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Sample records for active uvi reduction

  1. U(VI) Reduction in Sulfate-Reducing Subsurface Sediments Amended with Ethanol or Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Brandon J.; Wu, Tao; Findlay, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted with subsurface sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the potential for reduction of U(VI) under sulfate-reducing conditions with either ethanol or acetate as the electron donor. The results showed extensive U(VI) reduction in sediments supplied with either electron donor, where geochemical and microbiological analyses demonstrated active sulfate reduction. PMID:23624470

  2. Isotopic and Geochemical Tracers for U(VI) Reduction and U Mobility at an in Situ Recovery U Mine.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T; Christensen, John N; DePaolo, Donald J; Reimus, Paul W; Heikoop, Jeffrey M; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M; House, Brian M; Hartmann, Matt; Maher, Kate

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Postmining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers (238)U/(235)U (δ(238)U), (234)U/(238)U activity ratio, and (34)S/(32)S (δ(34)S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ(238)U in Rosita groundwater varies from +0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ(238)U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ(238)U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic (234)U/(238)U activity ratio and δ(34)S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.

  3. Reduction of U(VI) Complexes by Anthraquinone Disulfonate: Experiment and Molecular Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, C.C.; Wang, Z.; Rosso, K.M.

    2004-03-17

    Past studies demonstrate that complexation will limit abiotic and biotic U(VI) reduction rates and the overall extent of reduction. However, the underlying basis for this behavior is not understood and presently unpredictable across species and ligand structure. The central tenets of these investigations are: (1) reduction of U(VI) follows the electron-transfer (ET) mechanism developed by Marcus; (2) the ET rate is the rate-limiting step in U(VI) reduction and is the step that is most affected by complexation; and (3) Marcus theory can be used to unify the apparently disparate U(VI) reduction rate data and as a computational tool to constructmore » a predictive relationship.« less

  4. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE PAGES

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; ...

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore » an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  5. Cassini UVIS Observations Show Active Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L.; Colwell, J. E.; UVIS Team

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) is part of the remote sensing payload of the NASA/ESA Cassini spacecraft. This spectrograph includes channels for extreme UV and far UV spectroscopic imaging, high speed photometry of stellar occultations, solar EUV occultation, and a hydrogen/deuterium absorption cell. We report our initial results from UVIS observations of Saturn's rings. Dynamic interactions between neutrals, ions, rings, moons and meteoroids produce a highly structured and time variable Saturn system Oxygen in the Saturn system dominates the magnetosphere. Observed fluctuations indicate close interactions with plasma sources. Stochastic events in the E ring may be the ultimate source. The spectral signature of water ice is seen on Phoebe and in Saturn's rings. Water ice is mixed non-uniformly with darker constituents. The high structure of the UV ring reflectance argues that collisional transport dominates ballistic transport in darkening the rings. Our preliminary results support the idea that rings are recycled fragments of moons: the current processes are more important than history and initial conditions. The spectra along the UVIS SOI radial scan indicate varying amounts of water ice. In the A ring, the ice fraction increases outward to a maximum at the outer edge. This large-scale variation is consistent with initially pure ice that has suffered meteoritic bombardment over the age of the Solar system (Cuzzi and Estrada 1998). We also see variations over scales of 1000 - 3000 km, which cannot be explained by this mechanism. Ballistic transport of spectrally neutral extrinsic pollutants from meteoroids striking the rings has a typical throw distance of 6000 km (Durisen et al 1989), too long to explain this finer structure. We propose a class of smaller renewal events, in which a small moon residing within the rings is shattered by an external impactor (Colwell and Esposito 1993, Barbara and Esposito 2002, Esposito and Colwell 2003). The

  6. Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.

    2013-09-15

    Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 μmol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 μmol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had amore » finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 μmol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 μmol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 μmol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.« less

  7. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by indigenous bacteria in contaminated ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelouas, A.; Lu, Yongming; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, H. E.

    1998-12-01

    We report on bio-catalyzed reduction and immobilization of U(VI) species (0.25 mg/l to 235 mg/l) in ground water in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, sulfate and carbonate. We studied ground water from the uranium mill tailings site near Tuba City, Arizona (USA). Experiments with the ground water were conducted in the presence of the Navajo sandstone host rock. Uranium in solution is complexed by carbonate. Two indigenous denitrifying bacteria were identified Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. stutzeri, and one sulfate reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, also known as Fe(III)-reducer. S. putrefaciens can use U(VI) as an electron acceptor, instead of Fe(III). Ethanol was used as the organic carbon source. Microbially mediated reactions are sequential in the order of decreasing redox intensity. Metabolic reduction of nitrate to gaseous species (N 2, N 2O) was complete within 1 week at 16°C. The sulfate concentration remained constant. Some of the U(VI) coprecipitated with aragonite/calcite or was adsorbed on biomass during denitrification. Subsequently, the enzymatically catalyzed reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was complete within 3 weeks but was accompanied by reduction of sulfate to sulfide. U(IV) precipitated as a uraninite solid solution (U, Ca)O 2, adhering to the bacteria. The final concentration in solution was ≤1 μg/l. U(VI) was not reduced by sulfide. Complexation of U(VI) by carbonate made its reduction by sulfide even slower than in pure water. The bio-catalyzed reaction is the faster process under the conditions given by the composition of the ground water.

  8. Remediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Philips , Elizabeth J.P.; Landa, Edward R.; Lovely, Derek R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for concentrating uranium from contaminated soils in which the uranium is first extracted with bicarbonate and then the extracted uranium is precipitated with U(VI)-reducing microorganisms was evaluated for a variety of uranuum-contaminated soils. Bicarbonate (100 mM) extracted 20–94% of the uranium that was extracted with nitric acid. The U(VI)-reducing microorganism,Desulfovibrio desulfuricans reduced the U(VI) to U(IV) in the bicarbonate extracts. In some instances unidentified dissolved extracted components, presumably organics, gave the extract a yellow color and inhibited U(VI) reduction and/or the precipitation of U(IV). Removal of the dissolved yellow material with the addition of hydrogen peroxide alleviated this inhibition. These results demonstrate that bicarbonate extraction of uranium from soil followed by microbial U(VI) reduction might be an effective mechanism for concentrating uranium from some contaminated soils.

  9. Laboratory reduction rate and current efficiency studies of batch type electrolytic reduction of U(VI) in a sulfate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroshi; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Sato, Koji; Hirono, Shuichiro

    1986-01-01

    The electrolytic reduction of U(VI) was investigated to improve the batch type electrolytic reduction of uranyl sulfate. For this purpose, theoretical considerations were made on the time variation of reduction rate and of current efficiency. A monitoring device consisting of two titanium electrodes and one platinum electrode was developed to determine the reduction ratio and to detect the end point of the reduction of U(VI). The monitoring device worked well for these purposes. The reduction rate in a batch type electrolytic reduction of U(VI) at constant current was larger than theoretically expected. This phenomenon was attributed to the increase in the mass transfer rate of U(VI) species toward the cathode due to the disturbance of the concentration boundary layer by hydrogen gas evolved from the cathode surface. The deterioration of titanium cathode experienced in an operating plant was investigated, and was found to be caused by platinum plating onto the titanium cathode surface during the operation. The deteriorated cathode could be restored by immersing it in a hot aqua regia or a mixture of hydrofluoric acid and phosphoric acid for a few minutes.

  10. Microbial reduction of U(VI) under alkaline conditions: implications for radioactive waste geodisposal.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adam J; Morris, Katherine; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Charnock, John M; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2014-11-18

    Although there is consensus that microorganisms significantly influence uranium speciation and mobility in the subsurface under circumneutral conditions, microbiologically mediated U(VI) redox cycling under alkaline conditions relevant to the geological disposal of cementitious intermediate level radioactive waste, remains unexplored. Here, we describe microcosm experiments that investigate the biogeochemical fate of U(VI) at pH 10-10.5, using sediments from a legacy lime working site, stimulated with an added electron donor, and incubated in the presence and absence of added Fe(III) as ferrihydrite. In systems without added Fe(III), partial U(VI) reduction occurred, forming a U(IV)-bearing non-uraninite phase which underwent reoxidation in the presence of air (O2) and to some extent nitrate. By contrast, in the presence of added Fe(III), U(VI) was first removed from solution by sorption to the Fe(III) mineral, followed by bioreduction and (bio)magnetite formation coupled to formation of a complex U(IV)-bearing phase with uraninite present, which also underwent air (O2) and partial nitrate reoxidation. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed that Gram-positive bacteria affiliated with the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes dominated in the post-reduction sediments. These data provide the first insights into uranium biogeochemistry at high pH and have significant implications for the long-term fate of uranium in geological disposal in both engineered barrier systems and the alkaline, chemically disturbed geosphere.

  11. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Pfiffner, Susan M.; Löffler, Frank; Ritalahti, Kirsti

    2015-08-31

    The overall goal for this funded project was to develop and exploit environmental metaproteomics tools to identify biomarkers for monitoring microbial activity affecting U speciation at U-contaminated sites, correlate metaproteomics profiles with geochemical parameters and U(VI) reduction activity (or lack thereof), elucidate mechanisms contributing to U(VI) reduction, and provide remediation project managers with additional information to make science-based site management decisions for achieving cleanup goals more efficiently. Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the microbiology contribution to metal and radionuclide reduction, the cellular components, pathway(s), and mechanisms involved in U trans-formation remain poorly understood. Recent advances in (meta)proteomicsmore » technology enable detailed studies of complex samples, including environmental samples, which differ between sites and even show considerable variability within the same site (e.g., the Oak Ridge IFRC site). Additionally, site-specific geochemical conditions affect microbial activity and function, suggesting generalized assessment and interpretations may not suffice. This research effort integrated current understanding of the microbiology and biochemistry of U(VI) reduction and capitalize on advances in proteomics technology made over the past few years. Field-related analyses used Oak Ridge IFRC field ground water samples from locations where slow-release substrate biostimulation has been implemented to accelerate in situ U(VI) reduction rates. Our overarching hypothesis was that the metabolic signature in environmental samples, as deciphered by the metaproteome measurements, would show a relationship with U(VI) reduction activity. Since metaproteomic and metagenomic characterizations were computationally challenging and time-consuming, we used a tiered approach that combines database mining, controlled laboratory studies, U(VI) reduction activity measurements

  12. Dynamic Succession of Groundwater Functional Microbial Communities in Response to Emulsified Vegetable Oil Amendment during Sustained In Situ U(VI) Reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Ping; Wu, Wei-Min; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; ...

    2015-04-10

    A pilot-scale field experiment demonstrated that a one-time amendment of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) reduced groundwater U(VI) concentrations for 1 year in a fast-flowing aquifer. However, little is known about how EVO amendment stimulates the functional gene composition, structure, and dynamics of groundwater microbial communities toward prolonged U(VI) reduction. In this paper, we hypothesized that EVO amendment would shift the functional gene composition and structure of groundwater microbial communities and stimulate key functional genes/groups involved in EVO biodegradation and reduction of electron acceptors in the aquifer. To test these hypotheses, groundwater microbial communities after EVO amendment were analyzed using amore » comprehensive functional gene microarray. Our results showed that EVO amendment stimulated sequential shifts in the functional composition and structure of groundwater microbial communities. Particularly, the relative abundance of key functional genes/groups involved in EVO biodegradation and the reduction of NO 3 -, Mn(IV), Fe(III), U(VI), and SO 4 2- significantly increased, especially during the active U(VI) reduction period. The relative abundance for some of these key functional genes/groups remained elevated over 9 months. Montel tests suggested that the dynamics in the abundance, composition, and structure of these key functional genes/groups were significantly correlated with groundwater concentrations of acetate, NO 3 -, Mn(II), Fe(II), U(VI), and SO 4 2-. Our results suggest that EVO amendment stimulated dynamic succession of key functional microbial communities. Finally, this study improves our understanding of the composition, structure, and function changes needed for groundwater microbial communities to sustain a long-term U(VI) reduction.« less

  13. Microbial reductive transformation of phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in fluvial subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, James K; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Boyanov, Maxim I; Kemner, Kenneth M; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W; Bjornstad, Bruce N; Konopka, Allan E; Moore, Dean A; Resch, Charles T; Phillips, Jerry L

    2012-04-03

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) was investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in subsurface sediments incubated in sulfate-containing synthetic groundwater with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without, and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction of phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  14. Functional Diversity and Electron Donor Dependence of Microbial Populations Capable of U(VI) Reduction in Radionuclide-Contaminated Subsurface Sediments▿

    PubMed Central

    Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kerkhof, Lee; Stucki, Joseph W.; Anastácio, Alexandre S.; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Küsel, Kirsten; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Watson, David B.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2008-01-01

    In order to elucidate the potential mechanisms of U(VI) reduction for the optimization of bioremediation strategies, the structure-function relationships of microbial communities were investigated in microcosms of subsurface materials cocontaminated with radionuclides and nitrate. A polyphasic approach was used to assess the functional diversity of microbial populations likely to catalyze electron flow under conditions proposed for in situ uranium bioremediation. The addition of ethanol and glucose as supplemental electron donors stimulated microbial nitrate and Fe(III) reduction as the predominant terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs). U(VI), Fe(III), and sulfate reduction overlapped in the glucose treatment, whereas U(VI) reduction was concurrent with sulfate reduction but preceded Fe(III) reduction in the ethanol treatments. Phyllosilicate clays were shown to be the major source of Fe(III) for microbial respiration by using variable-temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy. Nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) were abundant throughout the shifts in TEAPs observed in biostimulated microcosms and were affiliated with the genera Geobacter, Tolumonas, Clostridium, Arthrobacter, Dechloromonas, and Pseudomonas. Up to two orders of magnitude higher counts of FeRB and enhanced U(VI) removal were observed in ethanol-amended treatments compared to the results in glucose-amended treatments. Quantification of citrate synthase (gltA) levels demonstrated a stimulation of Geobacteraceae activity during metal reduction in carbon-amended microcosms, with the highest expression observed in the glucose treatment. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the active FeRB share high sequence identity with Geobacteraceae members cultivated from contaminated subsurface environments. Our results show that the functional diversity of populations capable of U(VI) reduction is dependent upon the choice of electron donor. PMID:18378664

  15. Electrochemical and Spectroscopic Evidence on the One-Electron Reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on Magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S.; Antonio, Mark R.

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(VI) on mineral surfaces is often considered a one-step two-electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies Indicates U(VI) can undergo a one-electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(VI),. We investigated reduction pathways of uranium by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a, magnetite electrode at,pH 3.4. Cyclic voltammetry confirms the one-electron reduction of U(VI) . Formation of nanosize uranium precipitates on the magnetite surface at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials are observed by in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy. XPS, analysis Of the magnetitemore » electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages - from -0.1 to -0.9 V (E-U(VI)/U(V)(0)= -0.135 V vs Ag/AgCl) show the presence of, only U(V) and U(VI). The sample with the highest U(V)/U(VI) ratio was prepared at -0.7 V, where the longest average U-O-axial distance of 2.05 + 0.01 A was evident in the same sample revealed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) On magnetite only yields,U(V), even at a potential of -0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism, U(V) does not disproportionate but stabilizes on magnetite through precipitation Of mixed-valence state -U(V)/U(VI) solids.« less

  16. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    SciTech Connect

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas C.; Monsegue, Niven

    2013-03-05

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM,more » XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.« less

  17. Electrochemical and Spectroscopic Evidence on the One-Electron Reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on Magnetite.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S; Antonio, Mark R; Li, Zhongrui; Cook, Peter J; Becker, Udo

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) on mineral surfaces is often considered a one-step two-electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies indicates U(VI) can undergo a one-electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(IV). We investigated reduction pathways of uranium by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a magnetite electrode at pH 3.4. Cyclic voltammetry confirms the one-electron reduction of U(VI) to U(V). Formation of nanosize uranium precipitates on the magnetite surface at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials are observed by in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy. XPS analysis of the magnetite electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages from -0.1 to -0.9 V (E(0)(U(VI)/U(V))= -0.135 V vs Ag/AgCl) show the presence of only U(V) and U(VI). The sample with the highest U(V)/U(VI) ratio was prepared at -0.7 V, where the longest average U-O(axial) distance of 2.05 ± 0.01 Å was evident in the same sample revealed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) on magnetite only yields U(V), even at a potential of -0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism. U(V) does not disproportionate but stabilizes on magnetite through precipitation of mixed-valence state U(V)/U(VI) solids.

  18. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to U(VI) immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, Bulbul; Kennedy, David W; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, Jim K; Isern, Nancy G; Majors, Paul D; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells with minimal EPS, we show that (i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contribute significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; (ii) bEPS can be considered a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at lower initial U(VI) concentrations; and (iii) the U(VI) reduction efficiency is dependent upon the initial U(VI) concentration and decreases at lower concentrations. To quantify the relative contributions of sorption and reduction to U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(VI). We found that, when reduced, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated the reactivity of laEPS, while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, possibly facilitated U(VI) reduction.

  19. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.

    2011-06-05

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent uponmore » initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.« less

  20. Geochemical control on the reduction of U(VI) to mononuclear U(IV) species in lacustrine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetten, L.; Mangeret, A.; Brest, J.; Seder-Colomina, M.; Le Pape, P.; Ikogou, M.; Zeyen, N.; Thouvenot, A.; Julien, A.; Alcalde, G.; Reyss, J. L.; Bombled, B.; Rabouille, C.; Olivi, L.; Proux, O.; Cazala, C.; Morin, G.

    2018-02-01

    Contaminated systems in which uranium (U) concentrations slightly exceed the geochemical background are of particular interest to identify natural processes governing U trapping and accumulation in Earth's surface environments. For this purpose, we examined the role of early diagenesis on the evolution of U speciation and mobility in sediments from an artificial lake located downstream from a former mining site. Sediment and pore water chemistry together with U and Fe solid state speciation were analyzed in sediment cores sampled down to 50 cm depth at four locations in the lake. These organic-rich sediments (∼12% organic C) exhibited U concentrations in the 40-80 mg kg-1 range. The sediment columns were anoxic 2-3 mm below the sediment-water interface and pore waters pH was circumneutral. Pore water chemistry profiles showed that organic carbon mineralization was associated with Fe and Mn reduction and was correlated with a decrease in dissolved U concentration with depth. Immobilization of U in the sediment was correlated with the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) at depth, as shown by U LIII-edge XANES spectroscopic analysis. XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge showed the reduction of structural Fe(III) to Fe(II) in phyllosilicate minerals with depth, coincident with U(VI) to U(IV) reduction. Thermodynamic modeling suggests that Fe(II) could act as a major reducing agent for U(VI) during early diagenesis of these sediments, leading to complete U reduction below ∼30 cm depth. Shell-by-shell and Cauchy-Wavelet analysis of U LIII-EXAFS spectra indicates that U(VI) and U(IV) are mainly present as mononuclear species bound to C, P or Si ligands. Chemical extractions confirmed that ∼60-80% of U was present as non-crystalline species, which emphasizes that such species should be considered when evaluating the fate of U in lacustrine environments and the efficiency of sediment remediation strategies.

  1. Electron Transfer Pathways Facilitating U(VI) Reduction by Fe(II) on Al- vs Fe-Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S. D.; Becker, U.; Rosso, K. M.

    2017-09-06

    This study continues mechanistic development of heterogeneous electron transfer (ET) pathways at mineral surfaces in aquatic environments that enable the reduction U(VI) by surface-associated Fe(II). Using computational molecular simulation within the framework of Marcus Theory, our findings highlight the importance of the configurations and interaction of the electron donor and acceptor species with the substrate, with respect to influencing its electronic structure and thereby the ability of semiconducting minerals to facilitate ET. U(VI) reduction by surface-associated Fe(II) (adsorbed or structurally incorporated into the lattice) on an insulating, corundum (001) surface (α-Al2O3) occurs when proximal inner-sphere (IS) surface complexes are formed,more » such that ET occurs through a combination of direct exchange (i.e., Fe d- and U f-orbitals overlap through space) and superexchange via intervening surface oxygen atoms. U(VI) reduction by coadsorbed Fe(II) on the isostructural semiconducting hematite (α-Fe2O3) basal surface requires either their direct electronic interaction (e.g., IS complexation) or mediation of this interaction indirectly through the surface via an intrasurface pathway. Conceptually possible longer-range ET by charge-hopping through surface Fe atoms was investigated to determine whether this indirect pathway is competitive with direct ET. The calculations show that energy barriers are large for this conduction-based pathway; interfacial ET into the hematite surface is endothermic (+80.1 kJ/mol) and comprises the rate-limiting step (10–6 s–1). The presence of the IS adsorbates appears to weaken the electronic coupling between underlying Fe ions within the surface, resulting in slower intra-surface ET (10–5 s–1) than expected in the bulk basal plane. Our findings lay out first insights into donor-acceptor communication via a charge-hopping pathway through the surface for heterogeneous reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) and help provide

  2. Direct Solid-State Evidence of H2-Induced Partial U(VI) Reduction Concomitant with Adsorption by Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS).

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Zhou, Chen; Liu, Zhuolin; Xu, Xiaoyin; Zhou, Yun; Zhou, Dandan; Tang, Youneng; Ma, Fang; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2018-03-25

    Adsorption of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) has been studied, but the possibility of simultaneous U(VI) reduction mediated by EPS has not had experimental confirmation, as the reduction products have not yet been directly proven. Here, we reported the first direct evidence of lower-valent products of U(VI) immobilization by loosely associated EPS (laEPS) isolated from a fermenter strain of Klebsiella sp. J1 when the laEPS was exposed to H 2 . During the 120-minute tests for similarly 86% adsorption under O 2 , N 2 , and H 2 , 8% more U was immobilized through a non-adsorptive pathway by the EPS for H 2 than for N 2 and O 2 . A set of solid-state characterization tools (FT-IR, XPS, EELS, and TEM-EDX) confirmed partial reduction of U(VI) to lower-valence U, with the main form being uraninite (U IV O 2 ) nanoparticles, and the results reinforced the role of the reduction in accelerating U immobilization and shaping the characteristics of immobilized U in terms of valency, size, and crystallization. The laEPS, mostly comprised of carbohydrate and protein, contained non-cytochrome enzymes and electron carriers that could be responsible for electron transfer to U(VI). Taken together, our results directly confirm that EPS was able to mediate partial U(VI) reduction in the presence of H 2 through non-cytochrome catalysis and that reduction enhanced overall U immobilization. Our study fills in some gaps of the microbe-mediated U cycle and will be useful to understand and control U removal in engineered reactors and in-situ bioremediation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of Reactive Transport on the Reduction of U(VI) in the Presence of Fe(III) and Nitrate: Implications for U(VI) Immobilization by Bioremediation / Biobarriers- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Wood

    2007-01-01

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides represent some of the most challenging remediation problems confronting the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. In situ remediation of these contaminants by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been proposed as a potential cost effective remediation strategy. The primary focus of this research is to determine the mechanisms by which the fluxes of electron acceptors, electron donors, and other species can be controlled to maximize the transfer of reductive equivalents to the aqueous and solid phases. The proposed research is unique in the NABIR portfolio in that it focuses on (i) the role ofmore » flow and transport in the initiation of biostimulation and the successful sequestration of metals and radionuclides [specifically U(VI)], (ii) the subsequent reductive capacity and stability of the reduced sediments produced by the biostimulation process, and (iii) the potential for altering the growth of biomass in the subsurface by the addition of specific metabolic uncoupling compounds. A scientifically-based understanding of these phenomena are critical to the ability to design successful bioremediation schemes. The laboratory research will employ Shewanella putrefaciens (CN32), a facultative DMRB that can use Fe(III) oxides as a terminal electron acceptor. Sediment-packed columns will be inoculated with this organism, and the reduction of U(VI) by the DMRB will be stimulated by the addition of a carbon and energy source in the presence of Fe(III). Separate column experiments will be conducted to independently examine: (1) the importance of the abiotic reduction of U(VI) by biogenic Fe(II); (2) the influence of the transport process on Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization, with emphasis on methods for controlling the fluxes of aqueous species to maximize uranium reduction; (3) the reductive capacity of biologically-reduced sediments (with respect to re-oxidation by convective fluxes of O2 and NO3

  4. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.

    2012-11-07

    A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 µM) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 µM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A alsomore » could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.« less

  5. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Bulbul; Cao, Bin; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-01-01

    A facultative iron-reducing [Fe(III)-reducing] Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes [Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid and Fe(III)-citrate] but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 μM) of either of the electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 μM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We also found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ∼7:3 in PIPES [piperazine-N,N′-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid)] and ∼1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments. PMID:22961903

  6. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition: Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.J.; Callister, S.J.; Miletto, M.

    2010-02-15

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situmore » biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.« less

  7. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Miletto, Marzia

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situmore » biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.« less

  8. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome C3

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D

    2013-04-11

    The central objective of our proposed research was twofold: 1) to investigate the structure-function relationship of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (now Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20) cytochrome c3 with uranium and 2) to elucidate the mechanism for uranium reduction in vitro and in vivo. Physiological analysis of a mutant of D. desulfuricans with a mutation of the gene encoding the type 1 tetraheme cytochrome c3 had demonstrated that uranium reduction was negatively impacted while sulfate reduction was not if lactate were the electron donor. This was thought to be due to the presence of a branched pathway of electron flow from lactate leading tomore » sulfate reduction. Our experimental plan was to elucidate the structural and mechanistic details of uranium reduction involving cytochrome c3.« less

  9. Adsorption of Fe(II) and U(VI) to carboxyl-functionalized microspheres: The influence of speciation on uranyl reduction studied by titration and XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanov, Maxim I.; O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Roden, Eric E.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2007-04-01

    The chemical reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) is a potentially important pathway for immobilization of uranium in subsurface environments. Although the presence of surfaces has been shown to catalyze the reaction between Fe(II) and U(VI) aqueous species, the mechanism(s) responsible for the enhanced reactivity remain ambiguous. To gain further insight into the U-Fe redox process at a complexing, non-conducting surface that is relevant to common organic phases in the environment, we studied suspensions containing combinations of 0.1 mM U(VI), 1.0 mM Fe(II), and 4.2 g/L carboxyl-functionalized polystyrene microspheres. Acid-base titrations were used to monitor protolytic reactions, and Fe K-edge and U L-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used to determine the valence and atomic environment of the adsorbed Fe and U species. In the Fe + surface carboxyl system, a transition from monomeric to oligomeric Fe(II) surface species was observed between pH 7.5 and pH 8.4. In the U + surface carboxyl system, the U(VI) cation was adsorbed as a mononuclear uranyl-carboxyl complex at both pH 7.5 and 8.4. In the ternary U + Fe + surface carboxyl system, U(VI) was not reduced by the solvated or adsorbed Fe(II) at pH 7.5 over a 4-month period, whereas complete and rapid reduction to U(IV) nanoparticles occurred at pH 8.4. The U(IV) product reoxidized rapidly upon exposure to air, but it was stable over a 4-month period under anoxic conditions. Fe atoms were found in the local environment of the reduced U(IV) atoms at a distance of 3.56 Å. The U(IV)-Fe coordination is consistent with an inner-sphere electron transfer mechanism between the redox centers and involvement of Fe(II) atoms in both steps of the reduction from U(VI) to U(IV). The inability of Fe(II) to reduce U(VI) in solution and at pH 7.5 in the U + Fe + carboxyl system is explained by the formation of a transient, "dead-end" U(V)-Fe(III) complex that blocks the U(V) disproportionation pathway after the

  10. Biogeochemical Modeling of In Situ U(VI) Reduction and Immobilization with Emulsified Vegetable Oil as the Electron Donor at a Field Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Parker, J.; Wu, W.; Schadt, C. W.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.; Orifrc Team

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive biogeochemical model was developed to quantitatively describe the coupled hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological processes that occurred following injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor to immobilize U(VI) at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site (ORIFRC) in Tennessee. The model couples the degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, hydrogen and acetate, reduction of nitrate, manganese, ferrous iron, sulfate and uranium, and methanoganesis with growth of multiple microbial groups. The model describes the evolution of geochemistry and microbial populations not only in the aqueous phase as typically observed, but also in the mineral phase and therefore enables us to evaluate the applicability of rates from the literature for field scale assessment, estimate the retention and degradation rates of EVO and LCFA, and assess the influence of the coupled processes on fate and transport of U(VI). Our results suggested that syntrophic bacteria or metal reducers might catalyze LCFA oxidation in the downstream locations when sulfate was consumed, and competition between methanogens and others for electron donors and slow growth of methanogen might contribute to the sustained reducing condition. Among the large amount of hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological parameter values, the initial biomass, and the interactions (e.g., inhibition) of the microbial functional groups, and the rate and extent of Mn and Fe oxide reduction appear as the major sources of uncertainty. Our model provides a platform to conduct numerical experiments to study these interactions, and could be useful for further iterative experimental and modeling investigations into the bioreductive immobiliztion of radionuclide and metal contaminants in the subsurface.

  11. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in Aquifers: Simulations Exploring Coupled Effects of Heterogeneity and Fe(II) Sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Fang, Y.; Roden, E. E.; Brooks, S. C.; Chien, Y.; Murray, C. J.

    2004-05-01

    Uranium is a significant groundwater contaminant at many former mining and processing sites. In its oxidized state, U(VI) is soluble and mobile, although strongly retarded by sorption to natural iron oxide surfaces. It has been demonstrated that commonly occurring subsurface microorganisms can reduce uranium and other metals when provided sufficient carbon as an electron donor. Reduced U(IV) precipitates as a solid phase; therefore biostimulation provides a potential strategy for in situ removal from contaminated groundwater. However, these biogeochemical reactions occur in the context of a complex heterogeneous environment in which flow and transport dynamics and abiotic reactions can have significant impacts. We have constructed a high-resolution numerical model of groundwater flow and multicomponent reactive transport that incorporates heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity and initial Fe(III) distribution, microbial growth and transport dynamics, and effects of sorption or precipitation of biogenic Fe(II) on availability of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor. The biogeochemical reaction models and their parameters are based on laboratory experiments; the heterogeneous field-scale property distributions are based on interpretations of geophysical and other observations at a highly characterized field site. The model is being run in Monte Carlo mode to examine the controls that these factors exert on 1) the initial distribution of sorbed uranium in an oxic environment and 2) the reduction and immobilization of uranium upon introduction of a soluble electron donor.

  12. UVIS Flat Field Uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Jessica Kim

    2009-07-01

    The stability and uniformity of the low-frequency flat fields {L-flat} of the UVIS detector will be assessed by using multiple-pointing observations of the globular clusters 47 Tucanae {NGC104} and Omega Centauri {NGC5139}, thus imaging moderately dense stellar fields. By placing the same star over different portions of the detector and measuring relative changes in its brightness, it will be possible to determine local variations in the response of the UVIS detector. Based on previous experience with STIS and ACS, it is deemed that a total of 9 different pointings will suffice to provide adequate characterization of the flat field stability in any given band. For each filter to be tested, the baseline consists of 9 pointings in a 3X3 box pattern with dither steps of about 25% of the FOV, or 40.5", in either the x or y direction {useful also for CTE measurements, if needed in the future}. During SMOV, the complement of filters to be tested is limited to the following 6 filters: F225W, F275W, F336W, for Omega Cen, and F438W, F606W, and F814W for 47 Tuc. Three long exposures for each target are arranged such that the initial dither position is observed with the appropriate filters for that target within one orbit at a single pointing, so that filter-to-filter differences in the observed star positions can be checked. In addition to the 9 baseline exposures, two sets of short exposures will be taken:a} one short exposure will be taken of OmegaCen with each of the visible filters {F438W, F606W and F814W} in order to check the geometric distortion solution to be obtained with the data from proposal 11444;b} for each target, a single short exposure will be taken with each filter to facilitate the study of the PSF as a function of position on the detector by providing unsaturated images of sparsely-spaced bright stars.This proposal corresponds to Activity Description ID WF39. It should execute only after the following proposal has executed:WF21 - 11434

  13. Mechanisms and Rates of U(VI) Reduction by Fe(II) in Homogeneous Aqueous Solution and the Role of U(V) Disproportionation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Richard N.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2017-08-25

    Molecular-level pathways in the aqueous redox transformation of uranium by iron remain unclear, despite the importance of this knowledge for predicting uranium transport and distribution in natural and engineered environments. As the relative importance of homogeneous versus heterogeneous pathways is difficult to probe experimentally, here we apply computational molecular simulation to isolate rates of key one electron transfer reactions in the homogeneous pathway. By comparison to experimental observations the role of the heterogeneous pathway also becomes clear. Density functional theory (DFT) and Marcus theory calculations for all primary monomeric species at pH values ≤7 show for UO22+ and its hydrolysismore » species UO2OH+ and UO2(OH)20 that reduction by Fe2+ is thermodynamically favorable, though kinetically limited for UO22+. An inner-sphere encounter complex between UO2OH+ and Fe2+ was the most stable for the first hydrolysis species and displayed an electron transfer rate constant ket = 4.3 × 103 s-1. Three stable inner- and outer-sphere encounter complexes between UO2(OH)20 and Fe2+ were found, with electron transfer rate constants ranging from ket = 7.6 × 102 to 7.2 × 104 s-1. Homogeneous reduction of these U(VI) hydrolysis species to U(V) is, therefore, predicted to be facile. In contrast, homogeneous reduction of UO2+ by Fe2+ was found to be thermodynamically unfavorable, suggesting the possible importance of U(V)-U(V) disproportionation as a route to U(IV). Calculations on homogeneous disproportionation, however, while yielding a stable outer-sphere U(V)-U(V) encounter complex, indicate that this electron transfer reaction is not feasible at circumneutral pH. Protonation of both axial O atoms of acceptor U(V) (i.e., by H3O+) was found to be a prerequisite to stabilize U(IV), consistent with the experimental observation that the rate of this reaction is inversely correlated with pH. Thus, despite prevailing notions that U(V) is rapidly

  14. Decrease of U(VI) Immobilization Capability of the Facultative Anaerobic Strain Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 under Anoxic Conditions Due to Strongly Reduced Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of a facultative anaerobic bacterial isolate named Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 with U(VI) were studied under oxic and anoxic conditions in order to assess the influence of the oxygen-dependent cell metabolism on microbial uranium mobilization and immobilization. We demonstrated that aerobically and anaerobically grown cells of Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 accumulate uranium from aqueous solutions under acidic conditions (pH 2 to 6), under oxic and anoxic conditions. A combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods revealed that the speciation of U(VI) associated with the cells of the strain depend on the pH as well as on the aeration conditions. At pH 2 and pH 3, uranium was exclusively bound by organic phosphate groups provided by cellular components, independently on the aeration conditions. At higher pH values, a part (pH 4.5) or the total amount (pH 6) of the dissolved uranium was precipitated under oxic conditions in a meta-autunite-like uranyl phosphate mineral phase without supplying an additional organic phosphate substrate. In contrast to that, under anoxic conditions no mineral formation was observed at pH 4.5 and pH 6, which was clearly assigned to decreased orthophosphate release by the cells. This in turn was caused by a suppression of the indigenous phosphatase activity of the strain. The results demonstrate that changes in the metabolism of facultative anaerobic microorganisms caused by the presence or absence of oxygen can decisively influence U(VI) biomineralization. PMID:25157416

  15. UVIS Earth Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Peter

    2009-07-01

    This program is an experimental path finder for Cycle 18 calibration. Visible-wavelength flat fields will be obtained by observing the dark side of the Earth during periods of full moon illumination. The observations will consist of full-frame streaked WFC3 UVIS imagery: per 22-min total exposure time in a single "dark-sky" orbit, we anticipate collecting 7000 e/pix in F606W or 4500 e/pix in F814W. To achieve Poisson S/N > 100 per pixel, we requires at least 2 orbits of F606W and 3 orbits of F814W. For UVIS narrowband filters, exposures of 1 sec typically do not saturate on the sunlit Earth, so we will take sunlit Earth flats for three of the more-commonly used narrowband filters in Cycle 17 plus the also-popular long-wavelength quad filters, for which we get four filters at once.Why not use the Sunlit Earth for the wideband visible-light filters? It is too bright in the visible for WFC3 UVIS minimum exposure time of 0.5 sec. Similarly, for NICMOS the sunlit-Earth is too bright which saturates the detector too quickly and/or induces abnormal behaviors such as super-shading {Gilmore 1998, NIC 098-011}. In the narrowband visible and broadband near-UV its not too bright {predictions in Cox et al. 1987 "Standard Astronomical Sources for HST: 6. Spatially Flat Fields." and observations in ACS Program 10050}.Other possibilities? Cox et al.'s Section II.D addresses many other possible sources for flat fields, rejecting them for a variety of reasons. A remaining possibility would be the totally eclipsed moon. Such eclipses provide approximately 2 hours {1 HST orbit} of opportunity per year, so they are too rare to be generically useful. An advantage of the moon over the Earth is that the moon subtends less than 0.25 square degree, whereas the Earth subtends a steradian or more, so scattered light and light potentially leaking around the shutter presents additional problems for the Earth. Also, we're unsure if HST can point 180 deg from the Sun.

  16. Reduction of uranium by cytochrome c3 of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Widman, P.K.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism for U(VI) reduction by Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) was investigated. The H2-dependent U(VI) reductase activity in the soluble fraction of the cells was lost when the soluble fraction was passed over a cationic exchange column which extracted cytochrome c3. Addition of cytochrome c3 back to the soluble fraction that had been passed over the cationic exchange column restored the U(VI)-reducing capacity. Reduced cytochrome c3 was oxidized by U(VI), as was a c-type cytochrome(s) in whole-cell suspensions. When cytochrome c3 was combined with hydrogenase, its physiological electron donor, U(VI) was reduced in the presence of H2. Hydrogenase alone could not reduce U(VI). Rapid U(VI) reduction was followed by a subsequent slow precipitation of the U(IV) mineral uraninite. Cytochrome c3 reduced U(VI) in a uranium-contaminated surface water and groundwater. Cytochrome c3 provides the first enzyme model for the reduction and biomineralization of uranium in sedimentary environments. Furthermore, the finding that cytochrome c3 can catalyze the reductive precipitation of uranium may aid in the development of fixed-enzyme reactors and/or organisms with enhanced U(VI)-reducing capacity for the bioremediation of uranium- contaminated waters and waste streams.

  17. WFC3 UVIS Detector Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, Heather C.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Bourque, Matthew; MacKenty, John W.; Anderson, Jay; WFC3 Team

    2015-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) in May 2000. WFC3 has two observational channels, UV/visible (UVIS) and infrared (IR); both have been performing well on-orbit. Since installation, the WFC3 team has been diligent in monitoring the performance of both detectors. The UVIS channel consists of two e2v, backside illuminated, 2Kx4K CCDs arranged in a 2x1 mosaic. We present results from some of the monitoring programs used to check various aspects of the UVIS detector. We discuss the growth trend of hot pixels and the efficacy of regular anneals in controlling the hot pixel population. We detail a pixel population with lowered-sensitivity that evolves during the time between anneals, and is largely reset by each anneal procedure. We discuss the stability of the post-flash LED lamp, used and recommended for CTE mitigation in observations with less than 12 e-/pixel backgrounds. Finally, we summarize long-term photometric trends of the UVIS detector, as well as the absolute gain measurement, used as a proxy for the on-orbit evolution of the UVIS channel.

  18. WFC3/UVIS Bowtie Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, M.; Bagget, S.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of the WFC3/UVIS bowtie monitoring program based on data acquired during SMOV/Cycle 17 through current observations of Cycle 20, spanning all on-orbit data (June 2009 - June 2013). The bowtie program serves as a periodic monitor for intermittent low-level (up to 4%) detector hysteresis, i.e. a QE decit across each UVIS CCD chip. A set of three internal flat fields is used to probe for hysteresis, neutralize any QE decits via a saturated QE 'pinning' exposure, and assess the effectiveness of the hysteresis mitigation. Image ratios involving the flat fields before and after the saturating exposure indicate that hysteresis features (1) are detectable only in the first bowtie visit after UVIS anneal procedures wherein the detector is warmed then cooled back down to operating temperature and (2) are effectively suppressed at all times, ensuring that science observations are not compromised by QE offsets. For the first time on-orbit, a bowtie-shaped hysteresis pattern, for which the program is named, was observed following the August 2012 UVIS anneal; to date, this incident has been a one-time anomalous event on-orbit. A by-product of the bowtie monitoring data is the discovery of a slow decrease in flux level over time, currently about 0.19+/-0.01%/yr. Assuming the decline is due solely to the aging of the lamp, the lamp output is currently at 98% of its original level.

  19. Long-term diffusion of U(VI) in bentonite: Dependence on density

    DOE PAGES

    Joseph, Claudia; Mibus, Jens; Trepte, Paul; ...

    2016-10-12

    As a contribution to the safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories, U(VI) diffusion through the potential buffer material MX-80 bentonite was investigated at three clay dry densities over six years. Synthetic MX-80 model pore water was used as background electrolyte. Speciation calculations showed that Ca 2UO 2(CO 3) 3(aq) was the main U(VI) species. The in- and out-diffusion of U(VI) was investigated separately. U(VI) diffused about 3 mm, 1.5 mm, and 1 mm into the clay plug at ρ = 1.3, 1.6, and 1.9 g/cm 3, respectively. No through-diffusion of the U(VI) tracer was observed. However, leaching of natural uraniummore » contained in the clay occurred and uranium was detected in all receiving reservoirs. As expected, the effective and apparent diffusion coefficients, D e and D a, decreased with increasing dry density. The D a values for the out-diffusion of natural U(VI) were in good agreement with previously determined values. Surprisingly, D a values for the in-diffusion of U(VI) were about two orders of magnitude lower than values obtained in short-term in-diffusion experiments reported in the literature. Some potential reasons for this behavior that were evaluated are changes of the U(VI) speciation within the clay (precipitation, reduction) or changes of the clay porosity and pore connectivity with time. By applying Archie's law and the extended Archie's law, it was estimated that a significantly smaller effective porosity must be present for the long-term in-diffusion of U(VI). Finally, the results suggest that long-term studies of key transport phenomena may reveal additional processes that can directly impact long-term repository safety assessments.« less

  20. Long-term diffusion of U(VI) in bentonite: Dependence on density.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Claudia; Mibus, Jens; Trepte, Paul; Müller, Christa; Brendler, Vinzenz; Park, Dan M; Jiao, Yongqin; Kersting, Annie B; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2017-01-01

    As a contribution to the safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories, U(VI) diffusion through the potential buffer material MX-80 bentonite was investigated at three clay dry densities over six years. Synthetic MX-80 model pore water was used as background electrolyte. Speciation calculations showed that Ca 2 UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 (aq) was the main U(VI) species. The in- and out-diffusion of U(VI) was investigated separately. U(VI) diffused about 3mm, 1.5mm, and 1mm into the clay plug at ρ=1.3, 1.6, and 1.9g/cm 3 , respectively. No through-diffusion of the U(VI) tracer was observed. However, leaching of natural uranium contained in the clay occurred and uranium was detected in all receiving reservoirs. As expected, the effective and apparent diffusion coefficients, D e and D a , decreased with increasing dry density. The D a values for the out-diffusion of natural U(VI) were in good agreement with previously determined values. Surprisingly, D a values for the in-diffusion of U(VI) were about two orders of magnitude lower than values obtained in short-term in-diffusion experiments reported in the literature. Some potential reasons for this behavior that were evaluated are changes of the U(VI) speciation within the clay (precipitation, reduction) or changes of the clay porosity and pore connectivity with time. By applying Archie's law and the extended Archie's law, it was estimated that a significantly smaller effective porosity must be present for the long-term in-diffusion of U(VI). The results suggest that long-term studies of key transport phenomena may reveal additional processes that can directly impact long-term repository safety assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. UVIS CTE Monitor: Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noeske, Kai

    2010-09-01

    *** NOTE 2: 2ND CHANGE MAR 26 2011: VISIT 13 HAD FAILED. APPROVED FOR REPETITION. ****** NEW VISIT 14 IS IDENTICAL TO FORMER VISIT 13, WITH EXCEPTIONS THAT SOME SUBEXPOSURES ARE REMOVED. ****** SEE OBSERVING DESCRIPTION FOR DETAILS. ****** NOTE: THIS IS A CHANGED PHASE II PROPOSAL AFTER VISITS 1,2,7 HAD BEEN EXECUTED ****** CHANGES BECAME NECESSARY AFTER ANALYSIS OF INCOMING CALIBRATION DATA FROM 12379 AND 12348 ****** THIS REVISED PHASE II {submission 14FEB2011} ADDS THE EVALUATION OF CHARGE INJECTION***The changes amount to:1} dropping the 3rd epoch {August 2011} of external CTE monitoring {3 orbits}2} simplifying the CTE monitor observations in the second epoch {March 2011}, freeing up 1 orbit3} using the freed up orbits from 1} and 2}, together with two additional external orbits that we were granted, to thoroughly assess the data quality of charge - injected data under realistic observing setups.These charge-injected observations will be obtained during the 2nd epoch of the CTE monitor program, in the March 2011 window.------ Original Text prior to 14 Feb 2011 below this line -----------This program extends the Cycle 17 external CTE calibration {CAL/WFC3 ID 11924} program for WFC3/UVIS over Cycle 18. Targets are {i} the sparse cluster NGC 6791 observed in Cycle 17, to continue a consistent set of observations that allows to isolate the time evolution of the CTE, and {ii} a denser field in 47 Tuc {NGC 104}. The latter will provide data to measure the dependence of the CTE on field crowding. It will also provide a consistent comparison between the CTE evolution of WFC3/UVIS and that of ACS/WFC at the same time into the flight {1 year}, because ACS/WFC CTE data were based on 47 Tuc observations. Additional observations of 47 Tuc in the CVZ will provide a wide range of background levels to measure the background dependence of the UVIS CTE.Goals are {i} the continued monitoring of the time evolution of the WFC3/UVIS CTE, {ii} establishing the detector X

  2. WFC3/UVIS image skew

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Larry

    2009-07-01

    This proposal will provide an independent check of the skew in the ACS astrometric catalog of Omega Cen stars, using exposures taken in a 45-deg range of telescope roll. The roll sequence will also provide a test for orbital variation of skew and field angle dependent PSF variations. The astrometric catalog of Omega Cen, improved for a skew, will be used to derive the geometric distorion to all UVIS filters, which has preliminarily been determined from F606W images and an astrometric catalog of 47 Tuc.

  3. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C.; Tokuda, Joshua M.; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation. PMID:24297896

  4. Fate of Adsorbed U(VI) during Sulfidization of Lepidocrocite and Hematite

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The impact on U(VI) adsorbed to lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) was assessed when exposed to aqueous sulfide (S(-II)aq) at pH 8.0. With both minerals, competition between S(-II) and U(VI) for surface sites caused instantaneous release of adsorbed U(VI). Compared to lepidocrocite, consumption of S(-II)aq proceeded slower with hematite, but yielded maximum dissolved U concentrations that were more than 10 times higher, representing about one-third of the initially adsorbed U. Prolonged presence of S(-II)aq in experiments with hematite in combination with a larger release of adsorbed U(VI), enhanced the reduction of U(VI): after 24 h of reaction about 60–70% of U was in the form of U(IV), much higher than the 25% detected in the lepidocrocite suspensions. X-ray absorption spectra indicated that U(IV) in both hematite and lepidocrocite suspensions was not in the form of uraninite (UO2). Upon exposure to oxygen only part of U(IV) reoxidized, suggesting that monomeric U(IV) might have become incorporated in newly formed iron precipitates. Hence, sulfidization of Fe oxides can have diverse consequences for U mobility: in short-term, desorption of U(VI) increases U mobility, while reduction to U(IV) and its possible incorporation in Fe transformation products may lead to long-term U immobilization. PMID:28121137

  5. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  6. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggestedmore » the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.« less

  7. Bicarbonate impact on U(VI) bioreduction in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Chris; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al., 2003; Williams et al., 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al., 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer sediments desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ∼3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction in the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in

  8. Fe(III) reduction activity and cytochrome content of Shewanella putrefaciens grown on ten compounds as sole terminal electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Blakeney, M D; Moulaei, T; DiChristina, T J

    2000-07-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens was grown on a series of ten alternate compounds as sole terminal electron acceptor. Each cell type was analyzed for Fe(III) reduction activity, absorbance maxima in reduced-minus-oxidized difference spectra and heme-containing protein content. High-rate Fe(III) reduction activity, pronounced difference maxima at 521 and 551 nm and a predominant 29.3 kDa heme-containing protein expressed by cells grown on Fe(III), Mn(IV), U(VI), SO3(2-) and S2O3(2-), but not by cells grown on O2, NO3, NO2-, TMAO or fumarate. These results suggest that microbial Fe(III) reduction activity is enhanced by anaerobic growth on metals and sulfur compounds, yet is limited under all other terminal electron-accepting conditions.

  9. Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U(IV) nanoprecipitates on the magnetite (111) surface.

    PubMed

    Singer, David M; Chatman, Shawn M; Ilton, Eugene S; Rosso, Kevin M; Banfield, Jillian F; Waychunas, Glenn A

    2012-04-03

    Sequestration of uranium (U) by magnetite is a potentially important sink for U in natural and contaminated environments. However, molecular-scale controls that favor U(VI) uptake including both adsorption of U(VI) and reduction to U(IV) by magnetite remain poorly understood, in particular, the role of U(VI)-CO(3)-Ca complexes in inhibiting U(VI) reduction. To investigate U uptake pathways on magnetite as a function of U(VI) aqueous speciation, we performed batch sorption experiments on (111) surfaces of natural single crystals under a range of solution conditions (pH 5 and 10; 0.1 mM U(VI); 1 mM NaNO(3); and with or without 0.5 mM CO(3) and 0.1 mM Ca) and characterized surface-associated U using grazing incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GI-EXAFS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the absence of both carbonate ([CO(3)](T), denoted here as CO(3)) and calcium (Ca), or in the presence of CO(3) only, coexisting adsorption of U(VI) surface species and reduction to U(IV) occurs at both pH 5 and 10. In the presence of both Ca and CO(3), only U(VI) adsorption (VI) occurs. When U reduction occurs, nanoparticulate UO(2) forms only within and adjacent to surface microtopographic features such as crystal boundaries and cracks. This result suggests that U reduction is limited to defect-rich surface regions. Further, at both pH 5 and 10 in the presence of both CO(3) and Ca, U(VI)-CO(3)-Ca ternary surface species develop and U reduction is inhibited. These findings extend the range of conditions under which U(VI)-CO(3)-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction.

  10. Reduction of uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility that sulfate-reducing microorganisms contribute to U(VI) reduction in sedimentary environments was investigated. U(VI) was reduced to U(IV) when washed cells of sulfate-grown Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were suspended in a bicarbonate buffer with lactate or H2 as the electron donor. There was no U(VI) reduction in the absence of an electron donor or when the cells were killed by heat prior to the incubation. The rates of U(VI) reduction were comparable to those in respiratory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms. Azide or prior exposure of the cells to air did not affect the ability of D. desulfuricans to reduce U(VI). Attempts to grow D. desulfuricans with U(VI) as the electron acceptor were unsuccessful. U(VI) reduction resulted in the extracellular precipitation of the U(IV) mineral uraninite. The presence of sulfate had no effect on the rate of U(VI) reduction. Sulfate and U(VI) were reduced simultaneously. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) by D. desulfuricans was much faster than nonenzymatic reduction of U(VI) by sulfide, even when cells of D. desulfuricans were added to provide a potential catalytic surface for the nonenzymatic reaction. The results indicate that enzymatic U(VI) reduction by sulfate-reducing microorganisms may be responsible for the accumulation of U(IV) in sulfidogenic environments. Furthermore, since the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) precipitates uranium from solution, D. desulfuricans might be a useful organisms for recovering uranium from contaminated waters and waste streams.

  11. Photometric Repeatability of Scanned Imagery: UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Clare E.; McCullough, Peter; Baggett, Sylvia

    2017-08-01

    We provide the preliminary results of a study on the photometric repeatability of spatial scans of bright, isolated white dwarf stars with the UVIS channel of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We analyze straight-line scans from the first pair of identical orbits of HST program 14878 to assess if sub 0.1% repeatability can be attained with WFC3/UVIS. This study is motivated by the desire to achieve better signal-to-noise in the UVIS contamination and stability monitor, in which observations of standard stars in staring mode have been taken from the installation of WFC3 in 2009 to the present to assess temporal photometric stability. Higher signal to noise in this program would greatly benefit the sensitivity to detect contamination, and to better characterize the observed small throughput drifts over time. We find excellent repeatability between identical visits of program 14878, with sub 0.1% repeatability achieved in most filters. These! results support the initiative to transition the staring mode UVIS contamination and photometric stability monitor from staring mode images to spatial scans.

  12. Microbial reduction of uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Gorby, Y.A.; Landa, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    REDUCTION of the soluble, oxidized form of uranium, U(VI), to insoluble U(IV) is an important mechanism for the immobilization of uranium in aquatic sediments and for the formation of some uranium ores1-10. U(VI) reduction has generally been regarded as an abiological reaction in which sulphide, molecular hydrogen or organic compounds function as the reductant1,2,5,11. Microbial involvement in U(VI) reduction has been considered to be limited to indirect effects, such as microbial metabolism providing the reduced compounds for abiological U(VI) reduction and microbial cell walls providing a surface to stimulate abiological U(VI) reduction1,12,13. We report here, however, that dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can obtain energy for growth by electron transport to U(VI). This novel form of microbial metabolism can be much faster than commonly cited abiological mechanisms for U(VI) reduction. Not only do these findings expand the known potential terminal electron acceptors for microbial energy transduction, they offer a likely explanation for the deposition of uranium in aquatic sediments and aquifers, and suggest a method for biological remediation of environments contaminated with uranium.

  13. Potential for Methanosarcina to Contribute to Uranium Reduction during Acetate-Promoted Groundwater Bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dawn E; Orelana, Roberto; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Wang, Li-Ying; Shrestha, Pravin; Williams, Kenneth; Lovley, Derek R; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2018-03-02

    Previous studies of acetate-promoted bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers focused on Geobacter because no other microorganisms that can couple the oxidation of acetate with U(VI) reduction had been detected in situ. Monitoring the levels of methyl CoM reductase subunit A (mcrA) transcripts during an acetate-injection field experiment demonstrated that acetoclastic methanogens from the genus Methanosarcina were enriched after 40 days of acetate amendment. The increased abundance of Methanosarcina corresponded with an accumulation of methane in the groundwater. In order to determine whether Methanosarcina species could be participating in U(VI) reduction in the subsurface, cell suspensions of Methanosarcina barkeri were incubated in the presence of U(VI) with acetate provided as the electron donor. U(VI) was reduced by metabolically active M. barkeri cells; however, no U(VI) reduction was observed in inactive controls. These results demonstrate that Methanosarcina species could play an important role in the long-term bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers after depletion of Fe(III) oxides limits the growth of Geobacter species. The results also suggest that Methanosarcina have the potential to influence uranium geochemistry in a diversity of anaerobic sedimentary environments.

  14. Diffusion of U(VI) in Opalinus Clay: Influence of temperature and humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, C.; Van Loon, L. R.; Jakob, A.; Steudtner, R.; Schmeide, K.; Sachs, S.; Bernhard, G.

    2013-05-01

    activation energy for the diffusion of U(VI) through Opalinus Clay of 10 kJ/mol was calculated. The observed increased Kd and De values for U(VI)aqueous at 60 °C compensated each other to almost equal values of the apparent diffusion coefficient Da at 25 and 60 °C. Hence, an elevated temperature of 60 °C does not impact the migration of U(VI) through OPA significantly.

  15. Reduction kinetics of aqueous U(VI) in acidic chloride brines to uraninite by methane, hydrogen or C-graphite under hydrothermal conditions: Implications for the genesis of unconformity-related uranium ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargent, Maxime; Truche, Laurent; Dubessy, Jean; Bessaque, Gilles; Marmier, Hervé

    2015-10-01

    The formation of hydrothermal uranium ore deposits involves the reduction of dissolved U(VI)(aq) to uraninite. However, the nature of the reducing agent and the kinetics of such a process are currently unknown. These questions are addressed through dedicated experiments performed under conditions relevant for the genesis of unconformity-related uranium (URU) deposits. We tested the efficiency of the following potential reductants supposed to be involved in the reaction: H2, CH4, C-graphite and dissolved Fe(II). Results demonstrate the great efficiency of H2, CH4 and C-graphite to reduce U(VI)(aq) into uraninite in acidic chloride brines, unlike dissolved Fe(II). Times needed for H2 (1.4 bar), CH4 (2.4 bar) and C-graphite (water/carbon mass ratio = 10) to reduce 1 mM of U(VI)(aq) in an acidic brine (1 m LiCl, pH ≈ 1 fixed by HCl) to uraninite at 200 °C are 12 h, 3 days and 4 months, respectively. The effects of temperature (T) between 100 °C and 200 °C, H2 partial pressure (0.14, 1.4, and 5.4 bar), salinity (0.1, 1 and 3.2 m LiCl) and pH at 25 °C (0.8 and 3.3) on the reduction rate were also investigated. Results show that increasing temperature and H2 partial pressure increase the reaction rate, whereas increasing salinity or pH have the reverse effect. The reduction of uranyl to uraninite follows an apparent zero-order with respect to time, whatever the considered electron donor. From the measured rate constants, the following values of activation energy (Ea), depending on the nature of the electron donor, have been derived: EaC-graphite = 155 ± 3 kJ mol-1, EaCH4 = 143 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and EaH2 = 124 ± 15 kJ mol-1 at T < 150 °C and 32 ± 6 kJ mol-1 at T > 150 °C. An empirical relationship between the reaction rate, the hydrogen partial pressure, the uranyl speciation, and the temperature is also proposed. This allows an estimation of the time of formation of a giant U ore deposit such as McArthur River (Canada). The duration of the mineralizing event is

  16. Comparing different Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation observations using modeling of water vapor jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Hansen, Candice; Aye, Klaus-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Motivation: On March 11, 2016 the Cassini UVIS observed its 6th star occultation by Enceladus' plume. This observation was aimed to determine variability in the total gas flux from the Enceladus' southern polar region. The analysis of the received data suggests that the total gas flux is moderately increased comparing to the average gas flux observed by UVIS from 2005 to 2011 [1]. However, UVIS detected variability in individual jets. In particular, Baghdad 1 is more collimated in 2016 than in 2005, meaning its gas escapes at higher velocity.Model and fits: We use 3D DSMC model for water vapor jets to compare different UVIS occultation observations from 2005 to 2016. The model traces test articles from jets' sources [2] into space and results in coordinates and velocities for a set of test particles. We convert particle positions into the particle number density and integrate along UVIS line of sight (LoS) for each time step of the UVIS observation using precise observational geometry derived from SPICE [3]. We integrate all jets that are crossed by the LoS and perform constrained least-squares fit of resulting modeled opacities to the observed data to solved for relative strengths of jets. The geometry of each occultation is specific, for example, during solar occultation in 2010 UVIS LoS was almost parallel to tiger stripes, which made it possible to distinguish jets venting from different tiger stripes. In 2011 Eps Orionis occultation LoS was perpendicular to tiger stripes and thus many of the jets were geometrically overlapping. Solar occultation provided us with the largest inventory of active jets - our model fit detects at least 43 non-zero jet contributions. Stellar occultations generally have lower temporal resolution and observe only a sub-set of these jets: 2011 Eps Orionis needs minimum 25 non-zero jets to fit UVIS data. We will discuss different occultations and models fits, including the most recent Epsilon Orionis occultation of 2016.[1] Hansen et al

  17. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuatorsmore » in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.« less

  18. U(VI) behaviour in hyperalkaline calcite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kurt F.; Bryan, Nicholas D.; Swinburne, Adam N.; Bots, Pieter; Shaw, Samuel; Natrajan, Louise S.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.; Livens, Francis R.; Morris, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of U(VI) in hyperalkaline fluid/calcite systems was studied over a range of U(VI) concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM to 42.0 μM) and in two high pH systems, young and old synthetic cement leachate in batch sorption experiments. These systems were selected to be representative of young- (pH 13.3) and old-stage (pH 10.5) leachate evolution within a cementitious geological disposal facility. Batch sorption experiments, modelling, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, electron microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering and luminescence spectroscopy were used to define the speciation of U(VI) across the systems of study. At the lowest concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM 232U(VI)) significant U removal was observed for both old and young cement leachates, and this was successfully modelled using a first order kinetic adsorption modelling approach. At higher concentrations (>4.20 μM) in the young cement leachate, U(VI) showed no interaction with the calcite surface over an 18 month period. Small angle X-ray scattering techniques indicated that at high U concentrations (42.0 μM) and after 18 months, the U(VI) was present in a colloidal form which had little interaction with the calcite surface and consisted of both primary and aggregated particles with a radius of 7.6 ± 1.1 and 217 ± 24 Å, respectively. In the old cement leachate, luminescence spectroscopy identified two surface binding sites for U(VI) on calcite: in the system with 0.21 μM U(VI), a liebigite-like Ca2UO2(CO3)3 surface complex was identified; at higher U(VI) concentrations (0.42 μM), a second binding site of undetermined coordination was identified. At elevated U(VI) concentrations (>2.10 μM) in old cement leachate, both geochemical data and luminescence spectroscopy suggested that surface mediated precipitation was controlling U(VI) behaviour. A focused ion beam mill was used to create a section across the U(VI) precipitate-calcite interface. Transmission electron

  19. Active Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depuru-Mohan, N. K.; Doty, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Jet noise is often a dominant component of aircraft noise, particularly at takeoff. To meet the stringent noise regulations, the aircraft industry is in a pressing need of advanced noise reduction concepts. In the present study, the potential of piezoelectrically-activated chevrons for jet noise reduction was experimentally investigated. The perturbations near the nozzle exit caused by piezoelectrically-activated chevrons could be used to modify the growth rate of the mixing layer and thereby potentially reduce jet noise. These perturbations are believed to increase the production of small-scale disturbances at the expense of large-scale turbulent structures. These large-scale turbulent structures are responsible for the dominant portion of the jet mixing noise, particularly low-frequency noise. Therefore, by exciting the static chevron geometry through piezoelectric actuators, an additional acoustic benefit could possibly be achieved. To aid in the initial implementation of this concept, several flat-faced faceted nozzles (four, six, and eight facets) were investigated. Among the faceted nozzles, it was found that the eight-faceted nozzle behaves very similarly to the round nozzle. Furthermore, among the faceted nozzles with static chevrons, the four-faceted nozzle with static chevrons was found to be most effective in terms of jet noise reduction. The piezoelectrically-activated chevrons reduced jet noise up to 2 dB compared to the same nozzle geometry without excitation. This benefit was observed over a wide range of excitation frequencies by applying very low voltages to the piezoelectric actuators.

