis a causative agent of food spoilage and is often used as the nontoxigenic surrogate forClostridium botulinum Here, we described the draft genome sequence and annotation ofC. sporogenesstrain UC9000 isolated from raw milk. PMID:27081128

  17. Enrollment and Graduation Patterns of Undergraduates Transferring to UC Davis: 1984-1999. Research Synopsis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Davis. Office of Student Affairs Research and Information.

    This report discusses the effort put forth by the University of California (UC) at Davis and California's community colleges to reinvigorate and strengthen transfer student academic success. The report offers information on the Transfer Opportunity Program (TOP), Transfer Admission Agreements (TAA), and Transfer Articulation Agreements that exist…

  18. A novel UCS memory retrieval-extinction procedure to inhibit relapse to drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi-xiao; Xue, Yan-xue; Liu, Jian-feng; Shi, Hai-shui; Jian, Min; Han, Ying; Zhu, Wei-li; Bao, Yan-ping; Wu, Ping; Ding, Zeng-bo; Shen, Hao-wei; Shi, Jie; Shaham, Yavin; Lu, Lin

    2015-07-14

    We recently reported that a conditioned stimulus (CS) memory retrieval-extinction procedure decreases reinstatement of cocaine and heroin seeking in rats and heroin craving in humans. Here we show that non-contingent cocaine or methylphenidate injections (UCS retrieval) 1 h before the extinction sessions decreases cocaine-priming-induced reinstatement, spontaneous recovery, and renewal of cocaine seeking in rats. Unlike the CS-based memory retrieval-extinction procedure, the UCS memory retrieval manipulation decreases renewal and reinstatement of cocaine seeking in the presence of cocaine cues that were not present during extinction training and also decreases cocaine seeking when the procedure commences after 28 days of abstinence. The inhibitory effect of the UCS retrieval manipulation on cocaine-priming-induced reinstatement is mediated by regulation of AMPA-receptor endocytosis in the basolateral amygdala. The UCS memory retrieval-extinction procedure has superior relapse prevention characteristics than the CS memory retrieval-extinction procedure and could be a promising method for decreasing relapse in human addicts.

  19. A New Campus Building on Efficiency: University of California (UC) Merced Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    The University of California (UC), Merced partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit two existing buildings to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% as part of DOE’s Commercial Buildings Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  20. Environmental Profiles of Paper vs. Electronic UC-CEAS Annual Reports

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2010, the University of Cincinnati College of Engineering and Applied Sciences (UC-CEAS) created a new electronic format for the Annual Report that could be distributed through the college’s website to replace the prior print version. In order to determine the environmental co...

  1. What Was It like? Being in the Pioneer Class at UC Merced

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Entering the UC Merced campus and turning onto Scholars Lane, students saw, in this order, large cow pastures surrounding the campus, tall chainlink fences enclosing construction materials, orange fences stating "limits of construction," and across the small road, the residence facilities. Students who were willing to brave this combination of…

  2. Second primary cancers in patients with urothelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Altok, Muammer; Akdeniz, Fırat; Yıldız, Güner; Divrik, Rauf Taner

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the second primary cancers (SPCs) in patients with urothelial cancer (UC). Materials and Methods The records of 2,339 patients whose UC was diagnosed between January 1974 and December 2012 were reviewed. All data about characteristics of patients, of UC and, of SPC was, recorded digitally. We investigated the prevalence and the type of second or higher order cancers, and the factors associated with SPC. Results Total 260 patients (11.1%) had SPC, 14 had a third primary cancer and one had a fourth primary cancer. The most common SPC with UC was lung cancer (29.6%). Of all 260 with SPC, 64 (24.6%) had synchronous (within the 6 months) SPC, 120 (46.2%) had subsequent SPC and, 76 (29.2%) had antecedent SPC. The mean duration of SPC was 56 months in patients with subsequent SPC and 75.8 months in patients with antecedent SPC. The mean age at the time of diagnosis of UC was higher in patients with SPC. The ratio of male gender, body mass index, blood type, status of smoking and, occupational risk was similar in both groups. Total amount of smoking and the mean follow-up were higher in patients with SPC. Conclusions The majority of the patients with UC have long life expectancy. In patients with UC, the risk of having another cancer is quite higher than normal population. The physicians managing patients with UC should look for SPC. PMID:27617314

  3. Second primary cancers in patients with urothelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Altok, Muammer; Akdeniz, Fırat; Yıldız, Güner; Divrik, Rauf Taner

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the second primary cancers (SPCs) in patients with urothelial cancer (UC). Materials and Methods The records of 2,339 patients whose UC was diagnosed between January 1974 and December 2012 were reviewed. All data about characteristics of patients, of UC and, of SPC was, recorded digitally. We investigated the prevalence and the type of second or higher order cancers, and the factors associated with SPC. Results Total 260 patients (11.1%) had SPC, 14 had a third primary cancer and one had a fourth primary cancer. The most common SPC with UC was lung cancer (29.6%). Of all 260 with SPC, 64 (24.6%) had synchronous (within the 6 months) SPC, 120 (46.2%) had subsequent SPC and, 76 (29.2%) had antecedent SPC. The mean duration of SPC was 56 months in patients with subsequent SPC and 75.8 months in patients with antecedent SPC. The mean age at the time of diagnosis of UC was higher in patients with SPC. The ratio of male gender, body mass index, blood type, status of smoking and, occupational risk was similar in both groups. Total amount of smoking and the mean follow-up were higher in patients with SPC. Conclusions The majority of the patients with UC have long life expectancy. In patients with UC, the risk of having another cancer is quite higher than normal population. The physicians managing patients with UC should look for SPC.

  4. Variables associated with patient activation in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goodworth, Marie-Christine R; Stepleman, Lara; Hibbard, Judith; Johns, Lisa; Wright, Dustin; Hughes, Mary D; Williams, Mitzi J

    2016-01-01

    Identifying variables associated with patient activation in the multiple sclerosis population could serve to facilitate better multiple sclerosis self-management behaviors. Using a cross-sectional survey design, 199 participants were recruited from a multiple sclerosis center in the Southeastern United States. Depression, multiple sclerosis quality of life, and multiple Sclerosis self-efficacy were all significantly correlated with patient activation. Results of a hierarchical regression indicated that patient activation was significantly related to educational attainment, depression, and self-efficacy but not to quality of life. The results suggest several possible targets for intervention to increase patient activation, including health literacy, depression symptoms, and self-efficacy for multiple sclerosis disease management.

  5. Management of Hypertension: Adapting New Guidelines for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.; Batt, Mark E.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses recent guidelines on hypertension from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and details the latest management protocols for patients with high blood pressure. The article helps physicians interpret the guidelines for treating active patients, highlighting diagnosis, step care revision, pharmacology, and sports participation…

  6. The UC Berkeley K-12 Science Coalition - Facilitating Student Participation in Space Science Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, I.

    1999-05-01

    Although many astronomy undergraduate and graduate majors are interested in becoming professional astronomers, there is a growing number of students interested in following their astronomy training with alternate careers in science education. My talk will describe innovative opportunities for students at UC Berkeley to gain experience in K-12 science education and outreach through a coordinated effort, the UC Berkeley K-12 Science Coalition. At institutions of higher education, the many science departments and research units have disciplinary foci that are too specialized to meet the broad needs of the K-12 science curriculum. Thus, coordination of individual efforts is the only way to provide a cohesive program of support for K-12 schools, and fulfill science education standards and curricular requirements at the various grade levels. At UC Berkeley alone, scores of science education and outreach programs exist in many disciplinary areas working with schools at all grade levels. Until recently, these programs have traditionally worked independently of each other and without consistent levels of coordination with school district priorities. The UC Berkeley K-12 Science Coalition has recently been established under the leadership of the campus' Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost, to coordinate individual science outreach efforts to best serve the K-12 community. The goals of such coordination are to improve K-12 student achievement, teacher professional development, and curriculum through a cohesive structure in which the various programs and academic departments/units can contribute effectively. The Science Coalition will also serve as a framework for UC Berkeley students to participate effectively in science education, obtain needed training and experience, as well as an opportunity to explore alternate careers with an astronomy degree.

  7. Salivary Ceruloplasmin Ferroxidase & Oxidase Activities in Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Hathama R.; Ghadhban, Jasim M.; Abudal Kadhum, Zahraa I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate salivary ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activities in celiac patients with different histopathological severity. This study included 75 celiac patients with different mean age (18.68 ± 11.13) year, who had positive screen for celiac antibodies, and who had gastrointestinal symptoms. In order to simplify the comparison with the healthy control group, celiac patients were divided into two groups according to their histopathological severity: severe (marsh IIIa, b, c) & less severe (marsh 0, I). All these patients have been evaluating for salivary ceruloplasmin (Cp) concentration and Cp ferroxidase activities. To confirm the presence of the enzymatic activity of this protein, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out and then stained for Cp ferroxidase, as well as for Cp oxidase activity. Furthermore, the concentrations of salivary total protein, albumin, and globulin were measured in the studied groups. A significant increase (p<0.05) in salivary concentration of ceruloplasmin was found in all above mentioned patients groups in comparison to that of the control group, except for total villous atrophy (marsh IIIc) patients subgroup. Salivary Cp ferroxidase activity revealed statistically significant decrease among the patient groups as well as between them and the control group. The result of salivary total protein and globulin showed presence a significant increase (p<0.05) in comparison to that of the control group. Meanwhile albumin levels was found to increase non-significantly (p=0.186). PMID:23675269

  8. Decreased Prolidase Activity in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Mahmut; Atli, Abdullah; Kaplan, İbrahim; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Bez, Yasin; Özdemir, Pınar Güzel; Sır, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many neurochemical systems have been implicated in the development of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The prolidase enzyme is a cytosolic exopeptidase that detaches proline or hydroxyproline from the carboxyl terminal position of dipeptides. Prolidase has important biological effects, and to date, its role in the etiology of PTSD has not been studied. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate prolidase activity in patients with PTSD. Methods The study group consisted of patients who were diagnosed with PTSD after the earthquake that occurred in the province of Van in Turkey in 2011 (n=25); the first control group consisted of patients who experienced the earthquake but did not show PTSD symptoms (n=26) and the second control group consisted of patients who have never been exposed to a traumatic event (n=25). Prolidase activities in the patients and the control groups were determined by the ELISA method using commercial kits. Results Prolidase activity in the patient group was significantly lower when compared to the control groups. Prolidase activity was also significantly lower in the traumatized healthy subjects compared to the other healthy group (p<0.01). Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that the decrease in prolidase activity may have neuroprotective effects in patients with PTSD. PMID:27482243

  9. Concurrent validation of activity monitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis☆

    PubMed Central

    Backhouse, Michael R.; Hensor, Elizabeth M.A.; White, Derrick; Keenan, Anne-Maree; Helliwell, Philip S.; Redmond, Anthony C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity is frequently reported in rheumatology but it is difficult to measure objectively outside the gait laboratory. A new generation of activity monitors offers this potential but it has not yet been evaluated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This study aimed to evaluate three types of activity monitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods The Step-N-Tune, Activ4Life Pro V3.8, and the Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity activity monitors were tested concurrently in 12 patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as in a healthy control group of 12 volunteers. Participants walked at a self selected speed for two minutes and were filmed for later review. Temporal and spatial gait parameters were also validated against the GAITRite walkway and the total number of steps recorded by each activity monitor was compared to a gold standard derived from half speed video replays. Findings Activity monitor performance varied between devices but all showed poorer performance when used in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. Bland–Altman plots demonstrated wider 95% limits of agreement in the group with rheumatoid arthritis and a systematic decrease in agreement between activity monitors and the gold standard with decreasing functional ability. Interpretation Despite some variation between devices, all the activity monitors tested performed reasonably well in healthy young volunteers. All except the Activ4Life showed a marked decrease in performance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting Activ4Life could be the most suitable for use in this patient group. The marked between group difference in functional ability, and systematic decrease in device performance with deteriorating gait, indicate that activity monitors require specific validation in target clinical populations. PMID:23522723

  10. Rapid complete response of metastatic melanoma in a patient undergoing ipilimumab immunotherapy in the setting of active ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, A Doran; Salama, April K; Hanks, Brent A

    2015-01-01

    While blockade of the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) T cell regulatory receptor has become a commonly utilized strategy in the management of advanced melanoma, many questions remain regarding the use of this agent in patient populations with autoimmune disease. We present a case involving the treatment of a patient with stage IV melanoma and ulcerative colitis (UC) with anti-CTLA-4 antibody immunotherapy. Upon initial treatment, the patient developed grade III colitis requiring tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) blocking antibody therapy, however re-treatment with anti-CTLA-4 antibody following a total colectomy resulted in a rapid complete response accompanied by the development of a tracheobronchitis, a previously described extra-intestinal manifestation of UC. This case contributes to the evolving literature on the use of checkpoint inhibitors in patients also suffering from autoimmune disease, supports future clinical trials investigating the use of these agents in patients with autoimmune diseases, and suggests that an understanding of the specific molecular pathways involved in a patient's autoimmune pathology may provide insight into the development of more effective novel combinatorial immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25992290

  11. A transcribed ultraconserved noncoding RNA, Uc.173, is a key molecule for the inhibition of lead-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nan, Aruo; Zhou, Xinke; Chen, Lijian; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Li; Luo, Yuanwei; Liu, Zhenzhong; Dai, Lijun; Jiang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    As a common toxic metal, lead has significant neurotoxicity to brain development. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) function in multiple biological processes. However, whether lncRNAs are involved in lead-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. Uc.173 is a lncRNA from a transcribed ultra-conservative region (T-UCR) of human, mouse and rat genomes. We established a lead-induced nerve injury mouse model. It showed the levels of Uc.173 decreased significantly in hippocampus tissue and serum of the model. We further tested the expression of Uc.173 in serum of lead-exposed children, which also showed a tendency to decrease. To explore the effects of Uc.173 on lead-induced nerve injury, we overexpressed Uc.173 in an N2a mouse nerve cell line and found Uc.173 had an inhibitory effect on lead-induced apoptosis of N2a. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of Uc.173 in apoptosis associated with lead-induced nerve injury, we predicted the target microRNAs of Uc.173 by using miRanda, TargetScan and RegRNA. After performing quantitative real-time PCR and bioinformatics analysis, we showed Uc.173 might inter-regulate with miR-291a-3p in lead-induced apoptosis and regulate apoptosis-associated genes. Our study suggests Uc.173 significantly inhibits the apoptosis of nerve cells, which may be mediated by inter-regulation with miRNAs in lead-induced nerve injury.

  12. Complement Activation in Patients with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Wong, Maria; Renner, Brandon; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Giclas, Patricia C.; Joy, Melanie S.; Jalal, Diana; Radeva, Milena K.; Gassman, Jennifer; Gipson, Debbie S.; Kaskel, Frederick; Friedman, Aaron; Trachtman, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent pre-clinical studies have shown that complement activation contributes to glomerular and tubular injury in experimental FSGS. Although complement proteins are detected in the glomeruli of some patients with FSGS, it is not known whether this is due to complement activation or whether the proteins are simply trapped in sclerotic glomeruli. We measured complement activation fragments in the plasma and urine of patients with primary FSGS to determine whether complement activation is part of the disease process. Study Design Plasma and urine samples from patients with biopsy-proven FSGS who participated in the FSGS Clinical Trial were analyzed. Setting and Participants We identified 19 patients for whom samples were available from weeks 0, 26, 52 and 78. The results for these FSGS patients were compared to results in samples from 10 healthy controls, 10 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), 20 patients with vasculitis, and 23 patients with lupus nephritis. Outcomes Longitudinal control of proteinuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Measurements Levels of the complement fragments Ba, Bb, C4a, and sC5b-9 in plasma and urine. Results Plasma and urine Ba, C4a, sC5b-9 were significantly higher in FSGS patients at the time of diagnosis than in the control groups. Plasma Ba levels inversely correlated with the eGFR at the time of diagnosis and at the end of the study. Plasma and urine Ba levels at the end of the study positively correlated with the level of proteinuria, the primary outcome of the study. Limitations Limited number of patients with samples from all time-points. Conclusions The complement system is activated in patients with primary FSGS, and elevated levels of plasma Ba correlate with more severe disease. Measurement of complement fragments may identify a subset of patients in whom the complement system is activated. Further investigations are needed to confirm our findings and to determine the prognostic significance of

  13. Synchronization of EEG activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panischev, O. Yu; Demin, S. A.; Muhametshin, I. G.; Demina, N. Yu

    2015-12-01

    In paper we apply the method based on the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) to determine the differences in frequency-phase synchronization of the cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We found that for healthy subjects the frequency-phase synchronization of EEGs from long-range electrodes was significantly better for BD patients. In BD patients a high synchronization of EEGs was observed only for short-range electrodes. Thus, the FNS is a simple graphical method for qualitative analysis can be applied to identify the synchronization effects in EEG activity and, probably, may be used for the diagnosis of this syndrome.

  14. Virtual patients as activities: exploring the research implications of an activity theoretical stance.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H

    2014-09-01

    Virtual patients are computer-based simulators of patient encounters for the purposes of instruction, practice, and assessment. Although virtual patients have been around for some time they have yet to become part of mainstream medical education. A major reason for this would seem to be a lack of clarity as to what educational value virtual patients actually have. This paper argues that virtual patients should be seen as activities rather than artifacts and that activity theory can be used to generate different ways to frame scholarship in and around virtual patients. Drawing on the work of Leont'ev and Engeström this paper describes a range of perspectives based on the operations, actions, and objectives in and around virtual patients; the use of virtual patients to mediate activities; and the sociocultural context and the participants in virtual patient activities. This approach allows us to move beyond the 'does or does not work' discourse of much of the existing scholarship around virtual patients and, to an extent, around educational technologies as a whole. Activity perspectives, and activity theory in particular, offer new horizons for research and evaluation that address many of the limitations of intervention-based paradigms of inquiry.

  15. UC Assurance Plan For Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July2007

    SciTech Connect

    Chernowski, John

    2007-07-09

    This Division ES&H Self-Assessment Manual describes how the Laboratory administers a division self-assessment program that conforms to the institutional requirements promulgated in the 'LBNL Environment, Safety and Health Self-Assessment Program' (LBNL/PUB-5344, latest revision). The institutional program comprises all appraisal and reporting activities that identify environmental, safety, and health deficiencies and associated corrective actions. It is designed to meet U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for self-assessment. Self-assessment is a continuous process of information gathering and evaluation. A division selfassessment program should describe methods for gathering and documenting information, and methods to analyze these performance data to identify trends and root causes and their corrections.

  16. [Substantiation of active surgical tactics for patients with puerperal endometritis].

    PubMed

    Nikonov, A P; Ankirskaia, A S

    1991-01-01

    An active surgical tactics for managing patients (uterine wash and its cavity content vacuum aspiration) was applied in 34 patients with postnatal endometritis. Echography and hysteroscopy demonstrated that in 28 of 34 patients, the endometritis developed in the presence of pathological involvements into the uterine cavity, which made the use of surgical endometrial treatment justifiable. In addition, the surgical treatment substantially decreased the bacterial dissemination of the content in the uterine cavity. The proposed procedure enabled uterine extirpation to be avoided in 5 of 6 patients with partial suture inadequacy. PMID:2042714

  17. [Creative arts activity in manually handicapped patients].

    PubMed

    Wolf, N

    1986-02-01

    Congenital or acquired conditions directly or indirectly causal in total or partial impairment of manual function are set out. The possibilities for creative-expressive activity, using various techniques, nothwithstanding manual disabilities are pointed out. In Cefischer, who until his war-related loss of both upper limbs had been a renowned cartoonist, a comparison of his works, drawn initially by hand and later with the mouth, reveals his characteristic style of expression having remained the same. Further examples are given of creative expression in the presence of manual disability even under extreme circumstances (such as 11 years of confinement to the Iron Lung). Arts and crafts work of persons with leprosy-related manual handicaps are mentioned; typewriter graphics as a method inaugurated by Basset is presented as used in young people with total manual disability. Partial disability of manual function due to arthritis was present in Renoir, Jawlensky, and Grandma Moses, the course of their conditions is described over time. Contents and form of their pictures, after long years of being manually disabled, do not reveal any essential changes in comparison to their earlier ones. PMID:2938233

  18. Prognostic value of serum angiogenic activity in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Francisco-Jesus; Quesada, Ana-Rodriguez; Sevilla, Isabel; Baca, Juan-Javier; Medina, Miguel-Angel; Amores, Jose; Diaz, Juan Miguel; Rius-Diaz, Francisca; Marques, Eduardo; Alba, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Angiogenesis, resulting from an imbalance between angiogenic activator factors and inhibitors, is required for tumour growth and metastasis. The determination of the circulating concentration of all angiogenic factors (activators and inhibitors) is not feasible at present. We have evaluated diagnostic and prognostic values of the measurement of serum angiogenic activity in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. Serum proliferative activity (PA) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro, and serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were determined by ELISA in 53 patients with primary CRC, 16 subjects with non-neoplastic gastrointestinal disease (SC) and 34 healthy individuals. Data were compared with clinical outcome of the patients. Although serum from CRC patients significantly increased the PA of HUVEC, compared to culture control (HUVEC in medium + 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS); P < 0.001); our results indicate that serum PA in CRC patients was similar to that of SC or healthy individuals. There was no correlation between serum PA and circulating VEGF concentrations. Surgery produced a decrease of PA at 8 hrs after tumour resection in CRC patients compared to pre-surgery values (186 ± 47 versus 213 ± 41, P < 0.001). However, an increase in serum VEGF values was observed after surgery (280 [176–450] versus 251 [160–357] pg/ml, P = 0.004). Patients with lower PA values after surgery showed a worse outcome that those with higher PA values. Therefore, this study does not support a diagnostic value for serum angiogenic activity measured by proliferative activity on HUVEC but suggests it could have a prognostic value in CRC patients. PMID:17367506

  19. Development of the Patient Activation Measure for mental health.

    PubMed

    Green, Carla A; Perrin, Nancy A; Polen, Michael R; Leo, Michael C; Hibbard, Judith H; Tusler, Martin

    2010-07-01

    Our objective was to adapt the physical health Patient Activation Measure (PAM) for use among people with mental health conditions (PAM-MH). Data came from three studies among people with chronic mental health conditions and were combined in Rasch analyses. The PAM-MH's psychometric properties equal those of the original 13-item PAM. Test-retest reliability and concurrent validity were good, and the PAM-MH showed sensitivity to change. The PAM-MH appears to be a reliable and valid measure of patient activation among individuals with mental health problems. It appears to have potential for use in assessing change in activation. PMID:19728074

  20. Dynamic UC HII regions in Sgr B2: Flickering and Ionized Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pree, Christopher G.; Wilner, D. J.; Goss, M.; Mac Low, M.; Peters, T.; Klessen, R.; Keto, E. R.; Galvan-Madrid, R.; Banerjee, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Sgr B2 star forming region contains a large sample of ultracompact (UC) and hypercompact (HC) HII regions. The diversity of morphologies and number of unusual broad line sources make it an ideal laboratory for testing theories of UC HII region evolution. Recent high-resolution simulations that include heating from ionizing and non-ionizing radiation show that the dense, rotating, accretion flows required to form massive stars quickly become gravitationally unstable (Peters et al. 2010a). The orbits of these dense clumps and filaments near newly born massive stars irregularly trap and expose their ionizing radiation (Peters et al. 2010b). The resulting HII region flickers between HC and UC sizes throughout the main accretion phase, rather than monotonically expanding. Peters et al. (2010b) show that this model can solve the UC HII lifetime problem (Wood & Churchwell 1989), since accretion continues ten times longer than the free expansion timescale for an HII region. Imaged at 1.3 cm, the Sgr B2 region contains 49 regions, 25 of which are hypercompact, with physical diameters < 5000 AU (Gaume et al. 1995). In the past year, we have observed this large sample of UC HII regions in the Sgr B2 region with the EVLA in the three hybrid arrays in the 1.3-cm continuum and H66α and H68α lines with a resolution of 0.25''. We have also made continuum and RRL (H53α) observations at 7 mm in the BnA configuration to obtain morphological and line information at the highest available angular resolution of 0.06'' (650 AU). These new observations of Sgr B2 will allow us to: (1) Determine the frequency and magnitude of UC HII flux and size fluctuations over a 22 year time baseline (1989 to 2011) in one of the most source-rich massive star forming regions in the Milky Way, (2) Constrain and test the theoretical models described in Peters et al. (2010a, 2010b), (3) Observe recombination lines with the improved spectral resolution and bandwidth of the new EVLA correlator, and

  1. VLT near- to mid-IR imaging and spectroscopy of the M 17 UC1 - IRS5 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Jiang, Zhibo; Fang, Min

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the surroundings of the hypercompact H ii region M 17 UC1 to probe the physical properties of the associated young stellar objects and the environment of massive star formation. Methods: We use diffraction-limited near-IR (VLT/NACO) and mid-IR (VLT/VISIR) images to reveal the different morphologies at various wavelengths. Likewise, we investigate the stellar and nebular content of the region with VLT/SINFONI integral field spectroscopy with a resolution R ˜ 1500 at H + K bands. Results: Five of the seven point sources in this region show L-band excess emission. A geometric match is found between the H2 emission and near-IR polarized light in the vicinity of IRS5A, and between the diffuse mid-IR emission and near-IR polarization north of UC1. The H2 emission is typical for dense photodissociation regions (PDRs), which are initially far-ultraviolet pumped and repopulated by collisional de-excitation. The spectral types of IRS5A and B273A are B3-B7 V/III and G4-G5 III, respectively. The observed infrared luminosity LIR in the range 1-20 μm is derived for three objects; we obtain 2.0 × 103 L⊙ for IRS5A, 13 L⊙ for IRS5C, and 10 L⊙ for B273A. Conclusions: IRS5 might be a young quadruple system. Its primary star IRS5A is confirmed to be a high-mass protostellar object (˜9 M⊙, ˜1 × 105 yrs); it might have terminated accretion due to the feedback from stellar activities (radiation pressure, outflow) and the expanding H ii region of M 17. The object UC1 might also have terminated accretion because of the expanding hypercompact H ii region, which it ionizes. The disk clearing process of the low-mass young stellar objects in this region might be accelerated by the expanding H ii region. The outflows driven by UC1 are running south-north with its northeastern side suppressed by the expanding ionization front of M 17; the blue-shifted outflow lobe of IRS5A is seen in two types of tracers along the same line of sight in the form of H2 emission

  2. Activation of Massive Transfusion for Elderly Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Murry, Jason S; Zaw, Andrea A; Hoang, David M; Mehrzadi, Devorah; Tran, Danielle; Nuno, Miriam; Bloom, Matthew; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2015-10-01

    Massive transfusion protocol (MTP) is used to resuscitate patients in hemorrhagic shock. Our goal was to review MTP use in the elderly. All trauma patients who required activation of MTP at an urban Level I trauma center from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Elderly was defined as age ≥ 60 years. Sixty-six patients had MTP activated: 52 nonelderly (NE) and 14 elderly (E). There were no statistically significant differences between the two cohorts for gender, injury severity score, head abbreviated injury scale, emergency department Glasgow Coma Scale, initial hematocrit, intensive care unit length of stay, or hospital length of stay. Mean age for NE was 35 years and 73 years for E (P < 0.01). Less than half (43%) of E patients with activation of MTP received 10 or more units of blood products compared with 69 per cent of the NE (P = 0.07). Mortality rates were similar in the NE and the E (53%vs 50%, P = 0.80). After multivariate analysis with Glasgow Coma Scale, injury severity score, and blunt versus penetrating trauma, elderly age was not a predictor of mortality after MTP (P = 0.35). When MTP is activated, survival to discharge in elderly trauma patients is comparable to younger patients.

  3. [Physical activity in patients with microvascular complications of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Matoulek, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Physical activity is often underestimated and little used in the treatment of diabetes. The fear of damage, especially in patients with diabetes complications is one of the reasons why it occurs. Physical activity plays an important role in prevention of the progression of peripheral neuropathy and its impact is primarily on the development of muscle strength and the ability to replace the function of nerve fibers damaged disabilities. Demonstrable effect on neuropathy is already recorded a few weeks of regular exercise, long-term programs then demonstrate the safety of occurrence of ulcers in compliance with basic foot care. Present autonomic neuropathy cannot predict response to cardiac respectively, heart rate and blood pressure. Due to other risks (silent ischemia, arrhythmia etc.), it is appropriate to stress test before a prescription of exercise programs. Monitoring of blood pressure, heart rate and blood glucose during the first hours of physical activity is necessary. In patients with autonomic neuropathy of the gastrointestinal tract may significantly affect the composition of the diet not only the ability of physical activity, but can also affect hypoglycaemia due to a slow carbohydrate absorption in these patients. Another risk in patients with autonomic neuropathy is orthostatic hypotension, which may potentiate antihypertensive drugs in "white coat" hypertension. Prescription of patients with retinopathy depends on the form and degree of retinopathy. Only proliferative retinopathy can significantly reduce exercise prescription, and it is always necessary to consult with ophthalmologist. In patients with nephropathy is an important stage of renal insufficiency for prescription of physical activity. Prescription is then influenced by the degree of renal insufficiency in addition to the presence of other associated diseases (anemia, hypertension, osteopathy etc.). Physical activity is essential in patients on dialysis respectively. After renal

  4. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) and IL-37: Intestinal and peripheral expression by T and B regulatory cells in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Camarillo, Gabriela; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize and to quantify peripheral and tissue. IL-35- and IL-37-producing cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients. We studied a total of 38 active UC, 31 inactive UC, 17 active CD, and 13 inactive CD and 50 non-inflamed tissues as control group. Gene expression was measured by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and protein expression was evaluated in tissue by immunohistochemistry and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by flow cytometry. Higher levels of IL-35 was produced by intestinal regulatory B cells and circulating regulatory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in active vs. inactive disease or healthy donors (P<0.05). The IL-37 was conspicuously synthesized by circulating B cells, active natural killer cells and monocytes. These results suggest that down-regulation of inflammation in active IBD patients might be based on the increased expression of IL-35 and IL-37.

  5. Nonlinear analysis of brain activity in magnetic influenced Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Anninos, P A; Adamopoulos, A V; Kotini, A; Tsagas, N

    2000-01-01

    Magnetoencephalogram (MEG) recordings were obtained from the brain of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) using the Superconductive Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). For each patient the magnetic activity was recorded from a total of 64 points of the skull (32 points from each temporal lobe) as defined by a recording reference system, which is based on the 10-20 Electrode Placement System. Some of the recorded points were observed to exhibit abnormal rhythmic activity, characterized by high amplitudes and low frequencies. External magnetic stimulation (EMS) with intensity 1-7.5pT, and frequency the alpha-rhythm of the patient (8-13 Hz) was applied in the left-right temporal, frontal-occipital and vertex (2 minutes over each of the above regions) and the brain magnetic activity was recorded again. The application of the EMS resulted in rapid attenuation of the MEG activity of PD patients. Furthermore, chaotic dynamic methods were used, in order to estimate the correlation dimension D of the reconstructed phase spaces. The estimated values of D, in conjunction with the results derived from the other data analysis methods, strongly support the existence of low dimension chaotic structures in the dynamics of cortical activity of PD patients. In addition, the increased values of D of the MEG after the application of EMS when compared with the corresponding ones obtained from the MEGs prior to the EMS, suggest that the neural dynamics are strongly influenced by the application of EMS. PMID:11154103

  6. Failure to induce oral tolerance in Crohn's and ulcerative colitis patients: possible genetic risk.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Thomas A; Toy, Lisa; Chan, Lisa; Childs, Joseph; Cheifetz, Adam; Mayer, Lloyd

    2004-12-01

    It has been proposed that defective activation of suppressor or regulatory T cells is one mechanism involved in the uncontrolled inflammatory process seen in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Because suppressor/regulatory T cells are thought to play a role in the promotion of oral tolerance, we attempted to induce oral tolerance in normal controls (n = 21) and patients with either Crohn's disease (CD; n = 12) or ulcerative colitis (UC; n = 13). In the first study, subjects were fed the neoantigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) on days 1 to 5 and 11 to 15. Subcutaneous immunization with KLH was performed on day 26, with a booster immunization on day 35. Blood for KLH-induced T cell proliferation and serum for anti-KLH antibody production was obtained at baseline, on day 26 preimmunization (postfed), on day 35 after the first immunization, and again on day 42 after the second immunization. In normal individuals, KLH feeding prior to immunization and booster resulted in reduced KLH-specific T cell proliferation compared with the group that was not fed KLH. However, although on the same KLH-feeding protocol, both CD and UC patients demonstrated significantly enhanced proliferation without oral tolerance induction when compared with baseline values. These data suggest that oral tolerance induction is defective in patients with IBD. This may reflect an in vivo functional defect in mucosal suppression of immune responses in IBD. Both UC and CD appear to be multigenic disorders with evidence of familial segregation. We analyzed four multiplex Crohn's and two UC families to determine whether the defect in tolerance induction was genetically regulated. In three of the four CD families at least one unaffected family member also failed to tolerate (total 5 of 14 unaffected family members). In the UC families, the defect in tolerance segregated with disease. These data suggest a genetic defect in tolerance induction in Crohn's disease. PMID:15681761

  7. Production of UC-labeled gas in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits by Neisseria cinerea

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, J.M.; Mitchell, E.B. Jr.; Knapp, J.S.; Buttke, T.M.

    1985-09-01

    Six strains of Neisseria cinerea were tested in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.), and all yielded positive glucose growth indices and negative maltose and fructose growth indices. These results were similar to those achieved with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. However, most of the N. cinerea isolates tested yielded 3-h glucose growth indices that were lower than those obtained with gonococci. UC-labeled gas was produced significantly faster by N. gonorrhoeae than by N. cinerea. Additional studies suggested that the UC-labeled gas produced by N. cinerea was carbon dioxide. N. cinerea strains were similar to Branhamella catarrhalis strains because both species failed to produce detectable acid from glucose, maltose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose in cysteine-tryptic agar media. However, in contrast to N. cinerea strains, B. catarrhalis strains did not metabolize glucose in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits.

  8. The Influence of Health Literacy and Patient Activation on Patient Information Seeking and Sharing.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Christy J W; Cafferty, Lauren A; Russell, Travis C

    2015-01-01

    This study provided an assessment of how patients looked for information to prepare for a clinical appointment and whether they shared those findings with their provider. A cross-sectional survey allowed insight into patient attitudes, motivations, and behavior in clinical real time. At two hospital-based clinics, 243 patients completed surveys before and after clinical appointments. Younger patients with higher communicative and critical health literacy prepared for clinical appointments with information searches. The predicted association of health literacy and patient activation with information sharing was not supported. This study shows that patients with higher patient activation perceived that their providers responded more positively to patient-obtained medical information. The role of critical health literacy may show that individuals choosing to seek information are considering not just their ability to conduct the search but also their ability to synthesize and critically analyze the results of the information search. An implication for providers is to become skilled in directly asking or passively surveying what outside information sources the patient has engaged with, no matter if the patient does or does not introduce the information.

  9. MF2KtoMF05UC, a Program To Convert MODFLOW-2000 Files to MODFLOW-2005 and UCODE_2005 Files

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harbaugh, Arlen W.

    2007-01-01

    The program MF2KtoMF05UC has been developed to convert MODFLOW-2000 input files for use by MODFLOW-2005 and UCODE_2005. MF2KtoMF05UC was written in the Fortran 90 computer language. This report documents the use of MF2KtoMF05UC.

  10. Cast adrift: Gortex cast liners allow greater patient activity.

    PubMed

    Dubowitz, Gerald; Miller, Deborah M

    2003-01-01

    Extremity fractures are a common injury, with nearly 1.5 million cases reported in the United States in 1998. Treatment often involves lengthy periods of immobilization. This report outlines the use of a Gortex cast liner by a subject who was able to engage in swimming and scuba diving during the healing process. We report that a Gortex cast liner may be considered for an active patient who is keen to return to limited activities during fracture healing. Apparently because of a lack of knowledge of their existence, physicians currently are underutilizing this method of casting in active patients. The use of Gortex liners elsewhere has been reported to have higher patient and physician satisfaction in both use and performance, with no reported detrimental effects on outcome.

  11. Effect of Pre-Loading with Tensile Stress on Laboratory UCS of a Synthetic Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahendra; Lakshmi, Vijaya; Yudhbir; Srivastava, L. P.

    2015-01-01

    Amongst various index properties used by rock engineers, the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) is probably the most widely used property of intact rocks. In the field, in situ stresses are always present, and, when samples are extracted from such rocks, the stresses are released. These specimens, when tested in the laboratory, may give low strength values in comparison to what would have been obtained without stress removal. It is difficult to exactly follow the stress path of coring of rock in a natural stress environment; an indirect way of simulating effect of stress removal has been adopted in this study. Specimens of a synthetic rock have been subjected to pre-loading with tensile stress, and qualitative assessment of the reduction in the laboratory UCS of the rock has been made. To induce tensile stresses, conventional Brazilian test apparatus was modified. The results indicate that if pre-loading tensile stress exceeds about half of the Brazilian tensile strength, stress removal has substantial effect on the UCS and conservative results may be expected from laboratory tests on rock specimens.

  12. Initial source and site characterization studies for the U.C. Santa Barbara campus

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, R.; Nicholson, C.; Steidl, J.; Gurrola, L.; Alex, C.; Cochran, E.; Ely, G.; Tyler, T.

    1997-12-01

    The University of California Campus-Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) project is an integrated 3 year effort involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and four UC campuses - Los Angeles (UCLA), Riverside (UCR), Santa Barbara (UCSB), and San Diego (UCSD) - plus additional collaborators at San Diego State University (SDSU), at Los Alamos National Laboratory and in industry. The primary purpose of the project is to estimate potential ground motions from large earthquakes and to predict site-specific ground motions for one critical structure on each campus. This project thus combines the disciplines of geology, seismology, geodesy, soil dynamics, and earthquake engineering into a fully integrated approach. Once completed, the CLC project will provide a template to evaluate other buildings at each of the four UC campuses, as well as provide a methodology for evaluating seismic hazards at other critical sites in California, including other UC locations at risk from large earthquakes. Another important objective of the CLC project is the education of students and other professional in the application of this integrated, multidisciplinary, state-of-the-art approach to the assessment of earthquake hazard. For each campus targeted by the CLC project, the seismic hazard study will consist of four phases: Phase I - Initial source and site characterization, Phase II - Drilling, logging, seismic monitoring, and laboratory dynamic soil testing, Phase III - Modeling of predicted site-specific earthquake ground motions, and Phase IV - Calculations of 3D building response. This report cover Phase I for the UCSB campus and incudes results up through March 1997.

  13. Alteration of spontaneous brain activity in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaxing; Chen, Ji; Yu, Qian; Fan, Cunxiu; Zhang, Ran; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Fan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) results in a decrease in oxygen transport to the brain. The aim of the present study was to explore the alteration of spontaneous brain activity induced by hypoxia in patients with COPD. Patients and methods Twenty-five stable patients with COPD and 25 matching healthy volunteers were investigated. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of blood oxygenation level-dependent signal at resting state in the brain was analyzed using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results Whole-brain analysis using functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant decreases in ALFF in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyri and right lingual gyrus and an increase in ALFF in the left postcentral gyrus of patients with COPD. After controlling for SaO2, patients with COPD only showed an increase in ALFF in the left postcentral gyrus. Region of interest analysis showed a decrease in ALFF in the left precentral gyrus and an increase in ALFF in the left caudate nucleus of patients with COPD. In all subjects, ALFF in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyri and right lingual gyrus showed positive correlations with visual reproduction. Conclusion We demonstrated abnormal spontaneous brain activity of patients with COPD, which may have a pathophysiologic meaning. PMID:27555761

  14. Serum paraoxonase 1 activity in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gedikbasi, Asuman; Akalin, Nilgul; Gunaldi, Meral; Yilmaz, Deniz; Mert, Meral; Harmankaya, Ozlem; Soylu, Aliye; Karakaya, Pinar; Kumbasar, Abdulbaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In this study we aimed to detect paraoxonase 1 (PON-1) activity in iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and to compare it with healthy controls by observing the change after iron therapy. Material and methods In this study, 50 adult patients with IDA and 40 healthy subjects were enrolled. All patients were analyzed at the beginning and after treatment according to laboratory assessments. Results Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in the iron deficiency anemia group were significantly lower than mean activities of the control group (102.4 ±19.2 U/l and 163.3 ±13.68 U/l, respectively and 157.3 ±26.4 U/l and 256.1 ±24.6 U/l, respectively; p = 0.0001 for both). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment for IDA (143.2 ±13.9 and 197.6 ±27.9 U/l, respectively, p = 0.0001). Mean activities after treatment with iron were significantly lower than mean activities in the control group (p = 0.002; p = 0.0001 respectively). Conclusions Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in patients with IDA significantly increased after treatment with iron therapy. In adults IDA may also be one of the factors associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:27478448

  15. Peripheral cytokine profile in Chilean patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Caroll J; Candia, Enzo; Erranz, Benjamín; Figueroa, Carolina; Gonzalez, Maria J; Quera, Rodrigo; Hermoso, Marcela A

    2009-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) belong to the group of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), with complex ethiopathogenic factors that include an unbalanced immune and inflammatory response to commensal and food antigens. The differential diagnosis between CD and UC is performed using clinical, endoscopic, histopathological, serological and radiological methods; however between 10-15% of IBD patients are diagnosed as "unclassified colitis". Further research into IBD is necessary in order to develop additional diagnostic tools. The aim of this work was to see if the Th1, Th17 or Th2 immune pattern, represented by CD4+ lymphocytes producing IFN-gamma, IL-17 and IL-5 or IL-13, respectively (CD4/IFN-gamma+, CD4/IL-17+,CD4/IL-5+ or, CD4/IL13+), are useful peripheral markers which can be used to differentiate between UC and CD. Peripheral blood samples were taken from IBD patients from the Clinic Hospital of the University of Chile. The percentage of IFN-gamma-, IL-17-, IL-5- or IL-13-expressing CD4+ cells was determined by flow cytometry in phorbol ester- (PMA) and calcymycin-activated blood samples. The percentages of the CD4+ cell populations producing each cytokine were compared between UC and CD. IFN-gamma production by CD4+ lymphocytes was significantly higher in CD compared to UC and the control. The percentage of IL-17-expressing cells was significantly higher in CD patients compared to to the control; however, there were no differences between UC and CD; or between UC and healthy individuals. No significant differences were observed between the different groups as regards the representative Th2 cytokines. This study suggests that, under pathogenic conditions, several immune profiles may be operating, in the development of IBD. Although peripheral IFN-gamma and IL-17 expression, as indicators of the immune pattern, may help in the diagnosis of IBD, other cytokines and adaptive immune markers should be analyzed to allow better differentiation between

  16. In vitro fermentation of sugar beet arabino-oligosaccharides by fecal microbiota obtained from patients with ulcerative colitis to selectively stimulate the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Vigsnæs, Louise Kristine; Holck, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S; Licht, Tine Rask

    2011-12-01

    The potential prebiotic properties of arabino-oligosaccharides (AOS) derived from sugar beet pulp was studied using mixed cultures of human fecal bacteria from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), in remission or with active disease, and in healthy controls. These results were compared to those for fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), which are known to have a prebiotic effect. Fermentation studies were carried out using a small-scale static batch system, and changes in the fecal microbial communities and metabolites were monitored after 24 h by quantitative real-time PCR and short-chain fatty acid analysis. With a few minor exceptions, AOS affected the communities similarly to what was seen for FOS. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were selectively increased after fermentation of AOS or FOS by fecal microbiota derived from UC patients. The stimulation of growth of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. was accompanied by a high production of acetate and hence a decrease of pH. The fermentation of AOS may help improve the inflammatory conditions in UC patients through stimulation of bacteria eliciting anti-inflammatory responses and through production of acetate. AOS may therefore represent a new prebiotic candidate for reduction of the risk of flare-ups in UC patients. However, human trials are needed to confirm a health-promoting effect.

  17. Risk Factors for Urethral Condyloma among Heterosexual Young Male Patients with Condyloma Acuminatum of Penile Skin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first study that focuses on risk factor of urethral condyloma (UC). The subjects of our study included genital warts patients who had been diagnosed as having condyloma acuminatum of penile skin (CAPS) with/without UC. Relationship with UC of number of life time female partners, co-infection with urethritis, circumcision status, number of CAPS and wart diameter were studied by use of multivariate analysis. Co-infection with urethritis, circumcision status were risk factors of UC in heterosexual young male patients with CAPS. This information will be helpful for providing more professional counseling to patients with genital warts. PMID:27659432

  18. Fatty acyltranferases in serum in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zielenski, J.; Newman, L.J.; Slomiany, B.L.; Slomiany, A.

    1987-05-01

    Studies on serum and gastrointestinal secretion from CF patient is suggest that defective accumulation of mucus in gastrointestinal tract and excessive amount of a protease resistant peptides in serum are related to the abnormal activity of enzymes responsible for fatty acylation of proteins. Here, the authors investigated the fatty acyltransferase activities in serum of normal and CF patients. A 15 l of serum was mixed with 0.85 nmol ( UC)palmitoyl CoA, 200 g of serine and threonine and incubated at 37C for 30 min. The incubates were immediately frozen, dried extracted with C/M and chromatographed in chloroform/methanol/water. The incorporation of ( UC)palmitate was determined using linear radioscanner and authoradiography. The results of HPTLC revealed that CF serum in addition of ACAT and LCAT contained enzymes responsible for the transfer of ( UC)palmitate to monoacylphosphoglycerides, and serine and threonine. In normal serum the formation of a small amount of palmitoyl serine and palmitoyl threonine was also observed but the acylation of monoacylphosphoglycerides was not detectable. The authors conclude that in cystic fibrosis the abnormal fatty acyltransferases are responsible for the occurrence of protease resistant glycoprotein, unusual peptides in serum and possibly for the modification of membrane proteins and lipids.

