Science.gov

Sample records for active vibration cancellation

  1. Active vibration control on a quarter-car for cancellation of road noise disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgacem, Walid; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a methodology is presented for the cancellation of road noise, from the analysis of vibration transmission paths for an automotive suspension to the design of an active control system using inertial actuators on a suspension to reduce the vibrations transmitted to the chassis. First, experiments were conducted on a Chevrolet Epica LS automobile on a concrete test track to measure accelerations induced on the suspension by the road. These measurements were combined with experimental Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) measured on a quarter-car test bench to reconstruct an equivalent three dimensional force applied on the wheel hub. Second, FRFs measured on the test bench between the three-dimensional driving force and forces at each suspension/chassis linkage were used to characterize the different transmission paths of vibration energy to the chassis. Third, an experimental model of the suspension was constructed to simulate the configuration of the active control system, using the primary (disturbance) FRFs and secondary (control) FRFs also measured on the test bench. This model was used to optimize the configuration of the control actuators and to evaluate the required forces. Finally, a prototype of an active suspension was implemented and measurements were performed in order to assess the performance of the control approach. A 4.6 dB attenuation on transmitted forces was obtained in the 50-250 Hz range.

  2. A passive vibration-cancelling isolation mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Alan O.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of an idealized passive vibration-cancelling two-terminal mount with one degree of freedom at each mechanical terminal isolating a nonrigid machine from a nonrigid foundation is presented. To evaluate a vibration-cancelling (VC) mount, its effectiveness as a function of frequency is compared with the effectiveness of both conventional and compound mounts isolating a rigid machine from a nonrigid foundation. The comparisons indicate that a carefully designed and manufactured VC mount should provide substantially greater vibration reduction at its cancellation frequency than either a conventional or compound mount having the same low frequency stiffness, i.e., stiffness at the natural frequency of the machine mount system.

  3. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  4. Motorized Force-Sensing Micro-Forceps with Tremor Cancelling and Controlled Micro-Vibrations for Easier Membrane Peeling*

    PubMed Central

    Gonenc, Berk; Gehlbach, Peter; Handa, James; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2014-01-01

    Retinal microsurgery requires the manipulation of extremely delicate tissues by various micron scale maneuvers and the application of very small forces. Among vitreoretinal procedures, membrane peeling is a standard procedure requiring the delamination of a very thin fibrous membrane on the retina surface. This study presents the development and evaluation of an integrated assistive system for membrane peeling. This system combines a force-sensing motorized micro-forceps with an active tremor-canceling handheld micromanipulator, Micron. The proposed system (1) attenuates hand-tremor when accurate positioning is needed, (2) provides auditory force feedback to keep the exerted forces at a safe level, and (3) pulsates the tool tip at high frequency to provide ease in delaminating membranes. Experiments on bandages and raw chicken eggs have revealed that controlled micro-vibrations provide significant ease in delaminating membranes. Applying similar amount of forces, much faster delamination was observed when the frequency of these vibrations were increased (up to 50 Hz). PMID:25544965

  5. Modular Wideband Active Vibration Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David R.; Zewari, Wahid; Lee, Kenneth Y.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of space experiments with previous missions shows a common theme. Some of the recent experiments are based on the scientific fundamentals of instruments of prior years. However, the main distinguishing characteristic is the embodiment of advances in engineering and manufacturing in order to extract clearer and sharper images and extend the limits of measurement. One area of importance to future missions is providing vibration free observation platforms at acceptable costs. It has been shown by researchers that vibration problems cannot be eliminated by passive isolation techniques alone. Therefore, various organizations have conducted research in the area of combining active and passive vibration control techniques. The essence of this paper is to present progress in what is believed to be a new concept in this arena. It is based on the notion that if one active element in a vibration transmission path can provide a reasonable vibration attenuation, two active elements in series may provide more control options and better results. The paper presents the functions of a modular split shaft linear actuator developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and University of Massachusetts Lowell. It discusses some of the control possibilities facilitated by the device. Some preliminary findings and problems are also discussed.

  6. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  7. Active Vibration Dampers For Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascack, Albert F.; Ropchock, John J.; Lakatos, Tomas F.; Montague, Gerald T.; Palazzolo, Alan; Lin, Reng Rong

    1994-01-01

    Active dampers developed to suppress vibrations in rotating machinery. Essentially feedback control systems and reciprocating piezoelectric actuators. Similar active damper containing different actuators described in LEW-14488. Concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations in stationary structures subject to winds and earthquakes. Active damper offers adjustable suppression of vibrations. Small and lightweight and responds faster to transients.

  8. Vibrational Overtone Activation of Methylcyclopropene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-27

    the 5-0 vinyl and methyl CH stretches were determined using gas chromotography . Product ratios of 1,3-butadiene to 2-butyne were measured as a...methylenic and methyl vibrational progressions. Product yields from activation through the 5-0 vinyl and methyl CH stretches were determined using gas ... chromotography . Product ratios of 1,3-butadiene to 2-butyne were measured as a function of pressure and compared to the RRKM predicted yields. After careful

  9. Flight electronics for vibration cancellation in cryogenic refrigerators: performance and environmental testing results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burriesci, Lawrence G.; Cook, Eric I.; Hackett, John P.; Drummond, James R.; Mand, Gurpreet S.

    1996-10-01

    Space flight optical instruments and their support hardware must reliably operate in stressing environments for the duration of their mission. They must also survive the mechanical and thermal stresses of transportation, storage and launch. It is necessary to qualify the hardware design through environmental testing and to verify the hardware's ability to perform properly during and/or after some selected environmental tests on the ground. As a rule, flight electronics are subjected to thermal, mechanical and electromagnetic environmental testing. Thermal testing takes the form of temperature cycling over a temperature difference range (Delta) T of up to 100 degrees C for a minimum of six cycles, with additional performance verification testing at the hot and cold extremes. Mechanical testing takes the form of exposure to random vibration, sine sweep vibration, shock spectra and static loading on a centrifuge or by sine burst on a vibration table. A standard series of electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility testing is also performed.

  10. Active cancellation of acoustical resonances with an FPGA FIR filter.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Albert; Simon, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel approach to enhancing the bandwidth of a feedback-controlled mechanical system by digitally canceling acoustical resonances (poles) and anti-resonances (zeros) in the open-loop response via an FPGA FIR filter. By performing a real-time convolution of the feedback error signal with an inverse filter, we can suppress arbitrarily many poles and zeros below 100 kHz, each with a linewidth down to 10 Hz. We demonstrate the efficacy of this technique by canceling the ten largest mechanical resonances and anti-resonances of a high-finesse optical resonator, thereby enhancing the unity gain frequency by more than an order of magnitude. This approach is applicable to a broad array of stabilization problems including optical resonators, external cavity diode lasers, and scanning tunneling microscopes and points the way to applying modern optimal control techniques to intricate linear acoustical systems.

  11. Compact Active Vibration Control System for a Flexible Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A diamond-shaped actuator for a flexible panel has an inter-digitated electrode (IDE) and a piezoelectric wafer portion positioned therebetween. The IDE and/or the wafer portion are diamond-shaped. Point sensors are positioned with respect to the actuator and measure vibration. The actuator generates and transmits a cancelling force to the panel in response to an output signal from a controller, which is calculated using a signal describing the vibration. A method for controlling vibration in a flexible panel includes connecting a diamond-shaped actuator to the flexible panel, and then connecting a point sensor to each actuator. Vibration is measured via the point sensor. The controller calculates a proportional output voltage signal from the measured vibration, and transmits the output signal to the actuator to substantially cancel the vibration in proximity to each actuator.

  12. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  13. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  14. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  15. Active Inertial Vibration Isolators And Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren; Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Report describes development of active inertial vibration isolators and dampers in which actuators electromagnet coils moving linearly within permanent magnetic fields in housings, somewhat as though massive, low-frequency voice coils in loudspeakers. Discusses principle of operation, electrical and mechanical considerations in design of actuators, characteristics of accelerometers, and frequency responses of control systems. Describes design and performance of one- and three-degree-of-freedom vibration-suppressing system based on concept.

  16. Active source cancellation of the blade tone fundamental and harmonics in centrifugal fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmann, G. H.; Fox, D. J.; Neise, W.

    1988-10-01

    An active source method is shown to effectively cancel the blade tone fundamental and harmonics in centrifugal fans for a variety of fan loading conditions and duct terminations. The special case is considered where the frequency of the blade tone harmonics lies just above the cut-on frequency of the first higher order mode of the fan ducting. The results suggest that the present active control mechanism involves a local alteration of the aerodynamic source pressures.

  17. Active damping of spacecraft structural appendage vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An active vibration damper system, for bending in two orthogonal directions and torsion, in each of three mutually perpendicular axes is located at the extremities of the flexible appendages of a space platform. The system components for each axis includes: an accelerometer, filtering and signal processing apparatus, and a DC motor-inertia wheel torquer. The motor torquer, when driven by a voltage proportional to the relative vibration tip velocity, produces a reaction torque for opposing and therefore damping a specific modal velocity of vibration. The relative tip velocity is obtained by integrating the difference between the signal output from the accelerometer located at the end of the appendage with the output of a usually carried accelerometer located on a relatively rigid body portion of the space platform. A selector switch, with sequential stepping logic or highest modal vibration energy logic, steps to another modal tip velocity channel and receives a signal voltage to damp another vibration mode. In this manner, several vibration modes can be damped with a single sensor/actuator pair. When a three axis damper is located on each of the major appendages of the platform, then all of the system vibration modes can be effectively damped.

  18. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  19. Active vibration control using DEAP actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarban, Rahimullah; Jones, Richard W.

    2010-04-01

    Dielectric electro-active polymer (DEAP) is a new type of smart material, which has the potential to be used to provide effective actuation for a wide range of applications. The properties of DEAP material place it somewhere between those of piezoceramics and shape memory alloys. Of the range of DEAP-based actuators that have been developed those having a cylindrical configuration are among the most promising. This contribution introduces the use of a tubular type DEAP actuator for active vibration control purposes. Initially the DEAP-based tubular actuator to be used in this study, produced by Danfoss PolyPower A/S, is introduced along with the static and dynamic characteristics. Secondly an electromechanical model of the tubular actuator is briefly reviewed and its ability to model the actuator's hysteresis characteristics for a range of periodic input signals at different frequencies demonstrated. The model will be used to provide hysteresis compensation in future vibration isolation studies. Experimental active vibration control using the actuator is then examined, specifically active vibration isolation of a 250 g mass subject to shaker generated 'ground vibration'. An adaptive feedforward control strategy is used to achieve this. The ability of the tubular actuator to reject both tonal and broadband random vibratory disturbances is then demonstrated.

  20. Quantifying Ant Activity Using Vibration Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Oberst, Sebastian; Baro, Enrique Nava; Lai, Joseph C. S.; Evans, Theodore A.

    2014-01-01

    Ant behaviour is of great interest due to their sociality. Ant behaviour is typically observed visually, however there are many circumstances where visual observation is not possible. It may be possible to assess ant behaviour using vibration signals produced by their physical movement. We demonstrate through a series of bioassays with different stimuli that the level of activity of meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus) can be quantified using vibrations, corresponding to observations with video. We found that ants exposed to physical shaking produced the highest average vibration amplitudes followed by ants with stones to drag, then ants with neighbours, illuminated ants and ants in darkness. In addition, we devised a novel method based on wavelet decomposition to separate the vibration signal owing to the initial ant behaviour from the substrate response, which will allow signals recorded from different substrates to be compared directly. Our results indicate the potential to use vibration signals to classify some ant behaviours in situations where visual observation could be difficult. PMID:24658467

  1. Quantifying ant activity using vibration measurements.

    PubMed

    Oberst, Sebastian; Baro, Enrique Nava; Lai, Joseph C S; Evans, Theodore A

    2014-01-01

    Ant behaviour is of great interest due to their sociality. Ant behaviour is typically observed visually, however there are many circumstances where visual observation is not possible. It may be possible to assess ant behaviour using vibration signals produced by their physical movement. We demonstrate through a series of bioassays with different stimuli that the level of activity of meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus) can be quantified using vibrations, corresponding to observations with video. We found that ants exposed to physical shaking produced the highest average vibration amplitudes followed by ants with stones to drag, then ants with neighbours, illuminated ants and ants in darkness. In addition, we devised a novel method based on wavelet decomposition to separate the vibration signal owing to the initial ant behaviour from the substrate response, which will allow signals recorded from different substrates to be compared directly. Our results indicate the potential to use vibration signals to classify some ant behaviours in situations where visual observation could be difficult.

  2. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  3. Active vibration control in Duffing mechanical systems using dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Carbajal, F.; Silva-Navarro, G.

    2014-07-01

    This paper deals with the multi-frequency harmonic vibration suppression problem in forced Duffing mechanical systems using passive and active linear mass-spring-damper dynamic vibration absorbers. An active vibration absorption scheme is proposed to extend the vibrating energy dissipation capability of a passive dynamic vibration absorber for multiple excitation frequencies and, simultaneously, to perform reference position trajectory tracking tasks planned for the nonlinear primary system. A differential flatness-based disturbance estimation scheme is also described to estimate the unknown multiple time-varying frequency disturbance signal affecting the differentially flat nonlinear vibrating mechanical system dynamics. Some numerical simulation results are provided to show the efficient performance of the proposed active vibration absorption scheme and the fast estimation of the vibration disturbance signal.

  4. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  5. Bucking Coil Implementation on PMT for Active Cancelling of Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Gogami, T; Asaturyan, A; Bono, J; Baturin, P; Chen, C; Chiba, A; Chiga, N; Fujii, Y; Hashimoto, O; Kawama, D; Maruta, T; Maxwell, V; Mkrtchyan, A; Nagao, S; Nakamura, S N; Reinhold, J; Shichijo, A; Tang, L; Taniya, N; Wood, S A; Ye, Z

    2013-11-01

    Aerogel and water Cerenkov detectors were employed to tag kaons for a lambda hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment which used the (e,e'K{sup +}) reaction in experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab E05-115). Fringe fields from the kaon spectrometer magnet yielded ~5 Gauss at the photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for these detectors which could not be easily shielded. As this field results in a lowered kaon detection efficiency, we implemented a bucking coil on each photomultiplier tubes to actively cancel this magnetic field, thus maximizing kaon detection efficiency.

  6. Smart actuators for active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourboghrat, Farzad; Daneshdoost, Morteza

    1998-07-01

    In this paper, the design and implementation of smart actuators for active vibration control of mechanical systems are considered. A smart actuator is composed of one or several layers of piezo-electric materials which work both as sensors and actuators. Such a system also includes micro- electronic or power electronic amplifiers, depending on the power requirements and applications, as well as digital signal processing systems for digital control implementation. In addition, PWM type micro/power amplifiers are used for control implementation. Such amplifiers utilize electronic switching components that allow for miniaturization, thermal efficiency, cost reduction, and precision controls that are robust to disturbances and modeling errors. An adaptive control strategy is then developed for vibration damping and motion control of cantilever beams using the proposed smart self-sensing actuators.

  7. Vibrational Raman optical activity of ketose monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Alasdair F.; Hecht, Lutz; Barron, Laurence D.

    1995-07-01

    The vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the four ketose sugars D-fructose, L-sorbose, D-tagatose and D-psicose in aqueous solution, which have been measured in backscattering in the range ≈250-1500 cm -1, are reported. These results are combined with those from a previous ROA study of aldose and pentose sugars in an attempt to establish new vibrational assignments and to verify old ones. The high information content of these spectra provides a new perspective on all the central features of monosaccharide stereochemistry including dominant anomeric configuration, ring conformation, exocyclic CH 2OH group conformation and relative disposition of the hydroxyl groups around the ring.

  8. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Elastic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Fuller, Chris R.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Pairs of colocated piezoelectric transducers, independently controlled by multichannel adaptive controller, employed as actuators and sensors to achieve simultaneous attenuation of both extensional and flexural motion. Single pair used to provide simultaneous control of flexural and extensional waves, or two pairs used to control torsional motion also. Capability due to nature of piezoelectric transducers, when bonded to surfaces of structures and activated by oscillating voltages, generate corresponding oscillating distributions of stresses in structures. Phases and amplitudes of actuator voltages adjusted by controller to impede flow of vibrational energy simultaneously, in waves of various forms, beyond locations of actuators. Concept applies equally to harmonic or random response of structure and to multiple responses of structure to transverse bending, torsion, and compression within structural element. System has potential for many situations in which predominant vibration transmission path through framelike structure.

  9. Active vibration isolation using smart structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guigou, C.; Wagstaff, P. R.; Fuller, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    Passive technologies for the isolation of structures from vibrating sources are often inadequate. Using active control inputs applied directly to the source or designing a structure integrating the transducers required for the control inputs and the response measurements are ways of dealing with the problem. Results are given which were obtained on an experimental set up simulating this kind of problem where the form and the position of the transducers could be varied. By measuring the response of the structure integrated over a particular area the effects of particular types of modes could be taken into account to deal with specific types of input or limit particular modes of response more efficiently. Results of using different modes of vibration excitation of the receiving structure with and without control are presented for particular input frequencies. The problems of optimizing the control system to deal with multiple frequency inputs are discussed.

  10. Controlling kilometre-scale interferometric detectors for gravitational wave astronomy: Active phase noise cancellation using EOMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, N.; Balembois, L.; Bizouard, M. A.; Brisson, V.; Casanueva, J.; Cavalier, F.; Davier, M.; Frey, V.; Hello, P.; Huet, D.; Leroy, N.; Loriette, V.; Maksimovic, I.; Robinet, F.

    2017-02-01

    The second generation of Gravitational waves detectors are kilometric Michelson interferometers with additional recycling Fabry-Perot cavities on the arms and ​the addition of two more recycling cavities to enhance their sensitivity, with the particularity that all the mirrors are suspended. In order to control them a new technique, based on the use of auxiliary lasers, has been developed to bring the interferometer to its working point, with all the cavities on their resonance, in an adiabatic way. The implementation of this technique in Advanced Virgo is under preparation and the propagation of a stable laser through a 3-km optical fibre is one of the most problematic issues. A new technique of active phase noise cancellation based on the use of Electro Optical Modulators has been developed, and a first prototype has been successfully tested.

  11. Active vibration isolation platform on base of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Valery P.; Bazinenkov, Alexey M.

    2017-06-01

    The article describes the active vibration isolation platform on base of magnetorheological (MR) elastomers. An active damper based on the MR elastomers can be used as an actuator of micro- or nanopositioning for a vibroinsulated object. The MR elastomers give such advantages for active control of vibration as large range of displacements (up to 1 mm), more efficient absorption of the vibration energy, possibility of active control of amplitude-frequency characteristics and positioning with millisecond response speed and nanometer running accuracy. The article presents the results of experimental studies of the most important active damper parameters. Those are starting current, transient time for stepping, transmission coefficient of the vibration displacement amplitude.

  12. Electromechanical lever blocks for active vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Lorenzo; Genequand, Pierre M.

    2000-04-01

    This paper is a follow-up of a presentation at the Smart Structures Symposium of 1998. There we described an innovative technical solution which provides a combined passive damping and isolation interface with the appropriate transmissibility characteristics between a vibrating base and a sensitive payload, typically an optical terminal/telescope. The particularity of the solution is primarily found in the implementation of energy dissipation by means linear electromagnetic linear motors leveraged by means of flexure elements, to constitute an integrated resistor-damped electromechanic lever block, which we called MEDI (Mechanical Elastic element for Damping and Isolation). Passive viscous damping with attenuation of the order of -20 dB at 50 Hz with respect to a hard fixation, is obtained by simply short- circuiting the electro-magnetic motor. The study and test program presented here extends the application of MEDIs to active vibration reduction systems. The study, contracted by the European Space Agency, aimed at investigating the possibility of using the MEDI as an active isolator for scientific experiments in the International Space Station. By controlling the current in the electromagnetic motor in closed loop with the signal from specially designed force sensor (with extremely low noise), we achieved attenuation of the order of -15 dB at 1 Hz, -30 dB at 10 Hz, -50 dB at 30 Hz, with the isolation slope starting as low as 0.1 Hz.

  13. Active vibration control using mechanical and electrical analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Perez, A.; Hassan, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical-electrical analogous circuit models are widely used in electromechanical system design as they represent the function of a coupled electrical and mechanical system using an equivalent electrical system. This research uses electrical circuits to establish a discussion of simple active vibration control principles using two scenarios: an active vibration isolation system and an active dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using a voice coil motor (VCM) actuator. Active control laws such as gain scheduling are intuitively explained using circuit analysis techniques. Active vibration control approaches are typically constraint by electrical power requirements. The electrical analogous is a fast approach for specifying power requirements on the experimental test platform which is based on a vibration shaker that provides the based excitation required for the single Degree- of-Freedom (1DoF) vibration model under study.

  14. Active Members Excite And Measure Vibrations In Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Chin-Po; Chen, Gun-Shing; Wada, Ben K.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of use of active structural members to excite and measure vibrations as small as microns in truss structure. Part of continuing effort to develop active vibration-suppressing control system adapting itself to changing and/or partly unknown dynamical characteristics of truss structure in outer space. Some aspects of control concept and potential terrestrial applications described in "Two Techniques For Suppressing Vibrations In Structures" (NPO-17889).

  15. Piezoelectric Power Requirements for Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Matthew C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the power consumption of piezoelectric actuators utilized for active vibration control. Analytical developments and experimental tests show that the maximum power required to control a structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is independent of the dynamics between the piezoelectric actuator and the host structure. The results demonstrate that for a perfectly-controlled system, the power consumption is a function of the quantity and type of piezoelectric actuators and the voltage and frequency of the control law output signal. Furthermore, as control effectiveness decreases, the power consumption of the piezoelectric actuators decreases. In addition, experimental results revealed a non-linear behavior in the material properties of piezoelectric actuators. The material non- linearity displayed a significant increase in capacitance with an increase in excitation voltage. Tests show that if the non-linearity of the capacitance was accounted for, a conservative estimate of the power can easily be determined.

  16. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  17. Anomalous Cancellation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boas, R. P., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of getting a correct result when a fraction is reduced by cancelling a digit which appears in both the numerator and the denominator is extended from the base ten situation to any number base. (DT)

  18. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Thin Films for Active Noise Cancellation, Solar Energy Harvesting, and Energy Storage in Building Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shan

    This research explores the application of carbon nanotube (CNT) films for active noise cancellation, solar energy harvesting and energy storage in building windows. The CNT-based components developed herein can be integrated into a solar-powered active noise control system for a building window. First, the use of a transparent acoustic transducer as both an invisible speaker for auxiliary audio playback and for active noise cancellation is accomplished in this work. Several challenges related to active noise cancellation in the window are addressed. These include secondary path estimation and directional cancellation of noise so as to preserve auxiliary audio and internal sounds while preventing transmission of external noise into the building. Solar energy can be harvested at a low rate of power over long durations while acoustic sound cancellation requires short durations of high power. A supercapacitor based energy storage system is therefore considered for the window. Using CNTs as electrode materials, two generations of flexible, thin, and fully solid-state supercapacitors are developed that can be integrated into the window frame. Both generations consist of carbon nanotube films coated on supporting substrates as electrodes and a solid-state polymer gel layer for the electrolyte. The first generation is a single-cell parallel-plate supercapacitor with a working voltage of 3 Volts. Its energy density is competitive with commercially available supercapacitors (which use liquid electrolyte). For many applications that will require higher working voltage, the second-generation multi-cell supercapacitor is developed. A six-cell device with a working voltage as high as 12 Volts is demonstrated here. Unlike the first generation's 3D structure, the second generation has a novel planar (2D) architecture, which makes it easy to integrate multiple cells into a thin and flexible supercapacitor. The multi-cell planar supercapacitor has energy density exceeding that of

  20. A high quality voice coder with integrated echo canceller and voice activity detector for mobile satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondoz, A. M.; Evans, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    In the last decade, low bit rate speech coding research has received much attention resulting in newly developed, good quality, speech coders operating at as low as 4.8 Kb/s. Although speech quality at around 8 Kb/s is acceptable for a wide variety of applications, at 4.8 Kb/s more improvements in quality are necessary to make it acceptable to the majority of applications and users. In addition to the required low bit rate with acceptable speech quality, other facilities such as integrated digital echo cancellation and voice activity detection are now becoming necessary to provide a cost effective and compact solution. In this paper we describe a CELP speech coder with integrated echo canceller and a voice activity detector all of which have been implemented on a single DSP32C with 32 KBytes of SRAM. The quality of CELP coded speech has been improved significantly by a new codebook implementation which also simplifies the encoder/decoder complexity making room for the integration of a 64-tap echo canceller together with a voice activity detector.