  20. Enceladus Plume Morphology and Variability from UVIS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Candice; Esposito, Larry; Colwell, Josh; Hendrix, Amanda; Portyankina, Ganna

    2017-10-01

    The Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on the Cassini spacecraft has been observing Enceladus’ plume and its effect on the Saturnian environment since 2004. One solar and 7 stellar occultations have been observed between 2005 and 2017. On 27 March 2017 epsilon Canis Majoris (CMa) passed behind the plume of water vapor spewing from Enceladus’ tiger stripe fissures. With this occultation we have 6 cuts through the plume at a variety of orientations over 12 years. Following our standard procedure the column density along the line of sight from Enceladus to the star was determined and the water flux calculated [1]. The mean anomaly was 131, well away from the dust flux peak associated with Enceladus at an orbital longitude near apoapsis [2]. We find that the water vapor flux was ~160 kg/sec (this number will be refined when the final reconstructed trajectory is available). That puts it “in family” with the other occultations, with values that cluster around 200 kg/sec. It is at the low end, which may be consistent with the drop in particle output observed over the last decade [3]. UVIS results show that the supersonic collimated gas jets imbedded in the plume are the likely source of the variability in dust output [4], rather than overall flux from the tiger stripes. An occultation of epsilon Orionis was observed on 11 March 2016 when Enceladus was at a mean anomaly of 208. Although the bulk flux changed little the amount of water vapor coming from the Baghdad I supersonic jet increased by 25% relative to 2011. The Baghdad I jet was observed again in the 2017 epsilon CMa occultation, and the column density is half that of 2016, further bolstering the conclusion that the gas jets change output as a function of orbital longitude. UVIS results describing gas flux, jets, and general structure of the plume, the observables above the surface, are key to testing hypotheses for what is driving Enceladus’ eruptive activity below the surface. [1] Hansen, C. J. et

  1. WFC3 Ambient-2 Testing: UVIS Readnoise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, S.

    2007-05-01

    The WFC3 UVIS readnoise levels have been measured using recent ambient-level data obtained with the integrated instrument in the Space Systems Development and Integration Facility (SSDIF) clean room at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The UVIS-2 detector was in place, operating at -54C. Under these conditions, the readnoise levels in full-frame, four-amp bias image readouts, using a gain level of 1.5 e-/DN, are 3.1, 3.2, 2.8, and 3.1 e- for amps A,B,C, and D, respectively; errors are <0.1 e-. Application of the measured UVIS-2 gain values will increase the values by 3-10%, depending upon the specific amp. The readnoise has been measured in bias frames using the overscan region and the science area pixels; both methods yield effectively the same result. The overscan method has also been applied to non-bias images; the resulting readnoise levels differed from the bias frame results by 1-6% (0.02 to 0.2 e-), usually higher in the non-bias frames but not always. The readnoise in subarray images has also been evaluated; in 200x200 pixel subarray biases, the levels are slightly lower in amps A,B, and D (by ~0.02-0.15 e-) and slightly higher in amp C (~0.04e-) compared to the full-frame biases. Finally, an ambient superbias has been constructed from a stack of all good, full-frame, four-amp bias frames and its characteristics are described. There is some low-level systematic behavior to the noise in quadrant B: the bias level is slightly higher in odd-numbered columns than in even-numbered columns (~0.2 e- peak to peak). If this characteristic persists in images taken during the upcoming thermal vacuum tests and is found to vary with time, the pipeline algorithms could be modified to provide a column-dependent overscan correction.

  2. Astrometric Correction for WFC3/UVIS Lithographic-Mask Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhurina-Platais, V.; Hammer, D.; Dencheva, N.; Hack, W.

    2013-07-01

    Observations of the central field in Cen taken with large dither patterns and over a large range of HST roll-angles exposed through F606W UVIS filter hav e been used to examine the lithographic-mask pattern imprinted on the WFC3/UVIS detec tor during the manufacturing process. This detector defect introduces fine-scale astrome tric errors at the level of about 0.2 pixel with a complicated spatial structure across the WFC3/ UVIS CCD chips. The fine-scale solution was utilized to construct a 2-D look-up table for co rrection of the WFC3/UVIS lithographic-mask pattern. The astrometric errors due to th is detector defect have been cor- rected down to the ~ 0.05 pixel level. The derived 2-D look-up table can be interpol ated at any point in the WFC3/UVIS image by ST software DrizzlePac / AstroDrizzle. The main results of these calibrations are: 1) new polynomial coefficien ts of geometric distortion for 14 calibrated UVIS filters in the form of Instrument Distortion Co rrection Table (IDCTAB file) were improved to account for the lithographic-mask pattern i n the WFC3/UVIS detector; 2) new derived look-up table in the form of a D2IMFILE, which sig nificantly improves (30-60%) the fine-scale structure in the WFC3/UVIS geometric distorti on; 3) geometric distortion cou- pled with the D2IMFILE and new improved IDCTAB can now be succ essfully corrected to the precision level of ~ 0.05 pixel (2 mas) for the UVIS detector.

  3. Global Transcriptional Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 during Cr(VI) and U(VI) Reduction†

    PubMed Central

    Bencheikh-Latmani, Rizlan; Williams, Sarah Middleton; Haucke, Lisa; Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2005-01-01

    Whole-genome DNA microarrays were used to examine the gene expression profile of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 during U(VI) and Cr(VI) reduction. The same control, cells pregrown with nitrate and incubated with no electron acceptor, was used for the two time points considered and for both metals. U(VI)-reducing conditions resulted in the upregulation (≥3-fold) of 121 genes, while 83 genes were upregulated under Cr(VI)-reducing conditions. A large fraction of the genes upregulated [34% for U(VI) and 29% for Cr(VI)] encode hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Genes encoding proteins known to reduce alternative electron acceptors [fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, Mn(IV), or soluble Fe(III)] were upregulated under both U(VI)- and Cr(VI)-reducing conditions. The involvement of these upregulated genes in the reduction of U(VI) and Cr(VI) was tested using mutants lacking one or several of the gene products. Mutant testing confirmed the involvement of several genes in the reduction of both metals: mtrA, mtrB, mtrC, and menC, all of which are involved in Fe(III) citrate reduction by MR-1. Genes encoding efflux pumps were upregulated under Cr(VI)- but not under U(VI)-reducing conditions. Genes encoding proteins associated with general (e.g., groL and dnaJ) and membrane (e.g., pspBC) stress were also upregulated, particularly under U(VI)-reducing conditions, pointing to membrane damage by the solid-phase reduced U(IV) and Cr(III) and/or the direct effect of the oxidized forms of the metals. This study sheds light on the multifaceted response of MR-1 to U(VI) and Cr(VI) under anaerobic conditions and suggests that the same electron transport pathway can be used for more than one electron acceptor. PMID:16269787

  4. Influence of calcium on microbial reduction of solid phase uranium(VI).

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M; Wang, Zheming

    2007-08-15

    The effect of calcium on the dissolution and microbial reduction of a representative solid phase uranyl [U(VI)], sodium boltwoodite (NaUO(2)SiO(3)OH . 1.5H(2)O), was investigated to evaluate the rate-limiting step of microbial reduction of the solid phase U(VI). Microbial reduction experiments were performed in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, in a bicarbonate medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 6.8 buffered with PIPES. Calcium increased the rate of Na-boltwoodite dissolution and U(VI) bioavailability by increasing its solubility through the formation of a ternary aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate species. The ternary species, however, decreased the rates of microbial reduction of aqueous U(VI). Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) collectively revealed that microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) was a sequentially coupled process of Na-boltwoodite dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) to U(IV) that accumulated on bacterial surfaces/periplasm. Under studied experimental conditions, the overall rate of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) was limited by U(VI) dissolution reactions in solutions without calcium and limited by microbial reduction in solutions with calcium. Generally, the overall rate of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) was determined by the coupling of solid phase U(VI) dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) that were all affected by calcium. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Detecting collisions and dust in Saturn's F ring from diffraction signatures in Cassini UVIS solar occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. M.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Attree, N.; Murray, C.

    2017-12-01

    We analyzed 11 solar occultations by Saturn's F ring observed by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on Cassini. During four of these occultations we detected an unambiguous signal from diffracted sunlight. This signal appears as additional photon counts above the unocculted solar signal just before or after the occultation occurred. We compared the UVIS data with images of the F ring obtained by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and found that the ISS images showed collisional activity at each of the F ring longitudes where the diffraction signatures were detected. Furthermore, the ISS images revealed a quiescent region of the F ring at locations where diffraction signatures were conclusively not detected in the UVIS data. The strongest example of this correlation occurred in 2007, when UVIS serendipitously observed an occultation by a region of the F ring that had suffered a large collisional event several months prior (Murray, C.D. et al. [2008]. Nature 453, 739-744). The observation resulted in the detection of one of the most prominent diffraction signatures. We applied a forward model of the solar occultations to reproduce the observed UVIS light curves, varying the particle size distribution, optical depth, and radial width of the F ring. We found that the models that best reproduced the observations with a diffraction signature required a smaller effective particle size (aeff < 300 microns), while light curves without a diffraction signature were best reproduced using models with a larger effective particle size (aeff > 400 microns). We report that the diffraction signatures detected in the UVIS occultation data are indicative of recent collisional activity in the F ring, resulting in the release of a population of smaller (< 50 microns) ring particles.

  6. Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) Programme - 12397

    SciTech Connect

    Pether, Colin; Carrol, Phil; Birkett, Eddie

    2012-07-01

    Waste material from the reprocessing of irradiated fuel has been stored under water for several decades leading to the water becoming highly radioactive. As a critical enabler to the decommissioning strategy for the Sellafield site, the Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) programme has been established to provide a processing route for this highly radioactive liquor. This paper reviews the progress that has been made since the start of routine LAR transfer cycles (July 2010) and follows on from the earlier paper presented at WM2011. The paper focuses on the learning from the first full year of routine LAR transfer cycles andmore » the application of this learning to the wider strategies for the treatment of further radioactive liquid effluents on the Sellafield site. During this period over 100,000 Curies of radioactivity has been safely removed and treated. The past year has witnessed the very successful introduction of the LAR programme. This has lead to hazard reduction at MSSS and demonstration that the SIXEP facility can meet the significantly increased challenge that the LAR programme represents. Part of the success has been the ability to predict and deliver a realistic production schedule with the availability of the MSSS, EDT and SIXEP facilities being central to this. Most importantly, the LAR programme has been successful in bringing together key stakeholders to deliver this work while integrating with the existing, day to day, demands of the Sellafield site. (authors)« less

  7. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) on granite.

    PubMed

    Fan, Q H; Hao, L M; Wang, C L; Zheng, Z; Liu, C L; Wu, W S

    2014-03-01

    The effects of pH, counter ions and temperature on the adsorption of U(VI) on Beishan granite (BsG) were investigated in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA). The adsorption edge of U(VI) on BsG suggested that U(VI) adsorption was mainly controlled by ion exchange and outer-sphere complexation at low pH, whereas inner-sphere complex was the dominant adsorption species in the pH range of 4.0-9.0. Above pH 9.0, Na2U2O7 might play an important role in the rise of U(VI) adsorption again. Counter ions such as Cl(-), SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) can provoke U(VI) adsorption on BsG to some extent, which was directly correlated to the complexing ability of U(VI)-ligand. More noticeably, the large enhancement of U(VI) adsorption in the presence of phosphate can be attributed to the ternary complex formation (BsG-PO4-UO2), precipitation ((UO2)3(PO4)2(s)) and secondary phase (Na-autunite). Both FA and HA can slightly increase U(VI) adsorption at low pH, whereas they strongly inhibited U(VI) adsorption at high pH range. Artificial synthesized granite (AsG) prepared in the laboratory is impossible to use as an analogue of natural granite because of the large difference in the adsorption and surface properties.

  8. International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodroci, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the ISS requirements and initial design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to reduce risk -- given the determination and commitment to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS. While decades of work went into developing the ISS requirements, there are many things in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: (1) Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) (2) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity Level 4 materials, emergency hardware and procedures) (3) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards) Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of nearly a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery.

  9. Active aerodynamic drag reduction on morphable cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, M.; Reis, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    We study a mechanism for active aerodynamic drag reduction on morphable grooved cylinders, whose topography can be modified pneumatically. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the Saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea), which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. Our analog experimental samples comprise a spoked rigid skeleton with axial cavities, covered by a stretched elastomeric film. Decreasing the inner pressure of the sample produces axial grooves, whose depth can be accurately varied, on demand. First, we characterize the relation between groove depth and pneumatic loading through a combination of precision mechanical experiments and finite element simulations. Second, wind tunnel tests are used to measure the aerodynamic drag coefficient (as a function of Reynolds number) of the grooved samples, with different levels of periodicity and groove depths. We focus specifically on the drag crisis and systematically measure the associated minimum drag coefficient and the critical Reynolds number at which it occurs. The results are in agreement with the classic literature of rough cylinders, albeit with an unprecedented level of precision and resolution in varying topography using a single sample. Finally, we leverage the morphable nature of our system to dynamically reduce drag for varying aerodynamic loading conditions. We demonstrate that actively controlling the groove depth yields a drag coefficient that decreases monotonically with Reynolds number and is significantly lower than the fixed sample counterparts. These findings open the possibility for the drag reduction of grooved cylinders to be operated over a wide range of flow conditions.

  10. Cryogenic laser induced U(VI) fluorescence studies of a U(VI) substituted natural calcite: implications to U(VI) speciation in contaminated Hanford sediments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M; Mckinley, James P; Smith, Steven C

    2005-04-15

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and imaging spectromicroscopy (TRLFISM) were used to examine the chemical speciation of uranyl in contaminated subsurface sediments from the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Spectroscopic measurements for contaminant U(VI) were compared to those from a natural, uranyl-bearing calcite (NUC) that had been found via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to include uranyl in the same coordination environment as calcium. Spectral deconvolution of TRLFS measurements on the NUC revealed the unexpected presence of two distinct chemical environments consistent with published spectra of U(VI)-substituted synthetic calcite and aragonite. Apparently, some U(VI) substitution sites in calcite distorted to exhibit a local, more energetically favorable aragonite structure. TRLFS measurements of the Hanford sediments NP4-1 and NP1-6 were similar to the NUC in terms of peak positions and intensity, despite a small CaCO3 content (1.0 to 3.2 mass %). Spectral deconvolution of the sediments revealed the presence of U(VI) in calcite and aragonite structural environments. A third, unidentified U(VI) species was also present in the NP1-6 sediment. TRLFISM measurements at multiple locations in the different sediments displayed only minor variation, indicating a uniform speciation pattern. Collectively, the measurements implied that waste U(VI), long-resident beneath the sampled disposal pond (32 y), had coprecipitated within carbonates. These findings have major implications for the solubility and fate of contaminant U(VI).

  11. Simultaneous reduction of arsenic(V) and uranium(VI) by mackinawite: role of uranyl arsenate precipitate formation.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Lyndsay D; Tang, Yuanzhi; Borch, Thomas

    2014-12-16

    Uranium (U) and arsenic (As) often occur together naturally and, as a result, can be co-contaminants at sites of uranium mining and processing, yet few studies have examined the simultaneous redox dynamics of U and As. This study examines the influence of arsenate (As(V)) on the reduction of uranyl (U(VI)) by the redox-active mineral mackinawite (FeS). As(V) was added to systems containing 47 or 470 μM U(VI) at concentrations ranging from 0 to 640 μM. In the absence of As(V), U was completely removed from solution and fully reduced to nano-uraninite (nano-UO2). While the addition of As(V) did not reduce U uptake, at As(V) concentrations above 320 μM, the reduction of U(VI) was limited due to the formation of a trögerite-like uranyl arsenate precipitate. The presence of U also significantly inhibited As(V) reduction. While less U(VI) reduction to nano-UO2 may take place in systems with high As(V) concentrations, formation of trögerite-like mineral phases may be an acceptable reclamation end point due to their high stability under oxic conditions.

  12. Anaerobic bioremediation of hexavalent uranium in groundwater by reductive precipitation with methanogenic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rodriguez, Aida; Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2010-04-01

    Uranium has been responsible for extensive contamination of groundwater due to releases from mill tailings and other uranium processing waste. Past evidence has confirmed that certain bacteria can enzymatically reduce soluble hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) to insoluble tetravalent uranium (U(IV)) under anaerobic conditions in the presence of appropriate electron donors. This paper focuses on the evaluation of anaerobic granular sludge as a source of inoculum for the bioremediation of uranium in water. Batch experiments were performed with several methanogenic anaerobic granular sludge samples and different electron donors. Abiotic controls consisting of heat-killed inoculum and non-inoculated treatments confirmed the biological removal process. In this study, unadapted anaerobic granular sludge immediately reduced U(VI), suggesting an intrinsic capacity of the sludge to support this process. The high biodiversity of anaerobic granular sludge most likely accounts for the presence of specific microorganisms capable of reducing U(VI). Oxidation by O(2) was shown to resolubilize the uranium. This observation combined with X-ray diffraction evidence of uraninite confirmed that the removal during anaerobic treatment was due to reductive precipitation. The anaerobic removal activity could be sustained after several respikes of U(VI). The U(VI) removal was feasible without addition of electron donors, indicating that the decay of endogenous biomass substrates was contributing electron equivalents to the process. Addition of electron donors, such as H(2) stimulated the removal of U(VI) to varying degrees. The stimulation was greater in sludge samples with lower endogenous substrate levels. The present work reveals the potential application of anaerobic granular sludge for continuous bioremediation schemes to treat uranium-contaminated water. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Active participant reduction. 4043.23 Section 4043.23 Labor... Active participant reduction. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the number of active participants under a plan is reduced to less than 80 percent of the number of active participants at the...

  14. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-min; Watson, David B

    2013-01-01

    Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting.more » The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.« less

  15. Wide Field Camera 3: Trends in the UVIS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Anderson, J.; Baggett, S. M.; Biretta, J. A.; Deustua, S. E.; Hammer, D.; Noeske, K.; MacKenty, J. W.; WFC3 Team

    2013-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument that was installed during Servicing Missing 4 in May 2009 and has performed well on-orbit since then. The UVIS channel, named for its ultraviolet and visible light detecting capabilities, is comprised of two e2v CCDs and is one of two channels available on WFC3. We present the results of some of the monitoring programs used to regularly assess the performance and calibration of the UVIS detector. We discuss the long-term growth in the number of hot pixels and the effectiveness of the anneal procedures in controlling that growth as well as provide a summary of the long-term evolution in dark current. We also summarize the UVIS Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) monitoring accomplished using both external and internal observations and provide recommendations for CTE mitigation. We describe a program to check for detector hysteresis (quantum efficiency offset) in the detector and detail our method of successfully neutralizing any offset. Finally, we outline the routine photometric monitoring performed and provide an evaluation of the throughput stability of the UVIS channel. These and other trending programs will continue throughout and beyond HST's current proposal cycle as a means of evaluating the overall health and stability of WFC3/UVIS.

  16. The complete set of Cassini's UVIS occultation observations of Enceladus plume: model fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, G.; Esposito, L. W.; Hansen, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Since the discovery in 2005, plume of Enceladus was observed by most of the instruments onboard Cassini spacecraft. Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) have observed Enceladus plume and collimated jets embedded in it in occultational geometry on 6 different occasions. We have constructed a 3D direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) model for Enceladus jets and apply it to the analysis of the full set of UVIS occultation observations conducted during Cassini's mission from 2005 to 2017. The Monte Carlo model tracks test particles from their source at the surface into space. The initial positions of all test particles for a single jet are fixed to one of 100 jets sources identified by Porco et al. (2014). The initial three-dimensional velocity of each particle contains two components: a velocity Vz which is perpendicular to the surface, and a thermal velocity which is isotropic in the upward hemisphere. The direction and speed of the thermal velocity of each particle is chosen randomly but the ensemble moves isotropically at a speed which satisfies a Boltzmann distribution for a given temperature Tth. A range for reasonable Vz is then determined by requiring that modeled jet widths match the observed ones. Each model run results in a set of coordinates and velocities of a given set of test particles. These are converted to the test particle number densities and then integrated along LoS for each time step of the occultation observation. The geometry of the observation is calculated using SPICE. The overarching result of the simulation run is a test particle number density along LoS for each time point during the occultation observation for each of the jets separately. To fit the model to the data, we integrate all jets that are crossed by the LoS at each point during an observation. The relative strength of the jets must be determined to fit the observed UVIS curves. The results of the fits are sets of active jets for each occultation. Each UVIS occultation

  17. Kinetic Desorption and Sorption of U(VI) During Reactive Transport in a Contaminated Hanford Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2005-05-12

    Column experiments were conducted to investigate U(VI) desorption and sorption kinetics in a sand-textured, contaminated (22.7 µmol kg-1) capillary fringe sediment that had experienced long-term exposure to U(VI). The clay fraction mineralogy of the sediment was dominated by montmorillonite, muscovite, vermiculite, and chlorite. Saturated column experiments were performed under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of the Hanford site where uranyl–carbonate and calcium–uranyl–carbonate complexes dominate aqueous speciation. A U(VI) free solution was used to study U(VI) desorption in columns where different flow rates were applied. Uranium(VI) sorption was studied after the desorption of labile contaminant U(VI) using different U(VI) concentrations in themore » leaching solution. Strong kinetic behavior was observed for both U(VI) desorption and sorption. Although U(VI) is semi–mobile in mildly alkaline, calcareous subsurface environments, our results showed substantial U(VI) sorption, significant retardation during transport, and atypical breakthrough curves with extended tailing. A distributed rate model was applied to describe the effluent data and to allow comparisons between the desorption rate of contaminant U(VI) with the rate of short-term U(VI) sorption. Desorption was the slower process. Our results suggest that U(VI) release and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer system from which the sediment was obtained are kinetically controlled.« less

  18. Reduction of pheniramine toxicity using activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    Boehm, J J; Brown, T C; Oppenheim, R C

    1978-01-01

    Pheniramine is efficiently adsorbed by Norit Medicinal Activated Charcoal in vitro. Administration of activated charcoal after pheniramine ingestion in dogs resulted in significantly lower blood levels. Norit or another proven effective activated charcoal would be of value in first-aid treatment of pheniramine poisoning.

  19. An active noise reduction system for aircrew helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, P. D.; Rawlinson, D.; Pelc, S. F.; Dorey, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    An active noise reduction system was developed for use in aircrew flying helmets in which the acoustic noise field inside the ear defender is detected using a miniature microphone and an antiphase signal is fed back to a communications telephone within the ear defender. Performance of the active noise reduction system in a laboratory trial simulating flight conditions is shown to be satisfactory.

  20. Cassini UVIS Observations of Saturn during the Grand Finale Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, W. R.; Esposito, L. W.; West, R. A.; Jouchoux, A.; Radioti, A.; Grodent, D. C.; Gerard, J. C. M. C.; Gustin, J.; Lamy, L.; Badman, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    In 2016 and 2017, the Cassini Saturn orbiter executed a final series of high inclination, low-periapsis orbits ideal for studies of Saturn's polar regions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) obtained an extensive set of auroral images, some at the highest spatial resolution obtained during Cassini's long orbital mission (2004-2017). In some cases, two or three spacecraft slews at right angles to the long slit of the spectrograph were required to cover the entire auroral region to form auroral images. We will present selected images from this set showing narrow arcs of emission, more diffuse auroral emissions, multiple auroral arcs in a single image, discrete spots of emission, small scale vortices, large-scale spiral forms, and parallel linear features that appear to cross in places like twisted wires. Some shorter features are transverse to the main auroral arcs, like barbs on a wire. UVIS observations were in some cases simultaneous with auroral observations from the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) that will also be presented. UVIS polar images also contain spectral information suitable for studies of the auroral electron energy distribution. The long wavelength part of the UVIS polar images contains a signal from reflected sunlight containing absorption signatures of acetylene and other Saturn hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon spatial distribution will also be examined.

  1. Analog VLSI for active drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vidyabhusan

    In today's cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to increase fuel efficiency which reduces these costs. Even a 1% reduction in drag can translate into estimated savings of tens of millions of dollars in annual fuel costs. Fluid mechanicists believe that microscopic vortex pairs impinging on the surface play an important role in turbulent transport that may cause large skin friction drag. The microscopic nature and unpredictable appearance of these structures has limited practical approaches to their control. With the advent of micromachining technology providing the ability to build mechanical structures with microscopic dimensions, the tools finally exist with which to detect and control the vortex structures. These sensors and actuators require control circuitry between them in order to build a complete system. We propose an analog VLSI system that can process information along a surface in a moving fluid with the goal of controlling actuators to minimize the surface shear stress. We obtain the information from the surface by using microsensors which measure the surface shear stress. The actuators interact with the fluid by moving up and down in an attempt to diminish the impact of the drag-inducing structures in the fluid. We have designed the fabricated an analog control system. We have tested the system in several different experiments to verify its effectiveness in providing a control signal that energizes an actuator. We also have studied the methodology for a completely integrated wafer-scale system.

  2. Characterization of the biochemical-pathway of uranium (VI) reduction in facultative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mtimunye, Phalazane J; Chirwa, Evans M N

    2014-10-01

    Cultures of U(VI) reducing bacteria sourced from abandoned uranium mine tailing dam were evaluated for their ability to reduce U(VI) to U(IV). The species in the cultures reduced U(VI) in solutions with initial U(VI) concentration up to 400mgL(-)(1) under a near neutral pH of 6.5. The electron flow pathway and fate of reduced species was also analysed in the individual species in order to evaluate the potential for control and optimisation of the reduction potential at the biochemical level. The results showed that U(VI) reduction in live cells was completely blocked by the NADH-dehydrogenase inhibitor, rotenone (C23H22O6), and thioredoxin inhibitor, cadmium chloride (CdCl2), showing that U(VI) reduction involves the electron flow through NADH-dehydrogenase, a primary electron donor to the electron transport respiratory (ETR) system. Mass balance analysis of uranium species aided by visual and electron microscopy suggest that most U(VI) reduction occurred on the cell surface of the isolated species. This finding indicates the possibility of easy uranium recovery for beneficial use through biological remediation. Should the U(VI) be reduced inside the cell, recovery would require complete disruption of the cells and therefore would be difficult. The study contributes new knowledge on the underlying mechanisms in the U(VI) reduction in facultative anaerobes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dropout Prevention/Reduction Programs and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Seventeen activities or programs conducted in the Dade County (Florida) public elementary and secondary schools in order to reduce or prevent dropout are described in this resource guide. The programs activities include: (1) workshops to develop school-based dropout prevention programs; (2) "Students Working Intelligently to Combat High…

  4. Effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on the kinetics of microbial uranium reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, Keaton M.; DiChristina, Thomas J.; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Taillefert, Martial

    2015-05-01

    The ability to predict the success of the microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV) as an in situ bioremediation strategy is complicated by the wide range of geochemical conditions at contaminated sites and the strong influence of aqueous uranyl speciation on the bioavailability and toxicity of U(VI) to metal-reducing bacteria. To determine the effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on uranium bioreduction kinetics, incubations and viability assays with Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 were conducted over a range of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Ca2+, and Mg2+ concentrations. A speciation-dependent kinetic model was developed to reproduce the observed time series of total dissolved uranium concentration over the range of geochemical conditions tested. The kinetic model yielded the highest rate constant for the reduction of uranyl non-carbonate species (i.e., the 'free' hydrated uranyl ion, uranyl hydroxides, and other minor uranyl complexes), indicating that they represent the most readily reducible fraction of U(VI) despite being the least abundant uranyl species in solution. The presence of DIC, Ca2+, and Mg2+ suppressed the formation of more bioavailable uranyl non-carbonate species and resulted in slower bioreduction rates. At high concentrations of bioavailable U(VI), however, uranium toxicity to S. putrefaciens inhibited bioreduction, and viability assays confirmed that the concentration of non-carbonate uranyl species best predicts the degree of toxicity. The effect of uranium toxicity was accounted for by incorporating the free ion activity model of metal toxicity into the bioreduction rate law. Overall, these results demonstrate that, in the absence of competing terminal electron acceptors, uranium bioreduction kinetics can be predicted over a wide range of geochemical conditions based on the bioavailability and toxicity imparted on U(VI) by solution composition. These findings also imply that the concentration of uranyl non

  5. Total electron acceptor loading and composition affect hexavalent uranium reduction and microbial community structure in a membrane biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Zhou, Chen; Ilhan, Zehra Esra; de Saint Cyr, Louis Cornette; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2017-11-15

    Molecular microbiology tools (i.e., 16S rDNA gene sequencing) were employed to elucidate changes in the microbial community structure according to the total electron acceptor loading (controlled by influent flow rate and/or medium composition) in a H 2 -based membrane biofilm reactor evaluated for removal of hexavalent uranium. Once nitrate, sulfate, and dissolved oxygen were replaced by U(VI) and bicarbonate and the total acceptor loading was lowered, slow-growing bacteria capable of reducing U(VI) to U(IV) dominated in the biofilm community: Replacing denitrifying bacteria Rhodocyclales and Burkholderiales were spore-producing Clostridiales and Natranaerobiales. Though potentially competing for electrons with U(VI) reducers, homo-acetogens helped attain steady U(VI) reduction, while methanogenesis inhibited U(VI) reduction. U(VI) reduction was reinstated through suppression of methanogenesis by addition of bromoethanesulfonate or by competition from SRB when sulfate was re-introduced. Predictive metagenome analysis further points out community changes in response to alterations in the electron-acceptor loading: Sporulation and homo-acetogenesis were critical factors for strengthening stable microbial U(VI) reduction. This study documents that sporulation was important to long-term U(VI) reduction, whether or not microorganisms that carry out U(VI) reduction mediated by cytochrome c 3 , such as SRB and ferric-iron-reducers, were inhibited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Phosphate on U(VI) Sorption to Montmorillonite: Ternary Complexation and Precipitation Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming

    2016-02-15

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated.more » Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This

  7. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  8. WFC3 TV2 Testing: UVIS Channel Glint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas M.

    2007-10-01

    The UVIS spare detector (UVIS build 2) was housed in WFC3 during the most recent epoch of thermal vaccum ground testing. We scanned the chip gap with a HeNe laser, to look for scattering from any material in the CCD chip gap or the edges of the CCD chips themselves. Although we found no such scattering issues, we did find a significant glint problem involving reflection from the surface of the CCD to the CCD housing and back down to the CCD. The glint appears as a large streak, ~10,000 pixels in area, containing anywhere from 1% to 30% of the energy within the source itself, depending upon the wavelength and position of the source. Approximately 10% of the detector area leads to glint when a source is placed in that area. Although any one glint comprises a tiny fraction of the detector area, the glint sweeps over a large area as the source is moved, implying that approximately 15% of the detector could be significantly illuminated by glint when observing a crowded field. As a result, the UVIS detectors currently not installed in the instrument have been modified to mask the surfaces responsible for the glint, to avoid this issue on orbit.

  9. Enhanced U(VI) release from autunite mineral by aerobic Arthrobacter sp. in the presence of aqueous bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Katsenovich, Yelena; Carvajal, Denny A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2012-04-20

    The bacterial effect on U(VI) leaching from the autunite mineral (Ca[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4})]{sub 2} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O) was investigated to provide a more comprehensive understanding into important microbiological processes affecting autunite stability within subsurface bicarbonate-bearing environments. Experiments were performed in a culture of G975 Arthrobacter oxydans strain, herein referred to as G975, a soil bacterium previously isolated from Hanford Site soil. 91 mg of autunite powder and 50 mL of phosphorus-limiting sterile media were amended with bicarbonate ranging between 1-10 mM in glass reactor bottles and inoculated with G975 strain after the dissolution of autunite was at steady state. SEMmore » observations indicated G975 formed a biofilm on the autunite surface and penetrated the mineral cleavages. The mineral surface colonization by bacteria tended to increase concomitantly with bicarbonate concentrations. Additionally, a sterile cultureware with inserts was used in non-contact bioleaching experiments where autunite and bacteria cells were kept separately. The data suggest the G975 bacteria is able to enhance U(VI) leaching from autunite without the direct contact with the mineral. In the presence of bicarbonate, the damage to bacterial cells caused by U(VI) toxicity was reduced, yielding similar values for total organic carbon (TOC) degradation and cell density compared to U(VI)-free controls. The presence of active bacterial cells greatly enhanced the U(VI) bioleaching from autunite in bicarbonate-amended media.« less

  10. Enhanced U(VI) release from autunite mineral by aerobic Arthrobacter sp. in the presence of aqueous bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Katsenovich, Yelena P.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2012-05-01

    The bacterial effect on U(VI) release from the autunite mineral (Ca[(UO2)(PO4)]2•3H2O) was investigated to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the important microbiological processes affecting autunite stability within subsurface bicarbonate-bearing environments. Experiments were performed in a culture of the Arthrobacter oxydans G975 strain, herein referred to as G975, a soil bacterium previously isolated from Hanford Site soil. 91 mg of autunite powder and 50 mL of phosphorous-limiting sterile media were amended with bicarbonate (ranging between 1 and 10 mM) in glass reactor bottles and inoculated with the G975 strain after the dissolution of autunite was at steady state. SEM observationsmore » indicated that G975 formed a biofilm on the autunite surface and penetrated the mineral cleavages. The mineral surface colonization by bacteria tended to increase concomitantly with bicarbonate concentrations. Additionally, a sterile culture-ware with inserts was used in non-contact dissolution experiments where autunite and bacteria cells were kept separately. The data suggest that G975 bacteria is able to enhance the release of U(VI) from autunite without direct contact with the mineral. In the presence of bicarbonate, the damage to bacterial cells caused by U(VI) toxicity was reduced, yielding similar values for total organic carbon (TOC) degradation and cell density compared to U(VI)-free controls. The presence of active bacterial cells greatly enhanced the release of U(VI) from autunite in bicarbonate-amended media.« less

  11. Kinetic desorption and sorption of U(VI) during reactive transport in a contaminated Hanford sediment.

    PubMed

    Qafoku, Nikolla P; Zachara, John M; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L; Qafoku, Odeta S; Smith, Steven C

    2005-05-01

    Column experiments were conducted to investigate U(VI) desorption and sorption kinetics in a sand-textured, U(VI)-contaminated (22.7 micromol kg(-1)) capillary fringe sediment from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. Saturated column experiments were performed under mildly alkaline conditions representative of the Hanford site where uranyl-carbonate and calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes dominate aqueous speciation. A U(VI)-free solution was used to study contaminant U(VI) desorption in columns where different flow rates were applied. Sorbed, contaminant U(VI) was partially labile (11.8%), and extended leaching times and water volumes were required for complete desorption of the labile fraction. Uranium-(VI) sorption was studied after the desorption of labile, contaminant U(VI) using different U(VI) concentrations in the leaching solution. Strong kinetic effects were observed for both U(VI) sorption and desorption, with half-life ranging from 8.5 to 48.5 h for sorption and from 39.3 to 150 h for desorption. Although U(VI) is semi-mobile in mildly alkaline, subsurface environments, we observed substantial U(VI) adsorption, significant retardation during transport, and atypical breakthrough curves with extended tailing. A distributed rate model was applied to describe the effluent data and to allow comparisons between the desorption rate of contaminant U(VI) with the rate of shortterm U(VI) sorption. Desorption was the slower process. We speculate that the kinetic behavior results from transport or chemical phenomena within the phyllosilicate-dominated fine fraction present in the sediment. Our results suggest that U(VI) release and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer system from which the sediment was obtained are kinetically controlled.

  12. Discovery Of B Ring Propellers In Cassini UVIS, And ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, Miodrag; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2012-10-01

    We present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We identify two propeller populations: (1) tens of degrees wide propellers in the dense B ring core, and (2) smaller, more A ring like, propellers populating the inner B ring. The prototype of the first population is an object observed at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. The ubiquitous propeller "S" shape is seen both in UVIS occultations as an optical depth depletion and in ISS as a 40 degrees wide bright stripe in unlit geometries and dark in lit geometries. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap embedded in the high optical depth region of the B ring. The gap moves at orbital speed consistent with its radial location. From the radial separation of the propeller wings we estimate that the embedded body, which causes the propeller structure, is about 1.5km in size located at a=112,921km. The UVIS occultations indicate an asymmetric propeller "S" shape. Since the object is located at an edge between high and relatively low optical depth, this asymmetry is most likely a consequence of the strong surface mass density gradient. We estimate that there are possibly dozen up to 100 other propeller objects in Saturn's B ring. The location of the discovered body, at an edge of a dense ringlet within the B ring, suggests a novel mechanism for the up to now illusive B ring irregular large-scale structure of alternating high and low optical depth ringlets. We propose that this B ring irregular structure may have its cause in the presence of many embedded bodies that shepherd the individual B ring ringlets.

  13. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2013-10-16

    Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic,more » quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.« less

  14. UVI Cyber-security Workshop Workshop Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuykendall, Tommie G.; Allsop, Jacob Lee; Anderson, Benjamin Robert

    2015-07-08

    The cybersecurity consortium, which was established by DOE/NNSA’s Minority Serving Institutions Partnerships Program (MSIPP), allows students from any of the partner schools (13 HBCUs, two national laboratories, and a public school district) to have all consortia options available to them, to create career paths and to open doors to DOE sites and facilities to student members of the consortium. As a part of this year consortium activities, Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Virgin Islands conducted a week long cyber workshop that consisted of three courses; Digital Forensics and Malware Analysis, Python Programming, and ThunderBird Cup. These courses aremore » designed to enhance cyber defense skills and promote learning within STEM related fields.« less

  15. A first principles investigation of electron transfer between Fe(II) and U(VI) on insulating Al- vs. semiconducting Fe-oxide surfaces via the proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. D.; Marcano, M. C.; Becker, U.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates how the intrinsic chemical and electronic properties of mineral surfaces and their associated electron transfer (ET) pathways influence the reduction of U(VI) by surface-associated Fe(II). Density functional theory (DFT), including the Hubbard U correction to the exchange-correlation functional, was used to investigate sorption/redox reactions and ET mechanisms between Fe(II) and U(VI) coadsorbed on isostructural, periodic (0 0 1) surfaces of the insulator corundum (α-Al2O3) vs. the semiconductor hematite (α-Fe2O3). Furthermore, the coadsorbed Fe(II) and U(VI) ions are spatially separated from one another on the surfaces (⩾5.9 Å) to observe whether electronic-coupling through the semiconducting hematite surface facilitates ET between the adsorbates, a phenomenon known as the proximity effect. The calculations show that the different chemical and electronic properties between the isostructural corundum and hematite (0 0 1) surfaces lead to considerably different ET mechanisms between Fe(II) and U(VI). ET on the insulating corundum (0 0 1) surface is limited by the adsorbates' structural configuration. When Fe(II) and U(VI) are spatially separated and do not directly interact with one another (e.g. via an inner-sphere complex), U(VI) reduction by Fe(II) cannot occur as there is no physical pathway enabling ET between the adsorbates. In contrast to the insulating corundum (0 0 1) surface, the hematite (0 0 1) surface can potentially participate in ET reactions due to the high number of electron acceptor sites from the Fe d-states near the Fermi level at the hematite surface. The adsorption of Fe(II) also introduces d-states near the Fermi level as well as shifts unoccupied d-states of the Fe cations at the hematite surface to lower energies, making the surface more conductive. In turn, electronic coupling through the surface can link the spatially separated adsorbates to one another and provide distinct ET pathways for an electron from Fe

  16. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yin, J.; Haggerty, R.; Stoliker, D.L.; Kent, D.B.; Istok, J.D.; Greskowiak, J.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  18. Cassini UVIS Auroral Observations in 2016 and 2017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, Wayne R.; Esposito, Larry W.; Jouchoux, Alain; Radioti, Aikaterini; Grodent, Denis; Gustin, Jacques; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Lamy, Laurent; Badman, Sarah; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Cassini UVIS Team, Cassini VIMS Team, Cassini ISS Team, HST Saturn Auroral Team

    2017-10-01

    In 2016 and 2017, the Cassini Saturn orbiter executed a final series of high-inclination, low-periapsis orbits ideal for studies of Saturn's polar regions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) obtained an extensive set of auroral images, some at the highest spatial resolution obtained during Cassini's long orbital mission (2004-2017). In some cases, two or three spacecraft slews at right angles to the long slit of the spectrograph were required to cover the entire auroral region to form auroral images. We will present selected images from this set showing narrow arcs of emission, more diffuse auroral emissions, multiple auroral arcs in a single image, discrete spots of emission, small scale vortices, large-scale spiral forms, and parallel linear features that appear to cross in places like twisted wires. Some shorter features are transverse to the main auroral arcs, like barbs on a wire. UVIS observations were in some cases simultaneous with auroral observations from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), and the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) that will also be presented.

  19. WFC3/UVIS Dark Current Calibration and Detector Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Biretta, John A.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Anderson, Jay; MacKenty, John W.; WFC3 Team

    2015-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument that was installed during Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009. The WFC3/UVIS detector, comprised of two e2v CCDs, exhibits an inherent dark current (in the absence of any illumination) presently measured at ~6 e-/hr. In addition, detector degradation due to on-orbit radiation damage generates a continuously increasing though small population of hot pixels (dark current exceeding 54 e-/hr, ~4% of each chip) as well as 'sink' pixels (pixels which contain a large number of charge traps). We present the procedures and results of the WFC3/UVIS dark calibration, which provides calibration files used as a correction for these detector characteristics. We discuss the impacts that Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) losses and detector post-flashing have on the hot pixel population and overall calibration, as well as the plans for flagging the 'sink' pixels in the calibration pipeline. Finally, we discuss various improvements to the calibration procedure that will increase the accuracy of dark current and hot pixel measurements.

  20. Investigation of U(VI) Adsorption in Quartz-Chlorite Mineral Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Shang, Jianying

    2014-08-25

    A batch and cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz-chlorite mixtures with variable mass ratios have been performed under field-relevant uranium concentrations (5x10-7 M and 5x10-6 M) in pH 8.1 synthetic groundwater. The U(VI) adsorption Kd values steadily increased as the mass fraction of chlorite increased, indicating preferential sorption to chlorite. For all mineral mixtures, U(VI) adsorption Kd values were lower than that calculated from the assumption of component additivity; The largest deviation occurred when the mass fractions of the two minerals were equal. U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite displayed characteristic individual fluorescence spectra thatmore » were not affected by mineral mixing. The spectra of U(VI) adsorbed within the mixtures could be simulated by one surface U(VI) species on quartz and two on chlorite. The fluorescence intensity decreased in a nonlinear manner as the adsorbed U(VI) concentration increased with increasing chlorite mass fraction – likely due to ill-defined fluorescence quenching by both structural Fe/Cr in chlorite, and trace amounts of solubilized and re-precipitated Fe/Cr in the aqueous phase. However, the fractional spectral intensities of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite followed the same trend of fractional adsorbed U(VI) concentration in each mineral phase; approximate linear correlations in the quartz:chlorite mass ratio ranges of 0.0 - 0.2 and 0.2 - 1.0, offering a method to estimate of U(VI) concentration distribution between the mineral components.« less

  1. Investigation of U(VI) adsorption in quartz-chlorite mineral mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M; Shang, Jianying; Jeon, Choong; Liu, Juan; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-07-15

    A batch and cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy investigation of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz-chlorite mixtures with variable mass ratios have been performed under field-relevant uranium concentrations (5×10(-7) M and 5×10(-6) M) in pH 8.1 synthetic groundwater. The U(VI) adsorption Kd values steadily increased as the mass fraction of chlorite increased, indicating preferential sorption to chlorite. For all mineral mixtures, U(VI) adsorption Kd values were lower than that calculated from the assumption of component additivity possibly caused by surface modifications stemming from chlorite dissolution; The largest deviation occurred when the mass fractions of the two minerals were equal. U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite displayed characteristic individual luminescence spectra that were not affected by mineral mixing. The spectra of U(VI) adsorbed within the mixtures could be simulated by one surface U(VI) species on quartz and two on chlorite. The luminescence intensity decreased in a nonlinear manner as the adsorbed U(VI) concentration increased with increasing chlorite mass fraction-likely due to ill-defined luminescence quenching by both structural Fe/Cr in chlorite, and trace amounts of solubilized and reprecipitated Fe/Cr in the aqueous phase. However, the fractional spectral intensities of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite followed the same trend of fractional adsorbed U(VI) concentration in each mineral phase with approximate linear correlations, offering a method to estimate of U(VI) concentration distribution between the mineral components with luminescence spectroscopy.

  2. Blood pressure reduction following accumulated physical activity in prehypertensive

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Yogesh; Gupta, Rani; Moinuddin, Arsalan; Narwal, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    Context: Accumulated moderate physical activity (PA) for 30 min in a day is the only recommended treatment of prehypertension. Objective: We investigated autonomic modulation as a possible mechanism for the decrease in blood pressure (BP) during the rest periods in each 10 min session of PA. Design, Setting, and Participants: We conducted a single-blind randomized multi-arm control trial on 40 prehypertensive (pre-HT) young male adults. Methods: Participants were randomly divided by using random number table into four groups. Control (no intervention); Group 1 (walking at 50% of predicted VO2 peak); Group 2 (walking at 60% of predicted VO2 peak); Group 3 (walking at 70% of predicted VO2 peak). BP, heart rate variability (HRV), and heart rate recovery 1 min (HRR 1 min) were measured at baseline and during the rest period after each session of 10 min over 30 min of accumulated physical activity (PAcumm). Results: Significant diastolic BP (DBP) reduction (P < 0.001) was observed during the rest period after each session of PAcumm in intervention groups. An average reduction in DBP was more in pre-HT undertaking PAcumm at 70% of predicted VO2 Peak. Decrease in the mean value of low-frequency (LF) and LF/high-frequency ratio was observed following PAcumm in all intervention groups irrespective of the intensity of PA. No significant association of reduction of BP with HRV and HRR 1 s was observed. Conclusion: Reduction in BP was observed during the rest period after each 10 min session of PAcumm irrespective of the intensity of PA. Autonomic modulation does not seem to be the possible mechanism for the reduction in BP during the sessions. PMID:27843840

  3. Reductive activation of mitomycins A and C by vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Paz, Manuel M

    2013-06-01

    The anticancer drug mitomycin C produces cytotoxic effects after being converted to a highly reactive bis-electrophile by a reductive activation, a reaction that a number of 1-electron or 2-electron oxidoreductase enzymes can perform in cells. Several reports in the literature indicate that ascorbic acid can modulate the cytotoxic effects of mitomycin C, either potentiating or inhibiting its effects. As ascorbic acid is a reducing agent that is known to be able to reduce quinones, it could be possible that the observed modulatory effects are a consequence of a direct redox reduction between mitomycin C and ascorbate. To determine if this is the case, the reaction between mitomycin C and ascorbate was studied using UV/Vis spectroscopy and LC/MS. We also studied the reaction of ascorbate with mitomycin A, a highly toxic member of the mitomycin family with a higher redox potential than mitomycin C. We found that ascorbate is capable to reduce mitomycin A efficiently, but it reduces mitomycin C rather inefficiently. The mechanisms of activation have been elucidated based on the kinetics of the reduction and on the analysis of the mitosene derivatives formed after the reaction. We found that the activation occurs by the interplay of three different mechanisms that contribute differently, depending on the pH of the reaction. As the reduction of mitomycin C by ascorbate is rather inefficiently at physiologically relevant pH values we conclude that the modulatory effect of ascorbate on the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C is not the result of a direct redox reaction and therefore this modulation must be the consequence of other biochemical mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinghao; Cheng, Cheng; Xiao, Chengjian; Shao, Dadong; Xu, Zimu; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan

    2017-07-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH < 6.5 because of the strong complexation, and inhibits U(VI) adsorption at pH > 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  5. Comparing the ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS Calibration and Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, S. E.; Mack, J.

    2018-03-01

    A study was undertaken using synthetic photometry of CALSPEC stars to compare the ACS Wide Field Channel (WFC) photometry to the WFC3 UVIS imaging channel in eight similarly named passbands corresponding to the broadband filters F435W (ACS/WFC) F438W (WFC3/UVIS) and F475W, F555W, F606W, F625W, F775W, F814W and F850LP (both ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS). The uncertainty of the photometric calibration of ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS with respect to the white dwarf standard stars is within +/- 0.5% for F814W, F775W, F606W and F475W, and within +/-1% for F625W and F850LP. For F555W the apparent difference in the calibration is 2% for F555W and 6% for UVIS/F438W and ACS/F435W due to inherent differences in the filter passbands. Comparing the ACS/WFC to WFC3/UVIS mean flux for stars having a range of spectral types shows a color dependence. The WFC to UVIS F814W color dependence is +/- 0.02 mags for F814W, F775W, F475W and F606W. For the other filters the range is -0.06 to +0.02 mags. Aperture photometry of the 47 Tucanae cluster confirm the results from using synthetic photometry of CALSPEC stars.

  6. Study of sorption-retarded U(VI) diffusion in Hanford silt/clay material

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Jing; Liu, Chongxuan; Ball, William P.

    2009-10-15

    A diffusion cell method was developed to measure the effective aqueous diffusion coefficient for U(VI) under strictly controlled chemical conditions within the inter-particle pores of silt/clay sediment from the DOE Hanford site, WA. "Inward-flux” diffusion studies were conducted in which U(VI) concentrations in both aqueous and solid phases were measured as a function of distance into the cell under conditions of constant concentration at the cell boundaries. A sequential extraction method was developed to measure sorbed U(VI) content in the solid phase, while accounting for the non-negligible extractable background U(VI). U(VI) diffusion data were found to be consistent with amore » model that assumed that: 1) a single effective aqueous diffusion coefficient could be used to simulate the coupled diffusion of various aqueous U(VI) species, and 2) the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) is appropriate for modeling the effects of sorption under the given experimental conditions. An effective aqueous diffusion coefficient (De) of 1.6x10^-6 cm2/s was obtained under conditions of pH 8.0 and calcite saturation that are relevant to the subsurface conditions at some regions of the Hanford site. The developed experimental techniques provide a practical approach for measuring effective aqueous U(VI) diffusivity in sorptive porous media.« less

  7. Comparing approaches for simulating the reactive transport of U(VI) in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, G.P.; Kohler, M.; Davis, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The reactive transport of U(VI) in a well-characterized shallow alluvial aquifer at a former U(VI) mill located near Naturita, CO, was predicted for comparative purposes using a surface complexation model (SCM) and a constant K d approach to simulate U(VI) adsorption. The ground water at the site had U(VI) concentrations that ranged from 0.01 to 20 ??M, alkalinities that ranged from 2.5 to 18 meq/L, and a nearly constant pH of 7.1. The SCM used to simulate U(VI) adsorption was previously determined independently using laboratory batch adsorption experiments. Simulations obtained using the SCM approach were compared with simulations that used a constant K d approach to simulate adsorption using previously determined site-specific K d values. In both cases, the ground water flow and transport models used a conceptual model that was previously calibrated to a chloride plume present at the site. Simulations with the SCM approach demonstrated that the retardation factor varied temporally and spatially because of the differential transport of alkalinity and dissolved U(VI) and the nonlinearity of the U(VI) adsorption. The SCM model also simulated a prolonged slow decline in U(VI) concentration, which was not simulated using a constant K d model. Simulations using the SCM approach and the constant K d approach were similar after 20 years of transport but diverged significantly after 60 years. The simulations demonstrate the need for site-specific geochemical information on U(VI) adsorption to produce credible simulations of future transport. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  8. The Cassini UVIS stellar probe of the Titan atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Shemansky, Donald E; Stewart, A Ian F; West, Robert A; Esposito, Larry W; Hallett, Janet T; Liu, Xianming

    2005-05-13

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) observed the extinction of photons from two stars by the atmosphere of Titan during the Titan flyby. Six species were identified and measured: methane, acetylene, ethylene, ethane, diacetylene, and hydrogen cyanide. The observations cover altitudes from 450 to 1600 kilometers above the surface. A mesopause is inferred from extraction of the temperature structure of methane, located at 615 km with a temperature minimum of 114 kelvin. The asymptotic kinetic temperature at the top of the atmosphere determined from this experiment is 151 kelvin. The higher order hydrocarbons and hydrogen cyanide peak sharply in abundance and are undetectable below altitudes ranging from 750 to 600 km, leaving methane as the only identifiable carbonaceous molecule in this experiment below 600 km.

  9. The Cassini UVIS Stellar Probe of the Titan Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemansky, Donald E.; Stewart, A. Ian F.; West, Robert A.; Esposito, Larry W.; Hallett, Janet T.; Liu, Xianming

    2005-05-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) observed the extinction of photons from two stars by the atmosphere of Titan during the Titan flyby. Six species were identified and measured: methane, acetylene, ethylene, ethane, diacetylene, and hydrogen cyanide. The observations cover altitudes from 450 to 1600 kilometers above the surface. A mesopause is inferred from extraction of the temperature structure of methane, located at 615 km with a temperature minimum of 114 kelvin. The asymptotic kinetic temperature at the top of the atmosphere determined from this experiment is 151 kelvin. The higher order hydrocarbons and hydrogen cyanide peak sharply in abundance and are undetectable below altitudes ranging from 750 to 600 km, leaving methane as the only identifiable carbonaceous molecule in this experiment below 600 km.

  10. Auroral Observations from the POLAR Ultraviolet Imager (UVI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Elsen, R.; Chen, L.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    Because of the importance of the auroral regions as a remote diagnostic of near-Earth plasma processes and magnetospheric structure, spacebased instrumentation for imaging the auroral regions have been designed and operated for the last twenty-five years. The latest generation of imagers, including those flown on the POLAR satellite, extends this quest for multispectral resolution by providing three separate imagers for the visible, ultraviolet, and X ray images of the aurora. The ability to observe extended regions allows imaging missions to significantly extend the observations available from in situ or groundbased instrumentation. The complementary nature of imaging and other observations is illustrated below using results from tile GGS Ultraviolet Imager (UVI). Details of the requisite energy and intensity analysis are also presented.

  11. Analysis Of Cassini Uvis Observations Of Titan VUV Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianming; Shemansky, D. E.

    2007-10-01

    Cassini UVIS EUV and FUV spectrograph observations of high altitude sunlit Titan atmosphere emission show measurable emission at and above the exobase in electron excited nitrogen. The observations include emission from the N2 c4' (0,0) and other bands, NI, and NII in the EUV, with the N2 LBH system NI, HI and CI in the FUV. The emission properties indicate the top of the atmosphere has a developed ionosphere maintained by deposition of soft magnetospheric electrons. Comparison of the sub-solar equatorial region at encounter T0 with the sunlit polar high altitude emission obtained at TA have been made through application of a nitrogen physical chemistry model. The sub-solar spectra show the presence of scattered solar flux at wavelengths > 155 nm at altitudes extending above 1000 km, consistent with the aerosol extinction measurements in stellar occultations reported by Liang et al., 2007, and Shemansky et al., 2007. Derived extinction by CH4 in fits to the data is consistent with the UVIS occultation results. Model calculations fitting the observed non LTE atomic nitrogen emission show that more than 50% of the steady state NI population is in the 2Do state. Estimates of [N]/[N2] partitioning has high as 0.07 have been obtained. Heating in the ionosphere at 1300 km is assumed to be mainly through dissociation of N2. From the N2 profile we obtain 3.7 X 10-3 ergs cm-2 s-1, compared to 8.7 X 10-4 ergs cm-2 s-1 for photoionization. The total dissociation rate of N2 is estimated at 109 cm-2 s-1 compared to 2.2 X 108 cm-2 s-1 for solar photoionization. Atomic nitrogen loss rate into the magnetosphere is estimated to be 2. X 1026 atoms s-1. This work is supported by the Cassini Program and NASA PATM.

  12. Sustained removal of uranium from contaminated groundwater following stimulation of dissimilatory metal reduction.

    PubMed

    N'Guessan, A Lucie; Vrionis, Helen A; Resch, Charles T; Long, Philip E; Lovley, Derek R

    2008-04-15

    Previous field studies on in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater in an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado identified two distinct phases following the addition of acetate to stimulate microbial respiration. In phase I, Geobacter species are the predominant organisms, Fe(III) is reduced, and microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) removes uranium from the groundwater. In phase II, Fe(III) is depleted, sulfate is reduced, and sulfate-reducing bacteria predominate. Long-term monitoring revealed an unexpected third phase during which U(VI) removal continues even after acetate additions are stopped. All three of these phases were successfully reproduced in flow-through sediment columns. When sediments from the third phase were heat sterilized, the capacity for U(VI) removal was lost. In the live sediments U(VI) removed from the groundwater was recovered as U(VI) in the sediments. This contrasts to the recovery of U(IV) in sediments resulting from the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) during the Fe(III) reduction phase in acetate-amended sediments. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences in the sediments in which U(VI) was being adsorbed indicated that members of the Firmicutes were the predominant organisms whereas no Firmicutes sequences were detected in background sediments which did not have the capacity to sorb U(VI), suggesting that the U(VI) adsorption might be due to the presence of these living organisms or at least their intact cell components. This unexpected enhanced adsorption of U(VI) onto sediments following the stimulation of microbial growth in the subsurface may potentially enhance the cost effectiveness of in situ uranium bioremediation.

  13. Inner-sphere vs. outer-sphere reduction of uranyl supported by a redox-active, donor-expanded dipyrrin† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: General procedures, synthetic details, NMR spectra, EPR spectra, IR spectra, electronic absorption and emission spectra, voltammetric data, X-ray crystallographic data, computational details and optimised geometries. CCDC 1446511, 1446512 and 1507634. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c6sc02912d Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Pankhurst, James R.; Bell, Nicola L.; Zegke, Markus; Platts, Lucy N.; Lamfsus, Carlos Alvarez; Maron, Laurent; Natrajan, Louise S.; Sproules, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The uranyl(vi) complex UO2Cl(L) of the redox-active, acyclic diimino-dipyrrin anion, L– is reported and its reaction with inner- and outer-sphere reductants studied. Voltammetric, EPR-spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic studies show that chemical reduction by the outer-sphere reagent CoCp2 initially reduces the ligand to a dipyrrin radical, and imply that a second equivalent of CoCp2 reduces the U(vi) centre to form U(v). Cyclic voltammetry indicates that further outer-sphere reduction to form the putative U(iv) trianion only occurs at strongly cathodic potentials. The initial reduction of the dipyrrin ligand is supported by emission spectra, X-ray crystallography, and DFT; the latter also shows that these outer-sphere reactions are exergonic and proceed through sequential, one-electron steps. Reduction by the inner-sphere reductant [TiCp2Cl]2 is also likely to result in ligand reduction in the first instance but, in contrast to the outer-sphere case, reduction of the uranium centre becomes much more favoured, allowing the formation of a crystallographically characterised, doubly-titanated U(iv) complex. In the case of inner-sphere reduction only, ligand-to-metal electron-transfer is thermodynamically driven by coordination of Lewis-acidic Ti(iv) to the uranyl oxo, and is energetically preferable over the disproportionation of U(v). Overall, the involvement of the redox-active dipyrrin ligand in the reduction chemistry of UO2Cl(L) is inherent to both inner- and outer-sphere reduction mechanisms, providing a new route to accessing a variety of U(vi), U(v), and U(iv) complexes. PMID:28451154

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WFC3/UVIS quasar-stacked spectrum at z=~2.4 (Lusso+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusso, E.; Worseck, G.; Hennawi, J. F.; Prochaska, J. X.; Vignali, C.; Stern, J.; O'Meara, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    The data sample employed in the present analysis comes from a survey performed with HST using the WFC3 instrument. Quasar sample, HST observations, and reduction procedures are described in detail in O'meara et al. 2011, J/ApJS/195/16 (O11). The O11 survey consists of 53 quasars selected from SDSS Data Release 5 (Schneider et al. 2007, Cat. VII/252) with g<18.5 mag, 2.3UVIS-G280 grism in Cycle 17. These data were taken specifically for the scientific goal of surveying the abundance of strong H I Lyman limit absorption features at 1.2UVIS-G280 spectra span roughly λ=2000-6000Å and they have relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N~20) per pixel down to λ~2000Å (FWHM~60Å at λ=2500Å). (1 data file).