  19. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Block, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified “risk” factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact of risk factors such as demoralization can be mitigated by psychosocial “maximizing” factors—characteristics that propel the patient towards positive surgical results. One of these maximizing factors, patient activation, is discussed in depth. The patient activation measure (PAM), an inventory assessing the extent to which patients are active and engaged in their health care, is associated not only with improved spine surgery results, but with better outcomes across a broad range of medical conditions. Other maximizing factors are discussed in this article. The author concludes that the past research focus on psychosocial risk factors has limited the value of presurgical psychological screening, and that future research, as well as clinical assessment, should recognize that the importance of evaluating patients’ strengths as well as their vulnerabilities. PMID:27417599

  20. Fluctuations in butyrate-producing bacteria in ulcerative colitis patients of North India

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Reena; Ahuja, Vineet; Paul, Jaishree

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the interplay between butyrate concentration and butyrate-producing bacteria in fecal samples of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients vs control individuals. METHODS: Fecal samples were collected from 14 control individuals (hemorrhoid patients only) and 26 UC patients (severe: n = 12, moderate: n = 6, remission: n = 8), recruited by the gastroenterologist at the Department of Gastroenterology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Disease activity in UC patients was determined by clinical colitis activity index. We employed fluorescent in situ hybridization in combination with flow cytometry to enumerate the clostridium cluster population targeted by 16S rRNA gene probe. Major butyrate-producing species within this cluster were quantified to see if any change existed in control vs UC patients with different disease activity. This observed change was further validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition to this, we carried out gas chromatography to evaluate the changes in concentration of major short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), namely acetate, n-butyrate, iso-butyrate, in the above samples. Student t test and Graph pad prism-6 were used to compare the data statistically. RESULTS: There was a significant decrease of Clostridium coccoides (control, 25.69% ± 1.62% vs severe, 9.8% ± 2.4%, P = 0.0001) and Clostridium leptum clusters (control, 13.74% ± 1.05% vs severe, 6.2% ± 1.8%, P = 0.0001) in fecal samples of UC patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that some butyrate-producing members of the clostridial cluster, like Fecalibacterium prausnitzii (control, 11.66% ± 1.55% vs severe, 6.01% ± 1.6%, P = 0.0001) and Roseburia intestinalis (control, 14.48% ± 1.52% vs severe, 9% ± 1.83%, P = 0.02) were differentially present in patients with different disease activity. In addition, we also demonstrated decreased concentrations of fecal SCFAs, especially of n-butyrate (control, 24.32 ± 1.86 mmol/μL vs severe, 12.74

  1. Exercise in Treating Hypertension: Tailoring Therapies for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chintanadilok, Jirayos

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can be definitive therapy for some, and adjunctive therapy for many, people with hypertension, though people with secondary hypertension may not derive as much benefit. Low-to- moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can help with mild hypertension and reduce drug dosages in more severe cases. For active patients requiring medication,…

  2. The genetic difference between Western and Chinese urothelial cell carcinomas: infrequent FGFR3 mutation in Han Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Liu, Tiantian; Ge, Nan; Kong, Feng; Yang, Liu; Björkholm, Magnus; Fan, Yidong; Zhao, Shengtian; Xu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) includes urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC), renal pelvic carcinoma (RPC) and ureter carcinoma (UC), and its incidence varies dependent on geographical areas and tumor locations, which indicates different oncogenic mechanisms and/or different genetic susceptibility/environment exposure. The activating mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter are the most frequent genetic events in UCCs. These mutations have clinical utilities in UCC initial diagnostics, prognosis, recurrence monitoring and management. However, the vast majority of the results are obtained from studies of UCC patients in Western countries, and little has been known about these in Han Chinese patients. In the present study, we screened the FGFR3 gene and TERT promoter for mutations in 116 UBC, 91 RPC and 115 UC tumors from Han Chinese patients by using Sanger Sequencing. TERT promoter mutations occurred at a high frequency in these UCC patients, comparable with that seen in Western patients, however, the FGFR3 mutation was surprisingly lower, only 9.4% for UBCs, 8.8% for RPCs and 2.6% for UCs, respectively. Taken together, the FGFR3 gene is an infrequent target in the pathogenesis of Han Chinese UCCs, and its mutation detection and targeted therapy have limited clinical utility in these patients. Our results underscore the need for extensive characterization of cancer genomes from diverse patient populations, thereby contributing to precision medicine for cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:27029078

  3. The genetic difference between Western and Chinese urothelial cell carcinomas: infrequent FGFR3 mutation in Han Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaotian; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Kun; Liu, Li; Liu, Tiantian; Ge, Nan; Kong, Feng; Yang, Liu; Björkholm, Magnus; Fan, Yidong; Zhao, Shengtian; Xu, Dawei

    2016-05-01

    Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) includes urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC), renal pelvic carcinoma (RPC) and ureter carcinoma (UC), and its incidence varies dependent on geographical areas and tumor locations, which indicates different oncogenic mechanisms and/or different genetic susceptibility/environment exposure. The activating mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter are the most frequent genetic events in UCCs. These mutations have clinical utilities in UCC initial diagnostics, prognosis, recurrence monitoring and management. However, the vast majority of the results are obtained from studies of UCC patients in Western countries, and little has been known about these in Han Chinese patients. In the present study, we screened the FGFR3 gene and TERT promoter for mutations in 116 UBC, 91 RPC and 115 UC tumors from Han Chinese patients by using Sanger Sequencing. TERT promoter mutations occurred at a high frequency in these UCC patients, comparable with that seen in Western patients, however, the FGFR3 mutation was surprisingly lower, only 9.4% for UBCs, 8.8% for RPCs and 2.6% for UCs, respectively. Taken together, the FGFR3 gene is an infrequent target in the pathogenesis of Han Chinese UCCs, and its mutation detection and targeted therapy have limited clinical utility in these patients. Our results underscore the need for extensive characterization of cancer genomes from diverse patient populations, thereby contributing to precision medicine for cancer treatment and prevention.

  4. Interleukin-19 impairment in active Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Elisabet; Garcia Planella, Esther; Zamora-Atenza, Carlos; Nieto, Juan Camilo; Gordillo, Jordi; Ortiz, Ma Angels; Metón, Isidoro; Serrano, Elena; Vegas, Esteban; García-Bosch, Orlando; Juárez, Cándido; Vidal, Sílvia

    2014-01-01

    The exact function of interleukin-19 (IL-19) on immune response is poorly understood. In mice, IL-19 up-regulates TNFα and IL-6 expression and its deficiency increases susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis. In humans, IL-19 favors a Th2 response and is elevated in several diseases. We here investigate the expression and effects of IL-19 on cells from active Crohn's disease (CD) patient. Twenty-three active CD patients and 20 healthy controls (HC) were included. mRNA and protein IL-19 levels were analyzed in monocytes. IL-19 effects were determined in vitro on the T cell phenotype and in the production of cytokines by immune cells. We observed that unstimulated and TLR-activated monocytes expressed significantly lower IL-19 mRNA in active CD patients than in HC (logFC = -1.97 unstimulated; -1.88 with Pam3CSK4; and -1.91 with FSL-1; p<0.001). These results were confirmed at protein level. Exogenous IL-19 had an anti-inflammatory effect on HC but not on CD patients. IL-19 decreased TNFα production in PBMC (850.7 ± 75.29 pg/ml vs 2626.0 ± 350 pg/ml; p<0.01) and increased CTLA4 expression (22.04 ± 1.55% vs 13.98 ± 2.05%; p<0.05) and IL-4 production (32.5 ± 8.9 pg/ml vs 13.5 ± 2.9 pg/ml; p<0.05) in T cells from HC. IL-10 regulated IL-19 production in both active CD patients and HC. We observed that three of the miRNAs that can modulate IL-19 mRNA expression, were up-regulated in monocytes from active CD patients. These results suggested that IL-19 had an anti-inflammatory role in this study. Defects in IL-19 expression and the lack of response to this cytokine could contribute to inflammatory mechanisms in active CD patients.

  5. Patient activation and advocacy: which literacy skills matter most?

    PubMed

    Martin, Laurie T; Schonlau, Matthias; Haas, Ann; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Rosenfeld, Lindsay; Buka, Stephen L; Rudd, Rima

    2011-01-01

    Attention to the effect of a patient's literacy skills on health care interactions is relatively new. So, too, are studies of either structural or personal factors that inhibit or support a patient's ability to navigate health services and systems and to advocate for their own needs within a service delivery system. Contributions of the structural environment, of interpersonal dynamics, and of a variety of psychological and sociological factors in the relationship between patients and providers have long been under study. Less frequently examined is the advocacy role expected of patients. However, the complex nature of health care in the United States increasingly requires a proactive stance. This study examined whether four literacy skills (reading, numeracy, speaking, and listening) were associated with patient self-advocacy--a component of health literacy itself--when faced with a hypothetical barrier to scheduling a medical appointment. Although all literacy skills were significantly associated with advocacy when examined in isolation, greater speaking and listening skills remained significantly associated with better patient advocacy when all four skills were examined simultaneously. These findings suggest that speaking and listening skills and support for such skills may be important factors to consider when developing patient activation and advocacy skills.

  6. Brain activation induced by psychological stress in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Castro, M N; Villarreal, M F; Bolotinsky, N; Papávero, E; Goldschmidt, M G; Costanzo, E Y; Drucaroff, L; Wainsztein, A; de Achával, D; Pahissa, J; Bär, K-J; Nemeroff, C B; Guinjoan, S M

    2015-10-01

    Environmental influences are critical for the expression of genes putatively related to the behavioral and cognitive phenotypes of schizophrenia. Among such factors, psychosocial stress has been proposed to play a major role in the expression of symptoms. However, it is unsettled how stress interacts with pathophysiological pathways to produce the disease. We studied 21 patients with schizophrenia and 21 healthy controls aged 18 to 50years with 3T-fMRI, in which a period of 6min of resting state acquisition was followed by a block design, with three blocks of 1-min control-task, 1-min stress-task and 1-min rest after-task. Self-report of stress and PANSS were measured. Limbic structures were activated in schizophrenia patients by simple tasks and remained active during, and shortly after stress. In controls, stress-related brain activation was more time-focused, and restricted to the stressful task itself. Negative symptom severity was inversely related to activation of anterior cingulum and orbitofrontal cortex. Results might represent the neurobiological aspect of hyper-reactivity to normal stressful situations previously described in schizophrenia, thus providing evidence on the involvement of limbic areas in the response to stress in schizophrenia. Patients present a pattern of persistent limbic activation probably contributing to hypervigilance and subsequent psychotic thought distortions.

  7. Effect of trimebutine on colonic myoelectrical activity in IBS patients.

    PubMed

    Frexinos, J; Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L

    1985-01-01

    The effect of trimebutine 100 mg i.v. and placebo on colonic myoelectrical activity was investigated in 10 patients with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (5 constipated and 5 diarrhoeic), using an intraluminal probe supporting 8 groups of electrodes. At each site examined from transverse to sigmoid colon, the electromyograms exhibited two kinds of spike bursts: short spike bursts (SSB) localized at one electrode site and appearing rhythmically at 10.3/min, and long spike bursts (LSB), isolated or propagated orally or aborally. Computerized analysis of the duration of each kind of spike burst showed that, as compared to the control, trimebutine 100 mg, selectively inhibited by 43 to 73% the mean duration of LSB activity in the transverse, descending and sigmoid colon, from 0 to 30 min after administration. The inhibitory effect was similar in constipated and diarrhoeic patients. Placebo injection did not significantly affect (p greater than 0.05) the duration of LSB and SSB activity. Variance analysis indicated that the inhibitory effect of trimebutine was significantly greater (p less than 0.05) on LSB activity in the transverse than the descending colon, and that it was absent from the sigmoid colon. The results suggest that trimebutine selectively inhibits the propulsive activity of the proximal two thirds of the colon in IBS patients, and that this effect cannot entirely explain its therapeutic efficacy in IBS. PMID:3987797

  8. Integrated miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiling in Inflamed Colon of Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Goten, Jan; Vanhove, Wiebe; Lemaire, Katleen; Van Lommel, Leentje; Machiels, Kathleen; Wollants, Willem-Jan; De Preter, Vicky; De Hertogh, Gert; Ferrante, Marc; Van Assche, Gert; Rutgeerts, Paul; Schuit, Frans; Vermeire, Séverine; Arijs, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Background Ulcerative colitis (UC) is associated with differential colonic expression of genes involved in immune response (e.g. IL8) and barrier integrity (e.g. cadherins). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulators of gene expression and are involved in various immune-related diseases. In this study, we investigated (1) if miRNA expression in UC mucosa is altered and (2) if any of these changes correlate with mucosal mRNA expression. Integration of mRNA and miRNA expression profiling may allow the identification of functional links between dysregulated miRNAs and their target mRNA. Methodology Colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained from 17 UC (10 active and 7 inactive) patients and 10 normal controls. Total RNA was used to analyze miRNA and mRNA expression via Affymetrix miRNA 2.0 and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0ST arrays, respectively. Both miRNA and gene expression profiles were integrated by correlation analysis to identify dysregulated miRNAs with their corresponding predicted target mRNA. Microarray data were validated with qRT-PCR. Regulation of IL8 and CDH11 expression by hsa-miR-200c-3p was determined by luciferase reporter assays. Results When comparing active UC patients vs. controls, 51 miRNAs and 1543 gene probe sets gave significantly different signals. In contrast, in inactive UC vs. controls, no significant miRNA expression differences were found while 155 gene probe sets had significantly different signals. We then identified potential target genes of the significantly dysregulated miRNAs and genes in active UC vs. controls and found a highly significant inverse correlation between hsa-miR-200c-3p and IL8, an inflammatory marker, and between hsa-miR-200c-3p and CDH11, a gene related to intestinal epithelial barrier function. We could demonstrate that hsa-miR-200c-3p directly regulates IL8 and CDH11 expression. Conclusion Differential expression of immune- and barrier-related genes in inflamed UC mucosa may be influenced by altered expression of mi

  9. Vinflunine treatment in patients with metastatic urothelial cancer: A Nordic retrospective multicenter analysis

    PubMed Central

    Holmsten, Karin; Dohn, Line; Jensen, Niels Viggo; Shah, Carl-Henrik; Jäderling, Fredrik; Pappot, Helle; Ullén, Anders

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, vinflunine was introduced as a second-line treatment to be used after the failure of platinum therapy in patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma (mUC). The present study investigated the administered vinflunine to patients with mUC in standard clinical practice with the aim of evaluating treatment patterns, response, survival parameters and side-effects. Data were collected retrospectively from the first 100 mUC patients treated with vinflunine at three Nordic cancer centers associated with the Nordic Urothelial Cancer Oncology Group. The overall response rate was 23% and complete response was observed in one patient. The median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 2.8 (range, 0.5–34.3) and 6.3 (range, 0.3–39.7) months, respectively. An Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) of 2 was present in 20% of the patients, and those patients exhibited significantly shorter mOS (4.1 vs. 7.0 months, P=0.001) and a significantly higher degree of grade 3/4 toxicity (P=0.026) compared with ECOG PS 0–1 patients. Furthermore, patients without visceral metastases had significantly longer mOS than patients with visceral metastases (10.6 vs. 6.0 months, P=0.008). The median number of cycles of vinflunine was 3 (range, 1–28). The current data confirms that vinflunine is an active agent for second-line treatment in an unselected clinical cohort of patients with mUC. ECOG PS and presence of visceral metastases were significant prognostic parameters. In particular, patients with ECOG PS 2 receiving vinflunine had a shorter mOS and a higher frequency of severe toxicity, and, thus, should be treated with caution. Furthermore, the present study observed large inter-individual differences in radiological response and OS, indicating the need for further development of improved patient selection tools to optimize vinflunine treatment in platinum-refractory mUC patients. PMID:27446429

  10. [Exercises in patients with myositis--active treatment intervention?].

    PubMed

    Babić-Naglić, Durdica

    2012-01-01

    Polymyositis, dermatomyositis and inclusion body myositis are rare inflammatory myopathies characterized by muscle weakness. Regardless of pharmacological treatment in most patients remain muscle weakness and inability to perform daily activities. Until recently, the prevailing opinion was that active exercises can exacerbate the inflammatory activity in the muscles and is now known that active exercise and exercise with resistance improve strength and endurance of muscles, aerobic capacity and overall functional ability. Exercises are prescribed according to the disease activity, manual muscle test or dynamometer measurements, range of motion, cardiorespiratory capacity and clinical status of the locomotor system. Each of the components can be influenced by targeted exercises and should be a integral part of myositis therapy.

  11. Barriers associated with reduced physical activity in COPD patients*

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Priscila Batista; Stelmach, Rafael; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo Fernandes; Fernandes, Frederico Leon Arrabal; Carvalho-Pinto, Regina Maria; Cukier, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of COPD patients to perform activities of daily living (ADL); to identify barriers that prevent these individuals from performing ADL; and to correlate those barriers with dyspnea severity, six-minute walk test (6MWT), and an ADL limitation score. METHODS: In COPD patients and healthy, age-matched controls, the number of steps, the distance walked, and walking time were recorded with a triaxial accelerometer, for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire regarding perceived barriers and the London Chest Activity of Daily Living (LCADL) scale were used in order to identify the factors that prevent the performance of ADL. The severity of dyspnea was assessed with two scales, whereas submaximal exercise capacity was determined on the basis of the 6MWT. RESULTS: We evaluated 40 COPD patients and 40 controls. In comparison with the control values, the mean walk time was significantly shorter for COPD patients (68.5 ± 25.8 min/day vs. 105.2 ± 49.4 min/day; p < 0.001), as was the distance walked (3.9 ± 1.9 km/day vs. 6.4 ± 3.2 km/day; p < 0.001). The COPD patients also walked fewer steps/day. The most common self-reported barriers to performing ADL were lack of infrastructure, social influences, and lack of willpower. The 6MWT distance correlated with the results obtained with the accelerometer but not with the LCADL scale results. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COPD are less active than are healthy adults of a comparable age. Physical inactivity and the barriers to performing ADL have immediate implications for clinical practice, calling for early intervention measures. PMID:25410838

  12. Using a virtual patient activity to teach nurse prescribing.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Heather M; Marks-Maran, Diane

    2011-05-01

    The Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences at Kingston University/St George's University of London (KU/SGUL) provides a module to train registered nurses to qualify as independent nurse prescribers. During the programme the participants engage in an online learning activity using a virtual patient (VP). The aim of this VP activity is to enable students to consolidate their learning and to practice the range of skills that the students have been developing related to prescribing. The activity was designed by the module leader and was run as a pilot on two groups of students (n = 34). An evaluative study was undertaken on the value of this blended learning activity to the student and their prescribing practice. This paper presents the development, implementation and evaluation of the VP activity. Findings showed that the VP activity was perceived as being particular useful for helping them to learn the skills of patient history/assessment, decision-making and prescription writing. The VP was also perceived as being helpful in developing their confidence.

  13. Predictors of Abdominal Pain in Depressed Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Srinath, Arvind I.; Goyal, Alka; Zimmerman, Lori A.; Newara, Melissa C.; Kirshner, Margaret A.; McCarthy, F. Nicole; Keljo, David; Binion, David; Bousvaros, Athos; DeMaso, David R.; Youk, Ada; Szigethy, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have high rates of abdominal pain. The study aims were to (1) Evaluate biological and psychological correlates of abdominal pain in depressed youth with IBD, (2) Determine predictors of abdominal pain in Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods 765 patients ages 9–17 with IBD seen over 3 years at two sites were screened for depression. Depressed youth completed comprehensive assessments for abdominal pain, psychological (depression and anxiety), and biological (IBD-related, through disease activity indices and laboratory values) realms. Results 217 patients with IBD (161 CD, 56 UC) were depressed. 163 (120 CD, 43 UC) patients had complete API scores. In CD, abdominal pain was associated with depression (r=0.33; p<0.001), diarrhea (r=0.34; p=0.001), ESR (r=0.22; p=0.02), low albumin (r=0.24; p=.01), weight loss (r=0.33; p=0.001), and abdominal tenderness (r=0.38, p=0.002). A multivariate model with these significant correlates represented 32% of the variance in pain. Only depression (p=0.03), weight loss (p=0.04), and abdominal tenderness (p=0.01) predicted pain for CD patients. In UC, pain was associated with depression (r=0.46; p=0.002) and nocturnal stools (r=.32; p=.046). In the multivariate model with these significant correlates 23% of the variance was explained, and only depression (p=0.02) predicted pain. Conclusions The psychological state of pediatric patients with IBD may increase the sensitivity to abdominal pain. Thus, screening for and treating comorbid depression may prevent excessive medical testing and unnecessary escalation of IBD medications. PMID:24983975

  14. Basophil activation test with food additives in chronic urticaria patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Gyu; Song, Woo-Jung; Park, Han-Ki; Lim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Su-Jung; Lee, Suh-Young; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2014-01-01

    The role of food additives in chronic urticaria (CU) is still under investigation. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between food additives and CU by using the basophil activation test (BAT). The BAT using 15 common food additives was performed for 15 patients with CU who had a history of recurrent urticarial aggravation following intake of various foods without a definite food-specific IgE. Of the 15 patients studied, two (13.3%) showed positive BAT results for one of the tested food additives. One patient responded to monosodium glutamate, showing 18.7% of CD203c-positive basophils. Another patient showed a positive BAT result to sodium benzoate. Both patients had clinical correlations with the agents, which were partly determined by elimination diets. The present study suggested that at least a small proportion of patients with CU had symptoms associated with food additives. The results may suggest the potential utility of the BAT to identity the role of food additives in CU.

  15. Basophil Activation Test with Food Additives in Chronic Urticaria Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Gyu; Song, Woo-Jung; Park, Han-Ki; Lim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Su-Jung; Lee, Suh-Young; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up

    2014-01-01

    The role of food additives in chronic urticaria (CU) is still under investigation. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between food additives and CU by using the basophil activation test (BAT). The BAT using 15 common food additives was performed for 15 patients with CU who had a history of recurrent urticarial aggravation following intake of various foods without a definite food-specific IgE. Of the 15 patients studied, two (13.3%) showed positive BAT results for one of the tested food additives. One patient responded to monosodium glutamate, showing 18.7% of CD203c-positive basophils. Another patient showed a positive BAT result to sodium benzoate. Both patients had clinical correlations with the agents, which were partly determined by elimination diets. The present study suggested that at least a small proportion of patients with CU had symptoms associated with food additives. The results may suggest the potential utility of the BAT to identity the role of food additives in CU. PMID:24527415

  16. Role and mechanisms of action of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 in the maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis patients: An update.

    PubMed

    Scaldaferri, Franco; Gerardi, Viviana; Mangiola, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo; Pizzoferrato, Marco; Petito, Valentina; Papa, Alfredo; Stojanovic, Jovana; Poscia, Andrea; Cammarota, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-06-28

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease, whose etiology is still unclear. Its pathogenesis involves an interaction between genetic factors, immune response and the "forgotten organ", Gut Microbiota. Several studies have been conducted to assess the role of antibiotics and probiotics as additional or alternative therapies for Ulcerative Colitis. Escherichia coli Nissle (EcN) is a nonpathogenic Gram-negative strain isolated in 1917 by Alfred Nissle and it is the active component of microbial drug Mutaflor(®) (Ardeypharm GmbH, Herdecke, Germany and EcN, Cadigroup, In Italy) used in many gastrointestinal disorder including diarrhea, uncomplicated diverticular disease and UC. It is the only probiotic recommended in ECCO guidelines as effective alternative to mesalazine in maintenance of remission in UC patients. In this review we propose an update on the role of EcN 1917 in maintenance of remission in UC patients, including data about efficacy and safety. Further studies may be helpful for this subject to further the full use of potential of EcN. PMID:27350728

  17. Role and mechanisms of action of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 in the maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis patients: An update

    PubMed Central

    Scaldaferri, Franco; Gerardi, Viviana; Mangiola, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo; Pizzoferrato, Marco; Petito, Valentina; Papa, Alfredo; Stojanovic, Jovana; Poscia, Andrea; Cammarota, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease, whose etiology is still unclear. Its pathogenesis involves an interaction between genetic factors, immune response and the “forgotten organ”, Gut Microbiota. Several studies have been conducted to assess the role of antibiotics and probiotics as additional or alternative therapies for Ulcerative Colitis. Escherichia coli Nissle (EcN) is a nonpathogenic Gram-negative strain isolated in 1917 by Alfred Nissle and it is the active component of microbial drug Mutaflor® (Ardeypharm GmbH, Herdecke, Germany and EcN, Cadigroup, In Italy) used in many gastrointestinal disorder including diarrhea, uncomplicated diverticular disease and UC. It is the only probiotic recommended in ECCO guidelines as effective alternative to mesalazine in maintenance of remission in UC patients. In this review we propose an update on the role of EcN 1917 in maintenance of remission in UC patients, including data about efficacy and safety. Further studies may be helpful for this subject to further the full use of potential of EcN. PMID:27350728

  18. Step activity monitoring in lumbar stenosis patients undergoing decompressive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Tim; Winter, Corinna; Brandes, Mirko; Hackenberg, Lars; Wassmann, Hansdetlef; Liem, Dennis; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Bullmann, Viola

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic degenerative central lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a frequent indication for decompressive spinal surgery, to reduce spinal claudication. No data are as yet available on the effect of surgery on the level of activity measured with objective long-term monitoring. The aim of this prospective, controlled study was to objectively quantify the level of activity in central LSS patients before and after surgery, using a continuous measurement device. The objective data were correlated with subjective clinical results and the radiographic degree of stenosis. Forty-seven patients with central LSS and typical spinal claudication scheduled for surgery were included. The level of activity (number of gait cycles) was quantified for 7 consecutive days using the StepWatch Activity Monitor (SAM). Visual analogue scales (VAS) for back and leg pain, Oswestry disability index and Roland–Morris score were used to assess the patients’ clinical status. The patients were investigated before surgery and 3 and 12 months after surgery. In addition, the radiographic extent of central LSS was measured digitally on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography. The following results were found preoperatively: 3,578 gait cycles/day, VAS for back pain 5.7 and for leg pain 6.5. Three months after surgery, the patients showed improvement: 4,145 gait cycles/day, VAS for back pain 4.0 and for leg pain 3.0. Twelve months after surgery, the improvement continued: 4,335 gait cycles/day, VAS for back pain 4.1 and for leg pain 3.3. The clinical results and SAM results showed significant improvement when preoperative data were compared with data 3 and 12 months after surgery. The results 12 months after surgery did not differ significantly from those 3 months after surgery. The level of activity correlated significantly with the degree of leg pain. The mean cross-sectional area of the spinal canal at the central LSS was 94 mm2. The radiographic results did not

  19. Strong earthquake motion estimates for three sites on the U.C. San Diego campus

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S; Doroudian, M; Elgamal, A; Gonzales, S; Heuze, F; Lai, T; Minster, B; Oglesby, D; Riemer, M; Vernon, F; Vucetic, M; Wagoner, J; Yang, Z

    2002-05-07

    The approach of the Campus Earthquake Program (CEP) is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the UC system in geology, seismology, and geotechnical engineering, to estimate the earthquake strong motion exposure of UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, and dynamic soil testing. The UC campuses currently chosen for application of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The procedure starts with the identification of possible earthquake sources in the region and the determination of the most critical fault(s) related to earthquake exposure of the campus. Combined geological, geophysical, and geotechnical studies are then conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. We drill, sample, and geophysically log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties, and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access below the soil layers, to deeper materials that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analyses of conjugate downhole and uphole records provide a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and with nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are shared with the UC consultants, so that they can be used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings. Thus, for each campus targeted by the CEP project, the strong motion studies consist of two phases, Phase 1--initial source and site characterization, drilling

  20. Strong Earthquake Motion Estimates for Three Sites on the U.C. Riverside Campus

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, R.; Elgamal, A.; Heuze, F.; Lai, T.; Lavalle, D.; Lawrence, B.; Liu, P.C.; Matesic, L.; Park, S.; Riemar, M.; Steidl, J.; Vucetic, M.; Wagoner, J.; Yang, Z.

    2000-11-01

    The approach of the Campus Earthquake Program (CEP) is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the UC system in geology, seismology, and geotechnical engineering, to estimate the earthquake strong motion exposure of UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, and dynamic soil testing. The UC campuses currently chosen for application of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The procedure starts with the identification of possible earthquake sources in the region and the determination of the most critical fault(s) related to earthquake exposure of the campus. Combined geological, geophysical, and geotechnical studies are then conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. We drill and geophysically log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties, and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access below the soil layers, to deeper materials that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analyses of conjugate downhole and uphole records provide a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and with nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are shared with the UC consultants, so that they can be used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings. Thus, for each campus targeted by the CEP project, the strong motion studies consist of two phases, Phase 1--initial source and site characterization, drilling, geophysical

  1. Neutrophil activation in ivermectin-treated onchocerciasis patients.

    PubMed

    Njoo, F L; Hack, C E; Oosting, J; Stilma, J S; Kijlstra, A

    1993-11-01

    Ivermectin is a safe and effective drug for onchocerciasis treatment. In certain individuals, however, therapy is accompanied by adverse reactions. The mechanisms underlying these reactions are not yet known. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether neutrophils are involved in the development of these adverse reactions. Elastase and lactoferrin, two markers for the release of neutrophil azurophilic and specific granule contents respectively, were measured by radioimmunoassays in plasma of onchocerciasis patients with varying degrees of side effects, as well as in control subjects before and 1 and 2 days after ivermectin treatment. A considerable increase of elastase levels after treatment was observed, whereas lactoferrin levels did not change. The percentage of patients with elevated elastase levels was significantly correlated with the degree of side effects. These findings suggest that neutrophil activation may be involved in the development of adverse reactions in these patients.

  2. Sexual Activity and Heart Patients: A Contemporary Perspective.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ricardo; Sardinha, Aline; Araújo, Claudio Gil S

    2016-04-01

    Sexual activity (SA) encompasses several behaviors such as kissing (Ki), touching (T), oral (O) stimulation, masturbation (M), and vaginal/anal intercourse (I). The acronym KiTOMI is proposed here to represent these behaviors. SA, particularly coitus, is a major aspect of health-related quality of life and is often considered the most pleasant and rewarding exercise performed during an entire lifetime. Although several studies have been conducted on sexuality, relatively limited information is available regarding SA in patients with heart disease. Moreover, the level of evidence of this limited information is nearly always B or C. This article provides a comprehensive and updated review of the relevant literature and offers evidence and expert-based practical messages regarding SA in patients with heart disease. Considering the rationale for exercise prescription, SA is typically well tolerated by most clinically stable patients with heart disease. Even in more debilitated and sicker individuals, KiT activities would most likely be feasible and desirable. The absolute risk of major adverse cardiovascular events during SA is typically very low. Even lower death rates have been reported for specific groups, such as women in general, aerobically fit men, and asymptomatic young adults with congenital heart disease. Finally, we emphasize the relevance of sexual counselling for patients and their partners, including the proper use of medications to treat erectile dysfunction. Counselled patients will be reassured and adequately informed regarding how to gradually resume habitual SA after a major cardiac event or procedure, starting with KiT and progressively advancing to KiTOM until all KiTOMI activities are allowed. PMID:26690295

  3. Paraoxonase Activity and Oxidative Status in Patients with Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Akyüz, Servet; Somuk, Battal Tahsin; Soyalic, Harun; Yılmaz, Beyhan; Taskin, Abdullah; Bilinc, Hasan; Aksoy, Nurten

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate serum paraoxanase-1 (PON) activity, total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS), and the oxidative stress index (OSI) in tinnitus; and to compare the results with data from healthy subjects. Subjects and Methods A total of 114 subjects-54 patients with tinnitus and 60 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Serum PON activity, TOS, TAS, and OSI levels were measured. Results In the tinnitus group, TAS, and PON were significantly lower than in the control group (p<0.001). However, the TOS, and OSI levels were significantly higher in the tinnitus group than in the control group (p<0.001). Conclusions According to the data obtained from the present study, patients with tinnitus were exposed to potent oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may be the key contributing factor to the pathogenesis of tinnitus. PMID:27144229

  4. THE THERAPEUTIC VALUE OF SPORTS ACTIVITY IN NEUROTIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Kranidiotis, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Five cases of neurotic patients being oriented to sports practice as an additional therapeutic measure are reported in brief. The working mechanisms of sublimation, overcompensation, sharing aggressive guilt within group, displacement, turning aggressive feelings toward one's self, and denial of win used in the canalization of inner needs through sports activity are discussed. The favourable influence of sports activity in the expression of various conflictual tendencies and on the overall neurotic symptomatology is stressed and the usefulness of the dynamic exploration in sports orientation of athletes is concluded.

  5. Participation of iatrogenically coagulopathic patients in wilderness activities.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Seth C; Caudell, Michael J; Deloughery, Thomas G; Murray, William

    2013-09-01

    An increasing number of patients routinely undergo long-term anticoagulation with warfarin or other pharmacological agents. There is little evidence and no consensus documents in the literature regarding the appropriateness and relative risk of their participation in wilderness activities. We present a case report, conduct an analysis of the limited literature that is available, and make recommendations for wilderness medicine practitioners and screening personnel.

  6. Factors affecting daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Zhou, Cheng-ye; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yun-feng; Zou, Chang-lin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is the leading cause of death and long-term disability. This study was undertaken to investigate the factors influencing daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction so as to take interventional measures earlier to improve their daily activities. METHODS: A total of 149 patients with first-episode cerebral infarction were recruited into this prospective study. They were admitted to the Encephalopathy Center, Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College in Zhejiang Province from August 2008 to December 2008. The baseline characteristics of the patients and cerebral infarction risk factors on the first day of admission were recorded. White blood cell (WBC) count, plasma glucose (PG), and many others of laboratory targets were collected in the next morning. Barthel index (BI) was calculated at 2 weeks and 3 months respectively after onset of the disease at the outpatient clinic or by telephone call. Lung infection, urinary tract infection and atrial fibrillation if any were recorded on admission. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and the GCS scores were recorded within 24 hours on and after admission, at the second week, and at the third month after the onset of cerebral infarction respectively. RESULTS: The factors of BI at 2 weeks and 3 months after onset were the initial PG level, WBC count and initial NIHSS scores. Besides, urinary tract infection on admission was also the factor for BI at 3 months. CONCLUSION: Active measures should be taken to control these factors to improve the daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction. PMID:25214953

  7. In vitro induction of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activity in patients with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Handgretinger, R; Bruchelt, G; Kimmig, A; Dopfer, R; Niethammer, D; Treuner, J

    1989-01-01

    Therapy of disseminated neuroblastoma remains an unsolved problem in pediatric oncology. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches have to be developed for this malignancy. In this paper, we investigated the possibility of the in vitro generation and expansion of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells in patients with disseminated neuroblastoma. Although the patients had very low Natural Killer (NK) activity, it was possible to induce LAK activity in peripheral mononuclear lymphocytes (PMNC) by incubation with Interleukin-2 (IL-2). Moreover, the PMNCs could be expanded up to 50-fold in the presence of Interleukin-2 while maintaining or even increasing their LAK activity. The target cells were neuroblastoma cell lines and, in one case, autologous neuroblastoma cells. Additionally, it was possible to induce LAK cell activity against autologous neuroblastoma cells in bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells.

  8. Housestaff activism: the emergence of patient-care demands.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, L M

    1982-01-01

    There have been two trends within the physician housestaff movement: increased acceptance of collective bargaining and unions, and a shift from narrower economic to broader political demands, including some involving patient care. Case studies of politically active housestaff associations in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles are used to examine the emergence of "patient-care" demands and their compatibility with collective bargaining frameworks. As house-staff have become principal providers of care to indigent populations in public hospitals, and economic cutbacks have endangered service as well as the positions of physicians, patient-care demands arise and become infused with demands for participation and control in decision-making. Common factors in the politicization of housestaff have been the contribution of activists of the sixties as leaders, and the impact of fiscal crisis and economic retrenchment in the seventies. However, the emergence and resolution of these issues has differed depending upon legal, political, historical, and organizational variations. In general, patient-care issues are supported by housestaff when they dovetail with housestaff interests. However, physician interests can diverge from those of patients, as in the case of manpower redistribution. On the whole, wages and benefits have done better than educational or patient-care demands. Educational demands have met with counterattack, and patient care, limited by the traditional scope of collective bargaining, has had to evolve indirectly, and has been hurt by long-term economic trends. Finally, national housestaff organization is limited by the wide-ranging politics and ideas of diverse regional organizations which represent different types of training institutions and career orientations.

  9. Predictive and Prognostic Value of Ribonucleotide Reductase Regulatory Subunit M1 and Excision Repair Cross-Complementation Group 1 in Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma (UC) Treated with First-Line Gemcitabine Plus Platinum Combination Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miso; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Lee, Eunsik; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae Min; Heo, Dae Seog; Lee, Se-Hoon; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have suggested that expression of ribonucleotide reductase regulatory subunit M1 (RRM1) and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is associated with resistance to gemcitabine and cisplatin, respectively. We evaluated the significance of RRM1 and ERCC1 expression to predict tumor response to gemcitabine plus platinum chemotherapy (GP) and survival in advanced UC. We retrospectively collected tumor samples and reviewed clinical data of 53 patients with unresectable or metastatic UC, who were treated with first-line GP. RRM1 and ERCC1 expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Among 53 patients, 12 (22.6%) and 26 (49.1%) patients had tumors that demonstrated a high expression for RRM1 and ERCC1, respectively. Twenty-nine (70.7%) of 41 patients with low RRM1 expression achieved a clinical response (complete + partial responses), but only 3 (25.0%) of 12 patients with high RRM1 expression achieved a clinical response after GP (P=0.007). Nineteen (70.4%) of 27 patients with low ERCC1 expression achieved a clinical response, while 13 (50.0%) of 26 patients with high ERCC1 expression achieved a clinical response (P=0.130). High RRM1 expression was associated with shorter progression free survival and overall survival (PFS P=0.006, OS P=0.006). Multivariate analysis confirmed that patients with high RRM1 expression had a significantly greater risk of progression and death than those with low RRM1 expression. ERCC1 status was not a significant predictor for PFS and OS. RRM1 expression was predictive and prognostic of clinical outcome in advanced UC treated with gemcitabine plus platinum combination chemotherapy.

  10. Health Literacy and Education as Mediators of Racial Disparities in Patient Activation Within an Elderly Patient Cohort.

    PubMed

    Eneanya, Nwamaka D; Winter, Michael; Cabral, Howard; Waite, Katherine; Henault, Lori; Bickmore, Timothy; Hanchate, Amresh; Wolf, Michael; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) assesses facets of patient engagement to identify proactive health behaviors and is an important predictor of health outcomes. Health literacy and education are also important for patient participation and successful navigation of the health care system. Because health literacy, education, and patient activation are associated with racial disparities, we sought to investigate whether health literacy and education would mediate racial differences in patient activation. Participants were 265 older adults who participated in a computer-based exercise interventional study. Health literacy was assessed using the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA). Of 210 eligible participants, 72% self-identified as Black and 28% as White. In adjusted analyses, education and health literacy each significantly reduced racial differences in patient activation. These findings are especially important when considering emerging data on the significance of patient activation and new strategies to increase patient engagement. PMID:27524777

  11. Placebo Response is Driven by UCS Revaluation: Evidence, Neurophysiological Consequences and a Quantitative Model

    PubMed Central

    Puviani, Luca; Rama, Sidita

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing scientific interest in the placebo effect and increasing understanding of neurobiological mechanisms, theoretical modeling of the placebo response remains poorly developed. The most extensively accepted theories are expectation and conditioning, involving both conscious and unconscious information processing. However, it is not completely understood how these mechanisms can shape the placebo response. We focus here on neural processes which can account for key properties of the response to substance intake. It is shown that placebo response can be conceptualized as a reaction of a distributed neural system within the central nervous system. Such a reaction represents an integrated component of the response to open substance administration (or to substance intake) and is updated through “unconditioned stimulus (UCS) revaluation learning”. The analysis leads to a theorem, which proves the existence of two distinct quantities coded within the brain, these are the expected or prediction outcome and the reactive response. We show that the reactive response is updated automatically by implicit revaluation learning, while the expected outcome can also be modulated through conscious information processing. Conceptualizing the response to substance intake in terms of UCS revaluation learning leads to the theoretical formulation of a potential neuropharmacological treatment for increasing unlimitedly the effectiveness of a given drug. PMID:27436417

  12. Placebo Response is Driven by UCS Revaluation: Evidence, Neurophysiological Consequences and a Quantitative Model.

    PubMed

    Puviani, Luca; Rama, Sidita

    2016-07-20

    Despite growing scientific interest in the placebo effect and increasing understanding of neurobiological mechanisms, theoretical modeling of the placebo response remains poorly developed. The most extensively accepted theories are expectation and conditioning, involving both conscious and unconscious information processing. However, it is not completely understood how these mechanisms can shape the placebo response. We focus here on neural processes which can account for key properties of the response to substance intake. It is shown that placebo response can be conceptualized as a reaction of a distributed neural system within the central nervous system. Such a reaction represents an integrated component of the response to open substance administration (or to substance intake) and is updated through "unconditioned stimulus (UCS) revaluation learning". The analysis leads to a theorem, which proves the existence of two distinct quantities coded within the brain, these are the expected or prediction outcome and the reactive response. We show that the reactive response is updated automatically by implicit revaluation learning, while the expected outcome can also be modulated through conscious information processing. Conceptualizing the response to substance intake in terms of UCS revaluation learning leads to the theoretical formulation of a potential neuropharmacological treatment for increasing unlimitedly the effectiveness of a given drug.

  13. Development of telescope control system for the 50cm telescope of UC Observatory Santa Martina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tzu-Chiang; Soto, Ruben; Reveco, Johnny; Vanzi, Leonardo; Fernández, Jose M.; Escarate, Pedro; Suc, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    The main telescope of the UC Observatory Santa Martina is a 50cm optical telescope donated by ESO to Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. During the past years the telescope has been refurbished and used as the main facility for testing and validating new instruments under construction by the center of Astro-Engineering UC. As part of this work, the need to develop a more efficient and flexible control system arises. The new distributed control system has been developed on top of Internet Communication Engine (ICE), a framework developed by Zeroc Inc. This framework features a lightweight but powerful and flexible inter-process communication infrastructure and provides binding to classic and modern programming languages, such as, C/C++, java, c#, ruby-rail, objective c, etc. The result of this work shows ICE as a real alternative for CORBA and other de-facto distribute programming framework. Classical control software architecture has been chosen and comprises an observation control system (OCS), the orchestrator of the observation, which controls the telescope control system (TCS), and detector control system (DCS). The real-time control and monitoring system is deployed and running over ARM based single board computers. Other features such as logging and configuration services have been developed as well. Inter-operation with other main astronomical control frameworks are foreseen in order achieve a smooth integration of instruments when they will be integrated in the main observatories in the north of Chile

  14. Differentiation of UC-MSCs into hepatocyte-like cells in partially hepatectomized model rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Kuang, Qiaoting; Lao, Xue-Jun; Yang, Jie; Huang, Weidong; Zhou, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the possibility of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) surviving and differentiating into hepatocyte-like cells in partially hepatectomized model rats. MSCs were isolated from human umbilical cord and cultured with collagenase digestion. Cell surface markers were detected and fifth generation UC-MSCs were labeled with PKH26. The partially hepatectomized model rats were injected with the labeled human umbilical cord MSCs and transplanted through the portal vein. The survival of the labeled cells, in differentiation conditions and the expression of hepatic marker albumin were observed at post-transplantation 1, 2 and 3 weeks under a fluorescence microscope. It was found that the human umbilical cord MSCs could be cultured and amplified in vitro. Following transplantation to the partially hepatectomized liver of the model rat, the cells survived and expresses the hepatic marker albumin in vivo. After being labeled with PKH26, the cells were visualized as red fluorescence under a fluorescence microscope. In the frozen sections of the liver, the marked cells scattered around and most of them expressed albumin with green fluorescence under the fluorescence microscope. In conclusion, the transplanted human umbilical cord MSCs survived and differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells. The human umbilical cord MSCs may therefore be a main source of hepatocytes in transplantation. PMID:27602090

  15. Evidence for brain glial activation in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Loggia, Marco L; Chonde, Daniel B; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Arabasz, Grae; Catana, Ciprian; Edwards, Robert R; Hill, Elena; Hsu, Shirley; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ji, Ru-Rong; Riley, Misha; Wasan, Ajay D; Zürcher, Nicole R; Albrecht, Daniel S; Vangel, Mark G; Rosen, Bruce R; Napadow, Vitaly; Hooker, Jacob M

    2015-03-01

    Although substantial evidence has established that microglia and astrocytes play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of persistent pain in animal models, the role of glial cells in human pain disorders remains unknown. Here, using the novel technology of integrated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging and the recently developed radioligand (11)C-PBR28, we show increased brain levels of the translocator protein (TSPO), a marker of glial activation, in patients with chronic low back pain. As the Ala147Thr polymorphism in the TSPO gene affects binding affinity for (11)C-PBR28, nine patient-control pairs were identified from a larger sample of subjects screened and genotyped, and compared in a matched-pairs design, in which each patient was matched to a TSPO polymorphism-, age- and sex-matched control subject (seven Ala/Ala and two Ala/Thr, five males and four females in each group; median age difference: 1 year; age range: 29-63 for patients and 28-65 for controls). Standardized uptake values normalized to whole brain were significantly higher in patients than controls in multiple brain regions, including thalamus and the putative somatosensory representations of the lumbar spine and leg. The thalamic levels of TSPO were negatively correlated with clinical pain and circulating levels of the proinflammatory citokine interleukin-6, suggesting that TSPO expression exerts pain-protective/anti-inflammatory effects in humans, as predicted by animal studies. Given the putative role of activated glia in the establishment and or maintenance of persistent pain, the present findings offer clinical implications that may serve to guide future studies of the pathophysiology and management of a variety of persistent pain conditions.

  16. Left ventricular synchronicity is impaired in patients with active acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Kırış, Abdulkadir; Erem, Cihangir; Turan, Oğuzhan Ekrem; Civan, Nadim; Kırış, Gülhanım; Nuhoğlu, Irfan; Ilter, Abdulselam; Ersöz, Halil Onder; Kutlu, Merih

    2013-08-01

    Acromegaly is associated with a variety of cardiovascular disturbances such as left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic cardiac dysfunction, and hypertension. Left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony means the impairment of synchronicity and is defined as the loss of the simultaneous peak contraction of corresponding cardiac segments. The objective of this study was to investigate whether acromegalic patients have left ventricular dyssynchrony. Dyssynchrony was evaluated in 30 patients with active acromegaly and 30 controls. All the patients and controls were subjected to a tissue synchronization imaging. The time to regional peak systolic tissue velocity (Ts) in LV by the six-basal-six-mid-segmental model was measured on ejection phase TSI images and four TSI parameters of systolic dyssynchrony were computed. All TSI parameters of LV dyssynchrony increased in patients with acromegaly compared to the controls: the standard deviation (SD) of the 12 LV segments Ts (43.5 ± 13.5 vs 26.2 ± 12.5, p < 0.001); the maximal difference in Ts between any 2 of the 12 LV segments (133.3 ± 38 vs 84.6 ± 37.6, p < 0.001); the SD of the 6 basal LV segments (41.1 ± 15.9 vs 25.4 ± 14.8, p = 0.001); and the maximal difference in Ts between any 2 of the 6 basal LV segments (102.6 ± 37.5 vs 65.2 ± 36.9, p = 0.001). In addition, there were significant relationships between the levels of growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 and Ts-SD-12. LV synchronicity has been impaired in patients with acromegaly. Left ventricular dyssynchrony is associated with disease activity and it may contribute to the harmful cardiovascular effects of acromegaly.

  17. Activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the esophageal epithelium of patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Chwiesko, A; Baniukiewicz, A; Semeniuk, J; Kaczmarski, M; Wasielica-Berger, J; Milewski, R; Dabrowski, A

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE), a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease, is associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer. Mitogen-activated protein kinases may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this process. We aimed to evaluate mitogen-activated protein kinases activity in esophageal mucosa of patients with BE and find possible relationship between reflux type and BE. Twenty-four patients (mean age: 59 years) with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and endoscopically suspected esophageal metaplasia (ESEM) were prospectively enrolled for testing by a multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring along with a Bilitec 2000. Endoscopic biopsies were taken from methylene blue-positive pit patterns (sites suggesting specialized intestinal metaplasia [SIM]), from 2 cm above the Z-line and from cardial parts of the stomach. The biopsies were analyzed for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 activity by Western blot. Seventeen ESEMs had histologically proven metaplasia: eight patients had SIM and nine had gastric-type epithelia (GE). Biliary reflux was more evident in SIM (P = 0.019) but not in GE (P = 0.019); non-biliary reflux was typical for GE (P = 0.005) but not for SIM (P = 0.04). Strong activations of ERK and p38 were found predominantly in SIM, but not in normal esophageal mucosa (NE) (P = 0.01 and P < 0.001 respectively). Strong signals for active JNK and p38 were detected in GE, but not in NE (P = 0.006 and P = 0.02 respectively). ERK activity was significantly higher than p38 activity in ESEM patients only with GE (P = 0.02). The strong activation of ERK, but not JNK is indicative of SIM. The presence of bile in gastroesophageal refluxate is predisposing to SIM, but not to GE in esophageal mucosa.

  18. The myosin-binding UCS domain but not the Hsp90-binding TPR domain of the UNC-45 chaperone is essential for function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ni, Weiming; Hutagalung, Alex H; Li, Shumin; Epstein, Henry F

    2011-09-15

    The UNC-45 family of molecular chaperones is expressed in metazoan organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The UNC-45 protein is essential in C. elegans for early body-wall muscle cell development and A-band assembly. We show that the myosin-binding UCS domain of UNC-45 alone is sufficient to rescue lethal unc-45 null mutants arrested in embryonic muscle development and temperature-sensitive loss-of-function unc-45 mutants defective in worm A-band assembly. Removal of the Hsp90-binding TPR domain of UNC-45 does not affect rescue. Similar results were obtained with overexpression of the same fragments in wild-type nematodes when assayed for diminution of myosin accumulation and assembly. Titration experiments show that, on a per molecule basis, UCS has greater activity in C. elegans muscle in vivo than full-length UNC-45 protein, suggesting that UNC-45 is inhibited by either the TPR domain or its interaction with the general chaperone Hsp90. In vitro experiments with purified recombinant C. elegans Hsp90 and UNC-45 proteins show that they compete for binding to C. elegans myosin. Our in vivo genetic and in vitro biochemical experiments are consistent with a novel inhibitory role for Hsp90 with respect to UNC-45 action.

  19. Serum amylase activity and renal amylase activity clearance in patients with severely impaired renal function and in patients treated with renal allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E B; Brock, A; Kornerup, H J

    1976-03-01

    Serum amylase activity was measured in 29 nondialysed patients with severe renal failure, in 24 uraemic patients treated with chronic haemodialysis, and in 29 patients treated with renal allotransplantation. Simultaneous measurement of renal amylase activity clearance (CAm) and creatinine clearance (CCr) was performed in 25 patients with severe renal failure and in 19 transplanted patients. Serum amylase activity was elevated in all three groups. CAm was significantly correlated to CCr both in the group with severe renal failure and in the transplanted group. Unlike in the group of transplanted patients, the ratio CAm/CCr was significantly increased in patients with severe impaired renal function. It is concluded that the elevation of serum amylase activity in patients with impaired renal function is primarily due to decreased glomerular filtration rate. The value of CAm/CCr for diagnosing acute pancreatitis is doubtful in patients with severe renal disease.