  1. Vibration attenuation of aircraft structures utilizing active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, Gregory S.; Whitehouse, Stephen R.; Mackaman, John R.

    1993-09-01

    The need for active vibration control for airborne laser systems was demonstrated during the late 1970s by the Airborne Laser Laboratory. Other possible applications include sonic fatigue alleviation, reduction of buffet induced fatigue, vibration control for embedded antennae, and active aeroelastic control. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of active vibration control technology and its application to aircraft. Classification of classic aircraft vibration problems and currently available solutions are used to provide a framework for the study. Current solutions are classified as being either passive or active and by the methodology (modal modification or addition) used to reduce vibration. Possible applications for this technology in aircraft vibration control are presented within this framework to demonstrate the increased versatility active materials technologies provide the designer. An in- depth study of an active pylon to reduce wing/store vibration is presented as an example. Finally, perceived gaps in the existing technology base are identified and both on-going and future research plans in these areas are discussed.

  2. In-flight active wave cancelation with delayed-x-LMS control algorithm in a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bernhard; Fabbiane, Nicolò; Nemitz, Timotheus; Bagheri, Shervin; Henningson, Dan S.; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-10-01

    This manuscript demonstrates the first successful application of the delayed-x-LMS (dxLMS) control algorithm for TS-wave cancelation. Active wave cancelation of two-dimensional broadband Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) disturbances is performed with a single DBD plasma actuator. The experiments are conducted in flight on the pressure side of a laminar flow wing glove, mounted on a manned glider. The stability properties of the controller are investigated in detail with experimental flight data, DNS and stability analysis of the boundary layer. Finally, a model-free approach for dxLMS operation is introduced to operate the controller as a `black-box' system, which automatically adjusts the controller settings based on a group speed measurement of the disturbance wave packets. The modified dxLMS controller is operated without a model and is able to adapt to varying conditions that may occur during flight in atmosphere.

  3. In-Flight Active Wave Cancelation with Delayed-x-LMS Control Algorithm in a Laminar Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bernhard; Fabbiane, Nicolo; Nemitz, Timotheus; Bagheri, Shervin; Henningson, Dan; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-11-01

    This manuscript demonstrates the first successful application of the delayed-x-LMS (dxLMS) control algorithm for TS-wave cancelation. Active wave cancelation of two-dimensional broad-band Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) disturbances is performed with a single DBD plasma actuator. The experiments are conducted in flight on the pressure side of a laminar flow wing glove, mounted on a manned glider. The stability properties of the controller are investigated in detail with experimental flight data, DNS and stability analysis of the boundary layer. Finally, a model-free approach for dxLMS operation is introduced to operate the controller as a "black box" system, which automatically adjusts the controller settings based on a group speed measurement of the disturbance wave packets. The modified dxLMS controller is operated without a model and is able to adapt to varying conditions that may occur during flight in atmosphere. DFG No.GR3524/4-1.

  4. A Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. This paper provides a tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements as well as a comparison of the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation. This paper also surveys the flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: Suppression of Transient Accelerations By Levitation (STABLE); the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Mount (MIM); and the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS).

  5. Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration-sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. A tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem, including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements, as well as a comparison or the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation is provided. The flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: suppression of transient accelerations by levitation, the microgravity vibration isolation mount, and the active rack isolation system are surveyed.

  6. Active Suppression Of Vibrations In Stirling-Cycle Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Gaffney, Monique S.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents results of early research directed toward development of active control systems for suppression of vibrations in spacecraft Stirling-cycle cryocoolers. Researchers developed dynamical models of cryocooler compressor.

  7. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 3; Active Fan Noise Cancellation in the NASA Lewis Active Noise Control Fan Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G.; Hu, Ziqiang; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's (LERC) 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF). The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for global active noise cancellation of fan tones. The GE ANC system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is canceled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. Inputs to the controller are signals from a shaft encoder and from a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The key results are that the (6,0) was completely eliminated at the 920 Hz design frequency and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 6.8 dB (out of a possible 9.8 dB). Farfield reductions of 15 dB (SPL) were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB PWL decrease. The results indicate that global attenuation of PWL at the target frequency was obtained in the aft quadrant using an ANC actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct. The quality of the results depended on precise mode generation. High spillover into spurious modes generated by the ANC actuator array caused less than optimum levels of PWL reduction. The variation in spillover is believed to be due to calibration procedure, but must be confirmed in subsequent tests.

  8. Activated-like hopping transition in weakly vibrated granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anna, G.; Gremaud, G.

    2001-06-01

    The slow dynamics of a weakly vibrated granular medium is investigated using a low-frequency forced torsion pendulum method. A loss factor peak is observed in the pendulum response (or the granular susceptibility) as a function of the vibration intensity or the forcing frequency. The position of the peak follows an Arrhenius-like behaviour and the data can be described as an activated hopping process. The peak can be seen as a vibration-induced glass-like transition between a low-Γ jammed phase and the high-Γ fluid-like phase.

  9. Coarse-fine residual gravity cancellation system with magnetic levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salcudean, S. E.; Davis, H.; Chen, C. T.; Goertz, D. E.; Tryggvason, B. V.

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft flight along parabolic trajectories have been proposed and executed in order to achieve low cost, near free fall conditions of moderate duration. This paper describes a six degree of freedom experiment isolation system designed to cancel out residual accelerations due to mechanical vibrations and errors in aircraft trajectory. The isolation system consists of a fine motion magnetic levitator whose stator is transported by a conventional coarse motion stage. The levitator uses wide gap voice coil actuators and has the dual purpose of isolating the experiment platform from aircraft vibrations and actively cancelling residual accelerations through feedback control. The course motion stage tracks the levitated platform in order to keep the levitator's coils centered within their matching magnetic gaps. Aspects of system design, an analysis of the proposed control strategy and simulation results are presented. Feasibility experiments are also discussed.

  10. Influence of mono-axis random vibration on reading activity.

    PubMed

    Bhiwapurkar, M K; Saran, V H; Harsha, S P; Goel, V K; Berg, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on train passengers' activities found that many passengers were engaged in some form of work, e.g., reading and writing, while traveling by train. A majority of the passengers reported that their activities were disturbed by vibrations or motions during traveling. A laboratory study was therefore set up to study how low-frequency random vibrations influence the difficulty to read. The study involved 18 healthy male subjects of 23 to 32 yr of age group. Random vibrations were applied in the frequency range (1-10 Hz) at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m/s(2) rms amplitude along three directions (longitudinal, lateral and vertical). The effect of vibration on reading activity was investigated by giving a word chain in two different font types (Times New Roman and Arial) and three different sizes (10, 12 and 14 points) of font for each type. Subjects performed reading tasks under two sitting positions (with backrest support and leaning over a table). The judgments of perceived difficulty to read were rated using 7-point discomfort judging scale. The result shows that reading difficulty increases with increasing vibration magnitudes and found to be maximum in longitudinal direction, but with leaning over a table position. In comparison with Times New Roman type and sizes of font, subjects perceived less difficulty with Arial type for all font sizes under all vibration magnitude.

  11. Elements of active vibration control for rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    The success or failure of active vibration control is determined by the availability of suitable actuators, modeling of the entire system including all active elements, positioning of the actuators and sensors, and implementation of problem-adapted control concepts. All of these topics are outlined and their special problems are discussed in detail. Special attention is given to efficient modeling of systems, especially for considering the active elements. Finally, design methods for and the application of active vibration control on rotating machinery are demonstrated by several real applications.

  12. Ionization energy and active cation vibrations of trans-2-fluorostyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pei Ying; Tzeng, Sheng Yuan; Hsu, Ya Chu; Tzeng, Wen Bih

    2017-02-01

    We applied the two-color resonant two-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) technique to record the cation spectra of trans-2-fluorostyrene by ionizing via six intermediate vibronic levels. The adiabatic ionization energy was determined to be 69 304 ± 5 cm-1. The distinct MATI bands at 67, 124, 242, 355, 737, 806, 833, and 993 cm-1 were assigned to the active cation vibrations related to out-of-plane substituent-sensitive bending vibrations and in-plane ring deformation and bending motions. Many combination vibrations were also observed. Our experimental results suggest that the molecular geometry and vibrational coordinates of the trans-2-fluorostyrene cation in the D0 state resemble those of the neutral species in the S1 state.

  13. Active vibration control of basic structures using macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-03-01

    In the modern naval battle, as the anti-detection technique developing fleetly, enhancing submarine's hidden ability is becoming more and more important. However, in view of the worse control effect at low-frequency and weak adjustability to external influence, conventional passive vibration control can't satisfy the modern naval rigorous demands. Fortunately, active vibration control technology not only monitors the structure's real-time vibration, but also has more remarkable control effects and superior suitability. At the present time, it has a primary application in the vibration damping of ship engineering. In addition, due to functional materials rapidly developing, with the coming of piezoelectric composite materials, the advanced active control techniques have more applicability, lager damp amplitude and wider applied field, which basing on the piezoelectric-effect and inverse- piezoelectric-effect of piezoelectric materials. Especially, in the end of nineties, NASA had successfully manufactured the excellent macro fiber composite (MFC), which assembles actuating and sensing abilities. Comparing with the conventional piezoelectric ceramic materials, it provides the required durability, excellent flexibility, higher electromechanical coupling factors and stronger longitudinal actuating force by using interdigital electrodes. On the basis of the application of cantilever beam' active vibration control by using MFC actuators, this paper started with the mechanical characteristics of its actuating and sensing equations, and then investigated its piezoelectric feedback scale factor when equipped on the honeycomb aluminous panel. Finally, in order to validate the theoretical analysis method, the vibration control experiment of cantilever beam and honeycomb aluminous panel are built and tested with different activating force. The experimental results verify that MFC used in submarine structures' active vibration control are feasible and effective.

  14. Active Blade Vibration Control Being Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines are currently being designed to have increased performance, lower weight and manufacturing costs, and higher reliability. Consequently, turbomachinery components, such as turbine and compressor blades, have designs that are susceptible to new vibration problems and eventual in-service failure due to high-cycle fatigue. To address this problem, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing and testing innovative active blade vibration control concepts. Preliminary results of using an active blade vibration control system, involving a rotor supported by an active magnetic bearing in Glenn's Dynamic Spin Rig, indicate promising results (see the photograph). Active blade vibration control was achieved using feedback of blade strain gauge signals within the magnetic bearing control loop. The vibration amplitude was reduced substantially (see the graphs). Also, vibration amplitude amplification was demonstrated; this could be used to enhance structural mode identification, if desired. These results were for a nonrotating two-bladed disk. Tests for rotating blades are planned. Current and future active blade vibration control research is planned to use a fully magnetically suspended rotor and smart materials. For the fully magnetically suspended rotor work, three magnetic bearings (two radial and one axial) will be used as actuators instead of one magnetic bearing. This will allow additional degrees of freedom to be used for control. For the smart materials work, control effectors located on and off the blade will be considered. Piezoelectric materials will be considered for on-the-blade actuation, and actuator placement on a stator vane, or other nearby structure, will be investigated for off-the-blade actuation. Initial work will focus on determining the feasibility of these methods by performing basic analysis and simple experiments involving feedback control.

  15. Active and passive vibration suppression for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The relative benefits of passive and active vibration suppression for large space structures (LSS) are discussed. The intent is to sketch the true ranges of applicability of these approaches using previously published technical results. It was found that the distinction between active and passive vibration suppression approaches is not as sharp as might be thought at first. The relative simplicity, reliability, and cost effectiveness touted for passive measures are vitiated by 'hidden costs' bound up with detailed engineering implementation issues and inherent performance limitations. At the same time, reliability and robustness issues are often cited against active control. It is argued that a continuum of vibration suppression measures offering mutually supporting capabilities is needed. The challenge is to properly orchestrate a spectrum of methods to reap the synergistic benefits of combined advanced materials, passive damping, and active control.

  16. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, John M.; Barnes, Ryan P.; Keller, Timothy J.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  17. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR.

    PubMed

    Franck, John M; Barnes, Ryan P; Keller, Timothy J; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  18. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-05

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  19. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0–60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  20. Active vibration control of a single-stage spur gearbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogruer, C. U.; Pirsoltan, Abbas K.

    2017-02-01

    The dynamic transmission error between driving and driven gears of a gear mechanism with torsional mode is induced by periodic time-varying mesh stiffness. In this study, to minimize the adverse effect of this time-varying mesh stiffness, a nonlinear controller which adjusts the torque acting on the driving gear is proposed. The basic approach is to modulate the input torque such that it compensates the periodic change in mesh stiffness. It is assumed that gears are assembled with high precision and gearbox is analyzed by a finite element software to calculate the mesh stiffness curve. Thus, change in the mesh stiffness, which is inherently nonlinear, can be predicted and canceled by a feed-forward loop. Then, remaining linear dynamics is controlled by pole placement techniques. Under these premises, it is claimed that any acceleration and velocity profile of the input shaft can be tracked accurately. Thereby, dynamic transmission error is kept to a minimum possible value and a spur gearbox, which does not emit much noise and vibration, is designed.

  1. Muscle motion and EMG activity in vibration treatment.

    PubMed

    Fratini, Antonio; La Gatta, Antonio; Bifulco, Paolo; Romano, Maria; Cesarelli, Mario

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study is to highlight the relationship between muscle motion, generated by whole body vibration, and the correspondent electromyographic (EMG) activity and to suggest a new method to customize the stimulation frequency. Simultaneous recordings of EMG and tri-axial accelerations of quadriceps rectus femoris from fifteen subjects undergoing vibration treatments were collected. Vibrations were delivered via a sinusoidal oscillating platform at different frequencies (10-45 Hz). Muscle motion was estimated by processing the accelerometer data. Large EMG motion artifacts were removed using sharp notch filters centred at the vibration frequency and its superior harmonics. EMG-RMS values were computed and analyzed before and after artifact suppression to assess muscular activity. Muscles acceleration amplitude increased with frequency. Muscle displacements revealed a mechanical resonant-like behaviour of the muscle. Resonance frequencies and dumping factors depended on subject. Moreover, RMS of artifact-free EMG was found well correlated (R(2)=0.82) to the actual muscle displacement, while the maximum of the EMG response was found related to the mechanical resonance frequency of muscle. Results showed that maximum muscular activity was found in correspondence to the mechanical resonance of the muscle itself. Assuming the hypothesis that muscle activation is proportional to muscle displacement, treatment optimization (i.e. to choose the best stimulation frequency) could be obtained by simply monitoring local acceleration (resonance), leading to a more effective muscle stimulation. Motion artifact produced an overestimation of muscle activity, therefore its removal was essential.

  2. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control the flexural oscillations of large structures in space is investigated. Flexural oscillations are excited by impulsive loads. The vibratory response can degrade the pointing accuracy of cameras and antennae, and can cause high stresses at structural node points. Piezoelectric actuators have the advantage of exerting localized bending moments. In this way, vibration is controlled without exciting rigid body modes. The actuators are used in collocated sensor/driver pairs to form a feedback control system. The sensor produces a voltage that is proportional to the dynamic stress at the sensor location, and the driver produces a force that is proportional to the voltage applied to it. The analog control system amplifies and phase shifts the sensor signal to produce the voltage signal that is applied to the driver. The feedback control is demonstrated to increase the first mode damping in a cantilever beam by up to 100 percent, depending on the amplifier gain. The damping efficiency of the control system when the piezoelectrics are not optimally positioned at points of high stress in the beam is evaluated.

  3. Active Piezoelectric Vibration Control of Subscale Composite Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Min, James B.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program, researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are investigating new technologies supporting the development of lighter, quieter, and more efficient fans for turbomachinery applications. High performance fan blades designed to achieve such goals will be subjected to higher levels of aerodynamic excitations which could lead to more serious and complex vibration problems. Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing engine blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. To investigate this idea, spin testing was performed on two General Electric Aviation (GE) subscale composite fan blades in the NASA GRC Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. The first bending mode (1B) was targeted for vibration control. Because these subscale blades are very thin, the piezoelectric material was surface-mounted on the blades. Three thin piezoelectric patches were applied to each blade two actuator patches and one small sensor patch. These flexible macro-fiber-composite patches were placed in a location of high resonant strain for the 1B mode. The blades were tested up to 5000 rpm, with patches used as sensors, as excitation for the blade, and as part of open- and closed-loop vibration control. Results show that with a single actuator patch, active vibration control causes the damping ratio to increase from a baseline of 0.3% critical damping to about 1.0% damping at 0 RPM. As the rotor speed approaches 5000 RPM, the actively controlled blade damping ratio decreases to about 0.5% damping. This occurs primarily because of centrifugal blade stiffening, and can be observed by the decrease in the generalized electromechanical coupling with rotor speed.

  4. Six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Leonard S.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 1 Jan. - 31 Mar. 1993 on six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application is presented. A performance and cost report is included. Topics covered include: actuator testing; mechanical amplifier design; and neural network control system development and experimental evaluation.

  5. Active vibration isolation through a Stewart platform with piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaoxin; Xie, Xiling; Chen, Yanhao; Zhang, Zhiyi

    2016-09-01

    A Stewart platform with piezoelectric actuators is presented for micro-vibration isolation. The Jacobian matrix of the Stewart platform, which reveals the relationship between the position/pointing of the payload and the extensions of the struts, is derived by the kinematic analysis and modified according to measured FRFs(frequency response function). The dynamic model of the Stewart platform is established by the FRF synthesis method to accommodate flexible modes of the platform. In active isolation, the LMS-based adaptive method is adopted and combined with the Jacobian matrix to suppress pure vibrations of the payload. Numerical simulations and experiments were conducted to prove vibration isolation performance of the Stewart platform subjected to periodical disturbances, and the results have demonstrated that considerable attenuations can be achieved.

  6. In Operation Detection and Correction of Rotor Imbalance in Jet Engines Using Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchala, Daniel W.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Kascak, Albert F.; Montague, Gerald T.; Brown, Gerald V.; Lawrence, Charles; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Jet Engines may experience severe vibration due to the sudden imbalance caused by blade failure. This research investigates employment of on board magnetic bearings or piezoelectric actuators to cancel these forces in flight. This operation requires identification of the source of the vibrations via an expert system, determination of the required phase angles and amplitudes for the correction forces, and application of the desired control signals to the magnetic bearings or piezo electric actuators. This paper will show the architecture of the software system, details of the control algorithm used for the sudden imbalance correction project described above, and the laboratory test results.

  7. Vibration control through passive constrained layer damping and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1997-05-01

    To add damping to systems, viscoelastic materials (VEM) are added to structures. In order to enhance the damping effects of the VEM, a constraining layer is attached. When this constraining layer is an active element, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). Recently, the investigation of ACLD treatments has shown it to be an effective method of vibration suppression. In this paper, the treatment of a beam with a separate active element and passive constrained layer (PCLD) element is investigated. A Ritz- Galerkin approach is used to obtain discretized equations of motion. The damping is modeled using the GHM method and the system is analyzed in the time domain. By optimizing on the performance and control effort for both the active and passive case, it is shown that this treatment is capable of lower control effort with more inherent damping, and is therefore a better approach to damp vibration.

  8. Active cancellation of residual amplitude modulation in a frequency-modulation based Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinan; Wang, Yicheng; Pratt, Jon R.

    2016-03-01

    Residual amplitude modulation (RAM) is one of the most common noise sources known to degrade the sensitivity of frequency modulation spectroscopy. RAM can arise as a result of the temperature dependent birefringence of the modulator crystal, which causes the orientation of the crystal's optical axis to shift with respect to the polarization of the incident light with temperature. In the fiber-based optical interferometer used on the National Institute of Standards and Technology calculable capacitor, RAM degrades the measured laser frequency stability and correlates with the environmental temperature fluctuations. We have demonstrated a simple approach that cancels out excessive RAM due to polarization mismatch between the light and the optical axis of the crystal. The approach allows us to measure the frequency noise of a heterodyne beat between two lasers individually locked to different resonant modes of a cavity with an accuracy better than 0.5 ppm, which meets the requirement to further determine the longitudinal mode number of the cavity length. Also, this approach has substantially mitigated the temperature dependency of the measurements of the cavity length and consequently the capacitance.

  9. Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System on Parabolic Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenbo; Pletser, Vladimir; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System (MAIS) aims at reducing on-orbit vibrations, providing a better controlled lower gravity environment for microgravity physical science experiments. The MAIS will be launched on Tianzhou-1, the first cargo ship of the China Manned Space Program. The principle of the MAIS is to suspend with electro-magnetic actuators a scientific payload, isolating it from the vibrating stator. The MAIS's vibration isolation capability is frequency-dependent and a decrease of vibration of about 40dB can be attained. The MAIS can accommodate 20kg of scientific payload or sample unit, and provide 30W of power and 1Mbps of data transmission. The MAIS is developed to support microgravity scientific experiments on manned platforms in low earth orbit, in order to meet the scientific requirements for fluid physics, materials science, and fundamental physics investigations, which usually need a very quiet environment, increasing their chances of success and their scientific outcomes. The results of scientific experiments and technology tests obtained with the MAIS will be used to improve future space based research. As the suspension force acting on the payload is very small, the MAIS can only be operative and tested in a weightless environment. The 'Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.' (DLR, German Aerospace Centre) granted a flight opportunity to the MAIS experiment to be tested during its 27th parabolic flight campaign of September 2015 performed on the A310 ZERO-G aircraft managed by the French company Novespace, a subsidiary of the 'Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales' (CNES, French Space Agency). The experiment results confirmed that the 6 degrees of freedom motion control technique was effective, and that the vibration isolation performance fulfilled perfectly the expectations based on theoretical analyses and simulations. This paper will present the design of the MAIS and the experiment results obtained during the

  10. Influence of local vibration on plasma creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, A; Okuda, H; Inaba, R; Ariizumi, M

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to obtain basic information about the mechanism of the occurrence of muscular disorders after exposure to vibration. The hind legs of rats were exposed to acute and chronic local vibration at frequencies of 30, 60, 120, 240, 480, and 960 Hz with a constant acceleration of 50 m/sec2. The exposure time was four hours for acute, and four hours a day for two weeks continuously for chronic exposure. Blood was collected after exposure to measure plasma creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity. In both exposure groups the activity of plasma CPK was significantly higher at 30, 60, 120, 240, and 480 Hz compared with the control group and was especially high at 30 Hz; there was no significant change at 960 Hz. As a result of an analysis of the CPK isoenzymes, the increase in plasma CPK activity was shown to be due to the activity of the plasma CPK-MM fraction, originating in the skeletal muscle. Plasma CPK activity showed a tendency to decrease gradually with the increase in vibration frequency during acute exposure but showed no such tendency during chronic exposure. There was no remarkable pathohistological change in muscle preparations from the hind legs, hence it was presumed that the increase in plasma CPK activity was caused not by the morphological changes of muscle but by other mechanisms, such as an increase in the permeability of the cell membrane. Images PMID:4041385

  11. Neuroreceptor Activation by Vibration-Assisted Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Ross D.; Nichols, David; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hyothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction. PMID:25909758

  12. Active vibration control in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The low gravity environment of the space station is suitable for experiments or manufacturing processes which require near zero gravity. An experiment was fabricated to test the validity of the active control process and to verify the flow and control parameters identified in a theoretical model. Zero gravity is approximated in the horizontal plane using a low friction air bearing table. An analog control system was designed to activate calibrated air jets when displacement of the test mass is sensed. The experiment demonstrates that an air jet control system introduces an effective damping factor to control oscillatory response. The amount of damping as well as the flow parameters, such as pressure drop across the valve and flow rate of air, are verified by the analytical model.