  15. Long-Term International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forroci, Michael P.; Gafka, George K.; Lutomski, Michael G.; Maher, Jacilyn S.

    2011-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the initial ISS requirements and design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to further reduce risk given the determination, commitment, and resources to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS, and to reduce risk to all crewmembers. While years of work went into the development of ISS requirements, there are many things associated with risk reduction in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity hazard level-4 materials, emergency procedures, emergency equipment, control of drag-throughs) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards). Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of more than a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery for years to come.

  16. Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Non-Toxic Cryogenic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for non-toxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of non-toxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of non-toxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of non-toxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that non-toxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

  17. Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Nontoxic Cryogenic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for nontoxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of nontoxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of nontoxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of nontoxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that nontoxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

  18. Removal U(VI) from artificial seawater using facilely and covalently grafted polyacrylonitrile fibers with lysine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenting; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Li, Zhanshuang; Jing, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun

    2017-05-01

    Polyacrylonitrile fibers (PANF) covalently modified with lysine (PAN-Lys) was facilely synthesized and carefully characterized. The critical factors affecting U(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution were exploited, such as initial pH, contact time, concentration and temperature. The adsorption process is strongly dependent on solution pH. With excellent adsorption capacity and high affinity toward U(VI), the process for U(VI) is extremely rapid and the equilibrium can be reached within 20 min. The thermodynamics and kinetics were strictly evaluated. In addition, the hypothetical adsorption mechanisms were proposed. Moreover, the adsorption behavior at low concentrations (3-30 μg L-1) in simulated seawater was also investigated. Therefore, PAN-Lys can be potentially utilized for the efficient removal of U(VI) from seawater.

  19. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  20. Study of sorption-retarded U(VI) diffusion in Hanford silt/clay material.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing; Liu, Chongxuan; Ball, William P

    2009-10-15

    A diffusion cell method was applied to measure the effective pore diffusion coefficient (Dp) for U(VI) under strictly controlled chemical conditions in a silt/clay sediment from the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site, WA. "Inward-flux" diffusion studies were conducted in which [U(VI)] in both aqueous and solid phases was measured as a function of distance in the diffusion cell under conditions of constant concentration at the cell boundaries. A sequential extraction method was developed to measure sorbed contaminant U(VI) in the solid phase containing extractable background U(VI). The effect of sorption kinetics on U(VI) interparticle diffusion was evaluated by comparing sorption-retarded diffusion models with sorption described either as equilibrium or intraparticle diffusion-limited processes. Both experimental and modeling results indicated that (1) a single pore diffusion coefficient can simulate the diffusion of total aqueous U(VI), and (2) the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) is appropriate for modeling sorption-retarded diffusion under the given experimental conditions. Dp of 1.6-1.7 x 10(-6) cm2/s was estimated in aqueous solution at pH 8.0 and saturated with respect to calcite, as relevant to some subsurface regions of the Hanford site.

  1. Influence of calcium carbonate on U(VI) sorption to soils.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zuoping; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Wan, Jiamin

    2003-12-15

    The high stability of calcium uranyl carbonate complexes in the circumneutral pH range has a strong impact on U(VI) sorption in calcareous soils. To quantify this influence, sorption of U(VI) to soils in the presence of naturally occurring calcium carbonate was investigated by conducting batch experiments in which either U(VI) concentration or solution pH was varied. Two soils containing different calcium carbonate concentrations were selected, one from Oak Ridge, TN, and another from Altamont Pass, CA. The results show that the presence of calcium carbonate in soils strongly affects U(VI) sorption. Higher concentrations of soil calcium carbonate lead to a pronounced suppression of the pH-dependent sorption curve in the neutral pH range because of the formation of a very stable neutral complex of calcium uranyl carbonate in solution. A surface complexation model considering both strong and weak sites for ferrihydrite and ionizable hydroxyl sites for clay minerals was compared with experimental results, and U(VI) binding parameters were reasonably estimated. Fair agreement was found between the model predictions and sorption data, which span a wide range of U(VI) concentrations and pH. The results also show that appropriate solution-to-solid ratios need to be used when measuring distribution coefficients in calcareous soils to avoid complete CaCO3 dissolution and consequent dilution of calcium uranyl carbonate complexes.

  2. Discovery of B ring propellers in Cassini UVIS and ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    One of the successes of the planetary ring theory has been the theoretical prediction of gravitational signatures of bodies embedded in the rings, and their subsequent detection in Cassini data. Bodies within the rings perturb the nearby ring material, and the orbital shear forms a two-armed structure -- dubbed a ``propeller'' -- which is centered at the embedded body. Although direct evidence of the present body or moonlet is still lacking, the observations of their propeller signatures has proved as an indispensable method to extend our knowledge about ring structure and dynamics. So far, propellers have been successfully detected within Saturn's A ring in two populations: a group of small and numerous propellers interior to the Encke gap forming belts, and by far less numerous but larger propellers exterior to Pan's orbit. Although there have been hints of propellers present within the B ring, or even C ring, their detection is less certain (e.g. neither has a single propeller been seen twice, nor has the ubiquitous two armed structure been observed). In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. A single object is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe the feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at a=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B ring. The gap moves at Kepler speed appropriate for its radial location. Radial offsets of the gap locations in UVIS

  3. Reduction of selenite to elemental selenium nanoparticles by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohan; Matassa, Silvio; Singh, Satyendra; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-01-01

    Total selenium removal by the activated sludge process, where selenite is reduced to colloidal elemental selenium nanoparticles (BioSeNPs) that remain entrapped in the activated sludge flocs, was studied. Total selenium removal efficiencies with glucose as electron donor (2.0 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1)) at neutral pH and 30 °C gave 2.9 and 6.8 times higher removal efficiencies as compared to the electron donors lactate and acetate, respectively. Total selenium removal efficiencies of 79 (±3) and 86 (±1) % were achieved in shake flasks and fed batch reactors, respectively, at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations above 4.0 mg L(-1) and 30 °C when fed with 172 mg L(-1) (1 mM) Na2SeO3 and 2.0 g L(-1) COD of glucose. Continuously operated reactors operating at neutral pH, 30 °C and a DO >3 mg L(-1) removed 33.98 and 36.65 mg of total selenium per gram of total suspended solids (TSS) at TSS concentrations of 1.3 and 3.0 g L(-1), respectively. However, selenite toxicity to the activated sludge led to failure of a continuously operating activated sludge reactor at the applied loading rates. This suggests that a higher hydraulic retention time (HRT) or different reactor configurations need to be applied for selenium-removing activated sludge processes. Graphical Abstract Scheme representing the possible mechanisms of selenite reduction at high and low DO levels in the activated sludge process.

  4. Particle sizes in Saturn's rings from UVIS stellar occultations 1. Variations with ring region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Cooney, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) includes a high speed photometer (HSP) that has observed stellar occultations by Saturn's rings with a radial resolution of ∼10 m. In the absence of intervening ring material, the time series of measurements by the HSP is described by Poisson statistics in which the variance equals the mean. The finite sizes of the ring particles occulting the star lead to a variance that is larger than the mean due to correlations in the blocking of photons due to finite particle size and due to random variations in the number of individual particles in each measurement area. This effect was first exploited by Showalter and Nicholson (1990) with the stellar occultation observed by Voyager 2. At a given optical depth, a larger excess variance corresponds to larger particles or clumps that results in greater variation of the signal from measurement to measurement. Here we present analysis of the excess variance in occultations observed by Cassini UVIS. We observe differences in the best-fitting particle size in different ring regions. The C ring plateaus show a distinctly smaller effective particle size, R, than the background C ring, while the background C ring itself shows a positive correlation between R and optical depth. The innermost 700 km of the B ring has a distribution of excess variance with optical depth that is consistent with the C ring ramp and C ring but not with the remainder of the B1 region. The Cassini Division, while similar to the C ring in spectral and structural properties, has different trends in effective particle size with optical depth. There are discrete jumps in R on either side of the Cassini Division ramp, while the C ring ramp shows a smooth transition in R from the C ring to the B ring. The A ring is dominated by self-gravity wakes whose shadow size depends on the occultation geometry. The spectral ;halo; regions around the strongest density waves in the A ring correspond to

  5. Redox active iron nitrosyl units in proton reduction electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chung-Hung; Ding, Shengda; Erdem, Özlen F; Crouthers, Danielle J; Liu, Tianbiao; McCrory, Charles C L; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Popescu, Codrina V; Reibenspies, Joseph H; Hall, Michael B; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y

    2014-05-02

    Base metal, molecular catalysts for the fundamental process of conversion of protons and electrons to dihydrogen, remain a substantial synthetic goal related to a sustainable energy future. Here we report a diiron complex with bridging thiolates in the butterfly shape of the 2Fe2S core of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site but with nitrosyl rather than carbonyl or cyanide ligands. This binuclear [(NO)Fe(N2S2)Fe(NO)2](+) complex maintains structural integrity in two redox levels; it consists of a (N2S2)Fe(NO) complex (N2S2=N,N'-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,4-diazacycloheptane) that serves as redox active metallodithiolato bidentate ligand to a redox active dinitrosyl iron unit, Fe(NO)2. Experimental and theoretical methods demonstrate the accommodation of redox levels in both components of the complex, each involving electronically versatile nitrosyl ligands. An interplay of orbital mixing between the Fe(NO) and Fe(NO)2 sites and within the iron nitrosyl bonds in each moiety is revealed, accounting for the interactions that facilitate electron uptake, storage and proton reduction.

  6. Characterization of the holographic imaging grating of GOMOS UVIS spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeffe, Jussi; Saari, Heikki K.; Astola, Heikki; Rainio, Kari; Mazuray, Lorand; Pierot, Dominique; Craen, Pierre; Gruslin, Michel; Lecat, Jean-Herve; Bonnemason, Francis; Flamand, Jean; Thevenon, Alain

    1996-11-01

    A Finnish-French group has proposed an imaging spectrometer- based instrument for the ENVISAT Earth observation satellite of ESA, which yields a global mapping of the vertical profile of ozone and other related atmospheric gases. The GOMOS instrument works by measuring the UV-visible spectrum of a star that is occulting behind the Earth's atmosphere. The prime contractor of GOMOS is Matra Marconi Space France. The focal plane optics are designed and manufactured by Spacebel Instrumentation S.A. and the holographic grating by Jobin-Yvon. VTT Automation, Measurement Technology has participated in the GOMOS studies since 1989 and is presently responsible for the verification tests of the imaging quality and opto-mechanical interfaces of the holographic imaging grating of GOMOS. The UVIS spectrometer of GOMOS consists of a holographic, aberration corrected grating and of a CCD detector. The alignment of the holographic grating needs as an input very accurate knowledge of the mechanical interfaces. VTT Automation has designed, built and tested a characterization system for the holographic grating. This system combines the accurate optical imaging measurements with the absolute knowledge of the geometrical parameters at the accuracy of plus or minus 10 micrometers which makes the system unique. The developed system has been used for two breadboard gratings and the qualification model grating. The imaging quality results and their analysis together with alignment procedure utilizing of the knowledge of mechanical interfaces is described.

  7. Effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on the kinetics of microbial uranium reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Belli, Keaton M.; DiChristina, Thomas J.; Van Cappellen, Philippe; ...

    2015-02-16

    The ability to predict the success of the microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV) as an in situ bioremediation strategy is complicated by the wide range of geochemical conditions at contaminated sites and the strong influence of aqueous uranyl speciation on the bioavailability and toxicity of U(VI) to metal-reducing bacteria. In order to determine the effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on uranium bioreduction kinetics, incubations and viability assays with Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 were conducted over a range of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Ca 2+, and Mg 2+ concentrations. A speciation-dependent kinetic model was developedmore » to reproduce the observed time series of total dissolved uranium concentration over the range of geochemical conditions tested. The kinetic model yielded the highest rate constant for the reduction of uranyl non-carbonate species (i.e., the ‘free’ hydrated uranyl ion, uranyl hydroxides, and other minor uranyl complexes), indicating that they represent the most readily reducible fraction of U(VI) despite being the least abundant uranyl species in solution. In the presence of DIC, Ca 2+, and Mg 2+ is suppressed during the formation of more bioavailable uranyl non-carbonate species and resulted in slower bioreduction rates. At high concentrations of bioavailable U(VI), however, uranium toxicity to S. putrefaciens inhibited bioreduction, and viability assays confirmed that the concentration of non-carbonate uranyl species best predicts the degree of toxicity. The effect of uranium toxicity was accounted for by incorporating the free ion activity model of metal toxicity into the bioreduction rate law. These results demonstrate that, in the absence of competing terminal electron acceptors, uranium bioreduction kinetics can be predicted over a wide range of geochemical conditions based on the bioavailability and toxicity imparted on U(VI) by solution composition. Finally, these findings also

  8. Enzymatic iron and uranium reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Roden, E.E.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Woodward, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The potential for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to enzymatically reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) was investigated. Five species of Desulfovibrio as well as Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobulbus propionicus reduced Fe(III) chelated with nitrilotriacetic acid as well as insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Fe(III) oxide reduction resulted in the accumulation of magnetite and siderite. Desulfobacter postgatei reduced the chelated Fe(III) but not Fe(III) oxide. Desulfobacter curvatus, Desulfomonile tiedjei, and Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans did not reduce Fe(III). Only Desulfovibrio species reduced U(VI). U(VI) reduction resulted in the precipitation of uraninite. None of the SRB that reduced Fe(III) or U(VI) appeared to conserve enough energy to support growth from this reaction. However, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans metabolized H2 down to lower concentrations with Fe(III) or U(VI) as the electron acceptor than with sulfate, suggesting that these metals may be preferred electron acceptors at the low H2 concentrations present in most marine sediments. Molybdate did not inhibit Fe(III) reduction by D. desulfuricans. This indicates that the inability of molybdate to inhibit Fe(III) reduction in marine sediments does not rule out the possibility that SRB are important catalysts for Fe(III) reduction. The results demonstrate that although SRB were previously considered to reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) indirectly through the production of sulfide, they may also directly reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) through enzymatic mechanisms. These findings, as well as our recent discovery that the So-reducing microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans can reduce Fe(III), demonstrate that there are close links between the microbial sulfur, iron, and uranium cycles in anaerobic marine sediments. ?? 1993.

  9. Comparing the ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS Calibration and Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, S. E.; Mack, J.

    2018-03-01

    A study was undertaken using synthetic photometry of CALSPEC stars to compare the ACS Wide Field Channel (WFC) photometry to the WFC3 UVIS imaging channel in eight similarly named passbands corresponding to the broadband filters F435W (ACS/WFC) F438W (WFC3/UVIS) and F475W, F555W, F606W, F625W, F775W, F814W and F850LP (both ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS). The uncertainty of the photometric calibration of ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS with respect to the white dwarf standard stars is within ± 0.5% for F814W, F775W, F606W and F475W, and within ±1% for F625W and F850LP. For F555W the apparent difference in the calibration is 2% for F555W and 6% for UVIS/F438W and ACS/F435W due to inherent differences in the filter passbands. Comparing the ACS/WFC to WFC3/UVIS mean flux for stars having a range of spectral types shows a color dependence. The WFC to UVIS F814W color dependence is ± 0.02 mags for F814W, F775W, F475W and F606W. For the other filters the range is -0.06 to +0.02 mags. Aperture photometry of the 47 Tucanae cluster confirm the results from using synthetic photometry of CALSPEC stars.

  10. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; ...

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more » i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  11. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction.

    PubMed

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-05-05

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth's history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth's crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  12. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    PubMed Central

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  13. Active Vibration Reduction of the Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being developed as an option to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove. A Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) could offer space missions a more efficient power system that uses one fourth of the nuclear fuel and decreases the thermal footprint compared to the current state of the art. The Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project is funded by the RPS Program to developing Stirling-based subsystems, including convertors and controller maturation efforts that have resulted in high fidelity hardware like the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), and ASC Controller Unit (ACU). The SCTD Project also performs research to develop less mature technologies with a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, improving system reliability or fault tolerance, reducing mass or size, and developing advanced concepts that are mission enabling. Active vibration reduction systems (AVRS), or "balancers", have historically been developed and characterized to provide fault tolerance for generator designs that incorporate dual-opposed Stirling convertors or enable single convertor, or small RPS, missions. Balancers reduce the dynamic disturbance forces created by the power piston and displacer internal moving components of a single operating convertor to meet spacecraft requirements for induced disturbance force. To improve fault tolerance for dual-opposed configurations and enable single convertor configurations, a breadboard AVRS was implemented on the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The AVRS included a linear motor, a motor mount, and a closed-loop controller able to balance out the transmitted peak dynamic disturbance using acceleration feedback. Test objectives included quantifying power and mass penalty and reduction in transmitted force over a range of ASC

  14. Active Vibration Reduction of the Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being developed as an option to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove. A Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) could offer space missions a more efficient power system that uses one fourth of the nuclear fuel and decreases the thermal footprint compared to the current state of the art. The Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project is funded by the RPS Program to developing Stirling-based subsystems, including convertors and controller maturation efforts that have resulted in high fidelity hardware like the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), and ASC Controller Unit (ACU). The SCTD Project also performs research to develop less mature technologies with a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, improving system reliability or fault tolerance, reducing mass or size, and developing advanced concepts that are mission enabling. Active vibration reduction systems (AVRS), or "balancers", have historically been developed and characterized to provide fault tolerance for generator designs that incorporate dual-opposed Stirling convertors or enable single convertor, or small RPS, missions. Balancers reduce the dynamic disturbance forces created by the power piston and displacer internal moving components of a single operating convertor to meet spacecraft requirements for induced disturbance force. To improve fault tolerance for dual-opposed configurations and enable single convertor configurations, a breadboard AVRS was implemented on the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The AVRS included a linear motor, a motor mount, and a closed-loop controller able to balance out the transmitted peak dynamic disturbance using acceleration feedback. Test objectives included quantifying power and mass penalty and reduction in transmitted force over a range of ASC

  15. The SIM Lite Astrometric Observatory: engineering risk reduction activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goullioud, Renaud; Dekens, Frank; Nemati, Bijan; An, Xin; Hovland, Larry

    2010-07-01

    The SIM Lite Astrometric Observatory is a mission concept for a space-borne instrument to perform micro-arcsecond narrow-angle astrometry to search 60 to 100 nearby stars for Earth-like planets, and to perform global astrometry for a broad astrophysics program. The main enabling technology development for the mission was completed during phases A & B. While the project is waiting for the results of the ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey to proceed into flight implementation, the instrument team is currently converting the developed technology onto flight-ready engineering models. These key engineering tasks will significantly reduce the implementation risks during the flight phases C & D of the mission. The main optical interferometer components, including the astrometric beam combiner (ABC), the fine steering mechanism (FSM), the path-length control and modulation optical mechanisms (POM & MOM), focal plane camera electronics (ATC & FTC), camera cooling cryo-heat pipe, and the siderostat mechanism are currently under development. Main assemblies are built to meet flight requirements and have been or will be subjected to flight qualification level environmental testing (random vibration and thermal cycling) and performance testing. The Spectral Calibration Development Unit (SCDU), a white light interferometer testbed has recently demonstrated how to perform the spectral calibration of the instrument. The Guide 2 Telescope testbed (G2T) has demonstrated the 50 micro-arcsecond angle monitoring capability required by SIM Lite to perform astrometry. This paper summarizes recent progress in engineering risk reduction activities.

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of active noise reduction in flight helmets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forshaw, S. E.; Rylands, J. M.; Crabtree, R. B.

    1988-08-01

    The advent of high powered fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft and tracked armoured fighting vehicles has increased the level of noise to which crews are exposed. Active noise reduction (ANR) offers a means of increasing the attenuation at low and mid frequencies. It relies on sensing the sound inside a circumaural device and cancelling it by means of negative feedback through a miniature speaker inside the enclosed volume. This study was carried out to investigate laboratory procedures appropriate for measuring the effectiveness of ANR devices. The procedures were: ear-canal measurements using an acoustic test fixture (an objective procedure), and masked threshold and loudness balance tests (psycho-physical procedures). In addition, the effect of ANR on signal detection and speech reception was investigated. The results do not clearly permit one procedure to be recommended for the evaluation of ANR systems. Signal detection performance and speech intelligibility may be used, but the results are specific to the acoustic environment of the listener and the detection task or speech-system parameters of the evaluation. When the attenuation of the ANR system is measured objectively with a transducer inside the earmuff/ear-canal volume, the location of the transducer affects the observed ANR attenuations.

  17. Digital Signal Processing System for Active Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonson, William W.; Tucker, Jerry

    2002-12-01

    different adaptive noise cancellation algorithms and provide an operational prototype to understand the behavior of the system under test. DSP software was required to interface the processor with the data converters using interrupt routines. The goal is to build a complete ANC system that can be placed on a flexible circuit with added memory circuitry that also contains the power supply, sensors and actuators. This work on the digital signal processing system for active noise reduction was completed in collaboration with another ASEE Fellow, Dr. Jerry Tucker from Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA.

  18. Bioreduction of U(VI) and stability of immobilized uranium under suboxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Ding, De-xin; Li, Shi-mi; Tan, Xiang; Li, Guang-yue; Wang, Yong-dong; Xu, Fei

    2016-04-01

    In order to study the bioreduction of U(VI) and stability of immobilized uranium under suboxic conditions, microcosm were amended with ethanol, lactate and glucose, and incubated under suboxic conditions. During the incubation, total dissolved U in amended microcosms decreased from 0.95 mg/L to 0.03 mg/L. Pyrosequencing results showed that, the proportion of anaerobic microorganisms capable of reducing U(VI) under suboxic conditions was small compared with that under anoxic conditions; the proportion of aerobic and facultative anaerobic microorganisms capable of consuming the dissolved oxygen was large; and some of the facultative anaerobic microorganisms could reduce U(VI). These results indicated that different microbial communities were responsible for the bioreduction of U(VI) under suboxic and anoxic conditions. After the electron donors were exhausted, total dissolved U in the amended microcosms remained unchanged, while the U(VI)/U(IV) ratio in the solid phase of sediments increased obviously. This implied that the performance of bioreduction of the U(VI) can be maintained under suboxic condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using Cassini UVIS Data to Constrain Enceladus' Libration State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, Terry A.; Helfenstein, P.; Hansen, C.

    2010-01-01

    Given the non-spherical shape of Enceladus, the satellite may experience gravitational torques that will cause it to physically librate as it orbits Saturn. Physical libration would produce a diurnal oscillation in the longitude of Enceladus' tidal bulge, which could have a profound effect on the diurnal stresses experienced by the surface of the satellite. Although Cassini ISS has placed an observational upper limit on Enceladus' libration amplitude, stall amplitude librations may have geologically significant consequences. For example, a physical libration will affect heat production along the tiger stripes as produced by tidal shear heating and a previous study has explored possible libration states that provided better matches to Cassini CIRS observations of heat along the tiger stripes. Cassini UVIS stellar occultations provided measurements of the column density of the Enceladus plume at two different points in Enceladus' orbit and find comparable column density values. This column density may be a reflection of the amount of the tiger stripe rifts in tension and able to vent volatiles and a physical libration will also affect the fraction of tiger stripe in tension at different points in the orbit. We have modeled the expected fraction of tiger stripes in tension under different libration conditions. Without libration the amount of tiger stripe rifts in tension at both paints in the orbit would not be comparable and therefore may not allow comparable amounts of volatiles to escape. However, we identify libration conditions that do allow comparable amounts of the tiger stripes to be in tension at each point in the orbit, which might lead to comparable column densities. The librations identified coincide with possible librations states identified in the earlier study, which used Cassini CIRS observations.

  20. WFC3 TV3 Testing: System Throughput on the UVIS Build 1' Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas M.

    2008-12-01

    The UVIS flight detector (UVIS build 1') was installed in WFC3 prior to its third and final campaign of thermal vacuum ground testing. We performed testing of the end-to-end system throughput on the UVIS channel, and found that it performs near or better than expectations at most wavelengths. However, the measured throughput is significantly different than that measured for this detector in the first campaign of thermal vacuum testing. This is due to two systematic changes that generally work in opposite directions. First, the sensitivity of the ground reference detector was revised downward in the UV, which produces a corresponding change in sensitivity for the WFC3 detector. Second, the quantum yield correction (accounting for the fact that there is a finite chance of producing two electrons from a single incoming UV photon) was found to be very small for this detector, meaning that the true UV sensitivity of this detector is nearly as high as the raw sensitivity.

  1. Using High Performance Computing to Understand Roles of Labile and Nonlabile U(VI) on Hanford 300 Area Plume Longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, Peter C.; Hammond, Glenn E.

    2012-07-28

    Evolution of a hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] plume at the Hanford 300 Area bordering the Columbia River is investigated to evaluate the roles of labile and nonlabile forms of U(VI) on the longevity of the plume. A high fidelity, three-dimensional, field-scale, reactive flow and transport model is used to represent the system. Richards equation coupled to multicomponent reactive transport equations are solved for times up to 100 years taking into account rapid fluctuations in the Columbia River stage resulting in pulse releases of U(VI) into the river. The peta-scale computer code PFLOTRAN developed under a DOE SciDAC-2 project is employed inmore » the simulations and executed on ORNL's Cray XT5 supercomputer Jaguar. Labile U(VI) is represented in the model through surface complexation reactions and its nonlabile form through dissolution of metatorbernite used as a surrogate mineral. Initial conditions are constructed corresponding to the U(VI) plume already in place to avoid uncertainties associated with the lack of historical data for the waste stream. The cumulative U(VI) flux into the river is compared for cases of equilibrium and multirate sorption models and for no sorption. The sensitivity of the U(VI) flux into the river on the initial plume configuration is investigated. The presence of nonlabile U(VI) was found to be essential in explaining the longevity of the U(VI) plume and the prolonged high U(VI) concentrations at the site exceeding the EPA MCL for uranium.« less

  2. Rationally designed core-shell and yolk-shell magnetic titanate nanosheets for efficient U(VI) adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ling; Song, Shuang; Wang, Xiangxue; Niu, Fenglei; Ma, Ran; Yu, Shujun; Wen, Tao; Chen, Yuantao; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Wang, Xiangke

    2018-04-03

    The hierarchical core-shell and yolk-shell magnetic titanate nanosheets (Fe 3 O 4 @TNS) were successfully synthesized by employing magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) as interior core and intercrossed titanate nanostructures (NSs) as exterior shell. The as-prepared magnetic Fe 3 O 4 @TNS nanosheets had high specific areas (114.9 m 2  g -1 for core-shell Fe 3 O 4 @TNS and 130.1 m 2  g -1 for yolk-shell Fe 3 O 4 @TNS). Taking advantage of the unique multilayer structure, the nanosheets were suitable for eliminating U(VI) from polluted water environment. The sorption was strongly affected by pH values and weakly influenced by ionic strength, suggesting that the sorption of U(VI) on Fe 3 O 4 @TNS was mainly dominated by ion exchange and outer-sphere surface complexion. The maximum sorption capacities (Q max ) calculated from the Langmuir model were 68.59, 121.36 and 264.55 mg g -1 for core-shell Fe 3 O 4 @TNS and 82.85, 173.01 and 283.29 mg g -1 for yolk-shell Fe 3 O 4 @TNS, at 298 K, 313 K and 328 K, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and ΔG 0 ) demonstrated that the sorption process was endothermic and spontaneous. Based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses, the sorption mechanism was confirmed to be cation-exchange between interlayered Na + and UO 2 2+ . The yolk-shell Fe 3 O 4 @TNS had more extraordinary sorption efficiency than core-shell Fe 3 O 4 @TNS since the yolk-shell structure provided internal void space inside the titanate shell to accommodate more exchangeable active sites. The flexible recollection and high efficient sorption capacity made core-shell and yolk-shell Fe 3 O 4 @TNS nanosheets promising materials to eliminate U(VI) or other actinides in wastewater cleanup applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 77 FR 30310 - Information Collection Activities: Relief or Reduction in Royalty Rates; Proposed Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ...-0009; OMB Control Number 1014-0005] Information Collection Activities: Relief or Reduction in Royalty... Reduction in Royalty Rates. DATES: You must submit comments by July 23, 2012. ADDRESSES: You may submit... part 203, Relief or Reduction in Royalty Rates. OMB Control Number: 1014-0005. Abstract: The Outer...

  4. Transcription activation of a UV-inducible Clostridium perfringens bacteriocin gene by a novel sigma factor.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Bruno; Mani, Nagraj; Katayama, Seiichi; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2005-02-01

    Expression of the plasmid-encoded Clostridium perfringens gene for bacteriocin BCN5 was shown to depend in vivo and in vitro on the activity of UviA protein. UviA, also plasmid-encoded, proved to be an RNA polymerase sigma factor and was also partly autoregulatory. The uviA gene has two promoters; one provided a UviA-independent, basal level of gene expression while the stronger, UviA-dependent promoter was only utilized after the cell experienced DNA damage. As a result, BCN5 synthesis is induced by treatment with UV light or mitomycin C. UviA is related to a special class of sigma factors found to date only in Clostridium species and responsible for activating transcription of toxin genes in Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium botulinum.

  5. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Otwell, Annie E.; Sherwood, Roberts; Zhang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Metal reduction capability has been found in numerous species of environmentally abundant Gram-positive bacteria. However, understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. D. reducens has been shown to reduce not only Fe(III), but also the environmentally important contaminants U(VI) and Cr(VI). By extracting, separating, and analyzing the functional proteome of D. reducens, using a ferrozine-based assay in order to screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor,more » we have identified proteins not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. These are the protein NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble (presumably membrane) protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens, and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium.« less

  6. Size of Self-Gravity Wakes from Cassini UVIS Tracking Occultations and Ring Transparency Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Rehnberg, Morgan; Colwell, Joshua E.; Sremcevic, Miodrag

    2017-10-01

    We compare two methods for determining the size of self-gravity wakes in Saturn’s rings. Analysis of gaps seen in UVIS occultations gives a power law distribution from 10-100m (Rehnberg etal 2017). Excess variance from UVIS occultations can be related to characteristic clump widths, a method which extends the work of Showalter and Nicholson (1990) to more arbitrary shadow distributions. In the middle A ring, we use results from Colwell etal (2017) for the variance and results from Jerousek etal (2016) for the relative size of gaps and wakes to estimate the wake width consistent with the excess variance observed there. Our method gives:W= sqrt (A) * E/T2 * (1+ S/W)Where A is the area observed by UVIS in an integration period, E is the measured excess variance above Poisson statistics, T is the mean transparency, and S and W are the separation and width of self-gravity wakes in the granola bar model of Colwell etal (2006). We find:W ~ 10m and infer the wavelength of the fastest growing instabilityLambda(TOOMRE) = S + W ~ 30m.This is consistent with the calculation of the Toomre wavelength from the surface mass density of the A ring, and with the highest resolution UVIS star occultations.

  7. Size of Self-Gravity Wakes from Cassini UVIS Tracking Occultations and Ring Transparency Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Rehnberg, M.; Colwell, J. E.; Sremcevic, M.

    2017-12-01

    We compare two methods for determining the size of self-gravity wakes in Saturn's rings. Analysis of gaps seen in UVIS occultations gives a power law distribution from 10-100m (Rehnberg etal 2017). Excess variance from UVIS occultations can be related to characteristic clump widths, a method which extends the work of Showalter and Nicholson (1990) to more arbitrary shadow distributions. In the middle A ring, we use results from Colwell etal (2017) for the variance and results from Jerousek etal (2016) for the relative size of gaps and wakes to estimate the wake width consistent with the excess variance observed there. Our method gives: W= sqrt (A) * E/T2 * (1+ S/W)Where A is the area observed by UVIS in an integration period, E is the measured excess variance above Poisson statistics, T is the mean transparency, and S and W are the separation and width of self-gravity wakes in the granola bar model of Colwell etal (2006). We find: W 10m and infer the wavelength of the fastest growing instability lamdaT = S + W 30m. This is consistent with the calculation of the Toomre wavelength from the surface mass density of the A ring, and with the highest resolution UVIS star occultations.

  8. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-10-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broadermore » context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to

  9. Rare-earth element fractionation in uranium ore and its U(VI) alteration minerals

    DOE PAGES

    Balboni, Enrica; Spano, T; Cook, N; ...

    2017-10-20

    We developed a cation exchange chromatography method employing sulfonated polysterene cation resin (DOWEX AG50-X8) in order to separate rare-earth elements (REEs) from uranium-rich materials. The chemical separation scheme is designed to reduce matrix effects and consequently yield enhanced ionization efficiencies for concentration determinations of REEs without significant fractionation using solution mode-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. This method was then applied to determine REE abundances in four uraninite (ideally UO 2) samples and their associated U(VI) alteration minerals. In three of the samples analyzed, the concentration of REEs for primary uraninite are higher than those for their corresponding secondarymore » uranium alteration phases. The results for U(VI) alteration minerals of two samples indicate enrichment of the light REEs (LREEs) over the heavy REEs (HREEs). This differential mobilization is attributed to differences in the mineralogical composition of the U(VI) alteration. There is a lack of fractionation of the LREEs in the uraninite alteration rind that is composed of U(VI) minerals containing Ca 2+ as the interlayer cation (uranophane and bequerelite); contrarily, U(VI) alteration minerals containing K + and Pb 2+ as interlayer cations (fourmarierite, dumontite) indicate fractionation (enrichment) of the LREEs. Our results have implications for nuclear forensic analyses since a comparison is reported between the REE abundances for the CUP-2 (processed uranium ore) certified reference material and previously determined values for uranium ore concentrate (UOC) produced from the same U deposit (Blind River/Elliott Lake, Canada). UOCs represent the most common form of interdicted nuclear material and consequently is material frequently targeted for forensic analysis. The comparison reveals similar chondrite normalized REE signatures but variable absolute abundances. Based on the results reported here, the

  10. The U(VI) speciation influenced by a novel Paenibacillus isolate from Mont Terri Opalinus clay.

    PubMed

    Lütke, Laura; Moll, Henry; Bachvarova, Velina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Bernhard, Gert

    2013-05-21

    Bacterial cell walls have a high density of ionizable functional groups available for U(VI) binding, hence have a great potential to affect the speciation of this contaminant in the environment. The studied strain of the genus Paenibacillus is a novel isolate originating from the Mont Terri Opalinus clay formations (Switzerland) which are currently investigated as a potential host rock for future nuclear waste storage. U(VI) binding to the cell surface functional groups was studied by potentiometry combined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Four bacterial U(VI) surface complexes were identified: R-COO-UO2(+), R-O-PO3-UO2, R-O-PO3H-UO2(+), and (R-O-PO3)2-UO2(2-). The corresponding complex stability constants were calculated to be 5.33 ± 0.08, 8.89 ± 0.04, 12.92 ± 0.05, and 13.62 ± 0.08, respectively. Hence UO2(2+) displays a moderate to strong interaction with the bacterial surface functional groups. In the acidic pH range (pH 3) UO2(2+) binding onto the cell envelope is governed by coordination to hydrogen phosphoryl sites. Upon increasing the pH an increasing coordination of UO2(2+) to carboxylic and deprotonated phosphoryl sites was found. At a pH greater than 7 uranyl hydroxides dominate the speciation. Additionally the bacteria-mediated release of inorganic phosphate in dependence on [U(VI)] at different pH values was studied to assess the influence of phosphate release on U(VI) mobilization.

  11. Biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate promoted by microbially-mediated phytate hydrolysis in contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salome, Kathleen R.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Webb, Samuel M.; Sobecky, Patricia A.; Taillefert, Martial

    2017-01-01

    The bioreduction of uranium may immobilize a significant fraction of this toxic contaminant in reduced environments at circumneutral pH. In oxic and low pH environments, however, the low solubility of U(VI)-phosphate minerals also makes them good candidates for the immobilization of U(VI) in the solid phase. As inorganic phosphate is generally scarce in soils, the biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals via microbially-mediated organophosphate hydrolysis may represent the main immobilization process of uranium in these environments. In this study, contaminated sediments were incubated aerobically in two pH conditions to examine whether phytate, a naturally-occurring and abundant organophosphate in soils, could represent a potential phosphorous source to promote U(VI)-phosphate biomineralization by natural microbial communities. While phytate hydrolysis was not evident at pH 7.0, nearly complete hydrolysis was observed both with and without electron donor at pH 5.5, suggesting indigenous microorganisms express acidic phytases in these sediments. While the rate of hydrolysis of phytate generally increased in the presence of uranium, the net rate of inorganic phosphate production in solution was decreased and inositol phosphate intermediates were generated in contrast to similar incubations conducted without uranium. These findings suggest uranium stress enhanced the phytate-metabolism of the microbial community, while simultaneously inhibiting phosphatase production and/or activity by the indigenous population. Finally, phytate hydrolysis drastically decreased uranium solubility, likely due to formation of ternary sorption complexes, U(VI)-phytate precipitates, and U(VI)-phosphate minerals. Overall, the results of this study provide evidence for the ability of natural microbial communities to liberate phosphate from phytate in acidic sediments, possibly as a detoxification mechanism, and demonstrate the potential utility of phytate-promoted uranium

  12. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefert, Martial

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined thatmore » both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".« less

  13. Piezoelectric active control for workpiece chatter reduction during milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Neil D.; Zhang, Yuanming

    2004-07-01

    Regenerative chatter is a form of unstable, self-excited vibration that occurs in machining operations such as milling and turning. In high speed milling of many aircraft components, regenerative chatter is the fundamental factor that limits metal removal rate and consequently productivity. Regenerative chatter is essentially a feedback process: the cutting chip thickness produces a force between the tool and workpiece, and the dynamics of these components results in a change in the cutting chip thickness. An exciting method of avoiding chatter is to actively control the workpiece or tool during cutting. On thin walled workpieces, such as those for aerospace structural components, this can be achieved using piezoelectric devices. A wide range of control regimes could be applicable, such as feed-forward actuation, active constrained layer damping, or active damping, using either non-collocated or collocated sensors and actuators. This study focuses on active damping with collocated sensors and actuators. In this article, an experimental study is described whereby workpiece chatter during milling is reduced by using active vibration control with piezoelectric sensors and actuators.

  14. Design Activity in the Software Cost Reduction Project.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-18

    PM Physical Model S G System Generation SS Shared Services SU System Utilities . NOV M N 1600SEP A 0 JUL TOTAL 14000 MAAR cc 100 FEB :IESGN 0o 10000...iy---- .... ;’ TESTING Jan 78 Jan 79 Jan 80 Jan 81 Jan 82 Jan 83 Jan 84 Jan 85 M3ITH Fig. 7 - Shared services activities A F 0 U E C 1600 G B T...DISCUSSING 200M Jan 78 Jan 79 Jan 80 Jan 81 Jan 82 Jan 83 Jan 84 Jan 85 Fig 13 - Shared services design activities 5.~ S% 12 ......,ooU7 . . NRL REPORT 8974 A

  15. Risk Reduction from Weight Management and Physical Activity Interventions.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Melinda L; Fabian, Carol; McTiernan, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and low levels of physical activity are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer recurrence and mortality. Currently, over 65% of breast cancer survivors are overweight or obese, and fewer than 30% engage in recommended levels of physical activity. The reason for low adherence to lifestyle guidelines is likely multifactorial. Given the continuing trend of increased obesity and physical inactivity in the United States, worldwide and in breast cancer survivors, more research showing the direct effect of weight loss and/or exercise on breast cancer recurrence and mortality is needed. Many exercise interventions have examined the impact of increasing exercise on changes in quality of life, with most studies showing a favorable effect of exercise on quality of life. Smaller Phase II randomized trials using biomarkers as surrogate endpoints is likely appropriate to answer questions regarding mechanisms of action, exercise type, volume, and intensity, yet a definitive trial of weight loss and exercise on disease-free survival is critical for moving the field forward. Research is also necessary on how to disseminate lifestyle interventions into the clinic and community that lead to clinically meaningful weight losses of at least 5% that are maintained over time, and favorable sustained changes in physical activity levels. Changes in referrals, access, and reimbursement of lifestyle programs may lead to favorable changes in the prevalence of obesity and physical activity in breast cancer survivors and in turn rates of breast cancer recurrence and mortality.

  16. Extracellular reduction of uranium via Geobacter conductive pili as a protective cellular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cologgi, Dena L; Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Speers, Allison M; Kelly, Shelly D; Reguera, Gemma

    2011-09-13

    The in situ stimulation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by Geobacter bacteria leads to the concomitant precipitation of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater. Despite its promise for the bioremediation of uranium contaminants, the biological mechanism behind this reaction remains elusive. Because Fe(III) oxide reduction requires the expression of Geobacter's conductive pili, we evaluated their contribution to uranium reduction in Geobacter sulfurreducens grown under pili-inducing or noninducing conditions. A pilin-deficient mutant and a genetically complemented strain with reduced outer membrane c-cytochrome content were used as controls. Pili expression significantly enhanced the rate and extent of uranium immobilization per cell and prevented periplasmic mineralization. As a result, pili expression also preserved the vital respiratory activities of the cell envelope and the cell's viability. Uranium preferentially precipitated along the pili and, to a lesser extent, on outer membrane redox-active foci. In contrast, the pilus-defective strains had different degrees of periplasmic mineralization matching well with their outer membrane c-cytochrome content. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses demonstrated the extracellular reduction of U(VI) by the pili to mononuclear tetravalent uranium U(IV) complexed by carbon-containing ligands, consistent with a biological reduction. In contrast, the U(IV) in the pilin-deficient mutant cells also required an additional phosphorous ligand, in agreement with the predominantly periplasmic mineralization of uranium observed in this strain. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for Geobacter conductive pili in the extracellular reduction of uranium, and highlight its essential function as a catalytic and protective cellular mechanism that is of interest for the bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater.

  17. New GOES-R Risk Reduction Activities at CIRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, M. A.; Miller, S. D.; Grasso, L. D.; Haynes, J. M.; NOH, Y. J.; Forsythe, J.; Zupanski, M.; Lindsey, D. T.

    2017-12-01

    A team of atmospheric scientists at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) at the Colorado State University has been selected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) GOES-R Risk Reduction (GOES-R3) science program to develop applications to enhance the utilization of the GOES-R sensors, including the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). The selected project topics follow NOAA's Research and Development Objectives listed in its 5-year Strategic Plan. The projects will be carried out over a three-year period which started on 1 July 2017 and will end on 30 June 2019. CIRA is working on five GOES-R3 application developments: 1) Developing an Environmental Awareness Repertoire of ABI Imagery (`DEAR-ABII') to Advise the Operational Weather Forecaster. DEAR-ABII maximizes the vast potential of the new GOES-R/GOES-16 sensor technology. 2) GOES-R ABI channel differencing used to reveal cloud-free zones of `precursors of convective initiation'. This product identifies where convective initiation may occur in cloud free skies. 3) Improving the ABI Cloud Layers Product for Multiple Layer Cloud Systems and Aviation Forecast Applications. This project aims to improve the GOES-16 cloud layer product by providing information on the boundaries of cloud layers even when one layer overlies another. 4) Using the New Capabilities of GOES-R to Improve Blended, Multisensor Water Vapor Products for Forecasters. GOES-R TPW retrievals will be merged with TPW derived from polar orbiter and surface data to improve the operational NOAA blended TPW product. 5) Data assimilation of GLM observations in HWRF/GSI system. Assimilation of GOES-R GLM observations for the NOAA operational hurricane model with the goal to improve operational hurricane forecasting. Examples for each of these applications will be presented.

  18. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray-induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from themore » cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the

  19. Uranium(VI) reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron in anoxic batch systems: the role of Fe(II) and Fe(III).

    PubMed

    Yan, Sen; Chen, Yongheng; Xiang, Wu; Bao, Zhengyu; Liu, Chongxuan; Deng, Baolin

    2014-12-01

    The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in U(VI) reduction by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nanoFe0) was investigated using two iron chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and triethanolamine (TEA) under a CO2-free anoxic condition. The results showed that U(VI) reduction was strongly inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA in a pH range from 6.9 to 9.0. For instance, at pH 6.9 the observed U(VI) reduction rates decreased by 81% and 82% in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA, respectively. The inhibition was attributed to the formation of stable complexes between 1,10-phenanthroline and Fe(II) or TEA and Fe(III). In the absence of iron chelators, U(VI) reduction can be enhanced by surface-bound Fe(II) on nanoFe0. Our results suggested that Fe(III) and Fe(II) possibly acted as an electron shuttle to ferry the electrons from nanoFe0 to U(VI), therefore a combined system with Fe(II), Fe(III) and nanoFe0 could facilitate U(VI) reductive immobilization in the contaminated groundwater.

  20. Uranium(VI) reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron in anoxic batch systems: The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Sen; Chen, Yongheng; Xiang, Wu

    2014-12-01

    The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on U(VI) reduction by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nanoFe0) was investigated using two iron chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and triethanolamine (TEA) under a CO2-free anoxic condition. The results showed U(VI) reduction was strongly inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA in a pH range from 6.92 to 9.03. For instance, at pH 6.92 the observed U(VI) reduction rates decreased by 80.7% and 82.3% in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA, respectively. The inhibition was attributed to the formation of stable complexes between 1,10-phenanthroline and Fe(II) or TEA and Fe(III). In the absence of iron chelators, U(VI) reduction can bemore » enhanced by surface-bound Fe(II) on nanoFe0. Our results suggested that Fe(III) and Fe(II) probably acted as an electron shuttle to mediate the transfer of electrons from nanoFe0 to U(VI), therefore a combined system with Fe(II), Fe(III) and nanoFe0 can facilitate the U(VI) reductive immobilization in the contaminated groundwater.« less

  1. THE ACTIVITY OF YEAST INVERTASE AS A FUNCTION OF OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL

    PubMed Central

    Sizer, Irwin W.

    1942-01-01

    The activity of yeast invertase as a function of oxidation-reduction potential has been investigated using a large number of oxidants and reductants. The activity is constant over the range of Eh from –270 to +600 mv., but above Eh = +600 mv. there is a sharp decrease in activity reaching 0 at Eh = +1,000 mv. The inhibiting action of strong oxidants is upon the enzyme rather than on the substrate and appears to be essentially irreversible Experiments indicate that the inhibiting action of strong oxidants on invertase is primarily related to their high oxidation-reduction potential rather than to a specific toxic action unrelated to Eh. The effects of oxidation-reduction potential upon invertase activity are independent of the purity of the enzyme, since they are the same for commercial invertases, fresh bakers' yeast, powdered bakers' yeast, brewers' yeast, and highly purified invertase. Possible mechanisms involved in the inactivation of invertase by oxidants are discussed. PMID:19873283

  2. Boreal winter comparison of auroral images from Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, J. F.; Germany, G.; Maddox, W.; Fillingim, M.; Parks, G.; Mende, S.

    2004-12-01

    Same-scene images made with Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV are compared for the boreal winter of 2000-2001. The results of the comparison are used to determine whether the use of both instruments could lead to a better evaluation of the average precipitation and total energy input than with either one individually. These results are a part of a broader investigation to quantitatively compare conjugate images using both instruments and to correlate observed asymmetries with solar wind and seasonal parameters.

  3. RFI Risk Reduction Activities Using New Goddard Digital Radiometry Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Damon; Kim, Ed; Young, Peter; Miles, Lynn; Wong, Mark; Morris, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The Goddard Radio-Frequency Explorer (GREX) is the latest fast-sampling radiometer digital back-end processor that will be used for radiometry and radio-frequency interference (RFI) surveying at Goddard Space Flight Center. The system is compact and deployable, with a mass of about 40 kilograms. It is intended to be flown on aircraft. GREX is compatible with almost any aircraft, including P-3, twin otter, C-23, C-130, G3, and G5 types. At a minimum, the system can function as a clone of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) ground-based development unit [1], or can be a completely independent system that is interfaced to any radiometer, provided that frequency shifting to GREX's intermediate frequency is performed prior to sampling. If the radiometer RF is less than 200MHz, then the band can be sampled and acquired directly by the system. A key feature of GREX is its ability to simultaneously sample two polarization channels simultaneously at up to 400MSPS, 14-bit resolution each. The sampled signals can be recorded continuously to a 23 TB solid-state RAID storage array. Data captures can be analyzed offline using the supercomputing facilities at Goddard Space Flight Center. In addition, various Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) - amenable radiometer signal processing and RFI detection algorithms can be implemented directly on the GREX system because it includes a high-capacity Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA prototyping system that is user customizable.

  4. Reduction of interior sound fields in flexible cylinders by active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of interior sound reduction through active control of a thin flexible shell's vibrational response are presently evaluated in view of an analytical model. The noise source is a single exterior acoustic monopole. The active control model is evaluated for harmonic excitation; the results obtained indicate spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 20 dB over the source plane, for acoustic resonant conditions inside the cavity.

  5. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  6. Uranium Redox Transformations after U(VI) Coprecipitation with Magnetite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pidchenko, Ivan; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Yokosawa, Tadahiro; Finck, Nicolas; Bahl, Sebastian; Schild, Dieter; Polly, Robert; Bohnert, Elke; Rossberg, André; Göttlicher, Jörg; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg; Schäfer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst; Vitova, Tonya

    2017-02-21

    Uranium redox states and speciation in magnetite nanoparticles coprecipitated with U(VI) for uranium loadings varying from 1000 to 10 000 ppm are investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is demonstrated that the U M 4 high energy resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure (HR-XANES) method is capable to clearly characterize U(IV), U(V), and U(VI) existing simultaneously in the same sample. The contributions of the three different uranium redox states are quantified with the iterative transformation factor analysis (ITFA) method. U L 3 XAS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveal that initially sorbed U(VI) species recrystallize to nonstoichiometric UO 2+x nanoparticles within 147 days when stored under anoxic conditions. These U(IV) species oxidize again when exposed to air. U M 4 HR-XANES data demonstrate strong contribution of U(V) at day 10 and that U(V) remains stable over 142 days under ambient conditions as shown for magnetite nanoparticles containing 1000 ppm U. U L 3 XAS indicates that this U(V) species is protected from oxidation likely incorporated into octahedral magnetite sites. XAS results are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Further characterization of the samples include powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fe 2p X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  7. The SMILE Ultra-Violet Imager (UVI): Instrument design and performance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanswick, E.; Donovan, E.; Wang, C.; Hubert, B. A.; Enno, G.; Wang, Y.; Unick, C.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Raab, W.; Adamovic, M.; Escoubet, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) mission will utilize global (northern hemispheric) auroral images from an UltraViolet Imager (SMILE-UVI) to reveal magnetospheric system-level dynamics and their effects on the ionosphere and atmosphere. SMILE-UVI is a newly designed imager that is a partnership between the University of Calgary, the National Space Science Center (NSSC) and the University of Liège. The novel four mirror on-axis design is capable of imaging the aurora in full daylit conditions with sufficient resolution to enable cusp and polar cap boundary identification. The imager will also produce data of night-side auroral dynamics at an unprecedented spatial and temporal scales. In this paper, we discuss the science objectives of SMILE-UVI, the overall instrument design and the results of full instrument performance simulations utilizing modelled aurora, dayglow and solar Rayleigh scattering. We also briefly discuss the trade space for instrument performance and expected data products relative to previous global auroral imaging missions.

  8. Density and Bending Waves in Saturn's Rings from Cassini UVIS Star Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, L. W.

    2007-10-01

    In the first three years of its orbital tour at Saturn, Cassini observed 62 stellar occultations with the High Speed Photometer channel of the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS). Radial coverage was not complete for many occultations, while others sampled the same ring plane radius at two longitudes. Sampling rates and diffraction give a radial resolution of 10 m in some occultations. The large number of occultations and high spatial resolution allow us to explore both fine-scale and large-scale structure in the radial and azimuthal dimensions. Here we present preliminary results on the satellite density and bending waves seen in UVIS occultation data. The linear density wave theory of Shu et al. (1985) reproduces the phases, though not the amplitudes, of the first-order density waves we have analyzed so far. The dispersion of these waves provides a measure of the local surface mass density. We find evidence for variations in the background surface mass density within individual wavetrains. We present a summary of density wave measurements and surface mass densities from this initial set of occultations observed by UVIS. This research is supported by the Cassini Project through NASA/JPL.

  9. Complexation of UVI with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid in acidic to basic solutions.

    PubMed

    Reed, Wendy A; Rao, Linfeng; Zanonato, PierLuigi; Garnov, Alexander Yu; Powell, Brian A; Nash, Kenneth L

    2007-04-02

    Complexation of UVI with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) in acidic to basic solutions has been studied with multiple techniques. A number of 1:1 (UO2H3L), 1:2 (UO2HjL2 where j = +4, +3, +2, +1, 0, and -1), and 2:2 [(UO2)2HjL2 where j = +1, 0, and -1] complexes form, but the 1:2 complexes are the major species in a wide pH range. Thermodynamic parameters (formation constants and enthalpy and entropy of complexation) were determined by potentiometry and calorimetry. Data indicate that the complexation of UVI with HEDPA is exothermic, favored by the enthalpy of complexation. This is in contrast to the complexation of UVI with dicarboxylic acids in which the enthalpy term usually is unfavorable. Results from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and 31P NMR have confirmed the presence of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:2 UVIHEDPA complexes.

  10. HST/WFC3: Evolution of the UVIS Channel's Charge Transfer Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosmeyer, Catherine; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Anderson, Jay; WFC3 Team

    2016-06-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) contains both an IR and a UVIS channel. After more than six years on orbit, the UVIS channel performance remains stable; however, on-orbit radiation damage has caused the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of UVIS's two CCDs to degrade. This degradation is seen as vertical charge 'bleeding' from sources during readout and its effect evolves as the CCDs age. The WFC3 team has developed software to perform corrections that push the charge back to the sources, although it cannot recover faint sources that have been bled out entirely. Observers can mitigate this effect in various ways such as by placing sources near the amplifiers, observing bright targets, and by increasing the total background to at least 12 electrons, either by using a broader filter, lengthening exposure time, or post-flashing. We present results from six years of calibration data to re-evaluate the best level of total background for mitigating CTE loss and to re-verify that the pixel-based CTE correction software is performing optimally over various background levels. In addition, we alert observers that CTE-corrected products are now available for retrieval from MAST as part of the CALWF3 v3.3 pipeline upgrade.

  11. Functionalized Sugarcane Bagasse for U(VI) Adsorption from Acid and Alkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Su, Shouzheng; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Jing, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun

    2018-01-15

    The highly efficient removal of uranium from mine tailings effluent, radioactive wastewater and enrichment from seawater is of great significance for the development of nuclear industry. In this work, we prepared an efficient U(VI) adsorbent by EDTA modified sugarcane bagasse (MESB) with a simple process. The prepared adsorbent preserves high adsorptive capacity for UO 2 2+ (pH 3.0) and uranyl complexes, such as UO 2 (OH) + , (UO 2 ) 2 (OH) 2 2+ and (UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 + (pH 4.0 and pH 5.0) and good repeatability in acidic environment. The maximum adsorption capacity for U(VI) at pH 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 is 578.0, 925.9 and 1394.1 mg/g and the adsorption capacity loss is only 7% after five cycles. With the pH from 3.0 to 5.0, the inhibitive effects of Na + and K + decreased but increased of Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ . MESB also exhibits good adsorption for [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- at pH 8.3 from 10 mg/L to 3.3 μg/L. Moreover, MESB could effectively extract U(VI) from simulated seawater in the presence of other metals ions. This work provided a general and efficient uranyl enriched material for nuclear industry.

  12. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-min

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantialmore » biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.« less

  13. Microbial Activity in Aquatic Environments Measured by Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reduction and Intercomparison with Commonly Used Methods

    PubMed Central

    Griebler, Christian; Slezak, Doris

    2001-01-01

    A new method to determine microbial (bacterial and fungal) activity in various freshwater habitats is described. Based on microbial reduction of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to dimethyl sulfide (DMS), our DMSO reduction method allows measurement of the respiratory activity in interstitial water, as well as in the water column. DMSO is added to water samples at a concentration (0.75% [vol/vol] or 106 mM) high enough to compete with other naturally occurring electron acceptors, as determined with oxygen and nitrate, without stimulating or inhibiting microbial activity. Addition of NaN3, KCN, and formaldehyde, as well as autoclaving, inhibited the production of DMS, which proves that the reduction of DMSO is a biotic process. DMSO reduction is readily detectable via the formation of DMS even at low microbial activities. All water samples showed significant DMSO reduction over several hours. Microbially reduced DMSO is recovered in the form of DMS from water samples by a purge and trap system and is quantified by gas chromatography and detection with a flame photometric detector. The DMSO reduction method was compared with other methods commonly used for assessment of microbial activity. DMSO reduction activity correlated well with bacterial production in predator-free batch cultures. Cell-production-specific DMSO reduction rates did not differ significantly in batch cultures with different nutrient regimes but were different in different growth phases. Overall, a cell-production-specific DMSO reduction rate of 1.26 × 10−17 ± 0.12 × 10−17 mol of DMS per produced cell (mean ± standard error; R2 = 0.78) was calculated. We suggest that the relationship of DMSO reduction rates to thymidine and leucine incorporation is linear (the R2 values ranged from 0.783 to 0.944), whereas there is an exponential relationship between DMSO reduction rates and glucose uptake, as well as incorporation (the R2 values ranged from 0.821 to 0.931). Based on our results, we conclude that

  14. Influence of (calcium-)uranyl-carbonate complexation on U(VI) sorption on Ca- and Na-bentonites.

    PubMed

    Meleshyn, A; Azeroual, M; Reeck, T; Houben, G; Riebe, B; Bunnenberg, C

    2009-07-01

    The influence of uranyl-carbonate and calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexations on the kinetics of U(VI) (approximately 3.4 x 10(-3) mol L(-1)) sorption from NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2 solutions on Na- and Ca-bentonites at circumneutral ambient conditions was investigated. Complexation of U(VI) in Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) aqueous species, dominating the U(VI) speciation in Ca(NO3)2 solution, reduces its adsorption on bentonite by a factor of 2-3 in comparison with that in (UO2)2CO3(OH)3- species, dominating in NaNO3 solution, within the studied period of time (21 days). As a result of the dissolution of accessory calcite, Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) can be formed in the initially Ca-free solution in contact with either Na- or Ca-bentonite. U(VI) adsorption on Na-bentonite is a factor of approximately 2 higher than that on Ca-bentonite for solutions with the Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) complex dominating aqueous U(VI) speciation. This favors use of Na-bentonite over that of Ca-bentonite in final disposal of radioactive waste. Furthermore, the observed strong correlation between U(VI) adsorption and Mg release as a result of montmorillonite dissolution indicates in agreement with previous findings that under the applied conditions U(VI) is adsorbed on the edge surface of montmorillonite, which is a major mineral phase of the studied clays.

  15. Reduction in leisure activity and well-being during the transition to widowhood.

    PubMed

    Janke, Megan C; Nimrod, Galit; Kleiber, Douglas A

    2008-01-01

    There is relatively little evidence available about how leisure involvement changes with the death of a spouse and even less about how leisure activity is associated with the health and well-being of widows during this transition. Using data from the Americans Changing Lives (ACL) dataset, this study of 154 widows investigated change in leisure involvement during the transition to widowhood and examined the relationship between leisure activity reduction and widows' well-being. Results indicated a majority of widows reduced their involvement in leisure activity. Path models revealed that depressive symptoms and recovery from spousal loss were predictors of activity reduction, providing more support for the causal relationship of well-being influencing activity involvement than for activity influencing well-being.

  16. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity of Platinum Thin Films with Different Densities

    SciTech Connect

    Ergul, Busra; Begum, Mahbuba; Kariuki, Nancy

    2017-08-24

    Platinum thin films with different densities were grown on glassy carbon electrodes by high pressure sputtering deposition and evaluated as oxygen reduction reaction catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells using cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode techniques in aqueous perchloric acid electrolyte. The electrochemically active surface area, ORR mass activity (MA) and specific activity (SA) of the thin film electrodes were obtained. MA and SA were found to be higher for low-density films than for high-density film.