  20. Smoking further increases platelet activity in patients with mild hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1996-01-01

    In this study the authors examine whether smoking further heightens platelet activity and reduces fibrinolysis above that already present in mild hypertension. Ten smokers and 11 non-smokers, all with mild hypertension (defined as a diastolic pressure between 90 and 110 mm Hg) were compared for their platelet activity in vitro and in vivo and for their fibrinolytic activity. Successive measurements were made with the patients lying at rest after they had assumed the erect posture for 10 min and at the end of a 5-min moderately strenuous exercise test. The threshold for platelet aggregation by ADP in vitro was significantly lower in samples taken from the smokers at rest (1.4 +/- 0.9 mumol L(-1)) than in the non-smokers (3.5 +/- 2.5 mumol L(-1)), and the difference persisted both in the upright posture and after exercise. The level of platelet release of beta-thromboglobulin was, likewise, higher in the smokers in the upright posture. Neither standing up nor physical exercise had any significant influence on either of these two indices of platelet activity. The euglobulin clot lysis time was slightly longer in the smokers than in the non-smokers in all three experimental situations, but the differences were not significant. Inhibitor of tissue plasminogen activator was not materially different in the two groups (Table 2). The results indicate that smoking adds a further element of heightened platelet activity to that inherently present in hypertension.

  1. Reduced killer cell activity of lymphocytes from patients with asbestosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, M; Kagamimori, S; Yokoyama, K; Okada, A

    1985-01-01

    Immunological abnormalities in 30 patients with asbestosis were investigated by examining the cytoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity by killer (K) cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes; the effects of interferon on NK activity was also examined. Fifteen men and 15 women (mean age 58; range 40-72) with asbestosis but who were free of complications such as tuberculosis, carcinoma, or steroid treatment were the subjects for study. There were nine cases of type 1, 19 cases of type 2, and two cases of type 3 disease as described in the ILO classification of pneumoconiosis. They were all textile workers with a mean duration of 18 years (3-40 years) since first exposure to chrysotile. Controls matched for age and sex were selected from a population without occupational exposure to asbestos. The activity of the NK and K cells in patients with asbestosis was significantly lower than in the control group, but the populations of NK and K cells in the peripheral blood lymphocytes were not significantly different in the two groups. An in vitro experiment showed that the increase in the cytotoxicity of the NK cell after treatment with interferon-alpha was significantly lower in the subjects than in the controls. These results indicate that one of the defence mechanisms in relation to cancer is deficient in patients with asbestosis. PMID:3978049

  2. Scintigraphic assessment of indium-111-labeled granulocyte splenic pooling: A new approach to inflammatory bowel disease activity

    SciTech Connect

    Loreal, O.; Moisan, A.; Bretagne, J.F.; LeCloirec, J.; Raoul, J.L.; Gastard, J.; Herry, J.Y. )

    1990-09-01

    We have conducted a prospective study into the sensitivity and the specificity of the fall in splenic activity (FSA) as an index of activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). FSA was measured on scintiscans obtained at 3 and 24 hr postinjection of indium-111-labeled granulocytes. One hundred and twenty-two scans were acquired in 96 patients who were divided into six groups: Gr. I = normal volunteers (n = 10); Gr. II = inflammatory rheumatism (n = 10); Gr. III = abscesses (n = 17); Gr. IV = ulcerative colitis (UC: n = 23); Gr. V = colonic Crohn's disease (CCD: n = 22); and Gr. VI = ileal Crohn's disease (ICD: n = 14). FSA for Groups I and II was constantly below 10%, but it was increased in the other four groups (abscesses: 39% +/- 12%; UC: 35% +/- 13.5%; CCD: 23.7% +/- 14.7%; ICD: 21.5% +/- 11.7%). There was a significant correlation between fecal excretion of 111In (FEI) and FSA in patients with IBD (UC: r = 0.71, p less than 0.001; CCD: r = 0.74, p less than 0.001; ICD: r = 0.43, p less than 0.001). FSA was followed in 16 patients with IBD after medical treatment and there was a significant correlation between variations in FSA and in FEI (r = 0.879, p less than 0.001). FSA is a very sensitive although nonspecific index of disease activity in IBD and may replace FEI in the assessment of IBD activity.

  3. Prevention of urinary tract infections in palliative radiation for vertebral metastasis and spinal compression: A pilot study in 71 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Manas, Ana . E-mail: amanas.hdoc@salud.madrid.org; Glaria, Luis; Pena, Carmen; Sotoca, Amalia; Lanzos, Eduardo; Fernandez, Castalia; Riviere, Marc

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of bladder instillations of hyaluronic acid (HA) on the prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients receiving emergency radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression. Methods and Materials: Patients were recruited consecutively at one center and assigned to usual care (UC) (n = 34, mean age 62.2 years) or UC with once-weekly HA instillation (UC + HA) (Cystistat: 40 mg in 50 mL phosphate-buffered saline) (n = 37; mean age, 63.1 years). All patients had an indwelling catheter and received radiotherapy. UTI status was assessed at baseline and during hospitalization. Results: At baseline, patient groups were comparable, except for the prevalence of UTI at baseline, which was 11.8% and 0% in the UC and UC + HA patients, respectively (p = 0.0477). During hospitalization, 76.5% (vs. 11.8% at baseline, p < 0.0001) of the UC patients had a UTI compared with 13.5% (vs. 0% at baseline, p = 0.0541) of the UC + HA patients (p < 0.0001). Both groups were hospitalized for similar periods (19.8 days [UC] vs. 18.5 days, p = 0.4769) and received equivalent radiotherapy sessions (4.6 [UC] vs. 5.8 sessions, p = 0.2368). Conclusions: Patients receiving UC + HA had a 5.7-fold decrease in UTI prevalence over the hospitalization period compared to UC patients, suggesting that bladder instillations of HA effectively prevent UTI in patients with indwelling catheters receiving radiotherapy for nerve compression.

  4. Dynamic hyperinflation during activities of daily living in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cláudia S; Nogueira, Fabiana R; Porto, Elias F; Gazzotti, Mariana R; Nascimento, Oliver A; Camelier, Aquiles; Jardim, José R

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether some activities of daily living (ADLs) usually related to dyspnea sensation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with dynamic lung hyperinflation (DH) and whether the use of simple energy conservation techniques (ECTs) might reduce this possible hyperinflation. Eighteen patients (mean age: 65.8 ± 9.8 years) with moderate-to-severe COPD performed six ADLs (walking on a treadmill, storing pots, walking 56 meters carrying a 5-kilogram weight, climbing stairs, simulating taking a shower, and putting on shoes) and had their inspiratory capacity (IC) measured before and after each task. The patients were moderately obstructed with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1): 1.4 ± 0.4 L (50% ± 12.4); FEV1/forced vital capacity: 0.4 ± 8.1; residual volume/total lung capacity: 52.7 ± 10.2, and a reduction in IC was seen after all six activities (p < 0.05): (1) going upstairs, 170 mL; (2) walking 56 meters carrying 5 kilogram weight, 150 mL; (3) walking on a treadmill without and with ECT, respectively, 230 mL and 235 mL; (4) storing pots without and with ECT, respectively, 170 mL and 128 mL; (5) taking a shower without and with ECT, respectively, 172 mL and 118 mL; and (6) putting on shoes without and with ECT, respectively, 210 mL and 78 mL). Patients with moderate to severe COPD develop DH after performing common ADLs involving the upper and lower limbs. Simple ECTs may avoid DH in some of these ADLs.

  5. Dynamic hyperinflation during activities of daily living in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cláudia S; Nogueira, Fabiana R; Porto, Elias F; Gazzotti, Mariana R; Nascimento, Oliver A; Camelier, Aquiles; Jardim, José R

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether some activities of daily living (ADLs) usually related to dyspnea sensation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with dynamic lung hyperinflation (DH) and whether the use of simple energy conservation techniques (ECTs) might reduce this possible hyperinflation. Eighteen patients (mean age: 65.8 ± 9.8 years) with moderate-to-severe COPD performed six ADLs (walking on a treadmill, storing pots, walking 56 meters carrying a 5-kilogram weight, climbing stairs, simulating taking a shower, and putting on shoes) and had their inspiratory capacity (IC) measured before and after each task. The patients were moderately obstructed with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1): 1.4 ± 0.4 L (50% ± 12.4); FEV1/forced vital capacity: 0.4 ± 8.1; residual volume/total lung capacity: 52.7 ± 10.2, and a reduction in IC was seen after all six activities (p < 0.05): (1) going upstairs, 170 mL; (2) walking 56 meters carrying 5 kilogram weight, 150 mL; (3) walking on a treadmill without and with ECT, respectively, 230 mL and 235 mL; (4) storing pots without and with ECT, respectively, 170 mL and 128 mL; (5) taking a shower without and with ECT, respectively, 172 mL and 118 mL; and (6) putting on shoes without and with ECT, respectively, 210 mL and 78 mL). Patients with moderate to severe COPD develop DH after performing common ADLs involving the upper and lower limbs. Simple ECTs may avoid DH in some of these ADLs. PMID:25896955

  6. Epithelial Cell-Derived a Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase-17 Confers Resistance to Colonic Inflammation Through EGFR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Sasaki, Aya; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Okabayashi, Koji; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial regeneration is a key process for the recovery from ulcerative colitis (UC). Here we demonstrate that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17 (ADAM17), a main sheddase for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, is essential for defensive epithelial properties against UC by promoting epithelial cell growth and goblet cell differentiation in mouse and human. Mice with systemic deletion of Adam17 developed severe dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis when compared to mice with myeloid cell Adam17 deletion or control littermates. ADAM17 was predominantly expressed by regenerating epithelia in control mice, and its loss or inhibition attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation, epithelial proliferation, mucus production and barrier functions. Conversely, ectopic EGFR stimulation promoted epithelial regeneration thereby partially rescuing the severe colitis caused by ADAM17 deficiency. In UC patients, epithelial ADAM17 expression positively correlated with both cell proliferation and goblet cell number. These findings suggest that maintaining ADAM17–EGFR epithelial signaling is necessary for the recovery from UC and would be beneficial to therapeutic strategies targeting ADAM17-mediated TNF-α shedding. PMID:27077118

  7. Active core rewarming avoids bioelectrical impedance changes in postanesthetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Postoperative hypothermia is a common cause of complications in patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Hypothermia is known to elicit electrophysiological, biochemical, and cellular alterations thus leading to changes in the active and passive membrane properties. These changes might influence the bioelectrical impedance (BI). Our aim was to determine whether the BI depends on the core temperature. Methods We studied 60 patients (52 female and 8 male) age 40 to 80 years with an ASA I-II classification that had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy under balanced inhalation anesthesia. The experimental group (n = 30) received active core rewarming during the transanesthetic and postanesthesic periods. The control group (n = 30) received passive external rewarming. The BI was recorded by using a 4-contact electrode system to collect dual sets of measurements in the deltoid muscle. The body temperature, hemodynamic variables, respiratory rate, blood-gas levels, biochemical parameters, and shivering were also measured. The Mann-Whitney unpaired t-test was used to determine the differences in shivering between each group at each measurement period. Measurements of body temperature, hemodynamics variables, respiratory rate, and BI were analyzed using the two-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Results The gradual decrease in the body temperature was followed by the BI increase over time. The highest BI values (95 ± 11 Ω) appeared when the lowest values of the temperature (35.5 ± 0.5°C) were reached. The active core rewarming kept the body temperature within the physiological range (over 36.5°C). This effect was accompanied by low stable values (68 ± 3 Ω) of BI. A significant decrease over time in the hemodynamic values, respiratory rate, and shivering was seen in the active core-rewarming group when compared with the controls. The temporal course of shivering was different from those of body temperatue and BI. The control patients showed a

  8. Secretion of Alpha-Hemolysin by Escherichia coli Disrupts Tight Junctions in Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Du, Zhengyu; Struve, Carsten; Charbon, Godefroid; Karczewski, Jurgen; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Wells, Jerry M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The potential of Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolated from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to damage the integrity of the intestinal epithelium was investigated. Methods: E. coli strains isolated from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and healthy controls were tested for virulence capacity by molecular techniques and cytotoxic assays and transepithelial electric resistance (TER). E. coli isolate p19A was selected, and deletion mutants were created for alpha-hemolysin (α-hemolysin) (hly) clusters and cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1 (cnf1). Probiotic E. coli Nissle and pathogenic E. coli LF82 were used as controls. Results: E. coli strains from patients with active UC completely disrupted epithelial cell tight junctions shortly after inoculation. These strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are all α-hemolysin positive. In contrast, probiotic E. coli Nissle, pathogenic E. coli LF82, four E. coli from patients with inactive UC and three E. coli strains from healthy controls did not disrupt tight junctions. E. coli p19A WT as well as cnf1, and single loci of hly mutants from cluster I and II were all able to damage Caco-2 (Heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) cell tight junctions. However, this phenotype was lost in a mutant with knockout (Δ) of both hly loci (P<0.001). Conclusions: UC-associated E. coli producing α-hemolysin can cause rapid loss of tight junction integrity in differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers. This effect was abolished in a mutant unable to express α-hemolysin. These results suggest that high Hly expression may be a mechanism by which specific strains of E. coli pathobionts can contribute to epithelial barrier dysfunction and pathophysiology of disease in IBD. PMID:26938480

  9. Muscle activation patterns in patients with recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Jaggi, Anju; Noorani, Ali; Malone, Alex; Cowan, Joseph; Lambert, Simon; Bayley, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to present muscle patterns observed with the direction of instability in a series of patients presenting with recurrent shoulder instability. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was carried out on shoulder instability cases referred for fine wire dynamic electromyography (DEMG) studies at a specialist upper limb centre between 1981 and 2003. An experienced consultant clinical neurophysiologist performed dual needle insertion into four muscles (pectoralis major (PM), latissimus dorsi (LD), anterior deltoid (AD) and infraspinatus (IS)) in shoulders that were suspected to have increased or suppressed activation of muscles that could be contributing to the instability. Raw EMG signals were obtained while subjects performed simple uniplanar movements of the shoulder. The presence or absence of muscle activation was noted and compared to clinical diagnosis and direction of instability. Results: A total of 140 (26.6%) shoulders were referred for fine wire EMG, and 131 studies were completed. Of the shoulders tested, 122 shoulders (93%) were identified as having abnormal patterns and nine had normal patterns. PM was found to be more active in 60% of shoulders presenting with anterior instability. LD was found to be more active in 81% of shoulders with anterior instability and 80% with posterior instability. AD was found to be more active in 22% of shoulders with anterior instability and 18% with posterior instability. IS was found to be inappropriately inactive in only 3% of shoulders with anterior instability but in 25% with posterior instability. Clinical assessment identified 93% of cases suspected to have muscle patterning, but the specificity of the clinical assessment was only correct in 11% of cases. Conclusion: The DEMG results suggest that increased activation of LD may play a role in both anterior and posterior shoulder instability; increased activation of PM may play a role in anterior instability. PMID:23493512

  10. In vitro evaluation of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 as human immunodeficiency virus microbicides.

    PubMed

    Van Herrewege, Yven; Michiels, Jo; Van Roey, Jens; Fransen, Katrien; Kestens, Luc; Balzarini, Jan; Lewi, Paul; Vanham, Guido; Janssen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 (Dapivirine) effectively prevented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in cocultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells, representing primary targets in sexual transmission. Both drugs had a favorable therapeutic index. A 24-h treatment with 1,000 nM UC-781 or 100 nM TMC120-R147681 prevented cell-free HIV infection, whereas 10-fold-higher concentrations blocked cell-associated HIV. PMID:14693562

  11. In Vitro Evaluation of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 as Human Immunodeficiency Virus Microbicides†

    PubMed Central

    Van Herrewege, Yven; Michiels, Jo; Van Roey, Jens; Fransen, Katrien; Kestens, Luc; Balzarini, Jan; Lewi, Paul; Vanham, Guido; Janssen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 (Dapivirine) effectively prevented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in cocultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells, representing primary targets in sexual transmission. Both drugs had a favorable therapeutic index. A 24-h treatment with 1,000 nM UC-781 or 100 nM TMC120-R147681 prevented cell-free HIV infection, whereas 10-fold-higher concentrations blocked cell-associated HIV. PMID:14693562

  12. 78 FR 53195 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... patient satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any...

  13. Fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered UC-aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, T.; Hsieh, D.P.

    1985-05-01

    A detailed fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered UC-aflatoxin B1 at low doses was performed. The milk collected in the first 24 h following dosing contained radioactivity equivalent to 0.45-1.1% of the dose given. The radioactivity in each sample was partitioned into 4 fractions: ether, protein, dichloromethane, and water-alcohol. Over 80% of the radioactivity was detected in the dichloromethane fraction, of which over 95% was attributable to aflatoxin M1. No aflatoxin B1 or other known aflatoxin metabolites were detected in any fraction. The results indicate that the major metabolite of aflatoxin B1 in goat milk is aflatoxin M1 and that other metabolites, including conjugates, are of minor significance.

  14. FIFI: The MPE Garching/UC Berkeley Far-Infrared Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geis, Norbert; Genzel, Reinhard; Haggerty, M.; Herrmann, F.; Jackson, J.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Nikola, T.; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Rumitz, M.; Stacey, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the performance characteristics of the MPE Garching/UC Berkeley Far-Infrared Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FIFI) for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The spectrometer features two or three cryogenic tunable Fabry-Perot filters in series giving spectral resolution R of up to 10(exp 5) in the range of 40 microns less than lambda less than 200 microns, and an imaging 5x5 array of photoconductive detectors with variable focal plane plate scale. The instrument works at background limited sensitivity of up to 2 x 10(exp -19) W cm(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) per pixel per resolution element at R = 10(exp 5) on the KAO.

  15. The Chicago Public Schools (CPS)/University of Chicago (UC) Internet Project (CUIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, D.; Rebull, L. M.; Munoz-Franco, L.; Jay, M. J.; Burke, R. D.; Fenstermacher, K. D.; Lenz, D. D.; MacNaught, H.; Marks, M. D.; Murphy, J.; Thomas, C.; York, D. G.; Anderson, D.; Chisom, Y.; Dynis, R.; Letts, J.; Lewis, E.; Harris, E.; Segneri, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Chicago Public Schools (CPS)/University of Chicago (UC) Internet Project (CUIP) is a collaborative pilot project among the UC, CPS Central Administration, and 24 public schools in the Woodlawn, Hyde Park/ South Kenwood, and North Kenwood/Oakland neighborhoods. Our primary goal is connecting these schools to the Internet, emphasizing the continued support of the schools and their teachers after the computers and connections are in place. We work with principals, department heads, and individual teachers to create and nurture a self-sustaining computer culture that will both maintain the network systems and incorporate the technology into the curriculum. We also encourage the schools to take advantage of ther new connectivity by collaborating and sharing resources among themselves. Formal interactions are fostered with museums and research centers, locally and nationally. CUIP is committed to supporting these schools as they use the Internet to enhance student learning. CUIP's goals include: providing T-1 internet connectivity to 24 local schools, supporting the technology coordinator in each school in order to ensure continuous Internet connectivity, and developing effective technology plans, including technology upgrades; nurturing and supporting teachers interested in incorporating technology in their classroom; fostering an environment in which the students can acquire a wide range of comptuer skills appropriate to the current job market; and fostering similar community-based efforts, around Chicago and the nation. CUIP's milestones include: internet service connected to 12 schools; technology interns placed in some CUIP schools in collaboration with Governors State University; email provided to more than half of the 660 teachers in connected schools; and World Wide Web for Teachers, a summer class on curriculum uses of the Web, taught by CUIP staff to 23 of over 100 public school teacher applicants.

  16. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie; Mullins, C. Daniel; Novak, Priscilla; Thomas, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Designing culturally sensitive personalized interventions is essential to sustain patients' involvement in their treatment and encourage patients to take an active role in their own health and health care. We consider patient activation and empowerment as a cyclical process defined through patient accumulation of knowledge, confidence, and…

  17. An Open-Label, Single-Arm, Phase 2 Trial of the Polo-Like Kinase Inhibitor Volasertib (BI 6727) in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Walter M.; Vaughn, David J.; Sonpavde, Guru; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Petrylak, Daniel P.; Rosen, Peter; Lin, Chia-Chi; Mahoney, John; Modi, Sanjiv; Lee, Peter; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Su, Wu-Chou; Spira, Alexander; Pilz, Korinna; Vinisko, Richard; Schloss, Charles; Fritsch, Holger; Zhao, Charles; Carducci, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Polo-like kinases (Plks) control multiple steps during the cell cycle, and Plk1 is overexpressed in urothelial cancer (UC). Volasertib (BI 6727), a Plk inhibitor, has demonstrated antitumor activity in several malignancies, including UC. In this phase 2 trial, the authors investigated volasertib as a second-line treatment in advanced/metastatic UC. METHODS Patients who progressed within 2 years of 1 prior chemotherapy regimen received 300 mg volasertib on day 1 every 3 weeks. The dose was escalated to 350 mg in cycle 2 if volasertib was tolerated in cycle 1. The primary endpoint was tumor response, which was assessed every 6 weeks; secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, overall survival, duration of response, safety, and pharmacokinetics. RESULTS Fifty patients were enrolled, and the median patient age was 68.5 years (range, 52-83 years). All patients had received prior platinum, 94% of patients had relapsed ≤2 years after prior therapy, 36% had liver metastases, and 54% had lung metastases. The median number of treatment cycles was 2 (range, 1-27 treatment cycles), and 23 patients were dose escalated at cycle 2. Seven patients (14%) had a partial response, 13 (26%) had stable disease, and 30 (60%) progressed within 6 weeks. The median response duration was 41 weeks (range, 29.1-77.3 weeks). The median progression-free survival was 1.4 months, and the median overall survival was 8.5 months. The most frequent grade 3 and 4 adverse events were neutropenia (28%), thrombocytopenia (20%), and anemia (16%). No cumulative toxicity was observed. CONCLUSIONS Volasertib as second-line treatment for advanced/metastatic UC had an acceptable safety profile but demonstrated insufficient antitumor activity for further evaluation as a monotherapy. PMID:24339028

  18. Complement factor B activation in patients with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Ivan; Dalloul, Mudar; Wong, Karen A; Bakare, Olufunke; Schweis, Franz; Garala, Maya; Alam, Amit; Medranda, Giorgio; Lekovic, Jovana; Shuaib, Waqas; Tedjasukmana, Andreas; Little, Perry; Hanono, Daniel; Wijetilaka, Ruvini; Weedon, Jeremy; Lin, Jun; Toledano, Roulhac d'Arby; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Bb, the active fragment of complement factor B (fB), has been reported to be a predictor of preeclampsia. However, conflicting results have been found by some investigators. We hypothesized that the disagreement in findings may be due to the racial/ethnic differences among various study groups, and that fB activation is significant in women of an ethnic minority with preeclampsia. We investigated the maternal and fetal levels of Bb (the activated fB fragment) in pregnant women of an ethnic minority with or without preeclampsia. We enrolled 291 pregnant women (96% of an ethnic minority, including 78% African-American). Thirteen percent of these were diagnosed with preeclampsia. Maternal venous blood was collected from all participants together with fetal umbilical cord blood samples from 154 deliveries in the 291 women. The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and multivariate analyses. Maternal Bb levels were significantly higher in the preeclamptic group than in the nonpreeclamptic group. Levels of Bb in fetal cord blood were similar in both groups. Subgroup analyses of African-American patients' results confirmed the study hypothesis that there would be a significant increase in Bb in the maternal blood of the preeclamptic group and no increase in Bb in the fetal cord blood of this group. These results suggest that a maternal immune response through complement fB might play a role in the development of preeclampsia, particularly in African-American patients.

  19. Decreased microglial activation in MS patients treated with glatiramer acetate

    PubMed Central

    Ratchford, John N.; Endres, Christopher J.; Hammoud, Dima A.; Pomper, Martin G.; Shiee, Navid; McGready, John; Pham, Dzung L.; Calabresi, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Activated microglia are thought to be an important contributor to tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). The level of microglial activation can be measured non-invasively using [11C]-R-PK11195, a radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET). Prior studies have identified abnormalities in the level of [11C]-R-PK11195 uptake in patients with MS, but treatment effects have not been evaluated. Nine previously untreated relapsing-remitting MS patients underwent PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain at baseline and after one year of treatment with glatiramer acetate. Parametric maps of [11C]-R-PK11195 uptake were obtained for baseline and post-treatment PET scans, and the change in [11C]-R-PK11195 uptake pre- to post-treatment was evaluated across the whole brain. Region of interest analysis was also applied to selected subregions. Whole brain [11C]-R-PK11195 binding potential per unit volume decreased 3.17% (95% CI: −0.74%, −5.53%) between baseline and one year (p = 0.018). A significant decrease was noted in cortical gray matter and cerebral white matter, and a trend towards decreased uptake was seen in the putamen and thalamus. The results are consistent with a reduction in inflammation due to treatment with glatiramer acetate, though a larger controlled study would be required to prove that association. Future research will focus on whether the level of baseline microglial activation predicts future tissue damage in MS and whether [11C]-R-PK11195 uptake in cortical gray matter correlates with cortical lesion load. PMID:22160466

  20. Contact system dependent fibrinolytic activity in vivo: observations in healthy subjects and factor XII deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; Hack, C E; de Boer, J P; Brandjes, D P; Büller, H R; ten Cate, J W

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of activation of the contact system to activation of the fibrinolytic system in vivo was investigated in healthy volunteers and in factor XII deficient patients. The plasminogen activating activity in normal plasma was only partially blocked (for 77%) with specific antibodies to tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). The residual activity could be quenched by a monoclonal antibody that inhibits factor XII activity and was not present in patients with a factor XII deficiency. The formation of plasmin upon the DDAVP stimulus as reflected by circulating plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin (PAP) complexes was lower in factor XII deficient patients than in healthy volunteers. These results indicate that in vivo the plasminogen activating activity is partially dependent on activation of the contact system. This fibrinolytic activity is impaired in factor XII deficient patients which may explain the occurrence of thromboembolic complications in these patients.

  1. Relationship between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Iwakura, Masahiro; Okura, Kazuki; Shibata, Kazuyuki; Kawagoshi, Atsuyoshi; Sugawara, Keiyu; Takahashi, Hitomi; Shioya, Takanobu

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the relationship between balance impairments and physical activity in COPD. There has been no study investigating the relationship between balance and objectively measured physical activity. Here we investigated the association between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients. Materials and methods Twenty-two outpatients with COPD (mean age, 72±7 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 53%±21% predicted) and 13 age-matched healthy control subjects (mean age, 72±6 years) participated in the study. We assessed all 35 subjects’ balance (one-leg standing test [OLST] times, Short Physical Performance Battery total scores, standing balance test scores, 4 m gait speed, and five-times sit-to-stand test [5STST]) and physical activity (daily steps and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day [MV-PA]). Possible confounders were assessed in the COPD group. The between-group differences in balance test scores and physical activity were analyzed. A correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted in the COPD group. Results The COPD patients exhibited significant reductions in OLST times (P=0.033), Short Physical Performance Battery scores (P=0.013), 4 m gait speed (P<0.001), five-times sit-to-stand times (P=0.002), daily steps (P=0.003), and MV-PA (P=0.022) compared to the controls; the exception was the standing balance test scores. The correlation and multivariate regression analyses revealed significant independent associations between OLST times and daily steps (P<0.001) and between OLST times and MV-PA (P=0.014) in the COPD group after adjusting for possible confounding factors. Conclusion Impairments in balance and reductions in physical activity were observed in the COPD group. Deficits in balance are independently associated with physical inactivity. PMID:27445470

  2. Tackling the Transition to UC: To Implement Unified Communications on Campus, It Often Pays to Take a Phased Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the challenges faced by two schools that lie, coincidentally, just 110 miles apart in the vast spaces of North Dakota. Both schools, members of the North Dakota University System, decided to forge ahead with a unified communications (UC) implementation. And while their final solutions differ, how the two…

  3. The Issue of Transfer: Transfer Data from CPEC/UC/CSU & the Transfer Assembly. Student Equity Report #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jorge R.

    This report examines the flow of transfer students from Orange County community colleges to the University of California (UC), the California State University (CSU), and regionally accredited independent colleges as reported to the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC) and the Center for the Study of Community Colleges (CSCC). Data…

  4. Former University of California Chancellors Urge New Funding Models for UC. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.15.11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Studies in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this era of massive budget cuts, the survival of the University of California as a great institution of learning has become the subject of increasingly urgent debate. Twenty-two of the twenty-nine living former UC chancellors met in San Francisco on June 26-28, 2011 to discuss the current threats facing the University and all of California…

  5. Performance of a color-difference formula based on OSA-UCS space using small-medium color differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas, Rafael; Melgosa, Manuel; Oleari, Claudio

    2006-09-01

    An investigation of the color metrics and the complexity of the CIEDE2000 formula shows that CIELAB space is inadequate to represent small-medium color differences. The OSA-UCS (Uniform Color Space) Committee has shown that no space with uniform scale for large color differences exists. Therefore the practical way for color-difference specification is a color-difference formula in a nonuniform space. First, the BFD (Bradford University) ellipses are considered in the OSA-UCS space, and their very high regularity suggests a new and very simple color-difference formula at constant luminance. Then the COM (combined) data set used for the development of the CIEDE2000 formula is considered in the OSA-UCS space, and the color-difference formula is extended to sample pairs with a different luminance factor. The value of the performance factor PF/3 for the proposed OSA-UCS-based formula shows that the formula performs like the more complex CIEDE2000 formula for small-medium color differences.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Laverivirus UC1, a Dicistrovirus-Like RNA Virus Featuring an Unusual Genome Organization

    PubMed Central

    DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Laverivirus UC1, assembled from San Francisco wastewater. This dicistronic RNA virus bears some similarity to dicistroviruses; however, it appears to have a unique genome organization relative to all other known RNA viruses. PMID:26139710

  7. Thyroid axis activity and suicidal behavior in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Duval, Fabrice; Mokrani, Marie-Claude; Lopera, Felix Gonzalez; Diep, Thanh Son; Rabia, Hassen; Fattah, Saïd

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between suicidal behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis activity in depressed patients. The serum levels of thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were evaluated before and after 0800 and 2300 h thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) challenges, on the same day, in 95 medication-free DSM-IV euthyroid major depressed inpatients and 44 healthy hospitalized controls. Compared to controls: (1) patients with a positive suicide history (PSH; n=53) showed lower basal FT4 (at 0800 h: p<0.005; at 2300 h: p<0.03), but normal FT3 levels, while patients with a negative suicide history (NSH; n=42) showed normal FT4 and FT3 levels; (2) TSH responses to TRH (DeltaTSH) were blunted in NSHs (at 0800 h: p<0.03; at 2300 h: p<0.00001), but not in PSHs; (3) both NSHs and PSHs showed lower DeltaDeltaTSH values (differences between 2300 h-DeltaTSH and 0800 h-DeltaTSH) (p<0.000001 and p<0.003, respectively). Compared to NSHs, basal FT4 levels were reduced in PSHs (at 0800 h: p<0.002; at 2300h: p<0.006). HPT parameters were not significantly different between recent suicide attempters (n=32) and past suicide attempters (n=21). However, compared to controls, recent suicide attempters showed lower 2300 h-DeltaTSH (p<0.04) and DeltaDeltaTSH (p<0.002) values, and lower basal FT4 values (at 0800 h: p<0.006; at 2300 h: p<0.02). Our results, obtained in a large sample of depressed inpatients, indicate that various degrees of HPT axis dysregulation are associated with the history of suicide. PMID:20129737

  8. Peripheral Endocannabinoid System Activity in Patients Treated With Sibutramine

    PubMed Central

    Engeli, Stefan; Heusser, Karsten; Janke, Jürgen; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judith; Luft, Friedrich C.; Jordan, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Objective The endocannabinoid system (ECS) promotes weight gain and obesity-associated metabolic changes. Weight loss interventions may influence obesity-associated risk indirectly through modulation of the peripheral ECS. We investigated the effect of acute and chronic treatment with sibutramine on components of the peripheral ECS. Methods and Procedures Twenty obese otherwise healthy patients received randomized, double-blind, crossover treatment with placebo and 15 mg/day sibutramine for 5 days each, followed by 12 weeks open-label sibutramine treatment. We determined circulating anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol and expression levels of endocannabinoid genes in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue biopsies. Results Body weight was stable during the acute treatment period and decreased by 6.0 ± 0.8 kg in those patients completing 3 months of sibutramine treatment (P < 0.05). Circulating endocannabinoids and the expression of ECS genes did not change with acute or chronic sibutramine treatment. Discussion The ECS is activated in obesity. We did not find any influence of 5% body weight loss induced by sibutramine on circulating levels of endocannabinoids and adipose-tissue expression of endocannabinoid genes in obese subjects. These data confirm our previous findings on dietary weight loss and suggest that the dysregulation of the ECS may be a cause rather than a consequence of obesity. PMID:18356837

  9. Familial cancer among consecutive uterine cancer patients in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Uterine cancer (UC) represents 5.1% of all female malignancies in Sweden. Accumulation of UC in families occurs in around 5% of cases. We wanted to identify any familial association between UC and other selected cancers and to study the frequency of Lynch,Cowden and cancer syndromes among consecutive UC patients in Sweden. Methods 481 UC patients were included. Information on the cancer diagnoses of their relatives (first- (FDRs) and second-degree (SDRs) relatives and first cousins) was obtained. The relative frequencies of different cancers among relatives were compared to those in the Swedish general cancer population in 1970 and 2010. Families that fulfilled the criteria for hereditary cancer syndromes were tested for mutations in the causative genes. Families with at least one case of UC in addition to the index patient were compared to families with no additional cases to investigate possible characteristics of putative hereditary cancer syndromes. Results There was an increased prevalence of UC in our study population compared to the Swedish general cancer population in 1970 and 2010 (6% vs. 4% and 3%, respectively). Seven families had Lynch Syndrome according to the Amsterdam II criteria. No families fulfilled the criteria for Cowden syndrome. In total 13% of index patients had at least one relative with UC and these families tended to have more cases of early onset cancer among family members. In addition, 16% of index patients were diagnosed with at least one other cancer. No families fulfilled the criteria for Cowden syndrome. Conclusion We showed a familial clustering of UC among relatives of our index patients. Of the seven families with mutation-verified Lynch Syndrome, only one had been previously diagnosed, highlighting the need to increase gynecologists’ awareness of the importance of taking family history. Our data on multiple cancers and young age of onset in families with uterine cancer is compatible with the existence of additional

  10. Development of a pUC19-based recombinant plasmid to serve as a positive control in PCR for Orientia tsutsugamushi.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Nozomu; Sakata, Akiko; Takano, Ai; Kawabata, Hiroki; Watanabe, Haruo; Kurane, Ichiro; Kishimoto, Toshio; Ando, Shuji

    2009-05-01

    A recombinant positive control plasmid was developed to be used in PCR for Orientia tsutsugamushi. This pUC19-based plasmid contains the O. tsutsugamushi DNA sequence, part of which is replaced with Candida albicans DNA. pUC19-Posi is a PCR control that provides several advantages over currently used positive controls for both universal and serotypical PCR.

  11. Physical Activity Enjoyment and Self-Efficacy As Predictors of Cancer Patients' Physical Activity Level

    PubMed Central

    Ungar, Nadine; Wiskemann, Joachim; Sieverding, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical activity (PA) can support cancer patients during medical treatment by reducing side-effects and increasing quality of life. However, PA levels mostly decline after diagnosis. Which factors can explain if patients are able to remain or even increase their PA level? Self-efficacy is an important cognitive factor that has been linked to cancer patients' PA across many studies. In contrast, affective factors such as PA enjoyment have rarely been examined. We compare the influence of self-efficacy and PA enjoyment on cancer patients' PA levels after completion of an exercise or stress-management intervention. Methods: Outpatient cancer patients [N = 72; 54% female; M = 56 years, SD = 12.34; most with breast or colon cancer (34%, 15%)] were enrolled in the MOTIVACTION study, a 4-week intervention (1 h counseling followed by weekly phone calls), with pre-test (T1), post-test (T2), and a 10-week follow-up (T3). Participants were randomized to either an exercise intervention (emphasizing self-regulatory strategies for behavior change) or to a stress management intervention (coping and relaxation techniques). Sixty-seven patients remained in the study and completed the SQUASH assessment of PA, a measure of maintenance self-efficacy (7 items, Cronbach's α = 0.88) and PA enjoyment (2 items, Cronbach's α = 0.89). Regression analyses were calculated with PA level (at T2 and T3) as dependent variable and relative weight analyses were conducted. The study was registered at clinicalTrials.gov (unique identifier:NCT01576107; URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01576107?term=motivaction&rank=1). Results: Baseline self-efficacy and change in PA enjoyment significantly predicted cancer patients' PA level at T2 adjusting for baseline PA and type of intervention. Relative weight (RW) analysis revealed that PA enjoyment (baseline and change together) explained 34.3% of the dependent variable, self-efficacy (baseline and change) explained 38.4%. At follow

  12. Activation of blood coagulation and the activity of cancer procoagulant (EC 3.4.22.26) in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mielicki, W P; Tenderenda, M; Rutkowski, P; Chojnowski, K

    1999-11-01

    The activity of cancer procoagulant (CP), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), the concentration of thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT) and the concentration of fibrinogen were analysed in blood of breast cancer patients scheduled for surgery. The serum level of CP activity was dependent on the stage of the disease. The CP activity was increased in 72% of patients with an early stage of cancer and in only 20% of patients with an advanced stage of the disease when compared to the baseline level for non-cancer controls. In all patients PT remained at normal levels (80-120%). There was no significant change in APTT (27-39 s) in early stage cancer patients. Only one patient with advanced cancer had APTT shortened to 23 s. Also one advanced stage patient had significantly elevated level of TAT (14.96 microg/l); in all other patients the concentration of TAT remained at normal levels (1-4.1 microg/l). Forty-four percent of early stage cancer patients and 22% of advanced cancer patients had an elevated level of fibrinogen (Fg) ( > 350 mg%). However, there was no correlation between the level of Fg and the CP activity (P > 0.05). The data suggest that: (1) serum CP activity increases at the early stage of breast cancer and decreases down to the normal level in the advanced stage of the disease; (2) there is no evidence of blood clotting activation in the early stage breast cancer patients; and (3) CP does not facilitate the activation of coagulation in the breast cancer patients or the level of such activation is below the sensitivity of assays used in the experiment.

  13. Cooperative Activities of the University of California Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaupre, Linda

    The report documents current cooperation activities between University of California (UC) libraries and others. Information about programs, procedures, and agreements was gathered in the fall of 1976 from staff members at the nine UC campuses and from librarians at other California institutions. Information sharing between on-campus and off-campus…

  14. Phenomenological correlates of metabolic activity in 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Van Gelder, P.; Brodie, J.D.; Overall, J.E.; Cancro, R.; Gomez-Mont, F.

    1987-02-01

    Using (11C)-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography (PET), the authors measured brain metabolism in 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia to assess which of the metabolic measures from two test conditions was more closely related to the patients' differing clinical characteristics. The two conditions were resting and activation, and an eye tracking task was used. Patients with more negative symptoms showed lower global metabolic rates and more severe hypofrontality than did the patients with fewer negative symptoms. Differences among the patients were distinguished by the task: sicker patients failed to show a metabolic activation response. These findings suggest that cerebral metabolic patterns reflect clinical characteristics of schizophrenic patients.

  15. Patient Activation in Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Differ between Men and Women?

    PubMed Central

    van Hateren, Kornelis J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aim was to investigate whether the degree of patient activation of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is different between men and women. Furthermore, we investigated which factors are associated with patient activation in men and women. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 1615 patients with T2D from general practices. Patient activation was measured with the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) questionnaire. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to investigate the association between gender and patient activation. Stratified analyses according to gender were performed to investigate which factors are associated with patient activation. Results. No association between gender and PAM score was found after adjustment for all selected confounders (p = 0.094). In men, lower age (p = 0.001), a higher WHO-5 score (p < 0.001), and a lower BMI (p = 0.013) were associated with a higher PAM score. In women, a higher WHO-5 score (p < 0.017) and the absence of macrovascular complications (p < 0.031) were associated with a higher PAM score. Conclusion. There is no difference in the degree of patient activation of men and women with T2D. Age, well-being, and BMI were found to be associated with patient activation in men, whereas well-being and macrovascular complications were found to be associated with patient activation in women.

  16. Patient Activation in Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Differ between Men and Women?

    PubMed Central

    van Hateren, Kornelis J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aim was to investigate whether the degree of patient activation of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is different between men and women. Furthermore, we investigated which factors are associated with patient activation in men and women. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 1615 patients with T2D from general practices. Patient activation was measured with the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) questionnaire. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to investigate the association between gender and patient activation. Stratified analyses according to gender were performed to investigate which factors are associated with patient activation. Results. No association between gender and PAM score was found after adjustment for all selected confounders (p = 0.094). In men, lower age (p = 0.001), a higher WHO-5 score (p < 0.001), and a lower BMI (p = 0.013) were associated with a higher PAM score. In women, a higher WHO-5 score (p < 0.017) and the absence of macrovascular complications (p < 0.031) were associated with a higher PAM score. Conclusion. There is no difference in the degree of patient activation of men and women with T2D. Age, well-being, and BMI were found to be associated with patient activation in men, whereas well-being and macrovascular complications were found to be associated with patient activation in women. PMID:27656658

  17. Examination of UC-ZrC after long term irradiation at thermionic temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L.; Johnson, H. O.

    1972-01-01

    Two fluoride tungsten clad UC-ZrC fueled capsules, designated as V-2C and V-2D, were examined a hot cell after irradiation in NASA Plum Brook Reactor at a maximum cladding temperature of 1930 K for 11,089 and 12,031 hours to burnups of 3.0 x 10 to the 20th power and 2.1 x 10 to the 20th power fission/c.c. respectively. Percentage of fission gas release from the fuel material was measured by radiochemical means. Cladding deformation, fuel-cladding interaction and microstructures of fuel, cladding, and fuel-cladding interface were studied metallographically. Compositions of dispersions in fuel, fuel matrix and fuel-cladding interaction layer were analyzed by electron microprobe techniques. Axial and radial distributions of burnup were determined by gamma-scan, autoradiography and isotopic burnup analysis. The results are presented and discussed in conjunction with the requirements of thermionic fuel elements for space power application.

  18. High Dickkopf-1 expression is associated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, CHENG-HUANG; HSIEH, HSIAO-YEN; WANG, YUAN-HUNG; CHEN, SYUE-YI; TUNG, CHUN-LIANG; WU, JIANN-DER; LIN, CHANG-TE; CHAN, MICHAEL W.-Y.; HSU, CHENG-DA; CHANG, DECHING

    2010-01-01

    Although Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) has been demonstrated to be associated with tumorigenesis in various types of human tumors, a correlation between DKK1 and urothelial carcinoma (UC) has not been reported. In the present study, the correlation between DKK1 expression and UC progression was investigated. Seventy-five UC patients were enrolled. The expression of DKK1 in serum and UC tissue was detected by ELISA, real-time PCR and Western blotting. Prognostic significance was assessed by using Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank tests. The results showed that serum levels of DKK1 were significantly higher in the UC patients with muscle-invasive (p=0.0001) and high-grade tumors (p=0.00001) as compared to the controls. A high-serum DKK1 was also associated with poor disease-free survival in the UC patients (hazard ratio=2.44; 95% CI 1.10–5.40; p=0.028). Furthermore, DKK1 was also overexpressed in 93% (41/44) of the UC tissues. Therefore, the findings indicate that the expression of DKK1 is associated with UC progression. PMID:22993615

  19. Aberrant activation of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Tsung-Chieh; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Hsieh, Yi-Yueh; Chen, Tse-Chin; Yeh, Chien-Yu; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lin, Deng-Yn; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 (NFAT2), the major NFAT protein in peripheral T cells, in sustained T cell activation and intractable inflammation in human ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: We used two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis, immunohistochemistry, double immunohistochemical staining, and confocal microscopy to inspect the expression of NFAT2 in 107, 15, 48 and 5 cases of UC, Crohn’s disease (CD), non-specific colitis, and 5 healthy individuals, respectively. RESULTS: Up-regulation with profound nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 of lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of colonic mucosa was found specifically in the affected colonic mucosa from patients with UC, as compared to CD or NC (P < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 primarily occurred in CD8+T, but was less prominent in CD4+ T cells or CD20+B cells. It was strongly associated with the disease activity, including endoscopic stage (τ = 0.2145, P = 0.0281) and histologic grade (τ = 0.4167, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We disclose for the first time the nucleo-translocation/activatin of NFAT2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis. Activation of NFAT2 was specific for ulcerative colitis and highly associated with disease activity. Since activation of NFAT2 is implicated in an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop of sustained T-cell activation and NFAT proteins play key roles in the calcium/calcineurin signaling pathways, our results not only provide new insights into the mechanism for sustained intractable inflammation, but also suggest the calcium-calcineurin/NFAT pathway as a new therapeutic target for ulcerative colitis. PMID:18350607

  20. Discordant assessment of lupus activity between patients and their physicians: the Singapore experience.

    PubMed

    Leong, K P; Chong, E Y Y; Kong, K O; Chan, S P; Thong, B Y H; Lian, T Y; Chng, H H; Koh, E T; Teh, C L; Lau, T C; Law, W G; Cheng, Y K; Badsha, H; Chew, L C; Yong, W H; Howe, H S

    2010-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus often assess their disease activity differently from their physicians. We studied the factors associated with this discordance. The data provided by 534 systemic lupus erythematosus patients were analyzed. We compared the physician and patient assessments of lupus activity on a visual-assessment scale from the same visit. We collected clinical data and scores from MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Quality-of-Life Questionnaire, Rheumatology Attitudes Index, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index, and revised Systemic Lupus Activity Measure. Patients tended to score their disease activity higher than do their physicians, when these factors were present: poorer general health assessment, presence of thrombocytopenia, hypertension and urinary sediments, and difficulty in carrying groceries. Physicians tended to score the disease activity higher than do the patients in these circumstances proteinuria, hemolysis, use of azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, tiredness, photosensitivity, higher revised Systemic Lupus Activity Measure score, casturia, and patient report of being more easily ill than are other patients. There was only moderate correlation between the discordance in the baseline and the subsequent visits. The physician assessment of disease activity at baseline correlated better with an objective measure of disease activity (revised Systemic Lupus Activity Measure) in the subsequent visit than the patient assessment. In conclusion, discordance in the perception of disease activity between patients and physicians may be amenable to intervention.

  1. Influence of mental practice on upper limb muscle activity and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, JuHyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effects of mental practice on muscle activity of the upper extremity and performance of daily activities in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this research, mental practice was conducted by 2 chronic hemiplegic stroke patients. Mental practice was conducted 30 minutes a day, 5 times a week, for 2 weeks. Evaluation was conducted 4 times before and after intervention. Muscle activity was measured using a surface electromyogram test, and the Modified Barthel Index was used to measure changes in the ability to carry out daily activities. [Results] Both the muscle activity of the upper extremity and capability to perform daily activities showed improved outcomes after mental practice was conducted. [Conclusion] Through this research, mental practice was proven to be effective in improving the muscle activity of upper extremity and capability to perform daily activities in chronic hemiplegic stroke patients. PMID:27134412

  2. The long noncoding RNAs PVT1 and uc002mbe.2 in sera provide a new supplementary method for hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinyu; Han, Junqing; Zhang, Jian; Li, Guanzhen; Liu, Hui; Cui, Xianping; Xu, Yantian; Li, Tao; Liu, Juan; Wang, Chuanxi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults worldwide. Several studies have demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in the development of various types of cancer, including HCC. These findings prompted us to examine the detectability of lncRNAs in blood samples from patients with HCC. In this study, we explored the expression levels of 31 cancer-related lncRNAs in sera from 71 HCC patients and 64 healthy individuals by reverse transcription and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We found that 25 lncRNAs could be detected in the serum and that 7 had significantly different expression levels. A 2-lncRNA signature (PVT1 and uc002mbe.2) identified by stepwise regression showed potential as a diagnostic marker for HCC. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.764 (95% CI: 0.684–0.833). The sensitivity and specificity values of this serum 2-lncRNA signature for distinguishing HCC patients from the healthy group were 60.56% and 90.62%, respectively. The diagnostic ability of the combination of the serum 2-lncRNA signature with alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was much greater than that of AFP alone. The expression levels of the 2 lncRNAs were associated with clinical parameters including tumor size, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage, and serum bilirubin. PMID:27495068

  3. The long noncoding RNAs PVT1 and uc002mbe.2 in sera provide a new supplementary method for hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinyu; Han, Junqing; Zhang, Jian; Li, Guanzhen; Liu, Hui; Cui, Xianping; Xu, Yantian; Li, Tao; Liu, Juan; Wang, Chuanxi

    2016-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults worldwide. Several studies have demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in the development of various types of cancer, including HCC. These findings prompted us to examine the detectability of lncRNAs in blood samples from patients with HCC. In this study, we explored the expression levels of 31 cancer-related lncRNAs in sera from 71 HCC patients and 64 healthy individuals by reverse transcription and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We found that 25 lncRNAs could be detected in the serum and that 7 had significantly different expression levels. A 2-lncRNA signature (PVT1 and uc002mbe.2) identified by stepwise regression showed potential as a diagnostic marker for HCC. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.764 (95% CI: 0.684-0.833). The sensitivity and specificity values of this serum 2-lncRNA signature for distinguishing HCC patients from the healthy group were 60.56% and 90.62%, respectively. The diagnostic ability of the combination of the serum 2-lncRNA signature with alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was much greater than that of AFP alone. The expression levels of the 2 lncRNAs were associated with clinical parameters including tumor size, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage, and serum bilirubin. PMID:27495068

  4. 75 FR 32539 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review... Form 10-0503).'' Title: Survey of Healthcare Experiences, Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA...