  13. Vibration control of cylindrical shells using active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Manas C.; Chen, Tung-Huei; Baz, Amr M.

    1997-05-01

    The fundamentals of controlling the structural vibration of cylindrical shells treated with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments are presented. The effectiveness of the ACLD treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. The FEM is used to predict the natural frequencies and the modal loss factors of shells which are partially treated with patches of the ACLD treatments. The predictions of the FEM are validated experimentally using stainless steel cylinders which are 20.32 cm in diameter, 30.4 cm in length and 0.05 cm in thickness. The cylinders are treated with ACLD patches of different configurations in order to target single or multi-modes of lobar vibrations. The ACLD patches used are made of DYAD 606 visco-elastic layer which is sandwiched between two layers of PVDF piezo-electric films. Vibration attenuations of 85% are obtained with maximum control voltage of 40 volts. Such attenuations are attributed to the effectiveness of the ACLD treatment in increasing the modal damping ratios by about a factor of four over those of conventional passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatments. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  14. Active vibration damping using smart material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baras, John S.; Yan, Zhuang

    1994-01-01

    We consider the modeling and active damping of an elastic beam using distributed actuators and sensors. The piezoelectric ceramic material (PZT) is used to build the actuator. The sensor is made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). These materials are glued on both sides of the beam. For the simple clamped beam, the closed loop controller has been shown to be able to extract energy from the beam. The shape of the actuator and its influence on the closed loop system performance are discussed. It is shown that it is possible to suppress the selected mode by choosing the appropriate actuator layout. It is also shown that by properly installing the sensor and determining the sensor shape we can further extract and manipulate the sensor signal for our control need.

  15. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  16. Piezoelectric pushers for active vibration control of rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, A. B.; Kascak, A. F.; Lin, R. R.; Montague, J.; Alexander, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    The active control of rotordynamic vibrations and stability by magnetic bearings and electromagnetic shakers was discussed extensively in the literature. These devices, though effective, are usually large in volume and add significant weight to the stator. The use of piezoelectric pushers may provide similar degrees of effectiveness in light, compact packages. Analyses are contained which extend quadratic regulator, pole placement and derivative feedback control methods to the prescribed displacement character of piezoelectric pushers. The structural stiffness of the pusher is also included in the theory. Tests are currently being conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center with piezoelectric pusher-based active vibration control. Results performed on the NASA test rig as preliminary verification of the related theory are presented.

  17. INFRARED AND RAMAN VIBRATIONAL OPTICAL ACTIVITY: Theoretical and Experimental Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafie, Laurence A.

    1997-10-01

    Advances in the field of vibrational optical activity (VOA) are reviewed over the past decade. Topics are surveyed with an emphasis on the theoretical and instrumental progress in both vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA). Applications of VOA to stereochemical and biological problems are reviewed, with a bias toward new kinds of experiments made possible by theoretical and instrumental advances. In the field of VCD, the most notable advances have taken place in the quality and size of ab initio calculations of VOA intensities and in the quality of step-scan Fourier transform instrumentation. For ROA, the most dramatic progress has occurred in the areas of theoretical formulation and high-throughput instrumentation. Applications of VOA now include all major classes of biological and pharmaceutical molecules. VOA's importance as a diagnostic tool will likely grow as the control of molecular chirality increases in research and industrial areas.

  18. An Overview of Recent Automotive Applications of Active Vibration Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    coordinates of the deepest point. The control signal is generated as the output of the adaptive filter. 3.2 Disturbance Observer Approach This...sign reversal, as a control signal u. To generate the estimate, a disturbance observer is used. The observer is designed off-line assuming time...2003. Disturbance - observer -based active control of engine-induced vibrations in automotive vehicles. Proceedings of the 10th Annual International

  19. Active vibration control techniques for flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    Two proposed control system design techniques for active vibration control in flexible space structures are detailed. Control issues relevant only to flexible-body dynamics are addressed, whereas no attempt was made to integrate the flexible and rigid-body spacecraft dynamics. Both of the proposed approaches revealed encouraging results; however, further investigation of the interaction of the flexible and rigid-body dynamics is warranted.

  20. Active Vibration Suppression R and D for the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef C

    2001-12-17

    The nanometer scale beam sizes at the interaction point in linear colliders limit the allowable motion of the final focus magnets. We have constructed a prototype system to investigate the use of active vibration damping to control magnet motion. Inertial sensors are used to measure the position of a test mass, and a DSP based system provides feedback using electrostatic pushers. Simulation and experimental results for the control of a mechanically simple system are presented.

  1. ACTIVE VIBRATION SUPPRESSION R+D FOR THE NEXT LINEARCOLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, Leif S.

    2002-08-20

    The nanometer scale beam sizes at the interaction point in linear colliders limit the allowable motion of the final focus magnets. We have constructed a prototype system to investigate the use of active vibration damping to control magnet motion. Inertial sensors are used to measure the position of a test mass, and a DSP based system provides feedback using electrostatic pushers. Simulation and experimental results for the control of a mechanically simple system are presented.

  2. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOEpatents

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Mauger, Joseph; Anderson, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  3. 14-3-3-dependent inhibition of the deubiquitinating activity of UBPY and its cancellation in the M phase.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Emi; Kitamura, Naomi; Komada, Masayuki

    2007-10-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme UBPY, also known as USP8, regulates cargo sorting and membrane traffic at early endosomes. Here we demonstrate the regulatory mechanism of the UBPY catalytic activity. We identified 14-3-3 epsilon, gamma, and zeta as UBPY-binding proteins using co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric analysis. The 14-3-3 binding of UBPY was inhibited by mutating the consensus 14-3-3-binding motif RSYS(680)SP, by phosphatase treatment, and by competition with the Ser(680)-phosphorylated RSYS(680)SP peptide. Metabolic labeling with [(32)P]orthophosphate and immunoblotting using antibody against the phosphorylated 14-3-3-binding motif showed that Ser(680) is a major phosphorylation site in UBPY. These results indicated that 14-3-3s bind to the region surrounding Ser(680) in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The mutation at Ser(680) led to enhanced ubiquitin isopeptidase activity of UBPY toward poly-ubiquitin chains and a cellular substrate, epidermal growth factor receptor, in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, addition of 14-3-3epsilon inhibited the UBPY activity in vitro. Finally, UBPY was dephosphorylated at Ser(680) and dissociated from 14-3-3s in the M phase, resulting in enhanced activity of UBPY during cell division. We conclude that UBPY is catalytically inhibited in a phosphorylation-dependent manner by 14-3-3s during the interphase, and this regulation is cancelled in the M phase.

  4. [Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two refereed journal publications and ten talks given at conferences, seminars, and colloquia resulted from research supported by NASA. They are itemized in this report. The two publications were entitled "Reactive Tabu and Search Sensor Selection in Active Structural Acoustic Control Problems" and "Quelling Cabin Noise in Turboprop Aircraft via Active Control." The conference presentations covered various aspects of actuator placement, including location problems, for active sound and vibration control of cylinders, of commuter jets, of propeller driven or turboprop aircraft, and for quelling aircraft cabin or interior noise.

  5. a Hybrid-Type Active Vibration Isolation System Using Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, K. G.; Pahk, H. J.; Jung, M. Y.; Cho, D. W.

    1996-05-01

    Vibration isolation of mechanical systems is achieved through either passive or active vibration control systems. Although a passive vibration isolation system offers simple and reliable means to protect mechanical systems from a vibration environment, it has inherent performance limitations, that is, its controllable frequency range is limited and the shape of its transmissibility does not change. Recently, in some applications, such as active suspensions or precise vibration systems, active vibration isolation systems have been employed to overcome the limitations of the passive systems. In this paper, a hybrid-type active vibration isolation system that uses electromagnetic and pneumatic force is developed, and a new control algorithm adopting neural networks is proposed. The characteristics of the hybrid system proposed in the paper were investigated via computer simulation and experiments. It was shown that the transmissibility of the vibration isolation system could be kept below 0.63 over the entire frequency range, including the resonance frequency.

  6. Experimental study on active vibration control of a gearbox system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yuan H.; Lim, Teik C.; Steve Shepard, W.

    2005-04-01

    An active internal gearbox structure is developed and evaluated experimentally to suppress gear pair vibration due to transmission error excitation. The approach is based on an active shaft transverse vibration control concept that was theoretically analyzed in an earlier study and determined to be one of the most feasible methods. The system comprises of a piezoelectric stack actuator for applying control forces to the shaft via a rolling element-bearing, and a highly efficient, enhanced delayed-x LMS control algorithm to generate the appropriate control signals. To avoid the aliasing effects of higher frequency signals and reduce the phase delay of conventional filters, a multi-rate minimum-phase low-pass digital filter is also integrated into the controller. The experimental results yield 8-13 dB attenuation in the gearbox housing vibration levels and correspondingly 5-8 dB reduction in measured gear whine noise levels at the first and second operating gear mesh frequencies.

  7. Vibration control of an active mirror pointing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Joseph C.; Huang, Chien Y.; Austin, Fred; Knowles, Gareth J.

    1993-09-01

    An active vibration control experiment for precision mirror pointing using smart structure is described. The setup consists of a flexible plate clamped to the shaft of an electric motor. Part of the plate is polished to reflect a laser beam whose direction accuracy is the performance criterion. Electroceramic actuators and sensors are incorporated into the plate to control vibration. The analytical model is generated using the ANSYS program. Six flexible modes are kept to investigate the interaction between the rigid and the flexible modes. Three different control strategies were examined. The goal is to suppress the first and the second mode with very little spillover effects from other modes. Simulation results show that the performance objectives can be met. These analytical studies are verified in actual experiments in the near future.

  8. MIMO active vibration control of magnetically suspended flywheels for satellite IPAC service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junyoung

    Theory and simulation results have demonstrated that four, variable speed flywheels could potentially provide the energy storage and attitude control functions of existing batteries and control moment gyros (CMGs) on a satellite. Past modeling and control algorithms were based on the assumption of rigidity in the flywheel's bearings and the satellite structure. This dissertation provides simulation results and theory which eliminates this assumption utilizing control algorithms for active vibration control (AVC), flywheel shaft levitation and integrated power transfer and attitude control (IPAC) that are effective even with low stiffness active magnetic bearings (AMB), and flexible satellite appendages. The flywheel AVC and levitation tasks are provided by a multi input multi output (MIMO) control law that enhances stability by reducing the dependence of the forward and backward gyroscopic poles with changes in flywheel speed. The control law is shown to be effective even for (1) Large polar to transverse inertia ratios which increases the stored energy density while causing the poles to become more speed dependent and, (2) Low bandwidth controllers shaped to suppress high frequency noise. These two main tasks could be successfully achieved by MIMO (Gyroscopic) control algorithm, which is unique approach. The vibration control mass (VCM) is designed to reduce the vibrations of flexible appendages of the satellite. During IPAC maneuver, the oscillation of flywheel spin speeds, torque motions and satellite appendages are significantly reduced compared without VCM. Several different properties are demonstrated to obtain optimal VCM. Notch, band-pass and low-pass filters are implemented in the AMB system to reduce and cancel high frequency, dynamic bearing forces and motor torques due to flywheel mass imbalance. The transmitted forces and torques to satellite are considerably decreased in the present of both notch and band-pass filter stages. Successful IPAC simulation

  9. 14-3-3-dependent inhibition of the deubiquitinating activity of UBPY and its cancellation in the M phase

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Emi; Kitamura, Naomi; Komada, Masayuki

    2007-10-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme UBPY, also known as USP8, regulates cargo sorting and membrane traffic at early endosomes. Here we demonstrate the regulatory mechanism of the UBPY catalytic activity. We identified 14-3-3 {epsilon}, {gamma}, and {zeta} as UBPY-binding proteins using co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric analysis. The 14-3-3 binding of UBPY was inhibited by mutating the consensus 14-3-3-binding motif RSYS{sup 680}SP, by phosphatase treatment, and by competition with the Ser{sup 680}-phosphorylated RSYS{sup 680}SP peptide. Metabolic labeling with [{sup 32}P]orthophosphate and immunoblotting using antibody against the phosphorylated 14-3-3-binding motif showed that Ser{sup 680} is a major phosphorylation site in UBPY. These results indicated that 14-3-3s bind to the region surrounding Ser{sup 680} in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The mutation at Ser{sup 680} led to enhanced ubiquitin isopeptidase activity of UBPY toward poly-ubiquitin chains and a cellular substrate, epidermal growth factor receptor, in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, addition of 14-3-3{epsilon} inhibited the UBPY activity in vitro. Finally, UBPY was dephosphorylated at Ser{sup 680} and dissociated from 14-3-3s in the M phase, resulting in enhanced activity of UBPY during cell division. We conclude that UBPY is catalytically inhibited in a phosphorylation-dependent manner by 14-3-3s during the interphase, and this regulation is cancelled in the M phase.

  10. Active sensor/actuator assemblies for vibration damping, compensation, measurement, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryaboy, Vyacheslav M.; Kasturi, Prakash S.

    2010-04-01

    The vibration control module known as IQ damper had been developed as part of active vibration damping system for optical tables and other precision vibration isolated platforms. The present work describes steps to expand the application of these units to other tasks, namely, (1) dynamic testing of structures and (2) compensation of forced vibration in local areas. The sensor-actuator assembly, including signal conditioning circuits, is designed as a compact dynamically symmetric module with mechanical interface to an optical table. The test data show that the vibration control modules can be used to measure dynamic compliance characteristics of optical tables with precision comparable to that of dedicated vibration measurement systems. Stable concerted work of active vibration control modules compensating forced harmonic vibration is demonstrated experimentally.

  11. Active structural vibration control: Robust to temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vivek; Sharma, Manu; Thakur, Nagesh

    2012-11-01

    d-form augmented piezoelectric constitutive equations which take into account temperature dependence of piezoelectric strain coefficient (d31) and permittivity (∈33), are converted into e-form. Using e-form constitutive equations, a finite element model of a smart two dimensional plate instrumented with piezoelectric patches is derived. Equations of motion are derived using Hamilton's variational principle. Coupled equations of motion are uncoupled using modal analysis. Modal state vectors are estimated using the Kalman observer. The first mode of smart cantilevered plate is actively controlled using negative first modal velocity feedback at various temperatures. Total control effort required to do so is calculated using the electro-mechanical impedance method. The temperature dependence of sensor voltage, control voltage, control effort and Kalman observer equations is shown analytically. Simulation results are presented using MATLAB. Variations in (i) peak sensor voltage, (ii) actual and estimated first modal velocities, (iii) peak control voltage, (iv) total control effort and (v) settling time with respect to temperature are presented. Active vibration control performance is not maintained at temperature away from reference temperature when the temperature dependence of piezoelectric stress coefficient ‘e31' and permittivity ‘∈33' is not included in piezoelectric constitutive equations. Active control of vibrations becomes robust to temperature variations when the temperature dependence of ‘e31' and ‘∈33' is included in piezoelectric constitutive equations.

  12. 30 CFR 551.9 - Temporarily stopping, canceling, or relinquishing activities approved under a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... relinquishing activities approved under a permit. 551.9 Section 551.9 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL (G&G) EXPLORATIONS OF THE OUTER..., you are still responsible for proper abandonment of any drill sites in accordance with...

  13. 30 CFR 551.9 - Temporarily stopping, canceling, or relinquishing activities approved under a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... relinquishing activities approved under a permit. 551.9 Section 551.9 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL (G&G) EXPLORATIONS OF THE OUTER..., you are still responsible for proper abandonment of any drill sites in accordance with...

  14. 30 CFR 551.9 - Temporarily stopping, canceling, or relinquishing activities approved under a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... relinquishing activities approved under a permit. 551.9 Section 551.9 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSCIAL (G&G) EXPLORATIONS OF THE OUTER..., you are still responsible for proper abandonment of any drill sites in accordance with...

  15. Active vibration control of smart composite plates using LQR algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, R.; Venkateshwara Rao, G.

    2003-10-01

    The concept of using the actuators and sensors to form a self controlling and self monitoring smart system in advanced structural design has drawn considerable interest among the research community. The smart system has large number of active, light weight, distributed sensors and actuators either bonded or embedded in the structure for the purpose of vibration suppression, shape and acoustic controls as well as fault detection and mitigation. The present study addresses the issues related to the active vibration control schemes for the smart composite panels, with substrate as the fiber reinforced composite laminate and the piezo ceramic layers as the actuators and sensors, using LQR algorithm. The study involves the structural modelling, controller design, open and closed loop system response analysis. For this purpose, an eight noded isoparametric finite element with seven degrees of freedom, viz., three translations, two section rotations and two potential differences corresponding to the actuators and sensors is developed. The piezo-ceramic actuator and sensor layers are also considered as the load bearing components in the panel. The finite element equations are first transformed into the modal state space form and then are used to obtain the constant controller gains. These are used to obtain the closed loop responses.

  16. Integrated passive/active vibration absorber for multi-story buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina J.; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Horta, Lucas G.

    1995-01-01

    Passive isolator, active vibration absorber, and an integrated passive/active (hybrid) control are studied for their effectiveness in reducing structural vibration under seismic excitations. For the passive isolator, a laminated rubber bearing base isolator which has been studied and used extensively by researchers and seismic designers is considered. An active vibration absorber concept, which can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability with minimum knowledge of the controlled system, is used to reduce the passive isolator displacement and to suppress the top floor vibration. A three-story building model is used for the numerical simulation. The performance of an active vibration absorber and a hybrid vibration controller in reducing peak structural responses is compared with the passively isolated structural response and with absence of vibration control systems under the N00W component of El Centro 1940 and N90W component of the Mexico City earthquake excitation records. The results show that the integrated passive/active vibration control system is most effective in suppressing the peak structural acceleration for the El Centro 1940 earthquake when compared with the passive or active vibration absorber alone. The active vibration absorber, however, is the only system that suppresses the peak acceleration of the structure for the Mexico City 1985 earthquake.

  17. Vibrational Optical Activity of BODIPY Dimers: The Role of Magnetic-Electric Coupling in Vibrational Excitons.

    PubMed

    Abbate, Sergio; Bruhn, Torsten; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Longhi, Giovanna

    2017-01-12

    The vibrational exciton (VE) interpretation of intense bisignated couplets in vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of a pair of atropisomeric BODIPY (boron dipyrrin) dimers is discussed. The role of intrinsic magnetic moments is crucial to reproduce the different behaviors of quasi-isomeric BODIPY dimers with different aryl junction.

  18. Design of the Active Elevon Rotor for Low Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, Mark V.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter fuselages vibrate more than desired, and traditional solutions have limited effectiveness and can impose an appreciable weight penalty. Alternative methods of combating high vibration, including Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) via harmonic swashplate motion and Individual Blade Control (IBC) via active pitch links, have been studied for several decades. HHC via an on-blade control surface was tested in 1977 on a full scale rotor using a secondary active swashplate and a mechanical control system. Recent smart material advances have prompted new research into the use of on-blade control concepts. Recent analytical studies have indicated that the use of on-blade control surfaces produces vibration reduction comparable to swashplate-based HHC but for less power. Furthermore, smart materials (such as piezoceramics) have been shown to provide sufficient control authority for preliminary rotor experiments. These experiments were initially performed at small scale for reduced tip speeds. More recent experiments have been conducted at or near full tip speeds, and a full-scale active rotor is under development by Boeing with Eurocopter et al. pursuing a similarly advanced full-scale implementation. The US Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate has undertaken a new research program called the Active Elevon Rotor (AER) Focus Demo. This program includes the design, fabrication, and wind. tunnel testing of a four-bladed, 12.96 ft diameter rotor with one or two on-blade elevons per blade. The rotor, which will be Mach scaled, will use 2-5/rev elevon motion for closed-loop control and :will be tested in late 2001. The primary goal of the AER Focus Demo is the reduction of vibratory hub loads by 80% and the reduction of vibratory blade structural loads. A secondary goal is the reduction of rotor power. The third priority is the measurement and possible reduction of Blade Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. The present study is focused on elevon effectiveness, that is, the elevon

  19. Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1995-01-01

    Active structural acoustic control is a method in which the control inputs (used to reduce interior noise) are applied directly to a vibrating structural acoustic system. The control concept modeled in this work is the application of in-plane force inputs to piezoceramic patches bonded to the wall of a vibrating cylinder. The cylinder is excited by an exterior noise source -- an acoustic monopole -- located near the outside of the cylinder wall. The goal is to determine the force inputs and sites for the piezoelectric actuators so that (1) the interior noise is effectively damped; (2) the level of vibration of the cylinder shell is not increased; and (3) the power requirements needed to drive the actuators are not excessive. We studied external monopole excitations at two frequencies. A cylinder resonance of 100 Hz, where the interior acoustic field is driven in multiple, off-resonance cylinder cavity modes, and a cylinder resonance of 200 Hz are characterized by both near and off-resonance cylinder vibration modes which couple effectively with a single, dominant, low-order acoustic cavity mode at resonance. Previous work has focused almost exclusively on meeting objective (1) and solving a complex least-squares problem to arrive at an optimal force vector for a given set of actuator sites. In addition, it has been noted that when the cavity mode couples with cylinder vibration modes (our 200 Hz case) control spillover may occur in higher order cylinder shell vibrational modes. How to determine the best set of actuator sites to meet objectives (1)-(3) is the main contribution of our research effort. The selection of the best set of actuator sites from a set of potential sites is done via two metaheuristics -- simulated annealing and tabu search. Each of these metaheuristics partitions the set of potential actuator sites into two disjoint sets: those that are selected to control the noise (on) and those that are not (off). Next, each metaheuristic attempts to

  20. The influence of vibration type, frequency, body position and additional load on the neuromuscular activity during whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Gollhofer, Albert; Kramer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of different whole body vibration (WBV) determinants on the electromyographic (EMG) activity during WBV in order to identify those training conditions that cause highest neuromuscular responses and therefore provide optimal training conditions. In a randomized cross-over study, the EMG activity of six leg muscles was analyzed in 18 subjects with respect to the following determinants: (1) vibration type (side-alternating vibration (SV) vs. synchronous vibration (SyV), (2) frequency (5-10-15-20-25-30 Hz), (3) knee flexion angle (10°-30°-60°), (4) stance condition (forefoot vs. normal stance) and (5) load variation (no extra load vs. additional load equal to one-third of the body weight). The results are: (1) neuromuscular activity during SV was enhanced compared to SyV (P < 0.05); (2) a progressive increase in frequency caused a progressive increase in EMG activity (P < 0.05); (3) the EMG activity was highest for the knee extensors when the knee joint was 60° flexed (P < 0.05); (4) for the plantar flexors in the forefoot stance condition (P < 0.05); and (5) additional load caused an increase in neuromuscular activation (P < 0.05). In conclusion, large variations of the EMG activation could be observed across conditions. However, with an appropriate adjustment of specific WBV determinants, high EMG activations and therefore high activation intensities could be achieved in the selected muscles. The combination of high vibration frequencies with additional load on an SV platform led to highest EMG activities. Regarding the body position, a knee flexion of 60° and forefoot stance appear to be beneficial for the knee extensors and the plantar flexors, respectively.

  1. Active Flap Control of the SMART Rotor for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Steven R.; Anand, R. Vaidyanathan; Straub, Friedrich K.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Active control methodologies were applied to a full-scale active flap rotor obtained during a joint Boeing/ DARPA/NASA/Army test in the Air Force National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40- by 80-foot anechoic wind tunnel. The active flap rotor is a full-scale MD 900 helicopter main rotor with each of its five blades modified to include an on-blade piezoelectric actuator-driven flap with a span of 18% of radius, 25% of chord, and located at 83% radius. Vibration control demonstrated the potential of active flaps for effective control of vibratory loads, especially normal force loads. Active control of normal force vibratory loads using active flaps and a continuous-time higher harmonic control algorithm was very effective, reducing harmonic (1-5P) normal force vibratory loads by 95% in both cruise and approach conditions. Control of vibratory roll and pitch moments was also demonstrated, although moment control was less effective than normal force control. Finally, active control was used to precisely control blade flap position for correlation with pretest predictions of rotor aeroacoustics. Flap displacements were commanded to follow specific harmonic profiles of 2 deg or more in amplitude, and the flap deflection errors obtained were less than 0.2 deg r.m.s.