  17. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Karyn L; Rogers, Daniel R; Johnston, David T; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, [Formula: see text], DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  18. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kiana L.; Rogers, Karyn L.; Rogers, Daniel R.; Johnston, David T.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42−, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  19. Atomically dispersed Ni(i) as the active site for electrochemical CO2 reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong Bin; Hung, Sung-Fu; Liu, Song; Yuan, Kaidi; Miao, Shu; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Xiang; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Cai, Weizheng; Chen, Rong; Gao, Jiajian; Yang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Wei; Huang, Yanqiang; Chen, Hao Ming; Li, Chang Ming; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Bin

    2018-02-01

    Electrochemical reduction of CO2 to chemical fuel offers a promising strategy for managing the global carbon balance, but presents challenges for chemistry due to the lack of effective electrocatalyst. Here we report atomically dispersed nickel on nitrogenated graphene as an efficient and durable electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction. Based on operando X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, the monovalent Ni(i) atomic center with a d9 electronic configuration was identified as the catalytically active site. The single-Ni-atom catalyst exhibits high intrinsic CO2 reduction activity, reaching a specific current of 350 A gcatalyst-1 and turnover frequency of 14,800 h-1 at a mild overpotential of 0.61 V for CO conversion with 97% Faradaic efficiency. The catalyst maintained 98% of its initial activity after 100 h of continuous reaction at CO formation current densities as high as 22 mA cm-2.

  20. Active and stable carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoon T.; Won, Jong H.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon-based materials, such as nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays, Co3O4/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrids and carbon nanotube–graphene complexes have shown respectable oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media. Although certainly promising, the performance of these materials does not yet warrant implementation in the energy conversion/storage devices utilizing basic electrolytes, for example, alkaline fuel cells, metal-air batteries and certain electrolysers. Here we demonstrate a new type of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst obtained from iron acetate as an iron precursor and from cyanamide as a nitrogen and carbon nanotube precursor in a simple, scalable and single-step method. The composite has the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media of any non-precious metal catalysts. When used at a sufficiently high loading, this catalyst also outperforms the most active platinum-based catalysts. PMID:23715281

  1. Effect of oxidation and catalytic reduction of trace organic contaminants on their activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Schoutteten, Klaas V K M; Hennebel, Tom; Dheere, Ellen; Bertelkamp, Cheryl; De Ridder, David J; Maes, Synthia; Chys, Michael; Van Hulle, Stijn W H; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Verliefde, Arne R D

    2016-12-01

    The combination of ozonation and activated carbon (AC) adsorption is an established technology for removal of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs). In contrast to oxidation, reduction of TrOCs has recently gained attention as well, however less attention has gone to the combination of reduction with AC adsorption. In addition, no literature has compared the removal behavior of reduction vs. ozonation by-products by AC. In this study, the effect of pre-ozonation vs pre-catalytic reduction on the AC adsorption efficiency of five TrOCs and their by-products was compared. All compounds were susceptible to oxidation and reduction, however the catalytic reductive treatment proved to be a slower reaction than ozonation. New oxidation products were identified for dinoseb and new reduction products were identified for carbamazepine, bromoxynil and dinoseb. In terms of compatibility with AC adsorption, the influence of the oxidative and reductive pretreatments proved to be compound dependent. Oxidation products of bromoxynil and diatrizoic acid adsorbed better than their parent TrOCs, but oxidation products of atrazine, carbamazepine and dinoseb showed a decreased adsorption. The reductive pre-treatment showed an enhanced AC adsorption for dinoseb and a major enhancement for diatrizoic acid. For atrazine and bromoxynil, no clear influence on adsorption was noted, while for carbamazepine, the reductive pretreatment resulted in a decreased AC affinity. It may thus be concluded that when targeting mixtures of TrOCs, a trade-off will undoubtedly have to be made towards overall reactivity and removal of the different constituents, since no single treatment proves to be superior to the other. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    PubMed Central

    Otwell, A.E.; Sherwood, R.W.; Zhang, S.; Nelson, O.D.; Li, Z.; Lin, H.; Callister, S.J.; Richardson, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. Using non-denaturing separations and mass spectrometry identification, in combination with a colorimetric screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins from the D. reducens proteome not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. The proteins identified are NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:25389064

  3. Origin of enhanced activity in palladium alloy electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Shao, Minhua; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Junliang; Adzic, Radoslav

    2007-06-21

    We explored the origin of the enhanced activity of Pd-alloy electrocatalysts for the O2 reduction reaction by correlating the electrocatalytic activity of intrinsic Pd and Pt surfaces and Pd and Pt overlayers on several substrates with their electronic properties, and established the volcano-type dependence of O2 reduction activity on the binding energy of oxygen and the d-band center of the top metal layer. Intrinsic Pd and Pt surfaces bind oxygen too firmly to allow efficient removal of the adsorbed reaction intermediates. Therefore, they do not have the highest activity and are not on the top of the volcano plot. A Pd overlayer on a Pd3Fe(111) alloy, was predicted to lie on top of the volcano plot, and thus, it appears to be the most active catalyst among investigated ones because of its moderate interaction with oxygen. The results can help in designing better electrocatalysts for fuel cells and other applications.

  4. WFC3/UVIS Updated 2017 Chip-Dependent Inverse Sensitivity Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, S. E.; Mack, J.; Bajaj, V.; Khandrika, H.

    2017-06-01

    We present chip-dependent inverse sensitivity values recomputed for the 42 full frame filters based on the analysis of standard star observations with the WFC3/UVIS imager obtained between 2009 and 2015. Chip-dependent inverse sensitivities reported in the image header are now for the 'infinite' aperture, which is defined to have a radius of 6 arcseconds (151 pixels), and supercede the 2016 photometry header keyword values (PHOTFLAM, PHTFLAM1, PHTFLAM2), which correspond to a 0.3962 arcsecond (10 pixel) aperture. These new values are implemented in the June 2017 IMPHTTAB delivery and are concordant with the current synthetic photometry tables in the reference file database (CRDS). Since approximately 90% of the light is enclosed within 10 pixels, the new keyword values are 10% smaller. We also compute inverse sensitivities for an aperture with radius of 0.3962 arcseconds. Compared to the 2016 implementation, these new inverse sensitivity values differ by less than 0.5%, on average, for the same aperture. Values for the filters F200LP, F350LP, F600LP and F487N changed by more than 1% for UVIS1. UVIS2 values that changed by more than 1% are for the filters F350LP, F600LP, F850LP, F487N, and F814W. The 2017 VEGAmag zeropoint values in the UV change by up to 0.1 mag compared to 2016 and are calculated using the CALPSEC STIS spectrum for Vega. In 2016, the zeropoints were calculated with the CALSPEC Vega model.

  5. Retrieval of Composition and Shadowing Properties of Saturn's Rings from Cassini UVIS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, E. T.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.

    2017-12-01

    The rings of Saturn consist of centimeter-to-meter sized particles that are covered by a layer of regolith whose grains consist of water ice and some small amount of contaminant that is delivered to the rings through micrometeorite impacts. The mixing of the water ice and meteoritic material is affected by inter-particle collisions and from the meteoritic impacts. Two types of mixtures considered in this investigation are 1) discrete grains of water ice and contaminant and 2) grains of water ice with inclusions of contaminant embedded within the grain. The rough regolith-covered surfaces may result in shadowing between grains that darkens the observed rings reflectance spectra. We compared reflectance spectra of the rings at far ultraviolet wavelengths taken by the Cassini UVIS to models of the rings that include a shadowing function with both types of mixtures and with different contaminant materials. One contaminant that we used was the dark material of Comet 67P, where we retrieved the single scattering albedo at UVIS wavelengths from reflectance spectra measured by the ALICE spectrograph on the Rosetta spacecraft. We compared the reflectance over a range of phase angles with a Hapke model that included macroscopic roughness in order to account for shadowing in the Comet 67P material. We retrieved the ring particle albedo at discrete radial regions in the rings using reflectance spectra over a wide range of phase angles. We corrected the retrieved ring particle albedo for roughness using the shadowing function and then compared the "smooth" ring particle albedo to compositional models. We found that a two-component discrete grain model consisting of greater than ninety percent water ice and contaminant from either Triton tholin or material spectrally similar to Comet 67P were indistinguishable when compared to the UVIS spectra. This suggests a common darkening material and/or processing between the rings and Comet 67P.

  6. Organic layer formation and sorption of U(vi) on acetamide diethylphosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Eva C; Mason, Harris E; Shusterman, Jennifer A; Lukens, Wayne W

    2017-04-19

    Acetamide diethylphosphonate (AcPhos)-functionalized silica has been shown to have a high affinity for U(vi) in pH 2-3 nitric acid. Previous work with AcPhos-functionalized silica has focused on actinide and lanthanide extraction under various conditions, but has shown poor reproducibility in the functionalization process. For this work, four AcPhos-functionalized SBA-15 materials were synthesized and evaluated based on their U(vi) sorption capacity and their stability in nitric acid. Materials synthesized using pyridine as a basic catalyst were shown to form a greater fraction of polymeric structures at the silica surface, which correlated with higher structural integrity upon contact with acidic solutions. Single-pulse 31 P and 1 H NMR spectra of these materials show evidence of phosphonic acid groups, as well as hydrogen-bonding interactions either between ligands or with the silica surface. Additionally, these materials were found to have significantly higher U(vi) sorption capacities and K eq values than the materials synthesized without pyridine, most likely due to the ion-exchange properties of the phosphonic acid groups. The 31 P- 31 P DQ-DRENAR NMR technique was used to compare the average strength of dipolar coupling interactions between phosphorus atoms for the four materials. Because the strength of dipolar coupling interactions depends on the number and proximity of neighboring spins, this technique provides information about the average density of ligands on the surface. The conventional functionalization procedure yielded materials with the lowest average surface ligand density, while those using extended reaction times and the pyridine base catalyst yielded materials with higher surface ligand densities.

  7. Modeling of the Enceladus water vapor jets for interpreting UVIS star and solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the Cassini mission is jets emitting from the southern pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The composition of the jets is water vapor and salty ice grains with traces of organic compounds. Jets, merging into a wide plume at a distance, are observed by multiple instruments on Cassini. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along “tiger stripes” [Porco et al. 2014]. There is a recent controversy on the question if some of these jets are “optical illusion” caused by geometrical overlap of continuous source eruptions along the “tiger stripes” in the field of view of ISS [Spitale et al. 2015]. The Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume of Enceladus. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. These observations directly provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument and could help distinguish between the presence of only localized or also continuous sources. We use Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model the plume of Enceladus with multiple (or continuous) jet sources. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. The models result in the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densities derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets. The specific geometry of the UVIS observations helps to estimate the production rates and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted by the individual jets.Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422-1425 (2006); Hansen, C. J. et al, GRL 38:L11202 (2011

  8. Saturn's F ring as seen by Cassini UVIS: Kinematics and statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole; Sremčević, Miodrag; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new orbital model of Saturn's F ring core based on 93 occultations by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and the Voyager radio and stellar occultations. We demonstrate that the core, despite its intrinsic variability, is well-described as an inclined, freely precessing ellipse. We find that post-fit residuals with a root-mean-square of 24 km are genuine, representing the well-known non-Keplerian features observed in the ring. Over the nearly 4 years of UVIS observations we find the residual variance to increase, coincident with the apse anti-alignment of Prometheus and F ring core in December 2009. This increase in dynamical F ring core temperature most likely reflects the ever-stronger perturbations by Prometheus. Our results are in good agreement with Earth-based and HST observations as well as Voyager imaging. Cassini UVIS stellar occultations resolve the F ring at unprecedented resolutions of a few meters and we identify the F ring core and inner and outer strands. We infer their normal optical depth and full width at half maximum (FWHM) and show that core and strands form distinct morphological groups. Typically, a strand is about ten times wider than the core (average FWHM is ˜10 km) while having a ten times smaller optical depth. Unlike in pre-Cassini occultations the F ring core displays significant optical depth with in some cases >3. In many cases we find a narrow optically thick component (˜ few km and τ > 0.5) embedded in the F ring core. Entertaining the possibility that this is the actual, "true" F ring core then UVIS results suggest that this "true" core is highly non-continuous. In addition, we report the detection of a previously unknown structure - dubbed the "secondary" as it visually resembles the F ring core. Its morphology is similar to that of the core in optical depth and FWHM and it displays individual opaque features. Despite its core-like appearance, we show that its kinematics is consistent with that of

  9. Winter Comparison of Auroral Images from Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.; Germany, Glynn; Maddox, Will

    2004-01-01

    Same-scene images made with Polar UVI and IMAGE Fuv are compared for the period between 2000 and 2001. The comparison indicates that the use of both instruments may lead to a better evaluation of the average precipitation than with either one individually. The evaluation of total energy input is however, not improved With use of both measurements. These results are a part of a larger investigation to quantitatively compare conjugate images using both instruments and to correlate observed asymmetries with solar wind and seasonal parameters.

  10. Statistical approach to evaluating active reduction of crack propagation in aluminum panels with piezoelectric actuator patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, R.; Stapp, C.; Hanselka, H.

    2011-08-01

    Fatigue cracks in light-weight shell or panel structures may lead to major failures when used for sealing or load-carrying purposes. This paper describes investigations into the potential of piezoelectric actuator patches that are applied to the surface of an already cracked thin aluminum panel to actively reduce the propagation of fatigue cracks. With active reduction of fatigue crack propagation, uncertainties in the cracked structure's strength, which always remain present even when the structure is used under damage tolerance conditions, e.g. airplane fuselages, could be lowered. The main idea is to lower the cyclic stress intensity factor near the crack tip with actively induced mechanical compression forces using thin low voltage piezoelectric actuator patches applied to the panel's surface. With lowering of the cyclic stress intensity, the rate of crack propagation in an already cracked thin aluminum panel will be reduced significantly. First, this paper discusses the proper placement and alignment of thin piezoelectric actuator patches near the crack tip to induce the mechanical compression forces necessary for reduction of crack propagation by numerical simulations. Second, the potential for crack propagation reduction will be investigated statistically by an experimental sample test examining three cases: a cracked aluminum host structure (i) without, (ii) with but passive, and (iii) with activated piezoelectric actuator patches. It will be seen that activated piezoelectric actuator patches lead to a significant reduction in crack propagation.

  11. Drop punt kicking induces eccentric knee flexor weakness associated with reductions in hamstring electromyographic activity.

    PubMed

    Duhig, Steven J; Williams, Morgan D; Minett, Geoffrey M; Opar, David; Shield, Anthony J

    2017-06-01

    To examine the effect of 100 drop punt kicks on isokinetic knee flexor strength and surface electromyographic activity of bicep femoris and medial hamstrings. Randomized control study. Thirty-six recreational footballers were randomly assigned to kicking or control groups. Dynamometry was conducted immediately before and after the kicking or 10min of sitting (control). Eccentric strength declined more in the kicking than the control group (p<0.001; d=1.60), with greater reductions in eccentric than concentric strength after kicking (p=0.001; d=0.92). No significant between group differences in concentric strength change were observed (p=0.089; d=0.60). The decline in normalized eccentric hamstring surface electromyographic activity (bicep femoris and medial hamstrings combined) was greater in the kicking than the control group (p<0.001; d=1.78), while changes in concentric hamstring surface electromyographic activity did not differ between groups (p=0.863; d=0.04). Post-kicking reductions in surface electromyographic activity were greater in eccentric than concentric actions for both bicep femoris (p=0.008; d=0.77) and medial hamstrings (p<0.001; d=1.11). In contrast, the control group exhibited smaller reductions in eccentric than concentric hamstring surface electromyographic activity for bicep femoris (p=0.026; d=0.64) and medial hamstrings (p=0.032; d=0.53). Reductions in bicep femoris surface electromyographic activity were correlated with eccentric strength decline (R=0.645; p=0.007). Reductions in knee flexor strength and hamstring surface electromyographic activity are largely limited to eccentric contractions and this should be considered when planning training loads in Australian Football. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rotorcraft In-Plane Noise Reduction Using Active/Passive Approaches with Induced Vibration Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Miang Hwee

    A comprehensive study of the use of active and passive approaches for in-plane noise reduction, including the vibrations induced during noise reduction, was conducted on a hingeless rotor configuration resembling the MBB BO-105 rotor. First, a parametric study was performed to examine the effects of rotor blade stiffness on the vibration and noise reduction performance of a 20%c plain trailing edge flap and a 1.5%c sliding microflap. This was accomplished using a comprehensive code AVINOR (for Active VIbration and NOise Reduction). A two-dimensional unsteady reduced order aerodynamic model (ROM), using the Rational Function Approximation approach and CFD-based oscillatory aerodynamic load data, was used in the comprehensive code. The study identified a hingeless blade configuration with torsional frequency of 3.17/rev as an optimum configuration for studying vibration and noise reduction using on-blade control devices such as flaps or microflaps. Subsequently, a new suite of computational tools capable of predicting in-plane low frequency sound pressure level (LFSPL) rotorcraft noise and its control was developed, replacing the acoustic module WOPWOP in AVINOR with a new acoustic module HELINOIR (for HELIcopter NOIse Reduction), which overcomes certain limitations associated with WOPWOP. The new suite, consisting of the AVINOR/HELINOIR combination, was used to study active flaps, as well as microflaps operating in closed-loop mode for in-plane noise reduction. An alternative passive in-plane noise reduction approach using modification to the blade tip in the 10%R outboard region was also studied. The new suite consisting of the AVINOR/HELINOIR combination based on a compact aeroacoustic model was validated by comparing with wind tunnel test results, and subsequently verified by comparing with computational results. For active control, the in-plane noise reduction obtained with a single 20%c plain trailing edge flap during level flight at a moderate advance ratio

  13. Characterization of Azo Reduction Activity in a Novel Ascomycete Yeast Strain

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Patrícia A.; Cardoso, M. Helena; Cavaco-Paulo, A.; Ramalho, M. Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Several model azo dyes are reductively cleaved by growing cultures of an ascomycete yeast species, Issatchenkia occidentalis. In liquid media containing 0.2 mM dye and 2% glucose in a mineral salts base, more than 80% of the dyes are removed in 15 h, essentially under microaerophilic conditions. Under anoxic conditions, decolorization does not occur, even in the presence of pregrown cells. Kinetic assays of azo reduction activities in quasi-resting cells demonstrated the following: (i) while the optimum pH depends on dye structure, the optimum pH range was observed in the acidic range; (ii) the maximum decolorizing activity occurs in the late exponential phase; and (iii) the temperature profile approaches the typical bell-shaped curve. These results indirectly suggest the involvement of an enzyme activity in azo dye reduction. The decolorizing activity of I. occidentalis is still observed, although at a lower level, when the cells switch to aerobic respiration at the expense of ethanol after glucose exhaustion in the culture medium. Decolorization ceased when all the ethanol was consumed; this observation, along with other lines of evidence, suggests that azo dye reduction depends on cell growth. Anthraquinone-2-sulfonate, a redox mediator, enhances the reduction rates of the N,N-dimethylaniline-based dyes and reduces those of the 2-naphthol-based dyes, an effect which seems to be compatible with a thermodynamic factor. The dye reduction products were tested as carbon and nitrogen sources. 1-Amino-2-naphthol was used as a carbon and nitrogen source, and N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine was used only as a nitrogen source. Sulfanilic and metanilic acids did not support growth either as a carbon or nitrogen source. PMID:15066823

  14. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T.; Inwood, David W.; Leach, Andrew S.; Whalley, Penny S.; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E.; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50–100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns. PMID:28639621

  16. 77 FR 64535 - Information Collection Activities: Relief or Reduction in Royalty Rates; Submitted for Office of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ...-2012-0009; OMB Number 1014-0005] Information Collection Activities: Relief or Reduction in Royalty... have submitted to OMB an information collection request (ICR) to renew approval of the paperwork... (202) 395-5806 or email ( [email protected] ) directly to the Office of Information and...

  17. RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES FOR EXISTING DETACHED HOUSES - TECHNICAL GUIDANCE (THIRD EDITION) FOR ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical guidance document is designed to aid in the selection, design, installation and operation of indoor radon reduction techniques using soil depressurization in existing houses. Its emphasis is on active soil depressurization; i.e., on systems that use a fan to depre...

  18. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS FOR CHEMICAL REDUCTIONS OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sufficient kinetic data on abiotic reduction reactions involving organic contaminants are now available that quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for these reactions can be developed. Over 50 QSARs have been reported, most in just the last few years, and they ar...

  19. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots have iodate reduction activity in response to iodine

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Shota; Wachi, Takanori; Yoshihira, Kei; Nakagawa, Takuya; Ishikawa, Akifumi; Takagi, Daichi; Tezuka, Aya; Yoshida, Hideharu; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Michiko

    2013-01-01

    Although iodine is not an essential nutrient for higher plants, their roots take up and transport the element. However, the exact mechanisms involved in iodine uptake and metabolism in higher plants have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we compared two cultivars differing in iodine tolerance (“Nipponbare” and “Gohyakumangoku”) to increasing levels of I− and IO−3 in the root solutions of water-cultured rice (Oryza sativa L.). We found that IO−3 added to the root solutions was converted to I− in the presence of roots. Iodate reduction occurred over the course of several hours. Furthermore, the iodate reduction activity of “Nipponbare” (iodine-sensitive) and “Gohyakumangoku” (iodine-tolerant) roots increased after adding IO−3 or I−. The roots of barley and soybean also showed iodate reduction activity and the activity responded to iodine treatment either with IO−3 and I−. This study suggests that plant roots biologically reduce iodate to iodide and indicates that the iodate reduction activity of roots responds to external iodine conditions. PMID:23847633

  20. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediments from a former mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, S. P.; Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.

    2009-12-15

    U(VI) adsorption by two aquifer sediment samples was studied under oxic conditions as a function of pH, U(VI), Ca, and dissolved carbonate concentration. Background-A (BKG-A) sediment was collected upstream of a former uranium mill-tailings site at Rifle, Colorado, and Little Rusty Composite (LRC) was collected on site but with low U contamination. Batch adsorption experiments were performed using artificial groundwater solutions prepared to simulate the field groundwater composition in equilibrium with specific partial pressures of carbon dioxide. To encompass the geochemical conditions of the alluvial aquifer at the site, the experimental conditions ranged from 6.8×10-8 to 10-5 M in [U(VI)]tot,more » 7.2 to 8.0 in pH, 3.0×10-3 to 6.0×10-3 M in [Ca2+], and 0.05 to 2.6% in partial pressure of carbon dioxide. The sediment was extracted with a dilute bicarbonate/carbonate solution to determine the background labile U(VI) already present in the sediment. A semi-empirical surface complexation model was developed to describe U(VI) adsorption using FITEQL4. The non-electrostatic, generalized composite surface complexation model successfully simulated U(VI) adsorption over the range of groundwater conditions at the Old Rifle site, using a two-site, two-reaction fitting scheme. The sensitivity of model parameters to background U(VI) concentration on the two samples was evaluated. U(VI) adsorption experiments were also performed using a sand fraction of BKG-A separated through repeated sonication and wet-sieving. Surface area normalized Kd for the bulk and sand fraction indicated similar reactivity for both. The surface complexation model developed in this work is expected to contribute to the prediction of fate and transport of U(VI) in the alluvial aquifer at the Old Rifle site, and to assist in the simulation of biostimulation field experiments performed at the site.« less

  1. Revealing the Origin of Activity in Nitrogen-Doped Nanocarbons towards Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junyuan; Kan, Yuhe; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Bolun; Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Lin, Yangming; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Qingfeng; Centi, Gabriele; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-05-23

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are functionalized with nitrogen atoms for reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ). The investigation explores the origin of the catalyst's activity and the role of nitrogen chemical states therein. The catalysts show excellent performances, with about 90 % current efficiency for CO formation and stability over 60 hours. The Tafel analyses and density functional theory calculations suggest that the reduction of CO2 proceeds through an initial rate-determining transfer of one electron to CO2 , which leads to the formation of carbon dioxide radical anion (CO2 (.-) ). The initial reduction barrier is too high on pristine CNTs, resulting in a very high overpotentials at which the hydrogen evolution reaction dominates over CO2 reduction. The doped nitrogen atoms stabilize the radical anion, thereby lowering the initial reduction barrier and improving the intrinsic activity. The most efficient nitrogen chemical state for this reaction is quaternary nitrogen, followed by pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Prevention and Reduction of Obesity through Active Living (PROACTIVE): rationale, design and methods.

    PubMed

    Ross, R; Blair, S N; Godwin, M; Hotz, S; Katzmarzyk, P T; Lam, M; Lévesque, L; Macdonald, S

    2009-01-01

    The Prevention and Reduction of Obesity through Active Living (PROACTIVE) is a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a behaviourally based physical activity and diet composition programme to prevent and reduce obesity and related comorbidities in a primary healthcare setting. 491 abdominally obese men and women 25-75 years of age who were patients of primary care physicians were randomly assigned to either a usual care group (N = 242) or a behavioural intervention group (N = 249). Those in usual care received general advice from the physician regarding the merits of physical activity and a healthy diet as a strategy for obesity reduction. Those in the behavioural intervention group received an individually designed counselling programme from a specially trained health educator, with respect to physical activity, diet and obesity reduction. The study was designed to provide 95% power in both men and women to detect a 2% (2 cm) difference in waist circumference and 80% power to identify a 15% reduction in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, the two primary outcomes. PROACTIVE is the first behavioural intervention study to assess the effects of physical activity and diet on abdominal obesity and associated metabolic risk factors in a primary healthcare setting, include a generalised sample of men and women and examine long-term (24 months) effects. PROACTIVE has the potential to provide the basis for changing clinical practice (primary care) with respect to the prevention and reduction of obesity and related health risks. The purpose of this report is to present and discuss the rationale, design and methods of PROACTIVE.

  3. How small and how high? Enabling UV exoplanet cloud and exosphere science with WFC3/UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, David

    2017-08-01

    Progress on addressing two important exoplanet science topics can be made in the near-UV, where transit spectroscopy can measure aerosol scattering from the lower atmosphere, while large atmospheric escape signatures can be detectable in narrow-bands centred around strong Mg and Fe lines. WFC3/UVIS has never been used nor verified for high photometric precision transit observations, though it has the highest throughput among all HST near-UV instruments, making it an important instrument to develop for UV exoplanet science. This program targets the ultra-hot Jupiter HAT-P-41b to measure both the broadband near-UV transmission spectra, and the narrowband escaping atmosphere signatures of Mg. Recent WFC3/IR observations show strong evidence for aerosol haze in HAT-P-41b covering a near-IR H2O feature, making it an ideal target to study near-UV aerosol properties at high altitude. By measuring how high in the atmosphere near-UV scattering signatures can be seen, important constraints can be made on both cloud aerosol sizes and atmospheric vertical mixing rates; both critical parameters needed to explain how exoplanet clouds are suspended to high altitudes. In addition, the strong estimated atmospheric escape rates in HAT-P-41b also make it an ideal target to detect hydrodynamical escape signatures of Mg. Our pilot program will demonstrate the exoplanet capabilities of WFC3/UVIS, expanding Hubble's unique UV access with a potential to probe hundreds of exoplanets.

  4. Cassini UVIS Observations of the Io Plasma Torus. 4; Modeling Temporal and Azimuthal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffl, A. J.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this fourth paper in a series, we present a model of the remarkable temporal and azimuthal variability of the Io plasma torus observed during the Cassini encounter with Jupiter. Over a period of three months, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed a dramatic variaton in the average torus composition. Superimposed on this long-term variation, is a 10.07-hour periodicity caused by azimuthal variation in plasma composition subcorotating relative to System III longitude. Quite surprisingly, the amplitude of the azimuthal variation appears to be modulated at the beat frequency between the System III period and the observed 10.07-hour period. Previously, we have successfully modeled the months-long compositional change by supposing a factor of three increase in the amount of material supplied to Io's extended neutral clouds. Here, we extend our torus chemistry model to include an azimuthal dimension. We postulate the existence of two azimuthal variations in the number of superthermal electrons in the torus: a primary variation that subcorotates with a period of 10.07 hours and a secondary variation that remains fixed in System III longitude. Using these two hot electron variations, our model can reproduce the observed temporal and azimuthal variations observed by Cassini UVIS.

  5. Three-dimensional Structure of Saturn's Rings from Cassini UVIS Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Lissauer, J. J.; Jerousek, R. G.; Sremčević, M.

    2008-09-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed more than 80 stellar occultations by Saturn's rings during Cassini's four-year prime mission. The typical ring-plane spatial resolution of these occultations is ~20 m. Because the occultations are of stars in a variety of directions with respect to the rings, the observed transmitted light from multiple occultations provides a way to probe the threedimensional arrangement of ring particles. We have combined occultation measurements to reveal the structure of self-gravity wakes in the rings [1, 2]. Combining occultations has also revealed the structure of weak density waves in the Cassini Division [3] and B ring. The UVIS star occultations also resolve, for the first time, the many sharp edges in the ring system. The radial variation is convolved with the vertical thickness of the ring in a single occultation profile (Figure 1). By combining multiple occultations of the same edge from different viewing geometries we can separate the radial and vertical structure and solve for the three-dimensional structure of the edge, assuming the edge structure is constant with longitude. We also observe time-dependent and azimuthally variable structure, including the signature of small embedded moonlets and incomplete ringlets (Figure 2). Here we review the discoveries of the fine-scale structure of Saturn's rings enabled by these high resolution stellar occultations.

  6. Martian atmospheric O3 retrieval development for the NOMAD-UVIS spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewson, W.; Mason, J. P.; Leese, M.; Hathi, B.; Holmes, J.; Lewis, S. R.; Iriwin, P. G. J.; Patel, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    The composition of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols is a highly variable and poorly constrained component of the martian atmosphere, and by affecting martian climate and UV surface dose, represents a key parameter in the assessment of suitability for martian habitability. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) carries the Open University (OU) designed Ultraviolet and VIsible Spectrometer (UVIS) instrument as part of the Belgian-led Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery (NOMAD) spectrometer suite. NOMAD will begin transmitting science observations of martian surface and atmosphere back-scattered UltraViolet (UV) and visible radiation in Spring 2018, which will be processed to derive spatially and temporally averaged atmospheric trace gas and aerosol concentrations, intended to provide a better understanding of martian atmospheric photo-chemistry and dynamics, and will also improve models of martian atmospheric chemistry, climate and habitability. Work presented here illustrates initial development and testing of the OU's new retrieval algorithm for determining O3 and aerosol concentrations from the UVIS instrument.

  7. Multidisciplinary characterization of U(VI) sequestration by Acidovorax facilis for bioremediation purposes.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk-Bärsch, E; Gerber, U; Müller, K; Moll, H; Rossberg, A; Steudtner, R; Merroun, M L

    2018-04-05

    The contamination of the environment by U may affect plant life and consequently may have an impact on animal and human health. The present work describes U(VI) sequestration by Acidovorax facilis using a multidisciplinary approach combining wet chemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and spectroscopy methods (e.g. cryo-time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and in-situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). This bacterial strain is widely distributed in nature including U-contaminated sites. In kinetic batch experiments cells of A. facilis were contacted for 5 min to 48 h with 0.1 mM U(VI). The results show that the local coordination of U species associated with the cells depends upon time contact. U is bound mainly to phosphate groups of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at the outer membrane within the first hour. And, that both, phosphoryl and carboxyl functionality groups of LPS and peptidoglycan of A. facilis cells may effectuate the removal of high U amounts from solution at 24-48 h of incubation. It is clearly demonstrated that A. facilis may play an important role in predicting the transport behaviour of U in the environment and that the results will contribute to the improvement of bioremediation methods of U-contaminated sites. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. TITAN’S UPPER ATMOSPHERE FROM CASSINI/UVIS SOLAR OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Bénilan, Yves; Yelle, Roger V.

    2015-12-01

    Titan’s atmosphere is composed mainly of molecular nitrogen, methane being the principal trace gas. From the analysis of 8 solar occultations measured by the Extreme Ultraviolet channel of the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board Cassini, we derived vertical profiles of N{sub 2} in the range 1100–1600 km and vertical profiles of CH{sub 4} in the range 850–1300 km. The correction of instrument effects and observational effects applied to the data are described. We present CH{sub 4} mole fractions, and average temperatures for the upper atmosphere obtained from the N{sub 2} profiles. The occultations correspond to different times and locations,more » and an analysis of variability of density and temperature is presented. The temperatures were analyzed as a function of geographical and temporal variables, without finding a clear correlation with any of them, although a trend of decreasing temperature toward the north pole was observed. The globally averaged temperature obtained is (150 ± 1) K. We compared our results from solar occultations with those derived from other UVIS observations, as well as studies performed with other instruments. The observational data we present confirm the atmospheric variability previously observed, add new information to the global picture of Titan’s upper atmosphere composition, variability, and dynamics, and provide new constraints to photochemical models.« less

  9. High performance polydopamine-functionalized mesoporous silica nanospheres for U(VI) removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Linfeng; Duan, Shengxia; Jiang, Wanquan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Sheng; Sang, Min; Gong, Xinglong; Li, Jiaxing; Xuan, Shouhu

    2017-12-01

    This work reports the fabrication of polydopamine-functionalized mesoporous silica (mSiO2/PDA) nanospheres for removing U(VI) from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption capacity of mSiO2/PDA is 332.3 mg/g at 318.15 K and pH = 5.5. In comparison to the pristine mSiO2, the adsorption capacity of mSiO2/PDA has been remarkably enhanced, which can be ascribed to the large amounts of functional groups existed on the surface of mSiO2/PDA. The adsorption process fits well with the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorption isotherm follows the Langmuir isotherm model, revealing a monolayer adsorption of U(VI) onto mSiO2/PDA. Thermodynamic analysis indicates a spontaneous and endothermic adsorption process. Additionally, this adsorption process is pH-dependent, while the effect of ionic strength is negligible.

  10. WFC3/UVIS Dark Calibration: Monitoring Results and Improvements to Dark Reference Files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, M.; Baggett, S.

    2016-04-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS detector possesses an intrinsic signal during exposures, even in the absence of light, known as dark current. A daily monitor program is employed every HST cycle to characterize and measure this current as well as to create calibration files which serve to subtract the dark current from science data. We summarize the results of the daily monitor program for all on-orbit data. We also introduce a new algorithm for generating the dark reference files that provides several improvements to their overall quality. Key features to the new algorithm include correcting the dark frames for Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) losses, using an anneal-cycle average value to measure the dark current, and generating reference files on a daily basis. This new algorithm is part of the release of the CALWF3 v3.3 calibration pipeline on February 23, 2016 (also known as "UVIS 2.0"). Improved dark reference files have been regenerated and re-delivered to the Calibration Reference Data System (CRDS) for all on-orbit data. Observers with science data taken prior to the release of CALWF3 v3.3 may request their data through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to obtain the improved products.

  11. Reductive activation of mitomycin C by thiols: kinetics, mechanism, and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Paz, Manuel M

    2009-10-01

    The clinically used antitumor antibiotic mitomycin C requires a reductive activation to be converted to a bis-electrophile that forms several covalent adducts with DNA, including an interstrand cross-link which is considered to be the lesion responsible for the cytotoxic effects of the drug. Enzymes such as cytochrome P450 reductase and DT-diaphorase have traditionally been implicated in the bioreduction of mitomycin C, but recent reports indicate that enzymes containing a dithiol active site are also involved in the metabolism of mitomycin C. The reductive activation can also be effected in vitro with chemical reductants, but until now, mitomycin C was considered to be inert to thiols. We report here that mitomycin C can, in fact, be reductively activated by thiols. We show that the reaction is autocatalytic and that the end product is a relatively stable aziridinomitosene that can be trapped by adding several nucleophiles after the activation reaction. Kinetic studies show that the reaction is highly sensitive to pH and does not proceed or proceeds very slowly at neutral pH, an observation that explains the unsuccessful results on previous attempts to activate mitomycin C with thiols. The optimum pH for the reactions is around the pK(a) values of the thiols used in the activation. A mechanism for the reaction is hypothesized, involving the initial formation of a thiolate-mitomycin adduct, that then evolves to give the hydroquinone of mitomycin C and disulfide. The results presented here provide a chemical mechanism to explain how some biological dithiols containing an unusually acidic thiol group (deprotonated at physiological pH) participate in the modulation of mitomycin C cytotoxicity.

  12. Mechanical activation on aluminothermic reduction and magnetic properties of NiO powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjari Padhan, Aneeta; Sathish, M.; Saravanan, P.; Perumal, Alagarsamy

    2017-06-01

    We report the mechanically activated aluminothermic reduction of NiO [NiO-Al(x wt.%) with x  =  0, 20, 40] into NiO-Ni-Al2O3 nanocomposites using high-energy planetary ball milling under dry milling and the resulting structural and magnetic properties. Structural studies reveal that both NiO and NiO-Al powders exhibit a face centered cubic structure with large crystal size reduction. However, the NiO-Al milled powders unveil the process of aluminothermic reaction kinetics, which changes from gradual reaction as a function of milling time for x  =  20 powders to self-propagating combustion reaction for x  =  40. This allows us to achieve a maximum NiO reduction of 40% and 90% for x  =  20 and 40, respectively. The process of NiO reduction by Al is further confirmed through thermal studies. Pure NiO shows an antiferromagnetic (AFM) nature, which transforms into a ferromagnetic (FM) one with the moderate magnetization of about 1 emu g-1 with decreasing crystal size. The formation of FM Ni from AFM NiO matrix in milled NiO-Al powders could be precisely monitored by the change in the magnetization, which increases up to 4 emu g-1 and 28 emu g-1 for the gradual and combustion reactions, respectively. This results in a considerable exchange bias and its magnitude strongly depends on the relative fractions of NiO and Ni phases. Thermomagnetization data confirm the presence of mixed magnetic phases and the component of induced FM phase fades out due to the formation of Ni from the reduction of NiO. The changes in the structural and magnetic properties of milled NiO-Al powders are discussed on the basis of milling time-dependent mechanically activated reduction reaction of NiO into NiO-Ni-Al2O3 nanocomposites. The process of mechanical activation on the aluminothermic reduction allows for a controlled reduction of NiO; thus, it is suitable for the applications in catalysis and the ore reduction process.

  13. Machine-Learning Methods Enable Exhaustive Searches for Active Bimetallic Facets and Reveal Active Site Motifs for CO 2 Reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Ulissi, Zachary W.; Tang, Michael T.; Xiao, Jianping; ...

    2017-07-27

    Bimetallic catalysts are promising for the most difficult thermal and electrochemical reactions, but modeling the many diverse active sites on polycrystalline samples is an open challenge. Here, we present a general framework for addressing this complexity in a systematic and predictive fashion. Active sites for every stable low-index facet of a bimetallic crystal are enumerated and cataloged, yielding hundreds of possible active sites. The activity of these sites is explored in parallel using a neural-network-based surrogate model to share information between the many density functional theory (DFT) relaxations, resulting in activity estimates with an order of magnitude fewer explicit DFTmore » calculations. Sites with interesting activity were found and provide targets for follow-up calculations. This process was applied to the electrochemical reduction of CO 2 on nickel gallium bimetallics and indicated that most facets had similar activity to Ni surfaces, but a few exposed Ni sites with a very favorable on-top CO configuration. This motif emerged naturally from the predictive modeling and represents a class of intermetallic CO 2 reduction catalysts. These sites rationalize recent experimental reports of nickel gallium activity and why previous materials screens missed this exciting material. Most importantly these methods suggest that bimetallic catalysts will be discovered by studying facet reactivity and diversity of active sites more systematically.« less

  14. Lewis Base Activation of Silyl Acetals: Iridium-Catalyzed Reductive Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons Olefination.

    PubMed

    Dakarapu, Udaya Sree; Bokka, Apparao; Asgari, Parham; Trog, Gabriela; Hua, Yuanda; Nguyen, Hiep H; Rahman, Nawal; Jeon, Junha

    2015-12-04

    A Lewis base promoted deprotonative pronucleophile addition to silyl acetals has been developed and applied to the iridium-catalyzed reductive Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE) olefination of esters and the chemoselective reduction of the resulting enoates. Lewis base activation of silyl acetals generates putative pentacoordinate silicate acetals, which fragment into aldehydes, silanes, and alkoxides in situ. Subsequent deprotonative metalation of phosphonate esters followed by HWE with aldehydes furnishes enoates. This operationally convenient, mechanistically unique protocol converts the traditionally challenging aryl, alkenyl, and alkynyl esters to homologated enoates at room temperature within a single vessel.

  15. Incorporation of Np(V) and U(VI) in carbonate and sulfate minerals crystallized from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balboni, Enrica; Morrison, Jessica M.; Wang, Zheming; Engelhard, Mark H.; Burns, Peter C.

    2015-02-01

    The neptunyl Np(V)O2+ and uranyl U(VI)O22+ ions are soluble in groundwater, although their interaction with minerals in the subsurface may impact their mobility. One mechanism for the immobilization of actinyl ions in the subsurface is co-precipitation in low-temperature minerals that form naturally, or that are induced to form as part of a remediation strategy. Important differences in the crystal-chemical behavior of the Np(V) neptunyl and U(VI) uranyl ions suggest their behavior towards incorporation into growing crystals may differ significantly. Using a selection of low-temperature minerals synthesized in aqueous systems under ambient conditions, this study examines the factors that impact the structural incorporation of the Np(V) neptunyl and U(VI) uranyl ions in carbonate and sulfate minerals. Calcite (CaCO3), aragonite (CaCO3), gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), strontianite (SrCO3), cerussite (PbCO3), celestine (SrSO4), and anglesite (PbSO4) were synthesized from aqueous solutions containing either 400-1000 ppm of U(VI) or Np(V) relative to the divalent cation present in the system. The synthetic products were investigated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, luminescence and time resolved luminescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Amongst the carbonate minerals, calcite significantly favors Np(V) incorporation over U(VI). U(VI) and Np(V) are incorporated in aragonite and strontianite in similar amounts, whereas cerussite did not incorporate either U(VI) or Np(V) under the synthesis conditions. The sulfate minerals weakly interact with the actinyl ions, relative to the carbonate minerals. Incorporation of U(VI) and Np(V) in celestine was observed at the level of a few tens of ppm; anglesite and gypsum did not incorporate detectable U(VI) or Np(V). Luminescence spectra of the uranyl incorporated in aragonite and strontianite are consistent with a uranyl unit coordinated by three bidentate CO32- groups

  16. Trend in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Xu, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O{sub 2} on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes formore » nonaqueous Li-air batteries.« less

  17. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aspartame and their catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shufen; Yan, Songjing; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Cui, Jing; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrated a facile and environmental-friendly approach to form gold nanoparticles through the reduction of HAuCl4 by aspartame. The single-crystalline structure was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results indicated that aspartame played a pivotal role in the reduction and stabilization of the gold crystals. The crystals were stabilized through the successive hydrogen-bonding network constructed between the water and aspartame molecules. Additionally, gold nanoparticles synthesized through aspartame were shown to have good catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4.

  18. Mechanism of Uranium Reduction and Immobilization in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Roebbert, Yvonne; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-09-01

    The prevalent formation of noncrystalline U(IV) species in the subsurface and their enhanced susceptibility to reoxidation and remobilization, as compared to crystalline uraninite, raise concerns about the long-term sustainability of the bioremediation of U-contaminated sites. The main goal of this study was to resolve the remaining uncertainty concerning the formation mechanism of noncrystalline U(IV) in the environment. Controlled laboratory biofilm systems (biotic, abiotic, and mixed biotic-abiotic) were probed using a combination of U isotope fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Regardless of the mechanism of U reduction, the presence of a biofilm resulted in the formation of noncrystalline U(IV). Our results also show that biotic U reduction is the most effective way to immobilize and reduce U. However, the mixed biotic-abiotic system resembled more closely an abiotic system: (i) the U(IV) solid phase lacked a typically biotic isotope signature and (ii) elemental sulfur was detected, which indicates the oxidation of sulfide coupled to U(VI) reduction. The predominance of abiotic U reduction in our systems is due to the lack of available aqueous U(VI) species for direct enzymatic reduction. In contrast, in cases where bicarbonate is present at a higher concentration, aqueous U(VI) species dominate, allowing biotic U reduction to outcompete the abiotic processes.

  19. Suppression of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt-based electrocatalysts from ionomer incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Morimoto, Yu; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of Nafion on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is studied for Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C catalysts using thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) methods in 0.1 M HClO4. Ultrathin uniform catalyst layers and standardized activity measurement protocols are employed to obtain accurate and reproducible ORR activity. Nafion lowers the ORR activity which plateaus with increasing loading on Pt catalysts. Pt particle size is found not to have significant influence on the extent of the SA decrease upon Nafion incorporation. Catalysts using high surface area carbon (HSC) support exhibit attenuated activity loss resulting from lower ionomer coverage on catalyst particlesmore » located within the deep pores. The impact of metallic composition on the activity loss due to Nafion incorporation is also discussed.« less

  20. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)-CO3/Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Cao, Xiaohong; Luo, Xuanping; Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai; Liu, Yunhai

    2015-12-30

    The influence of U(VI)-CO3 and Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (qe) and distribution constant (Kd) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the qe and Kd values of NZVI were 5-10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0-3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)-CO3 complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (≡SOH) to form SO-UO2CO3(-) or SO-UO2 (CO3)2(3-). XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition Mechanism of Uranyl Reduction Induced by Calcium-Carbonato Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. E.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium mobility in the subsurface is controlled by the redox state and chemical speciation, generally as minimally soluble U(IV) or soluble U(VI) species. In the presence of even low carbonate concentrations the uranyl-carbonato complex quickly becomes the dominant aqueous species; they are, in fact, the primary aqueous species in most groundwaters. Calcium in groundwater leads to ternary calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes that limit the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction. This decrease in reduction rate has been attributed to surface processes, thermodynamic limitations, and kinetic factors. Here we present a new mechanism for the inhibition of ferrous iron reduction of uranyl-carbonato species in the presence of calcium. A series of experiments under variable Ca conditions were preformed to determine the role of Ca in the inhibition of U reduction by ferrous iron. Calcium ions in the Ca2UO2(CO3)3 complex sterically prevent the interaction of Fe(II) with U(VI), in turn preventing the Fe(II)-U(VI) distance required for electron transfer. The mechanism described here helps to predict U redox transformations in suboxic environments and clarifies the role of Ca in the fate and mobility of U. Electrochemical measurements further show the decrease of the U(VI) to U(V) redox potential of the uranyl-carbonato complex with decreasing pH suggesting the first electron transfer is critical determining the rate and extent of uranium reduction.

  2. Probing the Active Surface Sites for CO Reduction on Oxide-Derived Copper Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Verdaguer-Casadevall, Arnau; Li, Christina W.; Johansson, Tobias P.; ...

    2015-07-30

    CO electroreduction activity on oxide-derived Cu (OD-Cu) was found to correlate with metastable surface features that bind CO strongly. OD-Cu electrodes prepared by H 2 reduction of Cu 2O precursors reduce CO to acetate and ethanol with nearly 50% Faradaic efficiency at moderate overpotential. Temperature-programmed desorption of CO on OD-Cu revealed the presence of surface sites with strong CO binding that are distinct from the terraces and stepped sites found on polycrystalline Cu foil. After annealing at 350 °C, the surface-area corrected current density for CO reduction is 44-fold lower and the Faradaic efficiency is less than 5%. These changesmore » are accompanied by a reduction in the proportion of strong CO binding sites. Here, we propose that the active sites for CO reduction on OD-Cu surfaces are strong CO binding sites that are supported by grain boundaries. Uncovering these sites is a first step toward understanding the surface chemistry necessary for efficient CO electroreduction.« less

  3. Unraveling the Nature of Sites Active toward Hydrogen Peroxide Reduction in Fe-N-C Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Hyuck; Choi, Won Seok; Kasian, Olga; Mechler, Anna K; Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Brüller, Sebastian; Strickland, Kara; Jia, Qingying; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Mayrhofer, Karl J J; Jaouen, Frédéric

    2017-07-17

    Fe-N-C catalysts with high O 2 reduction performance are crucial for displacing Pt in low-temperature fuel cells. However, insufficient understanding of which reaction steps are catalyzed by what sites limits their progress. The nature of sites were investigated that are active toward H 2 O 2 reduction, a key intermediate during indirect O 2 reduction and a source of deactivation in fuel cells. Catalysts comprising different relative contents of FeN x C y moieties and Fe particles encapsulated in N-doped carbon layers (0-100 %) show that both types of sites are active, although moderately, toward H 2 O 2 reduction. In contrast, N-doped carbons free of Fe and Fe particles exposed to the electrolyte are inactive. When catalyzing the ORR, FeN x C y moieties are more selective than Fe particles encapsulated in N-doped carbon. These novel insights offer rational approaches for more selective and therefore more durable Fe-N-C catalysts. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  4. Effects of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Proton Activity on The Mechanism of Oxygen Reduction in Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Robert August

    Mechanisms for oxygen reduction are proposed for three distinct cases covering two ionic liquids of fundamentally different archetypes and almost thirty orders of magnitude of proton activity. Proton activity is treated both extrinsically by varying the concentration and intrinsically by selecting proton donors with a wide range of aqueous pKa values. The mechanism of oxygen reduction in ionic liquids is introduced by way of the protic ionic liquid (pIL) triethylammonium triflate (TEATf) which shares some similarities with aqueous acid solutions. Oxygen reduction in TEATf begins as the one electron rate limited step to form superoxide, O2 *-, which is then rapidly protonated by the pIL cation forming the perhydroxyl radical, HO2*. The perhydroxyl radical is further reduced to peroxidate (HO2-) and hydrogen peroxide in proportions in accordance with their pKa. The reaction does not proceed beyond this point due to the adsorption of the conjugate base triethylammine interfering with the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide. This work demonstrates that this mechanism is consistent across Pt, Au, Pd, and Ag electrodes. Two related sets of experiments were performed in the inherently aprotic ionic liquid 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium triflate (C4dMImTf). The first involved the titration of acidic species of varying aqueous pKa into the IL while monitoring the extent of oxygen reduction as a function of pKa and potential on Pt and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. These experiments confirmed the greater propensity of Pt to reduce oxygen by its immediate and abrupt transition from one electron reduction to four electron reduction, while oxygen reduction on GC gradually approaches four electron reduction as the potentials were driven more cathodic. The potential at which oxygen reduction initiates shows general agreement with the Nernst equation and the acid's tabulated aqueous pKa value, however at the extremely acidic end, a small deviation is observed. The second set

  5. Heavy Class Helicopter Fuselage Model Drag Reduction by Active Flow Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio, F.

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of helicopter blunt fuselage drag reduction using active flow control is being carried out within the European Clean Sky program. The objective is to demonstrate the capability of several active flow technologies to decrease fuselage drag by alleviating the flow separation occurring in the rear area of some helicopters. The work is performed on a simplified blunt fuselage at model-scale. Two different flow control actuators are considered for evaluation: steady blowing, unsteady blowing (or pulsed jets). Laboratory tests of each individual actuator are first performed to assess their performance and properties. The fuselage model is then equipped with these actuators distributed in 3 slots located on the ramp bottom edge. This paper addresses the promising results obtained during the wind-tunnel campaign, since significant drag reductions are achieved for a wide range of fuselage angles of attack and yaw angles without detriment of the other aerodynamic characteristics.

  6. Low temperature equilibrium isotope fractionation and isotope exchange kinetics between U(IV) and U(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangli; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lundstrom, Craig C.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the uranium (U) isotope ratio 238U/235U provide an emerging redox proxy in environmental and paleoredox studies, but many key parameters concerning U isotope fractionation are still poorly constrained. Here we report the equilibrium isotopic fractionation between dissolved U(IV) and dissolved U(VI), and rates of isotope exchange between solid-phase U(IV) and dissolved U(VI). We conducted one experiment at high concentration [35 mM U(IV) and 32 mM U(VI)] and low pH (0.2) in hydrochloric acid media at room temperature to determine the equilibrium isotopic fractionation between dissolved U(IV) and dissolved U(VI). Isotopic equilibrium was reached in about 19 days under such experimental conditions. The equilibrium isotope fractionation was determined to be 1.64 ± 0.16‰, with U(IV) being enriched in 238U relative to U(VI). Applicability of the determined equilibrium fractionation is discussed. We also conducted a set of experiments to determine isotopic exchange rates between dissolved U(VI) and nanouraninite U(IV) under conditions closer to those in natural system, with lower concentrations and neutral pH. The exchange rate was found to conform to the rate law R = k[U(VI)]adsorbed, in which R is the isotopic exchange rate (μM day-1); k is the rate constant determined to be 0.21 day-1; and [U(VI)]adsorbed is the concentration of U(VI) adsorbed to nanouraninite (μM). Our results, combined with consideration of the variables controlling U(VI)-U(IV) contact in natural settings, indicate that the timescale for significant isotope equilibration varies depending on environmental conditions, mostly uranium concentrations. In natural uncontaminated sediments with low uranium concentrations, equilibration is expected to occur on a timescale of hundreds to thousands of years. In contrast, in U-contaminated aquifers with high U concentrations, significant equilibration could occur on timescales of weeks to years.

  7. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  8. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  9. Highly active Pt@Au nanoparticles encapsulated in perfluorosulfonic acid for the reduction of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Niancai; Li, Huaiguang; Li, Guoqiang; Lv, Haifeng; Mu, Shichun; Sun, Xueliang; Pan, Mu

    2011-12-28

    The Pt@Au catalysts demonstrate remarkably high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity compared with Pt/C catalysts. The ORR of Pt(2)@Au(1)/C and Pt(1)@Au(2)/C is 9.5 and 6.6 times that of Pt/C, respectively. This improvement is attributed to the electronic structure effect of the Au core on the Pt shell and introduction of PFSA. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  10. Study of active rotor control for in-plane rotor noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianxiao

    This research consists of two parts: the main part of this research is the study of active rotor control for in-plane rotor noise reduction. The objective of this part of the research is to develop a methodology to find a loading solution that results in noise reduction at a single observer or over an area (at multiple observers), and propose potential active devices that may realize the loading solution to reduce in-plane noise. Another part of the research is the study of thickness noise prediction method, which aims to develop a new thickness noise prediction method able to provide fast and relatively accurate thickness noise prediction. In this research, a new thickness noise prediction method, called dual compact thickness noise model is developed. In this dual compact model, at each radial location, the airfoil is divided into two parts and the uniform pressure distribution is integrated on the front and rear part respectively. This generates two loading lines acting at different chordwise locations, and the loading noise generated by these two loading lines reproduces the acoustic signal of the normal thickness noise. The positions of the two loading lines are determined to be .... = 0.133 and .... = 0.867 in a baseline case by matching normal thickness noise and the dual compact result at an in-plane observer directly ahead of the rotor. The dual compact thickness noise model is validated through thickness noise computation for a wide variety of cases, in which different airfoils, blade planforms, and tip Mach numbers, are considered. The dual compact thickness noise result is in good agreement with normal thickness noise for each case. Additionally, the locations of the two loading lines are kept unchanged for all the cases. The computation time is significantly reduced by using the dual compact thickness noise model as compared to the normal thickness noise computation (typically 25 times faster). Finally, the accuracy of dual compact thickness noise

  11. Enhanced adsorption of U(VI) and 241Am(III) from wastewater using Ca/Al layered double hydroxide@carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haijun; Chen, Zhe; Zhao, Guixia; Zhang, Zhibin; Xu, Chao; Liu, Yunhai; Chen, Jing; Zhuang, Li; Haya, Tasawar; Wang, Xiangke

    2018-04-05

    Ca/Al layered double hydroxide decorated carbon nanotube (Ca/Al-LDH@CNTs) composites were fabricated by co-precipitation method and hydrothermal aged treatment. The prepared Ca/Al-LDH@CNTs was characterized by SEM, TEM, EDS, XRD, FT-IR, UV-vis and XPS techniques, and applied to remove U(VI) from aqueous solutions under various environmental conditions (i.e., pH, ionic strength, temperature and contact time). The results indicated that the adsorption of U(VI) on Ca/Al-LDH@CNTs was four times higher than that of U(VI) on bare CNTs. The kinetic investigations reflected the chemisorption of U(VI) on Ca/Al-LDH@CNTs through oxygen-containing functional groups. The adsorption isotherms demonstrated that the adsorption of U(VI) was well fitted by Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI) on Ca/Al-LDH@CNTs was calculated to be 382.9 mg g -1 at 289.15 K. The thermodynamic parameters calculated from temperature-dependent isotherms suggested that U(VI) adsorption on Ca/Al-LDH@CNTs were endothermic and spontaneous process. Furthermore, Ca/Al-LDH@CNTs could remove ∼91% of 241 Am(III) at pH = 8.0, which confirmed Ca/Al-LDH@CNTs as a promising material for multiply low level radionuclides' pollution remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A periodic piezoelectric smart structure with the integrated passive/active vibration-reduction performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxi; Niu, Shengkai; Hu, Yuantai

    2017-06-01

    The paper proposes a new piezoelectric smart structure with the integrated passive/active vibration-reduction performances, which is made of a series of periodic structural units. Every structural unit is made of two layers, one is an array of piezoelectric bimorphs (PBs) and one is an array of metal beams (MBs), both are connected as a whole by a metal plate. Analyses show that such a periodic smart structure possesses two aspects of vibration-reduction performance: one comes from its phonon crystal characteristics which can isolate those vibrations with the driving frequency inside the band gap(s). The other one comes from the electromechanical conversion of bent PBs, which is actively aimed at those vibrations with the driving frequency outside the band gap(s). By adjusting external inductance, the equivalent circuit of the proposed structure can be forced into parallel resonance such that most of the vibration energy is converted into electrical energy for dissipation by a resistance. Thus, an external circuit under the parallel resonance state is equivalent to a strong damping to the interrelated vibrating structure, which is just the action mechanism of the active vibration reduction performance of the proposed smart structure.

  13. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E.; Meyer, Claudius U.; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen + ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin + UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established. PMID:24749844

  14. Risk avoidance versus risk reduction: a framework and segmentation profile for understanding adolescent sexual activity.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Christopher D; Tanner, John F; Raymond, Mary Anne

    2004-01-01

    The teen birthrate in the United States is twice that of other industrialized nations. Adolescents in the U.S. are among high-risk groups for HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. As a result, the Department of Health and Human Services changed its policy on the promotion of abstinence to teenagers from a focus on a risk reduction strategy to a focus on a risk avoidance strategy. In order to create more effective risk avoidance as well as risk reduction campaigns, this study proposes a framework to illustrate the distinction that teens make between spontaneous sexual activity and planned sexual activity, as well as those teens that make a commitment to abstinence versus abstinence by default. Furthermore, this study classifies teens into three behavior segments (abstemious, promiscuous and monogamous) and then assesses specific differences that exist within these groups relative to their attitudes and perceptions concerning abstinence, sexual activity, contraception, fear and norms. This change in focus from a risk reduction to a risk avoidance strategy has important implications for social marketing, public policy and marketing theory.

  15. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  16. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-17

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  17. Effect of uranium(VI) speciation on simultaneous microbial reduction of uranium(VI) and iron(III).

    PubMed

    Stewart, Brandy D; Amos, Richard T; Fendorf, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Uranium is a pollutant of concern to both human and ecosystem health. Uranium's redox state often dictates whether it will reside in the aqueous or solid phase and thus plays an integral role in the mobility of uranium within the environment. In anaerobic environments, the more oxidized and mobile form of uranium (UO2(2+) and associated species) may be reduced, directly or indirectly, by microorganisms to U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO. However, various factors within soils and sediments, such as U(VI) speciation and the presence of competitive electron acceptors, may limit biological reduction of U(VI). Here we examine simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in batch systems containing dissolved uranyl acetate and ferrihydrite-coated sand. Varying amounts of calcium were added to induce changes in aqueous U(VI) speciation. The amount of uranium removed from solution during 100 h of incubation with S. putrefaciens was 77% in absence of Ca or ferrihydrite, but only 24% (with ferrihydrite) and 14% (without ferrihydrite) were removed for systems with 0.8 mM Ca. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) proceed through different enzyme pathways within one type of organism. We quantified the rate coefficients for simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in systems varying in Ca concecentration (0-0.8 mM). The mathematical construct, implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, reveals predominant factors controlling rates and extent of uranium reduction in complex geochemical systems.