  5. 76 FR 56504 - Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request... spinal cord patients' satisfaction with VA rehabilitation and health care system. Affected Public... of automated collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title:...

  6. [The activity of thermolability amylase in serum nonsmoking and smoking healthy persons and patients with pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Sliwińska-Mossoń, Mariola; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prove the influence of tobacco smoking on total and thermolability amylase activity in the serum of non-smoking and smoking health persons and patients with diagnosed acute (AP), chronic exaggerated (CEP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) and patients with diabetes. The blood has been collected from 28 healthy persons and 52 patients. The enzyme total activity has been determined using the colorimetric method with substrate 1,2-odilauryl-rac-glycero-3-glutaric acid -(6-methylresorufin) ester. The thermolability activity has been determined using the thermolability test. The tobacco smoke has been examined on the basic of concentration of cotinine in the serum of health persons and patients. The highest amylase total activity and her thermolability form have been found in smoking patients with diabetes. It has been noted that the serum amylase activity is significantly higher in smoking and healthy persons (p < 0.0002; p < 0.002) then in non-smoking and healthy patients. However no significant differences have been found between the thermolability total activity, however it has been noted higher thermolability thermolability activity in smoking patients with CP and nonsmoking patients with CP. Smoking patients with AP and CEP have been found to have a significantly increased enzyme and her form thermolability activity (p > 0.001; p > 0.005 respectively) when compared to non-smoking patients. Results of examination indicate that tobacco smoking has a significant influence on pancreatic amylase activity.

  7. [Physical activity adapted to the obese patients' needs: which assessments for what kind of prescription?].

    PubMed

    Lecoultre, V; Giusti, V

    2015-03-25

    Physical activity is a key element for the obese patient willing to lose weight. The main aim of physical activity is to contribute to produce, and maintain, a negative energy balance. A recent approach suggests to focus on the intensity eliciting the maximal lipid oxidation rate. Physical activity prescription should however be adapted to the patient's physiological and metabolic profile. Determining the physical fitness of the patient during an incremental test and assessing body composition may be central elements determining physical activity prescription. Provided the activities are adapted to the patient's profile, numerous physical activities may be performed by the obese patient. A practical, clinical approach, based upon the metabolic profiling of the patient is proposed in this article.

  8. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Mullins, C Daniel; Novak, Priscilla; Thomas, Stephen B

    2016-02-01

    Designing culturally sensitive personalized interventions is essential to sustain patients' involvement in their treatment and encourage patients to take an active role in their own health and health care. We consider patient activation and empowerment as a cyclical process defined through patient accumulation of knowledge, confidence, and self-determination for their own health and health care. We propose a patient-centered, multilevel activation and empowerment framework (individual-, health care professional-, community-, and health care delivery system-level) to inform the development of culturally informed personalized patient activation and empowerment (P-PAE) interventions to improve population health and reduce racial and ethnic disparities. We discuss relevant Affordable Care Act payment and delivery policy reforms and how they affect patient activation and empowerment. Such policies include Accountable Care Organizations and value-based purchasing, patient-centered medical homes, and the community health benefit. Challenges and possible solutions to implementing the P-PAE are discussed. Comprehensive and longitudinal data sets with consistent P-PAE measures are needed to conduct comparative effectiveness analyses to evaluate the optimal P-PAE model. We believe the P-PAE model is timely and sustainable and will be critical to engaging patients in their treatment, developing patients' abilities to manage their health, helping patients express concerns and preferences regarding treatment, empowering patients to ask questions about treatment options, and building up strategic patient-provider partnerships through shared decision making.

  9. Increased Enterococcus faecalis infection is associated with clinically active Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Youlian; Chen, Huiting; He, Hanchang; Du, Yanlei; Hu, Jiaqi; Li, Yingfei; Li, Yuyuan; Zhou, Yongjian; Wang, Hong; Chen, Ye; Nie, Yuqiang

    2016-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the abundance of pathogenic gut microbes in Chinese patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and disease severity.We collected clinical data and fecal samples from 47 therapy-naive Chinese patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 67 patients with Crohn disease (CD), and 48 healthy volunteers. Bacteria levels of Fusobacterium species (spp), enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (B fragilis), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E coli), and Enterococcus faecalis (E faecalis) were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated to test associations between bacterial content and clinical parameters.Compared to healthy controls, the levels of both Fusobacterium spp and E faecalis were significantly increased in the feces of patients with IBD (P < 0.01). B fragilis levels were higher (P < 0.05) and E faecalis levels lower (P < 0.05) in patients with CD compared to those with UC. Increased E faecalis colonization in CD associated positively with disease activity (P = 0.015), Crohn disease activity index (CDAI; R = 0.3118, P = 0.0108), and fecal calprotectin (P = 0.016).E faecalis and Fusobacterium spp are significantly enriched in patients with IBD, and increased E faecalis infection is associated with clinically active CD. PMID:27684872

  10. Formation of Diastereoisomeric Piperazine-2,5-dione from uc(dl)-Alanine in the Presence of Olivine and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchida, Shigeshi; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Masuda, Harue

    2016-04-01

    uc(dl)-Alanine (Ala) was heated with/without powdered olivine and water at 120 °C for 8 days to investigate the formation of the diastereoisomers of piperazine-2,5-dione (diketopiperazine, DKP). When only uc(dl)-Ala was heated with a small amount of water, 3.0 % of uc(dl)-Ala changed to cis- and trans-DKP after 8 days. DKPs were not detected after heating when no water was added. The presence of a small amount of water is important factor controlling peptide production rates under thermal conditions. When DL-Ala was heated with olivine powder for 8 days, the yields of cis- and trans-DKP were 6.8 and 4.9 %, respectively. The high yield of cis-DKP compared with trans-DKP was attributed to greater thermal stability of cis-DKP. After heating for 8 days, the diastereoisomeric excess of cis-DKP without olivine was 7.3 %, whereas a much higher value of 16.3 % was obtained in the presence of olivine. Taken together, these results show that olivine is not only an efficient catalyst for the formation of DKPs but that it also play a significant role in determining the diastereoisomer selectivity of these cyclic dipeptides.

  11. Energy-dependent cell volume maintenance in UC-11MG human astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Lomneth, R; Gruenstein, E I

    1989-10-01

    Swelling of astrocytes in the brain is a major cause of the morbidity and mortality associated with stroke and head trauma. Using a human astrocytoma cell line (UC-11MG) as a model system, we studied cell volume changes caused by ATP depletion under conditions mimicking hypoxia. ATP levels were reduced to less than 10% of control using the metabolic inhibitors KCN or antimycin in combination with glucose deprivation. This was sufficient to eliminate ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake, indicating the Na+-K+-adenosinetriphosphatase was not operating. Furosemide-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake was reduced by approximately 60%, indicating Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransport was also sensitive to ATP loss. ATP depletion resulted in a 30-40% reduction of cell volume within 60 min. ATP depletion also resulted in a net loss of intracellular K+. This loss of K+ could be blocked by Ba2+, indicating the K+ loss was through a conductive channel. When the net K+ loss was blocked by Ba2+, the volume decrease was also prevented. The cells remained viable throughout the time period as judged by exclusion of ethidium bromide by 99% of the cells and recovery of ATP levels to 75% of control within 60 min. We conclude that ATP depletion, following inhibition of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, causes astrocytes to shrink because of a more rapid loss of K+ than uptake of Na+. Thus it appears that ATP depletion alone is not sufficient to account for the rapid phase of astrocytic swelling observed during cerebral ischemia. PMID:2801931

  12. High pressure behaviour of uranium dicarbide (UC2): Ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B. D.; Mukherjee, D.; Joshi, K. D.; Kaushik, T. C.

    2016-08-01

    The structural stability of uranium dicarbide has been examined under hydrostatic compression employing evolutionary structure search algorithm implemented in the universal structure predictor: evolutionary Xtallography (USPEX) code in conjunction with ab-initio electronic band structure calculation method. The ab-initio total energy calculations involved for this purpose have been carried out within both generalized gradient approximations (GGA) and GGA + U approximations. Our calculations under GGA approximation predict the high pressure structural sequence of tetragonal → monoclinic → orthorhombic for this material with transition pressures of ˜8 GPa and 42 GPa, respectively. The same transition sequence is predicted by calculations within GGA + U also with transition pressures placed at ˜24 GPa and ˜50 GPa, respectively. Further, on the basis of comparison of zero pressure equilibrium volume and equation of state with available experimental data, we find that GGA + U approximation with U = 2.5 eV describes this material better than the simple GGA approximation. The theoretically predicted high pressure structural phase transitions are in disagreement with the only high experimental study by Dancausse et al. [J. Alloys. Compd. 191, 309 (1993)] on this compound which reports a tetragonal to hexagonal phase transition at a pressure of ˜17.6 GPa. Interestingly, during lowest enthalpy structure search using USPEX, we do not see any hexagonal phase to be closer to the predicted monoclinic phase even within 0.2 eV/f. unit. More experiments with varying carbon contents in UC2 sample are required to resolve this discrepancy. The existence of these high pressure phases predicted by static lattice calculations has been further substantiated by analyzing the elastic and lattice dynamic stability of these structures in the pressure regimes of their structural stability. Additionally, various thermo-physical quantities such as equilibrium volume, bulk modulus, Debye

  13. Evaluation of Potential Hydrocarbon Transport at the UC-4 Emplacement Hole, Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, Brad F.; Papelis, Charalambos; Pohll, Greg; Sloop, Derek

    1998-09-30

    Emplacement hole UC-4 was drilled in 1969 at the Central Nevada Test Area and left filled with drilling mud. Surface characterization samples collected from abandoned mud pits in the area yielded elevated concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbon, thereby raising a concern that the mud-filled emplacement hole may be leaching hydrocarbons into alluvial aquifers. This study was initiated to address this concern. An analytical solution for flow near a wellbore was used to calculate the amount of time it would take for a contaminant to move through the mud-filled well and into the surrounding aquifer. No hydraulic data are available from the emplacement hole; therefore, ranges of hydraulic conductivity and porosity were used in 100 Monte Carlo realizations to estimate a median travel time. Laboratory experiments were performed on samples collected from the central mud pit to determine the hydrocarbon release function for the bentonite drilling mud. The median contaminant breakthrough took about 12,000 years to travel 10 m, while the initial breakthrough took about 300 years and the final breakthrough took about 33,000 years. At a distance of about 10 m away from the emplacement hole, transport velocity is dominated by the hydraulics of the aquifer and not by the emplacement hole hydraulics. It would take an additional 45,500 years for the contaminant to travel 800 m to the U.S. Department of Energy land exclusion boundary. Travel times were primarily affected by the hydraulic conductivity and porosity of the drilling mud, then by the hydraulic conductivity, porosity and hydraulic gradient of the alluvial aquifer, followed by the hydrocarbon release function.

  14. Call 4 Concern: patient and relative activated critical care outreach.

    PubMed

    Odell, Mandy; Gerber, Karin; Gager, Melanie

    Patients can experience unexpected deterioration in their physiological condition that can lead to critical illness, cardiac arrest, admission to the intensive care unit and death. While ward staff can identify deterioration through monitoring physiological signs, these signs can be missed, interpreted incorrectly or mismanaged. Rapid response systems using early warning scores can fail if staff do not follow protocols or do not notice or manage deterioration adequately. Nurses often notice deterioration intuitively because of their knowledge of individual patients. Patients and their relatives have the greatest knowledge of patients, and can often pick up subtle signs physiological deterioration before this is identified by staff or monitoring systems. However, this ability has been largely overlooked. Call 4 Concern (C4C) is a scheme where patients and relatives can call critical care teams directly if they are concerned about a patient's condition- it is believed to be the first of its kind in the UK. A C4C feasibility project ran for six months, covering patients being transferred from the intensive care unit to general wards. C4C has the potential to prevent clinical deterioration and is valued by patients and relatives. Concerns of ward staff could be managed through project management. As it is relatively new, this field offers further opportunities for research. PMID:21139519

  15. Interleukin-15 receptor α expression in inflammatory bowel disease patients before and after normalization of inflammation with infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Clémentine; Arijs, Ingrid; Staelens, Dominiek; Breynaert, Christine; Cleynen, Isabelle; Covens, Kris; Ferrante, Marc; Assche, Gert; Vermeire, Séverine; Hertogh, Gert; Schuit, Frans; Rutgeerts, Paul; Ceuppens, Jan L

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine thought to contribute to the inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The specific receptor chain IL-15Rα can be expressed as a transmembranous signalling receptor, or can be cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain 17 (ADAM17) into a neutralizing, soluble receptor (sIL-15Rα). The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IL-15Rα in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) patients before and after infliximab (IFX) therapy. Gene expression of IL-15Rα, IL-15 and ADAM17 was measured at the mRNA level by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in mucosal biopsies harvested before and after first IFX therapy. Concentrations of sIL-15Rα were measured in sera of patients by ELISA and IL-15Rα protein was localized in the gut by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Mucosal expression of IL-15Rα is increased in UC and CD patients compared with controls and it remains elevated after IFX therapy in both responder and non-responder patients. The concentration of sIL-15Rα in serum is also increased in UC patients when compared with controls and does not differ between responders and non-responders either before or after IFX. CD patients have levels of sIL-15Rα comparable to healthy controls before and after therapy. In mucosal tissues, IL-15Rα+ cells closely resemble activated memory B cells with a pre-plasmablastic phenotype. To conclude, IBD patients have an increased expression of IL-15Rα mRNA in the mucosa. Expression is localized in B cells, suggesting that IL-15 regulates B-cell functions during bowel inflammation. No change in release of sIL-15Rα is observed in patients treated with IFX. PMID:23039249

  16. Mental Health in Multiple Sclerosis Patients without Limitation of Physical Function: The Role of Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Tallner, Alexander; Waschbisch, Anne; Hentschke, Christian; Pfeifer, Klaus; Mäurer, Mathias

    2015-07-02

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, in general, show reduced physical function, physical activity, and quality of life. Positive associations between physical activity and quality of life have been reported. In particular, we were interested in the relation between physical activity and mental health in MS patients without limitation of physical function, since limitations of physical function may influence both physical activity and quality of life. Assessment comprised the Baecke questionnaire on physical activity, the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We ranked our sample according to physical activity into four groups and performed an ANOVA to analyze the relationship between levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Then we performed a subgroup analysis and included patients with unlimited walking distance and a score of less than 18 in the BDI. Most active vs. inactive patients were compared for the mental subscales of the SF-36 and depression scores. From 632 patients, 265 met inclusion criteria and hence quartiles were filled with 67 patients each. Active and inactive patients did not differ considerably in physical function. In contrast, mental subscales of the SF-36 were higher in active patients. Remarkable and significant differences were found regarding vitality, general health perception, social functioning and mental health, all in favor of physically active patients. Our study showed that higher physical activity is still associated with higher mental health scores even if limitations of physical function are accounted for. Therefore, we believe that physical activity and exercise have considerable health benefits for MS patients.

  17. PPARgamma Pro12Ala polymorphism in HIV-1-infected patients with HAART-related lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Saumoy, Maria; Veloso, Sergi; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Domingo, Pere; Chacón, Matilde R; Miranda, Merce; Aragonès, Gerard; Gutiérrez, Maria Mar; Viladés, Consuelo; Peraire, Joaquim; Sirvent, Joan-Josep; López-Dupla, Miguel; Aguilar, Carmen; Richart, Cristóbal; Vidal, Francesc

    2009-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is involved in obesity and in some components of the metabolic syndrome in unselected population. To determine whether PPARgamma genetic variants are associated with the risk of developing lipodystrophy and its associated metabolic disturbances in HIV-1-infected patients treated with HAART and to assess PPARgamma mRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). The study group comprised 278 patients infected with HIV-1 and treated with antiretroviral drugs (139 with lipodystrophy and 139 without) and 105 uninfected controls (UC). The PPARgamma Pro12Ala (C%>G) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was assessed using PCR-RFLPs on white cell DNA. PPARgamma mRNA expression in SAT was assessed in 38 patients (25 with lipodystrophy and 13 without) and in 21 UC by real-time PCR. Statistical analysis was based on Student's T tests, Chi(2) tests, Spearman's correlations tests and logistic regression tests. PPARgamma Pro12Ala genotype distribution and allele frequencies were non-significantly different between both HIV-1-infected categories, lipodystrophy vs non-lipodystrophy (p=0.9 and p=0.87, respectively). Lipodystrophic patients harbouring the rare X/Ala genotype (Ala/Ala plus Pro/Ala) had significantly greater plasma total and LDL cholesterol levels compared with carriers of the common Pro/Pro genotype (p=0.029 and p=0.016, respectively) at univariate analyses. At multivariate analyses these associations were no longer significant. There was a near-significant decreased SAT PPARgamma mRNA expression in patients with lipodystrophy compared to UC (p=0.054). PPARgamma Pro12Ala SNP has no effect on the risk of developing lipodystrophy in HIV-1-infected patients treated with HAART. PPARgamma mRNA SAT expression appears decreased in lipodystrophy.

  18. Danish cohort of monozygotic inflammatory bowel disease twins: Clinical characteristics and inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Moller, Frederik Trier; Knudsen, Lina; Harbord, Marcus; Satsangi, Jack; Gordon, Hannah; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Jess, Tine; Andersen, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the establishment of a Danish inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) twin cohort with focus on concordance of treatment and inflammatory markers. METHODS: We identified MZ twins, likely to be discordant or concordant for IBD, by merging information from the Danish Twin Register and the National Patient Register. The twins were asked to provide biological samples, questionnaires, and data access to patient files and public registries. Biological samples were collected via a mobile laboratory, which allowed for immediate centrifugation, fractionation, and storage of samples. The mean time from collection of samples to storage in the -80 °C mobile freezer was less than one hour. The diagnoses where validated using the Copenhagen diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: We identified 159 MZ IBD twin pairs, in a total of 62 (39%) pairs both twins agreed to participate. Of the supposed 62 IBD pairs, the IBD diagnosis could be confirmed in 54 pairs. The cohort included 10 concordant pairs, whereof some were discordant for either treatment or surgery. The 10 concordant pairs, where both pairs suffered from IBD, included eight CD/CD pairs, one UC/UC pair and one UC/IBDU pair. The discordant pairs comprised 31 UC, 5 IBDU (IBD unclassified), and 8 CD discordant pairs. In the co-twins not affected by IBD, calprotectin was above 100 μg/g in 2 participants, and above 50 μg/g in a further 5 participants. CONCLUSION: The presented IBD twin cohorts are an excellent resource for bioinformatics studies with proper adjustment for disease-associated exposures including medication and inflammatory activity in the co-twins. PMID:27275097

  19. Active Patient Participation in the Development of an Online Intervention

    PubMed Central

    van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn M; Snippe, Harm Wouter; Gouw, Hans; Zijlstra, Josée M; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Background An important and challenging part of living with cancer relates to the repeated visits to the hospital. Since how patients cope between these post-diagnostic visits depends partly on the information and support received from their physician during the visits, it is important to make the most of them. Recent findings reinforce the importance of training not only the health care professionals in communication skills, but providing patients with support in communication as well. Delivering such supportive interventions online can have potential benefits in terms of accessibility, cost-effectiveness, and ability to tailor information to personal needs. However, problems with attrition (dropout, non-usage) during the test phase and poor uptake after implementation are frequently reported. The marginal level of engagement of the patient as end user seems to play a role in this. Therefore, recent research suggests integrating theory-based development methods with methods that promote involvement of the patient at an early stage. This paper describes a participatory protocol, used to let patients guide a theory-informed development process. Objective The objective of this project was to apply a bottom-up inspired procedure to develop a patient-centered intervention with corresponding evaluation and implementation plan. Methods The applied development protocol was based on the intervention mapping framework, combined with patient participatory methods that were inspired by the participation ladder and user-centred design methods. Results The applied protocol led to a self-directed online communication intervention aimed at helping patients gain control during their communications with health care professionals. It also led to an evaluation plan and an implementation plan. The protocol enabled the continuous involvement of patient research partners and the partial involvement of patient service users, which led to valuable insights and improvements. Conclusions

  20. Baseline Platelet Activation and Reactivity in Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    de Borst, Gert Jan; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Roest, Mark; Moll, Frans L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) have a high risk to develop cardiovascular events (CVE). We hypothesized that in CLI patients platelets would display increased baseline activation and reactivity. Objectives We investigated baseline platelet activation and platelet reactivity in patients with CLI. Patients/Methods In this study baseline platelet activation and platelet reactivity in response to stimulation of all major platelet activation pathways were determined in 20 CLI patients (11 using aspirin and 9 using vitamin K-antagonists) included in the Juventas-trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00371371) and in 17 healthy controls. Platelet activation was quantified with flow cytometric measurement of platelet P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding. Results CLI patients not using aspirin showed higher baseline platelet activation compared to healthy controls. Maximal reactivity to stimulation of the collagen and thrombin activation pathway was decreased in CLI patients compared to healthy controls. In line, attenuated platelet reactivity to stimulation of multiple activation pathways was associated with several traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Conclusions Baseline platelet activation was increased in CLI patients, whereas the reactivity of circulating platelets to several stimulatory agents is decreased. Reactivity of platelets was inversely correlated with cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26148006

  1. Does structural commonality of metal complex formation by PAC-1 (anticancer), DHBNH (anti-HIV), AHL (autoinducer), and UCS1025A (anticancer) denote mechanistic similarity? Signal transduction and medical aspects.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter

    2008-01-01

    There is an urgent need of novel approaches to drugs in the cancer, HIV, and bacterial areas. Increasing resistance to conventional therapies is observed. This minireview provides novel insights for drugs in these three areas. The agents PAC-1 (anticancer), DHBNH (anti-HIV), AHL (autoinducer), and UCS1025A (anticancer) have recently attracted attention due to considerable potential based on new approaches. PAC-1 activates procaspase-3 to caspase-3, resulting in induction of apoptosis in tumor cells. DHBNH binds to a newly revealed site on HIV reverse transcriptase. The drug mainly inhibits RNase H (RNA-cleaving). AHLs comprise an important class that participates in bacterial cell communication. UCS1025A is a fungus-derived inhibitor of the enzyme telomerase, present in cancer cells, which is crucially involved in tumor cell immortality. All four agents possess chelating sites for metal binding, which has not been appreciated. In PAC-1 and DHBNH, the coordinating portion is similar to salicylaldehyde semicarbazone. For AHL and UCS1025A, the metal-binding moiety is a beta -ketoamide. Metal complexes of heavier metals are well-known electron transfer (ET) functionalities that can generate reactive oxygen species. Hence, it is reasonable to hypothesize a commonality in mechanism based on metal ET. Differences in receptor binding can result, in part, in diverse physiological responses. There is considerable literature that addresses involvement of signal transduction with the various physiologically active agents discussed herein. Thus, cell communication appears to play an important role in the biochemistry of these endogenous and exogenous substances. Details of cell signaling are presented for complexes of metals (Fe, Cu, Ni, and As), telomerase, caspase-3, and RNase. In addition, practical medical aspects are discussed.

  2. Perceptions and measurements of physical activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, C A; Perna, M; Sargent, A B; Salmon, J E

    2011-03-01

    Promoting physical activity should be a priority for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) because a sedentary lifestyle compounds patients' already disproportionately high risk for cardiovascular events and other adverse health outcomes. The objectives of this pilot study were to assess physical activity in 50 patients with SLE and to compare activity levels with clinical and psychosocial variables, such as fatigue, depressive symptoms, and social support and stress. Patients were asked open-ended questions about physical activity, and responses were coded according to Grounded Theory. Patients then completed the Paffenbarger Physical Activity and Exercise Index, a survey of lifestyle energy expenditure reported in kilocalories/week, performed a 2-minute walk test according to a standard protocol, and completed questionnaires measuring fatigue, depressive symptoms and social support and stress. Most patients (92%) were women, had a mean age of 45 years, and did not have extensive SLE. In response to open-ended questions, patients reported they avoided physical activity because they did not want to exacerbate SLE in the short term. However, if they could overcome initial hurdles, 46 patients (92%) thought physical activity ultimately would improve SLE symptoms. Walking was the preferred activity and 45 (90%) thought they could walk more. According to the Paffenbarger Index, mean energy expenditure was 1466 ± 1366 kilocalories/week and mean time spent in moderate-intensity activity was 132 ± 222 min/week. In total, 18 patients (36%) and 14 patients (28%) met physical activity goals for these values, respectively. Mean distance walked during the 2-minute test was 149 ± 28 m, equivalent to two blocks, which is similar to reports for stable patients with other chronic diseases. Patients with more social stress and more fatigue reported less physical activity. We conclude that the proportion of patients meeting physical activity goals was

  3. Values of activities of daily living. A survey of stroke patients and their home therapists.

    PubMed

    Chiou, I I; Burnett, C N

    1985-06-01

    People's values influence their actions and efforts. Based on the assumption that a patient's values can be a guide to successful rehabilitation, the values of 15 activities of daily living as perceived by stroke patients and their home therapists were studied. Twenty-six stroke patients living at home and their 10 visiting occupational and physical therapists participated in the study. The study results indicated that the relative importance of each activity of daily living perceived by the patient group and by the therapist group was similar. Among the 29 therapist-patient pairs, however, only 1 pair showed significantly similar views regarding the values of these activities to the patient. Patients' age, gender, income level, duration since onset of stroke, impaired body side, and independence level in activities were significantly related to their values of certain activities of daily living. The relative value stroke patients living at home place on each activity of daily living could serve as a guide for sequencing learning steps during activities of daily living training in a hospital or rehabilitation setting. Determining patient rehabilitation goals as influenced by personal values may shorten rehabilitation time, be more cost-effective, and aid in the retention of gains made in the rehabilitation setting. PMID:4001168

  4. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  5. Clinicians' and Patients' Assessment of Activity Overuse and Underuse and Its Relation to Physical Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Annemieke Bonny; Preuper, Henrica R. Schiphorst; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2012-01-01

    To explore clinicians' and patients' (self)-assessment of activity overuse and underuse, and its relationship with physical capacity in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP). Study design was cross-sectional. Participants included patients with CMP, admitted to a multidisciplinary outpatient pain rehabilitation program. The main…

  6. 78 FR 79079 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900- 0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any correspondence....gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in...

  7. 75 FR 16912 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... measure patients' satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on..., Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0503. OMB Control Number: 2900-New (VA Form 10-0503)....

  8. Physical Activity of Depressed Patients and Their Motivation to Exercise: Nordic Walking in Family Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suija, Kadri; Pechter, Ulle; Kalda, Ruth; Tahepold, Heli; Maaroos, Jaak; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to find out how motivated depressed patients are to exercise regularly, to measure the physical activity of depressed patients and to find out how regular Nordic Walking affects the mood and physical fitness of depressed patients. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Three years after the Prediction of Primary…

  9. Systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for assessing disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Marieke J; Fransen, Jaap; Kievit, Wietske; van Riel, Piet LCM

    2016-01-01

    Patient assessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be useful in clinical practice, offering a patient-friendly, location independent, and a time-efficient and cost-efficient means of monitoring the disease. The objective of this study was to identify patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to assess disease activity in RA and to evaluate the measurement properties of these measures. Systematic literature searches were performed in the PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify articles reporting on clinimetric development or evaluation of PROM-based instruments to monitor disease activity in patients with RA. 2 reviewers independently selected articles for review and assessed their methodological quality based on the Consensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) recommendations. A total of 424 abstracts were retrieved for review. Of these abstracts, 56 were selected for reviewing the full article and 34 articles, presenting 17 different PROMs, were finally included. Identified were: Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Index (RADAI), RADAI-5, Patient-based Disease Activity Score (PDAS) I & II, Patient-derived Disease Activity Score with 28-joint counts (Pt-DAS28), Patient-derived Simplified Disease Activity Index (Pt-SDAI), Global Arthritis Score (GAS), Patient Activity Score (PAS) I & II, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data (RAPID) 2–5, Patient Reported Outcome-index (PRO-index) continuous (C) & majority (M), Patient Reported Outcome CLinical ARthritis Activity (PRO-CLARA). The quality of reports varied from poor to good. Typically 5 out of 10 clinimetric domains were covered in the validations of the different instruments. The quality and extent of clinimetric validation varied among PROMs of RA disease activity. The Pt-DAS28, RADAI, RADAI-5 and RAPID 3 had the strongest and most extensive validation. The measurement properties least reported and in need of more evidence were: reliability

  10. Systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for assessing disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Jos; de Jonge, Marieke J; Fransen, Jaap; Kievit, Wietske; van Riel, Piet Lcm

    2016-01-01

    Patient assessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be useful in clinical practice, offering a patient-friendly, location independent, and a time-efficient and cost-efficient means of monitoring the disease. The objective of this study was to identify patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to assess disease activity in RA and to evaluate the measurement properties of these measures. Systematic literature searches were performed in the PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify articles reporting on clinimetric development or evaluation of PROM-based instruments to monitor disease activity in patients with RA. 2 reviewers independently selected articles for review and assessed their methodological quality based on the Consensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) recommendations. A total of 424 abstracts were retrieved for review. Of these abstracts, 56 were selected for reviewing the full article and 34 articles, presenting 17 different PROMs, were finally included. Identified were: Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Index (RADAI), RADAI-5, Patient-based Disease Activity Score (PDAS) I & II, Patient-derived Disease Activity Score with 28-joint counts (Pt-DAS28), Patient-derived Simplified Disease Activity Index (Pt-SDAI), Global Arthritis Score (GAS), Patient Activity Score (PAS) I & II, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data (RAPID) 2-5, Patient Reported Outcome-index (PRO-index) continuous (C) & majority (M), Patient Reported Outcome CLinical ARthritis Activity (PRO-CLARA). The quality of reports varied from poor to good. Typically 5 out of 10 clinimetric domains were covered in the validations of the different instruments. The quality and extent of clinimetric validation varied among PROMs of RA disease activity. The Pt-DAS28, RADAI, RADAI-5 and RAPID 3 had the strongest and most extensive validation. The measurement properties least reported and in need of more evidence were: reliability

  11. Systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for assessing disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Marieke J; Fransen, Jaap; Kievit, Wietske; van Riel, Piet LCM

    2016-01-01

    Patient assessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be useful in clinical practice, offering a patient-friendly, location independent, and a time-efficient and cost-efficient means of monitoring the disease. The objective of this study was to identify patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to assess disease activity in RA and to evaluate the measurement properties of these measures. Systematic literature searches were performed in the PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify articles reporting on clinimetric development or evaluation of PROM-based instruments to monitor disease activity in patients with RA. 2 reviewers independently selected articles for review and assessed their methodological quality based on the Consensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) recommendations. A total of 424 abstracts were retrieved for review. Of these abstracts, 56 were selected for reviewing the full article and 34 articles, presenting 17 different PROMs, were finally included. Identified were: Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Index (RADAI), RADAI-5, Patient-based Disease Activity Score (PDAS) I & II, Patient-derived Disease Activity Score with 28-joint counts (Pt-DAS28), Patient-derived Simplified Disease Activity Index (Pt-SDAI), Global Arthritis Score (GAS), Patient Activity Score (PAS) I & II, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data (RAPID) 2–5, Patient Reported Outcome-index (PRO-index) continuous (C) & majority (M), Patient Reported Outcome CLinical ARthritis Activity (PRO-CLARA). The quality of reports varied from poor to good. Typically 5 out of 10 clinimetric domains were covered in the validations of the different instruments. The quality and extent of clinimetric validation varied among PROMs of RA disease activity. The Pt-DAS28, RADAI, RADAI-5 and RAPID 3 had the strongest and most extensive validation. The measurement properties least reported and in need of more evidence were: reliability

  12. Using the Pharmacist Interaction Tracking Tool for Capturing Student-Patient Interactions in Direct and Simulated Patient Care Activities

    PubMed Central

    Schonder, Kristine S.; Pater, Karen S.; McGivney, Melissa S.; Meyer, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To create and implement a standardized data collection tool for capturing student-patient interactions in direct and simulated patient care activities. Design. Faculty members and students determined key elements, design, and an implementation plan for the tool, which was to be used by students across professional years to quantify numbers and types of interactions with patients for tracking student progression toward achievement of curricular outcomes. Assessment. During the 2013-2014 academic year, 27 778 entries were completed, with 17 767 (64%) advanced pharmacy practice experiences, 7272 (26%) introductory pharmacy practice experiences, and 2739 (10%) simulation. Direct patient care interactions occurred with 11 090 patients and 10 983 providers, with 14 252 drug-related problems identified. Data was used by students for their professional portfolios, by administrators for curricular assessment, and to student impact on patient care. Conclusion. The PITT Form enabled the collection of data from actual and simulated patient care activities, allowed for curricular assessment of activities across years, and was used by individual students. PMID:27667842

  13. Using the Pharmacist Interaction Tracking Tool for Capturing Student-Patient Interactions in Direct and Simulated Patient Care Activities.

    PubMed

    Hall, Deanne L; Schonder, Kristine S; Pater, Karen S; McGivney, Melissa S; Meyer, Susan M

    2016-08-25

    Objective. To create and implement a standardized data collection tool for capturing student-patient interactions in direct and simulated patient care activities. Design. Faculty members and students determined key elements, design, and an implementation plan for the tool, which was to be used by students across professional years to quantify numbers and types of interactions with patients for tracking student progression toward achievement of curricular outcomes. Assessment. During the 2013-2014 academic year, 27 778 entries were completed, with 17 767 (64%) advanced pharmacy practice experiences, 7272 (26%) introductory pharmacy practice experiences, and 2739 (10%) simulation. Direct patient care interactions occurred with 11 090 patients and 10 983 providers, with 14 252 drug-related problems identified. Data was used by students for their professional portfolios, by administrators for curricular assessment, and to student impact on patient care. Conclusion. The PITT Form enabled the collection of data from actual and simulated patient care activities, allowed for curricular assessment of activities across years, and was used by individual students. PMID:27667842

  14. [Activation of caspases in lymphocytes of patients with depression and anxiety].

    PubMed

    Gerasimovich, E S; Yakovlev, A A; Druzhkova, T A; Grishkina, M N; Guekht, A B; Gulyaeva, N V

    2016-01-01

    The processes in the nervous and immune systems are closely interrelated. In particular, increased apoptosis was reported in lymphocytes of patients with depression. The aim of this study was to assess activities of proteases associated with cell death in lymphocytes of patient with personality disorders accompanied by depression and anxiety. In patients with personality disorders associated with organic brain dysfunction caspase activities were reduced in patients with depression and increased in patients with anxiety. The results may be useful for elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms of personality disorders and in search of new biomarkers of these diseases.

  15. [Activation of caspases in lymphocytes of patients with depression and anxiety].

    PubMed

    Gerasimovich, E S; Yakovlev, A A; Druzhkova, T A; Grishkina, M N; Guekht, A B; Gulyaeva, N V

    2016-01-01

    The processes in the nervous and immune systems are closely interrelated. In particular, increased apoptosis was reported in lymphocytes of patients with depression. The aim of this study was to assess activities of proteases associated with cell death in lymphocytes of patient with personality disorders accompanied by depression and anxiety. In patients with personality disorders associated with organic brain dysfunction caspase activities were reduced in patients with depression and increased in patients with anxiety. The results may be useful for elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms of personality disorders and in search of new biomarkers of these diseases. PMID:26973194

  16. Electromyographic activity of sternocleidomastoid and masticatory muscles in patients with vestibular lesions.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Barozzi, Stefania; Marin, Federico; Cesarani, Antonio; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the electromyographic characteristics of masticatory and neck muscles in subjects with vestibular lesions. Surface electromyography of the masseter, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles was performed in 19 patients with Ménière's disease, 12 patients with an acute peripheral vestibular lesion, and 19 control subjects matched for sex and age. During maximum voluntary clenching, patients with peripheral vestibular lesions had the highest co-contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (analysis of covariance, p=0.02), the control subjects had the smallest values, and the patients with Ménière's disease had intermediate values. The control subjects had larger standardized muscle activities than the other patient groups (p=0.001). In conclusion, during maximum voluntary tooth clenching, patients with vestibular alterations have both more active neck muscles, and less active masticatory muscles than normal controls. Results underline the importance of a more inclusive craniocervical assessment of patients with vestibular lesions.

  17. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY OF STERNOCLEIDOMASTOID AND MASTICATORY MUSCLES IN PATIENTS WITH VESTIBULAR LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M.; Barozzi, Stefania; Marin, Federico; Cesarani, Antonio; Ferrario, Virgilio F.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the electromyographic characteristics of masticatory and neck muscles in subjects with vestibular lesions. Surface electromyography of the masseter, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles was performed in 19 patients with Ménière's disease, 12 patients with an acute peripheral vestibular lesion, and 19 control subjects matched for sex and age. During maximum voluntary clenching, patients with peripheral vestibular lesions had the highest co-contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (analysis of covariance, p=0.02), the control subjects had the smallest values, and the patients with Ménière's disease had intermediate values. The control subjects had larger standardized muscle activities than the other patient groups (p=0.001). In conclusion, during maximum voluntary tooth clenching, patients with vestibular alterations have both more active neck muscles, and less active masticatory muscles than normal controls. Results underline the importance of a more inclusive craniocervical assessment of patients with vestibular lesions. PMID:19082397

  18. Validity of a Questionnaire to Assess the Physical Activity Level in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiraud, Thibaut; Granger, Richard; Bousquet, Marc; Gremeaux, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to compare, in coronary artery disease patients, physical activity (PA) assessed with the Dijon Physical Activity Questionnaire (DPAQ) and the true PA objectively measured using an accelerometer. Seventy patients wore an accelerometer (MyWellness Key actimeter) throughout 1 week after a cardiac rehabilitation program that…

  19. Aquatic life water quality criteria derived via the UC Davis method: I. Organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Amanda J; Tenbrook, Patti L; Fojut, Tessa L; Faria, Isabel R; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2012-01-01

    A new methodology for deriving freshwater aquatic life water quality criteria,developed by the University of California Davis, was used to derive criteria for three organophosphate insecticides. The UC Davis methodology resulted in similar criteria to other accepted methods, and incorporated new approaches that enable criteria generation in cases where the existing USEPA guidance cannot be used.Acute and chronic water quality criteria were derived for chlorpyrifos (10 and 10 ng/L, respectively), diazinon (200 and 70 ng/L, respectively), and malathion(170 and 28 ng/L, respectively). For acute criteria derivation, Burr Type III SSDs were fitted to the chlorpyrifos and diazinon acute toxicity data sets while an alternative assessment factor procedure was used for malathion because that acute data set did not contain adequate species diversity to use a distribution.ACRs were used to calculate chronic criteria because there was a dearth of chronic data in all cases, especially for malathion, for which there was a lack of paired acute and chronic invertebrate data. Another alternate procedure enabled calculation of the malathion chronic criterion by combining a default ratio with the experimentally derived ratios. A review of the diazinon chronic criterion found it to be under protective of cladoceran species, so a more protective criterion was calculated using a lower distributional estimate. The acute and chronic data sets were assembled using a transparent and consistent system for judging the relevance and reliability of studies, and the individual study review notes are included.The resulting criteria are unique in that they were reviewed to ensure particular protection of sensitive and threatened and endangered species, and mixture toxicity is incorporated into criteria compliance for all three compounds.For chlorpyrifos and diazinon, the UCDM generated criteria similar to the long-standing USEPA (1985) method, with less taxa requirements, a more statistically

  20. How do I measure physical activity in my patients? Questionnaires and objective methods.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, B E

    2009-01-01

    How do healthcare providers know if their patients are getting enough physical activity to promote good health and to reduce their risks of chronic diseases and injury? The first step is to identify the patient's current level of physical activity using questionnaires and/or motion sensors. Questionnaires assess activity levels by having patients answer a set of questions about the types and amounts of activity performed at some time in the past. Motion sensors assess physical activity by patients wearing a small monitoring device that records their body movement as it occurs. If a provider is interested in determining a patient's caloric energy expenditure, he/she can apply statistical regression models to the questionnaire and motion sensor data to estimate kilocalories. If more precise measures of energy expenditure are desired, a provider can use the isotopic doubly labelled water method to estimate kilocalories; however, this method is costly and is impractical in non-research clinical settings.

  1. Serum of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis inhibits differentiation of osteochondrogenic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Janak L; Verschueren, Patrick; Lems, Willem F; Bravenboer, Nathalie; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Bakker, Astrid D; Luyten, Frank P

    2016-05-01

    Delayed fracture healing is frequently experienced in patients with systemic inflammation such as during rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The reasons for this are diverse, but could also be caused by inflammatory cytokines and/or growth factors in serum from patients with active disease. We hypothesized that serum from patients with active RA contains circulating inflammatory factors that inhibit differentiation of osteochondrogenic precursors. Serum was obtained from 15 patients with active RA (active RA-sera) and from the same patients in clinical remission 1 year later (remission RA-sera; controls). The effect of active RA-sera on osteochondrogenic differentiation of chondrogenic ATDC5 cells and primary human periosteum-derived progenitor cells (HPDC) was determined in micromass culture. In ATDC5 cells, active RA-sera reduced Ki67 transcription levels by 40% and cartilage matrix accumulation by 14% at day 14, and Alp transcription levels by 16%, and matrix mineralization by 17% at day 21 compared with remission RA-sera. In HPDCs, active RA-sera inhibited metabolic activity by 8%, SOX9 transcription levels by 14%, and cartilage matrix accumulation by 7% at day 7 compared with remission RA-sera. In conclusion, sera from patients with active RA negatively affect differentiation of osteochondrogenic precursors, and as a consequence may contribute to delayed fracture healing in these patients.

  2. Active tissue factor and activated factor XI in circulating blood of patients with systolic heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zabczyk, Michał; Butenas, Saulius; Palka, Ilona; Nessler, Jadwiga; Undas, Anetta

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Elevated clotting factors and thrombin generation have been reported to occur in patients with heart failure (HF). Circulating activated factor XI (FXIa) and active tissue factor (TF) can be detected in acute coronary syndromes and stable angina. OBJECTIVES We investigated circulating FXIa and active TF and their associations in patients with systolic HF due to ischemic cardiomyopathy. PATIENTS AND METHODS In an observational study, we assessed 53 consecutive patients, aged below 75 years, with stable HF associated with documented coronary artery disease (CAD). Atrial fibrillation (LA), recent thromboembolic events, and current anticoagulant therapy were the exclusion criteria. Plasma TF and FXIa activity was determined in clotting assays by measuring the response to inhibitory monoclonal antibodies. RESULTS Coagulant TF activity was detected in 20 patients (37.7%), and FXIa in 22 patients (41.5%). Patients with detectable TF activity and/or FXIa were younger, had a history of myocardial infarction more frequently, significantly higher F1+2 prothrombin fragments, larger LA and right ventricular diastolic diameter, and higher right ventricular systolic pressure than the remaining subjects (P ≤0.01 for all). Circulating FXIa was positively correlated with F1+2 levels (r = 0.69; P <0.001). CONCLUSIONS Circulating active TF and FXIa occurred in about 40% of patients with systolic HF due to ischemic cardiomyopathy. The presence of these factors was associated with enhanced thrombin formation. Associations between both factors and LA diameter and right ventricular parameters might suggest that TF and FXIa predispose to thromboembolic complications of HF. PMID:20864906

  3. Radioaerosol lung clearance in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, M.P.; Baughman, R.P.; Hughes, J.; Fernandez-Ulloa, M.

    1985-05-01

    Pulmonary radioaerosol clearance rate of /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriamine pentacetate (DTPA) in 14 patients with untreated sarcoidosis was compared with /sup 67/Ga lung scan and increased lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Nine healthy nonsmoking subjects had a mean DTPA clearance rate of 1.18%/min (range, 0.54 to 1.60%/min). Eight of 14 patients with sarcoidosis had clearance rates greater than 1.60%/min. Of those 8 patients with abnormal DTPA clearance, 4 had positive gallium scans, 4 had more than 17% lymphocytes in the BAL fluid, and 3 had both tests positive. To study the cause of abnormal DTPA clearance, 23 subjects (including 3 normal controls, all 14 patients with sarcoidosis, and 6 patients with localized disease on chest roentgenogram) underwent both DTPA clearance studies and BAL for quantitation of the amount of albumin in lung fluid. There was a positive correlation between the rate of DTPA clearance and the albumin concentration in lung fluid (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01).

  4. [Active acromegaly and gigantism: some clinical characteristics of 50 patients].

    PubMed

    Pumarino, H; Oviedo, S; Michelsen, H; Campino, C

    1991-08-01

    50 patients with autonomous growth hormone excess (48 with adult acromegaly and 2 with gigantism) were studied between 1966 to 1986 (2.38 pts/year). Characteristic clinical presentation, an increase in growth hormone (GH) uninhibited by glucose, and/or hyperphosphemia and hyperhydroxiprolinuria were present in all patients. No cases of hypercalcemia were recorded. Phosphemia was increased in 55.8%, alkaline phosphatases in 61.7%, calciuria in 26.9% and hydroxyprolinuria in 74.2% of the patients. Basal GH was over 5 ng/ml (89.9 DS +/- 170.9) in 42 pts, and in 37 was not suppressed after glucose administration, 38% had an increased (paradoxical response) and 62% a flat response (less than 50% change of basal values). TRH test was performed in 14 patients, 8 presented an increase in GH titer. Hyperprolactinemia was seen in 4 of 12 patients in whom this hormone was measured. The size of the sella turcica was increased in 93%, and although the larger sellar size correlated to higher levels of GH, correlation was not significant. 20% of the pts had rheumatological disease, 14% goiter, 12% cardiac disease, 26.5% had diastolic hypertension and 4% renal lithiasis (hypercalciuric pts). 38% had hyperglycemia with a diabetic glucose tolerance test and 18% had non-diabetic abnormal glucose tolerance test. PMID:1844771

  5. [Influence of tobacco smoking on lipase activity in patients with pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Sliwińska-Mossoń, Mariola; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prove the influence of tobacco smoking on lipase activity in the blood of smoking and non-smoking health persons and in smoking and non-smoking patients with diagnosed acute (AP), chronic exaggerated (CEP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). The blood has been collected from 28 healthy persons and 55 patients with AP, CEP and CP. The enzyme activity has been determined using the colorimetric method with substrate 1,2-odilauryl-rac-glycero-3-glutaric acid -(6-methylresorufin) ester. The exposures to tobacco smoke have been examined on the basic of concentration of cotinine in the serum of patients. The highest lipase activity has been found in smoking patients with CEP. It has been noted that the serum lipase activity is significantly higher in smoking and healthy persons (p<0,05) then in non-smoking and healthy patients. However no significant differences have been found between the lipase activity in smoking patients with CP and non-smoking patients with CP. Smoking patients with AP and CEP have been found to have a significantly increased enzyme activity (p>0.01; p>0.05 respectively) when compared to non-smoking patients. Results of examination indicate that tobacco smoking has a significant influence on exocrine function of pancreas.