  2. Passive and active launch vibration studies in the LVIS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, Donald L.; Bartos, Bruce; Goodding, James C.; Wilke, Paul S.; Davis, Torey

    1998-06-01

    A U.S. Air Force-sponsored team consisting of Boeing (formerly McDonnell Douglas), Honeywell Satellite Systems, and CSA Engineering has developed technology to reduce the vibration felt by an isolated payload during launch. Spacecraft designers indicate that a launch vibration isolation system (LVIS) could provide significant cost benefits in payload design, testing, launch, and lifetime. This paper contains developments occurring since those reported previously. Simulations, which included models of a 6,500 pound spacecraft, an isolating payload attach fitting (PAF) to replace an existing PAF, and the Boeing Delta II launch vehicle, were used to generate PAF performance requirements for the desired levels of attenuation. Hardware was designed to meet the requirements. The isolating PAF concept replaces portions of a conventional metallic fitting with hydraulic- pneumatic struts featuring a unique hydraulic cross-link feature that stiffens under rotation to meet rocking restrictions. The pneumatics provide low-stiffness longitudinal support. Two demonstration isolating PAF struts were designed, fabricated and tested to determine their stiffness and damping characteristics and to verify the performance of the hydraulic crosslink concept. Measurements matched analytical predictions closely. An active closed-loop control system was simulated to assess its potential isolation performance. A factor of 100 performance increase over the passive case was achieved with minor weight addition and minimal power consumption.

  3. Vibration control of rotor shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.

    1985-01-01

    Suppression of flexural forced vibration or the self-excited vibration of a rotating shaft system not by passive elements but by active elements is described. The distinctive feature of this method is not to dissipate the vibration energy but to provide the force cancelling the vibration displacement and the vibration velocity through the bearing housing in rotation. Therefore the bearings of this kind are appropriately named Active Control Bearings. A simple rotor system having one disk at the center of the span on flexible supports is investigated in this paper. The actuators of the electrodynamic transducer are inserted in the sections of the bearing housing. First, applying the optimal regulator of optimal control theory, the flexural vibration control of the rotating shaft and the vibration control of support systems are performed by the optimal state feedback system using these actuators. Next, the quasi-modal control based on a modal analysis is applied to this rotor system. This quasi-modal control system is constructed by means of optimal velocity feedback loops. The differences between optimal control and quasi-modal control are discussed and their merits and demerits are made clear. Finally, the experiments are described concerning only the optimal regulator method.

  4. Active low-frequency vertical vibration isolation system for precision measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kang; Li, Gang; Hu, Hua; Wang, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Low-frequency vertical vibration isolation systems play important roles in precision measurements to reduce seismic and environmental vibration noise. Several types of active vibration isolation systems have been developed. However, few researches focus on how to optimize the test mass install position in order to improve the vibration transmissibility. An active low-frequency vertical vibration isolation system based on an earlier instrument, the Super Spring, is designed and implemented. The system, which is simple and compact, consists of two stages: a parallelogram-shaped linkage to ensure vertical motion, and a simple spring-mass system. The theoretical analysis of the vibration isolation system is presented, including terms erroneously ignored before. By carefully choosing the mechanical parameters according to the above analysis and using feedback control, the resonance frequency of the system is reduced from 2.3 to 0.03 Hz, a reduction by a factor of more than 75. The vibration isolation system is installed as an inertial reference in an absolute gravimeter, where it improved the scatter of the absolute gravity values by a factor of 5. The experimental results verifies the improved performance of the isolation system, making it particularly suitable for precision experiments. The improved vertical vibration isolation system can be used as a prototype for designing high-performance active vertical isolation systems. An improved theoretical model of this active vibration isolation system with beam-pivot configuration is proposed, providing fundamental guidelines for vibration isolator design and assembling.

  5. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment is performed to study the mechanisms of active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders via vibrational outputs. In the present method of control, a vibrational force input was used as the secondary control input to reduce the radiated acoustic field. For the frequencies considered, the active vibration technique provided good global reduction of interior sound even though only one actuator was used.

  6. Active vibration and balance system for closed cycle thermodynamic machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass. A method is also provided.

  7. Active vibration control using an inertial actuator with internal damping.

    PubMed

    Paulitsch, Christoph; Gardonio, Paolo; Elliott, Stephen J

    2006-04-01

    Collocated direct velocity feedback with ideal point force actuators mounted on structures is unconditionally stable and generates active damping. When inertial actuators are used to generate the control force, the system can become unstable even for moderate velocity feedback gains due to an additional -180 degree phase lag introduced by the fundamental axial resonant mode of the inertial actuator. In this study a relative velocity sensor is used to implement an inner velocity feedback loop that generates internal damping in a lightweight, electrodynamic, inertial actuator. Simulation results for a model problem with the actuator mounted on a clamped plate show that, when internal relative velocity feedback is used in addition to a conventional external velocity feedback loop, there is an optimum combination of internal and external velocity feedback gains, which, for a given gain margin, maximizes vibration reduction. These predictions are validated in experiments with a specially built lightweight inertial actuator.

  8. Determining the Posture and Vibration Frequency that Maximize Pelvic Floor Muscle Activity During Whole-Body Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juhyun; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the electromyogram (EMG) response of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) to whole-body vibration (WBV) while using different body posture and vibration frequencies. Material/Methods Thirteen healthy adults (7 men, 6 women) voluntarily participated in this cross-sectional study in which EMG data from PFM were collected in a total of 12 trials for each subject (4 body postures, 3 vibration frequencies). Pelvic floor EMG activity was recorded using an anal probe. The rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was assessed with a modified Borg scale. Results We found that vibration frequency, body posture, and muscle stimulated had a significant effect on the EMG response. The PFM had high activation at 12 Hz and 26 Hz (p<0.05). PFM activation significantly increased with knee flexion (p<0.05). The RPE significantly increased with increased frequency (p<0.05). Conclusions The knee flexion angle of 40° at 12 Hz frequency can be readily promoted in improving muscle activation during WBV, and exercise would be performed effectively. Based on the results of the present investigation, sports trainers and physiotherapists may be able to optimize PFM training programs involving WBV. PMID:27787476

  9. Changes in EMG activity in the upper trapezius muscle due to local vibration exposure.

    PubMed

    Aström, Charlotte; Lindkvist, Markus; Burström, Lage; Sundelin, Gunnevi; Karlsson, J Stefan

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to vibration is suggested as a risk factor for developing neck and shoulder disorders in working life. Mechanical vibration applied to a muscle belly or a tendon can elicit a reflex muscle contraction, also called tonic vibration reflex, but the mechanisms behind how vibration could cause musculoskeletal disorders has not yet been described. One suggestion has been that the vibration causes muscular fatigue. This study investigates whether vibration exposure changes the development of muscular fatigue in the trapezius muscle. Thirty-seven volunteers (men and women) performed a sub-maximal isometric shoulder elevation for 3 min. This was repeated four times, two times with induced vibration and two times without. Muscle activity was measured before and after each 3-min period to look at changes in the electromyography parameters. The result showed a significantly smaller mean frequency decrease when performing the shoulder elevation with vibration (-2.51 Hz) compared to without vibration (-4.04 Hz). There was also a slightly higher increase in the root mean square when exposed to vibration (5.7% of maximal voluntary contraction) compared to without (3.8% of maximal voluntary contraction); however, this was not statistically significant. The results of the present study indicate that short-time exposure to vibration has no negative acute effects on the fatiguing of upper trapezius muscle.

  10. Active-passive integrated vibration control for control moment gyros and its application to satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yao; Zang, Yue; Li, Mou; Wang, Youyi; Li, Wenbo

    2017-04-01

    The strategy of active-passive integrated vibration control on the truss enveloping control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) is presented and its characteristics of time domain and frequency domain are analyzed. Truss enveloping CMGs contains pyramid-type CMGs, which are enveloped by multiple struts. These struts can be employed to realize the active-passive integrated vibration control. In addition, the struts of the trusses can maintain the working space of CMGs. Firstly, the disturbance characteristics of CMGs are analyzed considering static and dynamic imbalances of the CMG's rotor; then, an active-passive integrated vibration isolation truss structure is developed based on its characteristics. This structure can restrain the CMG vibration as much as possible and reduce its influence on the photographic quality of optical payloads. Next, the dynamic model of the active-passive vibration isolation truss structure is established. The frequency domain analysis of this model shows that the active-passive integrated vibration control method can restrain the high-frequency vibration and also improve the characteristics of low-frequency vibration. Finally, the dynamic model for the whole satellite is built with this type of CMGs. The time domain simulations of satellite attitude control verify the attitude control improvements resulting from the CMGs vibration control strategy.

  11. Performance of active vibration control technology: the ACTEX flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, T. W.; Manning, R. A.; Qassim, K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and results of two intelligent structures space-flight experiments, each of which could affect architecture designs of future spacecraft. The first, the advanced controls technology experiment I (ACTEX I), is a variable stiffness tripod structure riding as a secondary payload on a classified spacecraft. It has been operating well past its expected life since becoming operational in 1996. Over 60 on-orbit experiments have been run on the ACTEX I flight experiment. These experiments form the basis for in-space controller design problems and for concluding lifetime/reliability data on the active control components. Transfer functions taken during the life of ACTEX I have shown consistent predictability and stability in structural behavior, including consistency with those measurements taken on the ground prior to a three year storage period and the launch event. ACTEX I can change its modal characteristics by employing its dynamic change mechanism that varies preloads in portions of its structure. Active control experiments have demonstrated maximum vibration reductions of 29 dB and 16 dB in the first two variable modes of the system, while operating over a remarkable on-orbit temperature range of -80 °C to 129 °C. The second experiment, ACTEX II, was successfully designed, ground-tested, and integrated on an experimental Department of Defense satellite prior to its loss during a launch vehicle failure in 1995. ACTEX II also had variable modal behavior by virtue of a two-axis gimbal and added challenges of structural flexibility by being a large deployable appendage. Although the loss of ACTEX II did not provide space environment experience, ground testing resulted in space qualifying the hardware and demonstrated 21 dB, 14 dB, and 8 dB reductions in amplitude of the first three primary structural modes. ACTEX II could use either active and/or passive techniques to affect vibration suppression. Both experiments trailblazed

  12. Magnetic Flux Cancellation and Formation of Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Kim, Mun Song; Chon Nam, Sok; Kim, Kyong Chol

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic flux cancellation appears to be closely related to various kinds of solar activities such as flares, microflares/surges/jets, X-ray bright points, erupting mini-filaments, transition region explosive events, filament formation, filament activation and eruption, and coronal mass ejections. It is commonly believed that magnetic reconnections in the low atmosphere are responsible for canceling magnetic features, and magnetic fragments are observed to originate as bipoles. According to the Sweet-Parker type reconnection model, the inflow speed closely corresponds to the converging speed of each pole in a canceling magnetic feature and the rate of flux cancellation must be explained by the observed converging speed. As distinct from the corona, the efficiency of photospheric magnetic reconnection may be due to the small Cowling conductivity, instead of the Spitzer, of weakly ionized and magnetized plasma in the low atmosphere of the sun. Using the VAL-C atmospheric model and Cowling conductivity, we have computed the parameters describing Sweet-Parker type reconnecting current sheets in the plasma of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, and particularly for the phenomena of magnetic flux cancellation and dark filament formation which occurred on July 2, 1994 we have estimated the rate of flux cancellation, the inflow speed(the converging speed) and the upward mass flux to compare with the observation. The results show that when taking account of the Cowling conductivity in the low atmosphere, large flux cancellation rates(>1019Mxhr-1) in solar active regions are better explained than by the Spitzer conductivity-considered reconnection model. Particularly for the flux cancellation event on July 2, 1994, the inflow speed(0.26kms-1)is almost similar to the converging speed(0.22kms-1)and the upward mass flux(3.3X1012gs-1) in the model is sufficient for the large dark filament formation in a time of several hours through magnetic flux cancellation process.

  13. Attenuation of cryocooler induced vibration in spaceborne infrared payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, A.; Twitto, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of operational responsive space programs calls for a development of compact, reliable, low power and vibration free cryogenic cooling for sophisticated infrared payloads. The refrigeration in a typical closed cycle split Stirling linear cryocooler is achieved by a cyclic compression and expansion of a gaseous working agent due to a synchronized reciprocation of electro-dynamically and pneumatically actuated compressor and expander pistons. Attenuation of the cryocooler induced vibration usually relies on the concept of actively assisted momentum cancellation. In a typical dual-piston compressor this objective is achieved by actively synchronizing the motion of oppositely moving piston assemblies; a typical single-piston expander may be counterbalanced by a motorized counter-balancer. The above approach produces complexity, weight, size, high incurred costs and affects reliability. The authors analyze the case of passive attenuation the vibration export induced by the split Stirling linear cryocooler comprised of inline mounted single-piston compressor and expander. Placement of all the moving components onto a common axis results in a single axis consolidation of vibration export and enables use of single tuned dynamic absorber and low frequency vibration mount. From theoretical analysis and full-scale testing, the performance of such vibration protection arrangement is similar to known systems of active vibration cancellation.

  14. Note: A three-dimension active vibration isolator for precision atom gravimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Min-Kang; Xiong, Xin; Chen, Le-Le; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2015-04-15

    An ultra-low frequency active vibration isolator, simultaneously suppressing three-dimensional vibration noise, is demonstrated experimentally. The equivalent natural period of the isolator is 100 s and 12 s for the vertical and horizontal direction, respectively. The vibration noise in the vertical direction is about 50 times reduced during 0.2 and 2 Hz, and 5 times reduced in the other two orthogonal directions in the same frequency range. This isolator is designed for atom gravimeters, especially suitable for the gravimeter whose sensitivity is limited by vibration couplings.

  15. On the Use of Active Higher Harmonic Blade Pitch Control for Helicopter Vibration Reduction,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    G., and Gabel, R.: Vibration Optimization of the CH-47C Helicopter Using NASTRAN . Symposium on Mathematical Modeling in Structural Engineering... helicopter . DESCRIPTION OF MODEL AND TESTS The basic wind tunnel model used in this investigation was the Structures Laboratory Aeroelastic Rotor...dynamically-scaled helicopter rotor model in which an active control system employing higher harmonic blade pitch was used for helicopter vibration

  16. Calculation of Raman optical activity spectra for vibrational analysis.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Shaun T; Zielinski, François; Popelier, Paul L A; Blanch, Ewan W

    2015-05-07

    By looking back on the history of Raman Optical Activity (ROA), the present article shows that the success of this analytical technique was for a long time hindered, paradoxically, by the deep level of detail and wealth of structural information it can provide. Basic principles of the underlying theory are discussed, to illustrate the technique's sensitivity due to its physical origins in the delicate response of molecular vibrations to electromagnetic properties. Following a short review of significant advances in the application of ROA by UK researchers, we dedicate two extensive sections to the technical and theoretical difficulties that were overcome to eventually provide predictive power to computational simulations in terms of ROA spectral calculation. In the last sections, we focus on a new modelling strategy that has been successful in coping with the dramatic impact of solvent effects on ROA analyses. This work emphasises the role of complementarity between experiment and theory for analysing the conformations and dynamics of biomolecules, so providing new perspectives for methodological improvements and molecular modelling development. For the latter, an example of a next-generation force-field for more accurate simulations and analysis of molecular behaviour is presented. By improving the accuracy of computational modelling, the analytical capabilities of ROA spectroscopy will be further developed so generating new insights into the complex behaviour of molecules.

  17. Development of a Practical Broadband Active Vibration Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Perey, Daniel F.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop robust, lightweight, and low-power control units that can be used to suppress structural vibration in flexible aerospace structures. In particular, this paper focuses on active damping, which is implemented using compact decentralized control units distributed over the structure. Each control unit consists of a diamond-shaped piezoelectric patch actuator, three miniature accelerometers, and analog electronics. The responses from the accelerometers are added together and then integrated to give a signal proportional to velocity. The signal is then inverted, amplified, and applied to the actuator, which generates a control force that is out of phase with the measured velocity. This paper describes the development of the control system, including a detailed description of the control and power electronics. The paper also presents experimental results acquired on a Plexiglas window blank. Five identical control units installed around the perimeter of the window achieved 10 dB peak reductions and a 2.4 dB integrated reduction of the spatially averaged velocity of the window between 500 and 3000 Hz.

  18. Multi-sensor control for 6-axis active vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Douglas Gary

    The goal of this research is to look at the two different parts of the challenge of active vibration isolation. First is the hardware that will be used to accomplish the task and improve performance. The cubic hexapod, or Stewart platform, has become a popular solution to the problem because of its ability to provide 6-axis vibration isolation with a relatively simple configuration. A number of these hexapods have been constructed at different research facilities around the country to address different missions, each with their own approach. Hood Technology Corporation and the University of Washington took the lessons learned from these designs and developed a new hexapod that addresses the requirements of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's planned space borne interferometry missions. This system has unique mechanical design details and is built with 4 sensors in each strut. This, along with a real time computer to implement controllers, allows for a great deal of flexibility in controller design and research into sensor selection. Other unique design features include a very soft axial stiffness, a custom designed voice coil actuator with a large displacement capability and elastomeric flexures both for guiding the actuator and providing pivot points on each strut. The second part, and the primary area of this research, is to examine multi-sensor control strategies in an effort to improve the performance of the controllers, their stability and/or how implementable they are. Up to this point, the primary method of control for systems of this type has been classical, designing single-input, single output controller loops to be closed around each strut. But because of the geometry of the hexapod and the different problems that can occur with some sensors, the classical approach is limited in what it can accomplish. This research shows the benefits to be gained by going to a multiple sensor controller and implementing controllers that are designed using a frequency

  19. Active Control of Panel Vibrations Induced by a Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, active and passive control of sound and vibration in aeroelastic structures have received a great deal of attention due to many potential applications to aerospace and other industries. There exists a great deal of research work done in this area. Recent advances in the control of sound and vibration can be found in the several conference proceedings. In this report we will summarize our research findings supported by the NASA grant NAG-1-1175. The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to study the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. The vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings will be presented in the next three sections. In Section II we shall describe our results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Section III is concerned with active control of the vibration and sound radiation from a nonlinear elastic panel. A detailed description of our work on the parametric vibrational control of nonlinear elastic panel will be presented in Section IV. This paper will be submitted to the Journal

  20. Brillouin scattering self-cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, O.; Jarschel, P. F.; Espinel, Y. A. V.; Cordeiro, C. M. B.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Wiederhecker, G. S.; Dainese, P.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between light and acoustic phonons is strongly modified in sub-wavelength confinement, and has led to the demonstration and control of Brillouin scattering in photonic structures such as nano-scale optical waveguides and cavities. Besides the small optical mode volume, two physical mechanisms come into play simultaneously: a volume effect caused by the strain-induced refractive index perturbation (known as photo-elasticity), and a surface effect caused by the shift of the optical boundaries due to mechanical vibrations. As a result, proper material and structure engineering allows one to control each contribution individually. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the perfect cancellation of Brillouin scattering arising from Rayleigh acoustic waves by engineering a silica nanowire with exactly opposing photo-elastic and moving-boundary effects. This demonstration provides clear experimental evidence that the interplay between the two mechanisms is a promising tool to precisely control the photon-phonon interaction, enhancing or suppressing it.

  1. Brillouin scattering self-cancellation

    PubMed Central

    Florez, O.; Jarschel, P. F.; Espinel, Y. A. V.; Cordeiro, C. M. B.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Wiederhecker, G. S.; Dainese, P.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between light and acoustic phonons is strongly modified in sub-wavelength confinement, and has led to the demonstration and control of Brillouin scattering in photonic structures such as nano-scale optical waveguides and cavities. Besides the small optical mode volume, two physical mechanisms come into play simultaneously: a volume effect caused by the strain-induced refractive index perturbation (known as photo-elasticity), and a surface effect caused by the shift of the optical boundaries due to mechanical vibrations. As a result, proper material and structure engineering allows one to control each contribution individually. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the perfect cancellation of Brillouin scattering arising from Rayleigh acoustic waves by engineering a silica nanowire with exactly opposing photo-elastic and moving-boundary effects. This demonstration provides clear experimental evidence that the interplay between the two mechanisms is a promising tool to precisely control the photon–phonon interaction, enhancing or suppressing it. PMID:27283092

  2. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  3. Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Trunk and Neck Muscle Activity in Consideration of Different Vibration Loads

    PubMed Central

    Perchthaler, Dennis; Hauser, Simon; Heitkamp, Hans-Christian; Hein, Tobias; Grau, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical parameters in terms of different peak-to-peak displacements and knee angles on trunk and neck muscle activity during whole-body vibration (WBV). 28 healthy men and women (age 23 ± 3 years) performed four static squat positions (2 peak-to-peak displacements x 2 knee angles) on a side alternating vibration platform with and without vibration stimulus. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the erector spinae muscle, the rectus abdominis muscle, and of the splenius muscle. EMG levels normalized to maximal voluntary contractions ranged between 3.2 – 27.2 % MVC during WBV. The increase in muscle activity caused by WBV was significant, particularly for the back muscles, which was up to 19.0 % MVC. The impact of the factor ‘condition’ (F-values ranged from 13.4 to 132.0, p ≤ 0.001) and of the factor ‘peak-to-peak displacement’ (F-values ranged from 6.4 to 69.0 and p-values from < 0.001 to 0.01) were statistically significant for each muscle tested. However, the factor ‘knee angle’ only affected the back muscles (F-value 10.3 and 7.3, p ≤ 0.01). The results of this study should give more information for developing effective and safe training protocols for WBV treatment of the upper body. Key points The maximum levels of muscle activity were significantly reached at high amplitudes at a vibration frequency of 30 Hz. WBV leads to a higher muscle activation of the lower back muscles than of the abdominal muscles. Both knee angles of 30° and 45° have similar effects on the vibration load and represent safe positions to prevent any actual harm. Certain combinations of the biomechanical variables have similar effects on the level of muscle activity. PMID:25729303

  4. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  5. Reduction of the radiating sound of a submerged finite cylindrical shell structure by active vibration control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-02-06

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  6. Active tuning of stroke-induced vibrations by tennis players.

    PubMed

    Chadefaux, Delphine; Rao, Guillaume; Androuet, Philippe; Berton, Eric; Vigouroux, Laurent

    2016-09-06

    This paper investigates how tennis players control stroke-induced vibration. Its aim is to characterise how a tennis player deals with entering vibration waves or how he/she has the ability to finely adjust them. A specific experimental procedure was designed, based on simultaneously collecting sets of kinematic, vibration and electromyographic data during forehand strokes using various commercial rackets and stroke intensities. Using 14 expert players, a wide range of excitations at spectral and temporal levels were investigated. Energetic and spectral descriptors of stroke-induced vibration occurring at the racket handle and at the player's wrist and elbow were computed. Results indicated that vibrational characteristics are strongly governed by grip force and to a lower extent by the racket properties. Grip force management drives the amount of energy, as well as its distribution, into the forearm. Furthermore, hand-grip can be assimilated to an adaptive filter which can significantly modify the spectral parameters propagating into the player's upper limb. A significant outcome is that these spectral characteristics are as much dependent on the player as on the racket. This contribution opens up new perspectives in equipment manufacture by underlining the need to account for player/racket interaction in the design process.