  18. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediments from a former mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyun, S.P.; Fox, P.M.; Davis, J.A.; Campbell, K.M.; Hayes, K.F.; Long, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    A study of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediment samples from a former uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado, was conducted under oxic conditions as a function of pH, U(VI), Ca, and dissolved carbonate concentration. Batch adsorption experiments were performed using <2mm size sediment fractions, a sand-sized fraction, and artificial groundwater solutions prepared to simulate the field groundwater composition. To encompass the geochemical conditions of the alluvial aquifer at the site, the experimental conditions ranged from 6.8 ?? 10-8 to 10-5 M in [U(VI)]tot, 7.2 to 8.0 in pH, 3.0 ?? 10-3 to 6.0 ?? 10 -3 M in [Ca2+], and 0.05 to 2.6% in partial pressure of carbon dioxide. Surface area normalized U(VI) adsorption Kd values for the sand and <2 mm sediment fraction were similar, suggesting a similar reactive surface coating on both fractions. A two-site two-reaction, nonelectrostatic generalized composite surface complexation model was developed and successfully simulated the U(VI) adsorption data. The model successfully predicted U(VI) adsorption observed from a multilevel sampling well installed at the site. A comparison of the model with the one developed previously for a uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado, indicated that possible calcite nonequilibrium of dissolved calcium concentration should be evaluated. The modeling results also illustrate the importance of the range of data used in deriving the best fit model parameters. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  19. Simulating adsorption of U(VI) under transient groundwater flow and hydrochemistry: Physical versus chemical nonequilibrium model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greskowiak, J.; Hay, M.B.; Prommer, H.; Liu, C.; Post, V.E.A.; Ma, R.; Davis, J.A.; Zheng, C.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled intragrain diffusional mass transfer and nonlinear surface complexation processes play an important role in the transport behavior of U(VI) in contaminated aquifers. Two alternative model approaches for simulating these coupled processes were analyzed and compared: (1) the physical nonequilibrium approach that explicitly accounts for aqueous speciation and instantaneous surface complexation reactions in the intragrain regions and approximates the diffusive mass exchange between the immobile intragrain pore water and the advective pore water as multirate first-order mass transfer and (2) the chemical nonequilibrium approach that approximates the diffusion-limited intragrain surface complexation reactions by a set of multiple first-order surface complexation reaction kinetics, thereby eliminating the explicit treatment of aqueous speciation in the intragrain pore water. A model comparison has been carried out for column and field scale scenarios, representing the highly transient hydrological and geochemical conditions in the U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford 300A site, Washington, USA. It was found that the response of U(VI) mass transfer behavior to hydrogeochemically induced changes in U(VI) adsorption strength was more pronounced in the physical than in the chemical nonequilibrium model. The magnitude of the differences in model behavior depended particularly on the degree of disequilibrium between the advective and immobile phase U(VI) concentrations. While a clear difference in U(VI) transport behavior between the two models was noticeable for the column-scale scenarios, only minor differences were found for the Hanford 300A field scale scenarios, where the model-generated disequilibrium conditions were less pronounced as a result of frequent groundwater flow reversals. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Effect of pH and Fe/U ratio on the U(VI) removal rate by the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yukui; Luo, Yingfeng; Fang, Qi; Xie, Yanpei; Wang, Zhihong; Zhu, Xiangyu

    2018-02-01

    As for the decommissioned uranium deposits of acid in-situ leaching, both of the concentrations of U(VI) and Fe(II) are relatively high in groundwater. In the presence of O2, the oxidation of Fe(II) into Fe(III) that forms Fe-hydroxides could effectively remove U(VI) in the forms of sorption or co-precipitation. In this process, pH condition and Fe content will have a significant effect on the U(VI) removal rate by the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2. In the present work, a series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of pH values and Fe/U mass ratio on the U(VI) removal rate by the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2. Experiment results show that the removal rate of U(VI) is mainly controlled by pH and secondly by Fe/U mass ratio. In the neutral conditions with pH at 7 and 8, the removal rate of U(VI) reaches up to 90% for all solutions with different initial Fe(II) concentrations. The optimal pH for the removal rate of U(VI) is above 7. In the acidic conditions with pH below 6, the effect of Fe/U mass ratio on the removal rate of U(VI) becomes more obvious and the optimal Fe/U mass ratio for U(VI) removal is 1:2.

  1. Active and stable Ir@Pt core–shell catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Strickler, Alaina L.; Jackson, Ariel; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-12-28

    Electrochemical oxygen reduction is an important reaction for many sustainable energy technologies, such as fuel cells and metal–air batteries. Kinetic limitations of this reaction, expensive electrocatalysts, and catalyst instability, however, limit the commercial viability of such devices. Herein, we report an active Ir@Pt core–shell catalyst that combines platinum overlayers with nanostructure effects to tune the oxygen binding to the Pt surface, thereby achieving enhanced activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction. Ir@Pt nanoparticles with several shell thicknesses were synthesized in a scalable, inexpensive, one-pot polyol method. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates the activity and stability of the Ir@Pt catalyst, with specificmore » and mass activities increasing to 2.6 and 1.8 times that of commercial Pt/C (TKK), respectively, after 10 000 stability cycles. Furthermore, activity enhancement of the Ir@Pt catalyst is attributed to weakening of the oxygen binding to the Pt surface induced by the Ir core.« less

  2. Vibratory Loads Reduction Testing of the NASA/Army/MIT Active Twist Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew; Mirick, Paul H.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Langston, Chester W.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, SangJoon

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that controlled strain-induced blade twisting can be attained using piezoelectric active fiber composite technology, and that such advancement may provide a mechanism for reduced rotorcraft vibrations and increased rotor performance. In order to validate these findings experimentally, a cooperative effort between the NASA Langley Research Center, the Army Research Laboratory, and the MIT Active Materials and Structures Laboratory has been developed. As a result of this collaboration a four-bladed, aeroelastically-scaled, active-twist model rotor has been designed and fabricated for testing in the heavy gas test medium of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Initial wind tunnel testing has been conducted to assess the impact of active blade twist on both fixed- and rotating-system vibratory loads in forward flight. The active twist control was found to have a pronounced effect on all system loads and was shown to generally offer reductions in fixed-system loads of 60% to 95%, depending upon flight condition, with 1.1 to 1.4 of dynamic blade twist observed. A summary of the systems developed and the vibratory loads reduction results obtained are presented in this paper.

  3. Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons

    DOE PAGES

    Sun-Mi Hwang; Choi, YongMan; Kim, Min Gyu; ...

    2016-03-08

    The high cost of Pt-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is a critical hurdle for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Recently, non-precious metal-based catalysts (NPMCs) have demonstrated much enhanced activity but their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is still inferior to that of Pt-based catalysts resulting in a much thicker electrode in the MEA. For the reduction of mass transport and ohmic overpotential we adopted a new concept of catalyst that combines an ultra-low amount of Pt nanoclusters with metal–nitrogen (M–Nx) doped ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbon (FeCo–OMPC(L)). The 5 wt% Pt/FeCo–OMPC(L) showed a 2-fold enhancement in activities comparedmore » to a higher loading of Pt. Our experimental results supported by first-principles calculations indicate that a trace amount of Pt nanoclusters on FeCo–OMPC(L) significantly enhances the ORR activity due to their electronic effect as well as geometric effect from the reduced active sites. Finally, in terms of fuel cell commercialization, this class of catalysts is a promising candidate due to the limited use of Pt in the MEA.« less

  4. Hexagonal 2H-MoSe2 broad spectrum active photocatalyst for Cr(VI) reduction

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Haipeng; Liu, Xinjuan; Liu, Baibai; Zhu, Guang; Lei, Wenyan; Du, Huigang; Liu, Junying; Li, Jianwei; Li, Can; Sun, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    To make full use of the solar energy, exploring broad spectrum active photocatalysts has become one of the core issues for photocatalysis. Here we report a novel hexagonal 2H-MoSe2 photocatalyst with ultraviolet (UV)-visible-near infrared (NIR) light response for the first time. The results indicate that the MoSe2 displays excellent photo-absorption and photocatalytic activity in the reduction of Cr(VI) under UV and visible even NIR light irradiation. MoSe2 synthesized at pH value of 2 achieves the highest Cr(VI) reduction rates of 99%, 91% and 100% under UV, visible and NIR light irradiation, respectively, which should be attributed to its comparatively higher light absorption, efficient charge separation and transfer as well as relatively large number of surface active sites. The excellent broad spectrum active photocatalytic activity makes the MoSe2 to be a promising photocatalyst for the effective utilization of solar energy. PMID:27734974

  5. Treatment of abdominal cellulite and circumference reduction with radiofrequency and dynamic muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Iamphonrat, Thanawan; Thanomkitti, Kanchalit; Lektrakul, Nittaya; Manuskiatti, Woraphong

    2015-01-01

    Cellulite is a frequent skin condition for which treatment remains a challenge. A wide variety of treatments are available but most procedures offer suboptimal clinical effect and/or delayed therapeutic outcome. Only few therapeutic options have proven efficacy in the treatment of cellulite. To determine the efficacy and the safety profiles of radiofrequency and dynamic muscle activation technology in treatment of abdominal cellulite and circumference reduction. Twenty-five females with abdominal cellulite received 6 weekly radiofrequency and dynamic muscle activation treatments. Treatment areas included the abdomen and both sides of flanks. Subjects were evaluated using standardized photographs, and measurements of body weight and abdominal circumference at baseline, before every treatment visit, and 1 week and four weeks after the final treatment. Subcutaneous tissue thickness was recorded by ultrasound at baseline and 4 weeks after completion of treatment protocol. Physicians' evaluation and patient's satisfaction of clinical improvement were also measured. All subjects completed the treatment protocol and attended every follow-up visits. There was significant abdominal circumference reduction of 2.96 and 2.52 cm at 1-, and 4-week follow-up visits (p < 0.05), respectively. At four weeks after the last treatment, the average circumferential reduction was sustained. Most of the patients were rated to have 25-49% improvement at 5th treatment, and 1- and 4-week follow-up visits. Ninety-two percent of the patients were satisfied with the treatment outcome. Radiofrequency provided beneficial effects on the reduction of abdomen and cellulite appearance. The benefit of muscle activation is yet to be determined.

  6. Extraction of U(VI) from oxalate solutions using tetradecylammonium oxalate (in Russian)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzina, M.G.; Lipovskii, A.A.

    1973-07-01

    The extraction of U(VI) from oxalate solutions at various pH values was studied. It was shown that, as a function of the extractant and uranium concentration ratios, the latter was extracted in the form of different acido and hydroxyacido complexes. With excess extractant, the compounds were (R/sub 4/N)/ sub 2/UO/sub 2/Ox/sub 2/ at lo w pH values of the aqueous solution and (R/sub 4/ N)/sub 2/UO/sub 2/Ox(OH)/sub 2/ at h igh values. When there was a deficit of the extractant, different hydroxyacido complexes were formed. (tr-auth)

  7. Optical and radiometric models of the NOMAD instrument part I: the UVIS channel.

    PubMed

    Vandaele, Ann C; Willame, Yannick; Depiesse, Cédric; Thomas, Ian R; Robert, Séverine; Bolsée, David; Patel, Manish R; Mason, Jon P; Leese, Mark; Lesschaeve, Stefan; Antoine, Philippe; Daerden, Frank; Delanoye, Sofie; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eddy; Ristic, Bojan; Lopez-Moreno, José-Juan; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Team, Nomad

    2015-11-16

    The NOMAD instrument has been designed to best fulfil the science objectives of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission that will be launched in 2016. The instrument is a combination of three channels that cover the UV, visible and IR spectral ranges and can perform solar occultation, nadir and limb observations. In this series of two papers, we present the optical models representing the three channels of the instrument and use them to determine signal to noise levels for different observation modes and Martian conditions. In this first part, we focus on the UVIS channel, which will sound the Martian atmosphere using nadir and solar occultation viewing modes, covering the 200-650nm spectral range. High SNR levels (>1000) can easily be reached for wavelengths higher than 300nm both in solar occultation and nadir modes when considering binning. Below 300nm SNR are lower primarily because of the lower signal and the impact of atmospheric absorption.

  8. Phenazines and Other Redox-Active Antibiotics Promote Microbial Mineral Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria E.; Kappler, Andreas; Newman, Dianne K.

    2004-01-01

    Natural products with important therapeutic properties are known to be produced by a variety of soil bacteria, yet the ecological function of these compounds is not well understood. Here we show that phenazines and other redox-active antibiotics can promote microbial mineral reduction. Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1391, a root isolate that produces phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN), is able to reductively dissolve poorly crystalline iron and manganese oxides, whereas a strain carrying a mutation in one of the phenazine-biosynthetic genes (phzB) is not; the addition of purified PCN restores this ability to the mutant strain. The small amount of PCN produced relative to the large amount of ferric iron reduced in cultures of P. chlororaphis implies that PCN is recycled multiple times; moreover, poorly crystalline iron (hydr)oxide can be reduced abiotically by reduced PCN. This ability suggests that PCN functions as an electron shuttle rather than an iron chelator, a finding that is consistent with the observation that dissolved ferric iron is undetectable in culture fluids. Multiple phenazines and the glycopeptidic antibiotic bleomycin can also stimulate mineral reduction by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR1. Because diverse bacterial strains that cannot grow on iron can reduce phenazines, and because thermodynamic calculations suggest that phenazines have lower redox potentials than those of poorly crystalline iron (hydr)oxides in a range of relevant environmental pH (5 to 9), we suggest that natural products like phenazines may promote microbial mineral reduction in the environment. PMID:14766572

  9. Cassini UVIS Observations of the Io Plasma Torus. 3; Observations of Temporal and Azimuthal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffl, A. J.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2006-01-01

    In this third paper in a series presenting observations by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) of the Io plasma torus, we show remarkable, though subtle, spatio-temporal variations in torus properties. The Io torus is found to exhibit significant, near sinusoidal variations in ion composition as a functions of azimuthal position. The azimuthal variation in composition is such that the mixing ratio of S II us strongly correlated with the mixing ratio of S III and the equatorial electron density and strongly anti-correlated with the mixing ratios of both S IV and O II and the equatorial electron temperature. Surprisingly, the azimuthal variation in ion composition is observed to have a period of 10.07 h -- 1.5% longer than the System III rotation period of Jupiter, yet 1.3% shorter than the System UV period defined by [Brown, M. E., 1995. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 21683-21696]. Although the amplitude of the azimuthal variation of S III and O II remained in the range of 2-5%, the amplitude of the S II and S IV compositional variation ranged between 5 and 25% during the UVIS observations. Furthermore, the amplitude of the azimuthal variations of S II and S IV appears to be modulated by its location in System III longitude, such that when the region of maximum S II mixing ration (minimum S IV mixing ratio) is aligned with a System III longitude of 200 deg +/-, the amplitude is a factor of 4 greater than when the variation is anti-aligned. This behavior can explain numerous, often apparently contradictory, observations of variations in the properties of the Io plasma torus with the System III and System IV coordinate systems.

  10. Ionospheric Convection in the Postnoon Auroral Oval: SuperDARN and Polar UVI Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, A.; Koustov, A.; Lyatsky, W.; Kangas, J.; Parks, G.; Chua, D.

    2002-01-01

    Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) observations, ultraviolet imaging from the Polar satellite (UVI), and particle precipitation data from DMSP satellites have been used to investigate the electrodynamics of the postnoon auroral oval in the Northern hemisphere. We show that: (1) For negative IMF By, the convection reversal (CR) was co-located with the maximum of auroral luminosity, but during positive IMF By the convection reversal was poleward of the auroral oval up to several degrees in latitude; (2) Postnoon auroral oval was associated with a large-scale upward field-aligned current (FAC) of the order of 6x10(exp -7). A m(exp -2) in magnitude (the FAC was inferred from the SuperDARN and UVI data). For negative IMF By, maximum of the auroral intensity coincides in latitude with the maximum of the upward field-aligned current. However, for positive IMF By. the maximum of the upward FAC was shifted to the poleward edge of the auroral oval; (3) In response to the IMF By turning from positive to negative, the maximum of the auroral luminosity did not change its position noticeably, but the position of the convection reversal changed considerably from 80-81 degs to about 76 degs MLAT, and the maximum of FAC moved from 77-78 degs to about 76 degs MLAT. Thus, after IMF By turns negative, both the FAC maximum and CR tend to coincide with the auroral maximum; (4) The IMF Bz positive deflection was followed by a decrease in both field-aligned current intensity and auroral luminosity. However, the decrease in the auroral luminosity lags behind the FAC decrease by about 12 min. Firstly, these observations allow us to suggest that the IMF By-related electric field can penetrate into the closed magnetosphere and produce convection and FAC changes in the region of the postnoon auroral oval. Secondly, we suggest that the interchange instability is a promising mechanism for the postnoon auroras.

  11. Enhancement of sludge reduction and methane production by removing extracellular polymeric substances from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Mohd Yasin, Nazlina Haiza; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Maeda, Toshinari

    2014-12-01

    The management of waste activated sludge (WAS) recycling is a concern that affects the development of the future low-carbon society, particularly sludge reduction and biomass utilization. In this study, we investigated the effect of removing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which play important roles in the adhesion and flocculation of WAS, on increased sludge disintegration, thereby enhancing sludge reduction and methane production by anaerobic digestion. EPS removal from WAS by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) significantly enhanced sludge reduction, i.e., 49 ± 5% compared with 27 ± 1% of the control at the end the digestion process. Methane production was also improved in WAS without EPS by 8881 ± 109 CH4 μmol g(-1) dry-weight of sludge. Microbial activity was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time polymerase chain reaction, which showed that the hydrolysis and acetogenesis stages were enhanced by pretreatment with 2% EDTA, with a larger methanogenic community and better methane production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct evidence of active site reduction and photo-driven catalysis in sensitized hydrogenase assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Brandon L.; Joseph, Crisjoe A.; Maroney, Michael J.; Dyer, R. Brian

    2012-01-01

    We report photo-catalytic H2 production by hydrogenase (H2ase)-quantum dot (QD) hybrid assemblies. Quenching of the CdTe exciton emission is observed, consistent with electron transfer from quantum dot to H2ase. GC analysis shows light driven H2 production in the presence of a sacrificial electron donor with an efficiency of 4%, which is likely a lower limit to these hybrid systems. FTIR was employed for direct observation of active site reduction in unprecedented detail for photo-driven H2ase catalysis with sensitivity towards both H2ase and sacrificial electron donor. Photosensitization with Ru(bpy)32+ shows distinct FTIR photo- reduction properties generating all states along the steady-state catalytic cycle with minimal H2 production indicating slow, sequential one electron reduction steps. Comparing H2ase activity and FTIR results of both systems shows that QDs bind more efficiently for electron transfer and the final enzyme state is different for the two sensitizers. The possible origins of these differences and their implications for the enzymatic mechanism are discussed. PMID:22716776

  13. Structural Basis of Eukaryotic Nitrate Reduction: Crystal Structures of the Nitrate Reductase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Katrin; Barbier, Guillaume G.; Hecht, Hans-Juergen; Mendel, Ralf R.; Campbell, Wilbur H.; Schwarz, Guenter

    2005-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation in autotrophs provides most of the reduced nitrogen on earth. In eukaryotes, reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalyzed by the molybdenum-containing NAD(P)H:nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.7.1.1-3). In addition to the molybdenum center, NR contains iron-heme and flavin adenine dinucleotide as redox cofactors involved in an internal electron transport chain from NAD(P)H to nitrate. Recombinant, catalytically active Pichia angusta nitrate-reducing, molybdenum-containing fragment (NR-Mo) was expressed in P. pastoris and purified. Crystal structures for NR-Mo were determined at 1.7 and 2.6 Å. These structures revealed a unique slot for binding nitrate in the active site and identified key Arg and Trp residues potentially involved in nitrate binding. Dimeric NR-Mo is similar in overall structure to sulfite oxidases, with significant differences in the active site. Sulfate bound in the active site caused conformational changes, as compared with the unbound enzyme. Four ordered water molecules located in close proximity to Mo define a nitrate binding site, a penta-coordinated reaction intermediate, and product release. Because yeast NAD(P)H:NR is representative of the family of eukaryotic NR, we propose a general mechanism for nitrate reduction catalysis. PMID:15772287

  14. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  15. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank. PMID:26350761

  16. Reduction of bodily pain in response to an online positive activities intervention.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Leslie R M; Parks, Acacia; Youk, Ada O; Kwoh, C Kent

    2014-05-01

    Inducing temporary positive states reduces pain and increases pain tolerance in laboratory studies. We tested whether completing positive activities in one's daily life produces long-term reductions in self-reported bodily pain in a randomized controlled trial of an online positive activities intervention. Participants recruited via the Web were randomly assigned to complete 0, 2, 4, or 6 positive activities administered online over a 6-week period. Follow-up assessments were collected at the end of 6 weeks and at 1, 3, and 6 months postintervention. We used linear mixed effects models to examine whether the intervention reduced pain over time among those who had a score <67 on the bodily pain subscale of the Short Form-36 at baseline (N = 417; pain scores range from 0 to 100; higher scores indicate less pain). Mean pain scores improved from baseline to 6 months in the 2-activity (55.7 to 67.4), 4-activity (54.2 to 71.0), and 6-activity (50.9 to 67.9) groups. Improvements were significantly greater (P < .05) in the 4-activity and 6-activity groups than in the 0-activity control group (54.1 to 62.2) in unadjusted and adjusted models. This study suggests that positive activities administered online can reduce bodily pain in adults with at least mild to moderate baseline pain. This study demonstrates that teaching people simple positive activities can decrease reported levels of bodily pain; moreover, these activities can be administered over the internet, a potential avenue for broadly disseminating health interventions at relatively low costs and with high sustainability. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. On the Occurrence of Anoxic Microniches, Denitrification, and Sulfate Reduction in Aerated Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Andreas; Santegoeds, Cecilia M.; Nielsen, Helle K.; Ploug, Helle; Wagner, Michael; Pribyl, Milan; Wanner, Jiri; Amann, Rudolf; de Beer, Dirk

    1999-01-01

    A combination of different methods was applied to investigate the occurrence of anaerobic processes in aerated activated sludge. Microsensor measurements (O2, NO2−, NO3−, and H2S) were performed on single sludge flocs to detect anoxic niches, nitrate reduction, or sulfate reduction on a microscale. Incubations of activated sludge with 15NO3− and 35SO42− were used to determine denitrification and sulfate reduction rates on a batch scale. In four of six investigated sludges, no anoxic zones developed during aeration, and consequently denitrification rates were very low. However, in two sludges anoxia in flocs coincided with significant denitrification rates. Sulfate reduction could not be detected in any sludge in either the microsensor or the batch investigation, not even under short-term anoxic conditions. In contrast, the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria was shown by fluorescence in situ hybridization with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and by PCR-based detection of genes coding for the dissimilatory sulfite reductase. A possible explanation for the absence of anoxia even in most of the larger flocs might be that oxygen transport is not only diffusional but enhanced by advection, i.e., facilitated by flow through pores and channels. This possibility is suggested by the irregularity of some oxygen profiles and by confocal laser scanning microscopy of the three-dimensional floc structures, which showed that flocs from the two sludges in which anoxic zones were found were apparently denser than flocs from the other sludges. PMID:10473433

  18. Drag and lift reduction of a 3D bluff-body using active vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aider, Jean-Luc; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    In this study, a passive flow control experiment on a 3D bluff-body using vortex generators (VGs) is presented. The bluff-body is a modified Ahmed body (Ahmed in J Fluids Eng 105:429-434 1983) with a curved rear part, instead of a slanted one, so that the location of the flow separation is no longer forced by the geometry. The influence of a line of non-conventional trapezoïdal VGs on the aerodynamic forces (drag and lift) induced on the bluff-body is investigated. The high sensitivity to many geometric (angle between the trapezoïdal element and the wall, spanwise spacing between the VGs, longitudinal location on the curved surface) and physical (freestream velocity) parameters is clearly demonstrated. The maximum drag reduction is -12%, while the maximum global lift reduction can reach more than -60%, with a strong dependency on the freestream velocity. For some configurations, the lift on the rear axle of the model can be inverted (-104%). It is also shown that the VGs are still efficient even downstream of the natural separation line. Finally, a dynamic parameter is chosen and a new set-up with motorized vortex generators is proposed. Thanks to this active device. The optimal configurations depending on two parameters are found more easily, and a significant drag and lift reduction (up to -14% drag reduction) can be reached for different freestream velocities. These results are then analyzed through wall pressure and velocity measurements in the near-wake of the bluff-body with and without control. It appears that the largest drag and lift reduction is clearly associated to a strong increase of the size of the recirculation bubble over the rear slant. Investigation of the velocity field in a cross-section downstream the model reveals that, in the same time, the intensity of the longitudinal trailing vortices is strongly reduced, suggesting that the drag reduction is due to the breakdown of the balance between the separation bubble and the longitudinal vortices

  19. Thermal Noise Reduction of Mechanical Oscillators by Actively Controlled External Dissipative Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Medich, David; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Sheng, Sitong; Yuan, Jian-Yang; Shao, Zhifeng

    1999-01-01

    We show that the thermal fluctuations of very soft mechanical oscillators, such as the cantilever in an atomic force microscope (AFM), can be reduced without changing the stiffness of the spring or having to lower the environment temperature. We derive a theoretical relationship between the thermal fluctuations of an oscillator and an actively external-dissipative force. This relationship is verified by experiments with an AFM cantilever where the external active force is coupled through a magnetic field. With simple instrumentation, we have reduced the thermal noise amplitude of the cantilever by a factor of 3.4, achieving an apparent temperature of 25 K with the environment at 295K. This active noise reduction approach can significantly improve the accuracy of static position or static force measurements in a number of practical applications.

  20. Oxygen reduction activity of N-doped carbon-based films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Shunya; Kawaguchi, Kazuhiro; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Masahito

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-based films with nitrogen species on their surface were prepared on a glassy carbon (GC) substrate for application as a non-platinum cathode catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Cobalt and carbon were deposited in the presence of N 2 gas using a pulsed laser deposition method and then the metal Co was removed by HCl-washing treatment. Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was electrochemically determined using a rotating disk electrode system in which the film samples on the GC substrate were replaceable. The ORR activity increased with the temperature of the GC substrate during deposition. A carbon-based film prepared at 600 °C in the presence of N 2 at 66.7 Pa showed the highest ORR activity among the tested samples (0.66 V vs. NHE). This film was composed of amorphous carbons doped with pyridine type nitrogen atoms on its surface.

  1. Prolonged Baroreflex Activation Abolishes Salt-Induced Hypertension After Reductions in Kidney Mass.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Drew A; Irwin, Eric D; Lohmeier, Thomas E

    2016-12-01

    Chronic electric activation of the carotid baroreflex produces sustained reductions in sympathetic activity and arterial pressure and is currently being evaluated for therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. However, patients with significant impairment of renal function have been largely excluded from clinical trials. Thus, there is little information on blood pressure and renal responses to baroreflex activation in subjects with advanced chronic kidney disease, which is common in resistant hypertension. Changes in arterial pressure and glomerular filtration rate were determined in 5 dogs after combined unilateral nephrectomy and surgical excision of the poles of the remaining kidney to produce ≈70% reduction in renal mass. After control measurements, sodium intake was increased from ≈45 to 450 mol/d. While maintained on high salt, animals experienced increases in mean arterial pressure from 102±4 to 121±6 mm Hg and glomerular filtration rate from 40±2 to 45±2 mL/min. During 7 days of baroreflex activation, the hypertension induced by high salt was abolished (103±6 mm Hg) along with striking suppression of plasma norepinephrine concentration from 139±21 to 81±9 pg/mL, but despite pronounced blood pressure lowering, there were no significant changes in glomerular filtration rate (43±2 mL/min). All variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. These findings indicate that after appreciable nephron loss, chronic suppression of central sympathetic outflow by baroreflex activation abolishes hypertension induced by high salt intake. The sustained antihypertensive effects of baroreflex activation occur without significantly compromising glomerular filtration rate in remnant nephrons. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  3. Why copper is preferred over iron for oxygen activation and reduction in haem-copper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Michael, Matthew A; Zhu, Qianhong; Reed, Julian; Sandoval, Braddock A; Mirts, Evan N; Chakraborty, Saumen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Haem-copper oxidase (HCO) catalyses the natural reduction of oxygen to water using a haem-copper centre. Despite decades of research on HCOs, the role of non-haem metal and the reason for nature's choice of copper over other metals such as iron remains unclear. Here, we use a biosynthetic model of HCO in myoglobin that selectively binds different non-haem metals to demonstrate 30-fold and 11-fold enhancements in the oxidase activity of Cu- and Fe-bound HCO mimics, respectively, as compared with Zn-bound mimics. Detailed electrochemical, kinetic and vibrational spectroscopic studies, in tandem with theoretical density functional theory calculations, demonstrate that the non-haem metal not only donates electrons to oxygen but also activates it for efficient O-O bond cleavage. Furthermore, the higher redox potential of copper and the enhanced weakening of the O-O bond from the higher electron density in the d orbital of copper are central to its higher oxidase activity over iron. This work resolves a long-standing question in bioenergetics, and renders a chemical-biological basis for the design of future oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  4. Why copper is preferred over iron for oxygen activation and reduction in haem-copper oxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Michael, Matthew A.; Zhu, Qianhong; Reed, Julian; Sandoval, Braddock A.; Mirts, Evan N.; Chakraborty, Saumen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Haem-copper oxidase (HCO) catalyses the natural reduction of oxygen to water using a haem-copper centre. Despite decades of research on HCOs, the role of non-haem metal and the reason for nature's choice of copper over other metals such as iron remains unclear. Here, we use a biosynthetic model of HCO in myoglobin that selectively binds different non-haem metals to demonstrate 30-fold and 11-fold enhancements in the oxidase activity of Cu- and Fe-bound HCO mimics, respectively, as compared with Zn-bound mimics. Detailed electrochemical, kinetic and vibrational spectroscopic studies, in tandem with theoretical density functional theory calculations, demonstrate that the non-haem metal not only donates electrons to oxygen but also activates it for efficient O-O bond cleavage. Furthermore, the higher redox potential of copper and the enhanced weakening of the O-O bond from the higher electron density in the d orbital of copper are central to its higher oxidase activity over iron. This work resolves a long-standing question in bioenergetics, and renders a chemical-biological basis for the design of future oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  5. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; ...

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resultingmore » in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.« less

  6. Activity reductions in perirhinal cortex predict conceptual priming and familiarity-based recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chun; Ranganath, Charan; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well established that regions in the medial temporal lobes are critical for explicit memory, recent work has suggested that one medial temporal lobe subregion--the perirhinal cortex (PRC)--may also support conceptual priming, a form of implicit memory. Here, we sought to investigate whether activity reductions in PRC, previously linked to familiarity-based recognition, might also support conceptual implicit memory retrieval. Using a free association priming task, the current study tested the prediction that PRC indexes conceptual priming independent of contributions from perceptual and response repetition. Participants first completed an incidental semantic encoding task outside of the MRI scanner. Next, they were scanned during performance of a free association priming task, followed by a recognition memory test. Results indicated successful conceptual priming was associated with decreased PRC activity, and that an overlapping region within the PRC also exhibited activity reductions that covaried with familiarity during the recognition memory test. Our results demonstrate that the PRC contributes to both conceptual priming and familiarity-based recognition, which may reflect a common role of this region in implicit and explicit memory retrieval. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  8. Enhanced Activity of Supported Ni Catalysts Promoted by Pt for Rapid Reduction of Aromatic Nitro Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Huishan; Pan, Kecheng; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Bing; Xiang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    To improve the activities of non-noble metal catalysts is highly desirable and valuable to the reduced use of noble metal resources. In this work, the supported nickel (Ni) and nickel-platinum (NiPt) nanocatalysts were derived from a layered double hydroxide/carbon composite precursor. The catalysts were characterized and the role of Pt was analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The Ni2+ was reduced to metallic Ni0 via a self-reduction way utilizing the carbon as a reducing agent. The average sizes of the Ni particles in the NiPt catalysts were smaller than that in the supported Ni catalyst. The electronic structure of Ni was affected by the incorporation of Pt. The optimal NiPt catalysts exhibited remarkably improved activity toward the reduction of nitrophenol, which has an apparent rate constant (Ka) of 18.82 × 10−3 s−1, 6.2 times larger than that of Ni catalyst and also larger than most of the reported values of noble-metal and bimetallic catalysts. The enhanced activity could be ascribed to the modification to the electronic structure of Ni by Pt and the effect of exposed crystal planes. PMID:28335231

  9. GEO activities towards improved Geophysical monitoring. A key input to Disaster Risk Reduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achache, J.; Rum, G.

    2007-05-01

    GEO has been established in 2005 with the main objective to put in place a Global, Coordinated, Comprehensive and Sustained System of Observing Systems (GEOSS) to serve 9 Social Benefit Areas, among which Disaster Risk Reduction. The paper will first set up the reference GEO framework, through a brief description of GEOSS key features, architectural functions and capacity building, and then will recall the value of the Geophysical observations, coming both from in situ and remote (satellite) systems, and, even more important, of their integration. GEO activities related to Geophysical monitoring and the use of related observation to foster social benefits in the Disaster Risk Reduction area will then be shortly described, together with the on-going key actions, including specific examples on key scientific/technical and data sharing aspects associated to GEOSS implementation. Special attention will be devoted on how Capacity Building strategy and activities are addressed through GEOSS development, building on infrastructure and programs under consolidation within GEO framework, such as the GEOSS Information collection and dissemination systems under development (GEONETCast, GEO Web Portal, GEO Clearinghouse) and the UN programs such as SPIDER (SPace based Information for Disaster management and Emergency Response) and UNOSAT. The paper will provide recommendations on the way forward for the implementation of Disaster Risk Management provisions as an integral part of sustainable development, also with the objective of creating within GEO a supporting framework to UNDP and World Bank activities on Risk Identification and Assessment.

  10. Targeting Reductions in Sitting Time to Increase Physical Activity and Improve Health.

    PubMed

    Keadle, Sarah K; Conroy, David E; Buman, Matthew P; Dunstan, David W; Matthews, Charles E

    2017-08-01

    : New evidence suggests that reductions in sedentary behavior may increase physical activity and improve health. These findings point to new behavioral targets for intervention and new ways to think about intervening to increase overall physical activity in the population. This report provides a knowledge update reflecting the rapid accumulation of new evidence related to sedentary behavior and health among adults. Recent observational studies suggest that leveraging the time-inverse relationship between sedentary and active behaviors by replacing sitting with standing, light- or moderate-intensity activity can have important health benefits, particularly among less active adults. Clinical studies are providing evidence of the probable physiologic mechanisms underlying these associations, as well as insights into the cardiometabolic impact of breaking up and reducing sedentary behavior. In contrast to the well-established behavioral theories that guide the development and dissemination of evidence-based interventions to increase moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, much less is known about how to reduce sedentary time to increase daily activities. It has become clear that the environmental, social, and individual level determinants for sedentary time are distinct from those linked to the adoption and maintenance of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity. As a result, novel intervention strategies that focus on sitting and lower-intensity activities by leveraging the surrounding environment (e.g., workplace, school, and home) as well as individual-level cues and habits of sedentary behavior are being tested to increase the potency of interventions designed to increase overall physical activity. Herein we summarize the solutions-oriented research across the behavioral research framework, with a focus on highlighting areas of synergy across disciplines and identifying gaps for future research.

  11. Spectrum of the reductive dehalogenation activity of Desulfitobacterium frappieri PCP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Dennie, D.; Gladu, I.; Lepine, F.

    1998-11-01

    Desulfitobacterium frappieri PCP-1 was induced for ortho- and para-dechlorinating activities by different chlorophenols. Dehalogenation rates ranging from 25 to 1,158 nmol/min/mg of cell protein were observed according to the chlorophenol tested and the position of the chlorine removed. D. frappieri shows a broad substrate specificity; in addition to tetrachloroethylene and pentachloropyridine, strain PCP-1 can dehalogenate at ortho, meta, and para positions a large variety of aromatic molecules with substituted hydroxyl or amino groups. Reactions of O demethylation and reduction of nitro to amino substituents on aromatic molecules were also observed.

  12. Single Atomic Iron Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media: Particle Size Control and Thermal Activation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Hanguang; Hwang, Sooyeon; Wang, Maoyu; ...

    2017-09-13

    It remains a grand challenge to replace platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts with earth-abundant materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media, which is crucial for large-scale deployment of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). We report a high-performance atomic Fe catalyst derived from chemically Fe-doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) by directly bonding Fe ions to imidazolate ligands within 3D frameworks. Although the ZIF was identified as a promising precursor, the new synthetic chemistry enables the creation of well-dispersed atomic Fe sites embedded into porous carbon without the formation of aggregates. The size of catalyst particles is tunablemore » through synthesizing Fe-doped ZIF nanocrystal precursors in a wide range from 20 to 1000 nm followed by one-step thermal activation. Similar to Pt nanoparticles, the unique size control without altering chemical properties afforded by this approach is able to increase the number of PGM-free active sites. The best ORR activity is measured with the catalyst at a size of 50 nm. Further size reduction to 20 nm leads to significant particle agglomeration, thus decreasing the activity. In using the homogeneous atomic Fe model catalysts, we elucidated the active site formation process through correlating measured ORR activity with the change of chemical bonds in precursors during thermal activation up to 1100 °C. The critical temperature to form active sites is 800 °C, which is associated with a new Fe species with a reduced oxidation number (from Fe 3+ to Fe 2+) likely bonded with pyridinic N (FeN 4) embedded into the carbon planes. Further increasing the temperature leads to continuously enhanced activity, linked to the rise of graphitic N and Fe–N species. The new atomic Fe catalyst has achieved respectable ORR activity in challenging acidic media (0.5 M H 2SO 4), showing a half-wave potential of 0.85 V vs RHE and leaving only a 30 mV gap with Pt/C (60 μg Pt/cm 2

  13. Single Atomic Iron Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media: Particle Size Control and Thermal Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hanguang; Hwang, Sooyeon; Wang, Maoyu

    2017-09-26

    It remains a grand challenge to replace platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts with earth-abundant materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media, which is crucial for large-scale deployment of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Here, we report a high-performance atomic Fe catalyst derived from chemically Fe-doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) by directly bonding Fe ions to imidazolate ligands within 3D frameworks. Although the ZIF was identified as a promising precursor, the new synthetic chemistry enables the creation of well-dispersed atomic Fe sites embedded into porous carbon without the formation of aggregates. The size of catalyst particles ismore » tunable through synthesizing Fe-doped ZIF nanocrystal precursors in a wide range from 20 to 1000 nm followed by one-step thermal activation. Similar to Pt nanoparticles, the unique size control without altering chemical properties afforded by this approach is able to increase the number of PGM-free active sites. The best ORR activity is measured with the catalyst at a size of 50 nm. Further size reduction to 20 nm leads to significant particle agglomeration, thus decreasing the activity. Using the homogeneous atomic Fe model catalysts, we elucidated the active site formation process through correlating measured ORR activity with the change of chemical bonds in precursors during thermal activation up to 1100 °C. The critical temperature to form active sites is 800 °C, which is associated with a new Fe species with a reduced oxidation number (from Fe3+ to Fe2+) likely bonded with pyridinic N (FeN4) embedded into the carbon planes. Further increasing the temperature leads to continuously enhanced activity, linked to the rise of graphitic N and Fe–N species. The new atomic Fe catalyst has achieved respectable ORR activity in challenging acidic media (0.5 M H2SO4), showing a half-wave potential of 0.85 V vs RHE and leaving only a 30 mV gap with Pt/C (60 μgPt/cm2). Enhanced

  14. Single Atomic Iron Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media: Particle Size Control and Thermal Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanguang; Hwang, Sooyeon; Wang, Maoyu; Feng, Zhenxing; Karakalos, Stavros; Luo, Langli; Qiao, Zhi; Xie, Xiaohong; Wang, Chongmin; Su, Dong; Shao, Yuyan; Wu, Gang

    2017-10-11

    It remains a grand challenge to replace platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts with earth-abundant materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media, which is crucial for large-scale deployment of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Here, we report a high-performance atomic Fe catalyst derived from chemically Fe-doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) by directly bonding Fe ions to imidazolate ligands within 3D frameworks. Although the ZIF was identified as a promising precursor, the new synthetic chemistry enables the creation of well-dispersed atomic Fe sites embedded into porous carbon without the formation of aggregates. The size of catalyst particles is tunable through synthesizing Fe-doped ZIF nanocrystal precursors in a wide range from 20 to 1000 nm followed by one-step thermal activation. Similar to Pt nanoparticles, the unique size control without altering chemical properties afforded by this approach is able to increase the number of PGM-free active sites. The best ORR activity is measured with the catalyst at a size of 50 nm. Further size reduction to 20 nm leads to significant particle agglomeration, thus decreasing the activity. Using the homogeneous atomic Fe model catalysts, we elucidated the active site formation process through correlating measured ORR activity with the change of chemical bonds in precursors during thermal activation up to 1100 °C. The critical temperature to form active sites is 800 °C, which is associated with a new Fe species with a reduced oxidation number (from Fe 3+ to Fe 2+ ) likely bonded with pyridinic N (FeN 4 ) embedded into the carbon planes. Further increasing the temperature leads to continuously enhanced activity, linked to the rise of graphitic N and Fe-N species. The new atomic Fe catalyst has achieved respectable ORR activity in challenging acidic media (0.5 M H 2 SO 4 ), showing a half-wave potential of 0.85 V vs RHE and leaving only a 30 mV gap with Pt/C (60 μg Pt /cm 2

  15. Mechanisms of Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Mace, W. Derry; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of the aerodynamic load that acts on a generic rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active flow control was investigated in a wind tunnel test conducted on an approximately 1/3-scale powered rotorcraft model simulating forward flight. The aerodynamic mechanisms that make these reductions, in both the drag and the download, possible were examined in detail through the use of the measured surface pressure distribution on the fuselage, velocity field measurements made in the wake directly behind the ramp of the fuselage and computational simulations. The fuselage tested was the ROBIN-mod7, which was equipped with a series of eight slots located on the ramp section through which flow control excitation was introduced. These slots were arranged in a U-shaped pattern located slightly downstream of the baseline separation line and parallel to it. The flow control excitation took the form of either synthetic jets, also known as zero-net-mass-flux blowing, and steady blowing. The same set of slots were used for both types of excitation. The differences between the two excitation types and between flow control excitation from different combinations of slots were examined. The flow control is shown to alter the size of the wake and its trajectory relative to the ramp and the tailboom and it is these changes to the wake that result in a reduction in the aerodynamic load.

  16. Effects of a TiC substrate on the catalytic activity of Pt for NO reduction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xingli; Fu, Zhaoming; Li, Shasha; Zhang, Xilin; Yang, Zongxian

    2016-05-11

    Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the catalytic properties of a Pt monolayer supported on a TiC(001) substrate (Pt/TiC) toward NO reduction. It is found that the compound system of Pt/TiC has a good stability due to the strong Pt-TiC interaction. The diverse dissociation paths (namely the direct dissociation mechanism and the dimeric mechanism) are investigated. The transition state searching calculations suggest that NO has strong diffusion ability and small activation energy for dissociation on the Pt/TiC. For NO reduction on the Pt/TiC surface, we have found that the direct dissociation mechanisms (NO + N + O → NO2 + N and NO + N + O → N2 + O + O) are easier with a smaller dissociation barrier than those on the Pt(111) surface; and the dimeric process (NO + NO → (NO)2 → N2O + O → N2 + O + O) is considered to be dominant or significant with even a lower energy barrier than that of the direct dissociation. The results show that Pt/TiC can serve as an efficient catalyst for NO reduction.

  17. Active Vibration Control for Helicopter Interior Noise Reduction Using Power Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J.; Chevva, K.; Sun, F.; Blanc, A.; Kim, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work performed by United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) under Contract NNL11AA06C. The objective of this program is to develop technology to reduce helicopter interior noise resulting from multiple gear meshing frequencies. A novel active vibration control approach called Minimum Actuation Power (MAP) is developed. MAP is an optimal control strategy that minimizes the total input power into a structure by monitoring and varying the input power of controlling sources. MAP control was implemented without explicit knowledge of the phasing and magnitude of the excitation sources by driving the real part of the input power from the controlling sources to zero. It is shown that this occurs when the total mechanical input power from the excitation and controlling sources is a minimum. MAP theory is developed for multiple excitation sources with arbitrary relative phasing for single or multiple discrete frequencies and controlled by a single or multiple controlling sources. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of MAP for structural vibration reduction of a realistic rotorcraft interior structure. MAP control resulted in significant average global vibration reduction of a single frequency and multiple frequency excitations with one controlling actuator. Simulations also demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the observed vibration reductions on interior radiated noise.

  18. Reduction of epileptiform activity in ketogenic mice: The role of monocarboxylate transporters.

    PubMed

    Forero-Quintero, Linda S; Deitmer, Joachim W; Becker, Holger M

    2017-07-07

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that affects approximately 50 million people worldwide. Ketogenic diet (KD) can be a very effective treatment for intractable epilepsy. Potential mechanisms of action for KD have been proposed, including the re-balance among excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission and decrease in the glycolytic rate in brain cells. KD has been shown to have an effect on the expression pattern of monocarboxylate transporters (MCT), however, it is unknown whether MCT transport activity is affected by KD and linked to the reduction of seizures during KD. Therefore, we studied the influence of KD on MCT transport activity and the role of MCTs during epileptiform activity. Our results showed a decrease in the epileptiform activity in cortical slices from mice fed on KD and in the presence of beta-hydroxybutyrate. KD increased transport capacity for ketone bodies and lactate in cortical astrocytes by raising the MCT1 expression level. Inhibition of MCT1 and MCT2 in control conditions decreases epileptiform activity, while in KD it induced an increase in epileptiform activity. Our results suggest that MCTs not only play an important role in the transport of ketone bodies, but also in the modulation of brain energy metabolism under normal and ketogenic conditions.

  19. A Computational Study of BVI Noise Reduction Using Active Twist Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    The results of a computational study examining the effects of active-twist control on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise using the Apache Active Twist Rotor are presented. The primary goal of this activity is to reduce BVI noise during a low-speed descent flight condition using active-twist control. Rotor aeroelastic behavior was modeled using the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics code and the rotor noise was predicted using the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP. The accuracy of the analysis was validated through comparisons with experimental acoustic data for the first generation Active Twist Rotor at an advance ratio of mu=0.14. The application of active-twist to the main rotor blade system consisted of harmonic actuation frequencies ranging from 2P to 5P, control phase angles from 0' to 360 , and tip-twist amplitudes ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 . The acoustic analysis was conducted for a single low-speed flight condition of advance ratio =0.14 and shaft angle-of-attack, c^=+6 , with BVI noise levels predicted on a flat plane of observers located 1.1 rotor diameters beneath the rotor. The results indicated reductions of up to 11dB in BVI noise using 1.25 tip-twist amplitude with negligible effects on 4P vertical hub shear.

  20. Body image and weight reduction attempts among adolescent girls involved in physical activity.

    PubMed

    Jankauskiene, Rasa; Kardelis, Kestutis

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine associations between adolescent girls' body image and the character of engagement in physical activity in a representative sample of Kaunas high school girls. A total of 405 girls (mean age 16.9+/-0.4) filled in a self-constructed questionnaire (reliability 90.3%), aimed at assessing the engagement in physical activity and weight related body image. Most kinds of sports emphasizing body image such as fitness, dancing, gymnastics were most popular among the irregular participants (82.7%), and among regular participant, too (62.7%). The main reason to engage in physical activity was to improve the body image (45.2%), while the health improvement motive was left out in the second place (33.6%). Satisfaction with the body shape and the overall appearance strongly depended on body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), but not on the participation or the character of participation in physical activity. Irregular participants showed more attempts to reduce weight compared to regular exercisers and nonparticipants, while both groups participating in sport reported healthier ways of weight reduction practice. Satisfaction with body shape and overall appearance strongly depends on body mass index, but not on the participation in physical activity. Irregular engagement in physical activity could be an indicator of more frequent attempts to reduce body weight among adolescent girls.

  1. Progress Towards Fuselage Drag Reduction via Active Flow Control: A Combined CFD and Experimental Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Lienard, Caroline; LePape, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental effort has been undertaken to study fuselage drag reduction on a generic, non-proprietary rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active ow control. Fuselage drag reduction is an area of research interest to both the United States and France and this area is being worked collaboratively as a task under the United States/France Memorandum of Agreement on Helicopter Aeromechanics. In the first half of this task, emphasis is placed on the US generic fuselage, the ROBIN-mod7, with the experimental work being conducted on the US side and complementary US and French CFD analysis of the baseline and controlled cases. Fuselage simulations were made using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes ow solvers and with multiple turbulence models. Comparisons were made to experimental data for numerical simulations of the isolated fuselage and for the fuselage as installed in the tunnel, which includes modeling of the tunnel contraction, walls, and support fairing. The numerical simulations show that comparisons to the experimental data are in good agreement when the tunnel and model support are included. The isolated fuselage simulations compare well to each other, however, there is a positive shift in the centerline pressure when compared to the experiment. The computed flow separation locations on the rear ramp region had only slight differences with and without the tunnel walls and model support. For the simulations, the flow control slots were placed at several locations around the flow separation lines as a series of eight slots that formed a nearly continuous U-shape. Results from the numerical simulations resulted in an estimated 35% fuselage drag reduction from a steady blowing flow control configuration and a 26% drag reduction for unsteady zero-net-mass flow control configuration. Simulations with steady blowing show a delayed flow separation at the rear ramp of the fuselage that increases the surface pressure acting on the ramp

  2. Micro- and Nano-scale Diffusion Domains Acting as Kinetic Controls for U(VI) Release to the Hanford 300-Area Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoliker, D. L.; Hay, M. B.; Davis, J. A.; Zachara, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The 300-Area of the Hanford reservation, a cold-war era nuclear processing facility, is plagued by long-term elevated concentrations of U(VI) in the underlying aquifer. While the sediment U(VI) concentration is relatively low, it continues to act as a source and sink for the contaminant, allowing for persistent groundwater concentrations well above the maximum contamination limit (MCL). Simple Kd modeling of the attenuation of U(VI) in the aquifer predicted that groundwater U(VI) concentrations would decrease to below the drinking water standard by the year 2002. However, grain-scale morphology of the aquifer material suggests that intra-grain flow paths and mineral coatings, in which sorption complexes and precipitates formed over years of waste disposal, provide a significant kinetic constraint that slows groundwater flushing of the sediments. In order to quantify the impact of diffusion kinetics on the release of U(VI), high-resolution, non-reactive tracer studies were conducted on vadose zone sediments in both column and batch reactors. Systems were equilibrated for long time scales with tritated artificial groundwater and then flushed with flow and stop-flow events included for columns. Previously collected U(VI) release data from batch dissolution/desorption studies is compared with tritium tracer diffusion kinetics as well as porosimetry and detailed microscopy characterization. The micro-scale and nano-scale diffusion regimes, including intra-granular regions as well as mineral coatings, represent a significant potential long-term source of contaminant U(VI). Understanding the physical kinetic limitations coupled with the complex chemistry of U(VI) sorption processes within natural systems is an important step forward in providing information to strengthen field-scale reactive transport simulations.

  3. Model-based Analysis of Mixed Uranium(VI) Reduction by Biotic and Abiotic Pathways During in Situ Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2013-10-24

    Uranium bioremediation has emerged as a potential strategy of cleanup of radionuclear contamination worldwide. An integrated geochemical & microbial community model is a promising approach to predict and provide insights into the bioremediation of a complicated natural subsurface. In this study, an integrated column-scale model of uranium bioremediation was developed, taking into account long-term interactions between biotic and abiotic processes. It is also combined with a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis to track the fate and cycling of biogenic species. As compared with other bioremediation models, the model increases the resolution of the connection of microbial community to geochemistry and establishes directmore » quantitative correlation between overall community evolution and geochemical variation, thereby accurately predicting the community dynamics under different sedimentary conditions. The thermodynamic analysis examined a recently identified homogeneous reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) under dynamic sedimentary conditions across time and space. It shows that the biogenic Fe(II) from Geobacter metabolism can be removed rapidly by the biogenic sulphide from sulfate reducer metabolism, hence constituting one of the reasons that make the abiotic U(VI) reduction thermodynamically infeasible in the subsurface. Further analysis indicates that much higher influent concentrations of both Fe(II) and U(VI) than normal are required to for abiotic U(VI) reduction to be thermodynamically feasible, suggesting that the abiotic reduction cannot be an alternative to the biotic reduction in the remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater.« less

  4. Nitrogen fertilization decouples roots and microbes: Reductions in belowground carbon allocation limit microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, J.; Walter, C. A.; Govindarajulu, R.; Hawkins, J.; Brzostek, E. R.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition has enhanced the ability of trees to capture atmospheric carbon (C). The effect of elevated N on belowground C cycling, however, is variable and response mechanisms are largely unknown. Recent research has highlighted distinct differences between ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) trees in the strength of root-microbial interactions. In particular, ECM trees send more C to rhizosphere microbes to stimulate enzyme activity and nutrient mobilization than AM trees, which primarily rely on saprotrophic microbes to mobilize N. As such, we hypothesized that N fertilization would weaken root-microbial interactions and soil decomposition in ECM stands more than in AM stands. To test this hypothesis, we measured root-microbial interactions in ECM and AM plots in two long-term N fertilization studies, the Fernow Experimental Forest, WV and Bear Brook Watershed, ME. We found that N fertilization led to declines in plant C allocation belowground to fine root biomass, branching, and root exudation in ECM stands to a greater extent than in AM stands. As ECM roots are tightly coupled to the soil microbiome through energy and nutrient exchange, reductions in belowground C allocation were mirrored by shifts in microbial community composition and reductions in fungal gene expression. These shifts were accompanied by larger reductions in fungal-derived lignolytic and hydrolytic enzyme activity in ECM stands than in AM stands. In contrast, as the AM soil microbiome is less reliant on trees for C and are more adapted to high inorganic nutrient environments, the soil metagenome and transcriptome were more resilient to decreases in belowground C allocation. Collectively, our results indicate the N fertilization decoupled root-microbial interactions by reducing belowground carbon allocation in ECM stands. Thus, N fertilization may reduce soil turnover and increase soil C storage to a greater extent in forests dominated by ECM than AM trees.

  5. Tailoring the Oxygen Reduction Activity of Hemoglobin through Immobilization within Microporous Organic Polymer-Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ahmed B; Haikal, Rana R; Abugable, Arwa A; Hassan, Mohamed H; Karakalos, Stavros G; Pellechia, Perry J; Hassan, Hamdy H; Yacoub, Magdi H; Alkordi, Mohamed H

    2017-08-23

    A facile one-pot, bottom-up approach to construct composite materials of graphene and a pyrimidine-based porous-organic polymer (PyPOP), as host for immobilizing human hemoglobin (Hb) biofunctional molecules, is reported. The graphene was selected because of its excellent electrical conductivity, while the PyPOP was utilized because of its pronounced permanent microporosity and chemical functionality. This approach enabled enclathration of the hemoglobin within the microporous composite through a ship-in-a-bottle process, where the composite of the PyPOP@G was constructed from its molecular precursors, under mild reaction conditions. The composite-enclathrated Fe-protoporphyrin-IX demonstrated electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction, as a functional metallocomplex, yet with a distinct microenvironment provided by the globin protein. This approach delineates a pathway for platform microporous functional solids, where fine-tuning of functionality is facilitated by judicious choice of the active host molecules or complexes, targeting specific application.

  6. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiuli; Zhang, Peng; Li, Shuang; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-17

    Developing inexpensive and non-precious metal electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is among the major goals in fuel cells. Herein, by using density-functional theory calculations, we show that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids exhibit unexpectedly high ORR catalytic activity-even comparable to that of the Pt(111) surface. Both graphitic-type and pyridine-type N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids are highly active for the ORR and have good CO tolerance. The formation of the second H2O molecule is the rate-determining step for the ORR with the graphitic-type hybrid, whereas on the pyridine-type hybrid, it is the formation of OOH. Note that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrid materials combine the high reactivity of olympicene and the high electrical conductivity of graphene, which allows them to be potentially used as low-cost and non-precious-metal ORR catalysts.

  7. Enhanced oxygen reduction activity and solid oxide fuel cell performance with a nanoparticles-loaded cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Li; Zhao, Zhe; Tu, Baofeng; Ou, Dingrong; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Chen, Xiaobo; Cheng, Mojie

    2015-03-11

    Reluctant oxygen-reduction-reaction (ORR) activity has been a long-standing challenge limiting cell performance for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in both centralized and distributed power applications. We report here that this challenge has been tackled with coloading of (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and Y2O3 stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticles within a porous YSZ framework. This design dramatically improves ORR activity, enhances fuel cell output (200-300% power improvement), and enables superior stability (no observed degradation within 500 h of operation) from 600 to 800 °C. The improved performance is attributed to the intimate contacts between nanoparticulate YSZ and LSM particles in the three-phase boundaries in the cathode.

  8. Integration of active and passive cool roof system for attic temperature reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yew, Ming Chian; Yew, Ming Kun; Saw, Lip Huat; Durairaj, Rajkumar

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this project is to study the capability of cool roof system in the reduction of heat transmission through metal roof into an attic. The cool roof system is designed in active and passive methods to reduce the thermal loads imposed to a building. Two main features are introduced to this cool roof system, which is thermal insulation coating (TIC) and moving air cavity (MAC) that served as active and passive manner, respectively. For MAC, two designs are introduced. Normal MAC is fabricated by six aluminium tubes whereby each aluminium tube is made up by sticking up of five aluminium cans. While improved MAC is also made by six aluminium tubes whereby each aluminium tube is custom made from steel rods and aluminium foils. MAC provides ventilation and heat reflection under the metal roof before the heat transfer into attic. It also coupled with three solar powered fans to increase heat flow inside the channel. The cool roof that incorporated TIC, MAC with solar powered fans and opened attic inlet showed a significant improvement with a reduction of up to 14 °C in the attic temperature compared to conventional roof system.

  9. Effect of EPS Content on Activated Sludge Reduction in Process of Predation by T. tubifex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yingjie; Ai, Cuiling; Zhang, Guochun

    2017-12-01

    A Sludge reduction in a conventional activated sludge process combined with a membrane biofilm inoculated with T. tubifex was investigated. The influence of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted in forms of LB-EPS and TB-EPS respectively on the surface properties of biomass was studied. Results showed that variations of polysaccharides and protein along with the increasing of EPS feeding would affect the existence of T. tubifex. When the amount of EPS varied from 10 to 50μg/mg, the specific resistance of a sludge suspension was obtained from 3.5×107 to 1.4×107 S2/g. Meanwhile, polysaccharides content in EPS was to be positively correlated with the SSR of sludge suspension whereas protein content would be not. Anyway, it can be argued that an increase in LB-EPS not TB-EPS may affect the performance of activated sludge reduction with efficiency about 40.1% to 31.6%.

  10. Classic Maya civilization collapse associated with reduction in tropical cyclone activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, M. A.; Polanco-Martinez, J. M.; Lases-Hernández, F.; Bradley, R. S.; Burns, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    In light of the increased destructiveness of tropical cyclones observed over recent decades one might assume that an increase and not a decrease in tropical cyclone activity would lead to societal stress and perhaps collapse of ancient cultures. In this study we present evidence that a reduction in the frequency and intensity of tropical Atlantic cyclones could have contributed to the collapse of the Maya civilization during the Terminal Classic Period (TCP, AD. 800-950). Statistical comparisons of a quantitative precipitation record from the Yucatan Peninsula (YP) Maya lowlands, based on the stalagmite known as Chaac (after the Mayan God of rain and agriculture), relative to environmental proxy records of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), and tropical Atlantic cyclone counts, suggest that these records share significant coherent variability during the TCP and that summer rainfall reductions between 30 and 50% in the Maya lowlands occurred in association with decreased Atlantic tropical cyclones. Analysis of modern instrumental hydrological data suggests cyclone rainfall contributions to the YP equivalent to the range of rainfall deficits associated with decreased tropical cyclone activity during the collapse of the Maya civilization. Cyclone driven precipitation variability during the TCP, implies that climate change may have triggered Maya civilization collapse via freshwater scarcity for domestic use without significant detriment to agriculture. Pyramid in Tikal, the most prominent Maya Kingdom that collapsed during the Terminal Classic Period (circa C.E. 800-950) Rainfall feeding stalagmites inside Rio Secreto cave system, Yucatan, Mexico.