  6. Patients' views of physical activity as treatment for depression: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Searle, Aidan; Calnan, Michael; Lewis, Glyn; Campbell, John; Taylor, Adrian; Turner, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical guidance recommends physical activity to manage patients with persistent subthreshold depressive symptoms or mild-to-moderate depression. However, little is known regarding the acceptability of physical activity as a treatment for depression from patients' perspective. Aim To explore patients' views of physical activity for the treatment of depression in the context of primary care. Design of study In-depth interviews were held with 33 participants taking part in a randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of physical activity for the management of depression. Setting Primary care. Results Most participants perceived physical activity to be an acceptable treatment for depression. The mechanisms by which physical activity could enhance mood were attributed to a number of subjective benefits including biochemical pathways, providing a source of distraction from negative thoughts, and a sense of purpose. Participants who expressed a belief that their depression was caused by biochemical mechanisms reported activity that ‘raised the heartbeat’ as most beneficial, while those who believed depression was situational in origin tended to state the benefits of less-aerobic activities, such as walking. Many participants reported low motivation and a lack of confidence as barriers to undertaking physical activity. These patients suggested that medication could be helpful for initiating and maintaining activity. Conclusion Patients view physical activity as an effective treatment for depression. However, they vary in their views about how physical activity might impact on depression, what intensity and form of activity is necessary to enhance mood, and the barriers to undertaking activity. This variation suggests the need for GPs to elicit patients' views on physical activity as a treatment, and offer interventions that are tailored to the needs and expectations of individual patients. PMID:21439172

  7. HLA-DR, DQ and T cell antigen receptor constant beta genes in Japanese patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, K; Atoh, M; Konoeda, Y; Yagita, A; Inoko, H; Sekiguchi, S

    1990-01-01

    We studied the T cell antigen receptor (TcR) constant beta chain genes on HLA typed Japanese patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). A TcR constant beta EcoRI 6.0-kb fragment was present in all Japanese UC patients (n = 17) but completely absent in the controls (n = 35) (chi2 = 47.6, P less than 0.001). The frequency of HLA-DR2 antigen was significantly higher in UC patients (85% versus 28% in controls, P less than 0.001). Furthermore, HLA-DQw1 antigen was also increased in UC patients (96% versus 60% in controls, P less than 0.001). However, HLA-DR4 antigen was significantly decreased in UC patients (12% versus 37%, P = 0.02). HLA-DR1 antigen was not found in UC patients and was present in only 15% of the controls. These results suggest that TcR beta chain and HLA-DQw1 antigen may be important in the pathogenesis of Japanese UC. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1973647

  8. Low level of self-reported physical activity in ambulatory patients new to dialysis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Kirsten L; Chertow, Glenn M; Kutner, Nancy G; Dalrymple, Lorien S; Grimes, Barbara A; Kaysen, George A

    2010-12-01

    Physical inactivity contributes to the frailty and the decline in function that develops over time among patients with end-stage renal disease. We assessed physical activity among 1547 ambulatory patients new to dialysis in the United States Renal Data System Comprehensive Dialysis Study. We used a self-reporting Human Activity Profile that included Maximal and Adjusted Activity Scores and compared results to established norms by age and gender. Physical activity was found to be extremely low with scores for all age and gender categories below the 5th percentile of healthy individuals and 95% of patients had scores consonant with low fitness. Older age, female gender, diabetes, atherosclerotic disease, and a low level of education were associated with lower activity scores assessed by univariate and multivariable linear regression analysis. Higher serum albumin, creatinine, and lower body mass index, but not hemoglobin levels, were associated with greater physical activity. By multivariable analysis, patients on hemodialysis using a catheter reported lower levels of physical activity compared to those on peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis using an arteriovenous fistula, or with a graft. Lower Maximal and Adjusted Activity Scores were associated with poor physical function and mental health. Hence, physical activity is distressingly low among patients new to dialysis. Thus, strategies to enhance activity in these patients should be explored.

  9. The clinical significance of activated lymphocytes in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: a single centre study of 131 patients.

    PubMed

    Meers, Stef; Vandenberghe, Peter; Boogaerts, Marc; Verhoef, Gregor; Delforge, Michel

    2008-07-01

    We studied the immune compartment in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. We show increased surface expression of activation markers (HLA-DR(+), CD57(+), CD28(-), CD62L(-)) on T lymphocytes in blood and bone marrow (n=131). T cell activation was not restricted to any relevant clinical subgroup (FAB, IPSS, cytogenetics) and did not correlate with blood counts or need for treatment. In vitro clonogenic growth of marrow mononuclear cells (n=18) was not influenced by T cells expressing these markers. In addition, using X-chromosome inactivation analysis (n=12) we demonstrate clonal involvement of NK and B cells in half of these patients. We conclude that although activated T lymphocytes can be found in MDS, their role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear in the majority of patients.

  10. Ubiquitin enzymes, ubiquitin and proteasome activity in blood mononuclear cells of MCI, Alzheimer and Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, C; Mlekusch, R; Kuschnig, A; Marksteiner, J; Humpel, C

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe chronic neurodegenerative disease. During aging and neurodegeneration, misfolded proteins accumulate and activate the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The aim of the present study is to explore whether ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, ubiquitin or proteasome activity are affected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared to healthy subjects. PBMCs were isolated from EDTA blood samples and extracts were analyzed by Western Blot. Proteasome activity was measured with fluorogenic substrates. When compared to healthy subjects, the concentration of enzyme E1 was increased in PBMCs of AD patients, whereas the concentration of the enzyme E2 was decreased in these same patients. Ubiquitin levels and proteasome activity were unchanged in AD patients. No changes in enzyme expression or proteasome activity was observed in MCI patients compared to healthy and AD subjects. In PD patients E2 levels and proteasomal activity were significantly reduced, while ubiquitin and E1 levels were unchanged. The present investigation demonstrates the differences in enzyme and proteasome activity patterns of AD and PD patients. These results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasomal system in different neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Effect of steroids on the activation status of platelets in patients with Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).

    PubMed

    Bhoria, Preeti; Sharma, Saniya; Varma, Neelam; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash; Luthra-Guptasarma, Manni

    2015-01-01

    The activation status of platelets in Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients--which is still somewhat controversial--is of potential interest, because activated platelets tend to aggregate (leading to excessive clotting or thromboembolic events) but cannot do so when platelet numbers are low, as in ITP. Although corticosteroids are the first line of therapy in ITP, the effect of steroids on activation of platelets has not been evaluated so far. We examined the status of platelet activation (with and without stimulation with ADP) in ITP patients, at the start of therapy (pre-steroid treatment, naive) and post-steroid treatment (classified on the basis of steroid responsiveness). We used flow cytometry to evaluate the levels of expression of P-selectin, and PAC-1 binding to platelets of 55 ITP patients and a similar number of healthy controls, treated with and without ADP. We found that platelets in ITP patients exist in an activated state. In patients who are responsive to steroids, the treatment reverses this situation. Also, the fold activation of platelets upon treatment with ADP is more in healthy controls than in ITP patients; treatment with steroids causes platelets in steroid-responsive patients to become more responsive to ADP-activation, similar to healthy controls. Thus steroids may cause changes in the ability of platelets to get activated with an agonist like ADP. Our results provide new insights into how, and why, steroid therapy helps in the treatment of ITP.

  12. [Patients on the move: validated methods to quantify physical activity].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Esmée A; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; de Vegt, Femmie; Busser, Guus S F; Hopman, Maria T E; Verbeek, André L M

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is an important component in the maintenance and improvement of general health; physical inactivity is, however, an increasing problem in the Netherlands. Requests for advice on physical activity are increasing within the healthcare. Assessment of an individual's physical activity pattern is required to provide tailored advice. There are a number of methods for measuring physical activity; these are divided into subjective and objective methods. Subjective measures include physical activity questionnaires and diaries. Objective measures include indirect calorimetry, measurement with doubly labelled water, heart-rate monitoring and the use of an accelerometer or pedometer. The choice of method depends predominantly on the aim of the measurement, and the availability of personnel, time and financial resources. In clinical practice a validated questionnaire is usually the preferred method, but when measuring effects this should be combined with an objective measurement instrument.

  13. Patient Engagement and Activation in Three Underserved Beacon Communities.

    PubMed

    Jardins, Terrisca Des; Drone, Shenetta A; Hashisaka, Susan; Hazzard, Jobyna; Hunt, Susan B; Massey, Kimberly; Rein, Alison; Schachter, Abigail; Turske, Scott

    2015-08-01

    Whether the setting is urban, rural, or somewhere in between, engagement strategies for the underserved require a great deal of flexibility and sensitivity to the socioeconomic, cultural, and geographic conditions of the patient population. The following report details how three unique communities designed specific strategies to engage underserved populations in the management of their chronic conditions.

  14. Patient Engagement and Activation in Three Underserved Beacon Communities.

    PubMed

    Jardins, Terrisca Des; Drone, Shenetta A; Hashisaka, Susan; Hazzard, Jobyna; Hunt, Susan B; Massey, Kimberly; Rein, Alison; Schachter, Abigail; Turske, Scott

    2015-08-01

    Whether the setting is urban, rural, or somewhere in between, engagement strategies for the underserved require a great deal of flexibility and sensitivity to the socioeconomic, cultural, and geographic conditions of the patient population. The following report details how three unique communities designed specific strategies to engage underserved populations in the management of their chronic conditions. PMID:26320912

  15. Patient Mood and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Alzheimer Disease: Relationship Between Patient and Caregiver Reports.

    PubMed

    Votruba, Kristen L; Persad, Carol; Giordani, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective study investigated the relationship between self-reports and caregiver perceptions of patients' depressive symptoms and the respective ability of these reports to predict instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) beyond what is accounted for by cognitive abilities in 71 patients with mild Alzheimer disease. Patients completed the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, and caregivers completed the Behavior Rating Scale for Dementia assessing their perception of patients' depressive symptoms. Caregivers also completed IADL items from the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Inventory. Cognitive measures included the Mini-Mental State Examination, Logical Memory from the Wechsler Memory Scale III, and Trail Making Test, Part B. The relationship between self-reported depressive symptoms and caregiver report of patients' depressive symptoms showed a trend toward significance (r = .22, P = .06). Measures of depressive symptoms significantly predicted 12.5% of the variance in IADLs performance, beyond that accounted for by patient demographics and cognitive functioning. Interestingly, patients' reports, rather than caregivers', were particularly useful in this prediction. PMID:26071443

  16. Patient Mood and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Alzheimer Disease: Relationship Between Patient and Caregiver Reports.

    PubMed

    Votruba, Kristen L; Persad, Carol; Giordani, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective study investigated the relationship between self-reports and caregiver perceptions of patients' depressive symptoms and the respective ability of these reports to predict instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) beyond what is accounted for by cognitive abilities in 71 patients with mild Alzheimer disease. Patients completed the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, and caregivers completed the Behavior Rating Scale for Dementia assessing their perception of patients' depressive symptoms. Caregivers also completed IADL items from the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Inventory. Cognitive measures included the Mini-Mental State Examination, Logical Memory from the Wechsler Memory Scale III, and Trail Making Test, Part B. The relationship between self-reported depressive symptoms and caregiver report of patients' depressive symptoms showed a trend toward significance (r = .22, P = .06). Measures of depressive symptoms significantly predicted 12.5% of the variance in IADLs performance, beyond that accounted for by patient demographics and cognitive functioning. Interestingly, patients' reports, rather than caregivers', were particularly useful in this prediction.

  17. Influence of sleep onset on upper-airway muscle activity in apnea patients versus normal controls.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, W S; Tangel, D J; White, D P

    1996-06-01

    Current evidence suggests that patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may have augmented pharyngeal dilator muscle activity during wakefulness, to compensate for deficient anatomy. However, the isolated effect of sleep on the activity of these muscles (comparing OSA patients with controls) has not been studied. We therefore determined waking levels of genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) muscle activity (% of maximum electromyographic [EMG] activity) in 10 OSA patients and eight controls, and then assessed the impact of the first two breaths of sleep (theta electroencephalographic [EEG] activity) following a period of stable wakefulness. Apnea patients demonstrated greater genioglossal (27.4 +/- 4.0 versus 10.7 +/- 2.1%) and tensor palatini (31.9 +/- 6.5 versus 10.6 +/- 1.9%) EMG activity than did controls during wakefulness. This augmented muscle activity in apnea patients could be reduced to near control levels during wakefulness with the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to the upper airway. At sleep onset, control subjects demonstrated small but consistent decrements in the activity of both the TP and GG muscles. On the other hand, apnea patients demonstrated large, significantly greater decrements in TP EMG at sleep onset than did the control subjects. The effect of sleep on GG EMG in apnea patients was inconsistent, with most (n = 7) demonstrating large (significantly larger than controls) decrements in genioglossal activity. However, three OSA patients demonstrated small increments in GG EMG at sleep onset despite falling TP EMG and obstructive apnea or hypopnea. We conclude that sleep onset is associated with significantly larger decrements in TP muscle EMG activity in OSA patients than in controls, which may represent a loss of neuromuscular compensation that is present during wakefulness. However, our results for the GG muscle were more variable, and did not always support this hypothesis.

  18. Intestinal disaccharidase activity in patients with autism: effect of age, gender, and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kushak, Rafail I; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Winter, Harland S; Buie, Timothy M

    2011-05-01

    Intestinal disaccharidase activities were measured in 199 individuals with autism to determine the frequency of enzyme deficiency. All patients had duodenal biopsies that were evaluated morphologically and assayed for lactase, sucrase, and maltase activity. Frequency of lactase deficiency was 58% in autistic children ≤ 5 years old and 65% in older patients. As would be expected, patients with autism at age 5 > years demonstrated significant decline in lactase activity (24%, p = .02) in comparison with ≤ 5 years old autistic patients. Boys ≤ 5 years old with autism had 1.7 fold lower lactase activity than girls with autism (p = .02). Only 6% of autistic patients had intestinal inflammation. Lactase deficiency not associated with intestinal inflammation or injury is common in autistic children and may contribute to abdominal discomfort, pain and observed aberrant behavior. Most autistic children with lactose intolerance are not identified by clinical history. PMID:21415091

  19. Characterization of physical activity and sitting time among patients on hemodialysis using a new physical activity instrument

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Kirsten L.; Painter, Patricia; Delgado, Cynthia; Doyle, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Physical activity questionnaires usually focus on moderate to vigorous activities and may not accurately capture physical activity or variation in levels of activity among extremely inactive groups like dialysis patients. Design Cross-sectional study Setting Three dialysis facilities in the San Francisco Bay Area Subjects 68 prevalent hemodialysis patients Intervention We administered a new physical activity questionnaire designed to capture activity in the lower end of the range, the Low Physical Activity Questionnaire (LoPAQ). Main Outcome Measure Outcome measures were correlation with a validated physical activity questionnaire, the Minnesota Leisure Time Activity (LTA) questionnaire and with self-reported physical function (Physical Function score of the SF-36) and physical performance (gait speed, chair stand, balance, and Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB]) . We also determined whether patients who were frail or reported limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) were less active on the LoPAQ. Results 68 participants (mean age 59 ± 14 years, 59% men) completed the study. Patients were inactive according to the LoPAQ, with a median (IQR) of 517 (204 – 1190) kcal/week of physical activity. Although activity from the LTA was lower than on the LoPAQ (411 (61 – 902) kcal/week), the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.20), and results from the two instruments were strongly correlated (rho =0.62, p < 0.001). In addition, higher physical activity measured by the LoPAQ was correlated with better self-reported functioning (rho = 0.64, p < 0.001), better performance on gait speed (rho = 0.32, p=0.02), balance (rho = 0.45, p < 0.001), and chair rising (rho = −0.32, p=0.03) tests and with higher SPPB total score (rho = 0.51, p < 0.001). Frail patients and patients with ADL limitations were less active than those who were not frail or limited. Conclusion The LoPAQ performed similarly to the Minnesota LTA questionnaire in our

  20. Activation of clotting factors XI and IX in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Peters, R J; de Winter, R; Lubbers, Y P; Barzegar, S; Bauer, K A; Rosenberg, R D; Hack, C E; ten Cate, H

    2000-11-01

    In acute coronary events, plaque rupture and the subsequent formation of the catalytic tissue factor-factor VIIa complex is considered to initiate coagulation. It is unknown whether clotting factors XI and IX are activated in acute coronary events. Therefore, we prospectively investigated the activation of clotting factors XI and IX as well as activation of the contact system and the common pathway in 50 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in 50 patients with unstable angina pectoris (UAP), and in 50 patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP). Factor XIa-C1 inhibitor complexes, which reflect acute activation of factor XI, were detected in 24% of the patients with AMI, 8% of the patients with UAP, and 4% of the patients with SAP (P<0.05), whereas factor XIa-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complexes, which reflect chronic activation, were observed equally in all 3 study groups. Factor IX peptide levels were significantly higher in the patients with AMI and UAP compared with the patients with SAP (P<0.01). No differences regarding markers of the common pathway were demonstrated. Fibrinopeptide A levels were elevated in patients with AMI compared with patients with UAP and those with SAP (P<0.01). Factor XIIa- or kallikrein-C1 inhibitor complexes were not increased. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration of the activation of clotting factors XI and IX in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Because these clotting factors are considered to be important for continuous thrombin generation and clot stability, their activation might have clinical and therapeutic consequences.

  1. Once-daily budesonide MMX in active, mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis: results from the randomised CORE II study

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Simon P L; Danese, Silvio; Kupcinskas, Limas; Alexeeva, Olga; D'Haens, Geert; Gibson, Peter R; Moro, Luigi; Jones, Richard; Ballard, E David; Masure, Johan; Rossini, Matteo; Sandborn, William J

    2014-01-01

    Objective Budesonide MMX is a novel oral formulation of budesonide that uses Multi-Matrix System (MMX) technology to extend release to the colon. This study compared the efficacy of budesonide MMX with placebo in patients with active, mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis (UC). Design Patients were randomised 1:1:1:1 to receive budesonide MMX 9 mg or 6 mg, or Entocort EC 9 mg (budesonide controlled ileal-release capsules; reference arm) or placebo once daily for 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was combined clinical and endoscopic remission, defined as UC Disease Activity Index score ≤1 with a score of 0 for rectal bleeding and stool frequency, no mucosal friability on colonoscopy, and a ≥1-point reduction in endoscopic index score from baseline. Results 410 patients were evaluated for efficacy. Combined clinical and endoscopic remission rates with budesonide MMX 9 mg or 6 mg, Entocort EC and placebo were 17.4%, 8.3%, 12.6% and 4.5%, respectively. The difference between budesonide MMX 9 mg and placebo was significant (OR 4.49; 95% CI 1.47 to 13.72; p=0.0047). Budesonide MMX 9 mg was associated with numerically higher rates of clinical (42.2% vs 33.7%) and endoscopic improvement (42.2% vs 31.5%) versus placebo. The rate of histological healing (16.5% vs 6.7%; p=0.0361) and proportion of patients with symptom resolution (23.9% vs 11.2%; p=0.0220) were significantly higher for budesonide MMX 9 mg than placebo. Adverse event profiles were similar across groups. Conclusion Budesonide MMX 9 mg was safe and more effective than placebo at inducing combined clinical and endoscopic remission in patients with active, mild-to-moderate UC. PMID:23436336

  2. Determination of the Anisotropic Optical Constant of Evaporated Polydiacetylene-C4UC4 Films at 632.8 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Haraguchi, Masanobu; Fukui, Masuo; Koda, Takao; Takeda, Kenji

    1998-10-01

    We have proposed a simple reflection method to evaluate the optical constants and optical thicknesses of various films. The optical constants and thicknesses of alkyl-urethane-substituted polydiacetylene (PDA-C4UC4) films on a BK-7 glass prism have been measured using the reflection method proposed in this paper. Unoriented blue-form PDAs have an optically anisotropic nature and their optical constants have been estimated in the tangential direction and in the direction normal to the film surface. Our reflection method also provides information on the polymerization state.

  3. [The brain structures functional activity and aggression patients' multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Reznikova, T N; Seliverstova, N A; Kataeva, G V; Aroev, R A; Il'ves, A G; Kuznetsova, A K

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to investigation of unconscious aggression in patients with multiple sclerosis. We carried out comparison of the relative assessments of metabolism speed of glucose (according to positron emission tomography) and indicators of unconscious aggression (in the Hand test). It is shown that an increased tendency to open aggression (unconscious aggression) in patients with multiple sclerosis, is mainly linked with a reduction in the functioning of different departments of the frontal lobes of the brain on the left and with changes of the metabolism speed of glucose in the structures of the limbic system of the left and right hemisphere. With increasing of unconscious aggression we observed decrease of glucose metabolism speed in certain areas of the lower and middle frontal gyrus.

  4. [Vaccines and preventive activities in patients with inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Casals-Sánchez, J L; Casals Vázquez, C; Vázquez Sánchez, M Á; Giménez Basallote, S

    2013-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis and eligible for immunosuppressive therapy account for more than 1% of general population, and represents a significant workload on family doctors. They are prone to other comorbidities, with an increased cardiovascular risk and a higher incidence of infections than the general population, especially skin infections and pneumonitis. This comorbidity can be considered vulnerable to a prevention program-prevention of cardiovascular risk, cancer screening, vaccination schedule for adults. As for prevention through vaccination, importance should be given to pneumococcal infection - significant in adults aged 50 or over, especially amongst immunosuppressed patients. The 13-valent conjugate vaccine, which has been recently approved for adults, must be considered. An attempt has been made to write a simple, applicable document on preventive measures that should be implemented both at primary and secondary care level for those adults.

  5. Evaluation of Prognostic Values of Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gurbuz, Yunus; Ozturk, Baris; Tutuncu, Emin Ediz; Sencan, Irfan; Cicek Senturk, Gonul; Altay, Fatma Aybala

    2015-01-01

    Background: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a widespread disease in Turkey, and was responsible for many deaths in endemic regions during the last decade. The pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood yet. Objectives: In this study we aimed to determine the levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as predictors of prognosis in CCHF. Patients and Methods: Patients who were diagnosed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and IgM positivity in the reference laboratory were included in this study. Tissue Plasminogen activator and PAI-1 levels were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a commercial kit (human t-PA ELISA and human PAL-1 ELISA; BioVendor research and diagnostic products, BioVendor-Laboratorni medicina a.s., Brno, Czech Republic). Results: A total of 46 patients participated in this study. The significant differences between recovering patients and the patients who died, regarding Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Creatine Phosphokinase (CPK), Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), Prothrombin Time (PT), activated Partial Thromboplastin time (aPTT), and thrombocyte and fibrinogen levels, were consistent with many clinical studies in the literature. The fatal cases were found to have higher tPA and PAI-1 levels in contrast to the patients who completely recovered. Conclusions: We think that these findings may help the progress of understanding of CCHF pathogenesis. PMID:26587219

  6. Standard magnitude prize reinforcers can be as efficacious as larger magnitude reinforcers in cocaine-dependent methadone patients

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Barry, Danielle; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Contingency management (CM) reduces cocaine use in methadone patients, but only about 50% of patients respond to CM interventions. This study evaluated whether increasing magnitudes of reinforcement will improve outcomes. Methods Cocaine-dependent methadone patients (N = 240) were randomized to one of four 12-week treatment conditions: usual care (UC), UC plus “standard” prize CM in which average expected prize earnings were about $300, UC plus high magnitude prize CM in which average expected prize earnings were about $900, or UC plus voucher CM with an expected maximum of about $900 in vouchers. Results All three CM conditions yielded significant reductions in cocaine use relative to UC, with effect sizes (d) ranging from 0.38 to 0.59. No differences were noted between CM conditions, with at least 55% of patients in each CM condition achieving one week or more of cocaine abstinence versus 35% in UC. During the 12 weeks after the intervention ended, CM increased time until relapse relative to UC, but the effects of CM were no longer significant at a 12-month follow-up. Conclusions Providing the standard magnitude of $300 in prizes was as effective as larger magnitude CM in cocaine-dependent methadone patients in this study. Given its strong evidence base and relatively low costs, standard magnitude prize CM should be considered for adoption in methadone clinics to encourage cocaine abstinence, but new methods need to be developed to sustain abstinence. PMID:25198284

  7. Beyond demographics: differences in patient activation across new immigrant, diverse language subgroups.

    PubMed

    Lubetkin, Erica I; Zabor, Emily C; Brennessel, Debra; Kemeny, M Margaret; Hay, Jennifer L

    2014-02-01

    The federal government promotes "patient-centered medical homes" to plan care with respect to patients' cultures and values and support patients' self-care efforts. To promote self-care, the medical home would be best utilized by activated, engaged patients. The objective of this study was to measure and compare patient activation scores in English-, Spanish-, and Haitian Creole-speaking patients seen at an inner-city hospital ambulatory care practice. Patient activation was measured using the patient activation measure (PAM). Mean PAM scores and activation levels differed according to survey language (p < 0.001). US-born participants had higher mean PAM scores than persons born outside of the US. Participants living in the US longer had higher mean PAM scores than participants newer to the US. Levels of activation and mean PAM scores increased with greater comfort reading, speaking, and thinking in English. The mean PAM (SD) score of 61.5 (16.5) for Haitian Creole-speaking Caribbean Blacks was significantly lower than the mean PAM score of 68.8 (15.6) for English-speaking Caribbean Blacks (p value = 0.006). Although mean PAM scores did not significantly differ between Haitian Creole and Spanish speakers, PAM stages differed according to language of survey completion (p < 0.001), with a greater percentage of Haitian Creole speakers being categorized as stage 1 (least activated) as well as stage 4 (most activated). Spanish and Haitian Creole speakers have lower mean PAM scores than English speakers. Mean PAM scores did not differ between Hispanics and non-Hispanics or according to race, illustrating the need to examine the role of language and culture on patient activation.

  8. Newly diagnosed lung cancer patients' preferences for and beliefs about physical activity prior to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Kristina H; Vallance, Jeff; Walker, Paul R

    2016-07-01

    Physical activity has been found to have a number of benefits for lung cancer patients yet very little information is available concerning physical activity beliefs and preferences for this population. The purpose of the study was to explore physical activity programming and counseling preferences and beliefs about physical activity in newly diagnosed lung cancer patients scheduled to receive chemotherapy. A total of 43 new diagnosed lung cancer patients completed a researcher-administered survey prior to commencing chemotherapy. Results indicated that only 7 participants (17%) reported meeting public health recommendations for physical activity yet the majority of participants (n = 28) indicated interest or possible interest in physical activity counseling. Many participants also indicated interest or possible interest in an exercise program (n = 29) for lung cancer survivors, preferring it to start during chemotherapy (n = 20), for it to be home based (n = 21), and moderate in intensity (n = 22). The most common behavioral belief (advantage) of physical activity was to build/maintain strength (n = 26) and the most common control belief (barrier) was fatigue (n = 11). These data suggest that physical activity counseling and programming may be well received by newly diagnosed lung cancer patients. Information about physical activity and programming preferences and beliefs from this study may be useful for the design of optimal physical activity interventions for lung cancer patients.

  9. Assessment of global disease activity in RA patients monitored in the METEOR database: the patient's versus the rheumatologist's opinion.

    PubMed

    Gvozdenović, Emilia; Koevoets, Rosanne; Wolterbeek, Ron; van der Heijde, Désirée; Huizinga, Tom W J; Allaart, Cornelia F; Landewé, Robert B M

    2014-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the patient's (PtGDA) and physician's (PhGDA) assessment of global disease activity and to identify factors that might influence these differences as well as factors that may influence the patient's and the physician's scores separately. Anonymous data were used from 2,117 Dutch patients included in the Measurement of efficacy of Treatment in the Era of Rheumatology database. PtGDA and PhGDA were scored independently on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) with 0 and 100 as extremes. The agreement, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), was calculated and a Bland-Altman plot was created to visualize the differences between PtGDA and PhGDA. Linear mixed model analysis was used to model PtGDA and PhGDA. Logistic repeated measurements were used to model the difference in PtGDA and PhGDA (PtGDA > PhGDA versus PtGDA ≤ PhGDA). Gender patient, gender physician, age, swollen joint count (SJC), tender joint count, VAS pain, disease duration, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were considered as possible determinants in both models. Mean (standard deviation) age was 57 (15) years and 67 % of the patients were female. Agreement between PtGDA and PhGDA was moderate (ICC, 0.57). Patients scored on average 11 units higher (worse) than rheumatologists (95 % limits of agreement, -25.2 to 47.6). Patient's perception of pain (VAS) was positively associated with a PtGDA being higher than PhGDA. Similarly, ESR and swollen joint counts were positively associated with a PtGDA being lower or equal to the PhGDA. Patients rate global disease activity consistently higher than their rheumatologists. Patients base their judgment primarily on the level of pain, physicians on the level of SJC and ESR.

  10. Endothelial activation by platelets from sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Proença-Ferreira, Renata; Brugnerotto, Ana Flávia; Garrido, Vanessa Tonin; Dominical, Venina Marcela; Vital, Daiana Morelli; Ribeiro, Marilene de Fátima Reis; dos Santos, Melissa Ercolin; Traina, Fabíola; Olalla-Saad, Sara T; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated with a hypercoagulable state. Increased platelet activation is reported in SCA and SCA platelets may present augmented adhesion to the vascular endothelium, potentially contributing to the vaso-occlusive process. We sought to observe the effects of platelets (PLTs) from healthy control (CON) individuals and SCA individuals on endothelial activation, in vitro. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured, in the presence, or not, of washed PLTs from CON or steady-state SCA individuals. Supernatants were reserved for cytokine quantification, and endothelial adhesion molecules (EAM) were analyzed by flow cytometry; gene expressions of ICAM1 and genes of the NF-κB pathway were analyzed by qPCR. SCA PLTs were found to be more inflammatory, displaying increased adhesive properties, an increased production of IL-1β and a tendency towards elevated expressions of P-selectin and activated αIIbβ3. Following culture in the presence of SCA PLTs, HUVEC presented significant augmentations in the expressions of the EAM, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, as well as increased IL-8 production and increased ICAM1 and NFKB1 (encodes p50 subunit of NF-κB) gene expressions. Interestingly, transwell inserts abolished the effects of SCA PLTs on EAM expression. Furthermore, an inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway, BAY 11-7082, also prevented the induction of EAM expression on the HUVEC surface by SCA PLTs. In conclusion, we find further evidence to indicate that platelets circulate in an activated state in sickle cell disease and are capable of stimulating endothelial cell activation. This effect appears to be mediated by direct contact, or even adhesion, between the platelets and endothelial cells and via NFκB-dependent signaling. As such, activated platelets in SCD may contribute to endothelial activation and, therefore, to the vaso-occlusive process. Results provide further evidence to support the use of anti-platelet approaches in association

  11. Reduced 5-Methylcytosine Level as a Potential Progression Predictor in Patients with T1 or Non-Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chi-Jung; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chuu, Chih-Pin; Yang, Chi-Rei; Chang, Yi-Huei; Huang, Chi-Ping; Chen, Wen-Chi; Chung, Mu-Chi; Chang, Han

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the level of DNA methylation in urothelial carcinomas (UCs) using 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) immunohistochemistry (IHC). We examined the relationship among 5-MeC levels, DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) immunostaining levels, and clinicopathologic features. Tissue samples included 23 normal urothelia and 150 urothelial neoplasia, which comprised 40 non-invasive and 110 invasive UCs. The levels of 5-MeC and DNMT1 were assessed based on their immunoreactivities and then divided into low and high levels. In addition, we collected information on clinical variables, pathologic features, and recurrent status from patient questionnaires and medical records. Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression model were used for analyses. Results showed that 5-MeC levels were positively associated with DNMT1 levels in UC (p = 0.0288). Both 5-MeC and DNMT1 were low in approximately 50% (76/150) of UC. The percentage of low 5-MeC levels was higher in invasive UC (65/110; 59%) than in normal urothelia (2/23; 13%) and non-invasive UC (18/40; 45%). Clinical factors were independently associated with low 5-MeC levels after adjusting for age and sex, including cancer stages II–IV, presence of UC in situ, and marked inflammation. Low 5-MeC levels in stage I invasive UC were not significantly different from those of non-invasive tumors (p = 0.8478). Low DNMT1 levels were only associated with UC with squamous differentiation (p = 0.0365). Neither 5-MeC nor DNMT1 levels were associated with UC recurrence. In conclusion, a low 5-MeC level could predict the progression of UC invasion into muscle. PMID:25561224

  12. Low natural-killer-cell activity in familial melanoma patients and their relatives.

    PubMed

    Hersey, P; Edwards, A; Honeyman, M; McCarthy, W H

    1979-07-01

    Patients with melanoma who had one or more close relatives with melanoma were studied for their natural-killer-cell (NK) activity against cultured melanoma cells and Chang cells. A high proportion of the patients and their relatives were found to have low NK activity against these target cells. In most of the patients this could not be attributed to general depression of their immune function, since B- and T-cell numbers and the mitogenic response to PHA were within normal limits. The levels of NK activity of the patients and their relatives were found to be significantly correlated, suggesting that the NK activity in these families may have been genetically (or environmentally) determined. Several genetic markers were examined in the patients and their relatives for association with the disease state and NK activity. No association with HLA antigens or ABO blood groups was detected, but there was a low incidence of the Rhesus negative phenotype in the patients (the Rh phenotype had previously been associated with high NK activity). The present results indicate that NK activity has a familial association in families with a high incidence of melanoma, and raise the question whether low NK activity may be one of the predisposing factors in the development of familial melanoma.

  13. Physical activity in patients with heart failure: barriers and motivations with special focus on sex differences

    PubMed Central

    Klompstra, Leonie; Jaarsma, Tiny; Strömberg, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to recommendations for physical activity is low in both male and female patients with heart failure (HF). Men are more physically active than women. In order to successfully promote physical activity, it is therefore essential to explore how much and why HF patients are physically active and if this is related to sex. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate physical activity in HF patients, to describe the factors related to physical activity, and to examine potential barriers and motivations to physical activity with special focus on sex differences. Methods The study had a cross-sectional survey design. HF patients living at home received a questionnaire during May–July 2014, with questions on physical activity (from the Short Form-International Physical Activity Questionnaire), and potential barriers and motivations to physical activity. Results A total of 154 HF patients, 27% women, with a mean age of 70±10 were included. In total, 23% of the patients reported a high level of physical activity, 46% a moderate level, and 34% a low level. Higher education, self-efficacy, and motivation were significantly associated with a higher amount of physical activity. Symptoms or severity of the disease were not related to physical activity. All the potential barriers to exercise were reported to be of importance. Psychological motivations were most frequently rated as being the most important motivation (41%) to be physically active. Physical motivations (33%) and social motivations were rated as the least important ones (22%). Women had significantly higher total motivation to be physically active. These differences were found in social, physical, and psychological motivations. Discussion One-third of the HF patients had a low level of physical activity in their daily life. Severity of the disease or symptoms were not related, whereas level of education, exercise self-efficacy, and motivation were important factors to take into account when

  14. Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity in hypertensive and normotensive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Rångemark, C; Hedner, J A; Carlson, J T; Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1995-04-01

    Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity was studied during rest and after ergometric exercise in 13 hypertensive or normotensive patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and in 10 sex- and weight-matched controls. All patients had undergone a complete polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA. The controls did not undergo any sleep investigation but had no history of snoring or witnessed apneas during sleep. On antihypertensive drug wash-out, two of the patients were normotensive, whereas 11 had mild to moderate hypertension. Platelet aggregation measured by adenosine 5'-diphosphate- or adrenaline-induced aggregation, platelet factor-4 or beta-thromboglobulin did not differ between patients and controls. During exercise beta-thromboglobulin decreased significantly in both OSA patients and controls. Plasma tissue plasminogen activator activity was similar in OSA patients and controls and increased significantly in both groups after exercise. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) was 18.4 +/- 3.6 IU/ml in OSA patients compared with 8.2 +/- 1.7 IU/ml in controls (p < 0.029) during rest, indicating decreased fibrinolytic activity. The difference between groups remained after exercise (p < 0.017). Blood pressure elevation was more common and body mass index (BMI) was higher in patients with OSA, but there was no direct relation between blood pressure level or BMI and PAI-1. Nevertheless, differences between groups were smaller when blood pressure and obesity were accounted for. It is concluded that patients with OSA may exhibit decreased fibrinolytic activity. Low fibrinolytic activity may represent a confounding pathophysiological mechanism behind the high incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with OSA.

  15. Creatine kinase activity in patients with diabetes mellitus type I and type II.

    PubMed

    Jevrić-Causević, Adlija; Malenica, Maja; Dujić, Tanja

    2006-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus can be looked upon as an array of diseases, all of which exhibit common symptoms. While pathogenesis of IDDM (insulin dependant diabetes mellitus) is well understood, the same is not true for diabetes mellitus type II. In the latter case, relative contribution of the two factors (insulin resistance or decreased insulin secretion) varies individually, being highly increased in peripheral tissues and strictly dependant on insulin for glucose uptake. Moreover, in patients with diabetes mellitus type II, disbalance at the level of regulation of glucose metabolism as well as lipid metabolism has been noted in skeletal muscles. It is normal to assume that in this type of diabetes, these changes are reflected at the level of total activity of enzyme creatine kinase. This experimental work was performed on a group of 80 regular patients of Sarajevo General Hospital. Forty of those patients were classified as patients with diabetes type I and forty as patients with diabetes type II. Each group of patients was carefully chosen and constituted of equal number of males and females. The same was applied for adequate controls. Concentration of glucose was determined for each patient with GOD method, while activity of creatine kinase was determined with CK-NAC activated kit. Statistical analysis of the results was performed with SPSS software for Windows. Obtained results point out highly expressed differences in enzyme activity between two populations examined. Changes in enzyme activity are more expressed in patients with diabetes type II. Positive correlation between concentration of glucose and serum activity of the enzyme is seen in both categories of diabetic patients which is not the case for the patients in control group. At the same time, correlation between age and type of diabetes does exist . This is not followed at the level of enzyme activity or concentration of glucose.

  16. Increased FDG activity in a dermatofibroma in esophageal cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Brigid A; Hatef, Daniel A; Chevez-Barrios, Patricia; Blackmon, Shanda H; Kim, Min P

    2013-03-01

    PET using the radiotracer (18)F-FDG is used for staging patients with esophageal cancer. Nonmalignant conditions, mainly inflammation and some benign tumors, however, can cloud the clinical picture by taking up FDG and producing a false-positive result. We report the case of a 46 year-old man with squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus who underwent combined PET/CT and had false-positive uptake in a chest wall dermatofibroma. Dermatofibroma is a benign skin lesion with a characteristic large presence of fibroblasts and macrophages. Macrophage uptake of FDG is likely responsible for the false-positive result on PET/CT. PMID:23357820

  17. Effectiveness of budesonide MMX (Cortiment) for the treatment of mild-to-moderate active ulcerative colitis: study protocol for a prospective multicentre observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Silvio; Hart, Ailsa; Dignass, Axel; Louis, Edouard; D'Haens, Geert; Dotan, Iris; Rogler, Gerhard; D'Agay, Laurence; Iannacone, Claudio; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A study has been developed to assess the use and effectiveness of budesonide MMX for mild-to-moderate active ulcerative colitis (UC) in routine clinical practice. Methods and analysis A prospective, multicentre, observational, cohort study of 300 patients prescribed budesonide MMX for the treatment of mild-to-moderate active UC will be conducted in Europe, Israel and Canada. Patients will be treated with budesonide MMX9 mg daily for induction of remission for ≤8 weeks. Data on effectiveness, including patient-reported outcomes, tolerability and use will be recorded at the end of treatment and at ≥2 weeks after. The primary outcome (improvement ≥3 point in the clinical subscores of the UC Disease Activity Index score at the end of treatment) will be compared in: patients who receive budesonide MMX added to mesalazine >2 weeks after increased/optimised mesalazine dose for the treatment of flare (late add-on); patients who receive budesonide MMX added to mesalazine ≤2 weeks since mesalazine increased/optimised for the treatment of flare, or without mesalazine dose modification (early add-on); and patients who receive budesonide MMX as monotherapy for the treatment of flare (mono). Propensity scoring will be used to minimise bias and confounding inherent in observational studies. Ethics and dissemination First ethical approval: Ethikkommission der Ärztekammer Hamburg (12/22/2015). The results will be published in full. Discussion Completion of primary data collection is expected in December 2017. Our results will provide further evidence on the effectiveness of budesonide MMX to support clinicians in their daily practice and inform therapeutic guidelines. Trial registration number NCT02586259. PMID:27239329

  18. Correlations between the sequelae of stroke and physical activity in Korean adult stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Kim, Hwang-Yong; Chun, In-Ae

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated a wide range of stroke patients living in South Korea using the Korean Community Health Survey raw data to determine the correlation between stroke and physical activity. [Subjects and Methods] This study used raw data from the 2012 Korean Community Health Survey. The total number of participants was 228,921; of the 4,475 stroke patients who had been diagnosed by a medical doctor or an oriental medical doctor, the data for 4,460 patients, excluding 15 whose amount of physical activity was unclear, were used in the analysis. [Results] The amount of physical activity performed by patients who had sequelae was significantly lower than that performed by patients who no longer had sequelae. Similarly, for the type of sequelae, palsy in the arms and legs, facial palsy, communication disability, swallowing or eating disability, and visual disability were associated with lower physical activity. Furthermore, as the number of sequelae increased, patients performed significantly less physical activity. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that when decisions on national policies and budgets are made, methods for increasing the physical activity of patients with a history of stroke should be considered. PMID:27390446

  19. Impact of thermal processing and the Maillard reaction on the basophil activation of hazelnut allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Cucu, Tatiana; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Bridts, Chris; Devreese, Bart; Ebo, Didier

    2012-05-01

    Food allergy, an abnormal immunological response due to sensitization to a food component, has become an important health problem, especially in industrialized countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of thermal processing and glycation on the basophil activation by hazelnut proteins using a basophil activation test. Patients with systemic allergic reactions (SR; n=6) to hazelnut as well as patients with an isolated oral allergy syndrome (OAS; n=4) were investigated. Thermal processing of hazelnut proteins either in the presence or absence of wheat proteins did not result in major changes in the stimulatory activity of the basophils for patients with SR or OAS. For the patients with OAS, incubation of hazelnut proteins with glucose led to complete depletion of the stimulatory activity of the basophils. An increase in stimulatory activity of the basophils for two out of six patients with SR was observed. For the other four patients slight or complete abolition of the stimulatory activity was observed. These results indicate that some patients with SR to hazelnut are at risk when exposed to hazelnut proteins, even in processed foods.

  20. Correlations between the sequelae of stroke and physical activity in Korean adult stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Kim, Hwang-Yong; Chun, In-Ae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated a wide range of stroke patients living in South Korea using the Korean Community Health Survey raw data to determine the correlation between stroke and physical activity. [Subjects and Methods] This study used raw data from the 2012 Korean Community Health Survey. The total number of participants was 228,921; of the 4,475 stroke patients who had been diagnosed by a medical doctor or an oriental medical doctor, the data for 4,460 patients, excluding 15 whose amount of physical activity was unclear, were used in the analysis. [Results] The amount of physical activity performed by patients who had sequelae was significantly lower than that performed by patients who no longer had sequelae. Similarly, for the type of sequelae, palsy in the arms and legs, facial palsy, communication disability, swallowing or eating disability, and visual disability were associated with lower physical activity. Furthermore, as the number of sequelae increased, patients performed significantly less physical activity. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that when decisions on national policies and budgets are made, methods for increasing the physical activity of patients with a history of stroke should be considered. PMID:27390446

  1. CT pulmonary densitovolumetry in patients with acromegaly: a comparison between active disease and controlled disease

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Gustavo B; Carvalho, Alysson R S; Machado, Dequitier C; Mogami, Roberto; Melo, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose was to compare the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function in patients with active acromegaly and controlled acromegaly and, secondarily, to correlate these findings. Methods: 11 patients with active acromegaly, 18 patients with controlled acromegaly and 17 control subjects, all non-smokers, underwent quantification of lung volume using multidetector CT (Q-MDCT) and pulmonary function tests. Results: Patients with active acromegaly had larger total lung mass (TLM) values than the controls and larger amounts of non-aerated compartments than the other two groups. Patients with active acromegaly also had larger amounts of poorly aerated compartments than the other two groups, a difference that was observed in both total lung volume (TLV) and TLM. TLV as measured by inspiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with total lung capacity, whereas TLV measured using expiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with functional residual capacity. Conclusion: Patients with active acromegaly have more lung mass and larger amounts of non-aerated and poorly aerated compartments. There is a relationship between the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function test parameters. Advances in knowledge: Although the nature of our results demands further investigation, our data suggest that both CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function tests can be used as useful tools for patients with acromegaly by assisting in the prediction of disease activity. PMID:26246281

  2. Activated natural killer cells accelerate liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Q; Zhu, Y Y; Chen, J; Ye, Y B; Li, J Y; Liu, Y R; Hu, M L; Zheng, Y C; Jiang, J J

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that natural killer (NK) cells may contribute to liver injury in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Because HBV infection progresses through various disease phases, the cytolytic profiles of peripheral and intrahepatic NK cells in HBV-infected patients remain to be defined. In this study, we comprehensively characterized intrahepatic and peripheral NK cells in a cohort of HBV-infected individuals, and investigated their impact on liver pathogenesis during chronic HBV infection. The study population included 34 immune-clearance (IC) patients, 36 immune-tolerant (IT) carriers and 10 healthy subjects. We found that the activity of peripheral NK cells from IC patients was functionally elevated compared to IT carriers and controls, and NK cell activation was indicated by an increased expression of CD69, CD107a, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Further analysis showed that the increased activity of both peripheral and hepatic NK cells was correlated positively with liver injury, which was assessed by serum alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) and the liver histological activity index (HAI). Interestingly, the frequency of peripheral NK cells was reduced in IC patients (especially those with higher HAI scores of 3-4), but there was a concomitant increase in hepatic NK cells. The functionally activated NK cells are enriched preferentially in the livers of IC patients and skew towards cytolytic activity that accelerates liver injury in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients.

  3. Successful Interferon Therapy Reverses Enhanced Hepatic Progenitor Cell Activation in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Noritake, Hidenao; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Ooba, Yukimasa; Matsunaga, Erika; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Shimoyama, Shin; Yamazaki, Satoru; Chida, Takeshi; Kawata, Kazuhito; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    The enhanced accumulation of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) is related to the risk of progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interferon (IFN) treatment reduces HCC risk in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of IFN treatment on HPC activation in HCV patients. Immunohistochemical detection and computer-assisted quantitative image analyses of cytokeratin 7 (CK7) were performed to evaluate HPC activation in paired pre- and post-treatment liver biopsies from 18 HCV patients with sustained virological response (SVR) to IFN-based therapy and from 23 patients without SVR, as well as normal liver tissues obtained from surgical resection specimens of 10 patients. Pretreatment HCV livers showed increased CK7 immunoreactivity, compared with normal livers (HCV: median, 1.38%; normal: median, 0.69%, P=0.006). IFN treatment reduced hepatic CK7 immunoreactivity (median, 1.57% pre-IFN vs. 0.69% post-IFN, P=0.006) in SVR patients, but not in non-SVR patients. The development of HCC following IFN treatment was encountered in 3 non-SVR patients who showed high post-IFN treatment CK7 immunoreactivity (>4%). Successful IFN therapy can reverse enhanced HPC activation in HCV patients, which may contribute to the reduced risk of HCC development in these patients.

  4. Promotion and support of physical activity in elderly patients on hemodialysis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Kotomi; Hashimoto, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to ascertain the optimum strategy for implementing a physical activity intervention in patients on hemodialysis by investigating the physical characteristics of elderly patients on hemodialysis, and their attitude to physical activity and level of daily activity. [Subjects] The Subject were 10 elderly patients on hemodialysis. [Methods] They wore a physical activity monitor for 1 week. Data obtained were analyzed for hemodialysis and non- hemodialysis days, and two-way analysis of variance was used to compare the number of steps and activity levels. A questionnaire was administered to investigate the stage of psychological preparedness for exercise and attitudes toward/awareness of exercise. [Results] There was no significant difference in the number of steps or exercise levels on hemodialysis and non- hemodialysis days. However, on both types of days, subjects spent long periods not engaged in any activity. Most of their activity was either inactivity or sedentary behavior. [Conclusion] Patients on hemodialysis with low physical activity levels are considered to have poor physical function and exercise tolerance. To maintain and improve the physical function of patients on hemodialysis, it will be necessary to reduce their time spent in inactive, and comprehensive care that covers psychosocial aspects should be provided to promote the proactive improvement of physical activity and their attitudes to exercise. PMID:27190487

  5. Altered Error-Related Activity in Patients with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Kathrin; Wagner, Gerd; Schultz, Christoph; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Nenadic, Igor; Axer, Martina; Reichenbach, Jurgen R.; Sauer, Heinrich; Schlosser, Ralf G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Deficits in working memory (WM) and executive cognitive control are core features of schizophrenia. However, findings regarding functional activation strengths are heterogeneous, partly due to differences in task demands and behavioral performance. Previous investigators proposed integrating these heterogeneous findings into a comprehensive model…

  6. Metabolic activity of sodium, measured by neutron activation, in the hands of patients suffering from bone diseases: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Spinks, T.J.; Bewley, D.K.; Paolillo, M.; Vlotides, J.; Joplin, G.F.; Ranicar, A.S.O.