  7. Vibration Control in Turbomachinery Using Active Magnetic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah D.

    1996-01-01

    The effective use of active magnetic bearings for vibration control in turbomachinery depends on an understanding of the forces available from a magnetic bearing actuator. The purpose of this project was to characterize the forces as functions shaft position. Both numerical and experimental studies were done to determine the characteristics of the forces exerted on a stationary shaft by a magnetic bearing actuator. The numerical studies were based on finite element computations and included both linear and nonlinear magnetization functions. Measurements of the force versus position of a nonrotating shaft were made using two separate measurement rigs, one based on strain gage measurement of forces, the other based on deflections of a calibrated beam. The general trends of the measured principal forces agree with the predictions of the theory while the magnitudes of forces are somewhat smaller than those predicted. Other aspects of theory are not confirmed by the measurements. The measured forces in the normal direction are larger than those predicted by theory when the rotor has a normal eccentricity. Over the ranges of position examined, the data indicate an approximately linear relationship between the normal eccentricity of the shaft and the ratio of normal to principal force. The constant of proportionality seems to be larger at lower currents, but for all cases examined its value is between 0.14 and 0.17. The nonlinear theory predicts the existence of normal forces, but has not predicted such a large constant of proportionality for the ratio. The type of coupling illustrated by these measurements would not tend to cause whirl, because the coupling coefficients have the same sign, unlike the case of a fluid film bearing, where the normal stiffness coefficients often have opposite signs. They might, however, tend to cause other self-excited behavior. This possibility must be considered when designing magnetic bearings for flexible rotor applications, such as gas

  8. Effect of vertical active vibration isolation on tracking performance and on ride qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimasi, F. P.; Allen, R. E.; Calcaterra, P. C.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation to determine the effect on pilot performance and comfort of an active vibration isolation system for a commercial transport pilot seat is reported. The test setup consisted of: a hydraulic shaker which produced random vertical vibration inputs; the active vibration isolation system; the pilot seat; the pilot control wheel and column; the side-arm controller; and a two-axis compensatory tracking task. The effects of various degrees of pilot isolation on short-term (two-minute) tracking performance and comfort were determined.

  9. Damping Control of Liquid Container by Swing-type Active Vibration Reducer on Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Masafumi; Taniguchi, Takao

    This paper proposes a damping control of sloshing in a cylindrical container with a swing-type active vibration reducer on a wheeled mobile robot (WMR). The WMR runs along a straight path on a horizontal plane. The container is mounted on the active vibration reducer. A laser displacement sensor is used to observe the liquid level in the container. The container can be tilted in the running direction by the active vibration reducer. A sloshing model is obtained from a spherical pendulum-type sloshing model, which approximately expresses (1, 1)-mode sloshing. The sloshing model is used to design a damping control system. The control system of the active vibration reducer is designed with an inverse model of sloshing and an optimal regulator with a Kalman filter. The WMR is driven by an acceleration pattern designed with an input shaping method. The usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated through simulation and experimental results.

  10. Electromechanical simulation and test of rotating systems with magnetic bearing or piezoelectric actuator active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Tang, Punan; Kim, Chaesil; Manchala, Daniel; Barrett, Tim; Kascak, Albert F.; Brown, Gerald; Montague, Gerald; Dirusso, Eliseo; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    This paper contains a summary of the experience of the authors in the field of electromechanical modeling for rotating machinery - active vibration control. Piezoelectric and magnetic bearing actuator based control are discussed.

  11. Optimal semi-active vibration absorber for harmonic excitation based on controlled semi-active damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.

    2014-09-01

    The semi-active vibration absorber (SVA) based on controlled semi-active damper is formulated to realize the behaviour of the passive undamped vibration absorber tuned to the actual harmonic disturbing frequency. It is shown that the controlled stiffness force, which is emulated by the semi-active damper to realize the precise real-time frequency tuning of the SVA, is unpreventably combined with the generation of undesirable damping in the semi-active damper whereby the SVA does not behave as targeted. The semi-active stiffness force is therefore optimized for minimum primary structure response. The results point out that the optimal semi-active stiffness force reduces the undesirable energy dissipation in the SVA at the expenses of slight imprecise frequency tuning. Based on these findings, a real-time applicable suboptimal SVA is formulated that also takes the relative motion constraint of real mass dampers into account. The results demonstrate that the performance of the suboptimal SVA is closer to that of the active solution than that of the passive mass damper.

  12. Active Vibration Reduction of the Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being developed as an option to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove. A Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) could offer space missions a more efficient power system that uses one fourth of the nuclear fuel and decreases the thermal footprint compared to the current state of the art. The Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project is funded by the RPS Program to developing Stirling-based subsystems, including convertors and controller maturation efforts that have resulted in high fidelity hardware like the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), and ASC Controller Unit (ACU). The SCTD Project also performs research to develop less mature technologies with a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, improving system reliability or fault tolerance, reducing mass or size, and developing advanced concepts that are mission enabling. Active vibration reduction systems (AVRS), or "balancers", have historically been developed and characterized to provide fault tolerance for generator designs that incorporate dual-opposed Stirling convertors or enable single convertor, or small RPS, missions. Balancers reduce the dynamic disturbance forces created by the power piston and displacer internal moving components of a single operating convertor to meet spacecraft requirements for induced disturbance force. To improve fault tolerance for dual-opposed configurations and enable single convertor configurations, a breadboard AVRS was implemented on the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The AVRS included a linear motor, a motor mount, and a closed-loop controller able to balance out the transmitted peak dynamic disturbance using acceleration feedback. Test objectives included quantifying power and mass penalty and reduction in transmitted force over a range of ASC

  13. Active Vibration Reduction of the Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being developed as an option to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove. A Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) could offer space missions a more efficient power system that uses one fourth of the nuclear fuel and decreases the thermal footprint compared to the current state of the art. The Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project is funded by the RPS Program to developing Stirling-based subsystems, including convertors and controller maturation efforts that have resulted in high fidelity hardware like the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), and ASC Controller Unit (ACU). The SCTD Project also performs research to develop less mature technologies with a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, improving system reliability or fault tolerance, reducing mass or size, and developing advanced concepts that are mission enabling. Active vibration reduction systems (AVRS), or "balancers", have historically been developed and characterized to provide fault tolerance for generator designs that incorporate dual-opposed Stirling convertors or enable single convertor, or small RPS, missions. Balancers reduce the dynamic disturbance forces created by the power piston and displacer internal moving components of a single operating convertor to meet spacecraft requirements for induced disturbance force. To improve fault tolerance for dual-opposed configurations and enable single convertor configurations, a breadboard AVRS was implemented on the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The AVRS included a linear motor, a motor mount, and a closed-loop controller able to balance out the transmitted peak dynamic disturbance using acceleration feedback. Test objectives included quantifying power and mass penalty and reduction in transmitted force over a range of ASC

  14. Active control of panel vibrations induced by a boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to consider the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. Although the sound radiation has not been included, the vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings are presented in three sections. In section two we describe results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Sections three and four are concerned with some analytical and numerical results in the optimal control of the linear and nonlinear panel vibrations, respectively, excited by the flow pressure fluctuations. Finally, in section five, we draw some conclusions from research findings.

  15. Active vibration isolation of macro-micro motion stage disturbances using a floating stator platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lufan; Long, Zhili; Cai, Jiandong; Liu, Yang; Fang, Jiwen; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-10-01

    Macro-micro motion stage is mainly applied in microelectronics manufacturing to realize a high-acceleration, high-speed and nano-positioning motion. The high acceleration and nano-positioning accuracy would be influenced by the vibration of the motion stage. In the paper, a concept of floating stage is introduced in the macro-micro motion for isolating vibration disturbances. The design model of the floating stage is established and its theoretical analyses including natural frequency, transient and frequency response analyses are investigated, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the floating stator platform as a vibration isolator for the macro-micro motion stage. Moreover, an optimal design of the floating stator is conducted and then verified by experiments. In order to characterize and quantify the performance of isolation obtained from the traditional fixed stator and the floating stator, the acceleration responses at different accelerations, speeds and displacements are measured in x, y and z directions. The theoretical and experimental analyses in time and frequency domains indicate that the floating stator platform is effective to actively isolate the vibration in the macro-micro motion stage. In macro-micro motion stage, high acceleration motion is provided by VCM. Vibration is induced from VCM, that is, VCM is a source system, the vibration response or force is felt by a receiver system. Generally, VCM is fixed on the base, which means that the base is the receiver system which absorbs or transfers the vibration. However, the vibration cannot completely disappear and the base vibration is inevitable. In the paper, a floated stator platform as isolation system is developed to decrease or isolate vibration between VCM and base. The floated stator platform consists of damper, stopper, floated lock, spring, limiter, sub base, etc. Unlike the traditional stator of VCM fixed on the base, the floated stator can be moved on the linear guide under vibration

  16. Estimation of In vivo Cancellous Bone Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Takahiko; Mano, Isao; Tsujimoto, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Tadahito; Teshima, Ryota; Naka, Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    The effect of decreasing bone density (a symptom of osteoporosis) is greater for cancellous bone than for dense cortical bone, because cancellous bone is metabolically more active. Therefore, the bone density or bone mineral density of cancellous bone is generally used to estimate the onset of osteoporosis. Elasticity or elastic constant is a fundamental mechanical parameter and is directly related to the mechanical strength of bone. Accordingly, elasticity is a preferable parameter for assessing fracture risk. A novel ultrasonic bone densitometer LD-100 has been developed to determine the mass density and elasticity of cancellous bone with a spatial resolution comparable to that of peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Bone density and bone elasticity are evaluated using ultrasonic parameters based on fast and slow waves in cancellous bone by modeling the ultrasonic wave propagation path. Elasticity is deduced from the measured bone density and the propagation speed of the fast wave. Thus, the elasticity of cancellous bone is approximately expressed by a cubic equation of bone density.

  17. Active damping of modal vibrations by force apportioning. [for spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallauer, W. L., Jr.; Barthelemy, J.-F. M.

    1980-01-01

    The theory and numerical simulation of active structural damping is described which requires few discrete control thrusters positioned on the structure. A particular apportioning of coherently phased control forces is applied for each vibration mode which is to be damped; this strongly affects the damped vibration mode, while minimally exciting all other modes. The force apportioning used is that which would tune a target mode if the structure was being shaken in a model vibration test. In contrast to model testing, the forces are varied temporally so as to dampen, rather than excite, the target mode(s).

  18. Active vibration control of thin-plate structures with partial SCLD treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Wang, Pan; Zhan, Zhenfei

    2017-02-01

    To effectively suppress the low-frequency vibration of a thin-plate, the strategy adopted is to develop a model-based approach to the investigation on the active vibration control of a clamped-clamped plate with partial SCLD treatment. Firstly, a finite element model is developed based on the constitutive equations of elastic, piezoelectric and viscoelastic materials. The characteristics of viscoelastic materials varying with temperature and frequency are described by GHM damping model. A low-dimensional real modal control model which can be used as the basis for active vibration control is then obtained from the combined reduction. The emphasis is placed on the feedback control system to attenuate the vibration of plates with SCLD treatments. A modal controller in conjunction with modal state estimator is designed to solve the problem of full state feedback, making it much more feasible to real-time control. Finally, the theoretical model is verified by modal test, and an active vibration control is validated by hardware-in-the-loop experiment under different external excitations. The numerical and experimental study demonstrate how the piezoelectric actuators actively control the lower modes (first bending and torsional modes) using modal controller, while the higher frequency vibration attenuated by viscoelastic passive damping layer.

  19. Active vibration attenuating seat suspension for an armored helicopter crew seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztein, Pablo Javier

    An Active Vibration Attenuating Seat Suspension (AVASS) for an MH-60S helicopter crew seat is designed to protect the occupants from harmful whole-body vibration (WBV). Magnetorheological (MR) suspension units are designed, fabricated and installed in a helicopter crew seat. These MR isolators are built to work in series with existing Variable Load Energy Absorbers (VLEAs), have minimal increase in weight, and maintain crashworthiness for the seat system. Refinements are discussed, based on testing, to minimize friction observed in the system. These refinements include the addition of roller bearings to replace friction bearings in the existing seat. Additionally, semi-active control of the MR dampers is achieved using special purpose built custom electronics integrated into the seat system. Experimental testing shows that an MH-60S retrofitted with AVASS provides up to 70.65% more vibration attenuation than the existing seat configuration as well as up to 81.1% reduction in vibration from the floor.

  20. A study of aliphatic amino acids using simulated vibrational circular dichroism and Raman optical activity spectra*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Brunger, Michael J.; Wang, Feng

    2013-11-01

    Vibrational optical activity (VOA) spectra, such as vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra, of aliphatic amino acids are simulated using density functional theory (DFT) methods in both gas phase (neutral form) and solution (zwitterionic form), together with their respective infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of the amino acids. The DFT models, which are validated by excellent agreements with the available experimental Raman and ROA spectra of alanine in solution, are employed to study other aliphatic amino acids. The inferred (IR) intensive region (below 2000 cm-1) reveals the signature of alkyl side chains, whereas the Raman intensive region (above 3000 cm-1) contains the information of the functional groups in the amino acids. Furthermore, the chiral carbons of the amino acids (except for glycine) dominate the VCD and ROA spectra in the gas phase, but the methyl group vibrations produce stronger VCD and ROA signals in solution. The C-H related asymmetric vibrations dominate the VOA spectra (i.e., VCD and ROA) > 3000 cm-1 reflecting the side chain structures of the amino acids. Finally the carboxyl and the C(2)H modes of aliphatic amino acids, together with the side chain vibrations, are very active in the VCD/IR and ROA/Raman spectra, which makes such the vibrational spectroscopic methods a very attractive means to study biomolecules.

  1. Semi-active control of helicopter vibration using controllable stiffness and damping devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    Semi-active concepts for helicopter vibration reduction are developed and evaluated in this dissertation. Semi-active devices, controllable stiffness devices or controllable orifice dampers, are introduced; (i) in the blade root region (rotor-based concept) and (ii) between the rotor and the fuselage as semi-active isolators (in the non-rotating frame). Corresponding semi-active controllers for helicopter vibration reduction are also developed. The effectiveness of the rotor-based semi-active vibration reduction concept (using stiffness and damping variation) is demonstrated for a 4-bladed hingeless rotor helicopter in moderate- to high-speed forward flight. A sensitivity study shows that the stiffness variation of root element can reduce hub vibrations when proper amplitude and phase are used. Furthermore, the optimal semi-active control scheme can determine the combination of stiffness variations that produce significant vibration reduction in all components of vibratory hub loads simultaneously. It is demonstrated that desired cyclic variations in properties of the blade root region can be practically achieved using discrete controllable stiffness devices and controllable dampers, especially in the flap and lag directions. These discrete controllable devices can produce 35--50% reduction in a composite vibration index representing all components of vibratory hub loads. No detrimental increases are observed in the lower harmonics of blade loads and blade response (which contribute to the dynamic stresses) and controllable device internal loads, when the optimal stiffness and damping variations are introduced. The effectiveness of optimal stiffness and damping variations in reducing hub vibration is retained over a range of cruise speeds and for variations in fundamental rotor properties. The effectiveness of the semi-active isolator is demonstrated for a simplified single degree of freedom system representing the semi-active isolation system. The rotor

  2. Selection of active elements in system reduction of vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, K.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents non-classical method of design of mechatronic systems. The purpose of this paper is also introduces synthesis of mechatronic system understand as design of mechatronic systems. The synthesis may be applied to modify the already existing systems in order to achieve a desired result. The system was consisted from mechanical and electrical elements. Electrical elements were used as subsystem reducing unwanted vibration of mechanical system. Electrical elements can be realized in the form of coils with movable core. The system was modelled in Matlab Simulink.

  3. Real-Time Performance of Mechatronic PZT Module Using Active Vibration Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Aggogeri, Francesco; Borboni, Alberto; Merlo, Angelo; Pellegrini, Nicola; Ricatto, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an innovative mechatronic piezo-actuated module to control vibrations in modern machine tools. Vibrations represent one of the main issues that seriously compromise the quality of the workpiece. The active vibration control (AVC) device is composed of a host part integrated with sensors and actuators synchronized by a regulator; it is able to make a self-assessment and adjust to alterations in the environment. In particular, an innovative smart actuator has been designed and developed to satisfy machining requirements during active vibration control. This study presents the mechatronic model based on the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the AVC device. To ensure a real time performance, a H2-LQG controller has been developed and validated by simulations involving a machine tool, PZT actuator and controller models. The Hardware in the Loop (HIL) architecture is adopted to control and attenuate the vibrations. A set of experimental tests has been performed to validate the AVC module on a commercial machine tool. The feasibility of the real time vibration damping is demonstrated and the simulation accuracy is evaluated. PMID:27681732

  4. Lumbar back muscle activity of helicopter pilots and whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, C G; Simpson, D M; Nadal, J

    2001-10-01

    Several studies have attributed the prevalence of low back pain (LBP) in helicopter pilots mainly to poor posture in-flight and whole-body vibration, with the latter hypothesis particularly related to a cyclic response of the erector spine (ES) muscle to vibration. This work aims to determine if helicopter vibration and the pilot's normal posture during flight have significant effects on the electromyogram (EMG) of the ES muscle. The bilateral surface EMG of the ES muscle at the L3 level was collected in 10 young pilots before and during a short flight in UH-50 helicopters. The vibration was monitored by a triaxial accelerometer fixed to the pilots' seat. Prior to the flight, the EMG was recorded for relaxed seated and standing postures with 0 degrees (P0) and 35 degrees (P35) of trunk flexion. The effect of the posture during the flight was tested by comparing left and right EMG (normalized with respect to P35). The in-flight muscle stress was evaluated by histograms of EMG activity, and compared to P0 values. Only one pilot in ten showed significant (p<0.05) correlation between the vibration and the EMG over cycles of vibration, and no consistent causal effect was found. The pilots' posture did not show significant asymmetric muscular activity, and low EMG levels were observed during most of the duration of the flight. The results do not provide evidence that LBP in helicopter pilots is caused by ES muscle stress in the conditions studied.

  5. Design of a stand-alone active damper for distributed control of vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinquemani, S.; Cazzulani, G.; Costa, A.; Resta, F.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of active vibration control is to enhance the performance of a system (eg. comfort, fatigue life, etc.) by limiting vibrations. One of the most effective technique to reach this goal is to increase the equivalent damping of the system and then the dissipation of the kinetic energy (the so called skyhook damping technique). Application of active vibration control often require a complex setup. When large structures are considered, it is often necessary to have a high number of sensors and actuators, suitably cabled, in addition to all the devices necessary to condition and amplify the signals of measurement and control and to execute in real time the control algorithms synthesized. This work arises from the need to simplify this situation, developing a standalone device that is able of carrying out operations of vibration control in an autonomous way, thus containing in itself an actuator, the sensors needed to evaluate the vibratory state of the structure, and a micro-controller embedding different control algorithm. The design of the smart damper covers many aspects and requires a strong integration of different disciplines. A prototype has been realized and tested on a vibrating structure. The experimental results show good performance in suppress vibration.

  6. Real-Time Performance of Mechatronic PZT Module Using Active Vibration Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Aggogeri, Francesco; Borboni, Alberto; Merlo, Angelo; Pellegrini, Nicola; Ricatto, Raffaele

    2016-09-25

    This paper proposes an innovative mechatronic piezo-actuated module to control vibrations in modern machine tools. Vibrations represent one of the main issues that seriously compromise the quality of the workpiece. The active vibration control (AVC) device is composed of a host part integrated with sensors and actuators synchronized by a regulator; it is able to make a self-assessment and adjust to alterations in the environment. In particular, an innovative smart actuator has been designed and developed to satisfy machining requirements during active vibration control. This study presents the mechatronic model based on the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the AVC device. To ensure a real time performance, a H2-LQG controller has been developed and validated by simulations involving a machine tool, PZT actuator and controller models. The Hardware in the Loop (HIL) architecture is adopted to control and attenuate the vibrations. A set of experimental tests has been performed to validate the AVC module on a commercial machine tool. The feasibility of the real time vibration damping is demonstrated and the simulation accuracy is evaluated.

  7. Selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes in a concise manner three selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems. The three topics are as follows: (1) the active control of helicopter air-resonance using an LQG/LTR approach; (2) simulation of higher harmonic control (HHC) applied to a four bladed hingeless helicopter rotor in forward flight; and (3) vibration suppression in forward flight on a hingeless helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap, which is mounted on the blade. Only a few selected illustrative results are presented. The results obtained clearly indicate that the partial span, actively controlled flap has considerable potential for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors.

  8. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  9. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  10. Application of a load-bearing passive and active vibration isolation system in hydraulic drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Oliver; Haase, Thomas; Pohl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Hydraulic drives are widely used in many engineering applications due to their high power to weight ratio. The high power output of the hydraulic drives produces high static and dynamic reaction forces and moments which must be carried by the mounts and the surrounding structure. A drawback of hydraulic drives based on rotating pistons consists in multi-tonal disturbances which propagate through the mounts and the load bearing structure and produce structure borne sound at the surrounding structures and cavities. One possible approach to overcome this drawback is to use an optimised mounting, which combines vibration isolation in the main disturbance direction with the capability to carry the reaction forces and moments. This paper presents an experimental study, which addresses the vibration isolation performance of an optimised mounting. A dummy hydraulic drive is attached to a generic surrounding structure with optimised mounting and excited by multiple shakers. In order to improve the performance of the passive vibration isolation system, piezoelectric transducers are applied on the mounting and integrated into a feed-forward control loop. It is shown that the optimised mounting of the hydraulic drive decreases the vibration transmission to the surrounding structure by 8 dB. The presented study also reveals that the use of the active control system leads to a further decrease of vibration transmission of up to 14 dB and also allows an improvement of the vibration isolation in an additional degree of freedom and higher harmonic frequencies.

  11. Maximizing semi-active vibration isolation utilizing a magnetorheological damper with an inner bypass configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Wereley, Norman M.; Hu, Wei

    2015-05-07

    A single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) semi-active vibration control system based on a magnetorheological (MR) damper with an inner bypass is investigated in this paper. The MR damper employing a pair of concentric tubes, between which the key structure, i.e., the inner bypass, is formed and MR fluids are energized, is designed to provide large dynamic range (i.e., ratio of field-on damping force to field-off damping force) and damping force range. The damping force performance of the MR damper is modeled using phenomenological model and verified by the experimental tests. In order to assess its feasibility and capability in vibration control systems, the mathematical model of a SDOF semi-active vibration control system based on the MR damper and skyhook control strategy is established. Using an MTS 244 hydraulic vibration exciter system and a dSPACE DS1103 real-time simulation system, experimental study for the SDOF semi-active vibration control system is also conducted. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements.

  12. Optimal actuator placement and active structure design for control of helicopter airframe vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heverly, David Ellsworth, II

    A comprehensive research program on active control of rotorcraft airframe vibration is detailed in this thesis. A systematic design methodology, to realize an active vibration control system, is proposed and studied. The methodology is a four-part design cycle and relies heavily on numerical computation, modeling, and analysis. The various analytical tools, models, and processes required to execute the methodology are described. Two dynamic models of the helicopter airframe and an optimization procedure for actuator placement are utilized within the methodology. The optimization procedure simultaneously determines the type of actuation, the locations to apply actuation, and the corresponding active control actions. A feasibility study is conducted to examine the effectiveness of helicopter vibration control by distributing actuators at optimal locations within the airframe, rather than confining actuation to a centralized region. Results indicate that distributed actuation is capable of greater vibration suppression and requires less control effort than a centralized actuation configuration. An analytical and experimental investigation is conducted on a scaled model of a helicopter tailboom. The scaled tailboom model is used to study the actuation design and realization issues associated with integrating dual-point actuation into a semi-monocoque airframe structure. A piezoelectric stack actuator configuration is designed and installed within the tailboom model. Experimental tests indicate the stack actuator configuration is able to produce a bending moment within the structure to suppress vibration without causing excessive localized stress in the structure.

  13. A robust vibration control for a multi-active mount system subjected to broadband excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vien-Quoc; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2011-05-01

    In this study, a frequency-shaped sliding mode control design is presented for the robust vibration control of a multi-active mount system in the presence of parametric uncertainties whose upper bounds are assumed to be known. The proposed mount system consists of four active mounts supporting vibration-sensitive equipment. Each active mount—constituted of a rubber element, an inertial mass and two piezostack actuators connected in serial configuration—can be modeled as a two-stage vibration isolator. After formulating the governing equations of motions of the mount system, a desired dynamic is specified in the frequency domain, and control laws are then derived to drive the system dynamics to the desired one based on Lyapunov's theorem. Simulations are performed in the frequency range from 100 to 1000 Hz in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the active mount system associated with the frequency-shaped sliding mode controller. It is demonstrated that the dynamic of the active mount system can approach the desired dynamic as the controller is activated. It also shown that robust vibration control performance is achieved in the presence of the parametric uncertainties.