  11. Batch and fixed-bed column study for p-nitrophenol, methylene blue, and U(VI) removal by polyvinyl alcohol-graphene oxide macroporous hydrogel bead.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Hongyu; Yang, Kai

    2018-01-01

    There is an increasing need to explore effective and clean approaches for hazardous contamination removal from wastewaters. In this work, a novel bead adsorbent, polyvinyl alcohol-graphene oxide (PVA-GO) macroporous hydrogel bead was prepared as filter media for p-nitrophenol (PNP), dye methylene blue (MB), and heavy metal U(VI) removal from aqueous solution. Batch and fixed-bed column experiments were carried out to evaluate the adsorption capacities of PNP, MB, and U(VI) on this bead. From batch experiments, the maximum adsorption capacities of PNP, MB, and U(VI) reached 347.87, 422.90, and 327.55 mg/g. From the fixed-bed column experiments, the adsorption capacities of PNP, MB, and U(VI) decreased with initial concentration increasing from 100 to 400 mg/L. The adsorption capacities of PNP, MB, and U(VI) decreased with increasing flow rate. Also, the maximum adsorption capacity of PNP decreased as pH increased from 3 to 9, while MB and U(VI) presented opposite tendencies. Furthermore, the bed depth service Time (BDST) model showed good linear relationships for the three ions' adsorption processes in this fixed-bed column, which indicated that the BDST model effectively evaluated and optimized the adsorption process of PVA-GO macroporous hydrogel bead in fixed-bed columns for hazardous contaminant removal from wastewaters.

  12. Effect of microstructure of nitrogen-doped graphene on oxygen reduction activity in fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lipeng; Niu, Jianbing; Dai, Liming; Xia, Zhenhai

    2012-05-15

    The development of fuel cells as clean-energy technologies is largely limited by the prohibitive cost of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of catalyst design principle that links material structures to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant nonmetal catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we present a first-principles study of ORR on nitrogen-doped graphene in acidic environment. We demonstrate that the ORR activity primarily correlates to charge and spin densities of the graphene. The nitrogen doping and defects introduce high positive spin and/or charge densities that facilitate the ORR on graphene surface. The identified active sites are closely related to doping cluster size and dopant-defect interactions. Generally speaking, a large doping cluster size (number of N atoms >2) reduces the number of catalytic active sites per N atom. In combination with N clustering, Stone-Wales defects can strongly promote ORR. For four-electron transfer, the effective reversible potential ranges from 1.04 to 1.15 V/SHE, depending on the defects and cluster size. The catalytic properties of graphene could be optimized by introducing small N clusters in combination with material defects.

  13. Activating the Bifunctionality of a Perovskite Oxide toward Oxygen Reduction and Oxygen Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Yu-Qi; Ciucci, Francesco

    2017-10-18

    This article presents a facile and effective approach to activate the bifunctionality of calcium-manganese perovskites toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We substituted Nb into the Mn site of CaMnO 3 (CMO) and treated the material with H 2 . The as-obtained CaMn 0.75 Nb 0.25 O 3-δ (H 2 -CMNO) displays the same structure as that of CMO, and compared to that of CMO, H 2 -CMNO exhibits significantly improved OER performance, including a lower overpotential, a reduced Tafel slope, a higher mass activity, and enhanced stability. In addition, the ORR performance of H 2 -CMNO is also greatly enhanced, relative to CMO, with a higher ORR activity and a more efficient electron-transfer pathway. H 2 -CMNO shows an even higher activity-per-catalyst cost and superior stability than that of state-of-the-art materials, such as IrO 2 and Pt/C. This great enhancement in ORR and OER activity of H 2 -CMNO is attributed to several factors, including phase stabilization, optimized e g filling, better OH - adsorption, and improved electrical conductivity.

  14. Incorporation of Np(V) and U(VI) in Carbonate and Sulfate Minerals Crystallized from Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Morrison, Jessica M.; Wang, Zheming

    2015-02-15

    The neptunyl Np(V)O2 + and uranyl U(VI)O2 2+ ions are soluble in groundwater, although their interaction with minerals in the subsurface may impact their mobility. One mechanism for the immobilization of actinyl ions in the subsurface is coprecipitation in low-temperature minerals that form naturally, or that are induced to form as part of a remediation strategy. Important differences in the crystal-chemical behavior of the Np(V) neptunyl and U(VI) uranyl ions suggest their behavior towards incorporation into growing crystals may differ significantly. Using a selection of low temperature minerals synthesized in aqueous systems under ambient conditions, this study examines the factorsmore » that impact the structural incorporation of the Np(V) neptunyl and U(VI) uranyl ions in carbonate and sulfate minerals.« less

  15. Microtubules Accelerate the Kinase Activity of Aurora-B by a Reduction in Dimensionality

    PubMed Central

    Noujaim, Michael; Bechstedt, Susanne; Wieczorek, Michal; Brouhard, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Aurora-B is the kinase subunit of the Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC), a key regulator of mitotic progression that corrects improper kinetochore attachments and establishes the spindle midzone. Recent work has demonstrated that the CPC is a microtubule-associated protein complex and that microtubules are able to activate the CPC by contributing to Aurora-B auto-phosphorylation in trans. Aurora-B activation is thought to occur when the local concentration of Aurora-B is high, as occurs when Aurora-B is enriched at centromeres. It is not clear, however, whether distributed binding to large structures such as microtubules would increase the local concentration of Aurora-B. Here we show that microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a “reduction in dimensionality.” We find that microtubules increase the kinase activity of Aurora-B toward microtubule-associated substrates while reducing the phosphorylation levels of substrates not associated to microtubules. Using the single molecule assay for microtubule-associated proteins, we show that a minimal CPC construct binds to microtubules and diffuses in a one-dimensional (1D) random walk. The binding of Aurora-B to microtubules is salt-dependent and requires the C-terminal tails of tubulin, indicating that the interaction is electrostatic. We show that the rate of Aurora-B auto-activation is faster with increasing concentrations of microtubules. Finally, we demonstrate that microtubules lose their ability to stimulate Aurora-B when their C-terminal tails are removed by proteolysis. We propose a model in which microtubules act as scaffolds for the enzymatic activity of Aurora-B. The scaffolding activity of microtubules enables rapid Aurora-B activation and efficient phosphorylation of microtubule-associated substrates. PMID:24498282

  16. MURMoT. Design and Application of Microbial Uranium Reduction Monitoring Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, Frank E.

    2014-12-31

    Uranium (U) contamination in the subsurface is a major remediation challenge at many DOE sites. Traditional site remedies present enormous costs to DOE; hence, enhanced bioremediation technologies (i.e., biostimulation and bioaugmentation) combined with monitoring efforts are being considered as cost-effective corrective actions to address subsurface contamination. This research effort improved understanding of the microbial U reduction process and developed new tools for monitoring microbial activities. Application of these tools will promote science-based site management decisions that achieve contaminant detoxification, plume control, and long-term stewardship in the most efficient manner. The overarching hypothesis was that the design, validation and application ofmore » a suite of new molecular and biogeochemical tools advance process understanding, and improve environmental monitoring regimes to assess and predict in situ U immobilization. Accomplishments: This project (i) advanced nucleic acid-based approaches to elucidate the presence, abundance, dynamics, spatial distribution, and activity of metal- and radionuclide-detoxifying bacteria; (ii) developed proteomics workflows for detection of metal reduction biomarker proteins in laboratory cultures and contaminated site groundwater; (iii) developed and demonstrated the utility of U isotopic fractionation using high precision mass spectrometry to quantify U(VI) reduction for a range of reduction mechanisms and environmental conditions; and (iv) validated the new tools using field samples from U-contaminated IFRC sites, and demonstrated their prognostic and diagnostic capabilities in guiding decision making for environmental remediation and long-term site stewardship.« less

  17. Sizes of the Smallest Particles at Saturn Ring Edges from Diffraction in UVIS Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Becker, T. M.; Esposito, L. W.

    2017-12-01

    Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed more than 150 ring stellar occultations since its arrival at Saturn in 2004. We use stellar occultation data from the UVIS High Speed Photometer (HSP) to identify diffraction signals at ring edges caused by small particles diffracting light into the detector and consequently increasing the signal above that of the unocculted star. The shape of a diffraction signal is indicative of the particle size distribution at the ring edge, which may be a dynamically perturbed region. Becker et al. (2015 Icarus doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.11.001) analyzed diffraction signals at the outer edge of the A Ring and the edges of the Encke Gap. We apply the Becker et al. (2015) model to the outer edge of the B Ring as well as the edges of ringlets within the C Ring and Cassini Division. In addition, we analyze diffraction signatures at the A Ring outer edge in 2 new occultations. The best-fit model signals to these occultations are consistent with the findings of Becker et al. (2015) who found an average minimum particle size amin =4.5 mm and average power law slope q=3.2. At the B Ring outer edge, we detect a diffraction signal in 10 of 28 occultations in which the diffraction signal would be observable according to our criteria for star brightness and observation geometry. We find a mean amin =11 mm and a mean q=3.0. At both edges of the so-called "Strange" ringlet (R6) we find a mean amin = 20 mm and mean q values of 3.0 and 2.8 at the inner and outer edges, respectively. In contrast, we do not observe any clear diffraction signals at either edge of the wider Huygens ringlet. This could imply an absence of cm-scale or smaller particles and indicates that collisions here may be less vigorous than at the other ring edges analyzed in this study. We detect diffraction in a small fraction ( 10%) of occultations at 3 ringlets within the Cassini Division: the Herschel ringlet, the Laplace ringlet, and the Barnard ringlet. We

  18. Complexation of U(VI) with 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonicAcid (HEDPA) in Acidic to Basic Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, W A; Rao, L; Zanonato, P

    2007-01-24

    Complexation of U(VI) with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) in acidic to basic solutions has been studied with multiple techniques. A number of 1:1 (UO{sub 2}H{sub 3}L), 1:2 (UO{sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 and -1) and 2:2 ((UO{sub 2}){sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 1, 0 and -1) complexes form, but the 1:2 complexes are the major species in a wide pH range. Thermodynamic parameters (formation constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation) were determined by potentiometry and calorimetry. Data indicate that the complexation of U(VI) with HEDPA is exothermic, favored by the enthalpy ofmore » complexation. This is in contrast to the complexation of U(VI) with dicarboxylic acids in which the enthalpy term usually is unfavorable. Results from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and {sup 31}P NMR have confirmed the presence of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:2 U(VI)-HEDPA complexes.« less

  19. The mechanism of uranium transformation from U(VI) into nano-uramphite by two indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis strains.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Fanbing; Cheng, Yangjian; Lin, Zhang; Guan, Xiong

    2015-10-30

    The mechanism of uranium transformation from U(VI) into nano-uramphite by two indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis strains was investigated in the present work. Our data showed that the bacteria isolated from uranium mine possessed highly accumulation ability to U(VI), and the maximum accumulation capacity was around 400 mg U/g biomass (dry weight). X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analyzes indicated that the U(VI) was adsorbed on the bacterial surface firstly through coordinating with phosphate, CH2 and amide groups, and then needle-like amorphous uranium compounds were formed. With the extension of time, the extracellular crystalline substances were disappeared, but some particles were appeared in the intracellular region, and these particles were characterized as tetragonal-uramphite. Moreover, the disrupted experiment indicated that the cell-free extracts had better uranium-immobilization ability than cell debris. Our findings provided the understanding of the uranium transformation process from amorphous uranium to crystalline uramphite, which would be useful in the regulation of uranium immobilization process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Coupled Biogeochemical Processes Governing the Stability of Bacteriogenic Uraninite and Release of U(VI) in Heterogeneous Media: Molecular to Meter Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R.

    2006-11-15

    In-situ reductive biotransformation of subsurface U(VI) to U(IV) (as ?UO2?) has been proposed as a bioremediation method to immobilize uranium at contaminated DOE sites. The chemical stability of bacteriogenic ?UO2? is the seminal issue governing its success as an in-situ waste form in the subsurface. The structure and properties of chemically synthesized UO2+x have been investigated in great detail. It has been found to exhibit complex structural disorder, with nonstoichiometry being common, hence the designation ?UO2+x?, where 0 < x < 0.25. Little is known about the structures and properties of the important bacteriogenic analogs, which are believed to occurmore » as nanoparticles in the environment. Chemically synthesized UO2+x exhibits an open fluorite structure and is known to accommodate significant doping of divalent cations. The extent to which bacteriogenic UO2+x incorporates common ground water cations (e.g., Ca2+) has not been investigated, and little is known about nonstoichiometry and structure defects in the bacteriogenic material. Particle size, nonstoichiometry, and doping may significantly alter the reactivity, and hence stability, of bacteriogenic UO2+x in the subsurface. The presence of associated sulfide minerals, and solid phase oxidants such as bacteriogenic Mn oxides may also affect the longevity of bacteriogenic UO2 in the subsurface.« less

  1. ESTIMATION OF MICROBIAL REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION RATES FOR CHLORINATED BENZENES AND PHENOLS USING A QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of literature data was used to derive several quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) to predict the rate constants for the microbial reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated aromatics. Dechlorination rate constants for 25 chloroaromatics were corrected for th...

  2. Reactions of the feldspar surface with metal ions: Sorption of Pb(II), U(VI) and Np(V), and surface analytical studies of reaction with Pb(II) and U(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardon, Emmanuelle S.; Bosbach, Dirk; Bryan, Nicholas D.; Lyon, Ian C.; Marquardt, Christian; Römer, Jürgen; Schild, Dieter; Vaughan, David J.; Wincott, Paul L.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Livens, Francis R.

    2008-01-01

    Feldspar minerals are thermodynamically unstable in the near-surface environment and their surfaces are well known to react readily with aqueous solutions, leading to incongruent dissolution at low pH values, but congruent dissolution at neutral and high pH values. Interactions with mineral surfaces are an important control on the environmental transport of trace elements and detrital feldspars are abundant in soils and sediments. However, the interactions of metal ions in solution with the reacting feldspar surface have not been widely explored. The interactions of Pb(II), U(VI) and Np(V) ions with the feldspar surface have therefore been studied. Lead is taken up by the microcline surface at pH 6 and 10, but no uptake could be measured at pH 2. There was measurable uptake of Pb(II) on the plagioclase surface at pH 2, 6 and 10. Uptake always increased with pH. In most conditions, Pb(II) reacts through cation exchange process although, at high pH, a discrete phase, probably hydrocerrusite, is observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) to precipitate on the plagioclase surface. Supersaturation with hydrocerrusite in these conditions is expected from thermodynamic calculations. Uptake of uranyl ion (UO22+), generally through surface complex formation, could only be measured at pH 6 and 10. At pH 6 and an initial U(VI) concentration above 21.0 μM, precipitation of becquerelite (Ca[(UO2)3O2(OH)3]2·8H2O), identified by AFM and characterised by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, is observed on plagioclase. The U(VI) concentration range in which becquerelite precipitation begins (dissolved U(VI) 1-5 μM) is consistent with that predicted from thermodynamic modelling. On plagioclase feldspar, secondary ion mass spectrometry showed diffusion of uranium into the altered surface layer. Uptake of the neptunyl ion (Np(V)) was found at pH 6 and 10 for microcline and at pH 2, 6 and 10 for plagioclase, and was generally lower than uptake of

  3. Reduction of EEG theta power and changes in motor activity in rats treated with ceftriaxone.

    PubMed

    Bellesi, Michele; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for the largest proportion of total glutamate transport. Recently, it has been demonstrated that ceftriaxone (CEF) robustly increases GLT-1 expression. In addition, physiological studies have shown that GLT-1 up-regulation strongly affects synaptic plasticity, and leads to an impairment of the prepulse inhibition, a simple form of information processing, thus suggesting that GLT-1 over-expression may lead to dysfunctions of large populations of neurons. To test this possibility, we assessed whether CEF affects cortical electrical activity by using chronic electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in male WKY rats. Spectral analysis showed that 8 days of CEF treatment resulted in a delayed reduction in EEG theta power (7-9 Hz) in both frontal and parietal derivations. This decrease peaked at day 10, i.e., 2 days after the end of treatment, and disappeared by day 16. In addition, we found that the same CEF treatment increased motor activity, especially when EEG changes are more prominent. Taken together, these data indicate that GLT-1 up-regulation, by modulating glutamatergic transmission, impairs the activity of widespread neural circuits. In addition, the increased motor activity and prepulse inhibition alterations previously described suggest that neural circuits involved in sensorimotor control are particularly sensitive to GLT-1 up-regulation.

  4. Reduction of EEG Theta Power and Changes in Motor Activity in Rats Treated with Ceftriaxone

    PubMed Central

    Bellesi, Michele; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for the largest proportion of total glutamate transport. Recently, it has been demonstrated that ceftriaxone (CEF) robustly increases GLT-1 expression. In addition, physiological studies have shown that GLT-1 up-regulation strongly affects synaptic plasticity, and leads to an impairment of the prepulse inhibition, a simple form of information processing, thus suggesting that GLT-1 over-expression may lead to dysfunctions of large populations of neurons. To test this possibility, we assessed whether CEF affects cortical electrical activity by using chronic electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in male WKY rats. Spectral analysis showed that 8 days of CEF treatment resulted in a delayed reduction in EEG theta power (7–9 Hz) in both frontal and parietal derivations. This decrease peaked at day 10, i.e., 2 days after the end of treatment, and disappeared by day 16. In addition, we found that the same CEF treatment increased motor activity, especially when EEG changes are more prominent. Taken together, these data indicate that GLT-1 up-regulation, by modulating glutamatergic transmission, impairs the activity of widespread neural circuits. In addition, the increased motor activity and prepulse inhibition alterations previously described suggest that neural circuits involved in sensorimotor control are particularly sensitive to GLT-1 up-regulation. PMID:22479544

  5. NMDA receptor hypofunction produces concomitant firing rate potentiation and burst activity reduction in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Mark E.; Homayoun, Houman; Moghaddam, Bita

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive deficits associated with frontal lobe dysfunction are a determinant of long-term disability in schizophrenia and are not effectively treated with available medications. Clinical studies show that many aspects of these deficits are transiently induced in healthy individuals treated with N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists. These findings and recent genetic linkage studies strongly implicate NMDA receptor deficiency in schizophrenia and suggest that reversing this deficiency is pertinent to treating the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Despite the wealth of behavioral data on the effects of NMDA antagonist treatment in humans and laboratory animals, there is a fundamental lack of understanding about the mechanisms by which a general state of NMDA deficiency influences the function of cortical neurons. Using ensemble recording in freely moving rats, we found that NMDA antagonist treatment, at doses that impaired working memory, potentiated the firing rate of most prefrontal cortex neurons. This potentiation, which correlated with expression of behavioral stereotypy, resulted from an increased number of irregularly discharged single spikes. Concurrent with the increase in spike activity, there was a significant reduction in organized bursting activity. These results identify two distinct mechanisms by which NMDA receptor deficiency may disrupt frontal lobe function: an increase in disorganized spike activity, which may enhance cortical noise and transmission of disinformation; and a decrease in burst activity, which reduces transmission efficacy of cortical neurons. These findings provide a physiological basis for the NMDA receptor deficiency model of schizophrenia and may clarify the nature of cortical dysfunction in this disease. PMID:15159546

  6. NMDA receptor hypofunction produces concomitant firing rate potentiation and burst activity reduction in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Mark E; Homayoun, Houman; Moghaddam, Bita

    2004-06-01

    Cognitive deficits associated with frontal lobe dysfunction are a determinant of long-term disability in schizophrenia and are not effectively treated with available medications. Clinical studies show that many aspects of these deficits are transiently induced in healthy individuals treated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists. These findings and recent genetic linkage studies strongly implicate NMDA receptor deficiency in schizophrenia and suggest that reversing this deficiency is pertinent to treating the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Despite the wealth of behavioral data on the effects of NMDA antagonist treatment in humans and laboratory animals, there is a fundamental lack of understanding about the mechanisms by which a general state of NMDA deficiency influences the function of cortical neurons. Using ensemble recording in freely moving rats, we found that NMDA antagonist treatment, at doses that impaired working memory, potentiated the firing rate of most prefrontal cortex neurons. This potentiation, which correlated with expression of behavioral stereotypy, resulted from an increased number of irregularly discharged single spikes. Concurrent with the increase in spike activity, there was a significant reduction in organized bursting activity. These results identify two distinct mechanisms by which NMDA receptor deficiency may disrupt frontal lobe function: an increase in disorganized spike activity, which may enhance cortical noise and transmission of disinformation; and a decrease in burst activity, which reduces transmission efficacy of cortical neurons. These findings provide a physiological basis for the NMDA receptor deficiency model of schizophrenia and may clarify the nature of cortical dysfunction in this disease.

  7. Water quality factors affecting bromate reduction in biologically active carbon filters.

    PubMed

    Kirisits, M J; Snoeyink, V L; Inan, H; Chee-Sanford, J C; Raskin, L; Brown, J C

    2001-03-01

    Biological removal of the ozonation by-product, bromate, was demonstrated in biologically active carbon (BAC) filters. For example, with a 20-min EBCT, pH 7.5, and influent dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrate concentrations 2.1 and 5.1 mg/l, respectively, 40% bromate removal was obtained with a 20 microg/l influent bromate concentration. In this study, DO, nitrate and sulfate concentrations, pH, and type of source water were evaluated for their effect on bromate removal in a BAC filter. Bromate removal decreased as the influent concentrations of DO and nitrate increased, but bromate removal was observed in the presence of measurable effluent concentrations of DO and nitrate. In contrast, bromate removal was not sensitive to the influent sulfate concentration, with only a slight reduction in bromate removal as the influent sulfate concentration was increased from 11.1 to 102.7 mg/l. Bromate reduction was better at lower pH values (6.8 and 7.2) than at higher pH values (7.5 and 8.2), suggesting that it may be possible to reduce bromate formation during ozonation and increase biological bromate reduction through pH control. Biological bromate removal in Lake Michigan water was very poor as compared to that in tapwater from a groundwater source. Bromate removal improved when sufficient organic electron donor was added to remove the nitrate and DO present in the Lake Michigan water, indicating that the poor biodegradability of the natural organic matter may have been limiting bromate removal in that water. Biological bromate removal was demonstrated to be a sustainable process under a variety of water quality conditions, and bromate removal can be improved by controlling key water quality parameters.

  8. Severe reduction of blood lysosomal acid lipase activity in cryptogenic cirrhosis: A nationwide multicentre cohort study.

    PubMed

    Angelico, Francesco; Corradini, Stefano Ginanni; Pastori, Daniele; Fargion, Silvia; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Angelico, Mario; Bolondi, Luigi; Tozzi, Giulia; Pujatti, Pietro Luigi; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Corazza, Gino Roberto; Averna, Maurizio; Perticone, Francesco; Croce, Giuseppe; Persico, Marcello; Bucci, Tommaso; Baratta, Francesco; Polimeni, Licia; Del Ben, Maria; Violi, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    Blood lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is reduced in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, which is the major cause of cryptogenic cirrhosis (CC); few data on LAL activity in CC do exist. We investigated LAL activity in a cohort of patients with liver cirrhosis. This is a multicentre cohort study including 274 patients with liver cirrhosis of different aetiology from 19 centres of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology distributed throughout Italy. Blood LAL activity (nmol/spot/h) was measured with dried blood spot extracts using Lalistat 2. Overall, 133 patients had CC, and 141 patients had cirrhosis by other causes (61 viral, 53 alcoholic, 20 alcoholic + viral, 7 autoimmune). Mean age was 64.2 ± 13.4 years, and 28.5% were women. Patients with CC were older compared to other aetiology-cirrhosis, with a lower Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP, p=0.003) and MELD (p=0.009) score, and a higher prevalence of cardio-metabolic risk factors and previous ischemic events. In the whole cohort, median LAL activity value was 0.58 nmol/spot/h, 0.49 and 0.65 in the groups of CC and known-aetiology cirrhosis, respectively (p=0.002). The difference remained significant after adjustment for white blood cells count (p=0.001). Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that CC (vs. known aetiology, Beta = -0.144, p=0.018), platelet count (Beta = 0.398, p < 0.001) and CTP score (Beta = -0.133, p=0.022) were associated with log-LAL activity. Similar results were found using MELD as covariate. We found a marked reduction of LAL activity in patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis compared to the other known aetiologies. A prospective study will clarify the role of LAL in chronic liver diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Single Atomic Iron Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media: Particle Size Control and Thermal Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hanguang; Hwang, Sooyeon; Wang, Maoyu

    2017-09-26

    To significantly reduce the cost of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, current Pt must be replaced by platinum-metal-group (PGM)-free catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid. We report here a new class of high-performance atomic iron dispersed carbon catalysts through controlled chemical doping of iron ions into zinc-zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF), a type of metal-organic framework (MOF). The novel synthetic chemistry enables accurate size control of Fe-doped ZIF catalyst particles with a wide range from 20 to 1000 nm without changing chemical properties, which provides a great opportunity to increase the density of active sites that ismore » determined by the particle size. We elucidated the active site formation mechanism by correlating the chemical and structural changes with thermal activation process for the conversion from Fe-N4 complex containing hydrocarbon networks in ZIF to highly active FeNx sites embedded into carbon. A temperature of 800oC was identified as the critical point to start forming pyridinic nitrogen doping at the edge of the graphitized carbon planes. Further increasing heating temperature to 1100oC leads to increase of graphitic nitrogen, generating possible synergistic effect with FeNx sites to promote ORR activity. The best performing catalyst, which has well-defined particle size around 50 nm and abundance of atomic FeNx sites embedded into carbon structures, achieve a new performance milestone for the ORR in acid including a half-wave potential of 0.85 V vs RHE and only 20 mV loss after 10,000 cycles in O2 saturated H2SO4 electrolyte. The new class PGM-free catalyst with approaching activity to Pt holds great promise for future PEM fuel cells.« less

  10. Active site intermediates in the reduction of O(2) by cytochrome oxidase, and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wikström, Mårten

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of dioxygen activation and reduction in cell respiration, as catalysed by cytochrome c oxidase, has a long history. The work by Otto Warburg, David Keilin and Britton Chance defined the dioxygen-binding heme iron centre, viz. das Atmungsferment, or cytochrome a(3). Chance brought the field further in the mid-1970's by ingenious low-temperature studies that for the first time identified the primary enzyme-substrate (ES) Michaelis complex of cell respiration, the dioxygen adduct of heme a(3), which he termed Compound A. Further work using optical, resonance Raman, EPR, and other sophisticated spectroscopic techniques, some of which with microsecond time resolution, has brought us to the situation today, where major principles of how O(2) reduction occurs in respiration are well understood. Nonetheless, some questions have remained open, for example concerning the precise structures, catalytic roles, and spectroscopic properties of the breakdown products of Compound A that have been called P, F (for peroxy and ferryl), and O (oxidised). This nomenclature has been known to be inadequate for some time already, and an alternative will be suggested here. In addition, the multiple forms of P, F and O states have been confusing, a situation that we endeavour to help clarifying. The P and F states formed artificially by reacting cytochrome oxidase with hydrogen peroxide are especially scrutinised, and some novel interpretations will be given that may account for previously unexplained observations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Changes in Spring Vegetation Activity over Eurasian Boreal Forest Associated with Reduction of Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Y.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, B. M.; Park, T. W.; Jeong, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    Vegetation activities over the high-latitude in the Northern-Hemisphere are known to be very sensitive to climate change, which can, in turn, affect the entire climate system. This is one of the important feedback effects on global climate change. In this study, we have detected a declining trend of vegetation index in the boreal forest (Taiga) region of Eurasia in early spring from the late 1990s, and confirmed that the cause is closely related to the decrease in winter temperature linked to the Arctic sea ice change. The reduction of Arctic sea ice induces weakening of the Polar vortex around the Arctic, which has a chilling effect throughout Eurasia until the early spring (March) by strengthening the Siberian high in the Eurasian continent. The decrease of vegetation growth is caused by the extreme cold phenomenon directly affecting the growth of the boreal trees. To verify this, we used vegetation-climate coupled models to investigate climate-vegetation sensitivity to sea ice reduction. As a result, when the Arctic sea ice decreased in the model simulation, the vegetation index of the boreal forest, especially needleleaf evergreen trees, decreased as similarly detected by observations.

  12. Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects: A CFD Validation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft fuselage is typically designed with an emphasis on operational functionality with aerodynamic efficiency being of secondary importance. This results in a significant amount of drag during high-speed forward flight that can be a limiting factor for future high-speed rotorcraft designs. To enable higher speed flight, while maintaining a functional fuselage design (i.e., a large rear cargo ramp door), the NASA Rotary Wing Project has conducted both experimental and computational investigations to assess active flow control as an enabling technology for fuselage drag reduction. This paper will evaluate numerical simulations of a flow control system on a generic rotorcraft fuselage with a rotor in forward flight using OVERFLOW, a structured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver developed at NASA. The results are compared to fuselage forces, surface pressures, and PN flow field data obtained in a wind tunnel experiment conducted at the NASA Langley 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel where significant drag and download reductions were demonstrated using flow control. This comparison showed that the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver was unable to predict the fuselage forces and pressure measurements on the ramp for the baseline and flow control cases. While the CFD was able to capture the flow features, it was unable to accurately predict the performance of the flow control.

  13. NASA Propulsion Concept Studies and Risk Reduction Activities for Resource Prospector Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Williams, Hunter; Burnside, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The trade study has led to the selection of propulsion concept with the lowest cost and net lowest risk -Government-owned, flight qualified components -Meet mission requirements although the configuration is not optimized. Risk reduction activities have provided an opportunity -Implement design improvements while development with the early-test approach. -Gain knowledge on the operation and identify operation limit -Data to anchor analytical models for future flight designs; The propulsion system cold flow tests series have provided valuable data for future design. -The pressure surge from the system priming and waterhammer within component operation limits. -Enable to optimize the ullage volume to reduce the propellant tank mass; RS-34 hot fire tests have successfully demonstrated of using the engines for the RP mission -No degradation of performance due to extended storage life of the hardware. -Enable to operate the engine for RP flight mission scenarios, outside of the qualification regime. -Provide extended data for the thermal and GNC designs. Significant progress has been made on NASA propulsion concept design and risk reductions for Resource Prospector lander.

  14. Microbial reduction of uranium (VI) by Bacillus sp. dwc-2: A macroscopic and spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Ding, Congcong; Liao, Jiali; Du, Liang; Sun, Qun; Yang, Jijun; Yang, Yuanyou; Zhang, Dong; Tang, Jun; Liu, Ning

    2017-03-01

    The microbial reduction of U(VI) by Bacillus sp. dwc-2, isolated from soil in Southwest China, was explored using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Our studies indicated that approximately 16.0% of U(VI) at an initial concentration of 100mg/L uranium nitrate could be reduced by Bacillus sp. dwc-2 at pH8.2 under anaerobic conditions at room temperature. Additionally, natural organic matter (NOM) played an important role in enhancing the bioreduction of U(VI) by Bacillus sp. dwc-2. XPS results demonstrated that the uranium presented mixed valence states (U(VI) and U(IV)) after bioreduction, which was subsequently confirmed by XANES. Furthermore, the TEM and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis suggested that the reduced uranium was bioaccumulated mainly within the cell and as a crystalline structure on the cell wall. These observations implied that the reduction of uranium may have a significant effect on its fate in the soil environment in which these bacterial strains occur. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Update on Risk Reduction Activities for a Liquid Advanced Booster for NASA's Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Andrew M.; Greene, William D.

    2017-01-01

    The stated goals of NASA's Research Announcement for the Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) are to reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS and enable competition by mitigating targeted Advanced Booster risks to enhance SLS affordability. Dynetics, Inc. and Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) formed a team to offer a wide-ranging set of risk reduction activities and full-scale, system-level demonstrations that support NASA's ABEDRR goals. During the ABEDRR effort, the Dynetics Team has modified flight-proven Apollo-Saturn F-1 engine components and subsystems to improve affordability and reliability (e.g., reduce parts counts, touch labor, or use lower cost manufacturing processes and materials). The team has built hardware to validate production costs and completed tests to demonstrate it can meet performance requirements. State-of-the-art manufacturing and processing techniques have been applied to the heritage F-1, resulting in a low recurring cost engine while retaining the benefits of Apollo-era experience. NASA test facilities have been used to perform low-cost risk-reduction engine testing. In early 2014, NASA and the Dynetics Team agreed to move additional large liquid oxygen/kerosene engine work under Dynetics' ABEDRR contract. Also led by AR, the objectives of this work are to demonstrate combustion stability and measure performance of a 500,000 lbf class Oxidizer-Rich Staged Combustion (ORSC) cycle main injector. A trade study was completed to investigate the feasibility, cost effectiveness, and technical maturity of a domestically-produced engine that could potentially both replace the RD-180 on Atlas V and satisfy NASA SLS payload-to-orbit requirements via an advanced booster application. Engine physical dimensions and performance parameters resulting from this study provide the system level requirements for the ORSC risk reduction test article

  16. Concentration Effects of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Activity for Three Platinum Catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Richards, R.; ...

    2014-10-04

    A rotating disk electrode (RDE) along with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), were used to investigate the impact of two model compounds representing degradation products of Nafion and 3M perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes on the electrochemical surface area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline Pt, nano-structured thin film (NSTF) Pt (3M), and Pt/Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vu) (TKK) electrodes. ORR kinetic currents (measured at 0.9 V and transport corrected) were found to decrease linearly with the log of concentration for both model compounds on all Pt surfaces studied. Ultimately, model compound adsorption effects on ECA weremore » more abstruse due to competitive organic anion adsorption on Pt surfaces superimposing with the hydrogen underpotential deposition (HUPD) region.« less

  17. NASA Propulsion Concept Studies and Risk Reduction Activities for Resource Prospector Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Williams, Hunter; Burnside, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Resource Prospector mission is to investigate the Moon's polar regions in search of volatiles. The government-version lander concept for the mission is composed of a braking stage and a liquid-propulsion lander stage. A propulsion trade study concluded with a solid rocket motor for the braking stage while using the 4th-stage Peacekeeper (PK) propulsion components for the lander stage. The mechanical design of the liquid propulsion system was conducted in concert with the lander structure design. A propulsion cold-flow test article was fabricated and integrated into a lander development structure, and a series of cold flow tests were conducted to characterize the fluid transient behavior and to collect data for validating analytical models. In parallel, RS-34 PK thrusters to be used on the lander stage were hot-fire tested in vacuum conditions as part of risk reduction activities.

  18. Reduction of Free Edge Peeling Stress of Laminated Composites Using Active Piezoelectric Layers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Kim, Heung Soo

    2014-01-01

    An analytical approach is proposed in the reduction of free edge peeling stresses of laminated composites using active piezoelectric layers. The approach is the extended Kantorovich method which is an iterative method. Multiterms of trial function are employed and governing equations are derived by taking the principle of complementary virtual work. The solutions are obtained by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. By this approach, the stresses automatically satisfy not only the traction-free boundary conditions, but also the free edge boundary conditions. Through the iteration processes, the free edge stresses converge very quickly. It is found that the peeling stresses generated by mechanical loadings are significantly reduced by applying a proper electric field to the piezoelectric actuators. PMID:25025088

  19. Cerebral Activity Associated with Transient Sleep-Facilitated Reduction in Motor Memory Vulnerability to Interference

    PubMed Central

    Albouy, Geneviève; King, Bradley R.; Schmidt, Christina; Desseilles, Martin; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Balteau, Evelyne; Phillips, Christophe; Degueldre, Christian; Orban, Pierre; Benali, Habib; Peigneux, Philippe; Luxen, André; Karni, Avi; Doyon, Julien; Maquet, Pierre; Korman, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Motor memory consolidation is characterized, in part, by a sleep-facilitated decrease in susceptibility to subsequent interfering experiences. Surprisingly, the cerebral substrates supporting this phenomenon have never been examined. We used fMRI to investigate the neural correlates of the influence of sleep on interference to motor memory consolidation. Healthy young adults were trained on a sequential motor task, and subsequently practiced a second competing sequence after an interval including diurnal sleep or wakefulness. Participants were then retested on the initial sequence 8 h and 24 h (including nocturnal sleep) after training. Results demonstrated that a post-training nap significantly protected memory against interference at 8 h and modulated the link between cerebral activity and behavior, such that a smaller post-interference decrease in cortico-striatal activity was associated with better performance. Interestingly, the protective effect of a nap was only transitory, as both groups performed similarly at 24 h. Activity in cortico-striatal areas that was disrupted during the day, presumably due to interference and accentuated in the absence of a nap, was restored overnight. Altogether, our findings offer the first evidence that cortico-striatal areas play a critical role in the transient sleep-facilitated reduction in motor memory vulnerability and in the overnight restoration of previously degraded memories. PMID:27725727

  20. Photocatalytic reduction synthesis of SrTiO3-graphene nanocomposites and their enhanced photocatalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SrTiO3-graphene nanocomposites were prepared via photocatalytic reduction of graphene oxide by UV light-irradiated SrTiO3 nanoparticles. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy analysis indicates that graphene oxide is reduced into graphene. Transmission electron microscope observation shows that SrTiO3 nanoparticles are well assembled onto graphene sheets. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared SrTiO3-graphene composites was evaluated by the degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7) under a 254-nm UV irradiation, revealing that the composites exhibit significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity compared to the bare SrTiO3 nanoparticles. This can be explained by the fact that photogenerated electrons are captured by graphene, leading to an increased separation and availability of electrons and holes for the photocatalytic reaction. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals were detected by the photoluminescence technique using terephthalic acid as a probe molecule and were found to be produced over the irradiated SrTiO3 nanoparticles and SrTiO3-graphene composites; especially, an enhanced yield is observed for the latter. The influence of ethanol, KI, and N2 on the photocatalytic efficiency was also investigated. Based on the experimental results, ·OH, h+, and H2O2 are suggested to be the main active species in the photocatalytic degradation of AO7 by SrTiO3-graphene composites. PACS 61.46. + w; 78.67.Bf; 78.66.Sq PMID:25050089

  1. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; ...

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd 9Au nanowires, which have been previouslymore » shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.« less

  2. Electrochemical activation of commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Xia, Guangsen; Liu, Haining; Xia, Shuwei; Lu, Yonghong

    2015-03-28

    Nitrogen (N)-doped carbon and its non-noble metal composite replacing platinum-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts still have some fundamental problems that remain. Here the micron-sized commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber (PAN-CF) electrode was modified using an electrochemical method, converting its inherent pyridinic-N into 2-pyridone (or 2-hydroxyl pyridine) functional group existing in three-dimensional active layers with remarkable ORR catalytic activity and stability. The carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen and oxygen atoms is prone to act as an active site to efficiently catalyze a two-electron ORR process. However, after coordinating pyridone to the Cu(2+) ion, together with the electrochemical reaction, the chemical redox between Cu(+) and ORR intermediates synergistically tends towards a four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. In different medium, the complexation and dissociation can induce the charge transfer and reconstruction among proton, metal ion and pyridone functionalities, eventually leading to the changes of ORR performance.

  3. Highly active trialkoxymolybdenum(VI) alkylidyne catalysts synthesized by a reductive recycle strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Kraft, Stefan; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2004-01-14

    A systematic study of alkyne metathesis catalyzed by trialkoxymolybdenum(VI) alkylidyne complexes is reported, in which substrate functional groups, alkynyl substituents, and catalyst ligands are varied. Sterically hindered trisamidomolybdenum(VI) propylidyne complex 5 was prepared conveniently through a previously communicated reductive recycle strategy. Alcoholysis of 5 with various phenols/alcohols provides a set of active catalysts for alkyne metathesis at room temperature, among which the catalyst with p-nitrophenol as ligand shows the highest catalytic activity and is compatible with a variety of functional groups and solvents. A key finding that enabled the use of highly active molybdenum(VI) catalysts is replacement of the commonly used propynyl substituents on the starting alkyne substrates with butynyl groups. Under reduced pressure using 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene as an involatile solvent, the alkyne metathesis of butynyl substituted compounds proceeds well at 30 degrees C providing high yields (83%-97%) of dimers. Rationalization of the special role played by butynyl substrates is discussed.

  4. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; ...

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can bemore » attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.« less

  5. Reduction of infarct size by gentle reperfusion without activation of reperfusion injury salvage kinases in pigs.

    PubMed

    Musiolik, Judith; van Caster, Patrick; Skyschally, Andreas; Boengler, Kerstin; Gres, Petra; Schulz, Rainer; Heusch, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    Reperfusion is mandatory to salvage ischaemic myocardium from infarction, but also induces additional reperfusion injury and contributes to infarct size (IS). Gentle reperfusion (GR) has been proposed to attenuate reperfusion injury, but this remains contentious. We now investigated whether (i) GR reduces IS and (ii) GR is associated with the activation of reperfusion injury salvage kinases (RISK). Anaesthetized pigs were subjected to 90 min left anterior descending coronary artery hypoperfusion and 120 min reperfusion. GR was induced by slowly increasing coronary inflow back to baseline over 30 min, using an exponential algorithm [F(t) = F(i)+e(-(0.1)(t)((min)-3)).(F(b)-F(i)); F(b), coronary inflow at baseline; F(i), coronary inflow during ischaemia; n = 12]. Pigs subjected to immediate full reperfusion (IFR; n = 13) served as controls. IS was determined by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining. The expression level of phosphorylated RISK proteins was determined by western blot analysis in myocardial biopsies taken at baseline, after 80-85 min ischaemia and at 10, 30, and 120 min reperfusion. In additional experiments with IFR (n = 3) and GR (n = 3), the PI3-AKT and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathways were pharmacologically blocked (BL). IS was 37 +/- 2% (mean +/- SEM) of the area at risk with IFR and 29 +/- 1% (P < 0.05) with GR. RISK phosphorylation was similar between GR and IFR at baseline and 85 min ischaemia. At 10 min reperfusion, RISK phosphorylation was increased with IFR, but not with GR. At 30 and 120 min reperfusion, RISK phosphorylation was still greater with IFR than GR. RISK blockade did not abolish the IS reduction by GR (BL-IFR: 27 +/- 4% of the area at risk; BL-GR: 42 +/- 5%; P < 0.05). Gentle reperfusion reduces infarct size in pigs, but RISK activation is not causally involved in this infarct size reduction.

  6. Update on Risk Reduction Activities for a Liquid Advanced Booster for NASA's Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Andrew M.; Doering, Kimberly B; Meadows, Robert G.; Lariviere, Brian W.; Graham, Jerry B.

    2015-01-01

    The stated goals of NASA's Research Announcement for the Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) are to reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS; and enable competition by mitigating targeted Advanced Booster risks to enhance SLS affordability. Dynetics, Inc. and Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) formed a team to offer a wide-ranging set of risk reduction activities and full-scale, system-level demonstrations that support NASA's ABEDRR goals. For NASA's SLS ABEDRR procurement, Dynetics and AR formed a team to offer a series of full-scale risk mitigation hardware demonstrations for an affordable booster approach that meets the evolved capabilities of the SLS. To establish a basis for the risk reduction activities, the Dynetics Team developed a booster design that takes advantage of the flight-proven Apollo-Saturn F-1. Using NASA's vehicle assumptions for the SLS Block 2, a two-engine, F-1-based booster design delivers 150 mT (331 klbm) payload to LEO, 20 mT (44 klbm) above NASA's requirements. This enables a low-cost, robust approach to structural design. During the ABEDRR effort, the Dynetics Team has modified proven Apollo-Saturn components and subsystems to improve affordability and reliability (e.g., reduce parts counts, touch labor, or use lower cost manufacturing processes and materials). The team has built hardware to validate production costs and completed tests to demonstrate it can meet performance requirements. State-of-the-art manufacturing and processing techniques have been applied to the heritage F-1, resulting in a low recurring cost engine while retaining the benefits of Apollo-era experience. NASA test facilities have been used to perform low-cost risk-reduction engine testing. In early 2014, NASA and the Dynetics Team agreed to move additional large liquid oxygen/kerosene engine work under Dynetics' ABEDRR contract. Also led by AR, the

  7. N-phenylmaleimides affect adipogenesis and present antitumor activity through reduction of FASN expression.

    PubMed

    Rosolen, Daiane; Kretzer, Iara Fabrícia; Winter, Evelyn; Noldin, Vânia Floriani; Rodrigues do Carmo, Ícaro Andrade; Filippin-Monteiro, Fabíola Branco; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir; Creczynski-Pasa, Tânia Beatriz

    2016-10-25

    In light of the evidence that in contrast to most healthy tissues, several neoplasms overexpress fatty acid synthase (FASN) upon their dependence on increased lipogenesis; targeting of this protein is being considered as a valuable strategy in anticancer drug development. This can be particularly relevant for aggressive tumors such as melanoma in which FASN overexpression has been associated with increased depth of invasion and worse prognosis. We have previously shown that a sub-class of cyclic imides, the N-phenylmaleimides, presented antitumor activity against L1210 leukemia and B16F10 melanoma with evidences of interference in the energetic metabolism. Here, we aimed to investigate if some selected N-phenylmaleimides (M1 and M5) interfere with fatty acids metabolism and its relation with cancer. For that, a model of pre-adipocytes differentiation (3T3-L1 cells) and also human melanoma cells (SK-Mel-147) were used. As results, when 3T3-L1 cells were exposed to non-cytotoxic concentrations of M1 and M5 in the presence of an adipogenic cocktail, intracellular lipid content decreased by 26-36%, marking the inhibition of adipocyte differentiation. High selectivity indexes were obtained for both compounds for tumoral cells. Cell cycle phases analysis revealed a remarkable proportion of cells with DNA fragmentation after their exposure to M1 and M5. This was correlated to both apoptosis and necrosis, showed by Annexin-V/PI assay. Furthermore, M1 and M5 reduced FASN expression by 19-39%, respectively. In conclusion, M1 and M5 presented antiadipogenic and antitumoral activities. The antitumoral activity that was associated to apoptosis and necrosis is a possible consequence of the FASN reduction, which in turn, might result in a fuel decrease to cell proliferation. As it happens with antiangiogenic activity, reduction of fatty acid synthesis might be a potential target for cancer treatment in a strategy of hunger-strike, which valorizes these N-phenylmaleimides as

  8. Chromate reduction by a pseudomonad isolated from a site contaminated with chromated copper arsenate.

    PubMed

    McLean, J; Beveridge, T J

    2001-03-01

    A pseudomonad (CRB5) isolated from a decommissioned wood preservation site reduced toxic chromate [Cr(VI)] to an insoluble Cr(III) precipitate under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. CRB5 tolerated up to 520 mg of Cr(VI) liter(-1) and reduced chromate in the presence of copper and arsenate. Under anaerobic conditions it also reduced Co(III) and U(VI), partially internalizing each metal. Metal precipitates were also found on the surface of the outer membrane and (sometimes) on a capsule. The results showed that chromate reduction by CRB5 was mediated by a soluble enzyme that was largely contained in the cytoplasm but also found outside of the cells. The crude reductase activity in the soluble fraction showed a K(m) of 23 mg liter(-1) (437 microM) and a V(max) of 0.98 mg of Cr h(-1) mg of protein(-1) (317 nmol min(-1) mg of protein(-1)). Minor membrane-associated Cr(VI) reduction under anaerobiosis may account for anaerobic reduction of chromate under nongrowth conditions with an organic electron donor present. Chromate reduction under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions may be a detoxification strategy for the bacterium which could be exploited to bioremediate chromate-contaminated or other toxic heavy metal-contaminated environments.

  9. Chromate Reduction by a Pseudomonad Isolated from a Site Contaminated with Chromated Copper Arsenate

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Jeff; Beveridge, Terry J.

    2001-01-01

    A pseudomonad (CRB5) isolated from a decommissioned wood preservation site reduced toxic chromate [Cr(VI)] to an insoluble Cr(III) precipitate under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. CRB5 tolerated up to 520 mg of Cr(VI) liter−1 and reduced chromate in the presence of copper and arsenate. Under anaerobic conditions it also reduced Co(III) and U(VI), partially internalizing each metal. Metal precipitates were also found on the surface of the outer membrane and (sometimes) on a capsule. The results showed that chromate reduction by CRB5 was mediated by a soluble enzyme that was largely contained in the cytoplasm but also found outside of the cells. The crude reductase activity in the soluble fraction showed a Km of 23 mg liter−1 (437 μM) and a Vmax of 0.98 mg of Cr h−1 mg of protein−1 (317 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1). Minor membrane-associated Cr(VI) reduction under anaerobiosis may account for anaerobic reduction of chromate under nongrowth conditions with an organic electron donor present. Chromate reduction under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions may be a detoxification strategy for the bacterium which could be exploited to bioremediate chromate-contaminated or other toxic heavy metal-contaminated environments. PMID:11229894

  10. Plasma-Facilitated Synthesis of Amidoxime/Carbon Nanofiber Hybrids for Effective Enrichment of 238U(VI) and 241Am(III).

    PubMed

    Sun, Yubing; Lu, Songhua; Wang, Xiangxue; Xu, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Chen, Changlun; Chen, Jing; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Alharbi, Njud S; Wang, Xiangke

    2017-11-07

    Plasma- and chemical-grafted amidoxime/carbon nanofiber hybrids (p-AO/CNFs and c-AO/CNFs) were utilized to remove 238 U(VI) and 241 Am(III) from aqueous solutions, seawater, and groundwater. Characteristic results indicated more nitrogen-containing groups in p-AO/CNFs compared to c-AO/CNFs. The maximum adsorption capacities of p-AO/CNFs at pH 3.5 and T = 293 K (588.24 mg of 238 U(VI)/g and 40.79 mg of 241 Am(III)/g from aqueous solutions, respectively) were significantly higher than those of c-AO/CNFs (263.18 and 22.77 mg/g for 238 U(VI) and 241 Am(III), respectively), which indicated that plasma-grafting was a highly effective, low-cost, and environmentally friendly method. Adsorption of 238 U(VI) on AO/CNFs from aqueous solutions was significantly higher than that of 238 U(VI) from seawater and groundwater; moreover, AO/CNFs displayed the highest effective selectivity for 238 U(VI) compared to the other radionuclides. Adsorption of 238 U(VI) onto AO/CNFs created inner-sphere complexes (e.g., U-C shells) as shown by X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, which was supported by surface complexation modeling. Three inner-sphere complexes gave excellent fits to pH-edge and isothermal adsorption of 238 U(VI) on the AO/CNFs. These observations are crucial for the utilization of plasma-grafted, AO-based composites in the preconcentration and immobilization of lanthanides and actinides in environmental remediation.

  11. Activation of the nickel-deficient carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum: Kinetic characterization and reductant requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Ensign, S.A.; Campbell, M.J.; Ludden, P.W.

    1990-02-27

    The requirements for and kinetics of the activation of the nickel-deficient (apo) CO dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum by exogenous nickel have been investigated. The activation is strictly dependent upon the presence of a low-potential one-electron reductant. Sodium dithionite and reduced methylviologen are suitable reductants, whereas reduced indigo carmine and the two-electron reductants sodium borohydride, NADH, and dithiothreitol are ineffective in stimulating activation. The midpoint potential for activation was observed at approximately {minus}475 mV. The ability of a reductant to stimulate activation is correlated with the reduced state of the enzyme Fe{sub 4}-S{sub 4} centers. The activation follows apparent first-order kineticsmore » in a saturable fashion, yielding a rate constant of 0.157 min{sup {minus}1} at saturating concentration of nickel. The initial rate at which the enzyme is activated by NiCl{sub 2} is also a saturable process, yielding a dissociation constant (K{sub D}) of 755 {mu}M for the initial association of nickel and enzyme. Cadmium(II), zinc(II), cobalt(II), and iron(II) are competitive inhibitors of nickel activation with inhibition constants of 2.44, 4.16, 175, and 349 {mu}M, respectively. Manganese(II), calcium(II), and magnesium(II) exhibit no inhibition of activation.« less

  12. Reductive activity of free and immobilized cells of cyanobacteria toward oxophosphonates-comparative study.

    PubMed

    Górak, Monika; Żymańczyk-Duda, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    This report, based on the previous studies, compares the reductive activity of different modes of following photobiocatalysts (on laboratory and preparative scale): Arthrospira maxima , Nostoc cf. muscorum and Nodularia sphaerocarpa , toward diethyl esters of 2-oxopropylphosphonate (1), 2-oxo-2-phenylethylphosphonate (2), and 2-oxobutylphosphonate (3). It was confirmed that immobilization in alginate matrix do not affect the activity and viability of the biocatalysts. Corresponding ( S )-hydroxyphosphonates (1a-3a) were obtained with similar efficiency compared to the free-cell mode with the yield and of the optical purity e.e respectively (e.g., N. sphaerocarpa experiments): (1) yield: 21 %, e.e . 84 %; (2) yield 97 %, e.e . 97; (3) yield 21 %, e.e. 89 %. Scaling up the processes for the best biocatalyst, N. sphaerocarpa , indicated that the use of free-living cells of cyanobacteria is more effective (640 mg of substrate 2, 44 % of yield, 91 % of e . e .), compared to the column bioreactor packed with immobilized cells of this photobiocatalyst (384 mg of substrate 2, 38 % of yield, 86 % of e.e ). In the case of free and immobilized cells of N. cf. muscorum , agitation of the medium was the crucial activity mediator. Shaking culture of free cells of N. cf. muscorum converted the diethyl 2-oxo-2-phenylethylphosphonate (2) with the yield of 43 % (99 % of e.e. ) compared to 18 % (99 % of e.e. , stationary culture). Immobilized cells of this cyanobacterium were also more active toward (2) under shaking conditions (28 % of yield, 99 % of e.e. ) than free ones without agitation.

  13. Time-driven activity-based costing to identify opportunities for cost reduction in pediatric appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yangyang R; Abbas, Paulette I; Smith, Carolyn M; Carberry, Kathleen E; Ren, Hui; Patel, Binita; Nuchtern, Jed G; Lopez, Monica E

    2016-12-01

    As reimbursement programs shift to value-based payment models emphasizing quality and efficient healthcare delivery, there exists a need to better understand process management to unearth true costs of patient care. We sought to identify cost-reduction opportunities in simple appendicitis management by applying a time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) methodology to this high-volume surgical condition. Process maps were created using medical record time stamps. Labor capacity cost rates were calculated using national median physician salaries, weighted nurse-patient ratios, and hospital cost data. Consumable costs for supplies, pharmacy, laboratory, and food were derived from the hospital general ledger. Time-driven activity-based costing resulted in precise per-minute calculation of personnel costs. Highest costs were in the operating room ($747.07), hospital floor ($388.20), and emergency department ($296.21). Major contributors to length of stay were emergency department evaluation (270min), operating room availability (395min), and post-operative monitoring (1128min). The TDABC model led to $1712.16 in personnel costs and $1041.23 in consumable costs for a total appendicitis cost of $2753.39. Inefficiencies in healthcare delivery can be identified through TDABC. Triage-based standing delegation orders, advanced practice providers, and same day discharge protocols are proposed cost-reducing interventions to optimize value-based care for simple appendicitis. II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reduction of computational complexity in the image/video understanding systems with active vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvich, Gary

    2003-10-01

    The vision system evolved not only as a recognition system, but also as a sensory system for reaching, grasping and other motion activities. In advanced creatures, it became a component of prediction function, allowing creation of environmental models and activity planning. Fast information processing and decision making is vital for any living creature, and requires reduction of informational and computational complexities. The brain achieves this goal using symbolic coding, hierarchical compression, and selective processing of visual information. Network-Symbolic representation, where both systematic structural / logical methods and neural / statistical methods are the parts of a single mechanism, is the most feasible for such models. It converts visual information into the relational Network-Symbolic structures, instead of precise computations of a 3-dimensional models. Narrow foveal vision provides separation of figure from ground, object identification, semantic analysis, and precise control of actions. Rough wide peripheral vision identifies and tracks salient motion, guiding foveal system to salient objects. It also provides scene context. Objects with rigid bodies and other stable systems have coherent relational structures. Hierarchical compression and Network-Symbolic transformations derive more abstract structures that allow invariably recognize a particular structure as an exemplar of class. Robotic systems equipped with such smart vision will be able effectively navigate in any environment, understand situation, and act accordingly.

  15. Preeclampsia is Characterized by Fetal NK Cell Activation and a Reduction in Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Loewendorf, Andrea I; Nguyen, Tina A; Yesayan, Maria N; Kahn, Daniel A

    2015-09-01

    Preeclampsia affects 3-17% of pregnancies worldwide and has serious consequences for both the mother and the fetus. As maternal-fetal immune tolerance is bidirectional, fetal immunopathology may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of pregnancy disorders. Nevertheless, the impact of preeclampsia on the fetal immune system is unclear. In this case-control study, we examined the phenotype of innate and adaptive immune cells from the cord blood of 3rd trimester babies born to healthy mothers and compared them to cord blood from 3rd trimester babies born to mothers with symptomatic preeclampsia. The ratio of CD56hi CD16- non-activated/regulatory NK cells to CD56lo CD16+ activated/effector NK cells as well as the proportion of CD4+ T cells was significantly decreased in the cord blood of babies born to preeclamptic mothers. The percentage of FoxP3+ Treg, especially the FoxP3lo populations (resting Treg and cytokine Treg), were significantly reduced. Importantly, this reduction in FoxP3+ Treg affected the ratio of CD8+ effector T cells per FoxP3+ Treg in the cord blood of babies born to preeclamptic mothers. These observations indicate that there are significant fetal immune system derangements during preeclampsia. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Reproductive Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons with very high electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jae Yeong; Kim, Taeyoung; Choi, YongMan; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Min Gyu; Sa, Young Jin; Kim, Jaesik; Lee, Zonghoon; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kwon, Kyungjung; Terasaki, Osamu; Park, Gu-Gon; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of the platinum-based cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has impeded the widespread application of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We report on a new family of non-precious metal catalysts based on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons (M-OMPC; M = Fe, Co, or FeCo) with high surface areas and tunable pore structures, which were prepared by nanocasting mesoporous silica templates with metalloporphyrin precursors. The FeCo-OMPC catalyst exhibited an excellent ORR activity in an acidic medium, higher than other non-precious metal catalysts. It showed higher kinetic current at 0.9 V than Pt/C catalysts, as well as superior long-term durability and MeOH-tolerance. Density functional theory calculations in combination with extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed a weakening of the interaction between oxygen atom and FeCo-OMPC compared to Pt/C. This effect and high surface area of FeCo-OMPC appear responsible for its significantly high ORR activity. PMID:24056308

  17. Can segmental model reductions quantify whole-body balance accurately during dynamic activities?

    PubMed

    Jamkrajang, Parunchaya; Robinson, Mark A; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat; Vanrenterghem, Jos

    2017-07-01

    When investigating whole-body balance in dynamic tasks, adequately tracking the whole-body centre of mass (CoM) or derivatives such as the extrapolated centre of mass (XCoM) can be crucial but add considerable measurement efforts. The aim of this study was to investigate whether reduced kinematic models can still provide adequate CoM and XCoM representations during dynamic sporting tasks. Seventeen healthy recreationally active subjects (14 males and 3 females; age, 24.9±3.2years; height, 177.3±6.9cm; body mass 72.6±7.0kg) participated in this study. Participants completed three dynamic movements, jumping, kicking, and overarm throwing. Marker-based kinematic data were collected with 10 optoelectronic cameras at 250Hz (Oqus Qualisys, Gothenburg, Sweden). The differences between (X)CoM from a full-body model (gold standard) and (X)CoM representations based on six selected model reductions were evaluated using a Bland-Altman approach. A threshold difference was set at ±2cm to help the reader interpret which model can still provide an acceptable (X)CoM representation. Antero-posterior and medio-lateral displacement profiles of the CoM representation based on lower limbs, trunk and upper limbs showed strong agreement, slightly reduced for lower limbs and trunk only. Representations based on lower limbs only showed less strong agreement, particularly for XCoM in kicking. Overall, our results provide justification of the use of certain model reductions for specific needs, saving measurement effort whilst limiting the error of tracking (X)CoM trajectories in the context of whole-body balance investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of Pt-Ni/graphene via in situ reduction and its enhanced catalyst activity for methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Lihong; Wu, Yuen; Lu, Jun; Nan, Caiyun; Li, Yadong

    2013-09-04

    A simple in situ reduction approach was used to obtain Pt3Ni/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with dominant {111} facets. The catalytic activity of Pt-Ni/rGO toward methanol electro-oxidation was studied by performing cyclic voltammetry. The Pt3Ni/rGO nanocatalysts exhibited improved catalytic activity and durability.

  19. Cardiovascular risk reduction in sedentary postmenopausal women during organised physical activity.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Krzysztof; Żmijewski, Piotr; Kozdroń, Ewa; Fojt, Anna; Czajkowska, Anna; Szczypiorski, Piotr; Mazurek, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) diseases are a major cause of death in elderly women. Aerobic training improves component CV risk factors. Long-term, higher-intensity, group-based and home-based exercise training has been shown to improve exer-cise performance. However, it is not clear if short-term, group-based or home-based training with an educational programme permanently improves cardiometabolic parameters in elderly women. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of organised physical activity programmes dedicated to elderly, sedentary women. Thirty-five sedentary women, aged > 55 years (mean 65.4 ± 7.3 years) were enrolled in a two-week group-based physical training programme of moderate intensity (2.5-5.0 METs) followed by three months of organised, home-based physical activity targeting all major muscle groups with special emphasis on postural muscles, combined with an educational programme about physical activity and CV risk. Eighteen months of self-guided physical activity was the final stage of training. Medical examination and blood samples were collected at baseline and after each step of exercises. Each step of training resulted in a reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.05), body mass index (p < 0.05), waist to hip ratio (p < 0.02), and low-density lipoprotein (p < 0.05) as compared to baseline. The time of exercise (p < 0.01), maximal tolerated load, and maximal oxygen consumption (p < 0.001) were significantly improved after two-weeks of training, as well as the high-density lipoprotein (p < 0.001). These changes remained significant after three months. Finally, the 10-year risk of fatal CV disease reduced significantly (p < 0.05). After 18 months 2/3 of subjects continued physical activity at a sufficient level to achieve additional health benefits according to the World Health Organisation. Organised, group-based exercise followed by home-based training and self-guided physical activities constantly improves

  20. Multiple Roles of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to U (VI) Reduction and Long-term Stability of Uraninte (UO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannela, R.; Zhou, C.; Rittmann, B. E.