    1980-01-01

    Turnover of sodium in the human hand was studied by neutron activation. Patients suffering from various metabolic abnormalities affecting the skeleton, who were undergoing routine neutron activation for the measurement of calcium, were investigated along with a group of healthy volunteers. Neutron activation labels the sodium atoms simultaneously and with equal probability regardless of the turnover time of individual body compartments. The loss of sodium can be described either by a sum of two exponentials or by a single power function. Distinctions between patients and normal subjects were not apparent from the exponential model but were brought out by the power function. The exponent of time in the latter is a measure of clearance rate. The mean values of this parameter in (a) a group of patients suffering from acromegaly; (b) a group including Paget's disease, osteoporosis, Cushing's disease, and hyperparathyroidism; and (c) a group of healthy subjects, were found to be significantly different from each other.

  7. Endothelial activation by platelets from sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Proença-Ferreira, Renata; Brugnerotto, Ana Flávia; Garrido, Vanessa Tonin; Dominical, Venina Marcela; Vital, Daiana Morelli; Ribeiro, Marilene de Fátima Reis; dos Santos, Melissa Ercolin; Traina, Fabíola; Olalla-Saad, Sara T; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated with a hypercoagulable state. Increased platelet activation is reported in SCA and SCA platelets may present augmented adhesion to the vascular endothelium, potentially contributing to the vaso-occlusive process. We sought to observe the effects of platelets (PLTs) from healthy control (CON) individuals and SCA individuals on endothelial activation, in vitro. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured, in the presence, or not, of washed PLTs from CON or steady-state SCA individuals. Supernatants were reserved for cytokine quantification, and endothelial adhesion molecules (EAM) were analyzed by flow cytometry; gene expressions of ICAM1 and genes of the NF-κB pathway were analyzed by qPCR. SCA PLTs were found to be more inflammatory, displaying increased adhesive properties, an increased production of IL-1β and a tendency towards elevated expressions of P-selectin and activated αIIbβ3. Following culture in the presence of SCA PLTs, HUVEC presented significant augmentations in the expressions of the EAM, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, as well as increased IL-8 production and increased ICAM1 and NFKB1 (encodes p50 subunit of NF-κB) gene expressions. Interestingly, transwell inserts abolished the effects of SCA PLTs on EAM expression. Furthermore, an inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway, BAY 11-7082, also prevented the induction of EAM expression on the HUVEC surface by SCA PLTs. In conclusion, we find further evidence to indicate that platelets circulate in an activated state in sickle cell disease and are capable of stimulating endothelial cell activation. This effect appears to be mediated by direct contact, or even adhesion, between the platelets and endothelial cells and via NFκB-dependent signaling. As such, activated platelets in SCD may contribute to endothelial activation and, therefore, to the vaso-occlusive process. Results provide further evidence to support the use of anti-platelet approaches in association

  8. Endothelial Activation by Platelets from Sickle Cell Anemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Proença-Ferreira, Renata; Brugnerotto, Ana Flávia; Garrido, Vanessa Tonin; Dominical, Venina Marcela; Vital, Daiana Morelli; Ribeiro, Marilene de Fátima Reis; dos Santos, Melissa Ercolin; Traina, Fabíola; Olalla-Saad, Sara T.; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated with a hypercoagulable state. Increased platelet activation is reported in SCA and SCA platelets may present augmented adhesion to the vascular endothelium, potentially contributing to the vaso-occlusive process. We sought to observe the effects of platelets (PLTs) from healthy control (CON) individuals and SCA individuals on endothelial activation, in vitro. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured, in the presence, or not, of washed PLTs from CON or steady-state SCA individuals. Supernatants were reserved for cytokine quantification, and endothelial adhesion molecules (EAM) were analyzed by flow cytometry; gene expressions of ICAM1 and genes of the NF-κB pathway were analyzed by qPCR. SCA PLTs were found to be more inflammatory, displaying increased adhesive properties, an increased production of IL-1β and a tendency towards elevated expressions of P-selectin and activated αIIbβ3. Following culture in the presence of SCA PLTs, HUVEC presented significant augmentations in the expressions of the EAM, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, as well as increased IL-8 production and increased ICAM1 and NFKB1 (encodes p50 subunit of NF-κB) gene expressions. Interestingly, transwell inserts abolished the effects of SCA PLTs on EAM expression. Furthermore, an inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway, BAY 11-7082, also prevented the induction of EAM expression on the HUVEC surface by SCA PLTs. In conclusion, we find further evidence to indicate that platelets circulate in an activated state in sickle cell disease and are capable of stimulating endothelial cell activation. This effect appears to be mediated by direct contact, or even adhesion, between the platelets and endothelial cells and via NFκB-dependent signaling. As such, activated platelets in SCD may contribute to endothelial activation and, therefore, to the vaso-occlusive process. Results provide further evidence to support the use of anti-platelet approaches in association

  9. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  10. Increased serum mitochondrial creatine kinase activity as a risk for hepatocarcinogenesis in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Enooku, Kenichiro; Nakagawa, Hayato; Soroida, Yoko; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Kageyama, Yuko; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Watanabe, Naoko; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Yatomi, Yutaka; Ikeda, Hitoshi

    2014-08-15

    Serum mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) activity was reportedly increased in cirrhotic patients although less prominent than that in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. To elucidate the clinical significance of serum MtCK activity in chronic liver disease, 171 chronic hepatitis C patients were enrolled. Serum MtCK activity in study subjects was correlated with serum albumin, platelet counts, liver stiffness values and serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase. In mouse fibrotic liver induced by bile duct ligation, ubiquitous MtCK mRNA and protein expressions were significantly enhanced and its immunoreactivity was increased, predominantly in hepatocytes. During the mean follow-up period of 2.7 years, HCC developed in 21 patients, in whom serum MtCK activity was significantly higher than that in patients without HCC development. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that higher serum MtCK activity was a risk for HCC development. A cutoff value of MtCK for the prediction of HCC development was determined as 9.0 U/L on receiver operating characteristics analysis, where area under receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.754, with a sensitivity of 61.9%, a specificity of 92.8% and a high negative predictive value of 94.2%. Cumulative incidence of HCC was significantly higher in patients with serum MtCK activity of >9.0 U/L compared to those with serum MtCK activity of ≤ 9.0 U/L even in patients with elevated liver stiffness value, >15 kPa. In conclusion, serum MtCK activity may be increased correlatively with the stage of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular damage. Increased serum MtCK activity is an independent risk for hepatocarcinogenesis in chronic hepatitis C patients. PMID:24420733

  11. Interplay between patient global assessment, pain, and fatigue and influence of other clinical disease activity measures in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Egsmose, Emilie Lund; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2015-07-01

    The interplay between patient-reported outcome measures in rheumatology is not well clarified. The objective of the study was to examine associations on the group level and concordance on the individual patient level between patient global assessment (PaGl), pain, and fatigue as scored on visual analog scales (VAS) in the daily clinic by patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Associations with other measures of disease activity were also examined. Traditional disease activity data on 221 RA patients with active disease planned to initiate biological treatment were extracted from the Danish DANBIO registry. Associations between VAS PaGl, pain, and fatigue (0-100) were examined using multiple regression analysis. Concordance between the VAS scores was expressed as the bias (mean difference between intra-individual scores) and the 95% lower and upper limits of agreement (LLoA; ULoA) according to the Bland-Altman method. Mean age was 57 ± 14 years, mean Disease Activity Score (DAS28-CRP4) 5.0 ± 0.9, and mean PaGl 63.6 ± 22.6. PaGl was most strongly predicted by pain and fatigue, pain by PaGl and fatigue, and fatigue by PaGl and pain (beta ranging from 0.17 to 0.69, p < 0.01-0.0001). More objective measures were not or far less predictive. LLoA;ULoA [bias] for PaGl vs. pain was -19.1; 29.5 [5.2], for PaGl vs. fatigue -22.8; 28.6 [2.9], and for fatigue vs. pain -29.2; 33.8 [2.3]. In conclusion, PaGl, pain, and fatigue were most strongly explained by each other, not by more objective clinical measures of disease activity and were nearly identical on the group level. On the individual patient level, however, differences between the scores varied considerably. The findings highlight the challenge of understanding and dealing with traditional patient-reported VAS measures when it comes to individual RA patients in the daily clinic.

  12. Striatal Activity is Associated with Deficits of Cognitive Control and Aberrant Salience for Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ceaser, Alan E.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2016-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis has shown that a large dopamine abnormality exists in the striatum when comparing patients with schizophrenia and controls, and this abnormality is thought to contribute to aberrant salience assignment (or a misattribution of relevance to irrelevant stimuli). This abnormality may also disrupt striatal contributions to cognitive control processing. We examined the relationship between striatal involvement in cognition and aberrant salience symptoms using a task of cognitive control that involves updating, interference control, and simple maintenance. The current study included a sample of 22 patients with schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls and used a slow event-related fMRI design. We predicted that (1) aberrant salience symptoms would be greater for patient's, (2) patients would demonstrate increased errors during interference control trials, given that patients may be inappropriately assigning salience to distracters, and (3) striatal activity during those errors would be correlated with aberrant salience symptoms. We found a trend toward a significant difference between patients and controls on aberrant salience symptoms, and a significant difference between groups on select task conditions. During interference control trials, patients were more likely to inappropriately encode distracters. For patients, both prefrontal and striatal activity was significantly greater when patients inappropriately identified the distracter as correct compared to activity during distracter rejection. During updating, patient prefrontal and striatal activity was significantly lower for incorrect than correct updating trials. Finally, as predicted, for patients the increase of activity during incorrect distracter trials was positively correlated with aberrant salience symptoms, but only for the striatal region. These relationships may have implications for treatments that improve cognitive function and reduce symptom expression. PMID:26869912

  13. Daily energy expenditure, physical activity, and weight loss in Parkinson's disease patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly exhibit weight loss (WL) which investigators attribute to various factors, including elevated energy expenditure. We tested the hypothesis that daily energy expenditure (DEE) and its components, resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity (P...

  14. Sports activity following total knee arthroplasty in patients older than 60 years.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Hermann O; Reinhold, Maik; Bernstein, Anke; Suedkamp, Norbert P; Stoehr, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    In a retrospective study with a population over 65 years, sports activity was conducted 6 years after cruciate retaining (CR) total condylar knee arthroplasty (TKA) with rotating platform (RP). Eighty-one Patients (71.8±5.4years) were examined at follow-up 6.4±0.9 years postoperative. Sport was practiced 5.3 hours every week in mean. Patients were active in sports 3.5times per week. Twenty-five percent performed high impact sports, 47% medium impact sports and 52% low impact sports at follow-up. In KOOS sports 60±28 was reached, in WOMAC 12.1±15.1. It can be concluded that in this population 50% of patients were active in medium and low impact sport 6 years after surgery. However, a quarter of patients were also active in high impact sports.

  15. Assessment of coagulation disorders and cancer procoagulant activity in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, K; Treliński, J; Wawrzyniak, E; Sobolewska, M; Mielicki, W

    2002-01-01

    Hemostatic disorders mainly due to thrombocytopenia represent an important clinical problem in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Much less is known about the possible coagulation abnormalities. Thirty patients with MDS were studied. Activity of cancer procoagulant (CP), concentrations of activation markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis such as thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT), prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2) and D-dimers (DD) as well as standard coagulation tests were determined. Coagulation abnormalities concerned mainly patients with RAEB and RAEB-t. In this group the mean values of TATand F1+2 concentrations were significantly higher than in control indicating chronic coagulation activation similar to that observed in acute leukemias. CP activity in MDS patients did not differ from the control group.

  16. Physical activity in patients with grown-up congenital heart defects after comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Jaworski, Radosław; Chojnicki, Maciej; Szalewska, Dominika; Leszczyńska, Katarzyna; Bakuła, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The group of grown-up patients with congenital heart defects (grown-up congenital heart – GUCH) complains of a number of specific medical and non-medical problems. The presented program of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR-GUCH), dedicated to the above mentioned group, can potentially improve the physical activity of GUCH patients. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the effect of the comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on the physical activity of GUCH patients. Material and methods The invitation to take part in the CCR-GUCH program was addressed to a group of 57 patients (mean age: 23.7 ± 4.1 years) who had undergone the surgical correction of ventricular septal defects (VSD) or atrial septal defects (ASD) at least 12 months earlier. The patients were divided into two groups: A – patients undergoing rehabilitation, and B – patients who did not participate in the program. The patients were initially examined using functional and stress tests, and the program of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation was started in group A. After 30 days, the patients from both groups underwent further testing using the same methods as during the initial evaluation. Results After one month of rehabilitation, the physical activity parameters of patients participating in the CCR-GUCH program (group A) were significantly better than those observed among non-participants (group B). Conclusions The introduction of the comprehensive rehabilitation program improves the physical activity and, consequently, the quality of life of GUCH patients. The CCR-GUCH program appears to be a justified supplement to holistic care in the late rehabilitation of patients after the surgical correction of congenital heart defects. PMID:26336469

  17. Impacts of physically active and under-active on clinical outcomes of esophageal cancer patients undergoing esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Cong; Guan, Shanghui; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity has been reported to positively influence quality of life and survival in certain cancers. However, the associations between them in esophageal cancer are previously undefined. The aims of this study are to investigate whether physically active esophageal cancer patients have improved quality of life and lower risk of recurrence as well as death compared with physically inactive patients. We evaluated the relationships between postoperative leisure time physical activity and quality of life and recurrence and death among patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer. We respectively used generalized estimating equations and Cox proportional regression to analysis quality of life and survival, adjusting for known potential confounding factors. Comparing esophageal cancer patients reporting more than 9 MET hours per week of postoperative leisure time physical activity with those reporting less, we found improved quality of life. Additionally, we also found that postoperative leisure time physical activity ≥9 MET hours per week, compared with less, was associated with a 23% lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 0.666; 95% CI, 0.481-0.921; P=0.014) and a 53% lower risk of recurrence (HR, 0.306; 95% CI 0.218-0.429; P<0.001). Leisure time physical activity was significantly associated with quality of life and risk of recurrence and death of esophageal cancer patients. Clinicians should consider increasing physical activity, regardless of previous behaviors, as a part of primary cancer treatment. The ultimate goal is to improve quality of life and prolong survival of cancer survivors. PMID:27508099

  18. Activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with sarcoidosis: visualisation of single cell activation products.

    PubMed Central

    Pantelidis, P.; Southcott, A. M.; Cambrey, A. D.; Laurent, G. J.; du Bois, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Interstitial lung diseases are characterised by the recruitment of mononuclear cells to disease sites where maturation occurs and activation products, including lysozyme (LZM), are released. Analysis of in vitro cell culture supernatants for activation products masks the functional heterogeneity of cell populations. It is therefore necessary to examine the secretion of activation products by single cells to assess whether the activation of newly recruited mononuclear phagocytes at the sites of disease in the lung is uniform and controlled by the local microenvironment. METHODS--The reverse haemolytic plaque assay was used to evaluate, at a single cell level, the ability of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from seven patients with sarcoidosis to activate Ficoll-Hypaque-separated peripheral blood mononuclear cells by comparison with BAL fluid from six normal volunteers and nine patients with systemic sclerosis. Monolayers of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and sheep red blood cells were cultured either alone or in the presence of 20% (v/v) BAL fluid with a polyclonal anti-LZM antibody. LZM/anti-LZM complexes bound to red blood cells surrounding the secreting cells were disclosed following complement lysis of red blood cells and quantification of plaque dimensions using microscopy and image analysis. RESULTS--Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from all the patients with sarcoidosis increased LZM secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells compared with unstimulated mononuclear cells. By contrast, BAL fluid from the other individuals had no effect on LZM secretion. CONCLUSIONS--Single cells activated by BAL fluid can be evaluated by the reverse haemolytic plaque assay. BAL fluid from patients with sarcoidosis, but not from patients with systemic sclerosis or normal individuals, contains components capable of activating mononuclear phagocytes to secrete lysozyme. Images PMID:7831632

  19. Impacts of physically active and under-active on clinical outcomes of esophageal cancer patients undergoing esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Cong; Guan, Shanghui; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity has been reported to positively influence quality of life and survival in certain cancers. However, the associations between them in esophageal cancer are previously undefined. The aims of this study are to investigate whether physically active esophageal cancer patients have improved quality of life and lower risk of recurrence as well as death compared with physically inactive patients. We evaluated the relationships between postoperative leisure time physical activity and quality of life and recurrence and death among patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer. We respectively used generalized estimating equations and Cox proportional regression to analysis quality of life and survival, adjusting for known potential confounding factors. Comparing esophageal cancer patients reporting more than 9 MET hours per week of postoperative leisure time physical activity with those reporting less, we found improved quality of life. Additionally, we also found that postoperative leisure time physical activity ≥9 MET hours per week, compared with less, was associated with a 23% lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 0.666; 95% CI, 0.481-0.921; P=0.014) and a 53% lower risk of recurrence (HR, 0.306; 95% CI 0.218-0.429; P<0.001). Leisure time physical activity was significantly associated with quality of life and risk of recurrence and death of esophageal cancer patients. Clinicians should consider increasing physical activity, regardless of previous behaviors, as a part of primary cancer treatment. The ultimate goal is to improve quality of life and prolong survival of cancer survivors. PMID:27508099

  20. Physical Activity and Exercise for Secondary Prevention among Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Darden, Douglas; Richardson, Caroline; Jackson, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-01

    Most adults do not achieve the recommended levels of physical activity, including patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Furthermore, healthcare providers often do not understand the benefits of physical activity in CVD patients, rather over emphasizing the potential risks related to activity. Recent studies suggest reductions in cardiovascular events including mortality with concomitant improvements in quality of life for many vascular conditions. However gaps in our current knowledge base remain. Recent research on physical activity including use of novel internet based interventions are developing areas of interest have moved to reduce such knowledge gaps.

  1. Physical Activity and Exercise for Secondary Prevention among Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Darden, Douglas; Richardson, Caroline; Jackson, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Most adults do not achieve the recommended levels of physical activity, including patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Furthermore, healthcare providers often do not understand the benefits of physical activity in CVD patients, rather over emphasizing the potential risks related to activity. Recent studies suggest reductions in cardiovascular events including mortality with concomitant improvements in quality of life for many vascular conditions. However gaps in our current knowledge base remain. Recent research on physical activity including use of novel internet based interventions are developing areas of interest have moved to reduce such knowledge gaps. PMID:24396552

  2. Physical Activity and Exercise for Secondary Prevention among Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Darden, Douglas; Richardson, Caroline; Jackson, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-01

    Most adults do not achieve the recommended levels of physical activity, including patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Furthermore, healthcare providers often do not understand the benefits of physical activity in CVD patients, rather over emphasizing the potential risks related to activity. Recent studies suggest reductions in cardiovascular events including mortality with concomitant improvements in quality of life for many vascular conditions. However gaps in our current knowledge base remain. Recent research on physical activity including use of novel internet based interventions are developing areas of interest have moved to reduce such knowledge gaps. PMID:24396552

  3. Epicatechin and catechin modulate endothelial activation induced by platelets of patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, R; Loffredo, L; Nocella, C; Bartimoccia, S; Bucci, T; De Falco, E; Peruzzi, M; Chimenti, I; Biondi-Zoccai, G; Pignatelli, P; Violi, F; Frati, G

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation contributes to the alteration of endothelial function, a critical initial step in atherogenesis through the production and release of prooxidant mediators. There is uncertainty about the precise role of polyphenols in interaction between platelets and endothelial cells (ECs). We aimed to investigate whether polyphenols are able to reduce endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. First, we compared platelet activation and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 healthy subjects (HS) and 10 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Then, we evaluated the effect of epicatechin plus catechin on platelet-HUVEC interaction by measuring soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), NOx production, and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) in HUVEC. Compared to HS, PAD patients had enhanced platelet activation. Conversely, PAD patients had lower FMD than HS. Supernatant of activated platelets from PAD patients induced an increase of sCAMs release and a decrease of p-eNOS and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability compared to unstimulated HUVEC. Coincubation of HUVEC, with supernatant of PAD platelets patients, pretreated with a scalar dose of the polyphenols, resulted in a decrease of sCAMs release and in an increase of p-eNOS and NO bioavailability. This study demonstrates that epicatechin plus catechin reduces endothelial activation induced by activated platelets.

  4. Epicatechin and Catechin Modulate Endothelial Activation Induced by Platelets of Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carnevale, R.; Loffredo, L.; Nocella, C.; Bartimoccia, S.; Bucci, T.; De Falco, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Chimenti, I.; Biondi-Zoccai, G.; Pignatelli, P.; Violi, F.; Frati, G.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation contributes to the alteration of endothelial function, a critical initial step in atherogenesis through the production and release of prooxidant mediators. There is uncertainty about the precise role of polyphenols in interaction between platelets and endothelial cells (ECs). We aimed to investigate whether polyphenols are able to reduce endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. First, we compared platelet activation and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 healthy subjects (HS) and 10 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Then, we evaluated the effect of epicatechin plus catechin on platelet-HUVEC interaction by measuring soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), NOx production, and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) in HUVEC. Compared to HS, PAD patients had enhanced platelet activation. Conversely, PAD patients had lower FMD than HS. Supernatant of activated platelets from PAD patients induced an increase of sCAMs release and a decrease of p-eNOS and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability compared to unstimulated HUVEC. Coincubation of HUVEC, with supernatant of PAD platelets patients, pretreated with a scalar dose of the polyphenols, resulted in a decrease of sCAMs release and in an increase of p-eNOS and NO bioavailability. This study demonstrates that epicatechin plus catechin reduces endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. PMID:25180068

  5. Epicatechin and catechin modulate endothelial activation induced by platelets of patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, R; Loffredo, L; Nocella, C; Bartimoccia, S; Bucci, T; De Falco, E; Peruzzi, M; Chimenti, I; Biondi-Zoccai, G; Pignatelli, P; Violi, F; Frati, G

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation contributes to the alteration of endothelial function, a critical initial step in atherogenesis through the production and release of prooxidant mediators. There is uncertainty about the precise role of polyphenols in interaction between platelets and endothelial cells (ECs). We aimed to investigate whether polyphenols are able to reduce endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. First, we compared platelet activation and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 healthy subjects (HS) and 10 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Then, we evaluated the effect of epicatechin plus catechin on platelet-HUVEC interaction by measuring soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), NOx production, and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) in HUVEC. Compared to HS, PAD patients had enhanced platelet activation. Conversely, PAD patients had lower FMD than HS. Supernatant of activated platelets from PAD patients induced an increase of sCAMs release and a decrease of p-eNOS and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability compared to unstimulated HUVEC. Coincubation of HUVEC, with supernatant of PAD platelets patients, pretreated with a scalar dose of the polyphenols, resulted in a decrease of sCAMs release and in an increase of p-eNOS and NO bioavailability. This study demonstrates that epicatechin plus catechin reduces endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. PMID:25180068

  6. The PROactive instruments to measure physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Raste, Yogini; Demeyer, Heleen; Louvaris, Zafeiris; de Jong, Corina; Rabinovich, Roberto A; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Polkey, Michael I; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Tabberer, Maggie; Dobbels, Fabienne; Ivanoff, Nathalie; de Boer, Willem I; van der Molen, Thys; Kulich, Karoly; Serra, Ignasi; Basagaña, Xavier; Troosters, Thierry; Puhan, Milo A; Karlsson, Niklas; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2015-10-01

    No current patient-centred instrument captures all dimensions of physical activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our objective was item reduction and initial validation of two instruments to measure physical activity in COPD.Physical activity was assessed in a 6-week, randomised, two-way cross-over, multicentre study using PROactive draft questionnaires (daily and clinical visit versions) and two activity monitors. Item reduction followed an iterative process including classical and Rasch model analyses, and input from patients and clinical experts.236 COPD patients from five European centres were included. Results indicated the concept of physical activity in COPD had two domains, labelled "amount" and "difficulty". After item reduction, the daily PROactive instrument comprised nine items and the clinical visit contained 14. Both demonstrated good model fit (person separation index >0.7). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the bidimensional structure. Both instruments had good internal consistency (Cronbach's α>0.8), test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥0.9) and exhibited moderate-to-high correlations (r>0.6) with related constructs and very low correlations (r<0.3) with unrelated constructs, providing evidence for construct validity.Daily and clinical visit "PROactive physical activity in COPD" instruments are hybrid tools combining a short patient-reported outcome questionnaire and two activity monitor variables which provide simple, valid and reliable measures of physical activity in COPD patients.

  7. Interrogation of Patient Smartphone Activity Tracker to Assist Arrhythmia Management.

    PubMed

    Rudner, Joshua; McDougall, Carol; Sailam, Vivek; Smith, Monika; Sacchetti, Alfred

    2016-09-01

    A 42-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation of unknown duration. Interrogation of the patient's wrist-worn activity tracker and smartphone application identified the onset of the arrhythmia as within the previous 3 hours, permitting electrocardioversion and discharge of the patient from the ED.

  8. Web-Based Self-Management in Chronic Care: A Study of Change in Patient Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Web-based self-management interventions (W-SMIs) are designed to help a large number of chronically ill people become more actively engaged in their health care. Despite the potential to engage more patients in self-managing their health, the use of W-SMIs by patients and their clinicians is low. Using a self-management conceptual model based on…

  9. Overcoming the Influence of Chronic Pain on Older Patients' Difficulty with Recommended Self-Management Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krein, Sarah L.; Heisler, Michele; Piette, John D.; Butchart, Amy; Kerr, Eve A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Many older patients with common chronic conditions also experience chronic pain. We examined how chronic pain affects patients' difficulty with recommended self-management activities and the potential intervening role of self-efficacy (the level of confidence in one's own ability to perform a specific task). Design and Methods: We…

  10. Evaluation of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Greek Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Panagiotoua, Irene; Roumeliotou, Anna; Symeonidi, Matina; Galanos, Antonis; Kouvaris, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Translation of the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was carried out and its psychometric properties were assessed in a Greek sample of patients with advanced cancer. The scale was translated with the forward-backward procedure into the Greek language. It was initially administered to 136 advanced cancer patients. To assess…

  11. Activity limitation and exertional dyspnea in adult asthmatic patients: What do we know?

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, François; Garcia, Gilles; Ninane, Vincent; Laveneziana, Pierantonio

    2016-08-01

    Limitation of activity is the most cited symptom described by uncontrolled asthma patients. Assessment of activity limitation can be undertaken through several ways, more or less complex, subjective or objective. Yet little is known about the link between patients sensations and objective measurements. The present review reports the current knowledge regarding activity limitation and symptom perception (i.e., exertional dyspnea) in adult patients with asthma. This work is based on references indexed by PubMed, irrespective of the year of publication. Overall, patients with stable asthma do not have a more sedentary lifestyle than healthy subjects. However, during a cycle ergometric test, the maximal load is reduced when FEV1, FVC and muscle strengths are decreased. Additionally, during the six-minute walking test, mild asthma patients walk less than healthy subjects even if the minimal clinically important difference is not reached. The major complaint of asthma patients when exercising is dyspnea that is mainly related to the inspiratory effort and also to dynamic hyperinflation in some circumstances. Finally, the administration of bronchodilator does not improve the ventilatory pattern and the exercise capacity of asthma patients and little is known on its effect on exertional dyspnea. The present review allows to conclude that until now there is no gold standard test allowing the objective assessment of "activity limitation and exertional dyspnea" in asthma patients. PMID:27492522

  12. Increased Risk of Urinary Tract Cancer in ESRD Patients Associated with Usage of Chinese Herbal Products Suspected of Containing Aristolochic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lai, Ming-Nan; Wei, Alan; Chen, Ya-Yin; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Both end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and urothelial cancer (UC) are associated with the consumption of Chinese herbal products containing aristolochic acid (AA) by the general population. The objective of this study was to determine the risk of UC associated with AA-related Chinese herbal products among ESRD patients. Methods We conducted a cohort study using the National Health Insurance reimbursement database to enroll all ESRD patients in Taiwan from 1998–2002. Cox regression models were constructed and hazard ratios and confidence intervals were estimated after controlling for potential confounders, including age, sex, residence in region with endemic black foot disease, urinary tract infection, and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen. Results A total of 38,995 ESRD patients were included in the final analysis, and 320 patients developed UC after ESRD. Having been prescribed Mu Tong that was adulterated with Guan Mu Tong (Aristolochia manshuriensis) before 2004, or an estimated consumption of more than 1–100 mg of aristolochic acid, were both associated with an increased risk of UC in the multivariable analyses. Analgesic consumption of more than 150 pills was also associated with an increased risk of UC, although there was little correlation between the two risk factors. Conclusion Consumption of aristolochic acid-related Chinese herbal products was associated with an increased risk of developing UC in ESRD patients. Regular follow-up screening for UC in ESRD patients who have consumed Chinese herbal products is thus necessary. PMID:25170766

  13. B cells from African American lupus patients exhibit an activated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Laurence C.; Habte, Sium; Gonsiorek, Waldemar; Lee, Deborah; Banas, Dana; Holloway, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Mark; Stetsko, Dawn; Casano, Francesca; Kansal, Selena; Davis, Patricia M.; Carman, Julie; Zhang, Clarence K.; Abidi, Ferva; Furie, Richard; Nadler, Steven G.; Suchard, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease driven by both innate and adaptive immune cells. African Americans tend to present with more severe disease at an earlier age compared with patients of European ancestry. In order to better understand the immunological differences between African American and European American patients, we analyzed the frequencies of B cell subsets and the expression of B cell activation markers from a total of 68 SLE patients and 69 normal healthy volunteers. We found that B cells expressing the activation markers CD86, CD80, PD1, and CD40L, as well as CD19+CD27–IgD– double-negative B cells, were enriched in African American patients vs. patients of European ancestry. In addition to increased expression of CD40L, surface levels of CD40 on B cells were lower, suggesting the engagement of the CD40 pathway. In vitro experiments confirmed that CD40L expressed by B cells could lead to CD40 activation and internalization on adjacent B cells. To conclude, these results indicate that, compared with European American patients, African American SLE patients present with a particularly active B cell component, possibly via the activation of the CD40/CD40L pathway. These data may help guide the development of novel therapies.

  14. B cells from African American lupus patients exhibit an activated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Laurence C.; Habte, Sium; Gonsiorek, Waldemar; Lee, Deborah; Banas, Dana; Holloway, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Mark; Stetsko, Dawn; Casano, Francesca; Kansal, Selena; Davis, Patricia M.; Carman, Julie; Zhang, Clarence K.; Abidi, Ferva; Furie, Richard; Nadler, Steven G.; Suchard, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease driven by both innate and adaptive immune cells. African Americans tend to present with more severe disease at an earlier age compared with patients of European ancestry. In order to better understand the immunological differences between African American and European American patients, we analyzed the frequencies of B cell subsets and the expression of B cell activation markers from a total of 68 SLE patients and 69 normal healthy volunteers. We found that B cells expressing the activation markers CD86, CD80, PD1, and CD40L, as well as CD19+CD27–IgD– double-negative B cells, were enriched in African American patients vs. patients of European ancestry. In addition to increased expression of CD40L, surface levels of CD40 on B cells were lower, suggesting the engagement of the CD40 pathway. In vitro experiments confirmed that CD40L expressed by B cells could lead to CD40 activation and internalization on adjacent B cells. To conclude, these results indicate that, compared with European American patients, African American SLE patients present with a particularly active B cell component, possibly via the activation of the CD40/CD40L pathway. These data may help guide the development of novel therapies. PMID:27699274

  15. New Model Predicts Fire Activity in South America

    NASA Video Gallery

    UC Irvine scientist Jim Randerson discusses a new model that is able to predict fire activity in South America using sea surface temperature observations of the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean. The find...

  16. Cognitive milieu therapy and physical activity: experiences of mastery and learning among patients with dual diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Borge, L; Røssberg, J I; Sverdrup, S

    2013-12-01

    During the last decade, there has been a growing interest in implementing cognitive milieu therapy (CMT) in psychiatric institutions. However, there is a lack of systematic evaluations from patients' point of view. The aim of this study was to explore and describe patient perceptions of essential experiences of mastery, learning alternative ways of thinking, and acquiring new skills through CMT and physical activity in an inpatient setting. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 20 patients with dual diagnosis. A hermeneutic - phenomenological approach was used in the data collection and analysis. The results showed that the learning climate in the unit was important. This included a proactive attitude from the staff, focusing on cooperation on equal terms between patients and staff, and a professional methodological approach through CMT. The optimal balance between staff-induced activities and patient initiatives was not easy to obtain. Patients appreciated both the education provided by the staff and learning from other patients. The cognitive method was sometimes experienced as too theoretical and difficult to understand. Physical activity, however, was experienced as 'concrete' and providing practical knowledge. It motivated patients to establish new habits and provided opportunities for the development of mastery together with other patients.

  17. In vivo and in vitro effects of growth hormone on the incorporation of ( UC)leucine into protein of liver and muscle of the eel

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Y.; Ishioka, H.

    1985-08-01

    In vivo administration of ovine GH (2 micrograms/g body wt) increased ( UC)leucine incorporation into protein of the liver, skeletal muscle, and opercular muscle of hypophysectomized eels. Addition of ovine GH into the medium slightly increased ( UC)leucine incorporation into protein of liver slices during 5 hr in vitro incubation, but did not affect protein synthesis from ( UC)leucine in opercular muscle. In vivo pretreatment with ovine GH 48 hr prior to tissue preparation clearly increased ( UC)leucine incorporation into protein of liver slices in vitro. However, no statistically significant change was observed for in vitro incorporation of ( UC)leucine into protein of opercular muscle of hypophysectomized eels which had been previously treated with ovine GH. These results indicate that ovine GH has a protein anabolic action in the liver and muscle of the eel and that compared to mammals a rather long lag period is needed to elicit such protein anabolic actions of GH in these animals.

  18. Dysregulated Immune Activation in Second-Line HAART HIV+ Patients Is Similar to That of Untreated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espíndola, Milena S.; Lima, Leonardo J. G.; Soares, Luana S.; Cacemiro, Maira C.; Zambuzi, Fabiana A.; de Souza Gomes, Matheus; Amaral, Laurence R.; Bollela, Valdes R.; Martins-Filho, Olindo A.; Frantz, Fabiani G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has changed the outcome of AIDS patients worldwide because the complete suppression of viremia improves health and prolongs life expectancy of HIV-1+ patients. However, little attention has been given to the immunological profile of patients under distinct HAART regimens. This work aimed to investigate the differences in the immunological pattern of HIV-1+ patients under the first- or second-line HAART in Brazil. Methods CD4+ T cell counts, Viral load, and plasma concentration of sCD14, sCD163, MCP-1, RANTES, IP-10, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-12, IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 were assessed for immunological characterization of the following clinical groups: Non-infected individuals (NI; n = 66), HIV-1+ untreated (HIV; n = 46), HIV-1+ treated with first-line HAART (HAART 1; n = 15); and HIV-1+ treated with second-line HAART (HAART 2; n = 15). Results We found that the immunological biosignature pattern of HAART 1 is similar to that of NI individuals, especially in patients presenting slow progression of the disease, while patients under HAART 2 remain in a moderate inflammatory state, which is similar to that of untreated HIV patients pattern. Network correlations revealed that differences in IP-10, TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-α, and IL-10 interactions were primordial in HIV disease and treatment. Heat map and decision tree analysis identified that IP-10>TNF-α>IFN-α were the best respective HAART segregation biomarkers. Conclusion HIV patients in different HAART regimens develop distinct immunological biosignature, introducing a novel perspective into disease outcome and potential new therapies that consider HAART patients as a heterogeneous group. PMID:26684789

  19. An Assessment of Patient Navigator Activities in Breast Cancer Patient Navigation Programs Using a Nine-Principle Framework

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Christine M; Clark, Jack A; Battaglia, Tracy A; Freund, Karen M; Parker, Victoria A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine how closely a published model of navigation reflects the practice of navigation in breast cancer patient navigation programs. Data Source Observational field notes describing patient navigator activities collected from 10 purposefully sampled, foundation-funded breast cancer navigation programs in 2008–2009. Study Design An exploratory study evaluated a model framework for patient navigation published by Harold Freeman by using an a priori coding scheme based on model domains. Data Collection Field notes were compiled and coded. Inductive codes were added during analysis to characterize activities not included in the original model. Principal Findings Programs were consistent with individual-level principles representing tasks focused on individual patients. There was variation with respect to program-level principles that related to program organization and structure. Program characteristics such as the use of volunteer or clinical navigators were identified as contributors to patterns of model concordance. Conclusions This research provides a framework for defining the navigator role as focused on eliminating barriers through the provision of individual-level interventions. The diversity observed at the program level in these programs was a reflection of implementation according to target population. Further guidance may be required to assist patient navigation programs to define and tailor goals and measurement to community needs. PMID:24820445

  20. Altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with cerebral palsy during cycling on an ergometer

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Pinto, Ana; Blumenstein, Tobias; Turova, Varvara; Lampe, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cycling on a recumbent ergometer constitutes one of the most popular rehabilitation exercises in cerebral palsy (CP). However, no control is performed on how muscles are being used during training. Given that patients with CP present altered muscular activity patterns during cycling or walking, it is possible that an incorrect pattern of muscle activation is being promoted during rehabilitation cycling. This study investigated patterns of muscular activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer in patients with CP and whether those patterns are determined by the degree of spasticity and of mobility. Methods Electromyographic (EMG) recordings of lower leg muscle activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer were performed in 14 adult patients diagnosed with CP and five adult healthy participants. EMG recordings were done with an eight-channel EMG system built in the laboratory. The activity of the following muscles was recorded: Musculus rectus femoris, Musculus biceps femoris, Musculus tibialis anterior, and Musculus gastrocnemius. The degree of muscle spasticity and mobility was assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale and the Gross Motor Function Classification System, respectively. Muscle activation patterns were described in terms of onset and duration of activation as well as duration of cocontractions. Results Muscle activation in CP was characterized by earlier onsets, longer periods of activation, a higher occurrence of agonist–antagonist cocontractions, and a more variable cycling tempo in comparison to healthy participants. The degree of altered muscle activation pattern correlated significantly with the degree of spasticity. Conclusion This study confirmed the occurrence of altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with CP during cycling on a recumbent ergometer. There is a need to develop feedback systems that can inform patients and therapists of an incorrect muscle activation during cycling and support the training

  1. Patient-Provider Communication: Understanding the Role of Patient Activation for Latinos in Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Dharma E.; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Fortuna, Lisa; Reinfeld, Sarah; Alegria, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights results from the Right Question Project-Mental Health (RQP-MH), an intervention designed to teach skills in question formulation and to increase patients' participation in decisions about mental health treatment. Of participants in the RQP-MH intervention, 83% were from a Latino background, and 75% of the interviews were…

  2. Physical activity referrals in Swedish primary health care – prescriber and patient characteristics, reasons for prescriptions, and prescribed activities

    PubMed Central

    Leijon, ME; Bendtsen, P; Nilsen, P; Ekberg, K; Ståhle, A

    2008-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, practitioners in primary health care (PHC) settings in many countries have issued written prescriptions to patients to promote increased physical activity or exercise. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse a comprehensive physical activity referral (PAR) scheme implemented in a routine PHC setting in Östergötland County. The study examines characteristics of the PARs recipients and referral practitioners, identifies reasons why practitioners opted to use PARs with their clients, and discusses prescribed activities and prescriptions in relation to PHC registries. Methods Prospective prescription data were obtained for 90% of the primary health care centres in Östergötland County, Sweden, in 2004 and 2005. The study population consisted of patients who were issued PARs after they were deemed likely to benefit from increased physical activity, as assessed by PHC staff. Results During the two-year period, a total of 6,300 patients received PARs. Two-thirds of the patients were female and half of the patients were 45–64 years. Half of the patients (50.8%) who received PARs were recommended a home-based activity, such as walking. One third (33%) of the patients issued PARs were totally inactive, reporting no days of physical activity that lasted for 30 minutes, and 29% stated that they reached this level 1–2 days per week. The number of PARs prescribed per year in relation to the number of unique individuals that visited primary health care during one year was 1.4% in 2004 and 1.2% in 2005. Two-thirds of the combined prescriptions were issued by physicians (38%) and nurses (31%). Physiotherapists and behavioural scientists issued the highest relative number of prescriptions. The most common reasons for issuing PARs were musculoskeletal disorders (39.1%) and overweight (35.4%), followed by high blood pressure (23.3%) and diabetes (23.2%). Conclusion Östergötland County's PAR scheme reached a relatively high proportion

  3. Epstein-Barr virus genomes in undifferentiated and squamous cell nasopharyngeal carcinomas in Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, G; Pilotti, S; Donghi, R; Pasquini, G; Longoni, A; Grandi, C; Salvatori, P; Pierotti, M A; Rilke, F

    1994-03-01

    Although undifferentiated carcinoma (UC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the nasopharynx are regarded as two distinct histopathologic and clinical entities, it is unclear whether, like UC, SCC carries Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomes. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens to test for the presence of EBV DNA in 20 cases of UC and 9 cases of SCC. Multiple copies of the viral genome were regularly detected in all UCs; however, of the nine cases of SCC, seven had no detectable EBV DNA and two contained viral genomes in a low copy number. In parallel, a marked difference in the serum levels of anti-EBV antibodies between patients with UC and SCC was found. Our findings provide evidence for the specific association of EBV with UC in Italian patients and prove by means of a highly sensitive molecular technique that SCC is occasionally related to EBV DNA. Because of the absence of EBV DNA in most cases of SCC and the minimal viral DNA copy number in the few EBV-associated cases of SCC, a different pathway of oncogenic transformation and growth of the nasopharyngeal epithelium is suggested for SCC and UC.

  4. Enhanced neutrophil activity is associated with shorter time to tumor progression in glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Afsar; Cederarv, Madeleine; Wolmer-Solberg, Nina; Tammik, Charlotte; Stragliotto, Giuseppe; Peredo, Inti; Fornara, Olesja; Xu, Xinling; Dzabic, Mensur; Taher, Chato; Skarman, Petra; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant tumor with a poor outcome that is often positive for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). GBM patients often have excessive numbers of neutrophils and macrophages near and within the tumor. Here, we characterized the cytokine patterns in the blood of GBM patients with and without Valganciclovir treatment. Furthermore, we determined whether neutrophil activation is related to HCMV status and patient outcome. Blood samples for analyses of cytokines and growth factors were collected from 42 GBM patients at the time of diagnosis (n = 42) and at weeks 12 and 24 after surgery. Blood neutrophils of 28 GBM patients were examined for CD11b expression. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interferon-γ, interferon-α, tumor necrosis factor α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1were analyzed with a bead-based flow cytometry assay. During the first six months after surgery, neutrophil activity was increased in 12 patients and was unchanged or decreased in 16. Patients with increased neutrophil activity had enhanced IL-12p70, high grade HCMV and a shorter time to tumor progression (TTP) than patients without or decreased neutrophil activity (median TTP; 5.4 vs. 12 months, 95% confidence interval; 1.6–10 vs. 0.1–0.6, hazard ratio = 3 vs. 0.4, p = 0.004). The levels of IL-12p70 were significantly decreased in Valganciclovir treated patients (n = 22, T 12W vs. T 24W, p = 0.03). In conclusion, our findings suggest that neutrophil activation is an early sign of tumor progression in GBM patients. PMID:27057448

  5. Preoperative evaluation of activity and function in patients with paralytic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Larsson, E L; Aaro, S; Ahlinder, P; Oberg, B

    1998-01-01

    Preoperative evaluation of patients with paralytic scoliosis should take into account the consequences of surgery on the every day life of the patient. However, the parameters that are customarily used in these operations relate only to very narrow measures such as the angle of scoliosis or kyphosis. The aim of this study was to introduce a set of instruments appropriate for measuring both function and activities in paralytic scoliosis patients. The study took as its starting point the WHO International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH), in which an activity is described at the level of the individual and function at the level of the organ. A consecutive series of 100 paralytic scoliosis patients with 18 different diagnoses were evaluated preoperatively with a set of instruments that had been specially developed at Linköping hospital, in which the variables are classified according to the system used in the ICIDH. The set of instruments included general information and evaluation of activities and function--sitting, balance, weight distribution to sitting surface, angle of scoliosis, reaching, pain estimation, activities of daily living (ADL) Barthel and ADL Klein and Bell, care given, time spent resting, and seating supports). The results showed that patients with paralytic scoliosis constitute a heterogeneous group in activities and function. Even when the patients were grouped into four subgroups according to the Scoliosis Research Society Classification, they remained very heterogeneous. However, reaching, Klein and Bell Activities of Daily Living and pain could only evaluate patients who could understand verbal instructions. In those who could not, assessment relied more heavily on measures of function and level of dependence. It was concluded that the choice of assessment must be guided by the patient's ability to understand verbal instructions irrespective of his/her disorder. It is important to use the three levels

  6. Physical Activity Counselling during Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients with COPD: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Burtin, Chris; Langer, Daniel; van Remoortel, Hans; Demeyer, Heleen; Gosselink, Rik; Decramer, Marc; Dobbels, Fabienne; Janssens, Wim; Troosters, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation programs only modestly enhance daily physical activity levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This randomised controlled trial investigates the additional effect of an individual activity counselling program during pulmonary rehabilitation on physical activity levels in patients with moderate to very severe COPD. Methods Eighty patients (66±7 years, 81% male, forced expiratory volume in 1 second 45±16% of predicted) referred for a six‐month multidisciplinary pulmonary rehabilitation program were randomised. The intervention group was offered an additional eight-session activity counselling program. The primary outcomes were daily walking time and time spent in at least moderate intense activities. Results Baseline daily walking time was similar in the intervention and control group (median 33 [interquartile range 16–47] vs 29 [17–44]) whereas daily time spent in at least moderate intensity was somewhat higher in the intervention group (17[4–50] vs 12[2–26] min). No significant intervention*time interaction effects were observed in daily physical activity levels. In the whole group, daily walking time and time spent in at least moderate intense activities did not significantly change over time. Conclusions The present study identified no additional effect of eight individual activity counselling sessions during pulmonary rehabilitation to enhance physical activity levels in patients with COPD. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00948623 PMID:26697853

  7. Leisure time activities of Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Sadegh; Asgari, Ali; Rassafiani, Mehdi; Yazdani, Farzaneh; Mazdeh, Mehrdokht

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leisure time is one of the most important aspects of life, especially for people with chronic diseases. The concept and types of leisure have frequently been evaluated in different socio-cultural populations. The aim of this study was to identify the nature of leisure activities among a sample of Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and classify the identified types of activities in the context of Iranian culture. Methods: In this qualitative study, semi-structured interview was applied to gather data from 34 MS patients that were selected through purposive sampling. The interviews were continued up to the point of saturation. Content analysis was used to explore experiences of the interviewees regarding their leisure activities. Results: Six categories of leisure activities were extracted for the studied patients with MS i.e.physical, social, individual, art/cultural, educational and spiritual/religious. Conclusion: The results represented the range and heterogeneity of leisure activities amongst the MS patients. Considering participation in spiritual/religious and social activities as leisure time undertaking might reflect cultural diversity in the perception and use of time for recreation. For mental health promotion purposes, paying special attention to the types of activities that people of different socio-cultural background choose for their refreshment could help health care providers in giving tailored advice for patients with MS and other chronic debilitating disease. PMID:27123437

  8. Quantification of muscle activity during sleep for patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Umaer; Trap, Lotte; Jennum, Poul; Zoetmulder, Marielle; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) is a very strong predictor for later development of Parkinson's disease (PD), and is characterized by REM sleep without atonia (RSWA), resulting in increased muscle activity during REM sleep. Abundant studies have shown the loss of atonia during REM sleep, but our aim was to investigate whether iRBD and PD patients have increased muscle activity in both REM and NREM sleep compared to healthy controls. This was achieved by developing a semi-automatic algorithm for quantification of mean muscle activity per second during all sleep stages for the enrolled patients. The three groups examined included patients suffering from iRBD, PD and healthy control subjects (CO). To determine muscle activity, a baseline and threshold were established after pre-processing of the raw surface electromyography (sEMG) signal. The signal was then segmented according to the different sleep stages and muscle activity beyond the threshold was counted. The results were evaluated statistically using the two-sided Mann-Whitney U-test. The results suggested that iRBD patients also exhibit distinctive muscle activity characteristics in NREM sleep, however not as evident as in REM sleep, leading to the conclusion that RSWA still is the most distinct characteristic of RBD. Furthermore, the muscle activity of PD patients was comparable to that of controls with only slightly elevated amplitudes. PMID:26737659

  9. Insights on the role of physical activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, Paola; Triggianese, Paola; Ippolito, Francesco; Lucchetti, Ramona; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Perricone, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are physically inactive, and trials have been undertaken to examine the effect of physical activity on pain, disease activity, functional ability and quality of life (QoL) in RA. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between physical activity and disease-activity in RA and in healthy controls. Our findings showed that fewer RA patients had a professional occupation compared with controls, but patients and controls were similar with respect to the sedentary extent of their job. Physical exercise was inversely associated with disease activity (DAS-28), stiffness visual analog scale (VAS), patient global VAS and SF-36, but not associated with Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), pain VAS, fatigue VAS, global health and the Arthritis Ipact Measurement Scale (AIMS), suggesting that pain and fatigue are important barriers to physical activity. Our findings suggest that this is more pronounced in RA patients who do not participate in regular physical activity, and so physical exercise should be recommended as part of comprehensive RA care.