  14. Active vibration control of rotating machinery with a hybrid piezohydraulic actuator system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, P.; Palazzolo, A.B.; Kascak, A.F.; Montague, G.T.

    1995-10-01

    An integrated, compact piezohydraulic actuator system for active vibration control was designed and developed with a primary application for gas turbine aircraft engines. Copper tube was chosen as the transmission line material for ease of assembly. Liquid plastic, which meets incompressibility and low-viscosity requirements, was adjusted to provide optimal actuator performance. Variants of the liquid plastic have been prepared with desired properties between {minus}40 F and 400 F. The effectiveness of this hybrid actuator for active vibration control (AVC) was demonstrated for suppressing critical speed vibration through two critical speeds for various levels of intentionally placed imbalance. A high-accuracy closed-loop simulation, which combines both finite element and state space methods, was applied for the closed-loop unbalance response simulation with/without AVC. Good correlation between the simulation and test results was achieved.

  15. Active control of sound radiated by a submarine in bending vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresta, Mauro

    2011-02-01

    This paper theoretically investigates the use of inertial actuators to reduce the sound radiated by a submarine hull in bending vibration under harmonic excitation from the propeller. The radial forces from the propeller are tonal at the blade passing frequency and are transmitted to the hull through the stern end cone. The hull is modelled as a fluid loaded cylindrical shell with ring stiffeners and two equally spaced bulkheads. The cylinder is closed by end-plates and conical end caps. The actuators are arranged in circumferential arrays and attached to the prow end cone. Both Active Vibration Control and Active Structural Acoustic Control are analysed. The inertial actuators can provide control forces with a magnitude large enough to reduce the sound radiated by the vibrations of the hull in some frequency ranges.

  16. Nonlinear parametrically excited vibration and active control of gear pair system with time-varying characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Wang, Jin-Jin; Liu, Jin-Jie; Li, Ya-Qian

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, we investigate the nonlinear parametrically excited vibration and active control of a gear pair system involving backlash, time-varying meshing stiffness and static transmission error. Firstly, a gear pair model is established in a strongly nonlinear form, and its nonlinear vibration characteristics are systematically investigated through different approaches. Several complicated phenomena such as period doubling bifurcation, anti period doubling bifurcation and chaos can be observed under the internal parametric excitation. Then, an active compensation controller is designed to suppress the vibration, including the chaos. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed controller is verified numerically. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61104040), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2012203090), and the University Innovation Team of Hebei Province Leading Talent Cultivation Project, China (Grant No. LJRC013).

  17. Postal cancellation from spaceport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center, in cooperation with the United States Postal Service, is offering a cancellation service to interested philatelists for the space flight programs at Kennedy.Philatelists who wish to avail themselves of this service may do so by following the procedures outlined below: Specify the event for which you wish this service. There is a limit of five covers per customer per event.

  18. Active control of high-frequency vibration: Optimisation using the hybrid modelling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthalif, Asan G. A.; Langley, Robin S.

    2012-06-01

    This work presents active control of high-frequency vibration using skyhook dampers. The choice of the damper gain and its optimal location is crucial for the effective implementation of active vibration control. In vibration control, certain sensor/actuator locations are preferable for reducing structural vibration while using minimum control effort. In order to perform optimisation on a general built-up structure to control vibration, it is necessary to have a good modelling technique to predict the performance of the controller. The present work exploits the hybrid modelling approach, which combines the finite element method (FEM) and statistical energy analysis (SEA) to provide efficient response predictions at medium to high frequencies. The hybrid method is implemented here for a general network of plates, coupled via springs, to allow study of a variety of generic control design problems. By combining the hybrid method with numerical optimisation using a genetic algorithm, optimal skyhook damper gains and locations are obtained. The optimal controller gain and location found from the hybrid method are compared with results from a deterministic modelling method. Good agreement between the results is observed, whereas results from the hybrid method are found in a significantly reduced amount of time.

  19. IIR filtering based adaptive active vibration control methodology with online secondary path modeling using PZT actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boz, Utku; Basdogan, Ipek

    2015-12-01

    Structural vibrations is a major cause for noise problems, discomfort and mechanical failures in aerospace, automotive and marine systems, which are mainly composed of plate-like structures. In order to reduce structural vibrations on these structures, active vibration control (AVC) is an effective approach. Adaptive filtering methodologies are preferred in AVC due to their ability to adjust themselves for varying dynamics of the structure during the operation. The filtered-X LMS (FXLMS) algorithm is a simple adaptive filtering algorithm widely implemented in active control applications. Proper implementation of FXLMS requires availability of a reference signal to mimic the disturbance and model of the dynamics between the control actuator and the error sensor, namely the secondary path. However, the controller output could interfere with the reference signal and the secondary path dynamics may change during the operation. This interference problem can be resolved by using an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter which considers feedback of the one or more previous control signals to the controller output and the changing secondary path dynamics can be updated using an online modeling technique. In this paper, IIR filtering based filtered-U LMS (FULMS) controller is combined with online secondary path modeling algorithm to suppress the vibrations of a plate-like structure. The results are validated through numerical and experimental studies. The results show that the FULMS with online secondary path modeling approach has more vibration rejection capabilities with higher convergence rate than the FXLMS counterpart.

  20. Investigation on active vibration isolation of a Stewart platform with piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaoxin; Xie, Xiling; Chen, Yanhao; Zhang, Zhiyi

    2016-11-01

    A Stewart platform with piezoelectric actuators is presented for micro-vibration isolation. The Jacobi matrix of the Stewart platform, which reveals the relationship between the position/pointing of the payload and the extensions of the six struts, is derived by kinematic analysis. The dynamic model of the Stewart platform is established by the FRF (frequency response function) synthesis method. In the active control loop, the direct feedback of integrated forces is combined with the FxLMS based adaptive feedback to dampen vibration of inherent modes and suppress transmission of periodic vibrations. Numerical simulations were conducted to prove vibration isolation performance of the Stewart platform under random and periodical disturbances, respectively. In the experiment, the output consistencies of the six piezoelectric actuators were measured at first and the theoretical Jacobi matrix as well as the feedback gain of each piezoelectric actuator was subsequently modified according to the measured consistencies. The direct feedback loop was adjusted to achieve sufficient active damping and the FxLMS based adaptive feedback control was adopted to suppress vibration transmission in the six struts. Experimental results have demonstrated that the Stewart platform can achieve 30 dB attenuation of periodical disturbances and 10-20 dB attenuation of random disturbances in the frequency range of 5-200 Hz.

  1. Muscular forearm activation in hand-grip tasks with superimposition of mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, L; Tirabasso, A; Lunghi, A; Di Giovanni, R; Sacco, F; Marchetti, E

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the muscular activation of the forearm, with or without vibration stimuli at different frequencies while performing a grip tasks of 45s at various level of exerted force. In 16 individuals, 9 females and 7 males, the surface electromyogram (EMG) of extensor carpi radialis longus and the flexor carpi ulnari muscles were assessed. At a short latency from onset EMG, RMS and the level of MU synchronization were assessed to evaluate the muscular adaptations. Whilst a trend of decay of EMG Median frequency (MDFd) was employed as an index of muscular fatigue. Muscular tasks consists of the grip of an instrumented handle at a force level of 20%, 30%, 40%, 60% of the maximum voluntary force. Vibration was supplied by a shaker to the hand in mono-frequential waves at 20, 30, 33 and 40Hz. In relation to EMG, RMS and MU synchronization, the muscular activation does not seem to change with the superimposition of the mechanical vibrations, on the contrary a lower MDFd was observed at 33Hz than in absence of vibration. This suggests an early muscular fatigue induced by vibration due to the fact that 33Hz is a resonance frequency for the hand-arm system.

  2. Generating cancelable fingerprint templates.

    PubMed

    Ratha, Nalini K; Chikkerur, Sharat; Connell, Jonathan H; Bolle, Ruud M

    2007-04-01

    Biometrics-based authentication systems offer obvious usability advantages over traditional password and token-based authentication schemes. However, biometrics raises several privacy concerns. A biometric is permanently associated with a user and cannot be changed. Hence, if a biometric identifier is compromised, it is lost forever and possibly for every application where the biometric is used. Moreover, if the same biometric is used in multiple applications, a user can potentially be tracked from one application to the next by cross-matching biometric databases. In this paper, we demonstrate several methods to generate multiple cancelable identifiers from fingerprint images to overcome these problems. In essence, a user can be given as many biometric identifiers as needed by issuing a new transformation "key." The identifiers can be cancelled and replaced when compromised. We empirically compare the performance of several algorithms such as Cartesian, polar, and surface folding transformations of the minutiae positions. It is demonstrated through multiple experiments that we can achieve revocability and prevent cross-matching of biometric databases. It is also shown that the transforms are noninvertible by demonstrating that it is computationally as hard to recover the original biometric identifier from a transformed version as by randomly guessing. Based on these empirical results and a theoretical analysis we conclude that feature-level cancelable biometric construction is practicable in large biometric deployments.

  3. Regular physical activity reduces the effects of Achilles tendon vibration on postural control for older women.

    PubMed

    Maitre, J; Serres, I; Lhuisset, L; Bois, J; Gasnier, Y; Paillard, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to determine in what extent physical activity influences postural control when visual, vestibular, and/or proprioceptive systems are disrupted. Two groups of healthy older women: an active group (74.0 ± 3.8 years) who practiced physical activities and a sedentary group (74.7 ± 6.3 years) who did not, underwent 12 postural conditions consisted in altering information emanating from sensory systems by means of sensory manipulations (i.e., eyes closed, cervical collar, tendon vibration, electromyostimulation, galvanic vestibular stimulation, foam surface). The center of foot pressure velocity was recorded on a force platform. Results indicate that the sensory manipulations altered postural control. The sedentary group was more disturbed than the active group by the use of tendon vibration. There was no clear difference between the two groups in the other conditions. This study suggests that the practice of physical activities is beneficial as a means of limiting the effects of tendon vibration on postural control through a better use of the not manipulated sensory systems and/or a more efficient reweighting to proprioceptive information from regions unaffected by the tendon vibration.

  4. Semi-active controller design for vibration suppression and energy harvesting via LMI approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yilun; Lin, Chi-Chang; Zuo, Lei

    2014-04-01

    The vibration control plays an important role in energy harvesting systems. Compared to the active control, semi-active control is a more preferred alternative for practical use. Many different semi-active control strategies have been developed, among which LQ-clip, Skyhook and model predictive control are the most popular strategies in literatures. In this paper, a different control strategy that designs semi-active controller via LMI approach is proposed. Different from clipping the control input after controller construction like most existing control methods, the proposed method fulfills the semi-active control input feasibility constraints before the controller construction. The methodology is developed through LMI approach which leads to a stabilizing linear controller to ensure semi-active constraint and the pre-designed performance. An illustrative example, vibration control system of a tall building, is presented to show the efficiency of the method and validate the new approach.

  5. Active member vibration control for a 4 meter primary reflector support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umland, J. W.; Chen, G.-S.

    1992-01-01

    The design and testing of a new low voltage piezoelectric active member with integrated load cell and displacement sensor is described. This active member is intended for micron level vibration and structural shape control of the Precision Segmented Reflector test-bed. The test-bed is an erectable 4 meter diameter backup support truss for a 2.4 meter focal length parabolic reflector. Active damping of the test-bed is then demonstrated using the newly developed active members. The control technique used is referred to as bridge feedback. With this technique the internal sensors are used in a local feedback loop to match the active member's input impedance to the structure's load impedance, which then maximizes vibrational energy dissipation. The active damping effectiveness is then evaluated from closed loop frequency responses.

  6. The Influence of Whole-Body Vibration on Creatine Kinase Activity and Jumping Performance in Young Basketball Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fachina, Rafael; da Silva, Antônio; Falcão, William; Montagner, Paulo; Borin, João; Minozzo, Fábio; Falcão, Diego; Vancini, Rodrigo; Poston, Brach; de Lira, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify creatine kinase (CK) activity changes across time following an acute bout of whole-body vibration (WBV) and determine the association between changes in CK activity and jumping performance. Method: Twenty-six elite young basketball players were assigned to 3 groups: 36-Hz and 46-Hz vibration groups (G36 and G46, respectively)…

  7. A new robust adaptive controller for vibration control of active engine mount subjected to large uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhari, Vahid; Choi, Seung-Bok; Cho, Chang-Hyun

    2015-04-01

    This work presents a new robust model reference adaptive control (MRAC) for vibration control caused from vehicle engine using an electromagnetic type of active engine mount. Vibration isolation performances of the active mount associated with the robust controller are evaluated in the presence of large uncertainties. As a first step, an active mount with linear solenoid actuator is prepared and its dynamic model is identified via experimental test. Subsequently, a new robust MRAC based on the gradient method with σ-modification is designed by selecting a proper reference model. In designing the robust adaptive control, structured (parametric) uncertainties in the stiffness of the passive part of the mount and in damping ratio of the active part of the mount are considered to investigate the robustness of the proposed controller. Experimental and simulation results are presented to evaluate performance focusing on the robustness behavior of the controller in the face of large uncertainties. The obtained results show that the proposed controller can sufficiently provide the robust vibration control performance even in the presence of large uncertainties showing an effective vibration isolation.

  8. A new approach to active vibration isolation for microgravity space experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Alok; Kao, Chikuan K.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1990-01-01

    A new method was developed to design an active vibration isolation system for microgravity space experiments. This method yields the required controller transfer functions for a specified transmissibility ratio. Hence, it is a straightforward task to guarantee that the desired vibration isolation performance is achieved at each frequency. The theory for such a controller design was presented by considering a single degree of freedom system. In addition, the magnitude of the input required by the new method has been found to be less than that used by a standard phase lead/lag compensator.

  9. Experiments on reduction of propeller induced interior noise by active control of cylinder vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Jones, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of reducing interior noise caused by advanced turbo propellers by controlling the vibration of aircraft fuselages was investigated by performing experiments in an anechoic chamber with an aircraft model test rig and apparatus. It was found that active vibration control provides reasonable global attenuation of interior noise levels for the cases of resonant (at 576 Hz) and forced (at 708 Hz) system response. The controlling mechanism behind the effect is structural-acoustic coupling between the shell and the contained field, termed interface modal filtering.

  10. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 2: Canceling Noise Source-Design of an Acoustic Plate Radiator Using Piezoceramic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, F. G.; Rajiyah, H.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic plate radiators powered by piezoceramic thin sheets as canceling sources for active control of aircraft engine fan noise is demonstrated. Analytical and numerical models of actuated beams and plates are developed and validated. An optimization study is performed to identify the optimum combination of design parameters that maximizes the plate volume velocity for a given resonance frequency. Fifteen plates with various plate and actuator sizes, thicknesses, and bonding layers were fabricated and tested using results from the optimization study. A maximum equivalent piston displacement of 0.39 mm was achieved with the optimized plate samples tested with only one actuator powered, corresponding to a plate deflection at the center of over 1 millimeter. This is very close to the deflection required for a full size engine application and represents a 160-fold improvement over previous work. Experimental results further show that performance is limited by the critical stress of the piezoceramic actuator and bonding layer rather than by the maximum moment available from the actuator. Design enhancements are described in detail that will lead to a flight-worthy acoustic plate radiator by minimizing actuator tensile stresses and reducing nonlinear effects. Finally, several adaptive tuning methods designed to increase the bandwidth of acoustic plate radiators are analyzed including passive, active, and semi-active approaches. The back chamber pressurization and volume variation methods are investigated experimentally and shown to be simple and effective ways to obtain substantial control over the resonance frequency of a plate radiator. This study shows that piezoceramic-based plate radiators can be a viable acoustic source for active control of aircraft engine fan noise.

  11. Inverse eigenvalue problems in vibration absorption: Passive modification and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.; Ram, Yitshak M.

    2006-01-01

    The abiding problem of vibration absorption has occupied engineering scientists for over a century and there remain abundant examples of the need for vibration suppression in many industries. For example, in the automotive industry the resolution of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) problems is of extreme importance to customer satisfaction. In rotorcraft it is vital to avoid resonance close to the blade passing speed and its harmonics. An objective of the greatest importance, and extremely difficult to achieve, is the isolation of the pilot's seat in a helicopter. It is presently impossible to achieve the objectives of vibration absorption in these industries at the design stage because of limitations inherent in finite element models. Therefore, it is necessary to develop techniques whereby the dynamic of the system (possibly a car or a helicopter) can be adjusted after it has been built. There are two main approaches: structural modification by passive elements and active control. The state of art of the mathematical theory of vibration absorption is presented and illustrated for the benefit of the reader with numerous simple examples.

  12. Active vibration control using optimized modified acceleration feedback with Adaptive Line Enhancer for frequency tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nima Mahmoodi, S.; Craft, Michael J.; Southward, Steve C.; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2011-03-01

    Modified acceleration feedback (MAF) control, an active vibration control method that uses collocated piezoelectric actuators and accelerometer is developed and its gains optimized using an optimal controller. The control system consists of two main parts: (1) frequency adaptation that uses Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE) and (2) an optimized controller. Frequency adaptation method tracks the frequency of vibrations using ALE. The obtained frequency is then fed to MAF compensators. This provides a unique feature for MAF, by extending its domain of capabilities from controlling a certain mode of vibrations to any excited mode. The optimized MAF controller can provide optimal sets of gains for a wide range of frequencies, based on the characteristics of the system. The experimental results show that the frequency tracking method works quite well and fast enough to be used in a real-time controller. ALE parameters are numerically and experimentally investigated and tuned for optimized frequency tracking. The results also indicate that the MAF can provide significant vibration reduction using the optimized controller. The control power varies for vibration suppression at different resonance frequencies; however, it is always optimized.

  13. Active control of bending vibrations in thick bars using PZT stack actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Parker, G.; Barney, P.; Rodeman, R.

    1995-07-01

    An experimental investigation into active control of bending vibrations in thick bar and plate-like structural elements is described. This work is motivated by vibration problems in machine tools and photolithography machines that require greater control authority than available from conventional surface mounted PZT patches or PVDF films. Focus of this experiment is a cantilevered circular steel bar in which PZT stacks are mounted in cutouts near the bar root. Axially aligned and offset from the neutral axis, these actuators control the bending vibrations by generating moments in the bar through their compressive loads. A Positive Feedback control law is used to significantly augment the damping in the first bending mode. Implications of the experimental results for machine tool stability enhancement are discussed.

  14. Semi-active vibration absorber based on real-time controlled MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.

    2014-06-01

    A semi-active vibration absorber with real-time controlled magnetorheological damper (MR-SVA) for the mitigation of harmonic structural vibrations is presented. The MR damper force targets to realize the frequency and damping adaptations to the actual structural frequency according to the principle of the undamped vibration absorber. The relative motion constraint of the MR-SVA is taken into account by an adaptive nonlinear control of the internal damping of the MR-SVA. The MR-SVA is numerically and experimentally validated for harmonic excitation of the primary structure when the natural frequency of the passive mass spring system of the MR-SVA is correctly tuned to the targeted structural resonance frequency and when de-tuning is present. The results demonstrate that the MR-SVA outperforms the passive TMD at structural resonance frequency by at least 12.4% and up to 60.0%.

  15. Active Vibration Isolation of Microgravity Experiments with Spring Umbilicals Using an Electrodynamic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, B. B.; Allaire, P. E.; Grodsinsky, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Microgravity experiments will require active vibration isolation in the low to mid frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz. Approximately two orders of acceleration reduction (40 dB) will be required. Previous works have reported results for accelerations transmitted through the umbilical. This paper describes experimental and theoretical results for vibration isolation in one dimension (horizontal) where the simulated experiment is connected to the spacecraft by a spring umbilical. The experiment consisted of a spacecraft (shaker), experiment (mass), umbilical, accelerometer, control electronics, and Lorentz actuator. The experiment mass was supported in magnetic bearings to avoid any stiction problems. Acceleration feedback control was employed to obtain the vibration isolation. Three different spring umbilicals were employed. Acceleration reductions on the order of 40 dB were obtained over the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz. Good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment.

  16. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  17. A reduced energy supply strategy in active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichchou, M. N.; Loukil, T.; Bareille, O.; Chamberland, G.; Qiu, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a control strategy is presented and numerically tested. This strategy aims to achieve the potential performance of fully active systems with a reduced energy supply. These energy needs are expected to be comparable to the power demands of semi-active systems, while system performance is intended to be comparable to that of a fully active configuration. The underlying strategy is called 'global semi-active control'. This control approach results from an energy investigation based on management of the optimal control process. Energy management encompasses storage and convenient restitution. The proposed strategy monitors a given active law without any external energy supply by considering purely dissipative and energy-demanding phases. Such a control law is offered here along with an analysis of its properties. A suboptimal form, well adapted for practical implementation steps, is also given. Moreover, a number of numerical experiments are proposed in order to validate test findings.

  18. Active noise and vibration control; Proceedings of the 213th EUROMECH Colloquium, Marseille, France, Sept. 8-11, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent advances in the active control of noise and vibration are examined in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include the aerodynamic potential of antisound, functional monotony and diagonal control in synchronous vibration absorption, active minimization of acoustic fields, and energy flow in active control systems. Consideration is given to antisound systems for short ducts, broadband-noise signal processing, active control of an acoustically driven combustion instability, adaptive attenuation of two-dimensional instability waves, and model reduction for the active control of vibrations in turbomachinery.

  19. Minimization of the mean square velocity response of dynamic structures using an active-passive dynamic vibration absorber.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O; Cheng, L

    2012-07-01

    An optimal design of a hybrid vibration absorber (HVA) with a displacement and a velocity feedback for minimizing the velocity response of the structure based on the H(2) optimization criterion is proposed. The objective of the optimal design is to reduce the total vibration energy of the vibrating structure under wideband excitation, i.e., the total area under the velocity response spectrum is minimized in this criterion. One of the inherent limitations of the traditional passive vibration absorber is that its vibration suppression is low if the mass ratio between the absorber mass and the mass of the primary structure is low. The active element of the proposed HVA helps further reduce the vibration of the controlled structure, and it can provide very good vibration absorption performance even at a low mass ratio. Both the passive and active elements are optimized together for the minimization of the mean square velocity of the primary system as well as the active force required in the HVA. The proposed HVA was tested on single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) and continuous vibrating structures and compared to the traditional passive vibration absorber.

  20. Activated vibrational modes and Fermi resonance in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengtao; Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-02-01

    Using p-aminothiophenol (PATP) molecules on a gold substrate and high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS), we show that the vibrational spectra of these molecules are distinctly different from those in typical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Detailed first-principles calculations help to assign the Raman peaks in the TERS measurements as Raman-active and IR-active vibrational modes of dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), providing strong spectroscopic evidence for the dimerization of PATP molecules to DMAB under the TERS setup. The activation of the IR-active modes is due to enhanced electromagnetic field gradient effects within the gap region of the highly asymmetric tip-surface geometry. Fermi resonances are also observed in HV-TERS. These findings help to broaden the versatility of TERS as a promising technique for ultrasensitive molecular spectroscopy.

  1. Improving the vibration suppression capabilities of a magneto-rheological damper using hybrid active and semi-active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Irfan; Wagg, David; Sims, Neil D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid active and semi-active control method for vibration suppression in flexible structures. The method uses a combination of a semi-active device and an active control actuator situated elsewhere in the structure to suppress vibrations. The key novelty is to use the hybrid controller to enable the magneto-rheological damper to achieve a performance as close to a fully active device as possible. This is achieved by ensuring that the active actuator can assist the magneto-rheological damper in the regions where energy is required. In addition, the hybrid active and semi-active controller is designed to minimize the switching of the semi-active controller. The control framework used is the immersion and invariance control technique in combination with sliding mode control. A two degree-of-freedom system with lightly damped resonances is used as an example system. Both numerical and experimental results are generated for this system, and then compared as part of a validation study. The experimental system uses hardware-in-the-loop to simulate the effect of both the degrees-of-freedom. The results show that the concept is viable both numerically and experimentally, and improved vibration suppression results can be obtained for the magneto-rheological damper that approach the performance of an active device.