    2012-04-01

    Our current research is focused on assessing the Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain and its versatility in uranium (U) bioremediation. D.vulgaris reduces U(VI) to U(IV), which can be immobilized by precipitation to uraninite (UO2) solids. We first studied the complementary mechanisms of direct enzymatic and indirect chemical reduction of U (VI) with the help of series of batch experiments. We observed 90% removal of U (VI) by enzymatic activity within 10 hours and formation of biogenic UO2 solids. These experiments also revealed that D. vulgaris reduced U(VI) fastest under sulfate-reducing conditions in absence of aqueous Fe(II). When, Fe (II) is present, the rate of uraninite formation was significantly reduced; suggesting the retardation by aqueous Fe2+. However, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) data indicated that biogenic uraninite was far more crystallized in presence of Fe2+. This data showed that the presence of aqueous iron (II) could enhance crystallization of uraninite. These results clearly confirm the chemical reduction of U(VI) by biogenic H2S as well as direct enzymatic U(VI) reduction by D.vulgaris strain. We are also investigating the other important role of biogenic iron sulfide (FeS) solids generated by D.vulgaris to long-term U (VI) bioremediation. Iron sulfide precipitates protect UO2 against oxidative dissolution of U by serving as an effective oxidant scavenger. In this regard, we first systematically studied effects of varying experimental conditions that represent real-life scenarios. In several batch experiments, we demonstrated that, over ranges of pH (6.5 to 8.6) and concentration ratios of lactate-to-sulfate (0.5:1 to 1.9:1) and iron-to-sulfate (0.11:1 to 1:1), D. vulgaris primarily produced mackinawite form of FeS when either soluble Fe2+ or Fe3+ was used as the iron source. We observed that poorly crystalline mackinawite ((Fe1+xS) - which is a more desired type of FeS, was found when low lactate-to-sulfate ratio (0.5:1), low iron-to-sulfate ratio

  1. Influence of perceptual cues and conceptual information on the activation and reduction of claustrophobic fear.

    PubMed

    Shiban, Youssef; Peperkorn, Henrik; Alpers, Georg W; Pauli, Paul; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Fear reactions in phobic patients can be activated by specific perceptual cues (C) or by conceptual fear-related information (I). An earlier study with spider phobic participants documented that perceptual stimuli are particularly potent to trigger fear responses. Because fear of spiders is activated by very circumscribed stimuli, we set out to investigate whether another phobia with more contextual fear-elicitation (i.e., a situational phobia) would yield similar patterns. Thus, we investigate the two paths of fear activation (cues vs. information) and fear reduction during exposure in claustrophobic patients. Forty-eight claustrophobic patients and 48 healthy control participants were randomly assigned to one of three virtual reality exposure conditions: C, I, or a combination of both (CI). Exposure lasted 5 min and was repeated 4 times. Self-report and physiological reactions were assessed. Claustrophobic patients experienced more initial self-reported fear when confronted with fear-relevant perceptual cues than conceptual information, when the perceptual cues were combined with conceptual information there was no significant enhancement. Furthermore, fear habituated more in the perceptual condition. For the physiological parameters, groups differed and in claustrophobic patients heart rate decreased differently in the conditions. Longer exposure duration and long-term effects of the manipulation were not investigated. We found similar patterns in a situational phobia as compared to a specific-cue related phobia (animal type). Thus, once more this highlights the central role of visual cues in phobic fear and the potential of virtual reality for conducting exposure therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Statistical study of Saturn's auroral electron properties with Cassini/UVIS FUV spectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, J.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A.; Pryor, W.; Lamy, L.; Ajello, J.

    2017-03-01

    About 2000 FUV spectra of different regions of Saturn's aurora, obtained with Cassini/UVIS from December 2007 to October 2014 have been examined. Two methods have been employed to determine the mean energy <;E> of the precipitating electrons. The first is based on the absorption of the auroral emission by hydrocarbons and the second uses the ratio between the brightness of the Lyman-α line and the H2 total UV emission (Lyα/H2), which is directly related to via a radiative transfer formalism. In addition, two atmospheric models obtained recently from UVIS polar occultations have been employed for the first time. It is found that the atmospheric model related to North observations near 70° latitude provides the results most consistent with constraints previously published. On a global point of view, the two methods provide comparable results, with mostly in the 7-17 keV range with the hydrocarbon method and in the 1-11 keV range with the Lyα/H2 method. Since hydrocarbons have been detected on ∼20% of the auroral spectra, the Lyα/H2 technique is more effective to describe the primary auroral electrons, as it is applicable to all spectra and allows an access to the lowest range of energies (≤5 keV), unreachable by the hydrocarbon method. The distribution of is found fully compatible with independent HST/ACS constraints (emission peak in the 840-1450 km range) and FUSE findings (emission peaking at pressure level ≤0.2 μbar). In addition, exhibits enhancements in the 3 LT-10 LT sector, consistent with SKR intensity measurements. An energy flux-electron energy diagram built from all the data points strongly suggests that acceleration by field-aligned potentials as described by Knight's theory is a main mechanism responsible for electron precipitation creating the aurora. Assuming a fixed electron temperature of 0.1 keV, a best-fit equatorial electron source population density of 3 × 103 m-3 is derived, which matches very well to the plasma

  3. Mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction via micro-electrolysis at the powdered zero-valent iron/activated carbon interface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinghuan; Song, Guangyu; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) powder always works well only at controlled pH lower than 4 due to the formation of iron (hydr)oxides on its surface. Fe(0) powder combined with activated carbon (AC), i.e., Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis system, was first introduced to enhance nitrate reduction in aqueous solution. Comparative study was carried out to investigate nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC system and Fe(0) under near-neutral conditions, showing that the Fe(0)/AC system successfully reduced nitrate even at initial pH 6 with the reduction efficiency of up to 73%, whereas for Fe(0) only ∼10%. The effect of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio on nitrate reduction efficiency was examined. Easier nitrate reduction was achieved with more contact between Fe(0) and AC as the result of decreasing Fe(0) to AC mass ratio. Ferrous ion and oxidation-reduction potential were measured to understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis. The results suggest that a relative potential difference drives much more electrons from Fe(0) to AC, thus generating adsorbed atomic hydrogen which makes it possible for nitrate to be reduced at near-neural pH. Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis thus presents a great potential for practical application in nitrate wastewater treatment without excessive pH adjustment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2014-12-22

    Two decimeter-scale 2D experiments were conducted in the proposed research. To the extent possible, the first experiment (2.44 m x 0.61 m x 10 cm) was be packed to reproduce the observed distributions of sediment size fractions in the subsurface at the tracer test site. Four size fractions of sediment (<125m, 125-250m, 250m to 2 mm, >2mm) were packed in the tank and the size fractions were placed in a sediment structure imitating pattern rather than the block pattern used in the previous experiments conducted with Naturita sediment. The second tank used the same total amount of sediment and proportionsmore » of the three size fractions used in the first experiment but was packed at larger geostatistical correlation lengths to evaluate how the scale of heterogeneity affects the upscaling results. This experiment was conducted with the goal of trying to determine how the upscaling would be affected by the diffusion path length associated with low permeability zones. The initial conditions in the tanks were based on observed field conditions. The influent was a synthetic groundwater that mimicked uncontaminated groundwater observed at the Naturita site. Samples were collected from side and end ports of the tank and were analyzed for U(VI), alkalinity, pH and major ions as was done in previous experiments. Each decimeter scale experiment was run for approximately 6 months and the experiments were run in parallel. Extensive premodeling occurred for both tanks and lasted the first year of the project.« less

  5. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A

    2014-06-03

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicated that "autunite-type" sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to "phosphuranylite-type" sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

  6. Analysis of Cassini UVIS Extreme and Far Ultraviolet Observations of Saturn’s Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher D.; Koskinen, Tommi; Gronoff, Guillaume; Yung, Yuk L.; Esposito, Larry

    2015-11-01

    The atmosphere of Saturn is mainly composed of H2 and neutral atomic helium. The study of He 584 Å and H Lyman-α brightnesses is interesting as the EUV and FUV (Extreme and Far Ultraviolet) planetary airglow have the potential to yield useful information about mixing and other important parameters in its thermosphere. Time variation, asymmetries, and polar enhancement of the airglow are also possible and analysis already performed using the public archived Cassini mission data sets have shown we can solve some of the outstanding problems associated with these phenomena for Saturn.Specifically, we have (1) examined epochal eddy mixing disparities in the Saturnian upper atmosphere and quantify temporal mixing variations that may have occurred in the upper atmosphere of Saturn, as may be evidenced in Cassini mission data, (2) quantified any enhanced mixing in the auroral regions of Saturn, and (3) performed a robust study of Saturnian H Lyman-α brightness with the view to discover any longitudinal H Lyman-α planetary asymmetry or “bulge” across the disc such as was discovered by Voyager at Jupiter, indicative of the distribution of atomic H and accounting for the observed flux and any variations from the normal temperature profile.We have analyzed Cassini UVIS EUV and FUV airglow data from Saturn using sophisticated photochemical and radiative transfer models to investigate unexplained differences in the dynamical processes operating within its upper atmosphere. Powerful analysis techniques allow us to extract information on atmospheric mixing, temperatures, and temporal changes due to the solar and seasonal cycles from the variations in distribution and intensity of airglow emissions that result. We report on results of these efforts to date.

  7. Activation domain in P67phox regulates the steady state reduction of FAD in gp91phox.

    PubMed

    Han, C H; Lee, M H

    2000-06-01

    An activation domain in p67(phox) (residues 199-210) is critical for regulating NADPH oxidase activity in cell-free system [10] To determine the steady state reduction of FAD, thioacetamide-FAD was reconstituted in gp91(phox), and the fluorescence of its oxidised form was monitored. Omission of p67(phox) decreased the steady state reduction of the FAD from 28% to 4%, but omission of p47(phox) had little effect. A series of the truncated forms of p67(phox) were expressed in E.coli to determine the domain in p67(phox) which is essential for regulating the steady state of FAD reduction. The minimal length of p67(phox) for for regulating the steady state of FAD reduction is shown to be 1-210 using a series of truncation mutants which indicates that the region 199-210 is also important for regulating electron flow within flavocytochrome b(558). The deletion of this domain not only decreased the superoxide generation but also decreased the steady state of FAD reduction. Therefore, the activation domain on p67(phox) regulates the reductive half-reaction for FAD, consistent with a dominant effect on hydride/electron transfer from NADPH to FAD.

  8. Novel Insights Into Microbial Uranium Reduction and Immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, F. E.; Fletcher, K.; Thomas, S.; Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.; Sanford, R.

    2010-12-01

    Many ferric iron- and manganese oxide-reducing bacteria affect the oxidation state and complexation of toxic radionuclides in subsurface environments. Relevant to uranium (U) speciation are bacteria that reduce predominantly water-soluble and mobile U(VI) to U(IV), which has reduced solubility and typically forms the uraninite (UO2) mineral. Gram-negative model organisms including Shewanella spp., Geobacter spp., and more recently Anaeromyxobacter spp. use U(VI) as growth-supporting electron acceptor; however, the biomass yields are lower than predicted based on the theoretical free energy changes associated with U(VI)-to-U(IV) reduction. Recent findings demonstrated that U(VI) reduction is not limited to Gram-negative bacteria, and members of the genus Desulfitobacterium, which are commonly found in soil and subsurface environments, share the ability to reduce U(VI). Interestingly, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in cultures of five Desulfitobacterium spp. was not UO2 but rather a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms. Since the properties of the reduced product influence U(IV) fate, knowledge of the diversity of U reduction mechanisms and the stability of the end products is desirable for controlling and predicting U fate. For example, UO2 is susceptible to reoxidation by oxidants, and oxic/anoxic interface processes are controlling the stability of the precipitated material. In other words, metal reducers that thrive at the oxic/anoxic interface are likely key players affecting long-term U fate. Anaeromyxobacter spp. are facultative microaerophiles and grow with oxygen as electron acceptor at partial pressures equal to or below 0.18 atm. Thus, Anaeromyxobacter are uniquely adapted to life at the oxic-anoxic interface where they consume oxygen and take advantage of oxidized metal species including U(VI) as electron acceptors. The application of 16S rRNA gene-targeted qPCR approaches

  9. Functionalization of Magnetic Chitosan Particles for the Sorption of U(VI), Cu(II) and Zn(II)—Hydrazide Derivative of Glycine-Grafted Chitosan

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Mohammed F.; Aly, Mohsen M.; Abdel-Rahman, Adel A.-H.; Ramadan, Samar; Raslan, Heba; Wang, Shengye; Vincent, Thierry; Guibal, Eric

    2017-01-01

    A new magnetic functionalized derivative of chitosan is synthesized and characterized for the sorption of metal ions (environmental applications and metal valorization). The chemical modification of the glycine derivative of chitosan consists of: activation of the magnetic support with epichlorohydrin, followed by reaction with either glycine to produce the reference material (i.e., Gly sorbent) or glycine ester hydrochloride, followed by hydrazinolysis to synthesize the hydrazide functionalized sorbent (i.e., HGly sorbent). The materials are characterized by titration, elemental analysis, FTIR analysis (Fourrier-transform infrared spectrometry), TGA analysis (thermogravimetric analysis) and with SEM-EDX (scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray analysis). The sorption performances for U(VI), Cu(II), and Zn(II) are tested in batch systems. The sorption performances are compared for Gly and HGly taking into account the effect of pH, the uptake kinetics (fitted by the pseudo-second order rate equation), and the sorption isotherms (described by the Langmuir and the Sips equations). The sorption capacities of the modified sorbent reach up to 1.14 mmol U g−1, 1.69 mmol Cu g−1, and 0.85 mmol Zn g−1. In multi-metal solutions of equimolar concentration, the chemical modification changes the preferences for given metal ions. Metal ions are desorbed using 0.2 M HCl solutions and the sorbents are re-used for five cycles of sorption/desorption without significant loss in performances. PMID:28772896

  10. Voice communications in the cockpit noise environment: The role of active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Peter David

    The topic of voice communications in the cockpit noise environment of modern fast-jet aircraft and helicopters is addressed, and in particular, research undertaken in support of the development of a system for reducing the noise level at the operators' ear is described by acoustic cancellation within the ear defender, known as active noise reduction (ANR). The internal noise spectra of today's high performance fast-jet aircraft and military helicopters is described, and the complex interaction of acoustic noise transmission, speech, and microphone noise pick-up, which produces the total acoustic environment at the aircrews' ears, is discussed. Means of mathematically modelling the audio channel, quantifying the components identified above, and identifying areas of shortfall in performance are derived, leading to a procedure for the development of attenuation requirements, described as the communications audit. A model of the electroacoustic characteristics of the ANR ear defender assembly is presented and the sound field distribution within the ear defender/ear cavity, and its effect upon cancellation performance, is discussed. The extensive laboratory and flight testing of the ANR system that was undertaken is reviewed, paying particular attention to the measurement and analysis techniques employed in such testing. Finally, the performance characteristics of ANR are discussed and compared with the requirements previously established. Design limitations placed upon the system by the constraints of its area of application are described, and the scope for future improvements is considered.

  11. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  12. Black TiO2 synthesized via magnesiothermic reduction for enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangdong; Fu, Rong; Yin, Qianqian; Wu, Han; Guo, Xiaoling; Xu, Ruohan; Zhong, Qianyun

    2018-04-01

    Utilizing solar energy for hydrogen evolution is a great challenge for its insufficient visible-light power conversion. In this paper, we report a facile magnesiothermic reduction of commercial TiO2 nanoparticles under Ar atmosphere and at 550 °C followed by acid treatment to synthesize reduced black TiO2 powders, which possesses a unique crystalline core-amorphous shell structure composed of disordered surface and oxygen vacancies and shows significantly improved optical absorption in the visible region. The unique core-shell structure and high absorption enable the reduced black TiO2 powders to exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity, including splitting of water in the presence of Pt as a cocatalyst and degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. Photocatalytic evaluations indicate that the oxygen vacancies play key roles in the catalytic process. The maximum hydrogen production rates are 16.1 and 163 μmol h-1 g-1 under the full solar wavelength range of light and visible light, respectively. This facile and versatile method could be potentially used for large scale production of colored TiO2 with remarkable enhancement in the visible light absorption and solar-driven hydrogen production.

  13. Recent Status of SIM Lite Astrometric Observatory Mission: Flight Engineering Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goullioud, Renaud; Dekens, Frank; Nemati, Bijan; An, Xin; Carson, Johnathan

    2010-01-01

    The SIM Lite Astrometric Observatory is a mission concept for a space-borne instrument to perform micro-arc-second narrow-angle astrometry to search 60 to 100 nearby stars for Earth-like planets, and to perform global astrometry for a broad astrophysics program. The instrument consists of two Michelson stellar interferometers and a telescope. The first interferometer chops between the target star and a set of reference stars. The second interferometer monitors the attitude of the instrument in the direction of the target star. The telescope monitors the attitude of the instrument in the other two directions. The main enabling technology development for the mission was completed during phases A & B. The project is currently implementing the developed technology onto flight-ready engineering models. These key engineering tasks will significantly reduce the implementation risks during the flight phases C & D of the mission. The main optical interferometer components, including the astrometric beam combiner, the fine steering optical mechanism, the path-length-control and modulation optical mechanisms, focal-plane camera electronics and cooling heat pipe, are currently under development. Main assemblies are built to meet flight requirements and will be subjected to flight qualification level environmental testing (random vibration and thermal cycling) and performance testing. This paper summarizes recent progress in engineering risk reduction activities.

  14. False Alarm Reduction in BSN-Based Cardiac Monitoring Using Signal Quality and Activity Type Information

    PubMed Central

    Tanantong, Tanatorn; Nantajeewarawat, Ekawit; Thiemjarus, Surapa

    2015-01-01

    False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs), the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs) can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring. PMID:25671512

  15. Gold-doped graphene: A highly stable and active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Stolbov, Sergey; Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2015-04-21

    In addressing the growing need of renewable and sustainable energy resources, hydrogen-fuel-cells stand as one of the most promising routes to transform the current energy paradigm into one that integrally fulfills environmental sustainability. Nevertheless, accomplishing this technology at a large scale demands to surpass the efficiency and enhance the cost-effectiveness of platinum-based cathodes, which catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this work, our first-principles calculations show that Au atoms incorporated into graphene di-vacancies form a highly stable and cost-effective electrocatalyst that is, at the same time, as or more (dependently of the dopant concentration) active toward ORR than the best-known Pt-based electrocatalysts. We reveal that partial passivation of defected-graphene by gold atoms reduces the reactivity of C dangling bonds and increases that of Au, thus optimizing them for catalyzing the ORR and yielding a system of high thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities. We also demonstrate that the linear relation among the binding energies of the reaction intermediates assumed in computational high-throughput material screening does not hold, at least for this non-purely transition-metal material. We expect Au-doped graphene to finally overcome the cathode-related challenge hindering the realization of hydrogen-fuel cells as the leading means of powering transportation and portable devices.

  16. An Overview of Propulsion Concept Studies and Risk Reduction Activities for Robotic Lunar Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Story, George; Burnside, Chris; Kudlach, Al

    2010-01-01

    In support of designing robotic lunar lander concepts, the propulsion team at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), with participation from industry, conducted a series of trade studies on propulsion concepts with an emphasis on light-weight, advanced technology components. The results suggest a high-pressure propulsion system may offer some benefits in weight savings and system packaging. As part of the propulsion system, a solid rocket motor was selected to provide a large impulse to reduce the spacecraft s velocity prior to the lunar descent. In parallel to this study effort, the team also began technology risk reduction testing on a high thrust-to-weight descent thruster and a high-pressure regulator. A series of hot-fire tests was completed on the descent thruster in vacuum conditions at NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in New Mexico in 2009. Preparations for a hot-fire test series on the attitude control thruster at WSTF and for pressure regulator testing are now underway. This paper will provide an overview of the concept trade study results along with insight into the risk mitigation activities conducted to date.

  17. Physiological selectivity and activity reduction of insecticides by rainfall to predatory wasps of Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Barros, Emerson C; Bacci, Leandro; Picanco, Marcelo C; Martins, Júlio C; Rosado, Jander F; Silva, Gerson A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we carried out three bioassays with nine used insecticides in tomato crops to identify their efficiency against tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta, the physiological selectivity and the activity reduction of insecticides by three rain regimes to predatory wasps Protonectarina sylveirae and Polybia scutellaris. We assessed the mortality caused by the recommended doses of abamectin, beta-cyfluthrin, cartap, chlorfenapyr, etofenprox, methamidophos, permethrin, phenthoate and spinosad to T. absoluta and wasps at the moment of application. In addition, we evaluated the wasp mortality due to the insecticides for 30 days on plants that did not receive rain and on plants that received 4 or 125 mm of rain. Spinosad, cartap, chlorfenapyr, phenthoate, abamectin and methamidophos caused mortality higher than 90% to T. absoluta, whereas the pyrethroids beta-cyfluthrin, etofenprox and permethrin caused mortality between 8.5% and 46.25%. At the moment of application, all the insecticides were highly toxic to the wasps, causing mortality higher than 80%. In the absence of rain, all the insecticides continued to cause high mortality to the wasps for 30 days after the application. The toxicity of spinosad and methamidophos on both wasp species; beta-cyfluthrin on P. sylveirae and chlorfenapyr and abamectin on P. scutellaris, decreased when the plants received 4 mm of rain. In contrast, the other insecticides only showed reduced toxicity on the wasps when the plants received 125 mm of rain.

  18. A metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT using multiple prior images by recursive active contour segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Haewon

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm for CT images that completes a corrupted sinogram along the metal trace region. When metal implants are located inside a field of view, they create a barrier to the transmitted X-ray beam due to the high attenuation of metals, which significantly degrades the image quality. To fill in the metal trace region efficiently, the proposed algorithm uses multiple prior images with residual error compensation in sinogram space. Multiple prior images are generated by applying a recursive active contour (RAC) segmentation algorithm to the pre-corrected image acquired by MAR with linear interpolation, where the number of prior image is controlled by RAC depending on the object complexity. A sinogram basis is then acquired by forward projection of the prior images. The metal trace region of the original sinogram is replaced by the linearly combined sinogram of the prior images. Then, the additional correction in the metal trace region is performed to compensate the residual errors occurred by non-ideal data acquisition condition. The performance of the proposed MAR algorithm is compared with MAR with linear interpolation and the normalized MAR algorithm using simulated and experimental data. The results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other MAR algorithms, especially when the object is complex with multiple bone objects. PMID:28604794

  19. Reduction and Removal of Chromium VI in Water by Powdered Activated Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanan; An, Dong; Sun, Sainan; Gao, Jiayi; Qian, Linping

    2018-01-01

    Cr adsorption on wood-based powdered activated carbon (WPAC) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The highest Cr(VI) adsorption (40.04%) was obtained under acidic conditions (pH 3), whereas Cr removal at pH 10 was only 0.34%. The mechanism of Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solutions by WPAC was based on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) with the concomitant oxidation of C-H and C-OH to C-OH and C=O, respectively, on the surface of WPAC, followed by Cr(III) adsorption. Raman spectroscopy revealed a change in the WPAC structure in terms of the D/G band intensity ratio after Cr(VI) adsorption. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the oxygen/carbon ratio on the WPAC surface increased from 9.85% to 17.74%. This result was confirmed by XPS measurements, which showed that 78.8% of Cr adsorbed on the WPAC surface was in the trivalent state. The amount of oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface increased due to the oxidation of graphitic carbons to C-OH and C=O groups. PMID:29425145

  20. A reduction in ATP demand and mitochondrial activity with neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Birket, Matthew J; Orr, Adam L; Gerencser, Akos A; Madden, David T; Vitelli, Cathy; Swistowski, Andrzej; Brand, Martin D; Zeng, Xianmin

    2011-02-01

    Here, we have investigated mitochondrial biology and energy metabolism in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and hESC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Although stem cells collectively in vivo might be expected to rely primarily on anaerobic glycolysis for ATP supply, to minimise production of reactive oxygen species, we show that in vitro this is not so: hESCs generate an estimated 77% of their ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. Upon differentiation of hESCs into NSCs, oxidative phosphorylation declines both in absolute rate and in importance relative to glycolysis. A bias towards ATP supply from oxidative phosphorylation in hESCs is consistent with the expression levels of the mitochondrial gene regulators peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, PGC-1β and receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) in hESCs when compared with a panel of differentiated cell types. Analysis of the ATP demand showed that the slower ATP turnover in NSCs was associated with a slower rate of most energy-demanding processes but occurred without a reduction in the cellular growth rate. This mismatch is probably explained by a higher rate of macromolecule secretion in hESCs, on the basis of evidence from electron microscopy and an analysis of conditioned media. Taken together, our developmental model provides an understanding of the metabolic transition from hESCs to more quiescent somatic cell types, and supports important roles for mitochondria and secretion in hESC biology.

  1. A reduction in ATP demand and mitochondrial activity with neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Birket, Matthew J.; Orr, Adam L.; Gerencser, Akos A.; Madden, David T.; Vitelli, Cathy; Swistowski, Andrzej; Brand, Martin D.; Zeng, Xianmin

    2011-01-01

    Here, we have investigated mitochondrial biology and energy metabolism in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and hESC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Although stem cells collectively in vivo might be expected to rely primarily on anaerobic glycolysis for ATP supply, to minimise production of reactive oxygen species, we show that in vitro this is not so: hESCs generate an estimated 77% of their ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. Upon differentiation of hESCs into NSCs, oxidative phosphorylation declines both in absolute rate and in importance relative to glycolysis. A bias towards ATP supply from oxidative phosphorylation in hESCs is consistent with the expression levels of the mitochondrial gene regulators peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, PGC-1β and receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) in hESCs when compared with a panel of differentiated cell types. Analysis of the ATP demand showed that the slower ATP turnover in NSCs was associated with a slower rate of most energy-demanding processes but occurred without a reduction in the cellular growth rate. This mismatch is probably explained by a higher rate of macromolecule secretion in hESCs, on the basis of evidence from electron microscopy and an analysis of conditioned media. Taken together, our developmental model provides an understanding of the metabolic transition from hESCs to more quiescent somatic cell types, and supports important roles for mitochondria and secretion in hESC biology. PMID:21242311

  2. Report on INL Activities for UncertaintyReduction Analysis of FY10

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

    2010-09-01

    The work scope of this project related to the Work Packages of “Uncertainty Reduction Analyses” with the goal of reducing nuclear data uncertainties is to produce a set of improved nuclear data to be used both for a wide range of validated advanced fast reactor design calculations, and for providing guidelines for further improvements of the ENDF/B files (i.e. ENDF/B-VII, and future releases). This report presents the status of activities performed at INL under the FC R&D Work Package previously mentioned. First an analysis of uncertainty evaluation is presented using the new covariance data (AFCI version 1.2) made available bymore » BNL. Then, analyses of a number of experiments, among those selected in the previous fiscal year and available, are presented making use of ENDF/B-VII data. These experiments include: updating of the ZPR-6/7 assembly (improved model and spectral indices), ZPPR-9 assembly (only simplified model available), ZPPR-10 (full detailed model), and irradiation experiments. These last experiments include PROFIL-1 were a new methodology has been employed in the Monte Carlo calculations, and also a deterministic analysis has been performed. This is the first time the Monte Carlo approach and ENDF/B-VII have been used for the PROFIL experiments. The PROFIL-2 and TRAPU experiments have been for the moment only modeled and a full analysis of the irradiation results will be finalized next fiscal year.« less

  3. Effects of activated carbon on reductive dechlorination of PCBs by organohalide respiring bacteria indigenous to sediments.

    PubMed

    Kjellerup, B V; Naff, C; Edwards, S J; Ghosh, U; Baker, J E; Sowers, K R

    2014-04-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have accumulated in aquatic sediments due to their inherent chemical stability and their presence poses a risk due to their potential toxicity in humans and animals. Granular activated carbon (GAC) has been applied to PCB contaminated sediment sites to reduce the aqueous concentration by sequestration thus reducing the PCB exposure and toxicity to both benthic and aquatic organisms. However, it is not known how the reduction of PCB bioavailability by adsorption to GAC affects bacterial transformation of PCBs by indigenous organohalide respiring bacteria. In this study, the impact of GAC on anaerobic dechlorination by putative organohalide respiring bacteria indigenous to sediment from Baltimore Harbor was examined. It was shown that the average Cl/biphenyl after dehalogenation of Aroclor 1260 was similar between treatments with and without GAC amendment. However, GAC caused a substantial shift in the congener distribution whereby a smaller fraction of highly chlorinated congeners was more extensively dechlorinated to mono- through tri-chlorinated congeners compared to the formation of tri- through penta-chlorinated congeners in unamended sediment. The results combined with comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences suggest that GAC caused a community shift to putative organohalide respiring phylotypes that coincided with more extensive dechlorination of ortho and unflanked chlorines. This shift in activity by GAC shown here for the first time has the potential to promote greater degradation in situ by promoting accumulation of less chlorinated congeners that are generally more susceptible to complete mineralization by aerobic PCB degrading bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. L-Malate dehydrogenase activity in the reductive arm of the incomplete citric acid cycle of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea does not synthesize 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase under aerobic conditions and so has an incomplete citric acid cycle. L-malate (S-malate) dehydrogenase (MDH) from N. europaea was predicted to show similarity to the NADP(+)-dependent enzymes from chloroplasts and was separated from the NAD(+)-dependent proteins from most other bacteria or mitochondria. MDH activity in a soluble fraction from N. europaea ATCC 19718 was measured spectrophotometrically and exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the reductive direction, activity with NADH increased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 but activity with NADPH was consistently lower and decreased with pH. At pH 7.0, the K m for oxaloacetate was 20 μM; the K m for NADH was 22 μM but that for NADPH was at least 10 times higher. In the oxidative direction, activity with NAD(+) increased with pH but there was very little activity with NADP(+). At pH 7.0, the K m for L-malate was 5 mM and the K m for NAD(+) was 24 μM. The reductive activity was quite insensitive to inhibition by L-malate but the oxidative activity was very sensitive to oxaloacetate. MDH activity was not strongly activated or inhibited by glycolytic or citric acid cycle metabolites, adenine nucleotides, NaCl concentrations, or most metal ions, but increased with temperature up to about 55 °C. The reductive activity was consistently 10-20 times higher than the oxidative activity. These results indicate that the L-malate dehydrogenase in N. europaea is similar to other NAD(+)-dependent MDHs (EC 1.1.1.37) but physiologically adapted for its role in a reductive biosynthetic sequence.

  5. Active Microbial Sulfate Reduction in Serpentinization Fluids of the Semail Ophiolite in Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glombitza, C.; Rempfert, K. R.; Templeton, A. S.; Hoehler, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction (SR) is among the oldest known microbial processes on Earth. It is the predominant anaerobic microbial process in sulfur-rich marine sediments but it also occurs in subsurface lithoautotrophic ecosystems, where it is driven by radiolytically produced H2 and sulfate [1]. Serpentinization is a process by which H2 is generated in a reaction of water with peridotite rock. This abiotic generation of H2 suggests its potential to power life in rocks as a stand-alone process, independent of the photosynthetic biosphere, because the generated H2 is a key energy source for microbial metabolism. This is of particular interest in understanding the role of water-rock reactions in generating habitable conditions on and beyond Earth. Sulfate is plausibly available in several of the water-bearing environments now known beyond Earth, making SR a potentially important metabolism in those systems. Sulfate minerals are abundant on the surface of Mars [2], suggesting that Martian groundwaters may be sulfate-rich. Sulfate is also postulated to be a component of the oceans of Europa and Enceladus [3, 4]. The inferred presence of both sulfate and peridotite rocks in these environments points toward a potential niche for sulfate reducers and highlights the need to understand how and where SR occurs in serpentinizing systems on Earth. We incubated formation fluids sampled from in the Semail Ophiolite in Oman with a 35-S labelled sulfate tracer and determined the rates of in-situ microbial sulfate reduction. The selected fluids represent different environmental conditions, in particular varying substrate concentrations (sulfate, H2 and CH4) and pH (pH 8.4 to pH 11.2). We found active microbial SR at very low rates in almost all fluids, ranging from 2 fmol mL-1 d-1 to 2 pmol mL-1 d-2. Lowest rates were associated with the hyperalkaline fluids (pH > 10), that had also the lowest sulfate concentration (50-90 µmol L-1). In line with previously determined species

  6. Common and Dissociable Neural Activity Following Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Relaxation Response Programs.

    PubMed

    Sevinc, Gunes; Hölzel, Britta K; Hashmi, Javeria; Greenberg, Jonathan; McCallister, Adrienne; Treadway, Michael; Schneider, Marissa L; Dusek, Jeffery A; Carmody, James; Lazar, Sara W

    2018-04-10

    We investigated common and dissociable neural and psychological correlates of two widely used meditation-based stress-reduction programs. Participants were randomized to the Relaxation Response (RR; n=18; 56% female) or the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR; n=16, 56% female) programs. Both programs utilize a 'bodyscan' meditation, however the RR program explicitly emphasizes physical relaxation during this practice, while the MBSR program emphasizes mindful awareness with no explicit relaxation instructions. Following the programs, neural activity during the respective meditation was investigated using fMRI. Both programs were associated with reduced stress (for RR, from 14.1±6.6 to11.3± 5.5; Cohen's d=0.50; for MBSR, from 17.7±5.7 to 11.9±5.0; Cohen's d= 1.02). Conjunction analyses revealed functional coupling between ventromedial prefrontal regions and supplementary motor areas (p<0.001). The disjunction analysis indicated that the RR bodyscan was associated with stronger functional connectivity of the right inferior frontal gyrus - an important hub of intentional inhibition and control- with supplementary motor areas (p<0.001, FWE corrected). The MBSR program was uniquely associated with improvements in self-compassion and rumination and the within group analysis of MBSR bodyscan revealed significant functional connectivity of the right anterior insula - an important hub of sensory awareness and salience- with pregenual anterior cingulate during bodyscan meditation compared to rest (p=0.03, FWE corrected). The bodyscan exercises in each program were associated with both overlapping and differential functional coupling patterns, which were consistent with each program's theoretical foundation. These results may have implications for the differential effects of these programs for the treatment of diverse conditions.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4

  7. Report on INL Activities for Uncertainty Reduction Analysis of FY11

    SciTech Connect

    G. Plamiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

    2011-09-01

    This report presents the status of activities performed at INL under the ARC Work Package on 'Uncertainty Reduction Analyses' that has a main goal the reduction of uncertainties associated with nuclear data on neutronic integral parameters of interest for the design of advanced fast reactors under consideration by the ARC program. First, an analysis of experiments was carried out. For both JOYO (the first Japanese fast reactor) and ZPPR-9 (a large size zero power plutonium fueled experiment performed at ANL-W in Idaho) the performance of ENDF/B-VII.0 is quite satisfying except for the sodium void configurations of ZPPR-9, but for whichmore » one has to take into account the approximation of the modeling. In fact, when one uses a more detailed model (calculations performed at ANL in a companion WP) more reasonable results are obtained. A large effort was devoted to the analysis of the irradiation experiments, PROFIL-1 and -2 and TRAPU, performed at the French fast reactor PHENIX. For these experiments a pre-release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 cross section files was also used, in order to provide validation feedback to the CSWEG nuclear data evaluation community. In the PROFIL experiments improvements can be observed for the ENDF/B-VII.1 capture data in 238Pu, 241Am, 244Cm, 97Mo, 151Sm, 153Eu, and for 240Pu(n,2n). On the other hand, 240,242Pu, 95Mo, 133Cs and 145Nd capture C/E results are worse. For the major actinides 235U and especially 239Pu capture C/E's are underestimated. For fission products, 105,106Pd, 143,144Nd and 147,149Sm are significantly underestimated, while 101Ru and 151Sm are overestimated. Other C/E deviations from unity are within the combined experimental and calculated statistical uncertainty. From the TRAPU analysis, the major improvement is in the predicted 243Cm build-up, presumably due to an improved 242Cm capture evaluation. The COSMO experiment was also analyzed in order to provide useful feedback on fission cross sections. It was found out that

  8. Highly Selective TiN-Supported Highly Dispersed Pt Catalyst: Ultra Active toward Hydrogen Oxidation and Inactive toward Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junming; Tang, Haibo; Tian, Xinlong; Hou, Sanying; Li, Xiuhua; Du, Li; Liao, Shijun

    2018-01-31

    The severe dissolution of the cathode catalyst, caused by an undesired oxygen reduction reaction at the anode during startup and shutdown, is a fatal challenge to practical applications of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. To address this important issue, according to the distinct structure-sensitivity between the σ-type bond in H 2 and the π-type bond in O 2 , we design a HD-Pt/TiN material by highly dispersing Pt on the TiN surface to inhibit the unwanted oxygen reduction reaction. The highly dispersed Pt/TiN catalyst exhibits excellent selectivity toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. With a Pt loading of 0.88 wt %, our catalyst shows excellent hydrogen oxidation reaction activity, close to that of commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst, and much lower oxygen reduction reaction activity than the commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst. The lack of well-ordered Pt facets is responsible for the excellent selectivity of the HD-Pt/TiN materials toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. Our work provides a new and cost-effective solution to design selective catalysts toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions, making the strategy of using oxygen-tolerant anode catalyst to improve the stability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells during startup and shutdown more affordable and practical.

  9. [Determination of extraction separation of Pd(II), U(VI) and Mo(VI) in PEG-Na2SO4-PAR system using spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Deng, F; Si, Y; Liu, Y

    2000-06-01

    In polyethylene glycol-2000(PEG)-sodium sulfate (Na2SO4)-4-(2-Pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) system the extraction separation behaviour of the complexes of Pd(II), U(VI), Mo(VI) and La(III) was investigated. The results indicated that the complexes of Pd(II) and U(VI) with PAR were almost completely extracted by the PEG phase, La(III) was partly extracted, while Mo(VI) was not extracted from the aqueous solution of pH 4.5-7.5. So Mo(VI) was quantitatively separated from the mixed solution of Mo(VI), Pd(II) and U(VI) ions. The extraction mechanism for PEG phase was studied preliminarily.

  10. Validity and use of the UV index: report from the UVI working group, Schloss Hohenkammer, Germany, 5-7 December 2011.

    PubMed

    Allinson, Sarah; Asmuss, Monika; Baldermann, Cornelia; Bentzen, Joan; Buller, David; Gerber, Nathalie; Green, Adele C; Greinert, Ruediger; Kimlin, Michael; Kunrath, Julie; Matthes, Ruediger; Pölzl-Viol, Christiane; Rehfuess, Eva; Rossmann, Constanze; Schüz, Natalie; Sinclair, Craig; Deventer, Emilie van; Webb, Ann; Weiss, Wolfgang; Ziegelberger, Gunde

    2012-09-01

    The adequacy of the UV Index (UVI), a simple measure of ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, has been questioned on the basis of recent scientific data on the importance of vitamin D for human health, the mutagenic capacity of radiation in the UVA wavelength, and limitations in the behavioral impact of the UVI as a public awareness tool. A working group convened by ICNIRP and WHO met to assess whether modifications of the UVI were warranted and to discuss ways of improving its effectiveness as a guide to healthy sun-protective behavior. A UV Index greater than 3 was confirmed as indicating ambient UV levels at which harmful sun exposure and sunburns could occur and hence as the threshold for promoting preventive messages. There is currently insufficient evidence about the quantitative relationship of sun exposure, vitamin D, and human health to include vitamin D considerations in sun protection recommendations. The role of UVA in sunlight-induced dermal immunosuppression and DNA damage was acknowledged, but the contribution of UVA to skin carcinogenesis could not be quantified precisely. As ambient UVA and UVB levels mostly vary in parallel in real life situations, any minor modification of the UVI weighting function with respect to UVA-induced skin cancer would not be expected to have a significant impact on the UV Index. Though it has been shown that the UV Index can raise awareness of the risk of UV radiation to some extent, the UVI does not appear to change attitudes to sun protection or behavior in the way it is presently used. Changes in the UVI itself were not warranted based on these findings, but rather research testing health behavior models, including the roles of self-efficacy and self-affirmation in relation to intention to use sun protection among different susceptible groups, should be carried out to develop more successful strategies toward improving sun protection behavior.

  11. Plant Thioredoxin CDSP32 Regenerates 1-Cys Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B Activity through the Direct Reduction of Sulfenic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Tarrago, Lionel; Laugier, Edith; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Marchand, Christophe H.; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Rey, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are ubiquitous enzymes catalyzing the reduction of disulfide bonds, thanks to a CXXC active site. Among their substrates, 2-Cys methionine sulfoxide reductases B (2-Cys MSRBs) reduce the R diastereoisomer of methionine sulfoxide (MetSO) and possess two redox-active Cys as follows: a catalytic Cys reducing MetSO and a resolving one, involved in disulfide bridge formation. The other MSRB type, 1-Cys MSRBs, possesses only the catalytic Cys, and their regeneration mechanisms by Trxs remain unclear. The plant plastidial Trx CDSP32 is able to provide 1-Cys MSRB with electrons. CDSP32 includes two Trx modules with one potential active site 219CGPC222 and three extra Cys. Here, we investigated the redox properties of recombinant Arabidopsis CDSP32 and delineated the biochemical mechanisms of MSRB regeneration by CDSP32. Free thiol titration and 4-acetamido-4′-maleimidyldistilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid alkylation assays indicated that the Trx possesses only two redox-active Cys, very likely the Cys219 and Cys222. Protein electrophoresis analyses coupled to mass spectrometry revealed that CDSP32 forms a heterodimeric complex with MSRB1 via reduction of the sulfenic acid formed on MSRB1 catalytic Cys after MetSO reduction. MSR activity assays using variable CDSP32 amounts revealed that MSRB1 reduction proceeds with a 1:1 stoichiometry, and redox titrations indicated that CDSP32 and MSRB1 possess midpoints potentials of −337 and −328 mV at pH 7.9, respectively, indicating that regeneration of MSRB1 activity by the Trx through sulfenic acid reduction is thermodynamically feasible in physiological conditions. PMID:20236937

  12. Aligned carbon nanotubes with built-in FeN{sub 4} active sites for electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Liu, D. J.; Chemical Engineering

    2008-01-01

    The electrocatalytic site FeN{sub 4}, which is active towards the oxygen reduction reaction, is incorporated into the graphene layer of aligned carbon nanotubes prepared through a chemical vapor deposition process, as is confirmed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and other characterization techniques.

  13. Further Examination of the Vibratory Loads Reduction Results from the NASA/ARMY/MIT Active Twist Rotor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2002-01-01

    The vibration reduction capabilities of a model rotor system utilizing controlled, strain-induced blade twisting are examined. The model rotor blades, which utilize piezoelectric active fiber composite actuators, were tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel using open-loop control to determine the effect of active-twist on rotor vibratory loads. The results of this testing have been encouraging, and have demonstrated that active-twist rotor designs offer the potential for significant load reductions in future helicopter rotor systems. Active twist control was found to use less than 1% of the power necessary to operate the rotor system and had a pronounced effect on both rotating- and fixed-system loads, offering reductions in individual harmonic loads of up to 100%. A review of the vibration reduction results obtained is presented, which includes a limited set of comparisons with results generated using the second-generation version of the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD II) rotorcraft comprehensive analysis.

  14. A feasibility study on assessing public health impacts of cumulative air pollution reduction activities in a small geographic area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Objective: The rnain objective ofthis study was to examine the feasibility ofconducting a local (e.g., city level) assessment ofthe public health impacts ofcumulative air pollution reduction activities (a.k.a. accountability) from the federal, state, local and vo...

  15. 77 FR 20890 - Proposed Information Collection (Interest Rate Reduction Refinancing Loan Worksheet) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... to determine whether lenders computed the loan amount on interest rate reduction refinancing loans... fee. VA uses the data collected to ensure lenders computed the funding fee and the maximum permissible...

  16. Waste Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Marilyn; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that focus on waste reduction in the school and community. The ideas are divided into grade level categories. Sample activities include Techno-Trash, where children use tools to take apart broken appliances or car parts, then reassemble them or build new creations. Activities are suggested for areas including language arts and…

  17. Plasma-induced grafting of acrylic acid on bentonite for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongshan, ZHU; Shengxia, DUAN; Lei, CHEN; Ahmed, ALSAEDI; Tasawar, HAYAT; Jiaxing, LI

    2017-11-01

    Fabrication of reusable adsorbents with satisfactory adsorption capacity and using environment-friendly preparation processes is required for the environment-related applications. In this study, acrylic acid (AA) was grafted onto bentonite (BT) to generate an AA-graft-BT (AA-g-BT) composite using a plasma-induced grafting technique considered to be an environment-friendly method. The as-prepared composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, thermal gravity analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Barrett-Emmett-Teller analysis, demonstrating the successful grafting of AA onto BT. In addition, the removal of uranium(VI) (U(VI)) from contaminated aqueous solutions was examined using the as-prepared composite. The influencing factors, including contact time, pH value, ionic strength, temperature, and initial concentration, for the removal of U(VI) were investigated by batch experiments. The experimental process fitted best with the pseudo-second-order kinetic and the Langmuir models. Moreover, thermodynamic investigation revealed a spontaneous and endothermic process. Compared with previous adsorbents, AA-g-BT has potential practical applications in treating U(VI)-contaminated solutions.

  18. U(VI) removal efficiency by the oxidation of Fe(II) under the only injection of O2 and co-injection of CO2 and O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yingfeng; Xie, Yanpei; Fang, Qi; Zou, Shuliang; Li, Mi; Tan, Wenfa; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2018-02-01

    Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the U(VI) removal efficiency by the oxidation of Fe(II) under the only injection of O2 and co-injection of CO2 and O2. Experiment results show that under the only injection of O2, the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2 could effectively remove U(VI) from the solution. For the different initial concentrations of Fe(II) at 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100 mg/L, almost all the removal rates of U(VI) reach up to 90% in the neutral conditions. There is no inevitable correlation between the removal efficiency of U(VI) and the initial concentration of Fe(II), revealing that the coprecipitation of U(VI) with Fe-oxides plays a dominant role in the removal of U(VI) rather than the simple sorption to the surface of Fe-oxides. Under the co-injection of CO2 and O2, the generated carbonate ions have a significant effect on the removal efficiency of U(VI) by the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2. The removal efficiency of U(VI) increases with the initial concentration of Fe(II). In the presence of carbonate ions, U(VI) is easy to bind with HCO3 - to form uranyl carbonate complexes such as UO2(CO3)2 0 and UO2(CO3)4 2-, which would hinder the process of sorption and co-precipitation of U(VI) with Fe-oxides.

  19. Activation of the central melanocortin system in rats persistently reduces body and fat mass independently of caloric reduction.

    PubMed

    Côté, Isabelle; Green, Sara M; Morgan, Drake; Carter, Christy S; Tümer, Nihal; Scarpace, Philip J

    2018-03-01

    Recent evidence indicate that melanotan II (MTII) reduces body mass independently of caloric reduction. Because MTII induces a transient hypophagia, caloric reduction is still considered a primary mechanism for MTII-mediated body mass loss. To examine the contribution of caloric reduction to long-term body mass loss in response to MTII, we centrally infused MTII or vehicle in ad libitum fed (MTII and Control) animals in comparison with a group of animals that were pair-fed (PF) to the MTII group. Food intake and body mass were recorded daily, and body composition was assessed biweekly. The present study demonstrates that central MTII-mediated body mass loss is only partially mediated by caloric restriction, and the long-term body mass loss is independent of the initial hypophagia. More importantly, central MTII administration induced a rapid but sustained fat mass loss, independently of caloric reduction. MTII-treated animals preserved their lean/fat mass ratio throughout the study, whereas PF animals underwent a transient reduction of lean/fat mass ratio that was only normalized when food intake returned to Control level. In summary, it can be concluded that activation of the central melanocortin system in rats persistently reduces body and fat mass independently of caloric reduction.

  20. Global Emissions of Nitrous Oxide: Key Source Sectors, their Future Activities and Technical Opportunities for Emission Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winiwarter, W.; Höglund-Isaksson, L.; Klimont, Z.; Schöpp, W.; Amann, M.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous oxide originates primarily from natural biogeochemical processes, but its atmospheric concentrations have been strongly affected by human activities. According to IPCC, it is the third largest contributor to the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (after carbon dioxide and methane). Deep decarbonization scenarios, which are able to constrain global temperature increase within 1.5°C, require strategies to cut methane and nitrous oxide emissions on top of phasing out carbon dioxide emissions. Employing the Greenhouse gas and Air pollution INteractions and Synergies (GAINS) model, we have estimated global emissions of nitrous oxide until 2050. Using explicitly defined emission reduction technologies we demonstrate that, by 2030, about 26% ± 9% of the emissions can be avoided assuming full implementation of currently existing reduction technologies. Nearly a quarter of this mitigation can be achieved at marginal costs lower than 10 Euro/t CO2-eq with the chemical industry sector offering important reductions. Overall, the largest emitter of nitrous oxide, agriculture, also provides the largest emission abatement potentials. Emission reduction may be achieved by precision farming methods (variable rate technology) as well as by agrochemistry (nitrification inhibitors). Regionally, the largest emission reductions are achievable where intensive agriculture and industry are prevalent (production and application of mineral fertilizers): Centrally Planned Asia including China, North and Latin America, and South Asia including India. Further deep cuts in nitrous oxide emissions will require extending reduction efforts beyond strictly technological solutions, i.e., considering behavioral changes, including widespread adoption of "healthy diets" minimizing excess protein consumption.

  1. Partial Reversibility of Hypothalamic Dysfunction and Changes in Brain Activity After Body Mass Reduction in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande-Lee, Simone; Pereira, Fabrício R.S.; Cintra, Dennys E.; Fernandes, Paula T.; Cardoso, Adilson R.; Garlipp, Célia R.; Chaim, Eliton A.; Pareja, Jose C.; Geloneze, Bruno; Li, Li Min; Cendes, Fernando; Velloso, Licio A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Inflammation and dysfunction of the hypothalamus are common features of experimental obesity. However, it is unknown whether obesity and massive loss of body mass can modify the immunologic status or the functional activity of the human brain. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of body mass reduction on brain functionality. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In humans, changes in hypothalamic activity after a meal or glucose intake can be detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Distinct fMRI analytic methods have been developed to explore changes in the brain’s activity in several physiologic and pathologic conditions. We used two analytic methods of fMRI to explore the changes in the brain activity after body mass reduction. RESULTS Obese patients present distinct functional activity patterns in selected brain regions compared with lean subjects. On massive loss of body mass, after bariatric surgery, increases in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-6 are accompanied by changes in fMRI patterns, particularly in the hypothalamus. CONCLUSIONS Massive reduction of body mass promotes a partial reversal of hypothalamic dysfunction and increases anti-inflammatory activity in the CSF. PMID:21515852

  2. Effects of background noise on audiometric thresholds during positron emission tomography: passive and active noise-reduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Burkard, R F; Lockwood, A H; Salvi, R J

    2000-01-01

    Position emission tomography (PET) is used to assess the functional activity of the human auditory brain; however, the activity detected by PET could be affected by ambient acoustic noise from the PET equipment. To evaluate these effects, we compared behavioural thresholds in the PET camera with those measured in an audiometric sound booth. Thresholds were measured with: (i) ER2 earphones, (ii) ER2 earphones + Cabot earmuffs, (iii) ER2 earphones + Bose Series II Aviation Headset with active noise-reduction off, and (iv) ER2 earphones + Bose Series II Aviation Headset with active noise-reduction on. Overall ambient noise level in the camera was 73 dB SPL and the maximum octave-band SPL was 68 dB SPL at 250 Hz. Threshold elevations in the PET camera were greatest with ER2 (17 dB, 125 Hz) earphones and lowest with ER2 earphones + Bose Series II Aviation Headset (8 dB at 250 Hz) with active noise-reduction. Thus, PET scanner noise had little or no effect on threshold when stimuli were presented through ER2 earphones covered with an activated Bose Series II Aviation Headset.

  3. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an actively controlled partial span trailing edge flap located on the blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes an analytical study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap located on the blade. The vibration reduction produced by the actively controlled flap (ACF) is compared with that obtained using individual blade control (IBC), in which the entire blade is oscillated in pitch. For both cases a deterministic feedback controller is implemented to reduce the 4/rev hub loads. For all cases considered, the ACF produced vibration reduction comparable with that obtained using IBC, but consumed only 10-30% of the power required to implement IBC. A careful parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of blade torsional stiffness, spanwise location of the control flap, and hinge moment correction on the vibration reduction characteristics of the ACF. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach to vibration reduction. It should be emphasized than the ACF, used together with a conventional swashplate, is completely decoupled from the primary flight control system and thus it has no influence on the airworthiness of the helicopter. This attribute is potentially a significant advantage when compared to IBC.

  4. Catalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Uranium by Formic Acid; RIDUZIONE CATALITICA DELL'URANIO ESAVALENTE MEDIANTE ACIDO FORMICO

    SciTech Connect

    Cogliati, G.; Lanz, R.; Lepscky, C.

    1963-10-01

    S>The catalytic reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by means of formic acid has been studied, considering particularly the uranyl nltrate solutions, This process will be applied in the urania--thoria mixed fuel reprocessing plant, (PCUT). Various catalysts have been tested and the influence of formic acid concentration, temperature and catalyst concentration on the reaction rate have been determined. A possible reduction mechanism coherent with Ihe experimental data is discussed. (auth)

  5. Synthesis, characterization and re-activation of a Fe0/Ti system for the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Liu, Junxi; Liu, Hong; Wang, Chuan; Li, Xiangzhong; Tong, Yexiang; Xuan, Xiaoli; Cui, Guofeng

    2008-03-01

    The conventionally employed zero-valent iron (Fe0) particles suffer a formation of surface oxides to lower their activity prior to use. During their using process for contaminant remediation, such oxide formation is also encountered, while the cumbersome handling of particles impedes the Fe0 recovery. To conquer the drawbacks, a Fe0 film was synthesized by electrodepositing ferrous ion cathodically on titanium (Ti) substrate to form a new Fe0/Ti system. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that the freshly electrodeposited (FED) Fe0 film was free of oxides, which was attributed to the particularity of electrodeposition procedure. Reduction results of 10.0 mg/L chromium [Cr(VI)] indicated that the FED Fe0 film had higher activity than the oxide-covered counterpart. Further analysis of the pH-dependent Cr(VI) reduction reaction indicated that the Fe0/Ti system kept its activity and could be reused for further Cr(VI) reduction at pH 3.0 and 4.0, while it was inactivated at pH 5.0 and 7.0. Due to the easy handling of Fe0/Ti system, the inactivated Fe0 was recovered significantly through a cathodic reduction.

  6. Pre-Launch GOES-R Risk Reduction Activities for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Boccippio, D. J.; Christian, H. J.; Koshak, W. J.; Petersen, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    The GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is a new instrument planned for GOES-R that will greatly improve storm hazard nowcasting and increase warning lead time day and night. Daytime detection of lightning is a particularly significant technological advance given the fact that the solar illuminated cloud-top signal can exceed the intensity of the lightning signal by a factor of one hundred. Our approach is detailed across three broad themes which include: Data Processing Algorithm Readiness, Forecast Applications, and Radiance Data Mining. These themes address how the data will be processed and distributed, and the algorithms and models for developing, producing, and using the data products. These pre-launch risk reduction activities will accelerate the operational and research use of the GLM data once GOES-R begins on-orbit operations. The GLM will provide unprecedented capabilities for tracking thunderstorms and earlier warning of impending severe and hazardous weather threats. By providing direct information on lightning initiation, propagation, extent, and rate, the GLM will also capture the updraft dynamics and life cycle of convective storms, as well as internal ice precipitation processes. The GLM provides information directly from the heart of the thunderstorm as opposed to cloud-top only. Nowcasting applications enabled by the GLM data will expedite the warning and response time of emergency management systems, improve the dispatch of electric power utility repair crews, and improve airline routing around thunderstorms thereby improving safety and efficiency, saving fuel and reducing delays. The use of GLM data will assist the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Forest Service in quickly detecting lightning ground strikes that have a high probability of causing fires. Finally, GLM data will help assess the role of thunderstorms and deep convection in global climate, and will improve regional air quality and global chemistry/climate modeling

  7. Effect of Boron Deficiency on Photosynthesis and Reductant Sources and Their Relationship with Nitrogenase Activity in Anabaena PCC 7119 1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-González, Mercedes; Mateo, Pilar; Bonilla, Ildefonso

    1990-01-01

    Nitrogenase activity of Anabaena PCC 7119 is inhibited under conditions of boron deficiency. To elucidate the mechanisms of this inhibition, this study examined how the deficiency of boron affected photosynthesis, photosynthetic pigments, the enzymes of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and respiration of Anabaena PCC 7119 cultures. After 24 to 48 hours of boron deficiency, reductions in photosynthetic O2 evolution and in CO2 fixation were observed. At the same time, the activities of oxidative pentose phosphate pathway enzymes and respiration increased significantly with boron deficiency. No change was observed in these processes when assays were performed after 4 to 6 hours of deficiency, a time at which nitrogenase activity was severely inhibited. These results suggest that the requirement for boron in N2 fixation is independent of its effects on photosynthesis and reductant supply. PMID:16667503

  8. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebush,S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TMmore » fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of

  9. In vitro enzymatic reduction kinetics of mineral oxides by membrane fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruebush, Shane S.; Icopini, Gary A.; Brantley, Susan L.; Tien, Ming

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  10. Arsenic Retention under Static and Dynamic Flow Conditions During Active Iron and Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quicksall, A. N.; Saalfield, S.; Landis, J. D.; Renshaw, C. E.; Bostick, B. C.

    2005-12-01

    Biological, physical and chemical parameters impact the speciation and phase associations of adsorbed metals and metalloids on iron hydroxides. In particular, iron- and sulfate-reducing conditions play an important role in their transport and fate in the environment. Here, we examine the effect of chemically and biologically-mediated reduction of sulfate and iron (hydr)oxides and sorbed arsenic in a series of column and batch incubation experiments using synthetic mineral suspensions and/or natural sediments. Arsenic-bearing natural sediments were collected from the Coeur d'Alene River area in northern Idaho and the upper Mekong delta in Cambodia to contrast heavily concentrated anthropogenic and widely disseminated arsenic sources. Sediment samples used in batch incubations were amended with growth media to stimulate indigenous microbial growth. Each sediment type was incubated in static batch incubations containing acetate or lactate. Select incubations also included molybdate to suppress sulfate reduction. Dynamic flow experiments were also performed in which packed columns of soils or As-bearing iron (hydr)oxide coated sand were reduced by sulfide produced in situ through sulfate reduction or the direct addition of sulfide. Solid phase products were identified by bulk and microfocused X-ray absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence and diffraction. In these experiments, iron forms a number of iron minerals, releasing As into solution. Under conditions favoring iron reduction alone, significant As was released into solution; however, little As was released to solution when sulfate reduction was stimulated in batch systems. Under dynamic flow conditions, at least some arsenic was released in all incubations. Flow rate strongly influenced the extent of As sequestration. Some, but not all, of the enhanced sequestration of arsenic in static systems appears to be tied to the production of arsenic sulfides or the re-adsorption of arsenite. The dependence of As retention

  11. Synthesis of chitosan supported palladium nanoparticles and its catalytic activity towards 2-nitrophenol reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanavel, S.; Nivethaa, E. A. K.; Esther, G.

    2016-05-23

    Chitosan supported Palladium nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple cost effective chemical reduction method using NaBH{sub 4}. The prepared nanocomposite was characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis, FESEM and Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis of X-rays (EDAX). The catalytic performance of the nanocomposite was evaluated on the reduction of 2-Nitrophenol to the 2-Amino phenol with rate constant 1.08 × 10{sup −3} S{sup −1} by NaBH{sub 4} using Spectrophotometer.