  10. Accuracy of 99mTc (V)-Dimercaptosuccinic Acid Scintigraphy and Fecal Calprotectin Compared with Colonoscopy in Localizing Active Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Basirat, Vahid; Azizi, Zahra; Javid Anbardan, Sanam; Taghizadeh Asl, Mina; Farbod, Yasaman; Teimouri, Azam; Ebrahimi Daryani, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Due to limitation of colonoscopy in assessing the entire bowel and patients’ intolerance in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in the current study, we aimed to prospectively compare the accuracy of 99mTc(V)-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and fecal calprotectin with ileocolonoscopy as new methods for localizing inflammations. METHODS Current prospective study conducted between 2012 and 2014 on 30 patients with IBD attending Gastroenterology Clinic of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Fecal calprotectin and disease activity were measured for all participants and all of them underwent 99mTc (V)-DMSA scintigraphy and colonoscopy. The accuracy of 99mTc (V)-DMSA scintigraphy and calprotectin in localizing bowel lesions were calculated. RESULTS A total of 22 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 8 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) were evaluated in our study. Sensitivity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), and positive predictive value (PPV) of scintigraphy and calprotectin over colonoscopy in localization of UC lesions were 86.36%, 0.86%, 100.00% and 90.91%, 0.91, and 100.00%, respectively. Meanwhile, it showed 66.67% sensitivity and 81.25% specificity with PLR=3.56, negative likelihood ratio (NLR)=0.41, PPV=84.21%, and negative predictive value (NPV)= 61.90% in localizing lesions in patients with CD. The calprotectin level had sensitivity, PLR, and PPV of 90.00%, 0.90, and 100.00% in detecting active disease over colonoscopy, respectively. CONCLUSION The 99mTc (V)-DMSA scintigraphy would be an accurate method for detecting active inflammation in follow-up of patients with IBD and assessing response to treatment as a non-invasive and complementary method beside colonoscopy for more accurate diagnosis of CD or UC. PMID:27698971

  11. Accuracy of 99mTc (V)-Dimercaptosuccinic Acid Scintigraphy and Fecal Calprotectin Compared with Colonoscopy in Localizing Active Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Basirat, Vahid; Azizi, Zahra; Javid Anbardan, Sanam; Taghizadeh Asl, Mina; Farbod, Yasaman; Teimouri, Azam; Ebrahimi Daryani, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Due to limitation of colonoscopy in assessing the entire bowel and patients’ intolerance in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in the current study, we aimed to prospectively compare the accuracy of 99mTc(V)-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and fecal calprotectin with ileocolonoscopy as new methods for localizing inflammations. METHODS Current prospective study conducted between 2012 and 2014 on 30 patients with IBD attending Gastroenterology Clinic of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Fecal calprotectin and disease activity were measured for all participants and all of them underwent 99mTc (V)-DMSA scintigraphy and colonoscopy. The accuracy of 99mTc (V)-DMSA scintigraphy and calprotectin in localizing bowel lesions were calculated. RESULTS A total of 22 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 8 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) were evaluated in our study. Sensitivity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), and positive predictive value (PPV) of scintigraphy and calprotectin over colonoscopy in localization of UC lesions were 86.36%, 0.86%, 100.00% and 90.91%, 0.91, and 100.00%, respectively. Meanwhile, it showed 66.67% sensitivity and 81.25% specificity with PLR=3.56, negative likelihood ratio (NLR)=0.41, PPV=84.21%, and negative predictive value (NPV)= 61.90% in localizing lesions in patients with CD. The calprotectin level had sensitivity, PLR, and PPV of 90.00%, 0.90, and 100.00% in detecting active disease over colonoscopy, respectively. CONCLUSION The 99mTc (V)-DMSA scintigraphy would be an accurate method for detecting active inflammation in follow-up of patients with IBD and assessing response to treatment as a non-invasive and complementary method beside colonoscopy for more accurate diagnosis of CD or UC.

  12. [Evoked potentials and brainstem reflex activity in patients of young and middle age with chronic headache].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, E A; Iakupov, E Z

    2011-01-01

    Neurophysiological peculiarities of functional state of afferent systems, including brain evoked potentials of different modalities and brainstem reflex activity, in patients of young and middle age with chronic headaches have been studied. In young patients, there was the increased reflex activity of visual and trigeminal systems, somatosensory cortex and brainstem structures that indicated the main role of the generator of pathologically increased excitation (GPIE) of different levels in the pathogenesis of chronic pain. In patients of middle age, we observed the predominant role of conduction delay on the supraspinal level. The revealed age-related neurophysiological peculiarities determine the pathogenetic therapy of chronic headaches.

  13. Effects of Partners Together in Health (PaTH) Intervention on Physical Activity and Healthy Eating Behaviors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Bernice C.; Norman, Joseph; Meza, Jane; Krogstrand, Kaye Stanek; Harrington, Susana; Shurmur, Scott; Johnson, Matthew; Schumacher, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite proven efficacy of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in helping patients initiate physical activity and healthy eating changes, less than 50% of CR participants maintain changes 6 months later. Objective The objective of this feasibility study was to test the Partners Together in Health (PaTH) Intervention versus usual care (UC) in improving physical activity and healthy eating behaviors in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients and spouses. Methods An experimental, two-group (n = 17 couples/group), repeated measures design was used. CABG patients in both groups participated in Phase II outpatient CR. Spouses in the PaTH group attended CR with the patient and were asked to make the same physical activity and healthy eating changes as patients. Spouses in the control group attended educational classes with patients. It was theorized that “two persons would be better than one” at making changes and sticking with them long-term. Physical activity behavior was measured using the Actiheart accelerometer; the activity biomarker was an exercise tolerance test. Eating behavior was measured using 3-day food records; the biomarker was the lipid profile. Data were collected at baseline (entrance in CR), 3-months (post-CR), and 6-months. Changes over time were examined using Mann-Whitney U statistics and effect sizes. Results The PaTH intervention was successful primarily in demonstrating improved trends in healthy eating behavior for patients and spouses. No differences were found between the PaTH and UC patients or spouses at 3 or 6 months in the number of minutes/week of physical activity. By 6 months, patients in both groups were, on average, below the national guidelines for PA recommendations (≥ 150 min/week at > 3 METs). Conclusions The couple-focused PaTH intervention demonstrated promise in offsetting the decline in dietary adherence typically seen 6 months after CR. PMID:24434826

  14. Natural cytotoxic activity in multiple sclerosis patients: defects in IL-2/interferon gamma-regulatory circuit.

    PubMed

    Braakman, E; van Tunen, A; Meager, A; Lucas, C J

    1986-11-01

    In order to determine the factors underlying the impaired natural cytotoxic (NC) activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, we have analysed the interleukin 2 (IL-2)-interferon gamma-(IFN gamma)-NC activity regulatory circuit in 40 MS patients and 40 matched healthy controls. Exogenous recombinant IFN gamma (rIFN gamma) enhanced NC activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) derived from MS patients and controls equally well. In contrast, PBL from MS patients showed a significantly lower increase of NC activity in response to IL-2 than healthy controls. This defect in responsiveness was independent of the dose of IL-2. Even at the highest dose of rIL-2 (1000 U/ml), MS patients showed a decreased response. PBL from MS patients required a 2 to 10 times higher dose of IL-2 to reach NC activity levels comparable to controls. In healthy individuals IL-2 can act upon both Fc gamma R+ and Fc gamma R- NC precursor cells. The decreased responsiveness to IL-2 is not confined to one subpopulation of IL-2-responsive precursor cells because depletion of Fc gamma R+ cells before culture in the presence of IL-2 revealed no significant differences in the contribution of Fc gamma R+ precursor cells to the IL-2 enhanced NC activity between MS patients and controls. Also the number of IL-2-responsive precursor cells appeared to be normal since the number of Fc gamma R+ cells in MS patients and controls was comparable. PBL from MS patients produced significantly lower amounts of IFN gamma upon stimulation with IL-2. Analysis of the different parameters of the regulatory circuit at the population level showed, both for patients and controls, a significant correlation between IFN gamma production and increase of NC activity induced by IL-2. Also the endogenous NC activity and IFN gamma production, both in patients and controls, were correlated. At the individual level, defects in NC activity could not be linked to another parameter of the regulatory circuit.

  15. Effectiveness of behavioral graded activity after first-time lumbar disc surgery: short term results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ostelo, R W J G; de Vet, H C W; Berfelo, M W; Kerckhoffs, M R; Vlaeyen, J W S; Wolters, P M J C; van den Brandt, P A

    2003-12-01

    Behavioral approaches to treating patients following lumbar disc surgery are becoming increasingly popular. The treatment method is based on the assumption that pain and pain disability are not only influenced by somatic pathology, if found, but also by psychological and social factors. A recent study highlighted the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral interventions, as compared to no treatment, for chronic low back patients. However, to the authors' knowledge, there is no randomized controlled trial that evaluates a behavioral program for patients following lumbar disc surgery. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a behavioral graded activity (BGA) program compared to usual care (UC) in physiotherapy following first-time lumbar disc surgery. The BGA program was a patient-tailored intervention based upon operant therapy. The essence of the BGA is to teach patients that it is safe to increase activity levels. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. Assessments were carried out before and after treatment by an observer blinded to treatment allocation. Patients suffering residual symptoms restricting their activities of daily living and/or work at the 6 weeks post-surgery consultation by the neurosurgeon were included. The exclusion criteria were: complications during surgery, any relevant underlying pathology, and any contraindication to physiotherapy or the BGA program. Primary outcome measures were the patient's Global Perceived Effect and the functional status. Secondary measures were: fear of movement, viewing pain as extremely threatening, pain, severity of the main complaint, range of motion, and relapses. Physiotherapists in the BGA group received proper training. Between November 1997 and December 1999, 105 patients were randomized; 53 into the UC group and 52 into the BGA group. The unadjusted analysis shows a 19.3% (95% CI: 0.1 to 38.5) statistically significant difference to the advantage of the UC group on Global

  16. Indomethacin augments lymphokine-activated killer cell generation by patients with malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, L.S.; Bowman, R.V.; Davis, M.R.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1989-10-01

    Human malignant mesothelioma (MM) cells are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell lysis but susceptible to lysis by lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from control individuals. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of patients with MM (n = 22) and individuals occupationally exposed to asbestos (the major population at risk of developing this disease, n = 52) to generate LAK cells capable of effectively lysing human mesothelioma cells. Compared to controls (n = 20), both patient groups demonstrated significantly depressed LAK cell activity against mesothelioma tumor cell targets (55 +/- 3% lysis by controls vs 34 +/- 3% lysis by patients with MM, P less than 0.005; and 45 +/- 3% lysis by asbestos-exposed individuals, P less than 0.025). Addition of 10 micrograms/ml indomethacin during LAK cell generation restored normal LAK cell activity for patients with MM (52 +/- 6% lysis of cultured human MM cells, P = NS compared to controls), suggesting that the defective cytolytic cell function observed in some patients with MM is a result of prostaglandin-induced immunosuppression. The ability of indomethacin to restore suppressed LAK cell activity in patients with MM suggests that the concomitant use of this agent in ex vivo LAK cell generation and in patients undergoing interleukin/LAK cell therapy may be beneficial.

  17. Asymptomatic Atherosclerosis in Egyptian Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Its Relation to Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Elshereef, Rawhya R.; Darwish, Aymen; Ali, Amal; Abdel-kadar, Mohammed; Hamdy, Lamiaa

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To detect the frequency of subclinical atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients without clinically evident atherosclerosis and to correlate its presence with the disease activity. Patients and Methods. Our study includes 112 RA patients (group 1) and 40 healthy controls (group 11). All patients and controls were subjected to full history taking, clinical examination, and laboratory investigations. Carotid intima media wall thickness (IMT) and carotid plaques were measured in both groups by B-mode ultrasonography; also color duplex Doppler ultrasound of the brachial artery was done to detect endothelial function. Results. There is atherosclerosis in 31.3% of asymptomatic RA patients compared with only 5% in controls (P = 0.003**). A significant difference was detected in patients with and without atherosclerosis regarding duration of the disease (P = 0.0001***) and patient's age (P = 0.01*). There is highly statistical significant correlation between atherosclerosis and disease activity index. Conclusion. The frequency of subclinical atherosclerosis was high in long-term active RA patients. PMID:25737726

  18. Complement activation in patients with sepsis is in part mediated by C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Wolbink, G J; Bossink, A W; Groeneveld, A B; de Groot, M C; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the activation of complement in patients with sepsis was investigated. In 104 patients with infections of varying severity, circulating levels of CRP-complement complexes, which are specific indicators for CRP-mediated complement activation, were assessed. Complement-CRP complexes were increased in almost all patients and correlated significantly with levels of C3a (r = .59; P < .001) and C-reactive protein (r = .76; P < .001). In addition, they correlated with levels of secretory phospholipase A2 (r = .59; P < .001). Levels of complement-CRP complexes in patients with a pneumococcal type of infection were similar to those in patients with other types of infections. Complement-CRP complexes were significantly higher in patients with shock (P = .01) and in patients who died (P = .03). These results demonstrate that part of the complement activation in patients with sepsis is independent from a direct interaction with microorganisms but rather results from an endogenous mechanism involving CRP.

  19. Effects of meals and physical activity on blood pressure variability in elderly patients. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Tsuchihashi, T; Abe, I; Tsukashima, A; Kobayashi, K; Fujishima, M

    1990-12-01

    Twenty-four-hour blood pressure (BP) was determined noninvasively in 11 ambulatory (active group, 78 +/- 2 years old) and 11 bedridden (passive group, 79 +/- 2 years old) elderly patients. Postprandial reduction in BP was evident in both groups. BP variability during the daytime was significantly greater in the active group than in the passive group. Consequently, only patients of the passive group showed a significant day-night difference in BP and a significant circadian rhythm of BP as well. We conclude the following: 1) postprandial reduction in BP contributes to BP variability during daytime in elderly patients, 2) the greater BP variability seen in ambulatory patients obscures the day-night rhythm of BP, and 3) the day-night rhythm of BP exists in bedridden patients.

  20. [Immunosuppressive therapy in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic active hepatitis B?].

    PubMed

    Maier, K P; Lepiorz, H; Berthold, H; Gerok, W

    1982-08-01

    The course of HBsAg-positive chronic active hepatitis was followed in 36 patients who were treated by immunosuppression and in 45 controls by means of serial determinations of HBeAg titers and by repeated biopsies of the liver. In the treated group remission occurred in 52% (HBeAg negative) resp. 48% (HBeAg positive); in the control group these percentages were almost identical, that is to say 61% resp. 41%. During therapy 5 out of 9 HBeAg positive patients and 7 out of 12 HBeAg negative patients developed cirrhosis of the liver as compared to 5 resp. 10, and 2 resp. 12 patients in the control group. Judging from these results it seems unlikely, that the course of HBsAg positive, chronic-active hepatitis in patients, whose serum shows a positive HBeAg titer by immunodiffusion, might be influenced in a positive way by immunosuppressive therapy.

  1. Arginase activity - a marker of disease status in patients with visceral leishmaniasis in ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Tamrat; Takele, Yegnasew; Weldegebreal, Teklu; Cloke, Tom; Closs, Ellen; Corset, Camille; Hailu, Asrat; Hailu, Workagegnehu; Sisay, Yifru; Corware, Karina; Corset, Margaux; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Müller, Ingrid; Kropf, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms resulting in the profound immune suppression characteristic of human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) are not fully understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that arginase, an enzyme associated with immunosuppression, is higher in patients with VL and contributes to impaired T cell responses. We recruited patients with VL before and after treatment and healthy controls and measured the arginase metabolism in the blood of these individuals. Our results show that arginase activity is significantly higher in the blood of patients with active VL as compared to controls. These high levels of arginase decline considerably once the patients are successfully treated. We identified the phenotype of arginase-expressing cells among PBMCs as neutrophils and show that their frequency was increased in PBMCs of patients before treatment; this coincides with reduced levels of L-arginine in the plasma and decreased expression levels of CD3ζ in T cells. PMID:23556019

  2. The changing face(book) of psychiatry: can we justify 'following' patients' social media activity?

    PubMed

    Cox-George, Chantal

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with mental health issues may post information on social networking sites that can provide an insight into their mental health status. It could be argued that doctors (and specifically psychiatrists) should understand the way in which social media is used by their patients to gain a better insight into their illnesses. However, choosing to actively monitor a patient's social media activity raises important questions about the way in which medical students, qualified clinicians and other healthcare professionals obtain information about patients. While this may be framed as a mere form of 'collateral history-taking', there are obvious practical and ethical problems with doing so. Here, a case is made against monitoring the social media activity of patients involved with psychiatric services. PMID:26755986

  3. Intestinal Disaccharidase Activity in Patients with Autism: Effect of Age, Gender, and Intestinal Inflammation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushak, Rafail I.; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Winter, Harland S.; Buie, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal disaccharidase activities were measured in 199 individuals with autism to determine the frequency of enzyme deficiency. All patients had duodenal biopsies that were evaluated morphologically and assayed for lactase, sucrase, and maltase activity. Frequency of lactase deficiency was 58% in autistic children less than or equal to 5 years…

  4. Activated Protein C Resistance Does Not Increase Risk for Recurrent Stroke or Death in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christoph; Sonntag, Natalie; Schleef, Michael; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Poppert, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated protein C (APC) resistance is the most common inherited prothrombotic disorder. The role of APC resistance in ischemic stroke is controversially discussed. Objectives The aim of this single center follow up study was to investigate the effect of APC resistance on stroke recurrence and survival in stroke patients. Patients/Methods We retrospectively identified 966 patients who had had an ischemic stroke or transitory ischemic attack (TIA) and in whom laboratory tests for APC resistance had been conducted. These patients were contacted to determine the primary outcomes of recurrent ischemic stroke or death. Results A total of 858 patients with an average follow up time of 8.48 years were included. APC resistance did not influence cumulative incidence functions for stroke free and total survival. In multivariate analyses, crude and adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent stroke as well as for death where not significantly increased in patients with APC resistance. This also applies to the subgroups of young patients, patients with cryptogenic stroke and patients with atrial fibrillation. Conclusion APC-resistance is not a risk factor for subsequent stroke or death in patients with a first ischemic stroke or TIA. Testing for APC-resistance in stroke patients therefore cannot be routinely recommended. PMID:27508300

  5. Activation of monocytes and cytokine production in patients with peripheral atherosclerosis obliterans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arterial peripheral disease is a condition caused by the blocked blood flow resulting from arterial cholesterol deposits within the arms, legs and aorta. Studies have shown that macrophages in atherosclerotic plaque are highly activated, which makes these cells important antigen-presenting cells that develop a specific immune response, in which LDLox is the inducing antigen. As functional changes of cells which participate in the atherogenesis process may occur in the peripheral blood, the objectives of the present study were to evaluate plasma levels of anti-inflammatory and inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with peripheral arteriosclerosis obliterans, to assess the monocyte activation level in peripheral blood through the ability of these cells to release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and to develop fungicidal activity against Candida albicans (C. albicans) in vitro. Methods TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10 and TGF-β from plasma of patients were detected by ELISA. Monocyte cultures activated in vitro with TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma were evaluated by fungicidal activity against C. albicans by culture plating and Colony Forming Unit (CFU) recovery, and by H2O2 production. Results Plasma levels of all cytokines were significantly higher in patients compared to those detected in control subjects. Control group monocytes did not release substantial levels of H2O2 in vitro, but these levels were significantly increased after activation with IFN-γ and TNF-α. Monocytes of patients, before and after activation, responded less than those of control subjects. Similar results were found when fungicidal activity was evaluated. The results seen in patients were always significantly smaller than among control subjects. Conclusions: The results revealed an unresponsiveness of patient monocytes in vitro probably due to the high activation process occurring in vivo as corroborated by high plasma cytokine levels

  6. Deep brain stimulation suppresses pallidal low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonic movements.

    PubMed

    Barow, Ewgenia; Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Brücke, Christof; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Brown, Peter; Krauss, Joachim K; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus alleviates involuntary movements in patients with dystonia. However, the mechanism is still not entirely understood. One hypothesis is that deep brain stimulation suppresses abnormally enhanced synchronized oscillatory activity within the motor cortico-basal ganglia network. Here, we explore deep brain stimulation-induced modulation of pathological low frequency (4-12 Hz) pallidal activity that has been described in local field potential recordings in patients with dystonia. Therefore, local field potentials were recorded from 16 hemispheres in 12 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for severe dystonia using a specially designed amplifier allowing simultaneous high frequency stimulation at therapeutic parameter settings and local field potential recordings. For coherence analysis electroencephalographic activity (EEG) over motor areas and electromyographic activity (EMG) from affected neck muscles were recorded before and immediately after cessation of high frequency stimulation. High frequency stimulation led to a significant reduction of mean power in the 4-12 Hz band by 24.8 ± 7.0% in patients with predominantly phasic dystonia. A significant decrease of coherence between cortical EEG and pallidal local field potential activity in the 4-12 Hz range was revealed for the time period of 30 s after switching off high frequency stimulation. Coherence between EMG activity and pallidal activity was mainly found in patients with phasic dystonic movements where it was suppressed after high frequency stimulation. Our findings suggest that high frequency stimulation may suppress pathologically enhanced low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonia. These dystonic features are the quickest to respond to high frequency stimulation and may thus directly relate to modulation of pathological basal ganglia activity, whereas improvement in tonic features may depend on long-term plastic changes within the

  7. Correlation of Paraoxonase Status with Disease Activity Score and Systemic Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Usha Dudeja; Siddiqui, Merajul Haque; Sharma, Dilutpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite, various preventive efforts on conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, the incidence of CVD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients increases continuously. To solve this conundrum one needs more investigations. Aim The present study was conducted to evaluate the plasma paraoxonase (PON) activity along with the markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and disease activity score-28 (DAS28) in RA patients and clarify their role in determining the probability of RA patients to develop future CVD risk. Materials and Methods Plasma PON, total antioxidant activity (TAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), synovial interleukin-6 (IL-6) and erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in 40 RA patients aged 40-55 years aged and 40 age-matched healthy controls. The data obtained were compared statistically by using Student’s t-test and Pearson correlation test. Results Besides dyslipidaemia, marked reduction in plasma PON and TAA (p< 0.05) were observed in RA patients as compared with that of healthy controls. Erythrocyte MDA, plasma CRP and synovial IL-6 levels were increased significantly (p<0.05) in RA patients. PON was negatively correlated with MDA (r = - 0.672; p < 0.001), CRP (r = -0.458; p<0.05), IL-6 (r = -0.426; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r = -0.598; p < 0.001), and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol (r = 0.648; p<0.001) and TAA (r = 0.608; p< 0.001) levels in RA patients. Conclusion Alteration in PON activity might contribute to the progression of future CVD risk in RA patients, which may result from interplay of several confounding factors, such as inflammation, oxidative stress and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, plasma PON activity, CRP and TAA levels could be considered as non-traditional factors to predict CVD risk. Thus, it is suggested that future drugs could be developed to target the non-traditional risk factors in RA patients. PMID:27134854

  8. Active video gaming in patients with renal transplant: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with renal transplant are at higher risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population. Physical activity has been shown to reduce the risk of CVD mortality in these patients. Unfortunately, barriers such as the harsh Canadian climate prevent patients from engaging in and harvesting the health benefits of physical activity. This pilot study explored active video gaming (AVG) as a way for patients with renal transplant to obtain physical activity and examined its effect on their functional status and quality of life (QOL). Main text We recruited nine patients for an 8-week prospective pilot study. All patients received a Microsoft Xbox 360™ video gaming console, a Microsoft Kinect™ sensor, and the video game Your Shape Fitness Evolved 2012. Assessment of each participant before and after the intervention included blood pressure measures, a 6-minute walk test, and the Godin Leisure Time Questionnaire (GLTQ). We analyzed all nine patients at the end of the 8-week study period, and found no changes in blood pressure or GLTQ scores. However, there was a significant increase in the 6-minute walk distance (P = 0.022), which represented a consistent increase for most patients (correlation = 0.977). In addition, participants over the age of 45 years (n = 4) were more likely to use the AVG system (P = 0.042). Conclusion AVG has the potential to improve the functional status in patients with renal transplant. Further research is required to corroborate the full health benefits of AVG in this patient population. PMID:25114788

  9. Benefit of a Tiered-Trauma Activation System to Triage Dead-on-Arrival Patients

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Omar K; Wilson, Kenneth L; Heron, Sheryl; Ahmed, Yusuf; Walker, Travelyan M; Houry, Debra; Haley, Leon L; Matthews, Leslie Ray

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although national guidelines have been published for the management of critically injured traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest (TCPA) patients, many hospital systems have not implemented in-hospital triage guidelines. The objective of this study was to determine if hospital resources could be preserved by implementation of an in-hospital tiered triage system for patients in TCPA with prolonged resuscitation who would likely be declared dead on arrival (DOA). Method We conducted a retrospective analysis of 4,618 severely injured patients, admitted to our Level I trauma center from December 2000 to December 2008 for evaluation. All of the identified patients had sustained life-threatening penetrating and blunt injuries with pre-hospital TCPA. Patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for 10 minutes were assessed for survival rate, neurologic outcome, and charge-for-activation (COA) for our hospital trauma system. Results We evaluated 4,618 charts, which consisted of patients seen by the MSM trauma service from December 2001 through December 2008. We identified 140 patients with severe, life-threatening traumatic injuries, who sustained pre-hospital TCPA requiring prolonged CPR in the field and were brought to the emergency department (ED). Group I was comprised of 108 patients sustaining TCPA (53 blunt, 55 penetrating), who died after receiving < 45 minutes of ACLS after arrival. Group II, which consisted of 32 patients (25 blunt, 7 penetrating), had resuscitative efforts in the ED lasting > 45 minutes, but all ultimately died prior to discharge. Estimated hospital charge-for-activation for Group I was approximately $540,000, based on standard charges of $5000 per full-scale trauma system activation (TSA). Conclusion Full-scale trauma system activation for patients sustaining greater than 10 minutes of prehospital TCPA in the field is futile and economically depleting. PMID:22900119

  10. Decreased Plasma Histidine Level Predicts Risk of Relapse in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Ono, Nobukazu; Imaizumi, Akira; Mori, Maiko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Uo, Michihide; Hashimoto, Masaki; Naganuma, Makoto; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Mizuno, Shinta; Kitazume, Mina T.; Yajima, Tomoharu; Ogata, Haruhiko; Iwao, Yasushi; Hibi, Toshifumi; Kanai, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Patients with UC have repeated remission and relapse. Clinical biomarkers that can predict relapse in UC patients in remission have not been identified. To facilitate the prediction of relapse of UC, we investigated the potential of novel multivariate indexes using statistical modeling of plasma free amino acid (PFAA) concentrations. We measured fasting PFAA concentrations in 369 UC patients in clinical remission, and 355 were observed prospectively for up to 1 year. Relapse rate within 1 year was 23% (82 of 355 patients). The age- and gender-adjusted hazard ratio for the lowest quartile compared with the highest quartile of plasma histidine concentration was 2.55 (95% confidence interval: 1.41–4.62; p = 0.0020 (log-rank), p for trend = 0.0005). We demonstrated that plasma amino acid profiles in UC patients in clinical remission can predict the risk of relapse within 1 year. Decreased histidine level in PFAAs was associated with increased risk of relapse. Metabolomics could be promising for the establishment of a non-invasive predictive marker in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26474176

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Intestinal Flora of Uygur and Han Ethnic Chinese Patients with Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ping; Cui, Min; Wang, Haikun; Gao, Hongliang; Wang, Lei; Yang, Tao; Cheng, Yongbo

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To study the correlation between intestinal flora and ulcerative colitis by analyzing the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in the intestinal of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and healthy controls with Uygur and Han ethnic. Methods. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted from fecal samples and analyzed with real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Results. The samples from UC patients, Uygur and Han ethnic combined, had higher abundance of Bacteroides (P = 0.026) but lower Clostridium (P = 0.004), Bifidobacterium spp. (P = 0.009), and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (P = 0.008) than those from healthy controls. Among UC patients, Bacteroides population was raised in acute UC patients (P ≤ 0.05), while the abundance of Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., Fusobacterium, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii decreased (P ≤ 0.05) compared with the remission. In both UC patients group and control group, no difference was observed in the abundance of these 5 bacteria between the Han and the Uygur group. Conclusions. Variations in the abundance of these five bacterial strains in intestines may be associated with the occurrence of UC in Uygur and Han populations; however, these variations were not associated with ethnic difference.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Intestinal Flora of Uygur and Han Ethnic Chinese Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ping; Cui, Min; Wang, Haikun; Gao, Hongliang; Wang, Lei; Yang, Tao; Cheng, Yongbo

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To study the correlation between intestinal flora and ulcerative colitis by analyzing the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in the intestinal of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and healthy controls with Uygur and Han ethnic. Methods. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted from fecal samples and analyzed with real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Results. The samples from UC patients, Uygur and Han ethnic combined, had higher abundance of Bacteroides (P = 0.026) but lower Clostridium (P = 0.004), Bifidobacterium spp. (P = 0.009), and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (P = 0.008) than those from healthy controls. Among UC patients, Bacteroides population was raised in acute UC patients (P ≤ 0.05), while the abundance of Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., Fusobacterium, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii decreased (P ≤ 0.05) compared with the remission. In both UC patients group and control group, no difference was observed in the abundance of these 5 bacteria between the Han and the Uygur group. Conclusions. Variations in the abundance of these five bacterial strains in intestines may be associated with the occurrence of UC in Uygur and Han populations; however, these variations were not associated with ethnic difference. PMID:26839545

  13. Treatment of lower-extremity long-bone fractures in active, nonambulatory, wheelchair-bound patients.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Michelle T; Davidovitch, Roy; Montero, Nicole; Nobel, Tamar; Egol, Kenneth A

    2012-09-01

    A retrospective review of surgically treated lower-extremity long-bone fractures in wheelchair-bound patients was conducted. Between October 2000 and July 2009, eleven lower-extremity fractures in 9 wheelchair-bound patients underwent surgical fixation. The Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment, Short Form, and Spinal Cord Injury Quality of Life questionnaires were used to assess functional outcome. Mechanism of injury for all patients was a low-energy fall that occurred while transferring. Four patients who sustained a distal femur fracture, 1 patient who sustained a distal femur fracture and a subsequent proximal tibia fracture, and 1 patient who sustained a proximal third tibia shaft fracture underwent open reduction and internal fixation with plates and screws. Three patients with 4 midshaft tibia fractures underwent intramedullary nailing. At last follow-up, all 9 patients had returned to their baseline preoperative function. Quality of life was significantly higher (P<.01) than the Spinal Cord Injury Quality of Life questionnaire's reference score. Self-reported visual analog scale pain scores improved significantly from time of fracture to last follow-up (P=.02). All fractures achieved complete union, and no complications were reported. This study's findings demonstrate that operative treatment in active, wheelchair-bound patients can provide an improved quality of life postinjury and a rapid return to activities.

  14. Variable Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathways in Patients Undergoing SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijun; Liang, Grace; Ong, Sang-Ging; Han, Leng; Sanchez-Freire, Veronica; Lee, Andrew S.; Vasanawala, Minal; Segall, George; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT MPI) has improved the diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with suspected coronary artery disease, it remains a primary source of low dose radiation exposure for cardiac patients. To determine the biological effects of low dose radiation from SPECT MPI, we measured the activation of the DNA damage response pathways using quantitative flow cytometry and single cell gene expression profiling. Methods and Results Blood samples were collected from patients before and after SPECT MPI (n=63). Overall, analysis of all recruited patients showed no marked differences in the phosphorylation of proteins (H2AX, p53, and ATM) following SPECT. The majority of patients also had either down-regulated or unchanged expression in DNA damage response genes at both 24 and 48 hours post-SPECT. Interestingly, a small subset of patients with increased phosphorylation also had significant up-regulation of genes associated with DNA damage, whereas those with no changes in phosphorylation had significant down-regulation or no difference, suggesting that some patients may potentially be more sensitive to low dose radiation exposure. Conclusions Our findings showed that SPECT MPI resulted in a variable activation of the DNA damage response pathways. Although only a small subset of patients had increased protein phosphorylation and elevated gene expression post-imaging, continued care should be taken to reduce radiation exposure to both patients and operators. PMID:25609688

  15. Activity of Fosfomycin against Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Uropathogens in Patients in the Community and Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Strymish, Judith; Weir, Susan; Berg, Gretchen; Brecher, Stephen; Gupta, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Few oral antibiotics exist for the empirical treatment of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) urinary tract infections (UTI). In this study, we sought to determine the activity of fosfomycin against ESBL-producing uropathogens from patients at 3 Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities between 2010 and 2013. Among the ESBL uropathogens, 19.9% were fosfomycin resistant. Klebsiella species were more likely than Escherichia coli to be resistant (46% versus 4%; P < 0.001). Fosfomycin remains active against a majority of the ESBL uropathogens, although resistance among Klebsiella spp. was higher than that in previous reports. PMID:26596940

  16. Catalase, carbonic anhydrase and xanthine oxidase activities in patients with mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Beyaztas, Serap; Gokce, Basak; Arslan, Oktay; Guler, Ozen Ozensoy

    2015-04-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. In several studies the relationship between catalase (CAT), human cytosolic carbonic anhydrases (CA; hCA-I and hCA-II) and xanthine oxidase (XO) enzyme activities have been investigated in various types of cancers but carbonic anhydrase, catalase and xanthine oxidase activities in patients with MF have not been previously reported. Therefore, in this preliminary study we aim to investigate CAT, CA and XO activities in patients with MF. This study enrolled 32 patients with MF and 26 healthy controls. According to the results, CA and CAT activities were significantly lower in patients with mycosis fungoides than controls (p < 0.001) (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in XO activity between patient and control group (p = 0.601). Within these findings, we believe these enzyme activity levels might be a potentially important finding as an additional diagnostic biochemical tool for MF.

  17. Fluoxetine modulates motor performance and cerebral activation of patients recovering from stroke.

    PubMed

    Pariente, J; Loubinoux, I; Carel, C; Albucher, J F; Leger, A; Manelfe, C; Rascol, O; Chollet, F

    2001-12-01

    In order to determine the influence of a single dose of fluoxetine on the cerebral motor activation of lacunar stroke patients in the early phase of recovery, we conducted a prospective, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study on 8 patients with pure motor hemiparesia. Each patient underwent two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations: one under fluoxetine and one under placebo. The first was performed 2 weeks after stroke onset and the second a week later. During the two fMRI examinations, patients performed an active controlled motor task with the affected hand and a passive one conducted by the examiner with the same hand. Motor performance was evaluated by motor tests under placebo and under fluoxetine immediately before the examinations to investigate the effect of fluoxetine on motor function. Under fluoxetine, during the active motor task, hyperactivation in the ipsilesional primary motor cortex was found. Moreover, fluoxetine significantly improved motor skills of the affected side. We found that a single dose of fluoxetine was enough to modulate cerebral sensory-motor activation in patients. This redistribution of activation toward the motor cortex output activation was associated with an enhancement of motor performance. PMID:11761469

  18. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles.

  19. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles. PMID:27630416

  20. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles. PMID:27630416

  1. Activities of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and erythrocyte glutathione dependent enzymes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Ngah, W Z; Shamaan, N A; Said, M H; Azhar, M T

    1993-01-01

    Plasma gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (gamma-GT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities were determined in normal and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. No difference in enzyme activities was observed in the three major races of the Malaysian population, i.e. Malay, Chinese and Indian patients. However, plasma gamma-GT, erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase (GST) and GPx activities were significantly increased in all NPC patients, while GR activity remained unchanged. Patients with elevated plasma gamma-GT activities also had increased GST and GPx activities. Plasma gamma-GT and GPx activities were then found to be affected by treatment. Patients with plasma gamma-GT activity greater than 70 IU/l had very poor prognoses but patients with decreased gamma-GT activities were found to be in remission.

  2. Production of spherical UO/sub 2/-UC/sub 2/ for nuclear fuel applications using thermochemical principles

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.; Spence, R.D.

    1981-03-01

    A process for the fabrication of uranium dioxide-uranium dicarbide microspheres for use as an advanced nuclear fuel is described. The uranium-carbon-oxygen phase diagram was used extensively in applying thermochemical principles to the combined process of uranium carbide synthesis and kernel sintering. Variation of the partial pressure of carbon monoxide during the carbothermic reduction of urania plus carbon allowed the kernel composition and density to be controlled. X-ray diffraction, microstructural examination, and detailed chemical analyses were used to identify the kernel composition. A procedure was developed to convert urania plus carbon microspheres produced by a wet-chemical gelation process to a highly dense UO/sub 2/-UC/sub 2/ product at 1550/sup 0/C.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A CS(2-1) survey of UC HII regions (Bronfman+, 1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronfman, L.; Nyman, L.-A.; May, J.

    1995-09-01

    We have made a complete survey of the CS(2-1) emission toward IRAS point sources in the galactic plane. The sources observed were selected according to their far infrared (FIR) colors, which are characteristic of UC HII regions. They have 25μm/12μm flux ratios larger than 3.7 and 60μm/12μm flux ratios larger than 19.3. The survey covered a region from b=-2deg to b=2deg from l=300deg to l=0deg and from l=0deg to l=60deg, and from b=-4deg to b=4deg elsewhere. We detected 843 sources out of 1427 sources observed. The distributions of detected and undetected sources in a FIR color-color diagram show some differences, suggesting that more than one type of object is present in our observed sample. (1 data file).

  4. Lithogenic activity as a factor to consider in the metabolic evaluation of patients with calcium lithiasis.

    PubMed

    Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Angel; Cano-Garcia, Maria Del Carmen; Arrabal-Martin, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic evaluation is important in high-risk patients with a history of urinary calculi, in order to prevent recurrence. This study aimed to compare patients with calcium calculi and mild lithogenic activity with those with moderate to severe lithogenic activity. Patients with moderate to severe activity had higher levels of urinary calcium level (271.9 mg/24h versus 172.1 mg/24 h, P < .001), uric acid (612.3 mg/24 h versus 528.9 mg/24h, P = .008), and fasting calcium-creatinine ratio (0.16 versus 0.12, P = .001) compared to those with mild lithogenic activity. No association was observed between lithogenic factors in 24-hour urine and mild lithogenic activity in multivariable analysis. We initially thought that in patients who develop recurrent calculi after 5 years or who have mild lithogenic activity, complete metabolic evaluation would not be necessary. However, based on our study findings, it may be important to conduct further studies assessing the lithogenic activity. PMID:26552354

  5. Health and economic benefits of physical activity for patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Herbert, William G

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic, life-disrupting event with an annual incidence of 17,000 cases in the US. SCI is characterized by progressive physical deconditioning due to limited mobility and lack of modalities to allow safe physical activity that may partially offset these deleterious physical changes. Approximately, 50% of patients with SCI report no leisure-time physical activity and 15% report leisure-time physical activity below the threshold where meaningful health benefits could be realized. Collectively, about 363,000 patients with SCI, or 65% of the entire spinal cord injured population in the US, engages in insufficient physical activity and represents a target population that could derive considerable health benefits from even modest physical activity levels. Currently, the annual direct costs related to SCI exceed US$45 billion in the US. Rehabilitation protocols and technologies aimed to improve functional mobility have potential to significantly reduce the risk of medical complications and cost associated with SCI. Patients who commence routine physical activity in the first post-injury year and experience typical motor function improvements would realize US$290,000 to US$435,000 in lifetime cost savings, primarily due to fewer hospitalizations and less reliance on assistive care. New assistive technologies that allow patients with SCI to safely engage in routine physical activity are desperately needed. PMID:27757043

  6. Recommendations for health-enhancing physical activities in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Mynarski, Władysław; Cholewa, Jarosław; Rozpara, Michał; Borek, Zbigniew; Strojek, Krzysztof; Nawrocka, Agnieszka

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease of civilization with epidemiological coverage. An integral component of a comprehensive process of type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention and treatment is reasonably proportioned exercise. The aim of the study was to evaluate the weekly physical activity of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and healthy subjects with respect to recommendations of the American College of Sports Medicine and American Diabetes Association. [Subjects] The study involved 31 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (treatment duration 9 ± 0.8) and 31 healthy people. [Methods] Physical activity levels were determined by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. A χ(2) test was applied to determine the percentage of people who met recommendations. [Results] Analysis of the obtained results demonstrated that the intensity of physical activity in patients with diabetes was moderate or low. The men in the control group met the recommendations for standard health-related activities significantly more often than the patients with diabetes. In women, there was no such relationship, since most of the women were insufficiently physically active. [Conclusion] The conclusion to be drawn is that there is an urgent need to develop and implement effective programs to enhance physical activity among people at risk of diseases of civilization, including type 2 diabetes. PMID:26356173

  7. Selenium supplementation on plasma glutathione peroxidase activity in patients with end-stage chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronisław A; Koterska, Dominika; Manitius, Jacek; Sadowski, Leszek; Dziedziczko, Andrzej; Salak, Anna; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) usually have a lower than healthy level of selenium (Se) in whole blood and plasma. Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) is synthesized mostly in the kidney. In CRF patients, activity of this enzyme is significantly reduced and its reduction increases with the progress of the disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of Se supplementation to CRF patients at various stages of the disease on Se concentration in blood components and on plasma GSHPx activity. The study group comprised 53 CRF patients at various stages of the disease supplemented with Se (200 microg/d for 3 mo as Se-enriched yeast, containing about 70% L-selenomethionine [SeMet]). The control group consisted of 20 healthy subjects. The Se concentration in blood components was measured spectrofluorometrically with 2,3-diaminonaphthalene as a complexing reagent. GSH-Px activity in red cell hemolysates and plasma was assayed by the coupled method with tert-butyl hydroperoxide as a substrate. The Se concentration in whole blood and plasma of CRF patients is significantly lower as compared with healthy subjects, but similar at all stages of the disease. In the patients' plasma, total protein and albumin levels are also significantly lower than in healthy subjects. Plasma GSH-Px activity in patients is extremely low, and contrary to Se concentration, it decreases linearly with the increasing stage of the illness. Se-supplied patients show an increased Se concentration in all blood components and at all disease stages, whereas plasma GSH-Px activity is enhanced only at the incipient stage of the disease. Se supply has no effect on plasma GSHPx activity in uremic patients at the end stage of the disease. Total plasma protein and albumin levels did not change after Se supplementation. Our data seem to show that in patients with CRF lower total protein and albumin levels in plasma may be the chief cause of the low blood and plasma Se concentrations. GSH

  8. Optimizing Physical Activity Among Older Adults Post Trauma: Overcoming System and Patient Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells PT, Chris L.; Boltz, Marie; Holtzman, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    By 2050 it is anticipated that close to half (40%) of all trauma patients will be over the age of 65. Recovery post trauma for these individuals is more complicated than among younger individuals. Specifically there is an increased risk for: (1) functional decline; (2) higher mortality rates; (3) longer length of stay; (4) greater resource consumption; (5) nursing home placement; (6) adverse events such as infections, pressure ulcers and falls; and (7) rehospitalization post discharge. Early mobilization has been shown to improve outcomes. Unfortunately, there are many challenges to early mobilization. The Function Focused Care Intervention was developed to overcome these challenges. The purpose of this paper was to describe the initial recruitment of the first 25 participants and delineate the challenges and successes associated with implementation of this intervention. Overall the intervention was implemented as intended and recruitment rates were consistent with other studies. Most patients were female, white and on average 79 years of age. Optimizing physical activity of patients was a low priority for the nurses with patient safety taking precedence. Patients spent most of the time in bed. Age, depression and tethering were the only factors that were associated with physical activity and functional outcomes of patients. Ongoing work is needed to keep patients physically active in the immediate post trauma recovery period. PMID:26547682

  9. How to build an "active" patient? The work of AIDS associations in France.

    PubMed

    Barbot, Janine

    2006-02-01

    "What is an "active" patient?" is a question that arises in most medicine and illness-related social science research. This article examines the normative work carried out by AIDS associations in France to define an "active" patient in healthcare and research. While the fight against AIDS is often presented as being homogenous, we look at the diversity of opinion between different associations (Aides, Act Up-Paris, Actions Traitements and Positifs). We find four different cases: the patient as manager of his illness, the empowerment of patients, the science-wise patient and the experimenter. Systematic comparison of these cases shows that these perceptions of the "active" patient, in terms of the same pathology, are based upon different ways of seeing: the nature of the relationships between the different types of knowledge of the illness (scientific knowledge, clinical knowledge, experience of the illness) and the distribution of roles and powers among the various actors in the healthcare system (the government, pharmaceutical companies, the medical profession, the patients). This article highlights the historical dynamics which allow us to have a better understanding of these differences, especially the major distinction between two generations of associations, which adopted different positions with regard to their public identity.

  10. Surgical Outcome in Hemodialysis Patients with Active-Phase Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Atsushi; Maruta, Kazuto; Masuda, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristics of chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients requiring surgery during the active phase of infective endocarditis (IE). Methods: From December 2004 to July 2015, 58 patients underwent surgery in our institute for active IE. Seven patients had been on HD for 1–15 years. Their preoperative profiles and surgical outcomes were compared to those of the other 51 patients (non-HD group). Results: The predominant causative microorganisms in the HD group were Staphylococcus spp, particularly methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), whereas Streptococcus spp were predominant in the non-HD group. Prosthetic dysfunction (stuck valve after mechanical and structural valve dysfunction following bioprosthetic valve replacement), complete atrioventricular (AV) block, and annular abscess formation were more frequent in the HD group. In-hospital mortality was higher in the HD group (29% vs. 6%, p = 0.044). Actuarial survival in the HD and non-HD groups was 43% vs. 87% at 5 years and 43% vs. 76% at 10 years (p = 0.007). Conclusions: Early and long term outcomes in patients with chronic HD were poor. Compared to other patients, chronic HD patients undergoing valve surgery during active IE had higher incidences of MRSA infection, annular abscess formation, postoperative valve dysfunction, and postoperative complete AV block. PMID:26948436

  11. Administration of C1 inhibitor reduces neutrophil activation in patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Caliezi, Christoph; van Mierlo, Gerard; Eerenberg-Belmer, Anke; Sulzer, Irmela; Hack, C Erik; Wuillemin, Walter A

    2003-07-01

    Forty patients with severe sepsis or septic shock recently received C1 inhibitor. In the present study we studied the effect of C1 inhibitor therapy on circulating elastase-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complex (EA) and lactoferrin (LF) levels in these patients to gain further insight about agonists involved in the activation of neutrophils in human sepsis. Elevated levels of EA and LF were found in 65 and 85% of the septic patients, respectively. Patients with elevated EA levels had higher organ dysfunction scores, higher levels of cytokines, and higher levels of complement activation products than patients with normal EA levels. C1 inhibitor therapy reduced EA as well as complement activation and IL-8 release in the patients with elevated EA on admission. We conclude that neutrophil activation in human sepsis correlates with the severity of organ dysfunction and involves complement and interleukin-8 as agonists. The effect of C1 inhibitor therapy on neutrophils may provide an explanation for the beneficial, although mild, effects of this treatment on organ dysfunction in sepsis.