  2. Active vibration damping of the Space Shuttle remote manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of providing active damping augmentation of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) following normal payload handling operations is investigated. The approach used in the analysis is described, and the results for both linear and nonlinear performance analysis of candidate laws are presented, demonstrating that significant improvement in the RMS dynamic response can be achieved through active control using measured RMS tip acceleration data for feedback.

  3. Active vibration damping of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of providing active damping augmentation of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) following normal payload-handling operations is investigated. The approach used in the analysis is described and the results from both linear and nonlinear performance analyses of candidate laws are presented, demonstrating that significant improvement in the RMS dynamic response can be achieved through active control using measured RMS tip acceleration data for feedback.

  4. Mechanisms of active control for noise inside a vibrating cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1987-01-01

    The active control of propeller-induced noise fields inside a flexible cylinder is studied with attention given to the noise reduction mechanisms inherent in the present coupled acoustic shell model. The active noise control model consists of an infinitely long aluminum cylinder with a radius of 0.4 m and a thickness of 0.001 m. Pressure maps are shown when the two external sources are driven in-phase at a frequency corresponding to Omega = 0.22.

  5. Reduction of interior sound fields in flexible cylinders by active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of interior sound reduction through active control of a thin flexible shell's vibrational response are presently evaluated in view of an analytical model. The noise source is a single exterior acoustic monopole. The active control model is evaluated for harmonic excitation; the results obtained indicate spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 20 dB over the source plane, for acoustic resonant conditions inside the cavity.

  6. Comparison of the electronic and vibrational optical activity of a europium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Hudecová, Jana; You, Xiao-Zeng; Urbanová, Marie; Bouř, Petr

    2015-04-07

    The geometry and the electronic structure of chiral lanthanide(III) complexes are traditionally probed by electronic methods, such as circularly polarised luminescence (CPL) and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy. The vibrational phenomena are much weaker. In the present study, however, significant enhancements of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectral intensities were observed during the formation of a chiral bipyridine-Eu(III) complex. The ten-fold enhancement of the vibrational absorption and VCD intensities was explained by a charge-transfer process and the dominant effect of the nitrate ion on the spectra. A much larger enhancement of the ROA and Raman intensities and a hundred-fold increase of the circular intensity difference (CID) ratio were explained by the resonance of the λ = 532 nm laser light with the (7)F0 → (5)D0 transitions. This phenomenon is combined with a chirality transfer, and mixing of the Raman and luminescence effects involving low-energy (7)F states of europium. The results thus indicate that the vibrational optical activity (VOA) may be a very sensitive tool for chirality detection and probing of the electronic structure of Eu(III) and other coordination compounds.

  7. Active vibration control of a submerged cylindrical shell by piezoelectric sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Yang, Dong-Ho; Lee, Jae-Ha

    2012-04-01

    The active vibration control of a submerged cylindrical shell by piezoelectric sensors and actuators is investigated. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid and irrotational in developing a theoretical model. The cylindrical shell is modelled by using the Rayleigh- Ritz method based on the Donnell-Mushtari shell theory. The fluid motion is modelled based on the baffled shell model, which is applied to the fluid-structure interaction problem. The kinetic energy of the fluid is derived by solving the boundary-value problem. The resulting equations of motion are expressed in matrix form, which enables us to design control easily. The natural vibration characteristics of the cylindrical shell in air and in water are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental results show that the natural frequencies of the submerged cylindrical shell decrease to a great extent compared the natural frequencies in air. However, the natural mode shapes for lower modes are not different from the mode shapes in air. Two MFC actuators were glued to the shell and the positive position feedback control was applied. Experiments on the active vibration control of the submerged cylindrical shell were carried out in water tank. Both theoretical and experimental results showed that both vibrations and sound radiation can be suppressed by piezoelectric actuators.

  8. Nonplanar tertiary amides in rigid chiral tricyclic dilactams. Peptide group distortions and vibrational optical activity.

    PubMed

    Pazderková, Markéta; Profant, Václav; Hodačová, Jana; Sebestík, Jaroslav; Pazderka, Tomáš; Novotná, Pavlína; Urbanová, Marie; Safařík, Martin; Buděšínský, Miloš; Tichý, Miloš; Bednárová, Lucie; Baumruk, Vladimír; Maloň, Petr

    2013-08-22

    We investigate amide nonplanarity in vibrational optical activity (VOA) spectra of tricyclic spirodilactams 5,8-diazatricyclo[6,3,0,0(1,5)]undecan-4,9-dione (I) and its 6,6',7,7'-tetradeuterio derivative (II). These rigid molecules constrain amide groups to nonplanar geometries with twisted pyramidal arrangements of bonds to amide nitrogen atoms. We have collected a full range vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra including signals of C-H and C-D stretching vibrations. We report normal-mode analysis and a comparison of calculated to experimental VCD and ROA. The data provide band-to-band assignment and offer a possibility to evaluate roles of constrained nonplanar tertiary amide groups and rigid chiral skeletons. Nonplanarity shows as single-signed VCD and ROA amide I signals, prevailing the couplets expected to arise from the amide-amide interaction. Amide-amide coupling dominates amide II (mainly C'-N stretching, modified in tertiary amides by the absence of a N-H bond) transitions (strong couplet in VCD, no significant ROA) probably due to the close proximity of amide nitrogen atoms. At lower wavenumbers, ROA spectra exhibit another likely manifestation of amide nonplanarity, showing signals of amide V (δ(oop)(N-C) at ~570 cm(-1)) and amide VI (δ(oop)(C'═O) at ~700 cm(-1) and ~650 cm(-1)) vibrations.

  9. Semi-active magnetorheological seat suspensions for enhanced crashworthiness and vibration isolation of rotorcraft seats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemenz, Gregory J.

    current state-of-the-art rotorcraft seat suspensions which can provide no better than 20% risk of occupant injury. Finally, an MR-based seat suspension designed solely for the purposes of vibration isolation was designed, analyzed, and experimentally demonstrated. MR dampers were integrated into the current crashworthy SH-60 crew seat with minimal weight impact such that the original crashworthy capabilities were maintained. Then, utilizing semi-active control, experimental vibration testing demonstrated that the system reduced vertical cockpit vibrations transmitted to the occupant by 76%. This is a significant advance over current state-of-the-art rotorcraft seats which provide no attenuation of cockpit vibrations.

  10. Active noise and vibration control for vehicular applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.S.; Ellis, S.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project investigated semi-active suspension systems based on real time nonlinear control of magneto-rheological (MR) shock absorbers. This effort was motivated by Laboratory interactions with the automobile industry and with the Defense Department. Background research and a literature search on semi-active suspensions was carried out. Numerical simulations of alternative nonlinear control algorithms were developed and adapted for use with an MR shock absorber. A benchtop demonstration system was designed, including control electronics and a mechanical demonstration fixture to hold the damper/spring assembly. A custom-made MR shock was specified and procured. Measurements were carried out at Los Alamos to characterize the performance of the device.

  11. Active Noise and Vibration Control Literature Survey: Sensors and Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    duire leur detectabilite done leur vulnerabilite a l’attaque ennemie. Le present rapport contient une etude approfondie des technologies des capteurs ...concentree sur une vaste gamme de materiaux de capteur et d’actionneur, tels que les materiaux piezoelectriques et electrostrictifs, les materiaux...l’air. On a etudie les technologies des capteurs et des actionneurs convenant a la limitation active du bruit se propageant par ces trajets (ou des

  12. Modeling and experimental vibration analysis of nanomechanical cantilever active probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Bashash, Saeid; Jalili, Nader

    2008-08-01

    Nanomechanical cantilever (NMC) active probes have recently received increased attention in a variety of nanoscale sensing and measurement applications. Current modeling practices call for a uniform cantilever beam without considering the intentional jump discontinuities associated with the piezoelectric layer attachment and the NMC cross-sectional step. This paper presents a comprehensive modeling framework for modal characterization and dynamic response analysis of NMC active probes with geometrical discontinuities. The entire length of the NMC is divided into three segments of uniform beams followed by applying appropriate continuity conditions. The characteristics matrix equation is then used to solve for system natural frequencies and mode shapes. Using an equivalent electromechanical moment of a piezoelectric layer, forced motion analysis of the system is carried out. An experimental setup consisting of a commercial NMC active probe from Veeco and a state-of-the-art microsystem analyzer, the MSA-400 from Polytec, is developed to verify the theoretical developments proposed here. Using a parameter estimation technique based on minimizing the modeling error, optimal values of system parameters are identified. Mode shapes and the modal frequency response of the system for the first three modes determined from the proposed model are compared with those obtained from the experiment and commonly used theory for uniform beams. Results indicate that the uniform beam model fails to accurately predict the actual system response, especially in multiple-mode operation, while the proposed discontinuous beam model demonstrates good agreement with the experimental data. Such detailed and accurate modeling framework can lead to significant enhancement in the sensitivity of piezoelectric-based NMC sensors for use in variety of sensing and imaging applications.

  13. Active control of panel vibrations induced by boundary-layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1991-01-01

    Some problems in active control of panel vibration excited by a boundary layer flow over a flat plate are studied. In the first phase of the study, the optimal control problem of vibrating elastic panel induced by a fluid dynamical loading was studied. For a simply supported rectangular plate, the vibration control problem can be analyzed by a modal analysis. The control objective is to minimize the total cost functional, which is the sum of a vibrational energy and the control cost. By means of the modal expansion, the dynamical equation for the plate and the cost functional are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations and the cost functions for the modes. For the linear elastic plate, the modes become uncoupled. The control of each modal amplitude reduces to the so-called linear regulator problem in control theory. Such problems can then be solved by the method of adjoint state. The optimality system of equations was solved numerically by a shooting method. The results are summarized.

  14. Active Vibration Control for Helicopter Interior Noise Reduction Using Power Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J.; Chevva, K.; Sun, F.; Blanc, A.; Kim, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work performed by United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) under Contract NNL11AA06C. The objective of this program is to develop technology to reduce helicopter interior noise resulting from multiple gear meshing frequencies. A novel active vibration control approach called Minimum Actuation Power (MAP) is developed. MAP is an optimal control strategy that minimizes the total input power into a structure by monitoring and varying the input power of controlling sources. MAP control was implemented without explicit knowledge of the phasing and magnitude of the excitation sources by driving the real part of the input power from the controlling sources to zero. It is shown that this occurs when the total mechanical input power from the excitation and controlling sources is a minimum. MAP theory is developed for multiple excitation sources with arbitrary relative phasing for single or multiple discrete frequencies and controlled by a single or multiple controlling sources. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of MAP for structural vibration reduction of a realistic rotorcraft interior structure. MAP control resulted in significant average global vibration reduction of a single frequency and multiple frequency excitations with one controlling actuator. Simulations also demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the observed vibration reductions on interior radiated noise.

  15. Vibration and damping characteristics of cylindrical shells with active constrained layer damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Yi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the application of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments is extended to the vibration control of cylindrical shells. The governing equation of motion of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments is derived on the basis of the constitutive equations of elastic, piezoelectric and visco-elastic materials and an energy approach. The damping of a visco-elastic layer is modeled by the complex modulus formula. A finite element model is developed to describe and predict the vibration characteristics of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments. A closed-loop control system based on proportional and derivative feedback of the sensor voltage generated by the piezo-sensor of the ACLD patches is established. The dynamic behaviors of cylindrical shells with ACLD treatments such as natural frequencies, loss factors and responses in the frequency domain are further investigated. The effects of several key parameters such as control gains, location and coverage of ACLD treatments on vibration suppression of cylindrical shells are also discussed. The numerical results indicate the validity of the finite element model and the control strategy approach. The potential of ACLD treatments in controlling vibration and sound radiation of cylindrical shells used as major critical structures such as cabins of aircraft, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles is thus demonstrated.

  16. Optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of gas turbine blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Marx, N.; Gentili, S.; Schwingshackl, C. W.; Di Mare, L.; Cerri, G.; Dini, D.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the gas turbine blade vibrations can give rise to catastrophic failures and a reduction of the blades life because of fatigue related phenomena[1]-[3] . In last two decades, the adoption of piezoelectric elements, has received considerable attention by many researcher for its potential applicability to different areas of mechanical, aerospace, aeronautical and civil engineering. Recently, a number of studies of blades vibration control via piezoelectric plates and patches have been reported[4]-[6] . It was reported that the use of piezoelectric elements can be very effective in actively controlling vibrations. In one of their previous contributions[7] , the authors of the present manuscript studied a model to control the blade vibrations by piezoelectric elements and validated their results using a multi-physics finite elements package (COMSOL) and results from the literature. An optimal placement method of piezoelectric plate has been developed and applied to different loading scenarios for realistic configurations encountered in gas turbine blades. It has been demonstrated that the optimal placement depends on the spectrum of the load, so that segmented piezoelectric patches have been considered and, for different loads, an optimal combination of sequential and/or parallel actuation and control of the segments has been studied. In this paper, an experimental investigation carried out by the authors using a simplified beam configuration is reported and discussed. The test results obtained by the investigators are then compared with the numerical predictions [7] .

  17. Refinement and evaluation of helicopter real-time self-adaptive active vibration controller algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    A Real-Time Self-Adaptive (RTSA) active vibration controller was used as the framework in developing a computer program for a generic controller that can be used to alleviate helicopter vibration. Based upon on-line identification of system parameters, the generic controller minimizes vibration in the fuselage by closed-loop implementation of higher harmonic control in the main rotor system. The new generic controller incorporates a set of improved algorithms that gives the capability to readily define many different configurations by selecting one of three different controller types (deterministic, cautious, and dual), one of two linear system models (local and global), and one or more of several methods of applying limits on control inputs (external and/or internal limits on higher harmonic pitch amplitude and rate). A helicopter rotor simulation analysis was used to evaluate the algorithms associated with the alternative controller types as applied to the four-bladed H-34 rotor mounted on the NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus (RTA) which represents the fuselage. After proper tuning all three controllers provide more effective vibration reduction and converge more quickly and smoothly with smaller control inputs than the initial RTSA controller (deterministic with external pitch-rate limiting). It is demonstrated that internal limiting of the control inputs a significantly improves the overall performance of the deterministic controller.

  18. Active vibration control with optimized modified acceleration feedback equipped with adaptive line enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi, S. Nima; Craft, Michael J.; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2010-04-01

    Modified acceleration feedback (MAF) control, an active vibration control method that uses collocated piezoelectric actuator actuators and sensors is improved using an optimal controller. The controller consists of two main parts: 1) Frequency adaptation that uses Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE), and 2) an optimal controller. Frequency adaptation tracks the frequency of vibrations using ALE. The obtained frequency is then fed to MPPF compensators and the optimal controller. This provides a unique feature for MAF, by extending its domain of capabilities from controlling tonal vibrations to broad band disturbances. The optimal controller consists of a set of optimal gains for wide range of frequencies that is provided, related to the characteristics of the system. Based on the tracked frequency, the optimal control system decides to use which set of gains for the MAF controller. The gains are optimal for the frequencies close to the tracked frequency. The numerical results show that the frequency tracking method that is derived has worked quite well. In addition, the frequency tracking is fast enough to be used in real-time controller. The results also indicate that the MAF can provide significant vibration reduction using the optimal controller.

  19. Design and optimization of voice coil actuator for six degree of freedom active vibration isolation system using Halbach magnet array.

    PubMed

    Kim, MyeongHyeon; Kim, Hyunchang; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling, optimization, and validation of an active vibration isolation system using a voice coil motor. The active vibration isolating method was constructed with a passive isolator and an active isolator. A spring was used for passive isolating; an actuator was used for active isolating. The proposed active vibration isolation system (AVIS) can isolate disturbances for many kinds of instruments. Until now, developed AVIS were able to isolate a six degree-of-freedom disturbance effectively. This paper proposes the realization of such a six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system that can work as a bench top device for precision measuring machines such as atomic force microscope, scanning probe microscope, etc.

  20. Modelling and study of active vibration control for off-road vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junwei; Chen, Sizhong

    2014-05-01

    In view of special working characteristics and structure, engineering machineries do not have conventional suspension system typically. Consequently, operators have to endure severe vibrations which are detrimental both to their health and to the productivity of the loader. Based on displacement control, a kind of active damping method is developed for a skid-steer loader. In this paper, the whole hydraulic system for active damping method is modelled which include swash plate dynamics model, proportional valve model, piston accumulator model, pilot-operated check valve model, relief valve model, pump loss model, and cylinder model. A new road excitation model is developed for the skid-steer loader specially. The response of chassis vibration acceleration to road excitation is verified through simulation. The simulation result of passive accumulator damping is compared with measurements and the comparison shows that they are close. Based on this, parallel PID controller and track PID controller with acceleration feedback are brought into the simulation model, and the simulation results are compared with passive accumulator damping. It shows that the active damping methods with PID controllers are better in reducing chassis vibration acceleration and pitch movement. In the end, the test work for active damping method is proposed for the future work.

  1. Active-passive vibration absorber of beam-cart-seesaw system with piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Huang, C. J.; Chang, Julian; Wang, S.-W.

    2010-09-01

    In contrast with fully controllable systems, a super articulated mechanical system (SAMS) is a controlled underactuated mechanical system in which the dimensions of the configuration space exceed the dimensions of the control input space. The objectives of the research are to develop a novel SAMS model which is called beam-cart-seesaw system, and renovate a novel approach for achieving a high performance active-passive piezoelectric vibration absorber for such system. The system consists of two mobile carts, which are coupled via rack and pinion mechanics to two parallel tracks mounted on pneumatic rodless cylinders. One cart carries an elastic beam, and the other cart acts as a counterbalance. One adjustable counterweight mass is also installed underneath the seesaw to serve as a passive damping mechanism to absorb impact and shock energy. The motion and control of a Bernoulli-Euler beam subjected to the modified cart/seesaw system are analyzed first. Moreover, gray relational grade is utilized to investigate the sensitivity of tuning the active proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller to achieve desired vibration suppression performance. Consequently, it is shown that the active-passive vibration absorber can not only provide passive damping, but can also enhance the active action authority. The proposed software/hardware platform can also be profitable for the standardization of laboratory equipment, as well as for the development of entertainment tools.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, S.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-06-01

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Premkumar, S.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2015-06-24

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material.

  4. Active vibration control of an inertial actuator subject to broadband excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camperi, S.; Ghanchi-Tehrani, M.; Zilletti, M.; Elliott, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    Active vibration control has been widely used in many engineering applications in order to minimise vibrations in structures, when subjected to broadband random disturbances. Feedback control in the form of velocity feedback is considered in this paper, which generates a damping force proportional to the velocity. The control gain is tuned in such a way to minimise the kinetic energy of the system. In this paper, an inertial actuator excited by a random voltage is considered and an active control is implemented. The dynamic equations of the system are derived and the response is obtained with and without control. The stability of the system is analysed using the Nyquist plot. The response of the actuator is obtained from time domain simulations using Matlab. The effect of the control gains are also investigated on the responses. Energy analysis shows how the energy in the system decreases by increasing the feedback gain up to a stability limit.

  5. Structural vibration control of micro/macro-manipulator using feedforward and feedback approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, J.Y.; Cannon, D.W.; Magee, D.P.; Book, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PDL) researchers investigated the combined use of two control approaches to minimize micro/macro-manipulator structural vibration: (1) modified input shaping and (2) inertial force active damping control. Modified input shaping (MIS) is used as a feedforward controller to modify reference input by canceling the vibratory motion. Inertial force active damping (IFAD) is applied as a feedback controller to increase the system damping and robustness to unexpected disturbances. Researchers implemented both control schemes in the PNL micro/macro flexible-link manipulator testbed collaborating with Georgia Institute of Technology. The experiments successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of two control approaches in reducing structural vibration. Based on the results of the experiments, the combined use of two controllers is recommended for a micro/macro manipulator to achieve the fastest response to commands while canceling disturbances from unexpected forces.

  6. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Qiao, P.; Sethi, V.; Prasad, A.

    2004-08-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results on active vibration control of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. The PZT (lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensation, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000% with positive position feedback control.

  7. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Qiao, Pizhong; Sethi, Vineet; Prasad, A.

    2002-06-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results of active vibration control of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. PZT (Lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface-bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensator, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000 percent with a positive position feedback control.

  8. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  9. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  10. Li2MoO4 crystal growth from solution activated by low-frequency vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinova, Olga; Sadovskiy, Andrey; Ermochenkov, Ivan; Kirsanova, Svetlana; Sukhanova, Ekaterina; Kostikov, Vladimir; Belov, Stanislav; Mozhevitina, Elena; Khomyakov, Andrew; Kuchuk, Zhanna; Zharikov, Eugeny; Avetissov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of Li2MoO4 crystal growth from aqueous solutions activated by axial vibrational control (AVC) technique was investigated. It was found out that a low-frequency mechanical activation of the solution led to an increase of Li2MoO4 equilibrium solubility in aqueous solution for 11 rel% in the 25-29 °C temperature range. The changes in solution structure were analyzed in situ by Raman study of the solution. The AVC activation of solution resulted in a re-faceting of growing crystals, a smoothing of a face surface morphology and reduction of water content in the crystal.

  11. Enzyme activation and catalysis: characterisation of the vibrational modes of substrate and product in protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Sytina, Olga A; Alexandre, Maxime T; Heyes, Derren J; Hunter, C Neil; Robert, Bruno; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-02-14

    The light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide, a key step in the synthesis of chlorophyll, is catalyzed by the enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) and requires two photons (O. A. Sytina et al., Nature, 2008, 456, 1001-1008). The first photon activates the enzyme-substrate complex, a subsequent second photon initiates the photochemistry by triggering the formation of a catalytic intermediate. These two events are characterized by different spectral changes in the infra-red spectral region. Here, we investigate the vibrational frequencies of the POR-bound and unbound substrate, and product, and thus provide a detailed assignment of the spectral changes in the 1800-1250 cm(-1) region associated with the catalytic conversion of PChlide:NADPH:TyrOH into Chlide:NADP(+):TyrO(-). Fluorescence line narrowed spectra of the POR-bound Pchlide reveal a C=O keto group downshifted by more than 20 cm(-1) to a relatively low vibrational frequency of 1653 cm(-1), as compared to the unbound Pchlide, indicating that binding of the chromophore to the protein occurs via strong hydrogen bond(s). The frequencies of the C=C vibrational modes are consistent with a six-coordinated state of the POR-bound Pchlide, suggesting that there are two coordination interactions between the central Mg atom of the chromophore and protein residues, and/or a water molecule. The frequencies of the C=C vibrational modes of Chlide are consistent with a five-coordinated state, indicating a single interaction between the central Mg atom of the chromophore and a water molecule. Rapid-scan FTIR measurements on the Pchlide:POR:NADPH complex at 4 cm(-1) spectral resolution reveal a new band in the 1670 cm(-1) region. The FTIR spectra of the enzyme activation phase indicate involvement of a nucleotide-binding structural motif, and an increased exposure of the protein to solvent after activation.

  12. Quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment problem with time delay for active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J. M.; Singh, K. V.; Datta, B. N.

    2009-08-01

    Partial pole assignment in active vibration control refers to reassigning a small set of unwanted eigenvalues of the quadratic eigenvalue problem (QEP) associated with the second order system of a vibrating structure, by using feedback control force, to suitably chosen location without altering the remaining large number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors. There are several challenges of solving this quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment problem (QPEVAP) in a computational setting which the traditional pole-placement problems for first-order control systems do not have to deal with. In order to these challenges, there has been some work in recent years to solve QPEVAP in a computationally viable way. However, these works do not take into account of the practical phenomenon of the time-delay effect in the system. In this paper, a new "direct and partial modal" approach of the quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment problem with time-delay is proposed. The approach works directly in the quadratic system without requiring transformation to a standard state-space system and requires the knowledge of only a small number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors that can be computed or measured in practice. Two illustrative examples are presented in the context of active vibration control with constant time-delay to illustrate the success of our proposed approach. Future work includes generalization of this approach to a more practical complex time-delay system and extension of this work to the multi-input problem.