  12. Dependent Relationship between Quantitative Lattice Contraction and Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Activity over Pt-Cu Alloy Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yige; Wu, Yijun; Liu, Jingjun; Wang, Feng

    2017-10-18

    Lattice contraction has been regarded as an important factor influencing oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of Pt-based alloys. However, the relationship between quantitative lattice contraction and ORR activity has rarely been reported. Herein, using Pt-Cu alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with similar particle sizes but different compositions as examples, we investigated the relationship between quantitative lattice contraction and ORR activity by defining the shrinking percentage of Pt-Pt bond distance as lattice contraction percentage. The results show that the ORR activities of Pt-Cu alloy NPs exhibit a well-defined volcano-type dependent relationship toward the lattice contraction percentage. The dependent correlation can be explained by the Sabatier principle. This study not only proposes a valid descriptor to bridge the activity and atomic composition but also provides a reference for understanding the composition-structure-activity relationship of Pt-based alloys.

  13. Sequestration of U(VI) from Acidic, Alkaline, and High Ionic-Strength Aqueous Media by Functionalized Magnetic Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles: Capacity and Binding Mechanisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Uranium (VI) exhibits little adsorption onto sediment minerals in acidic, alkaline or high ionic-strength aqueous media that often occur in U mining or contaminated sites, which makes U(VI) very mobile and difficult to sequester. In this work, magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparti...

  14. Quest for Environmentally-Benign Ligands for Actinide Separations: Thermodynamic, Spectroscopic, and Structural Characterization of U(VI) Complexes with Oxa-Diamide and Related Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-01-05

    Complexation of U(VI) with N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TMOGA) and N,N-dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DMOGA) was studied in comparison with their dicarboxylate analog, oxydiacetic acid (ODA). Thermodynamic parameters, including stability constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation, were determined by spectrophotometry, potentiometry and calorimetry. Single-crystal X-ray diffractometry, EXAFS spectroscopy, FT-IR absorption and laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy were used to obtain structural information on the U(VI) complexes. Like ODA, TMOGA and DMOGA form tridentate U(VI) complexes, with three oxygen atoms (the amide, ether and/or carboxylate oxygen) coordinating to the linear UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} cation via the equatorial plane. The stability constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation all decreasemore » in the order ODA > DMOGA > TMOGA, showing that the complexation is entropy driven and the substitution of a carboxylate group with an amide group reduces the strength of complexation with U(VI) due to the decrease in the entropy of complexation. The trend in the thermodynamic stability of the complexes correlates very well with the structural and spectroscopic data obtained by single crystal XRD, FT-IR and laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy.« less

  15. College and University Waste Reduction and Recycled Product Procurement Activities, Barriers, and Assistance Strategies: Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    In response to an official request for information and evaluation of solid waste production and management at California's public colleges and universities, this study examined existing conditions and barriers to solid waste reduction and recycled product procurement, and suggested assistance strategies. The examination found that these…

  16. Numerical Investigation of Rotorcraft Fuselage Drag Reduction Using Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of unsteady zero-net-mass-flux jets for fuselage drag reduction was evaluated numerically on a generic rotorcraft fuselage in forward flight with a rotor. Previous efforts have shown significant fuselage drag reduction using flow control for an isolated fuselage by experiment and numerical simulation. This work will evaluate a flow control strategy, that was originally developed on an isolated fuselage, in a more relevant environment that includes the effects of a rotor. Evaluation of different slot heights and jet velocity ratios were performed. Direct comparisons between an isolated fuselage and rotor/fuselage simulations were made showing similar flow control performance at a -3deg fuselage angle-of-attack condition. However, this was not the case for a -5deg angle-of-attack condition where the performance between the isolated fuselage and rotor/fuselage were different. The fuselage flow control resulted in a 17% drag reduction for a peak C(sub mu) of 0.0069 in a forward flight simulation where mu = 0:35 and CT/sigma = 0:08. The CFD flow control results also predicted a favorable 22% reduction of the fuselage download at this same condition, which can have beneficial compounding effects on the overall performance of the vehicle. This numerical investigation was performed in order to provide guidance for a future 1/3 scale wind tunnel experiment to be performed at the NASA 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel.

  17. Salt reduction in slow fermented sausages affects the generation of aroma active compounds.

    PubMed

    Corral, Sara; Salvador, Ana; Flores, Mónica

    2013-03-01

    Slow fermented sausages with different salt content were manufactured: control (2.7% NaCl, S), 16% salt reduced (2.26% NaCl, RS) and 16% replaced by KCl (2.26% NaCl and 0.43% KCl, RSK). The effect of salt reduction on microbiology and chemical parameters, sensory characteristics, texture and volatile compounds was studied. The aroma compounds were identified by GC-MS and olfactometry analyses. Small salt reduction (16%) (RS) affected sausage quality producing a reduction in the acceptance of aroma, taste, juiciness and overall quality. The substitution by KCl (RSK) produced the same acceptability by consumers as for high salt (S) treatment except for the aroma that was not improved by KCl addition. The aroma was affected due to the reduction in sulfur and acids and the increase of aldehyde compounds. Aroma compounds that characterized the high salt treatment (S) were dimethyl trisulfide, 3-methyl thiophene, 2,3-butanedione, 2-nonanone and acetic acid. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  19. Scattering properties of Saturn's rings in the far ultraviolet from Cassini UVIS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, E. Todd; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.

    2013-07-01

    We use Cassini UVIS data to determine the scattering properties of Saturn's ring particles in the FUV. We have replaced the scattering function from the classical Chandrasekhar single scattering radiative transfer equation for reflectance with a ring wake model for the A and B rings derived from stellar occultations. The free parameters in this model are the ring particle Bond albedo, AB, and the ring particle asymmetry parameter, g, which equals the cosine of the most probable scattering angle of a photon from a ring particle. The spectrum of Saturn's rings from 140 to 190 nm shows an absorption feature due to water ice shortward of 165 nm. We compare our model values for I/F to lit-side data at 155 nm and at 180 nm for regions in both the A and B rings. We used the unmodified Chandrasekhar model for the C ring and Cassini Division, and in all cases we determined AB and g in the FUV for the first time. Values of AB vary between 0.04 and 0.091 at 180 nm and between 0.012 and 0.019 at 155 nm. The variations across the ring of AB at 180 nm is consistent with a greater abundance of non-ice contaminant in the C ring and Cassini Division and a minimum in contaminant abundance in the outer B ring. There is little variation in AB at 155 nm across the rings, which suggests that the reflectance of the water ice and non-water ice material shortward of the 165 nm absorption edge are about the same. Values of g vary between -0.68 and -0.78 at 180 nm and between -0.63 and -0.77 at 155 nm showing that the ring particles are highly backscattering in the FUV. We find that the wavelength of the absorption feature varies with ring region and viewing geometry indicating a different photon mean path length, L, through the outer layer of the ring particle (Bradley, E.T., Colwell, J.E., Esposito, L.W., Cuzzi, J.N., Tollerud, H., Chambers, L. [2010]. Icarus 206 (2), 458-466). We compared I/F from 152 to 185 nm to a radiative transfer spectral model developed by Shkuratov et al

  20. An investigation into the unusual linkage isomerization and nitrite reduction activity of a novel tris(2-pyridyl) copper complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Isolda; Wilson, Claire; Senn, Hans M.; Sproules, Stephen; Symes, Mark D.

    2017-08-01

    The copper-containing nitrite reductases (CuNIRs) are a class of enzymes that mediate the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in biological systems. Metal-ligand complexes that reproduce the salient features of the active site of CuNIRs are therefore of fundamental interest, both for elucidating the possible mode of action of the enzymes and for developing biomimetic catalysts for nitrite reduction. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new tris(2-pyridyl) copper complex ([Cu1(NO2)2]) that binds two molecules of nitrite, and displays all three of the common binding modes for NO2-, with one nitrite bound in an asymmetric quasi-bidentate κ2-ONO manner and the other bound in a monodentate fashion with a linkage isomerism between the κ1-ONO and κ1-NO2 binding modes. We use density functional theory to help rationalize the presence of all three of these linkage isomers in one compound, before assessing the redox activity of [Cu1(NO2)2]. These latter studies show that the complex is not a competent nitrite reduction electrocatalyst in non-aqueous solvent, even in the presence of additional proton donors, a finding which may have implications for the design of biomimetic catalysts for nitrite reduction.

  1. The Particle Size Distribution in Saturn’s C Ring from UVIS and VIMS Stellar Occultations and RSS Radio Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerousek, Richard Gregory; Colwell, Josh; Hedman, Matthew M.; French, Richard G.; Marouf, Essam A.; Esposito, Larry; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2017-10-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have measured ring optical depths over a wide range of viewing geometries at effective wavelengths of 0.15 μm and 2.9 μm respectively. Using Voyager S and X band radio occultations and the direct inversion of the forward scattered S band signal, Marouf et al. (1982), (1983), and Zebker et al. (1985) determined the power-law size distribution parameters assuming a minimum particle radius of 1 mm. Many further studies have also constrained aspects of the particle size distribution throughout the main rings. Marouf et al. (2008a) determined the smallest ring particles to have radii of 4-5 mm using Cassini RSS data. Harbison et al. (2013) used VIMS solar occultations and also found minimum particle sizes of 4-5 mm in the C ring with q ~ 3.1, where n(a)da=Ca^(-q)da is the assumed differential power-law size distribution for particles of radius a. Recent studies of excess variance in stellar signal by Colwell et al. (2017, submitted) constrain the cross-section-weighted effective particle radius to 1 m to several meters. Using the wide range of viewing geometries available to VIMS and UVIS stellar occultations we find that normal optical depth does not strongly depend on viewing geometry at 10km resolution (which would be the case if self-gravity wakes were present). Throughout the C ring, we fit power-law derived optical depths to those measured by UVIS, VIMS, and by the Cassini Radio Science Subsystem (RSS) at 0.94 and 3.6 cm wavelengths to constrain the four parameters of the size distribution at 10km radial resolution. We find significant amounts of particle size sorting throughout the region with a positive correlation between maximum particles size (amax) and normal optical depth with a mean value of amax ~ 3 m in the background C ring. This correlation is negative in the C ring plateaus. We find an inverse correlation in minimum particle radius with normal

  2. The effect of organic and inorganic aqueous uranium speciation on U(VI) bioavailability to an aquatic invertebrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, C.; Croteau, M. N.; Campbell, K. M.; Cain, D.; Aiken, G.

    2015-12-01

    Growing world-wide demand for uranium (U) as an energy source has raised concerns of the human and ecological risks of U extraction and processing in the United States. Because of limited information on the relationship between U speciation and bioavailability, particularly in aquatic animals, we are characterizing U uptake by a model freshwater invertebrate (the snail Lymnaea stagnalis). This species grazes on biofilms and is thus key in the trophic transfer of contaminants through aquatic food webs. We determined the bioavailability of dissolved U(VI) over a range of water hardness, pH (6 to 8), and the presence of dissolved natural organic matter (NOM) as a competing ligand, to test the effect of aqueous speciation on uptake. Bioavailability was assessed using U uptake rate constants (kuw) derived from a kinetic bioaccumulation model. Dissolved U (1 to 1000 nM) was bioavailable over the range of geochemical conditions tested with kuw (L/g/d) decreasing with increasing dissolved Ca and with increasing pH. For example, kuw decreased from 1.6 to 0.3 as dissolved Ca was increased from 0.04 to 1.5 mM, suggesting competition between bioavailable U(VI) species and strong ternary calcium uranyl carbonato complexes. At pH 7.5 in synthetic moderately hard freshwater, kuw decreased from 0.22 in the absence of NOM to 0.07 in the presence of a hydrophobic acid NOM isolate of high aromaticity (SUVA = 5) consistent with strong aqueous complexation of U(VI) by the NOM. The co-variance of U uptake and aqueous U species distribution is being analyzed to determine which U species are bioavailable. U speciation in systems with NOM is calculated using conditional U-NOM binding constants derived by equilibrium dialysis ligand exchange methodology. The bioavailability of dietborne U is being tested since dietary metal uptake prevails for many aquatic species. These experiments include addition of ferrihydrite with U sorbed, both in the presence and absence of NOM, and mixed with diet.

  3. Cassini UVIS solar occultations by Saturn's F ring and the detection of collision-produced micron-sized dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Tracy M.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.; Attree, Nicholas O.; Murray, Carl D.

    2018-05-01

    We present an analysis of eleven solar occultations by Saturn's F ring observed by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on the Cassini spacecraft. In four of the solar occultations we detect an unambiguous signal from diffracted sunlight that adds to the direct solar signal just before or after the occultations occur. The strongest detection was a 10% increase over the direct signal that was enabled by the accidental misalignment of the instrument's pointing. We compare the UVIS data with images of the F ring obtained by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and find that in each instance of an unambiguous diffraction signature in the UVIS data, the ISS data shows that there was a recent disturbance in that region of the F ring. Similarly, the ISS images show a quiescent region of the F ring for all solar occultations in which no diffraction signature was detected. We therefore conclude that collisions in the F ring produce a population of small ring particles that can produce a detectable diffraction signal immediately interior or exterior to the F ring. The clearest example of this connection comes from the strong detection of diffracted light in the 2007 solar occultation, when the portion of the F ring that occulted the Sun had suffered a large collisional event, likely with S/2004 S 6, several months prior. This collision was observed in a series of ISS images (Murray et al., 2008). Our spectral analysis of the data shows no significant spectral features in the F ring, indicating that the particles must be at least 0.2 μm in radius. We apply a forward model of the solar occultations, accounting for the effects of diffracted light and the attenuated direct solar signal, to model the observed solar occultation light curves. These models constrain the optical depth, radial width, and particle size distribution of the F ring. We find that when the diffraction signature is present, we can best reproduce the occultation data using a particle population

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic, antimicrobial, XRD, fluorescence of new Ni(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and U(VI) complexes with 1-(2-furylmethylene)-N-(3-phenylallylidene)methanamine Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Wahab, Zeinab H. Abd; Ali, Omyma A. M.; Ismail, Basma A.

    2017-09-01

    The 1:1 condensation of 2-furfurylamine and cinnamaldehyde under template condition gives the Schiff base ligand 1-(2-furylmethylene)-N-(3-phenylallylidene)methanamine (L). The reaction of the ligand with Ni(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and U(VI) ions gives a series of novel complexes formulated as [NiLCl(H2O)]Cl·1½H2O, [CdL2(H2O)2]·2NO3·½H2O, [HgL2Cl2] and [UO2L3]·2NO3·H2O. The stoichiometry of the complexes was 1:1 for Ni(II), 1:2 for both Cd(II) and Hg(II) and 1:3 (M:L) for U(VI) complexes. The molar conductance of the complexes lies in the range of 135-250 Ω-1mol-1cm2 indicating their electrolytic behavior except Hg(II) complex. Electronic spectra and magnetic moments suggested varieties of geometries around the central metal atoms. The emission spectra of these complexes indicate the luminescence characteristics of the complexes. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of Schiff base and its complexes were investigated in powder forms. Thermodynamic parameters were computed from the thermal data using Coats and Redfern method. Structural optimization of the ligand and its Ni(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes was computed using the density functional theory (DFT), where the B3LYP functional was employed. The synthesized complexes exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than its free Schiff base ligand.

  5. In-line localized monitoring of catalyst activity in selective catalytic NO.sub.x reduction systems

    DOEpatents

    Muzio, Lawrence J [Laguna Niguel, CA; Smith, Randall A [Huntington Beach, CA

    2009-12-22

    Localized catalyst activity in an SCR unit for controlling emissions from a boiler, power plant, or any facility that generates NO.sub.x-containing flue gases is monitored by one or more modules that operate on-line without disrupting the normal operation of the facility. Each module is positioned over a designated lateral area of one of the catalyst beds in the SCR unit, and supplies ammonia, urea, or other suitable reductant to the catalyst in the designated area at a rate that produces an excess of the reductant over NO.sub.x on a molar basis through the designated area. Sampling probes upstream and downstream of the designated area draw samples of the gas stream for NO.sub.x analysis, and the catalyst activity is determined from the difference in NO.sub.x levels between the two probes.

  6. Solvothermal synthesis of N-doped graphene supported PtCo nanodendrites with highly catalytic activity for 4-nitrophenol reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Feng, Jiu-Ju; Wang, Ai-Jun

    2018-01-01

    A simple solvothermal method was developed to prepare N-doped reduced graphene oxide supported homogeneous PtCo nanodendrites (PtCo NDs/N-rGO), where ethylene glycol (EG) served as the reducing agent and the solvent, and linagliptin as the structure-directing and stabilizing agent for PtCo NDs and dopant for rGO, respectively. Controlled researches showed that the dosage of linagliptin and the ratios of the two metal precursors were important in the current synthesis. The PtCo NDs/N-rGO nanocomposite exhibited higher catalytic activity towards the reduction of 4-nitrophnol (4-NP) in contrast with the referenced Pt1Co3 NCs/N-rGO, Pt3Co1 NCs/N-rGO and commercial Pt/C catalysts. More importantly, the constructed catalyst exhibited the superior stability without sacrificing the catalytic activity, showing great prospect for the reduction of 4-NP in practice.

  7. Spectroscopic study on the role of TiO{sub 2} in the adsorption of Eu(III) and U(VI) on silica surfaces in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Hee-Jung, E-mail: imhj@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Kyoung Kyun; Jung, Euo Chang

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Enhanced adsorption of Eu(III) and U(VI) onto TiO{sub 2}-coated silica. • Enhanced Eu(III) luminescence and lifetime on TiO{sub 2}-coated silica. • Energy transfer from TiO{sub 2} of TiO{sub 2}-coated silica to Eu(III) in solutions. - Abstract: To determine the effects of TiO{sub 2} on the adsorption of actinides onto mineral surfaces in groundwater, silica was partially coated with TiO{sub 2}, and Eu(III) and U(VI) were individually adsorbed from separate 0.1 mM concentration solutions. The TiO{sub 2}-coated silica showed higher Eu(III) and U(VI) adsorption capacities for increasing amounts of TiO{sub 2} coated on the silica surfaces, and thus themore » existence of TiO{sub 2} can decrease the mobility of Eu(III) and U(VI) contaminants. In luminescence studies, it was found that TiO{sub 2} considerably enhanced the luminescence of the adsorbed Eu(III) indicating that TiO{sub 2}–Eu(III) forms surface complexes which may decrease the number of water molecules at the inner sphere of Eu(III), but this was not observed for U(VI). An energy transfer from the TiO{sub 2} to the Eu(III) was confirmed in this case of amorphous TiO{sub 2}-coated silica in Eu(III) solutions, and an increase of the luminescence lifetime of Eu(III) for increasing concentrations of coated TiO{sub 2} was also observed.« less

  8. A rapid and simple method for estimating sulfate reduction activity and quantifying inorganic sulfides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ulrich, G.A.; Krumholz, L.R.; Suflita, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    A simplified passive extraction procedure for quantifying reduced inorganic sulfur compounds from sediments and water is presented. This method may also be used for the estimation of sulfate reduction rates. Efficient extraction of FeS, FeS(inf2), and S(sup2-) was obtained with this procedure; however, the efficiency for S(sup0) depended on the form that was tested. Passive extraction can be used with samples containing up to 20 mg of reduced sulfur. We demonstrated the utility of this technique in a determination of both sulfate reduction rates and reduced inorganic sulfur pools in marine and freshwater sediments. A side-by-side comparison of the passive extraction method with the established single-step distillation technique yielded comparable results with a fraction of the effort.

  9. Validation of Algorithms for Basal Insulin Rate Reductions in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Practising Physical Activity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-19

    Type 1 Diabetes With a Subcutaneous Insulin Pump; Adjustment of the Recommended Basal Insulin Flow Rate in the Event of Physical Activity; Adjustment of the Recommended Prandial Insulin in the Event of Physical Activity

  10. NO Dioxygenase Activity in Hemoglobins Is Ubiquitous In Vitro, but Limited by Reduction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Smagghe, Benoit J.; Trent, James T.; Hargrove, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Genomics has produced hundreds of new hemoglobin sequences with examples in nearly every living organism. Structural and biochemical characterizations of many recombinant proteins reveal reactions, like oxygen binding and NO dioxygenation, that appear general to the hemoglobin superfamily regardless of whether they are related to physiological function. Despite considerable attention to “hexacoordinate” hemoglobins, which are found in nearly every plant and animal, no clear physiological role(s) has been assigned to them in any species. One popular and relevant hypothesis for their function is protection against NO. Here we have tested a comprehensive representation of hexacoordinate hemoglobins from plants (rice hemoglobin), animals (neuroglobin and cytoglobin), and bacteria (Synechocystis hemoglobin) for their abilities to scavenge NO compared to myoglobin. Our experiments include in vitro comparisons of NO dioxygenation, ferric NO binding, NO-induced reduction, NO scavenging with an artificial reduction system, and the ability to substitute for a known NO scavenger (flavohemoglobin) in E. coli. We conclude that none of these tests reveal any distinguishing predisposition toward a role in NO scavenging for the hxHbs, but that any hemoglobin could likely serve this role in the presence of a mechanism for heme iron re-reduction. Hence, future research to test the role of Hbs in NO scavenging would benefit more from the identification of cognate reductases than from in vitro analysis of NO and O2 binding. PMID:18446211

  11. Tuning spontaneous polarization to alter water oxidation/reduction activities of LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hongwei; Song, Yan; Wu, Yangqing; Huang, Huiting; Fan, Guozheng; Xu, Jun; Li, Zhaosheng; Zou, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    Here, we investigated the effects of spontaneous polarization on photoreactivities by using a ferroelectric material n-type congruent LiNbO3 single crystal as a model. It was found that c+ LiNbO3 was superior to c- LiNbO3 in photocatalytic water reduction, while c- LiNbO3 exhibited better performances for photoelectrochemical water oxidation than c+ LiNbO3. Using Kelvin probe force microscopy and open circuit potential methods, we observed that c- LiNbO3 generated a higher photovoltage and had a slower charge-recombination rate than c+ LiNbO3. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements indicated that c- LiNbO3 may favor the hole transport from the bulk to the surface compared with c+ LiNbO3, leading to the anisotropic performances of c+ and c- LiNbO3 in water oxidation/reduction. Therefore, tuning the direction of the polarization may be a strategy to dramatically prompt the photoreactivities of water oxidation or reduction.

  12. Assessment of calcium addition on the removal of U(VI) in the alkaline conditions created by NH 3 gas

    SciTech Connect

    Katsenovich, Yelena; Cardona, Claudia; Szecsody, Jim

    2018-03-06

    Remediation of uranium (U) contamination in the deep vadose zone (VZ) sediments abundant in calcite mineral is a challenging task considering the formation of highly stable and mobile uranyl complexes with carbonate and calcium in pore water composition. There is a concern that uranium contamination in the VZ can serve as a continued source for groundwater pollution, creating a risk to human health and the environment through the groundwater pathway. This requires in-situ remediation of the radionuclide-contaminated VZ to convert soluble U species to low solubility precipitates that are stable in the natural environment. Injection of reactive gasses (e.g., NHmore » 3) is a promising technology to decrease U mobility in the unsaturated zone without the addition of liquid amendments. The NH 3 injection creates alkaline conditions that can alter the sediment pore water composition due to a release of elements from minerals (via desorption and dissolution) that are present in the sediment. However, it is not known how VZ pore water constituents (Si, Al 3+, HCO 3 -, and Ca 2 +) would affect U(VI) removal/precipitation in alkaline conditions. This study quantified the role of major pore water constituents typically present in the arid and semi-arid environments of the western regions of the U.S and identified solid uranium-bearing phases that could potentially precipitate from solutions approximating pore water compositions after pH manipulations via ammonia gas injections. Triplicate samples were prepared using six Si (5, 50 100, 150, 200, and 250 mM), six HCO 3 - (0, 3, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mM), and two Ca 2+ (5 and 10 mM) concentrations. The concentration of aluminum and uranium was kept constant at 5 mM and 0.0084 mM, respectively, in all synthetic formulations tested. Results showed that the percentage of U(VI) removal was controlled by the Si/Al molar ratios and Ca 2+ concentrations. Regardless of the bicarbonate concentration tested, the percentage of U(VI

  13. Optimal treatment scheduling of ionizing radiation and sunitinib improves the antitumor activity and allows dose reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kleibeuker, Esther A; ten Hooven, Matthijs A; Castricum, Kitty C; Honeywell, Richard; Griffioen, Arjan W; Verheul, Henk M; Slotman, Ben J; Thijssen, Victor L

    2015-01-01

    The combination of radiotherapy with sunitinib is clinically hampered by rare but severe side effects and varying results with respect to clinical benefit. We studied different scheduling regimes and dose reduction in sunitinib and radiotherapy in preclinical tumor models to improve potential outcome of this combination treatment strategy. The chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) was used as an angiogenesis in vivo model and as a xenograft model with human tumor cells (HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma, OE19 esophageal adenocarcinoma). Treatment consisted of ionizing radiation (IR) and sunitinib as single therapy or in combination, using different dose-scheduling regimes. Sunitinib potentiated the inhibitory effect of IR (4 Gy) on angiogenesis. In addition, IR (4 Gy) and sunitinib (4 days of 32.5 mg/kg per day) inhibited tumor growth. Ionizing radiation induced tumor cell apoptosis and reduced proliferation, whereas sunitinib decreased tumor angiogenesis and reduced tumor cell proliferation. When IR was applied before sunitinib, this almost completely inhibited tumor growth, whereas concurrent IR was less effective and IR after sunitinib had no additional effect on tumor growth. Moreover, optimal scheduling allowed a 50% dose reduction in sunitinib while maintaining comparable antitumor effects. This study shows that the therapeutic efficacy of combination therapy improves when proper dose-scheduling is applied. More importantly, optimal treatment regimes permit dose reductions in the angiogenesis inhibitor, which will likely reduce the side effects of combination therapy in the clinical setting. Our study provides important leads to optimize combination treatment in the clinical setting. PMID:25828633

  14. A review of heat-treatment effects on activity and stability of PEM fuel cell catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, Cicero W. B.; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Hansan; Lee, Kunchan; Marques, Aldaléa L. B.; Marques, Edmar P.; Wang, Haijiang; Zhang, Jiujun

    This paper reviews over 120 papers regarding the effect of heat treatment on the catalytic activity and stability of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell catalysts. These catalysts include primarily unsupported and carbon-supported platinum (Pt), Pt alloys, non-Pt alloys, and transition metal macrocycles. The heat treatment can induce changes in catalyst properties such as particle size, morphology, dispersion of the metal on the support, alloying degree, active site formation, catalytic activity, and catalytic stability. The optimum heat-treatment temperature and time period are strongly dependent on the individual catalyst. With respect to Pt-based catalysts, heat treatment can induce particle-size growth, better alloying degree, and changes in the catalyst surface morphology from amorphous to more ordered states, all of which have a remarkable effect on oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and stability. However, heat treatment of the catalyst carbon supports can also significantly affect the ORR catalytic activity of the supported catalyst. Regarding non-noble catalysts, in particular transition metal macrocycles, heat treatment is also important in ORR activity and stability improvement. In fact, heat treatment is a necessary step for introducing more active catalytic sites. For metal chalcogenide catalysts, it seems that heat treatment may not be necessary for catalytic activity and stability improvement. More research is necessary to improve our fundamental understanding and to develop a new strategy that includes innovative heat-treatment processes for enhancing fuel cell catalyst activity and stability.

  15. Surface Oxidation of AuNi Heterodimers to Achieve High Activities toward Hydrogen/Oxygen Evolution and Oxygen Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing; He, Peng; Liao, Wenxin; Chen, Shuangming; Gu, Lin; Gong, Yue; Wang, Kai; Zhuang, Jing; Song, Li; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Xun

    2018-04-01

    Although much attention has been paid to the exploration of highly active electrocatalysts, especially catalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the development of multifunctional catalysts remains a challenge. Here, we utilize AuNi heterodimers as the starting materials to achieve high activities toward HER, OER and ORR. The HER and ORR activities in an alkali environment are similar to those of Pt catalysts, and the OER activity is very high and better than that of commercial IrO 2 . Both the experimental and calculated results suggest that the surface oxidation under oxidative conditions is the main reason for the different activities. The NiO/Ni interface which exists in the as-synthesized heterodimers contributes to high HER activity, the Ni(OH) 2 -Ni-Au interface and the surface Ni(OH) 2 obtained in electrochemical conditons gives rise to promising ORR and OER activities, respectively. As a comparison, a Au@Ni core-shell structure is also synthesized and examined. The core-shell structure shows lower activities for HER and OER than the heterodimers, and reduces O 2 selectively to H 2 O 2 . The work here allows for the development of a method to design multifunctional catalysts via the partial oxidation of a metal surface to create different active centers. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Order of Activity of Nitrogen, Iron Oxide, and FeNx Complexes towards Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Medium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yansong; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-12-07

    In alkaline medium, it seems that both metal-free and iron-containing carbon-based catalysts, such as nitrogen-doped nanocarbon materials, FeOx -doped carbon, and Fe/N/C catalysts, are active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the order of activity of these different active compositions has not been clearly determined. Herein, we synthesized nitrogen-doped carbon black (NCB), Fe3 O4 /CB, Fe3 O4 /NCB, and FeN4 /CB. Through the systematic study of the ORR catalytic activity of these four catalysts in alkaline solution, we confirmed the difference in the catalytic activity and catalytic mechanism for nitrogen, iron oxides, and Fe-N complexes, respectively. In metal-free NCB, nitrogen can improve the ORR catalytic activity with a four-electron pathway. Fe3 O4 /CB catalyst did not exhibit improved activity over that of NCB owing to the poor conductivity and spinel structure of Fe3 O4 . However, FeN4 coordination compounds as the active sites showed excellent ORR catalytic activity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. ANP system activity predicts variability of fat mass reduction and insulin sensitivity during weight loss.

    PubMed

    Brachs, Maria; Wiegand, Susanna; Leupelt, Verena; Ernert, Andrea; Kintscher, Ulrich; Jumpertz von Schwarzenberg, Reiner; Decker, Anne-Marie; Bobbert, Thomas; Hübner, Norbert; Chen, Wei; Krude, Heiko; Spranger, Joachim; Mai, Knut

    2016-06-01

    In weight loss trials, a considerable inter-individual variability in reduction of fat mass and changes of insulin resistance is observed, even under standardized study conditions. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Given the metabolic properties of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system, we hypothesized that ANP signaling might be involved in this phenomenon by changes of ANP secretion or receptor balance. Therefore, we investigated the impact of systemic, adipose and myocellular ANP system on metabolic and anthropometric improvements during weight loss. We comprehensively investigated 143 subjects (31 male, 112 female) before and after a 3 month-standardized weight loss program. The time course of BMI, fat mass, insulin sensitivity, circulating mid-regional proANP (MR-proANP) levels as well as adipose and myocellular natriuretic receptor A (NPR-A) and C (NPR-C) mRNA expression were investigated. BMI decreased by -12.6±3.7%. This was accompanied by a remarkable decrease of adipose NPR-C expression (1005.0±488.4 vs. 556.7±465.6; p<0.001) as well as a tendency towards increased adipose NPR-A expression (4644.7±946.8 vs. 4877.6±869.8; p=0.051). Weight loss induced changes in NPR-C (ΔNPR-C) was linked to relative reduction of total fat mass (ΔFM) (r=0.281; p<0.05), reduction of BMI (r=0.277; p<0.01), and increase of free fatty acids (ΔFFA) (r=-0.258; p<0.05). Basal NPR-C expression and weight loss induced ΔNPR-C independently explained 22.7% of ΔFM. In addition, ΔMR-proANP was independently associated with improvement of insulin sensitivity (standardized ß=0.246, p<0.01). ANP receptor expression predicted the degree of weight loss induced fat mass reduction. Our comprehensive human data support that peripheral ANP signalling is involved in control of adipose tissue plasticity and function during weight loss. (Funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (KFO281/2), the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and the German Centre for

  18. Update on Risk Reduction Activities for a Liquid Advanced Booster for NASA's Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Andy; Greene, William D.

    2017-01-01

    Goals of NASA's Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) are to: (1) Reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS. (2) Enable competition by mitigating targeted Advanced Booster risks to enhance SLS affordability. SLS Block 1 vehicle is being designed to carry 70 mT to LEO: (1) Uses two five-segment solid rocket boosters (SRBs) similar to the boosters that helped power the space shuttle to orbit. Evolved 130 mT payload class rocket requires an advanced booster with more thrust than any existing U.S. liquid-or solid-fueled boosters

  19. Active Vibration Reduction of Titanium Alloy Fan Blades (FAN1) Using Piezoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Kauffman, Jeffrey; Duffy, Kirsten; Provenza, Andrew; Morrison, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this paper, a digital resonant control technique emulating passive shunt circuits is used to demonstrate vibration reduction of FAN1 Ti real fan blade at the several target modes. Single-mode control and multi-mode control using one piezoelectric material are demonstrated. Also a conceptual study of how to implement this digital control system into the rotating fan blade is discussed.

  20. Spectroscopic insights into the nature of active sites in iron–nitrogen–carbon electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Qingying; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Tylus, Urszula

    2016-11-01

    Developing efficient and inexpensive catalysts for the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) constitutes one of the grand challenges in the fabrication of commercially viable fuel cell devices and metal–air batteries for future energy applications. Despite recent achievements in designing advanced Pt-based and Pt-free catalysts, current progress primarily involves an empirical approach of trial-and-error combination of precursors and synthesis conditions, which limits further progress. Rational design of catalyst materials requires proper understanding of the mechanistic origin of the ORR and the underlying surface properties under operating conditions that govern catalytic activity. Herein, several different groups of iron-based catalysts synthesized via differentmore » methods and/or precursors were systematically studied by combining multiple spectroscopic techniques under ex situ and in situ conditions in an effort to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the synthesis-products correlations, nature of active sites, and the reaction mechanisms. These catalysts include original macrocycles, macrocycle-pyrolyzed catalysts, and Fe-N–C catalysts synthesized from individual Fe, N, and C precursors including polymer-based catalysts, metal organic framework (MOF)-based catalysts, and sacrificial support method (SSM)-based catalysts. The latter group of catalysts is most promising as not only they exhibit exceptional ORR activity and/or durability, but also the final products are controllable. We show that the high activity observed for most pyrolyzed Fe-based catalysts can mainly be attributed to a single active site: non-planar Fe–N 4 moiety embedded in distorted carbon matrix characterized by a high potential for the Fe 2+/3+ redox transition in acidic electrolyte/environment. The high intrinsic ORR activity, or turnover frequency (TOF), of this site is shown to be accounted for by redox catalysis mechanism that highlights the dominant role of the site

  1. Influence of riboflavin on the reduction of radionuclides by Shewanella oneidenis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Cherkouk, Andrea; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Law, Katie; Renshaw, Joanna C; Morris, Katherine; Livens, Francis R; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2016-03-28

    Uranium (as UO2(2+)), technetium (as TcO4(-)) and neptunium (as NpO2(+)) are highly mobile radionuclides that can be reduced enzymatically by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble species. The redox chemistry of Pu is more complicated, but the dominant oxidation state in most environments is highly insoluble Pu(IV), which can be reduced to Pu(III) which has a potentially increased solubility which could enhance migration of Pu in the environment. Recently it was shown that flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can act as electron shuttles, promoting anoxic growth coupled to the accelerated reduction of poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Here, we studied the role of riboflavin in mediating the reduction of radionuclides in cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results demonstrate that the addition of 10 μM riboflavin enhances the reduction rate of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III) and to a lesser extent, Np(V) to Np(IV), but has no significant influence on the reduction rate of U(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Thus riboflavin can act as an extracellular electron shuttle to enhance rates of Tc(VII), Np(V) and Pu(IV) reduction, and may therefore play a role in controlling the oxidation state of key redox active actinides and fission products in natural and engineered environments. These results also suggest that the addition of riboflavin could be used to accelerate the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated environments.

  2. Active control for drag reduction in turbulent channel flow: the opposition control schemes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin-Shan; Huang, Wei-Xi; Xu, Chun-Xiao

    2016-10-01

    The opposition control schemes first proposed by Choi et al (1994 J. Fluid Mech. 262 75) employing wall-normal (v) and spanwise (w) velocity are revisited in the present study by performing direct numerical simulation to turbulent channel flow at R{e}τ = 180. Special attention is paid to the combined control, in which the wall-normal and spanwise velocities are imposed at the wall just instantaneously opposite to those at a small distance to the wall. In comparison to the v- and w-controls, combined-control could achieve the best drag reduction rate and control efficiency, with the greatest suppression of turbulence intensities. The influence of control on the statistical properties of vortices is scrutinized. By control, the numbers of vortices with every circulation and radius apparently decrease at the same normal location near the wall, while the vortex radius scaled by the actual wall-friction velocity almost remains the same. The streamwise vortices and the induced Reynolds shear stress undergo the greatest suppression by combined control. It is shown that combined control achieves a better efficacy, attributed to the co-work of the mechanisms of the v- and w-controls. At a higher Reynolds number R{e}τ = 1000, combined control is also more effective than v- and w-controls. The better suppression effect on the outer large scales is the primary reason for the larger drag reduction rate in combined control.

  3. Concentrated energy addition for active drag reduction in hypersonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwin Ganesh, M.; John, Bibin

    2018-01-01

    Numerical optimization of hypersonic drag reduction technique based on concentrated energy addition is presented in this study. A reduction in wave drag is realized through concentrated energy addition in the hypersonic flowfield upstream of the blunt body. For the exhaustive optimization presented in this study, an in-house high precision inviscid flow solver has been developed. Studies focused on the identification of "optimum energy addition location" have revealed the existence of multiple minimum drag points. The wave drag coefficient is observed to drop from 0.85 to 0.45 when 50 Watts of energy is added to an energy bubble of 1 mm radius located at 74.7 mm upstream of the stagnation point. A direct proportionality has been identified between energy bubble size and wave drag coefficient. Dependence of drag coefficient on the upstream added energy magnitude is also revealed. Of the observed multiple minimum drag points, the energy deposition point (EDP) that offers minimum wave drag just after a sharp drop in drag is proposed as the most optimum energy addition location.

  4. Chaetomium thermophilum formate dehydrogenase has high activity in the reduction of hydrogen carbonate (HCO3 -) to formate.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Aşkın Sevinç; Valjakka, Jarkko; Ruupunen, Jouni; Yildirim, Deniz; Turner, Nicholas J; Turunen, Ossi; Binay, Barış

    2017-01-01

    While formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) have been used for cofactor recycling in chemoenzymatic synthesis, the ability of FDH to reduce CO 2 could also be utilized in the conversion of CO 2 to useful products via formate (HCOO - ). In this study, we investigated the reduction of CO 2 in the form of hydrogen carbonate (HCO 3 - ) to formate by FDHs from Candida methylica (CmFDH) and Chaetomium thermophilum (CtFDH) in a NADH-dependent reaction. The catalytic performance with HCO 3 - as a substrate was evaluated by measuring the kinetic rates and conducting productivity assays. CtFDH showed a higher efficiency in converting HCO 3 - to formate than CmFDH, whereas CmFDH was better in the oxidation of formate. The pH optimum of the reduction was at pH 7-8. However, the high concentrations of HCO 3 - reduced the reaction rate. CtFDH was modeled in the presence of HCO 3 - showing that it fits to the active site. The active site setting for hydride transfer in CO 2 reduction was modeled. The hydride donated by NADH would form a favorable contact to the carbon atom of HCO 3 - , resulting in a surplus of electrons within the molecule. This would cause the complex formed by hydrogen carbonate and the hydride to break into formate and hydroxide ions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Structure-guided unravelling: Phenolic hydroxyls contribute to reduction of acrylamide using multiplex quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Huang, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun

    2016-05-15

    We reported a structure-activity relationship study on unravelling phenolic hydroxyls instead of alcoholic hydroxyls contribute to the reduction of acrylamide formation by flavonoids. The dose-dependent study shows a close correlation between the number of phenolic hydroxyls of flavonoids and their reduction effects. In view of positions of hydroxyls, the 3',4'(ortho)-dihydroxyls in B cycle, 3-hydroxyl or hydroxyls of 3-gallate in C cycle, and 5,7(meta)-dihydroxyls in A cycle of flavonoid structures play an important role in the reduction of acrylamide. Flavone C-glycosides are more effective at reducing the formation of acrylamide than flavone O-glycosides when sharing the same aglycone. The current multiplex quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) equations effectively predict the inhibitory rates of acrylamide using selected chemometric parameters (R(2): 0.835-0.938). This pioneer study opens a broad understanding on the chemoprevention of acrylamide contaminants on a structural basis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding activity and selectivity of metal-nitrogen-doped carbon catalysts for electrochemical reduction of CO2.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wen; Bagger, Alexander; Hao, Guang-Ping; Varela, Ana Sofia; Sinev, Ilya; Bon, Volodymyr; Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Kaskel, Stefan; Rossmeisl, Jan; Strasser, Peter

    2017-10-16

    Direct electrochemical reduction of CO 2 to fuels and chemicals using renewable electricity has attracted significant attention partly due to the fundamental challenges related to reactivity and selectivity, and partly due to its importance for industrial CO 2 -consuming gas diffusion cathodes. Here, we present advances in the understanding of trends in the CO 2 to CO electrocatalysis of metal- and nitrogen-doped porous carbons containing catalytically active M-N x moieties (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu). We investigate their intrinsic catalytic reactivity, CO turnover frequencies, CO faradaic efficiencies and demonstrate that Fe-N-C and especially Ni-N-C catalysts rival Au- and Ag-based catalysts. We model the catalytically active M-N x moieties using density functional theory and correlate the theoretical binding energies with the experiments to give reactivity-selectivity descriptors. This gives an atomic-scale mechanistic understanding of potential-dependent CO and hydrocarbon selectivity from the M-N x moieties and it provides predictive guidelines for the rational design of selective carbon-based CO 2 reduction catalysts.Inexpensive and selective electrocatalysts for CO 2 reduction hold promise for sustainable fuel production. Here, the authors report N-coordinated, non-noble metal-doped porous carbons as efficient and selective electrocatalysts for CO 2 to CO conversion.

  7. Enhanced catalytic activity of Ag nanoparticles supported on polyacrylamide/polypyrrole/graphene oxide nanosheets for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hui; Ji, Chunguang; Liu, Meihong; Cao, Zhenqian; Sun, Dayin; Xing, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Song, Xi-Ming

    2018-03-01

    High-density and well-dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) with a mean size of 20 nm have been successfully supported on the surface of polyacrylamide functionalized polypyrrole/graphene oxide (PAM/PPy/GO) nanosheets. The obtained Ag/PAM/PPy/GO composite nanosheets exhibited an excellent catalytic activity for reduction of 4-nitrophenol by NaBH4 with the kinetic reaction rate constant of 3.38 × 10-2 s-1 due to the synergistic effect of all the components of the composite nanosheets. The corresponding catalytic mechanism has been revealed by investigating the effect of different components of Ag/PAM/PPy/GO composite nanosheets on the catalytic performance: GO with the excellent two-dimensional structures offered large surface area for the immobilization of more Ag NPs; PPy with a high electric conductivity promoted the electron transport in the reduction of 4-NP; PAM did not only act as a good linker between Ag NPs and PPy/GO nanosheets for the synthesis of Ag/PAM/PPy/GO composite nanosheets, but also could facilitate the efficient contact between 4-NP and Ag NPs; Ag NPs were the catalytic active site for the reduction of 4-NP, respectively.

  8. Preparation of silver nanoparticles/polydopamine functionalized polyacrylonitrile fiber paper and its catalytic activity for the reduction 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shixiang; Yu, Jianying; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qian; Barras, Alexandre; Xu, Wenguo; Szunerits, Sabine; Cornu, David; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2017-07-01

    The study reports on the preparation of polyacrylonitrile fiber paper (PANFP) functionalized with polydopamine (PD) and silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), named as Ag NPs/PD/PANFP. The composite material was obtained via a simple two-step chemical process. First, a thin polydopamine layer was coated onto the PANFP surface through immersion into an alkaline dopamine (pH 8.5) aqueous solution at room temperature. The reductive properties of polydopamine were further exploited for the deposition of Ag NPs. The morphology and chemical composition of the composite material were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The catalytic activity of the nanocomposite was evaluated for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) at room temperature. The Ag NPs/PD/PANFP displayed good catalytic performance with a full reduction of 4-nitrophenol into the corresponding 4-aminophenol within 30 min. Moreover, the composite material exhibited a good stability up to 4 cycles without a significant loss of its catalytic activity.

  9. Reduction in platelet activation by citrate anticoagulation does not prevent intradialytic hemodynamic instability.

    PubMed

    Gritters, Mareille; Borgdorff, Piet; Grooteman, Muriel P C; Schoorl, Marianne; Schoorl, Margreet; Bartels, Piet C M; Tangelder, Geert Jan; Nubé, Menso J

    2007-01-01

    The etiology of intradialytic hemodynamic instability is multifactorial. Of the various factors involved, a rise in core temperature seems to be crucial. In this respect, the bioincompatibility of hemodialysis (HD) treatment might play an important role. The application of cool dialysate reduces the number of periods of intradialytic hypotension (IDH) considerably. In rats, roller pump perfusion caused hypotension by shear stress induced platelet aggregation and subsequent serotonin release. During clinical HD, citrate anticoagulation abolished platelet activation almost completely. Hence, citrate anticoagulation might reduce IDH, whereas the beneficial effect of cool dialysate might be partly explained by reduced platelet activation. In the present study, blood pressure, IDH episodes, platelet activation, platelet aggregation, and serotonin release were studied crossover in 10 patients during HD with dalteparin anticoagulation at normal and low dialysate temperatures and during HD with citrate. Citrate strongly reduced platelet activation, but did not improve IDH. The blood pressure was best preserved during cool-temperature HD, despite manifest platelet activation. Platelet activation was not accompanied by a rise in the plasma serotonin concentration. Three major conclusions can be drawn: (1) it is unlikely that platelet activation and subsequent serotonin release underlie IDH in the clinical situation; (2) the protective effects of cool dialysate on IDH appear to be independent of HD-induced platelet activation, and (3) extrapolating results from rat experiments to the human situation requires uppermost prudence. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Reduction of exercise capacity in children from summer to winter is associated with lower sporting activity: a serial study.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jan; Böhm, Birgit; Elmenhorst, Julia; Barta, Christiane; Oberhoffer, Renate

    2013-10-01

    Declining activity in children over the past decades is thought to be one of the main risk factors for an early development of exercise intolerance and obesity. Taking this background into account, this prospective study investigated the seasonal change of children's physical activity and its association with objective measures of exercise capacity. A total of 96 children from two schools in Munich (42 girls, age 12.4 ± 0.8 y) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) and an assessment of their daily activities (school sport, club sport, leisure sport) twice. Baseline testing was conducted in summer 2011. Follow-up examination was performed during winter 2012. From summer to winter, self-reported sporting activity decreased from 10.6 ± 4.1 to 8.5 ± 4.3 h/wk (P < 0.001) as school sport (P < 0.001) and leisure sport activities (P = 0.002) decreased, but the activity associated with club sport did not (P = 0.700). In parallel, peak oxygen uptake (VO2) declined from 102.0 ± 17.5 to 96.9 ± 17.9 % of predicted (P < 0.001). This decline in VO2 was associated with a reduction in overall sporting activity (r = 0.234; P < 0.032). Enhancing sporting activity in children during winter might be important to maintaining their exercise capacity.

  11. Catalytic activity of Ni complexed aminoclay towards the reduction of Cr(V), p-nitrophenol and fluorescein dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranchani, A. Amala Jeya; Parthasarathy, V.; Devi, A. Anitha; Meenarathi, B.; Anbarasan, R.

    2017-11-01

    A green-colored Ni-complexed aminoclay (AC) was synthesized and its size and crystalline nature were confirmed by HRTEM images and XRD, respectively. The AC-Ni system was used as a catalyst towards the reduction of environmental pollutants like Cr(VI), fluorescein (Fluor) and nitrophenol (NiP) individually and also their mixture. The catalytic reduction of Cr(VI) was elaborately studied under different experimental conditions. The thermodynamic parameters were determined. The AC-Ni system exhibited lower energy of activation ( E a) value. The apparent rate constant of individual components and their mixture was determined, analyzed and compared with the literature reports. The pollutants present in the mixture exhibited the lower k app value due to the complex formation.

  12. Reduction of microglial activity in a model of multiple sclerosis by dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Sloka, Scott; Metz, Luanne M; Hader, Walter; Starreveld, Yves; Yong, V Wee

    2013-07-18

    Despite extensive and persistent activation of microglia in multiple sclerosis (MS), microglia inhibitors have not yet been identified for treatment of the disorder. We sought to identify medications already in clinical use that could inhibit the activation of microglia. On the basis of the reported inhibitory effects of dipyridamole on phosphodiesterase activity that result in the production of various anti-inflammatory outcomes, we selected it for study. Dipyridamole is used clinically for secondary prevention in stroke. In this study, dipyridamole was examined using microglia in culture and in the mouse model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We found that dipyridamole attenuated the elevation of several cytokines and chemokines in human microglia caused by Toll-like receptor stimulation. Morphological characteristics of activated microglia in culture were also normalized by dipyridamole. In mice, dipyridamole decreased the clinical severity of EAE and reduced microglial activity and other histological indices of EAE in the spinal cord. Dipyridamole is an inhibitor of microglia activation and may have a role in MS and other neurological conditions to attenuate microglial activity.

  13. Reduction of microglial activity in a model of multiple sclerosis by dipyridamole

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite extensive and persistent activation of microglia in multiple sclerosis (MS), microglia inhibitors have not yet been identified for treatment of the disorder. We sought to identify medications already in clinical use that could inhibit the activation of microglia. On the basis of the reported inhibitory effects of dipyridamole on phosphodiesterase activity that result in the production of various anti-inflammatory outcomes, we selected it for study. Dipyridamole is used clinically for secondary prevention in stroke. In this study, dipyridamole was examined using microglia in culture and in the mouse model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Results We found that dipyridamole attenuated the elevation of several cytokines and chemokines in human microglia caused by Toll-like receptor stimulation. Morphological characteristics of activated microglia in culture were also normalized by dipyridamole. In mice, dipyridamole decreased the clinical severity of EAE and reduced microglial activity and other histological indices of EAE in the spinal cord. Conclusions Dipyridamole is an inhibitor of microglia activation and may have a role in MS and other neurological conditions to attenuate microglial activity. PMID:23866809

  14. Simulation model of harmonics reduction technique using shunt active filter by cascade multilevel inverter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreh, Angga Muhamad; Subiyanto, Sunardiyo, Said

    2017-01-01

    Development of non-linear loading in the application of industry and distribution system and also harmonic compensation becomes important. Harmonic pollution is an urgent problem in increasing power quality. The main contribution of the study is the modeling approach used to design a shunt active filter and the application of the cascade multilevel inverter topology to improve the power quality of electrical energy. In this study, shunt active filter was aimed to eliminate dominant harmonic component by injecting opposite currents with the harmonic component system. The active filter was designed by shunt configuration with cascaded multilevel inverter method controlled by PID controller and SPWM. With this shunt active filter, the harmonic current can be reduced so that the current wave pattern of the source is approximately sinusoidal. Design and simulation were conducted by using Power Simulator (PSIM) software. Shunt active filter performance experiment was conducted on the IEEE four bus test system. The result of shunt active filter installation on the system (IEEE four bus) could reduce THD current from 28.68% to 3.09%. With this result, the active filter can be applied as an effective method to reduce harmonics.

  15. Biological reduction of uranium coupled with oxidation of ammonium by Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 under iron reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Emily R; Huang, Shan; Jaffé, Peter R

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the possibility of links between the biological immobilization of uranium (U) and ammonium oxidation under iron (Fe) reducing conditions. The recently-identified Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 (ATCC, PTA-122488) derives energy from ammonium oxidation coupled with Fe reduction. This bacterium has been found in various soil and wetland environments, including U-contaminated wetland sediments. Incubations of Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 with nontronite, an Fe(III)-rich clay, and approximately 10 µM U indicate that these bacteria can use U(VI) in addition to Fe(III) as an electron acceptor in the presence of ammonium. Measurements of Fe(II) production and ammonium oxidation support this interpretation. Concentrations of approximately 100 µM U were found to entirely inhibit Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 activity. These results suggest that natural sites of active ammonium oxidation under Fe reducing conditions by Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 could be hotspots of U immobilization by bioreduction. This is the first report of biological U reduction that is not coupled to carbon oxidation.

  16. Assembly of Modified Ferritin Proteins on Carbon Nanotubes and its Electrocatalytic Activity for Oxygen Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lillehei, Peter T.; Park, Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Highly effective dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be made using a commercially available buffer solution. Buffer solutions of 3-(N-morpholino)-propanesulfonic acid (MOPS), which consists of a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatoms, a charged group, and an alkyl chain greatly enhance the dispersibility and stability of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Additionally, the ability of biomolecules, especially cationized Pt-cored ferritins, to adhere onto the well-dispersed CNTs in the aqueous buffer solution is also improved. This was accomplished without the use of surfactant molecules, which are detrimental to the electrical, mechanical, and other physical properties of the resulting products. The assembled Pt-cored ferritin proteins on the CNTs were used as an electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

  17. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity. PMID:27356485

  18. Horseshoe crab spawning activity in Delaware Bay, USA, after harvest reduction: A mixed-model analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David R.; Robinson, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    A Delaware Bay, USA, standardized survey of spawning horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, was carried out in 1999 − 2013 through a citizen science network. Previous trend analyses of the data were at the state (DE or NJ) or bay-wide levels. Here, an alternative mixed-model regression analysis was used to estimate trends in female and male spawning densities at the beach level (n = 26) with the objective of inferring their causes. For females, there was no overall trend and no single explanation applies to the temporal and spatial patterns in their densities. Individual beaches that initially had higher densities tended to experience a decrease, while beaches that initially had lower densities tended to experience an increase. As a result, densities of spawning females at the end of the study period were relatively similar among beaches, suggesting a redistribution of females among the beaches over the study period. For males, there was a positive overall trend in spawning abundance from 1999 to 2013, and this increase occurred broadly among beaches. Moreover, the beaches with below-average initial male density tended to have the greatest increases. Possible explanations for these patterns include harvest reduction, sampling artifact, habitat change, density-dependent habitat selection, or mate selection. The broad and significant increase in male spawning density, which occurred after enactment of harvest controls, is consistent with the harvest reduction explanation, but there is no single explanation for the temporal or spatial pattern in female densities. These results highlight the continued value of a citizen-science-based spawning survey in understanding horseshoe crab ecology and conservation.

  19. Half-sandwich rhodium(III) transfer hydrogenation catalysts: Reduction of NAD(+) and pyruvate, and antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Soldevila-Barreda, Joan J; Habtemariam, Abraha; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Sadler, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Organometallic complexes have the potential to behave as catalytic drugs. We investigate here Rh(III) complexes of general formula [(Cp(x))Rh(N,N')(Cl)], where N,N' is ethylenediamine (en), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzenesulfonamide (TfEn), and Cp(x) is pentamethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp*), 1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetramethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp(xPh)) or 1-biphenyl-2,3,4,5-tetramethyl cyclopentadienyl (Cp(xPhPh)). These complexes can reduce NAD(+) to NADH using formate as a hydride source under biologically-relevant conditions. The catalytic activity decreased in the order of N,N-chelated ligand bpy > phen > en with Cp* as the η(5)-donor. The en complexes (1-3) became more active with extension to the Cp(X) ring, whereas the activity of the phen (7-9) and bpy (4-6) compounds decreased. [Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+) (4) showed the highest catalytic activity, with a TOF of 37.4±2h(-1). Fast hydrolysis of the chlorido complexes 1-10 was observed by (1)H NMR (<10min at 310K). The pKa* values for the aqua adducts were determined to be ca. 8-10. Complexes 1-9 also catalysed the reduction of pyruvate to lactate using formate as the hydride donor. The efficiency of the transfer hydrogenation reactions was highly dependent on the nature of the chelating ligand and the Cp(x) ring. Competition reactions between NAD(+) and pyruvate for reduction by formate catalysed by 4 showed a preference for reduction of NAD(+). The antiproliferative activity of complex 3 towards A2780 human ovarian cancer cells increased by up to 50% when administered in combination with non-toxic doses of formate, suggesting that transfer hydrogenation can induce reductive stress in cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Progressive increase of lysosomal enzyme activities in hippocampus associated with reduction of population spike in a rat model of neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Stara, Veronika; Navarova, Jana; Ujhazy, Eduard; Gasparova, Zdenka

    2016-12-18

    Extensive effort has been made to identify early markers of neurodegeneration as late stages have no chance of treatment. Recently, many experimental models have been used to study hallmarks of neuronal injury. One of them is the model of trimethyltin (TMT)-induced damage associated with cognitive decline, thus called a model of Alzheimer-like disease. Our aim was to study neuronal transmission in hippocampal slices of male Wistar rats affected with a single dose of TMT (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.) during the first three weeks of its action. The monitored time periods after TMT administration were days 1-3; 8-10 and 15-17. At the same time periods, right hippocampi were collected for determination of changes in specific activities of two lysosomal enzymes. Electrophysiological measurements were based on stimulation of Schäffer collaterals and registration of evoked responses in the stratum pyramidale and the stratum radiatum at the CA3-CA1 synapse. Specific activities of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGA) and cathepsin D (Cat D) were determined spectrophotometrically. During three weeks after i.p. TMT administration to rats, we found a time-dependent reduction of postsynaptic neuronal firing, expressed by diminished population spike (PoS) amplitude recorded in the stratum pyramidale accompanied with marked increase in specific activity of NAGA to respective 111%, 163% and 252% in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd week compared to unaffected rats. In the stratum radiatum, reduction of the slope of excitatory postsynaptic potential was not time-dependent but almost constantly reduced from the 1st to 3rd week after TMT administration (55-60%) compared to control rats. Specific activity of lysosomal enzyme Cat D was significantly increased in the 3rd week after TMT administration. This work demonstrates a time-dependent reduction of somatic response in the hippocampus of TMT affected rats during the first three weeks. This reduction of neuronal firing was later accompanied with increase of

  1. Linking structure to function: The search for active sites in non-platinum group metal oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Holby, Edward F.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2016-05-17

    Atomic-scale structures of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) active sites in non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalysts, made from pyrolysis of carbon, nitrogen, and transition-metal (TM) precursors have been the subject of continuing discussion in the fuel cell electrocatalysis research community. We found that quantum chemical modeling is a path forward for understanding of these materials and how they catalyze the ORR. Here, we demonstrate through literature examples of how such modeling can be used to better understand non-PGM ORR active site relative stability and activity and how such efforts can also aid in the interpretation of experimental signatures produced by thesemore » materials.« less

  2. Reduction of physical activity in daily life and its determinants in smokers without airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Furlanetto, Karina Couto; Mantoani, Leandro Cruz; Bisca, Gianna; Morita, Andrea Akemi; Zabatiero, Juliana; Proença, Mahara; Kovelis, Demétria; Pitta, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    In smokers without airflow obstruction, detailed, objective and controlled quantification of the level of physical inactivity in daily life has never been performed. This study aimed to objectively assess the level of physical activity in daily life in adult smokers without airflow obstruction in comparison with matched non-smokers, and to investigate the determinants for daily physical activity in smokers. Sixty smokers (aged 50 (39-54) years) and 50 non-smokers (aged 48 (40-53) years) matched for gender, age, anthropometric characteristics, educational level, employment status and seasons of the year assessment period were cross-sectionally assessed regarding their daily physical activity with a step counter, besides assessment of lung function, functional exercise capacity, quality of life, anxiety, depression, self-reported comorbidities carbon monoxide level, nicotine dependence and smoking habits. When compared with non-smokers, smokers walked less in daily life (7923 ± 3558 vs 9553 ± 3637 steps/day, respectively), presented worse lung function, functional exercise capacity, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Multiple regression analyses identified functional exercise capacity, Borg fatigue, self-reported motivation/physical activity behaviour and cardiac disease as significant determinants of number of steps/day in smokers (partial r(2)  = 0.10, 0.12, 0.16 and 0.05; b = 15, -997, 1207 and -2330 steps/day, respectively; overall fit of the model R(2)  = 0.38; P < 0.001). Adult smokers without airflow obstruction presented reduced level of daily physical activity. Functional exercise capacity, extended fatigue sensation, aspects of motivation/physical activity behaviour and self-reported cardiac disease are significant determinants of physical activity in daily life in smokers. © 2014 The Authors. Respirology © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  3. Potential Health Implications and Health Cost Reductions of Transit-Induced Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Sener, Ipek N; Lee, Richard J; Elgart, Zachary

    2016-06-01

    Transit has the potential to increase an individual's level of physical activity due to the need to walk or bike at the beginning and end of each trip. Consideration of these health benefits would allow transit proponents to better demonstrate its true costs and benefits. In light of transit's potential health-related impacts, this study contributes to the growing discussion in the emerging field of health and transportation by providing a review of the current level of understanding and evidence related to the physical activity implications of transit use and its associated health cost benefits. Findings from the review revealed that transit use is associated with increased levels of physical activity and improved health outcomes, but the mag