  12. Abnormal activation of the occipital lobes during emotion picture processing in major depressive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianying; Xu, Cheng; Cao, Xiaohua; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yanfang; Peng, Juyi; Zhang, Kerang

    2013-06-25

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that depression patients have cognitive dysfunction. With recently developed brain functional imaging, studies have focused on changes in brain function to investigate cognitive changes. However, there is still controversy regarding abnormalities in brain functions or correlation between cognitive impairment and brain function changes. Thus, it is important to design an emotion-related task for research into brain function changes. We selected positive, neutral, and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Patients with major depressive disorder were asked to judge emotion pictures. In addition, functional MRI was performed to synchronously record behavior data and imaging data. Results showed that the total correct rate for recognizing pictures was lower in patients compared with normal controls. Moreover, the consistency for recognizing pictures for depressed patients was worse than normal controls, and they frequently recognized positive pictures as negative pictures. The consistency for recognizing pictures was negatively correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Functional MRI suggested that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, limbic lobe, and cerebellum was enhanced, but that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and occipital lobe was weakened while the patients were watching positive and neutral pictures compared with normal controls. The activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and limbic lobe was enhanced, but the activation of some areas in the occipital lobe were weakened while the patients were watching the negative pictures compared with normal controls. These findings indicate that patients with major depressive disorder have negative cognitive disorder and extensive brain dysfunction. Thus, reduced activation of the occipital lobe may be an initiating factor for

  13. Why do patients with long-term conditions use unscheduled care? A qualitative literature review.

    PubMed

    Langer, Susanne; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Hunter, Cheryl; Guthrie, Elspeth A; Salmon, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Unscheduled care (UC) refers to non-routine face-to-face care, such as accident and emergency care, out-of-hours care, or walk-in centres. Current health service policy aims to reduce its use. Unscheduled care is common in people with long-term conditions such as diabetes, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary heart disease. By reviewing qualitative research literature, we aimed to understand the breadth of psychosocial and other influences on UC use in people with long-term conditions. Few qualitative papers specifically address UC in patients in these disease groups. Therefore, our literature search also included qualitative research that explored factors potentially relevant to UC use, including attitudes to healthcare use in general. By searching Medline, Embase, Psycinfo and Cinahl from inception to 2011, we identified 42 papers, published since 1984, describing relevant original research and took a meta-ethnographic approach in reviewing them. The review was conducted between Spring 2009 and April 2011, with a further search in December 2011. Most papers reported on asthma (n = 13) or on multiple or unspecified conditions (n = 12). The most common methods reported were interviews (n = 33) and focus groups (n = 13), and analyses were generally descriptive. Theoretical and ethical background was rarely explicit, but the implicit starting point was generally the 'problem' of UC, and health-care, use in general, decontextualised from the lives of the patients using it. Patients' use of UC emerged as understandable, rational responses to pressing clinical need in situations in which patients thought it the only option. This belief reflected the value that they had learned to attach to UC versus routine care through previous experiences. For socially or economically marginalised patients, UC offered access to clinical or social care that was otherwise unavailable to them. PMID:23009718

  14. Systematic Review with Network Meta-Analysis: Comparative Efficacy of Biologics in the Treatment of Moderately to Severely Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Adrian D.; Ainsworth, Claire; Mody, Reema; Bergman, Annika; Ling, Caroline S.; Medjedovic, Jasmina; Smyth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Biological therapies are increasingly used to treat ulcerative colitis (UC). Aim To compare the efficacy of biologics in adults with moderately-to-severely active UC, stratified by prior exposure to anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy. Methods A systematic literature review was undertaken to identify studies of biologics approved for UC. Network meta-analysis was conducted for endpoints at induction and maintenance. Results Seven studies were included in the meta-analysis of induction treatment for anti-TNF therapy-naïve patients. All biologics were more effective than placebo in inducing clinical response, clinical remission, and mucosal healing. Infliximab demonstrated a statistically significant improvement over adalimumab in clinical response (odds ratio [OR] [95% credible interval (CrI)]: 2.19 [1.35–3.55]), clinical remission (OR [95% CrI]: 2.81 [1.49–5.49]), and mucosal healing (OR [95% CrI]: 2.23 [1.21–4.14]); there were no other significant differences between biologics for induction efficacy. Five studies were included in the meta-analysis of maintenance treatment, two studies rerandomised responder patients at end of induction, and three followed the same patients ‘straight through’. To account for design differences, the number of responders at end of induction was assumed to be equivalent to the number rerandomised. Vedolizumab showed significantly different durable clinical response from comparators (OR [95% CrI] infliximab 3.18 [1.14–9.20], golimumab 2.33 [1.04–5.41], and adalimumab 3.96 [1.67–9.84]). In anti-TNF therapy-experienced patients, only vedolizumab and adalimumab could be compared. At induction, no significant differences in efficacy were seen. During maintenance, vedolizumab showed significantly improved rates of mucosal healing versus adalimumab (OR [95% CrI]: 6.72 [1.36–41.0]). Conclusions This study expands the understanding of comparative efficacies of biologic treatments for UC, encompassing

  15. Active Tobacco Smoking and Distant Metastasis in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Sean M.; Ali, Nawal N.; Margalit, Danielle N.; Chan, Annie W.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Distant metastasis is the site of first relapse in approximately one-third of patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma, irrespective of human papillomavirus status. Yet the risk factors associated with distant metastasis are not well characterized. We sought to characterize the relationship between smoking status and distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the association between tobacco smoking status and distant metastasis in a retrospective cohort study of 132 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy and chemotherapy for Stage III-IVA/B oropharyngeal cancer. Information on tobacco smoking was prospectively collected by patient questionnaires and physician notes at the time of diagnosis. Thirty-three percent of the patients were nonsmokers, 51% were former smokers, 16% were active smokers. The cumulative lifetime tobacco smoking in pack-years was 20 (range, 0-150). Results: With a median follow-up time of 52 months, the overall rate of distant metastasis at 4 years was 8%. Distant metastasis was the most common first site of relapse, occurring in 56% of the patients with recurrences. Active smokers had higher rates of distant metastasis than non-active smokers (including never- and former smokers; 31% vs. 4%, p < 0.001) and former smokers (31% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of distant metastasis for patients with lifetime cumulative pack-years >20 and {<=}20 (10% vs. 4%, p = 0.19). In univariate analysis, active smoking (p = 0.0004) and N category (p = 0.009) were predictive of increased risk of distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, active smoking was the most significant predictive factor for increased risk of distant metastasis (hazard ratio, 12.7, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: This study identified a strong association between active smoking and distant metastasis in patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

  16. IL-2-Activated Killer Cells and Native Cytokines in Treatment of Patients with Advanced Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostanin, Alexander A.; Chernykh, Helena R.; Leplina, Olga Y.; Shevela, Ekaterina Ya.; Niconov, Sergey D.; Kozlov, Vladimir A.

    1997-12-01

    We evaluated the efficiency/tolerability of and the immunological changes induced by the adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) with IL-2-activated killer cells, and preparation of native cytokines from swine spleen (PSS) in treatment of 20 patients with advanced cancer (10 patients with primary lung cancer; 3 with metastatic melanoma; 2 with advanced neuroblastoma; 2 with ovarian cancer; renal cancer; gastric adenocarcinoma; and colorectal cancer). The partial/minor response of duration period 2-10 months was observed in 20% of patients. 2/4 patients, who underwent partial surgical tumor resection and following AIT course, sustained the event-free survival for more than 24 months. The response to the therapy was revealed in 4/10 patients with lung cancer, 2/2 patients with neuroblastoma, of whom each had ovarian and colorectal cancers. The evaluation of a dose of infused LAKcells as well as combined i.v./local (endobronchial or endoperitoneal) LAK administration were necessary to assure positive response in patients. The cytokine and/or side effects were moderate and the combined LAK-PSS infusions were generally well tolerated by the patients. The treatment was followed by activation of the patient immune system that included: (i) rebound in amount of peripheral blood lymphocytes; (ii) gain in amount of CD3(+) T cells and those CD4(+) helper/inducer; (iii) enchantment of lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production (IL-2, IL-1, TNF-alpha). Being injected to patients in combination with LAK cells, cytokines related to PSS action and/or those, either exogenous or secondary, and released by in vitro and in vivo, activated lymphocytes and could cause the therapeutic effects.

  17. Glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activities in blood of patients in early stages following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronislaw A; Wlodarczyk, Zbigniew; Andruszkiewicz, Jacek; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on glutathione (GSH) level in red blood cells, as well as on glutathione peroxidases (GSH-Px) activities in red blood cells and in plasma of chronic renal failure (CRF) patients following renal transplantation. We want to focus our main attention on plasma GSH-Px, the selenoenzyme that is synthesized primarily in the kidney. In CRF patients, activity of this enzyme is significantly reduced, and the reduction decreases with the progress of the disease, reaching in the end-stage 20% to 30% of the activity of healthy patients. We have shown that following renal transplantation the activity of plasma GSH-Px is restored very rapidly, and 2 weeks after surgery it reached the value of the control group. Red blood cell GSH level is significantly higher in CRF patients, and following transplantation, no significant changes were observed. Red blood cell GSH-Px activity before transplantation was the same as in healthy patients and did not change significantly after surgery. PMID:16350829

  18. Reduced activity of arylsulfatase A and predisposition to neurological disorders: analysis of 140 pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Sangiorgi, S; Ferlini, A; Zanetti, A; Mochi, M

    1991-09-01

    A sample of 140 children exhibiting neurologic disturbances (93 suffering from epilepsy and 47 with delayed psychomotor development or mental retardation) was tested for the activity of some lysosomal enzymes. A partial deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ASA) in leucocytes (activities lower than 60% of the control average) was detected in 36 patients (25.7%), whereas few ASA-deficient individuals (1.4%) were found in the control sample of 71 healthy children. Therefore, the frequency of ASA deficiency is abnormally high in our sample of pediatric patients. ASA activity levels were also assayed on fibroblasts from 12 of the 36 ASA-deficient patients; the mean activity in these cells was 20% of the control average. Excretion of urinary sulfatides was not increased in the tested ASA-deficient patients (10/36). Clinical symptoms of these ASA-deficient patients bore no resemblance to classical metachromatic leucodystrophy (MLD), but resemble literature cases labeled as atypical MLD or diagnostic puzzles. This result suggests that reduced ASA activity might be associated with an increased risk of developing neurologic or neuropsychiatric disturbances in children. PMID:1683156

  19. Cerebral Activations Related to Ballistic, Stepwise Interrupted and Gradually Modulated Movements in Parkinson Patients

    PubMed Central

    Toxopeus, Carolien M.; Maurits, Natasha M.; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A.; Leenders, Klaus L.; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) experience impaired initiation and inhibition of movements such as difficulty to start/stop walking. At single-joint level this is accompanied by reduced inhibition of antagonist muscle activity. While normal basal ganglia (BG) contributions to motor control include selecting appropriate muscles by inhibiting others, it is unclear how PD-related changes in BG function cause impaired movement initiation and inhibition at single-joint level. To further elucidate these changes we studied 4 right-hand movement tasks with fMRI, by dissociating activations related to abrupt movement initiation, inhibition and gradual movement modulation. Initiation and inhibition were inferred from ballistic and stepwise interrupted movement, respectively, while smooth wrist circumduction enabled the assessment of gradually modulated movement. Task-related activations were compared between PD patients (N = 12) and healthy subjects (N = 18). In healthy subjects, movement initiation was characterized by antero-ventral striatum, substantia nigra (SN) and premotor activations while inhibition was dominated by subthalamic nucleus (STN) and pallidal activations, in line with the known role of these areas in simple movement. Gradual movement mainly involved antero-dorsal putamen and pallidum. Compared to healthy subjects, patients showed reduced striatal/SN and increased pallidal activation for initiation, whereas for inhibition STN activation was reduced and striatal-thalamo-cortical activation increased. For gradual movement patients showed reduced pallidal and increased thalamo-cortical activation. We conclude that PD-related changes during movement initiation fit the (rather static) model of alterations in direct and indirect BG pathways. Reduced STN activation and regional cortical increased activation in PD during inhibition and gradual movement modulation are better explained by a dynamic model that also takes into account enhanced

  20. Cerebral activations related to ballistic, stepwise interrupted and gradually modulated movements in Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Toxopeus, Carolien M; Maurits, Natasha M; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A; Leenders, Klaus L; de Jong, Bauke M

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience impaired initiation and inhibition of movements such as difficulty to start/stop walking. At single-joint level this is accompanied by reduced inhibition of antagonist muscle activity. While normal basal ganglia (BG) contributions to motor control include selecting appropriate muscles by inhibiting others, it is unclear how PD-related changes in BG function cause impaired movement initiation and inhibition at single-joint level. To further elucidate these changes we studied 4 right-hand movement tasks with fMRI, by dissociating activations related to abrupt movement initiation, inhibition and gradual movement modulation. Initiation and inhibition were inferred from ballistic and stepwise interrupted movement, respectively, while smooth wrist circumduction enabled the assessment of gradually modulated movement. Task-related activations were compared between PD patients (N = 12) and healthy subjects (N = 18). In healthy subjects, movement initiation was characterized by antero-ventral striatum, substantia nigra (SN) and premotor activations while inhibition was dominated by subthalamic nucleus (STN) and pallidal activations, in line with the known role of these areas in simple movement. Gradual movement mainly involved antero-dorsal putamen and pallidum. Compared to healthy subjects, patients showed reduced striatal/SN and increased pallidal activation for initiation, whereas for inhibition STN activation was reduced and striatal-thalamo-cortical activation increased. For gradual movement patients showed reduced pallidal and increased thalamo-cortical activation. We conclude that PD-related changes during movement initiation fit the (rather static) model of alterations in direct and indirect BG pathways. Reduced STN activation and regional cortical increased activation in PD during inhibition and gradual movement modulation are better explained by a dynamic model that also takes into account enhanced

  1. TLR activation of tumor-associated macrophages from ovarian cancer patients triggers cytolytic activity of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Bellora, Francesca; Castriconi, Roberta; Dondero, Alessandra; Pessino, Anna; Nencioni, Alessio; Liggieri, Giovanni; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mantovani, Alberto; Moretta, Alessandro; Bottino, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    We analyzed the functional outcome of the interaction between tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and natural killer (NK) cells. TAMs from ascites of ovarian cancer patients displayed an alternatively activated functional phenotype (M2) characterized by a remarkably high frequency and surface density of membrane-bound IL-18. Upon TLR engagement, TAMs acquired a classically activated functional phenotype (M1), released immunostimulatory cytokines (IL-12, soluble IL-18), and efficiently triggered the cytolytic activity of NK cells. TAMs also induced the release of IFN-γ from NK cells, which however was significantly lower compared with that induced by in vitro-polarized M2 cells. Most tumor-associated NK cells displayed a CD56(bright) , CD16(neg) or CD56(bright) , CD16(dim) phenotype, and very poor cytolytic activities, despite an increased expression of the activation marker CD69. They also showed downregulation of DNAM-1, 2B4, and NTB-A activating receptors, and an altered chemokine receptor repertoire. Importantly however, when appropriately stimulated, NK cells from the patients, including those cells isolated from ascites, efficiently killed autologous TAMs that expressed low, "nonprotective" levels of HLA class I molecules. Overall, our data show the existence of a complex tumor microenvironment in which poorly cytolytic/immature NK cells deal with immunosuppressive tumor-educated macrophages.

  2. The use of the percentile method for searching empirical relationships between compression strength (UCS), Point Load (Is50) and Schmidt Hammer (RL) Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Giovanni; Bobbo, Luigi; Vessia, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Is50 and RL indices are commonly used to indirectly estimate the compression strength of a rocky deposit by in situ and in laboratory devices. The widespread use of Point load and Schmidt hammer tests is due to the simplicity and the speediness of the execution of these tests. Their indices can be related to the UCS by means of the ordinary least square regression analyses. Several researchers suggest to take into account the lithology to build high correlated empirical expressions (R2 >0.8) to draw UCS from Is50 or RL values. Nevertheless, the lower and upper bounds of the UCS ranges of values that can be estimated by means of the two indirect indices are not clearly defined yet. Aydin (2009) stated that the Schmidt hammer test shall be used to assess the compression resistance of rocks characterized by UCS>12-20 MPa. On the other hand, the Point load measures can be performed on weak rocks but upper bound values for UCS are not suggested. In this paper, the empirical relationships between UCS, RL and Is50 are searched by means of the percentile method (Bruno et al. 2013). This method is based on looking for the best regression function, between measured data of UCS and one of the indirect indices, drawn from a subset sample of the couples of measures that are the percentile values. These values are taken from the original dataset of both measures by calculating the cumulative function. No hypothesis on the probability distribution of the sample is needed and the procedure shows to be robust with respect to odd values or outliers. In this study, the carbonate sedimentary rocks are investigated. According to the rock mass classification of Dobereiner and De Freitas (1986), the UCS values for the studied rocks range between 'extremely weak' to 'strong'. For the analyzed data, UCS varies between 1,18-270,70 MPa. Thus, through the percentile method the best empirical relationships UCS-Is50 and UCS-RL are plotted. Relationships between Is50 and RL are drawn, too

  3. The American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISESS) at UC Irvine: A Two-Week Residential Summer Program for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. R.; Polequaptewa, N.; Leon, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Native Americans remain severely underrepresented in the geosciences, despite a clear need for qualified geoscience professionals within Tribal communities to address critical issues such as natural resource and land management, water and air pollution, and climate change. In addition to the need for geoscience professionals within Tribal communities, increased participation of Native Americans in the geosciences would enhance the overall diversity of perspectives represented within the Earth science community and lead to improved Earth science literacy within Native communities. To address this need, the Department of Earth System Science and the American Indian Resource Program at the University California have organized a two-week residential American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISESS) for high-school students (grades 9-12) from throughout the nation. The format of the AISESS program is based on the highly-successful framework of a previous NSF Funded American Indian Summer Institute in Computer Science (AISICS) at UC Irvine and involves key senior personnel from the AISICS program. The AISESS program, however, incorporates a week of camping on the La Jolla Band of Luiseño Indians reservation in Northern San Diego County, California. Following the week of camping and field projects, the students spend a week on the campus of UC Irvine participating in Earth System Science lectures, laboratory activities, and tours. The science curriculum is closely woven together with cultural activities, native studies, and communication skills programs The program culminates with a closing ceremony during which students present poster projects on environmental issues relevant to their tribal communities. The inaugural AISESS program took place from July 15th-28th, 2012. We received over 100 applications from Native American high school students from across the nation. We accepted 40 students for the first year, of which 34 attended the program. The

  4. Daily activity level buffers stress-glycemia associations in older sedentary NIDDM patients.

    PubMed

    Aikens, K S; Aikens, J E; Wallander, J L; Hunt, S

    1997-08-01

    Examined glycemic associations with medical variables, activity, daily stress, and mood state in 72 older patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). On three occasions over a 2-week observation period, subjects provided measures of everyday life stress, negative mood state, and daily activities. At the end of this period, fructosamine was assayed to measure glycemic control throughout the assessment period. After controlling for medical variables (age, illness duration, body mass index, caloric intake, and activity) and the main effects of psychological factors (stress; anxious, angry, and depressed mood states), stress interacted with activity such that glycemic elevation was positively associated with stress for subjects below the activity median but not for those above the median. This was unattributable to any overall activity-related differences in fructosamine, stress, or mood. None of the mood states interacted with activity. The findings suggest that extremely low levels of activity may strengthen life stress-glycemia associations in NIDDM. PMID:9298436

  5. Relationship Between Grip and Pinch Strength and Activities of Daily Living in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Hyun; Seo, Kyung Mook; Kim, Don-Kyu; Shin, Hyun Iee; Shin, Hye Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between grip and pinch strength and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) in stroke patients. Methods Medical records of 577 stroke patients from January 2010 to February 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' grip and pinch strength of both hemiplegic and non-hemiplegic hands and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) score were collected. These patients were divided into three groups: group A (onset duration: ≤3 months), group B (onset duration: >3 months and <2 years), and group C (onset duration: ≥2 years). The correlation between grip and pinch strength and the K-MBI score was analyzed. Results In group A (95 patients), the K-MBI score was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the grip and pinch strength of both hands in patients with right hemiplegia. Significant (p<0.05) correlation between the K-MBI score and the grip and pinch strength of the hemiplegic hand was shown in patients with left hemiplegia. In group B (69 patients) and group C (73 patients), the K-MBI score was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the grip and pinch strength of the hemiplegic hand. Conclusion Stroke patients in subacute stage mainly performed activities of daily living using their dominant hand. However, independence in ADL was associated with the strength of the affected dominant hand. For stroke patients in chronic and late chronic stages, their hand power of the affected hand was associated with independence in ADL regardless whether the dominant hand was affected. PMID:26605173

  6. [The changes of basal brain electric activity in patients with epilepsy after callosotomy].

    PubMed

    Beĭn, B N; Dravert, N E; Tatarenko, S A

    2008-01-01

    Short-term and long-term outcomes of basal brain activity were estimated in 20 epileptic patients with a medical history of callosotomy. Patients with malignant courses selected for callosotomy retained the high capacity of cerebral electric activity after surgery. In spite of limitations of bilateral synchronized irradiation of electric discharges in the brain, patients had the high power of cerebral electric genesis. A clinical study revealed the decrease of the number of seizures and their severity in patients who underwent the surgery. Thus, callosotomy plays only a palliative role in epileptic processes. Of primary importance is individual selection of anti-epileptic drugs to support cell mechanisms of epilepsy and improvement of treatment outcomes.

  7. Spectrum of gallium-67 renal activity in patients with no evidence of renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.E.; Van Nostrand, D.; Howard, W.H. III; Kyle, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    Thirty-seven gallium-67 images were reviewed retrospectively to determine relative renal gallium activity (RGA) in patients with no evidence of renal disease. Twenty-four patients were classified as having no evidence of renal disease (NRD). RGA was identified in 50.0% (12/24) of patients in the NRD group. The authors conclude that the presence of RGA neither suggests nor rules out renal disease. Altered nonrenal biological factors (such as saturation of iron-binding capacity) may decrease soft-tissue gallium accumulation while activity in the kidney remains unchanged. The latter provides renal images with better signal-to-noise ratio. Current imaging equipment may allow renal visualization in these patients.

  8. Activity performance problems of patients with cardiac diseases and their impact on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Duruturk, Neslihan; Tonga, Eda; Karatas, Metin; Doganozu, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To describe the functional consequences of patients with cardiac diseases and analyze associations between activity limitations and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy subjects (mean age: 60.1±12.0 years) were being treated by Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Cardiology Departments were included in the study. Activity limitations and participation restrictions as perceived by the individual were measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale was used to describe limitations in daily living activities. To detect the impact of activity limitations on quality of life the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used. [Results] The subjects described 46 different types of problematic activities. The five most identified problems were walking (45.7%), climbing up the stairs (41.4%), bathing (30%), dressing (28.6%) and outings (27.1%). The associations between COPM performance score with all subgroups of NEADL and NHP; total, energy, physical abilities subgroups, were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Our results showed that patients with cardiac diseases reported problems with a wide range of activities, and that also quality of life may be affected by activities of daily living. COPM can be provided as a patient-focused outcome measure, and it may be a useful tool for identifying those problems. PMID:26311919

  9. Activated protein C resistance in patients with central retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, J; Sellman, A; Bauer, B

    1997-01-01

    AIM/BACKGROUND—A new defect in the anticoagulant system has recently been discovered—activated protein C resistance. The frequency of this disorder has been shown to be increased in young patients (<50 years of age) with central retinal vein occlusion. This study was carried out to determine if there was any overrepresentation of activated protein C resistance in patients >50 years of age with central retinal vein occlusion.
METHODS—Blood samples were obtained from 83 patients >50 years of age and with a history of central retinal vein occlusion. The blood samples were analysed for activated protein C resistance with standard clinical laboratory methods.
RESULTS—In this material 11% of the patients were resistant to activated protein C. The normal incidence of activated protein C resistance in the same geographical area is 10-11%.
CONCLUSION—Activated protein C resistance does not seem to be a cause of central retinal vein occlusion in people older than 50 years.

 PMID:9486021

  10. Rest-Activity and Behavioral Disruption in a Patient with Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Merrilees, J.; Hubbard, E.; Mastick, J.; Miller, B.L.; Dowling, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    The neurological deterioration in dementia is associated with disturbances in circadian rhythms and rest-activity patterns. These disruptions have been documented in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies but little is known about rest-activity patterns in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We report longitudinal (2 year) actigraphy results for a patient who met diagnostic criteria for FTD and his family caregiver. The subject and his family caregiver wore Actiwatches continuously for 2-weeks at 1-year intervals. The findings suggest that with disease progression there is worsening in multiple areas of rest-activity measures for the patient and a negative impact on sleep quality for the family caregiver. PMID:19736599

  11. Suppression of ventilatory muscle activity in healthy subjects and COPD patients with negative pressure ventilation.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, F; Duranti, R; Fabiani, A; Schiavina, M; Scano, G

    1991-05-01

    We evaluated the ability of NPV to suppress EMGd and EMGint in seven patients with severe COPD and five normal subjects. Subjects were studied either without (A) or with mouthpiece and nose clip (B). Electromyographic suppression was assessed comparing EMG activity during NPV with the control activity without a mouthpiece and prior to the initiation of the NPV run. In normal subjects, in A, NPV resulted in a partial suppression of EMGd; in B, prior to NPV, EMGd rose compared with A prior to NPV. In patients, in A, NPV resulted in a suppression of both EMGd and EMGint. In B, prior to NPV, both EMGd and EMGint rose compared with A prior to NPV. Thus, it seems that NPV is able to produce a consistent reduction in inspiratory muscle EMG activity. This variable NPV ability would have to be assessed for better selection criteria for patient candidates in a rehabilitation program.

  12. Elevated serum interleukin-23 levels in ankylosing spondylitis patients and the relationship with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Mahir; Baygutalp, Nurcan Kilic; Melikoglu, Meltem Alkan; Baygutalp, Fatih; Altas, Elif Umay; Seferoglu, Buminhan

    2015-11-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the relationship between serum interleukin-23 (IL-23) levels and ankylosing spondylitis (AS).Twenty male patients diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis according to the 1984 modified New York criteria for AS and twenty male healthy controls were included in this study.The demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory findings of the patients were recorded. Serum IL-23 levels, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured in both the AS and control groups. The Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity ındex (BASDAI), the Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI), and the Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI) were evaluated as disease activity parameters. The AS patients were divided into two subgroups as active and inactive in respect of CRP, ESR levels and BASDAI scores. The mean serum IL-23 levels of the AS and control groups were 334.45±176.54 pg/ml and 166.49±177.50 pg/ml respectively, and there was a significant difference between the groups. Correlation analysis of serum IL-23 levels with clinical and laboratory parameters showed that there were positive correlations between serum IL-23 levels and the BASDAI, BASFI scores in total, active and inactive patients and the BASMI scores in total and inactive patients and negative correlations between serum IL-23 levels and ESR in inactive patients. It was shown that altered serum IL-23 levels were related to AS disease activity. Further studies in large patient series are necessary to investigate the role of IL-23 protein in etiopathogenesis of AS.

  13. Functional MRI of neuronal activation in epilepsy patients with malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Simona; Bartha, Robert; Parrent, Andrew G; Steven, David A; Diosy, David; Burneo, Jorge G

    2015-10-01

    Malformations of cortical development are disturbances in brain formation that arise from abnormalities affecting the processes of cortical development. Surgical treatment of intractable epilepsy in patients with malformations of cortical development requires localization of both epileptogenic and eloquent cortices. Functional magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to detect the reorganization of activation patterns in such patients. The purpose of this study was to determine whether functional reorganization of the primary sensory and motor cortices occurs in patients with epileptogenic malformations of cortical development. Functional MRI data were obtained for 11 patients (four male, seven female) with a mean age of 36 years (range 18-55 years). The mean age at epilepsy onset was 23 years (range 3-55 years). Twelve healthy controls (six male, six female) with mean age of 33 years (range 28-51 years) were also recruited for comparison. High resolution anatomical MRI was used to confirm the presence and the location of the malformation. All imaging experiments were performed using a 3.0T Siemens Tim Trio whole body MRI. Each subject performed four block-paradigm fMRI experiments to study motor and sensory activation for each hand. A total of 132 image sets were collected for each paradigm over 5.5min (2.5s per image). Each paradigm consisted of seven stimulus periods lasting 30s (12 images) and stimulus onset of 30, 90, 150, 210 and 270s. Functional data were obtained from all eligible patients and compared to those of controls. Reorganization and reduction in function in the motor and sensory areas were observed in patients with cortical dysplasia. Patients with polymicrogyria did not present with significant functional reorganization and patients with heterotopias and coexisting polymicrogyria and/or cortical dysplasia had variable patterns of activation. In summary, this study showed evidence of functional reorganization of sensory and motor cortices in

  14. Selenium levels and Glutathione peroxidase activity in the plasma of patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    González de Vega, Raquel; Fernández-Sánchez, María Luisa; Fernández, Juan Carlos; Álvarez Menéndez, Francisco Vicente; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Selenium, an essential trace element, is involved in the complex system of defense against oxidative stress through selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx) and other selenoproteins. Because of its antioxidant properties, selenium or its selenospecies at appropriate levels could hinder oxidative stress and so development of diabetes. In this vein, quantitative speciation of selenium in human plasma samples from healthy and diabetic patients (controlled and non-controlled) was carried out by affinity chromatography (AF) coupled on-line to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and isotope dilution analysis (IDA). Similarly, it is well known that patients with diabetes who exhibit poor control of blood glucose show a decreased total antioxidant activity. Thus, we evaluated the enzymatic activity of GPx in diabetic and healthy individuals, using the Paglia and Valentine enzymatic method, observing a significant difference (p<0.05) between the three groups of assayed patients (healthy (n=24): 0.61±0.11U/ml, controlled diabetic (n=38): 0.40±0.12U/ml and non-controlled diabetic patients (n=40): 0.32±0.09U/ml). Our results show that hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. What is more, glycation of GPx experiments demonstrated that it is the degree of glycation of the selenoenzyme (another species of the Se protein) what actually modulates its eventual activity against ROS in type II diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27473831

  15. Posttransplant adoptive immunotherapy with activated natural killer cells in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    deMagalhaes-Silverman, M; Donnenberg, A; Lembersky, B; Elder, E; Lister, J; Rybka, W; Whiteside, T; Ball, E

    2000-01-01

    Relapse after high-dose chemotherapy is the main cause of therapeutic failure in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Adoptive immunotherapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2) plus activated natural killer cells may eliminate residual disease without excessive toxicity. The authors sought to determine if immunotherapy immediately after transplantation would affect engraftment and the toxicity associated with transplantation. Fifteen consecutive patients with metastatic breast cancer were allocated to three cohorts. Cohort 1 (five patients) received high-dose cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin (CTCb) followed by peripheral blood stem cell infusion and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor at 10 micrograms/kg. Cohort 2 (five patients) received in addition rhIL-2 (2 x 10(6) IU/m2/day) for 4 days intravenously via continuous infusion after peripheral blood stem cell infusion. In cohort 3 (five patients), peripheral blood stem cell transplant was followed by infusion of autologous activated NK cells and rhIL-2 (2 x 10(6) IU/m2/day) for 4 days (via continuous intravenous infusion). Generation of activated NK cells was possible in all patients in cohort 3. All patients has successful engraftment. Median time to absolute neutrophil count more than 0.5 x 10(9)/L was 8 days (range, 8 to 11 days) in cohort 1, 9 days (range, 7 to 11 days) in cohort 2, and 9 days (range, 8 to 9 days) in cohort 3. Median time until the platelet count was more than 20 x 10(9)/L was 14 days (range, 9 to 22 days) in cohort 1, 11 days (range, 6 to 14 days) in cohort 2, and 12 days (range, 11 to 21 days) in cohort 3. All patients developed neutropenic fevers, but the overall toxicity associated with the infusion of IL-2 (cohort 2) or IL-2 plus activated NK cells (cohort 3) did not differ from that observed in cohort 1. Complete responses were achieved in one patient in cohort 1, in two patients in cohort 2, and in one patient in cohort 3. In conclusion, post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy with

  16. A self-regulation-based intervention to increase physical activity in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Nadine; Sieverding, Monika; Weidner, Gerdi; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiskemann, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The study examined whether a behavior-change intervention focusing on self-regulatory strategies and emphasizing role model support increases physical activity (PA) among insufficiently active (not meeting PA guidelines of 150 min/week) cancer patients. Ambulatory cancer patients [N = 72; 54% female; M = 56 years, SD = 12.34; most with breast or colon cancer (34, 15%)] were enrolled in the MOTIVACTION-study, a 4-week intervention (1-hr counseling, followed by weekly phone calls), with pretest (T1), posttest (T2) and a 10-week follow-up (T3). Participants were randomized to either an exercise or to a stress management intervention (active control). The exercise intervention emphasized self-regulatory strategies (e.g. action- and coping planning and self-monitoring); patients were also encouraged to contact a physically active same-sex role model as a potential exercise partner. The active control condition consisted of coping and relaxation techniques. Sixty-seven patients remained in the study and completed the SQUASH assessment of PA and a measure of perceived stress. PA was validated by Actigraph accelerometry. At T2, 46% of the patients in the exercise group and 19% of stress management patients increased their activity levels to meet PA guidelines (>150 min/week; χ(2)(1) = 5.51, p = .019). At T3, participants in the exercise intervention maintained their exercise level (46%), but also 31% of the stress management patients met the guidelines. All patients reported reductions in perceived stress. Additional analyses comparing patients in the exercise group by role model contact (63% realized contact) revealed that those who had contact with their role model were significantly more likely to adhere to the recommended guidelines (T2:50%; T3:64%) compared to those who did not have contact with a role model (T2:39%; T3:15%), suggesting the potential of mobilizing role model support to facilitate PA. In sum, cancer patients may not only benefit from an exercise

  17. A self-regulation-based intervention to increase physical activity in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Nadine; Sieverding, Monika; Weidner, Gerdi; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiskemann, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The study examined whether a behavior-change intervention focusing on self-regulatory strategies and emphasizing role model support increases physical activity (PA) among insufficiently active (not meeting PA guidelines of 150 min/week) cancer patients. Ambulatory cancer patients [N = 72; 54% female; M = 56 years, SD = 12.34; most with breast or colon cancer (34, 15%)] were enrolled in the MOTIVACTION-study, a 4-week intervention (1-hr counseling, followed by weekly phone calls), with pretest (T1), posttest (T2) and a 10-week follow-up (T3). Participants were randomized to either an exercise or to a stress management intervention (active control). The exercise intervention emphasized self-regulatory strategies (e.g. action- and coping planning and self-monitoring); patients were also encouraged to contact a physically active same-sex role model as a potential exercise partner. The active control condition consisted of coping and relaxation techniques. Sixty-seven patients remained in the study and completed the SQUASH assessment of PA and a measure of perceived stress. PA was validated by Actigraph accelerometry. At T2, 46% of the patients in the exercise group and 19% of stress management patients increased their activity levels to meet PA guidelines (>150 min/week; χ(2)(1) = 5.51, p = .019). At T3, participants in the exercise intervention maintained their exercise level (46%), but also 31% of the stress management patients met the guidelines. All patients reported reductions in perceived stress. Additional analyses comparing patients in the exercise group by role model contact (63% realized contact) revealed that those who had contact with their role model were significantly more likely to adhere to the recommended guidelines (T2:50%; T3:64%) compared to those who did not have contact with a role model (T2:39%; T3:15%), suggesting the potential of mobilizing role model support to facilitate PA. In sum, cancer patients may not only benefit from an exercise

  18. Evaluating disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis using 99mtc-glucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Manolios, Nicholas; Ali, Marina; Camden, Bradley; Aflaky, Elham; Pavic, Katrina; Markewycz, Andrew; De Costa, Robert; Angelides, Socrates

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical utility of a novel radiotracer, 99mTc-glucosamine, in assessing disease activity of both rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Material and Methods: Twenty-five patients with RA (nine males and 16 females) and 12 patients with AS (all male) at various stages of disease were recruited for the study. A clinical history and examination was performed, followed by the measurement of hematological, biochemical, and autoimmune serological parameters to assess disease activity. 99mTc-glucosamine was intravenously administered and scans were compared with other imaging modalities, including plain X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bone scans. Results In patients with AS, 99mTc-glucosamine scans were more capable of identifying active disease and differentiating between inflammatory and non-inflammatory causes. In patients with RA, 99mTc-glucosamine accumulated at all known sites of disease involvement. Uptake was most pronounced in patients with active untreated disease. The relative tracer activity in the involved joints increased with time compared with that in the adjoining soft tissue, liver, and cardiac blood pool. Using Spearman’s correlation coefficient, there was a positive correlation among glucosamine scan scores, C-reactive protein (p=0.048), and clinical assessment (p=0.003), which was not noted with bone scans. Conclusion The radiotracer was well tolerated by all patients, with no adverse reactions. 99mTc-glucosamine imaging could detect spinal inflammation in AS. With respect to RA, 99mTc-glucosamine was a viable alternative to 99mTc-labeled methylene diphosphonate nuclear bone scans for imaging inflamed joints and had the added advantage of demonstrating a significant clinical correlation between disease activity and scan findings. PMID:27708974

  19. Selenium concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activities in blood of patients before and after allogenic kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronisław A; Włodarczyk, Zbigniew; Masztalerz, Marek; Adamowicz, Andrzej; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    In animals and humans, the highest level of selenium (Se) occurs in the kidney. This organ is also the major site of the synthesis of the selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Decreased Se levels and GSH-Px activities in blood are common symptoms in the advanced stage of chronic renal failure (CRF). Blood samples for Se levels and GSH-Px activities measurements from patients were collected just before transplantation and 3, 7, 14, 30, and 90 d posttransplant. The Se levels in whole blood and plasma of patients before transplantation (79.5 and 64.5 ng/mL, respectively) were lower by 23% and 21%, respectively, as compared with controls (p < 0.0001), and 7 d after operation, it further decreased in both components (p < 0.01). Fourteen days after surgery, the levels reached the initial values and increased slowly in the later period. Red blood cell GSHPx activity in patients in the entire period of the study did not differ from the control group. Plasma GSH-Px of patients before the surgery was extremely low (76 U/L) as compared with controls (243 U/L; p < 0.0001) but increased rapidly to 115 U/L after 3 d, to 164 U/L after 14 d, and to 208 U/L after 3 mo posttransplant. In CRF patients, after kidney transplantation, plasma GSH-Px activity increased rapidly, approaching, after 3 mo, the values that were close to the normal levels. A negative correlation between creatinine level and plasma GSH-Px activity is observed in patients after kidney transplantation. Monitoring of plasma GSH-Px activity may be a useful additional marker of the transplanted kidney function. PMID:14742896

  20. Evaluation of in vivo immune complex formation and complement activation in patients receiving intravenous streptokinase.

    PubMed Central

    Freysdottir, J; Ormarsdottir, S; Sigfusson, A

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of several different methods for detecting immune complex formation and complement activation in the circulation were applied to samples from patients receiving intravenous Streptokinase therapy for myocardial infarction. Streptokinase is a foreign antigen and can cause immune reactions. We collected samples from 13 patients, before Streptokinase administration (baseline), at the end of infusion (1 h), 12 h later and on day 7. We measured IgG containing immune complexes (IgG-IC), free C3d and antibodies to Streptokinase by ELISA, and CR1, C3d and C4d on erythrocytes by flow cytometric assay. Antibodies to Streptokinase are common, as all but two of the patients had measurable antibody levels. During Streptokinase treatment there was a drop in antibody levels, most prominent in those patients who had high baseline levels. At the same time increased levels of free C3d and erythrocyte-bound C3d were observed. After 12 h free C3d was usually back to baseline level, but C3d on erythrocytes was still raised. These data indicate the formation of Streptokinase immune complexes in patients with high Streptokinase antibody levels, and show that these complexes are cleared rapidly from the circulation, leaving more persistent signs of complement activation. We conclude that free C3d is a good indicator of ongoing complement activation, whereas C3d on erythrocytes indicates that complement activation has recently taken place. PMID:8222319

  1. Tim-3 pathway affects NK cell impairment in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Hou, Hongyan; Wu, Shiji; Tang, Qing; Huang, Min; Yin, Botao; Huang, Jing; Liu, Weiyong; Mao, Lie; Lu, Yanfang; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-12-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) patients show impaired NK cell function, and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we confirmed the decrease in activation, cytokine secretion, and degranulation potential of NK cells in active TB patients. We further investigated whether coinhibitory receptor Tim-3 was involved with impairment of NK cells. Our results revealed that the expression of Tim-3 on NK cells was increased in active TB patients. Tim-3 expression was inversely correlated with IL-12-stimualted IFN-γ production. Moreover, blocking the Tim-3 pathway restored IFN-γ secretion and degranulation of NK cells. Blocking this pathway also increased NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 target cells, and improved the ability of NK cells to control Mtb growth in monocyte-derived macrophages. The Tim-3 expression on NK cells was also observed to be significantly decreased in TB patients post-treatment. In this study, we have identified that Tim-3 is involved with NK cell impairment in TB patients.

  2. Aberrant temporal and spatial brain activity during rest in patients with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Malinen, Sanna; Vartiainen, Nuutti; Hlushchuk, Yevhen; Koskinen, Miika; Ramkumar, Pavan; Forss, Nina; Kalso, Eija; Hari, Riitta

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of external stimuli, human hemodynamic brain activity displays slow intrinsic variations. To find out whether such fluctuations would be altered by persistent pain, we asked 10 patients with unrelenting chronic pain of different etiologies and 10 sex- and age-matched control subjects to rest with eyes open during 3-T functional MRI. Independent component analysis was used to identify functionally coupled brain networks. Time courses of an independent component comprising the insular cortices of both hemispheres showed stronger spectral power at 0.12 to 0.25 Hz in patients than in control subjects, with the largest difference at 0.16 Hz. A similar but weaker effect was seen in the anterior cingulate cortex, whereas activity of the precuneus and early visual cortex, used as a control site, did not differ between the groups. In the patient group, seed point-based correlation analysis revealed altered spatial connectivity between insulae and anterior cingulate cortex. The results imply both temporally and spatially aberrant activity of the affective pain-processing areas in patients suffering from chronic pain. The accentuated 0.12- to 0.25-Hz fluctuations in the patient group might be related to altered activity of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:20308545

  3. Phospholipid-dependent procoagulant activity is highly expressed by circulating microparticles in patients with Essential Thrombocythemia

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Marina; Tartari, Carmen J; Russo, Laura; Panova-Noeva, Marina; Leuzzi, Annamaria; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Finazzi, Guido; Woodhams, Barry; Falanga, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the functional procoagulant features of plasma MP in order to explore the MP contribution to the hypercoagulable state of patients with Essential Thrombocythemia (ET). Platelet-free plasma samples were obtained from 73 ET patients (37 positive for the JAK2V617F mutation) and 72 control subjects. The calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) was performed in plasma samples to determine thrombin generation of MP-associated tissue factor (TF) and procoagulant phospholipid (PPL) activity, and the STA Procoag PPL assay to measure MP-PPL activity only. Both thrombin generation and PPL procoagulant activities were found significantly elevated in ET patients compared to controls, and were associated to significantly higher levels of TF antigen and FVIIa/AT complex. Thrombin generation was significantly greater in JAK2-V617F positive compared to JAK2-V617F negative patients and normal subjects. Significant correlations were found between the PPL-assay and the different parameters of the CAT assay. No difference was seen between the thrombosis and no thrombosis group. Prospective studies are needed to test whether MP-associated thrombin generation and procoagulant activity may predict for thrombosis in these patients. PMID:24009132

  4. Phospholipid-dependent procoagulant activity is highly expressed by circulating microparticles in patients with essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Marina; Tartari, Carmen J; Russo, Laura; Panova-Noeva, Marina; Leuzzi, Annamaria; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Finazzi, Guido; Woodhams, Barry; Falanga, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the functional procoagulant features of plasma microparticle (MP) to explore the MP contribution to the hypercoagulable state of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET). Platelet-free plasma samples were obtained from 73 ET patients (37 positive for the JAK2V617F mutation) and 72 control subjects. The calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) was performed in plasma samples to determine thrombin generation of MP-associated tissue factor (TF) and procoagulant phospholipid (PPL) activity, and the STA Procoag PPL assay to measure MP-PPL activity only. Both thrombin generation and PPL procoagulant activities were found significantly elevated in ET patients compared to controls, and were associated to significantly higher levels of TF antigen and FVIIa/AT complex. Thrombin generation was significantly greater in JAK2-V617F positive compared to JAK2-V617F negative patients and normal subjects. Significant correlations were found between the PPL-assay and the different parameters of the CAT assay. No difference was seen between the thrombosis and no thrombosis group. Prospective studies are needed to test whether MP-associated thrombin generation and procoagulant activity may predict for thrombosis in these patients. PMID:24009132

  5. [Melatonin production in thrombocytes and their functional activity in patients with aspirin asthma].

    PubMed

    Evsiukova, E V; Muraia, E V; Zubzhitskaia, L B; Kveshnoĭ, I M

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to study melatonin production in thrombocytes and their functional activity in correlation with 6-sulfatoximelatonin (6-SOM) urinary excretion in patients with aspirin-induced bronchial asthma (AIBA). Forty-three patients with bronchial asthma (BA) were examined. The main group consisted of 26 AIBA patients; the comparison group consisted of 17 BA patients with no intolerance to aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; 30 practically healthy individuals constituted the control group. The study found no melatonin production in thrombocytes of AIBA patients: only 13.0 +/- 1.3% of platelets expressed melatonin, while in healthy people 97.7 +/- 0.6% of the cells did. Besides, daytime urinary excretion of 6-SOM, the main melatonin metabolite, was lower in AIBA patients. Lower daytime and higher nighttime melatonin production in AIBA patients correlated with the acceleration of the 1st phase and increased intensity of thrombocyte aggregation, which evidences high thrombocyte reactivity to the inducing agent. The presence of a pathologic reaction of thrombocytes to exogenous melatonin, manifesting by changes in the 1st stage of aggregation, suggests the presence of pathology in thrombocyte membrane-receptor complex and the calcium homeostasis of the cell, which determines constant activation and the participation of thrombocytes in the development of asthmatic syndrome. PMID:18154178

  6. Graduate and Professional School Applications, Admissions and Enrollments (1981-1988): A Status Report on Ethnic Groups Underrepresented at UC Davis. Research Synopsis No. 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Davis. Office of Student Affairs Research and Information.

    This report describes postgraduate enrollment trends for ethnic groups underrepresented at University of California, Davis. The UC Davis Student Affirmative Action (SAA) Plan identifies the following groups as underrepresented in both the Graduate Division and professional schools: American Indian, Black/African-American, Chicano/Mexican American,…

  7. A Report Card on Latina/o Leadership in California's Public Universities: A Trend Analysis of Faculty, Students, and Executives in the CSU and UC Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Jose L.; Acevedo-Gil, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The article examines the status of leadership in two California public higher education systems: California State University (CSU) and the University of California (UC) from 2001 to 2009. Findings reveal that the representation of Latina/o faculty and administrators does not reflect the density in the Latina/o undergraduate student and general…

  8. Cloning and Characterization of the Pyrrolomycin Biosynthetic Gene Clusters from Actinosporangium vitaminophilum ATCC 31673 and Streptomyces sp. Strain UC 11065▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujun; Parry, Ronald J.

    2007-01-01

    The pyrrolomycins are a family of polyketide antibiotics, some of which contain a nitro group. To gain insight into the nitration mechanism associated with the formation of these antibiotics, the pyrrolomycin biosynthetic gene cluster from Actinosporangium vitaminophilum was cloned. Sequencing of ca. 56 kb of A. vitaminophilum DNA revealed 35 open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence analysis revealed a clear relationship between some of these ORFs and the biosynthetic gene cluster for pyoluteorin, a structurally related antibiotic. Since a gene transfer system could not be devised for A. vitaminophilum, additional proof for the identity of the cloned gene cluster was sought by cloning the pyrrolomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. strain UC 11065, a transformable pyrrolomycin producer. Sequencing of ca. 26 kb of UC 11065 DNA revealed the presence of 17 ORFs, 15 of which exhibit strong similarity to ORFs in the A. vitaminophilum cluster as well as a nearly identical organization. Single-crossover disruption of two genes in the UC 11065 cluster abolished pyrrolomycin production in both cases. These results confirm that the genetic locus cloned from UC 11065 is essential for pyrrolomycin production, and they also confirm that the highly similar locus in A. vitaminophilum encodes pyrrolomycin biosynthetic genes. Sequence analysis revealed that both clusters contain genes encoding the two components of an assimilatory nitrate reductase. This finding suggests that nitrite is required for the formation of the nitrated pyrrolomycins. However, sequence analysis did not provide additional insights into the nitration process, suggesting the operation of a novel nitration mechanism. PMID:17158935

  9. Factors that influence physicians' and medical students' confidence in counseling patients about physical activity.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Durkin, Martin W; Stallworth, James Rast; Powell, Caroline Keller; Poston, Mary Beth; Blair, Steven N

    2014-06-01

    Less than half of US adults and two-thirds of US high school students do not meet current US guidelines for physical activity. We examined which factors promoted physicians' and medical students' confidence in counseling patients about physical activity. We established an online exercise survey targeting attending physicians, resident and fellow physicians, and medical students to determine their current level of physical activity and confidence in counseling patients about physical activity. We compared their personal level of physical activity with the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines of the US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). We administered a survey in 2009 and 2010 that used the short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. A total of 1,949 individuals responded to the survey, of whom 1,751 (i.e., 566 attending physicians, 138 fellow physicians,