  13. Decentralized harmonic active vibration control of a flexible plate using piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Matthieu; Micheau, Philippe; Berry, Alain

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated decentralized active control of periodic panel vibration using multiple pairs combining PZT actuators and PVDF sensors distributed on the panel. By contrast with centralized MIMO controllers used to actively control the vibrations or the sound radiation of extended structures, decentralized control using independent local control loops only requires identification of the diagonal terms in the plant matrix. However, it is difficult to a priori predict the global stability of such decentralized control. In this study, the general situation of noncollocated actuator-sensor pairs was considered. Frequency domain gradient and Newton-Raphson adaptation of decentralized control were analyzed, both in terms of performance and stability conditions. The stability conditions are especially derived in terms of the adaptation coefficient and a control effort weighting coefficient. Simulations and experimental results are presented in the case of a simply supported panel with four PZT-PVDF pairs distributed on it. Decentralized vibration control is shown to be highly dependent on the frequency, but can be as effective as a fully centralized control even when the plant matrix is not diagonal-dominant or is not strictly positive real (not dissipative).

  14. The Development of an Intelligent Hybrid Active-passive Vibration Isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Changgeng; Ma, Jianguo; Rustighi, Emiliano

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid active-passive vibration isolator made up of electromagnetic actuator and air spring in parallel can be used to effectively isolate the broadband and line spectrum vibration of mechanical equipment simultaneously. However, due to its reliability and safety problems caused by the impact, its application in ships is limited. In this paper, an impact- resistant structure and an air gap self-sensing method of the passive-active hybrid vibration isolator are proposed and developed on the base of modelling, simulation and analysis. A thin magnetic rubber is filled into the air gap of electromagnetic actuator, which can avoid rigid collision between the armature and the permanent magnet under the action of impact. A suspension armature structure including pre-compression spring is suggested, which can automatically compensate the deformation caused by impact and protect the coil and permanent magnet from impact damage. An air gap self-sensing method is developed through detecting the voltage between the input and output terminals of actuator, which is verified by experiments.

  15. Optimization of Passive and Active Non-Linear Vibration Mounting Systems Based on Vibratory Power Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, T. J.; Singh, R.

    1996-07-01

    While significant non-linear behavior has been observed in many vibration mounting applications, most design studies are typically based on the concept of linear system theory in terms of force or motion transmissibility. In this paper, an improved analytical strategy is presented for the design optimization of complex, active of passive, non-linear mounting systems. This strategy is built upon the computational Galerkin method of weighted residuals, and incorporates order reduction and numerical continuation in an iterative optimization scheme. The overall dynamic characteristics of the mounting system are considered and vibratory power transmission is minimized via adjustment of mount parameters by using both passive and active means. The method is first applied through a computational example case to the optimization of basic passive and active, non-linear isolation configurations. It is found that either active control or intentionally introduced non-linearity can improve the mount's performance; but a combination of both produces the greatest benefit. Next, a novel experimental, active, non-linear isolation system is studied. The effect of non-linearity on vibratory power transmission and active control are assessed via experimental measurements and the enhanced Galerkin method. Results show how harmonic excitation can result in multiharmonic vibratory power transmission. The proposed optimization strategy offers designers some flexibility in utilizing both passive and active means in combination with linear and non-linear components for improved vibration mounts.

  16. Multi-objective optimal design of active vibration absorber with delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Rong-Hua; Chen, Long-Xiang; Sun, Jian-Qiao

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a multi-objective optimal design of delayed feedback control of an actively tuned vibration absorber for a stochastically excited linear structure is investigated. The simple cell mapping (SCM) method is used to obtain solutions of the multi-objective optimization problem (MOP). The continuous time approximation (CTA) method is applied to analyze the delayed system. Stability is imposed as a constraint for MOP. Three conflicting objective functions including the peak frequency response, vibration energy of primary structure and control effort are considered. The Pareto set and Pareto front for the optimal feedback control design are presented for two examples. Numerical results have found that the Pareto optimal solutions provide effective delayed feedback control design.

  17. Use of piezoelectric actuators in active vibration control of rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Reng Rong; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Kascak, Albert F.; Montague, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical and test results for the development of piezoelectric-actuator-based active vibration control (AVC) are presented. The evolution of this technology starts with an ideal model of the actuator and progresses to a more sophisticated model where the pushers force the squirrel cage ball bearing supports of a rotating shaft. The piezoelectric pushers consist of a stack of piezoelectric ceramic disks that are arranged on top of one another and connected in parallel electrically. This model consists of a prescribed displacement that is proportional to the input voltage and a spring that represents the stiffness of the stack of piezoelectric disks. System tests were carried out to stabilize the AVC system, verify its effectiveness in controlling vibration, and confirm the theory presented.

  18. Active vibration control of flexible cantilever plates using piezoelectric materials and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Inman, Daniel J.

    2016-02-01

    The study presented in this paper introduces a new intelligent methodology to mitigate the vibration response of flexible cantilever plates. The use of the piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs for active control of plates is discussed. An intelligent neural network based controller is designed to control the optimal voltage applied on the piezoelectric patches. The control technique utilizes a neurocontroller along with a Kalman Filter to compute the appropriate actuator command. The neurocontroller is trained based on an algorithm that incorporates a set of emulator neural networks which are also trained to predict the future response of the cantilever plate. Then, the neurocontroller is evaluated by comparing the uncontrolled and controlled responses under several types of dynamic excitations. It is observed that the neurocontroller reduced the vibration response of the flexible cantilever plate significantly; the results demonstrated the success and robustness of the neurocontroller independent of the type and distribution of the excitation force.

  19. Probing the Raman-active acoustic vibrations of nanoparticles with extraordinary spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Skyler; Gelfand, Ryan M.; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots, viruses, DNA and all other nanoparticles have acoustic vibrations that can act as ‘fingerprints’ to identify their shape, size and mechanical properties, yet high-resolution Raman spectroscopy in this low-energy range has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy to measure the Raman-active vibrations of single isolated nanoparticles in the 0.1-10 cm-1 range with ˜0.05 cm-1 resolution, to resolve peak splitting from material anisotropy and to probe the low-frequency modes of biomolecules. EAR employs a nanoaperture laser tweezer that can select particles of interest and manipulate them once identified. We therefore believe that this nanotechnology will enable expanded capabilities for the study of nanoparticles in the materials and life sciences.

  20. Experimental evaluation of magnetorheological dampers for semi-active tuned vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Jeong-Hoi; Ahmadian, Mehdi; Setareh, Mehdi

    2003-07-01

    The main purpose of this study is to experimentally evaluate the dynamic performance of a semi-active Tuned Vibration Absorber (TVA) with a Magneto-Rheological (MR) damper. To this end, a test apparatus was built to represent a two-degree-of-freedom primary structure model coupled with a MR TVA. The primary structure mass, which is modeled with steel plates, was excited by a hydraulic actuator through four air springs. The air springs represent the stiffness of the primary structure and offer the ability to change the stiffness. The semi-active TVA consists of a steel plate, a MR damper, and four coil springs for physical representation of the mass, the damping element, and the stiffness of the TVA, respectively. Mounted on top of the primary structure, the TVA is connected to the primary structure plates by hardened linear bearing shafts. A series of transducers along with a data acquisition system was used to collect sensory information and implement real time control of the MR TVA. Using this test rig setup, a parametric study was performed to analyze the dynamics of the semi-active TVA and to compare the performance of the semi-active TVA with a passive TVA. Displacement based on-off groundhook (on-off DBG) control was used as the control policy for the semi-active TVA. In the parametric study, the effects of on/off-state damping of the MR damper were investigated and compared with a passive TVA to analyze the relative benefits of a semi-active TVA. When damping increased in the passive TVA, the two resonant peaks merge into one peak, and the peak grows. This indicates that the primary structure and TVA are linked together, disabling the TVA, and it eventually magnifies the vibrations. For a semi-active TVA, however, the two resonant peaks decrease as on-state damping increases (keeping low off-state damping), indicating reduction of vibrations. It is shown that semi-active TVAs outperform passive TVAs in reducing the peak transmissibility, implying that semi-active

  1. Cable connected active tuned mass dampers for control of in-plane vibrations of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, B.; Basu, B.

    2014-11-01

    In-plane vibrations of wind turbine blades are of concern in modern multi-megawatt wind turbines. Today's turbines with capacities of up to 7.5 MW have very large, flexible blades. As blades have grown longer the increasing flexibility has led to vibration problems. Vibration of blades can reduce the power produced by the turbine and decrease the fatigue life of the turbine. In this paper a new active control strategy is designed and implemented to control the in-plane vibration of large wind turbine blades which in general is not aerodynamically damped. A cable connected active tuned mass damper (CCATMD) system is proposed for the mitigation of in-plane blade vibration. An Euler-Lagrangian wind turbine model based on energy formulation has been developed for this purpose which considers the structural dynamics of the system and the interaction between in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations and also the interaction between the blades and the tower including the CCATMDs. The CCATMDs are located inside the blades and are controlled by an LQR controller. The turbine is subject to turbulent aerodynamic loading simulated using a modification to the classic Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory with turbulence generated from rotationally sampled spectra. The turbine is also subject to gravity loading. The effect of centrifugal stiffening of the rotating blades has also been considered. Results show that the use of the proposed new active control scheme significantly reduces the in-plane vibration of large, flexible wind turbine blades.

  2. Buck-boost converter for simultaneous semi-active vibration control and energy harvesting for electromagnetic regenerative shock absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Chongxiao; Kim, Junyoung; Yu, Liangyao; Zuo, Lei

    2014-04-01

    Regenerative semi-active suspensions can capture the previously dissipated vibration energy and convert it to usable electrical energy for powering on-board electronic devices, while achieve both the better ride comfort and improved road handling performance at the same time when certain control is applied. To achieve this objective, the power electronics interface circuit connecting the energy harvester and the electrical loads, which can perform simultaneous vibration control and energy harvesting function is in need. This paper utilized a buck-boost converter for simultaneous semi-active vibration control and energy harvesting with electromagnetic regenerative shock absorber, which utilizes a rotational generator to converter the vibration energy to electricity. It has been found that when the circuit works in discontinuous current mode (DCM), the ratio between the input voltage and current is only related to the duty cycle of the switch pulse width modulation signal. Using this property, the buck-boost converter can be used to perform semi-active vibration control by controlling the load connected between the terminals of the generator in the electromagnetic shock absorber. While performing the vibration control, the circuit always draw current from the shock absorber and the suspension remain dissipative, and the shock absorber takes no additional energy to perform the vibration control. The working principle and dynamics of the circuit has been analyzed and simulations were performed to validate the concept.

  3. Semi-active vibration control in cable-stayed bridges under the condition of random wind load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, G.; Joonryong, Jeon

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims at an experimental study on the real-time vibration control of bridge structures using a semi-active vibration control method that has been in the spotlight recently. As structures are becoming larger and larger, structural harmful vibration caused by unspecified external forces such as earthquakes, gusts of wind, and collisions has been brought to attention as an important issue. These harmful vibrations can cause not only user anxiety but also severe structural damage or even complete failure of structures. Therefore, in view of structural safety and economical long-term maintenance, real-time control technology of the harmful structural vibration is urgently required. In this paper, a laboratory-scale model of a cable-stayed bridge was built, and a shear-type MR damper and a semi-active vibration control algorithm (Lyapunov and clipped optimal) were applied for the control of harmful vibration of the model bridge, in real time. On the basis of the test results, each semi-active control algorithm was verified quantitatively.

  4. Frequency domain active vibration control of a flexible plate based on neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxin; Chen, Xuefeng; He, Zhengjia

    2013-06-01

    A neural-network (NN)-based active control system was proposed to reduce the low frequency noise radiation of the simply supported flexible plate. Feedback control system was built, in which neural network controller (NNC) and neural network identifier (NNI) were applied. Multi-frequency control in frequency domain was achieved by simulation through the NN-based control systems. A pre-testing experiment of the control system on a real simply supported plate was conducted. The NN-based control algorithm was shown to perform effectively. These works lay a solid foundation for the active vibration control of mechanical structures.

  5. Vibrational resonance, allostery, and activation in rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Kristina N.; Pfeffer, Jürgen; Dutta, Arpana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2016-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are a large family of membrane proteins activated by a variety of structurally diverse ligands making them highly adaptable signaling molecules. Despite recent advances in the structural biology of this protein family, the mechanism by which ligands induce allosteric changes in protein structure and dynamics for its signaling function remains a mystery. Here, we propose the use of terahertz spectroscopy combined with molecular dynamics simulation and protein evolutionary network modeling to address the mechanism of activation by directly probing the concerted fluctuations of retinal ligand and transmembrane helices in rhodopsin. This approach allows us to examine the role of conformational heterogeneity in the selection and stabilization of specific signaling pathways in the photo-activation of the receptor. We demonstrate that ligand-induced shifts in the conformational equilibrium prompt vibrational resonances in the protein structure that link the dynamics of conserved interactions with fluctuations of the active-state ligand. The connection of vibrational modes creates an allosteric association of coupled fluctuations that forms a coherent signaling pathway from the receptor ligand-binding pocket to the G-protein activation region. Our evolutionary analysis of rhodopsin-like GPCRs suggest that specific allosteric sites play a pivotal role in activating structural fluctuations that allosterically modulate functional signals.

  6. Vibrational resonance, allostery, and activation in rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Woods, Kristina N; Pfeffer, Jürgen; Dutta, Arpana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2016-11-16

    G protein-coupled receptors are a large family of membrane proteins activated by a variety of structurally diverse ligands making them highly adaptable signaling molecules. Despite recent advances in the structural biology of this protein family, the mechanism by which ligands induce allosteric changes in protein structure and dynamics for its signaling function remains a mystery. Here, we propose the use of terahertz spectroscopy combined with molecular dynamics simulation and protein evolutionary network modeling to address the mechanism of activation by directly probing the concerted fluctuations of retinal ligand and transmembrane helices in rhodopsin. This approach allows us to examine the role of conformational heterogeneity in the selection and stabilization of specific signaling pathways in the photo-activation of the receptor. We demonstrate that ligand-induced shifts in the conformational equilibrium prompt vibrational resonances in the protein structure that link the dynamics of conserved interactions with fluctuations of the active-state ligand. The connection of vibrational modes creates an allosteric association of coupled fluctuations that forms a coherent signaling pathway from the receptor ligand-binding pocket to the G-protein activation region. Our evolutionary analysis of rhodopsin-like GPCRs suggest that specific allosteric sites play a pivotal role in activating structural fluctuations that allosterically modulate functional signals.

  7. Vibrational resonance, allostery, and activation in rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Kristina N.; Pfeffer, Jürgen; Dutta, Arpana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are a large family of membrane proteins activated by a variety of structurally diverse ligands making them highly adaptable signaling molecules. Despite recent advances in the structural biology of this protein family, the mechanism by which ligands induce allosteric changes in protein structure and dynamics for its signaling function remains a mystery. Here, we propose the use of terahertz spectroscopy combined with molecular dynamics simulation and protein evolutionary network modeling to address the mechanism of activation by directly probing the concerted fluctuations of retinal ligand and transmembrane helices in rhodopsin. This approach allows us to examine the role of conformational heterogeneity in the selection and stabilization of specific signaling pathways in the photo-activation of the receptor. We demonstrate that ligand-induced shifts in the conformational equilibrium prompt vibrational resonances in the protein structure that link the dynamics of conserved interactions with fluctuations of the active-state ligand. The connection of vibrational modes creates an allosteric association of coupled fluctuations that forms a coherent signaling pathway from the receptor ligand-binding pocket to the G-protein activation region. Our evolutionary analysis of rhodopsin-like GPCRs suggest that specific allosteric sites play a pivotal role in activating structural fluctuations that allosterically modulate functional signals. PMID:27849063

  8. Unexpected Cancellations in Gravity Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.; Carrasco, J.J.; Forde, D.; Ita, H.; Johansson, H.; /UCLA

    2007-07-13

    Recent computations of scattering amplitudes show that N = 8 supergravity is surprisingly well behaved in the ultraviolet and may even be ultraviolet finite in perturbation theory. The novel cancellations necessary for ultraviolet finiteness first appear at one loop in the guise of the ''no-triangle hypothesis''. We study one-loop amplitudes in pure Einstein gravity and point out the existence of cancellations similar to those found previously in N = 8 supergravity. These cancellations go beyond those found in the one-loop effective action. Using unitarity, this suggests that generic theories of quantum gravity based on the Einstein-Hilbert action may be better behaved in the ultraviolet at higher loops than suggested by naive power counting, though without additional (supersymmetric) cancellations they diverge. We comment on future studies that should be performed to support this proposal.

  9. Development of stewart platforms for active vibration isolation and precision pointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Benli

    2007-07-01

    Vibration isolation and extreme precision pointing is needed for future space telescopes, imaging sensors, laser communication, space-borne optical interferometer, and other sensitive payloads which have increased performance, depending on sustained sub-microradian pointing accuracy and stability. However, the vibration sources are increased due to the large flexible structures, truss-type structures and motion devices. The spatial Stewart platform (hexapod), built by smart materials and smart structures, is a promising way to address these issues, especially for the six degree-of-freedom control purpose, since the platform offers several advantages over the serial counterparts and other methods. Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), University of Washington, the Hexapod Research Group of University of Wyoming, CSA Engineering Inc, Honeywell Satellite Systems Operation and other groups have done a lot of research, this paper provides a representative look at the state-of-the-art technology and research in active vibration isolation and precision pointing applied in space.

  10. Semi-modal active vibration control of plates using discrete piezoelectric modal filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, Marcelo A.; Pagani, Carlos C.; Oliveira, Leopoldo P. R.

    2015-09-01

    Modal sensors and actuators working in closed loop enable to observe and control independently specific vibration modes, reducing the apparent dynamical complexity of the system and the necessary energy to control them. Modal sensors may be obtained by a properly designed weighted sum of the output signals of an array of sensors distributed on the host structure. Although some works found in the literature present techniques for designing and implementing modal filters based on a given array of sensors, the effect of the sensors' distribution on the modal filter performance has received little attention. Recent studies have shown that some parameters, such as size, shape and location of the sensors, are very important for the performance of the resulting modal filters. This work presents a methodology for the design of semi-modal active vibration control of a rectangular plate using modal filters based on arrays of piezoelectric sensors. The geometric distribution of the array of piezoelectric sensors bonded to a rectangular plate is numerically optimized to improve the effectiveness and frequency range of a set of modal filters. An experimental implementation of the modal filters is carried out in order to validate their performance. It is shown that proper setup of weighting coefficients is an important requirement. Then, two simple control laws, namely direct velocity feedback and positive position feedback, using the modal filter output are designed and implemented. It is shown that modal filtering allows to effectively control selected vibration modes with quite simple signal processing requirements.

  11. Adaptive active vibration control to improve the fatigue life of a carbon-epoxy smart structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Cazzulani, Gabriele; Cinquemani, Simone; Resta, Ferruccio; Torti, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Active vibration controls are helpful in improving fatigue life of structures through limitation of absolute displacements. However, control algorithms are usually designed without explicitly taking into account the fatigue phenomenon. In this paper, an adaptive vibration controller is proposed to increase the fatigue life of a smart structure made of composite material and actuated with piezoelectric patches. The main innovation with respect to the most common solutions is that the control laws are directly linked to a damage driving force, which is correlated to a fatigue damage model for the specific material. The control logic is different depending on the damage state of the structure. If no significant damage affects the structure, the controller decreases the crack nucleation probability by limiting the driving forces in the overall structure. On the contrary, if initiated cracks are present, their further propagation is prevented by controlling the damage driving forces in the already damaged areas. The structural diagnostics is performed through a vibration-based health monitoring technique, while periodical adaptation of the controller is adopted to consider damage-induced changes on the structure state-space model and to give emphasis to the most excited modes. The control algorithm has been numerically validated on the finite element model of a cantilever plate.

  12. Analysis of muscle activation in each body segment in response to the stimulation intensity of whole-body vibration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a whole-body vibration exercise, as well as to discuss the scientific basis to establish optimal intensity by analyzing differences between muscle activations in each body part, according to the stimulation intensity of the whole-body vibration. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects included 10 healthy men in their 20s without orthopedic disease. Representative muscles from the subjects’ primary body segments were selected while the subjects were in upright positions on exercise machines; electromyography electrodes were attached to the selected muscles. Following that, the muscle activities of each part were measured at different intensities. No vibration, 50/80 in volume, and 10/25/40 Hz were mixed and applied when the subjects were on the whole-vibration exercise machines in upright positions. After that, electromyographic signals were collected and analyzed with the root mean square of muscular activation. [Results] As a result of the analysis, it was found that the muscle activation effects had statistically meaningful differences according to changes in exercise intensity in all 8 muscles. When the no-vibration status was standardized and analyzed as 1, the muscle effect became lower at higher frequencies, but became higher at larger volumes. [Conclusion] In conclusion, it was shown that the whole-body vibration stimulation promoted muscle activation across the entire body part, and the exercise effects in each muscle varied depending on the exercise intensities. PMID:28265155

  13. High-damping-performance magnetorheological material for passive or active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Taixiang; Yang, Ke; Yan, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Xu, Yangguang

    2016-10-01

    Optical assembly and alignment system plays a crucial role for the construction of high-power or high-energy laser facility, which attempts to ignite fusion reaction and go further to make fusion energy usable. In the optical assembly and alignment system, the vibration control is a key problem needs to be well handled and a material with higher damping performance is much desirable. Recently, a new kind of smart magneto-sensitive polymeric composite material, named magnetorheological plastomer (MRP), was synthesized and reported as a high-performance magnetorheological material and this material has a magneto-enhanced high-damping performance. The MRP behaves usually in an intermediate state between fluid-like magnetorheological fluid and solid-like magnetorheological elastomer. The state of MRP, as well as the damping performance of MRP, can be tuned by adjusting the ratio of hard segments and soft segments, which are ingredients to synthesize the polymeric matrix. In this work, a series of MRP are prepared by dispersing micron-sized, magneto-sensitive carbonyl iron powders with related additives into polyurethane-based, magnetically insensitive matrix. It is found that the damping performance of MRP depends much on magnetic strength, shear rate, carbonyl iron content and shear strain amplitude. Especially, the damping capacity of MRP can be tuned in a large range by adjusting external magnetic field. It is promising that the MRP will have much application in passive and active vibration control, such as vibration reduction in optical assembly and alignment system, vibration isolation or absorption in vehicle suspension system, etc.

  14. Comparison of vibration amplitude supression vs. dynamic bearing load suppression in active vibration control of rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, William W.; Kim, J. H.; Marangoni, Roy D.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents two optimal control methods for attenuating steady-state vibrations in rotating machinery. One method minimizes shaft displacements while the other minimizes dynamic bearing reaction forces. The two methods are applied to a model of a typical rotating machinery system, and their results are compared. It is found that displacement minimization can increase bearing loads, while bearing load minimization, on the other hand, decreases bearing loads without significant change in shaft displacements.

  15. Magnetic force driven six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system using a phase compensated velocity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongdae; Park, Kyihwan; Kim, Sangyoo

    2009-04-15

    A six-axis active vibration isolation system (AVIS) is developed using voice coil actuators. Point contact configuration is employed to have an easy assembly of eight voice coil actuators to an upper and a base plates. The velocity sensor, using an electromagnetic principle that is commonly used in the vibration control, is investigated since its phase lead characteristic causes an instability problem for a low frequency vibration. The performances of the AVIS are investigated in the frequency domain and finally validated by comparing with the passive isolation system using the atomic force microscope images.

  16. Study on active vibration control for high order mode of flexible beam using smart material piezoelectric ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Da-fang; Huang, Liang; Mu, Meng; Wang, Yue-wu; Wu, Shuang

    2011-11-01

    In order to reduce effective load and lower the launch cost, many light-weight flexible structures are employed in spacecraft. The research of active control on flexible structural vibration is very important in spacecraft design. Active vibration control on a flexible beam with smart material piezoelectric pieces bonded in surface is investigated experimentally using independent modal space control method, which is able to control the first three modes independently. A comparison between the systems responses before and after control indicates that the modal damping of flexible structure is greatly improved after active control is performed, indicating remarkable vibration suppression effect. Dynamic equation of the flexible beam is deducted by Hamilton principle, and numerical simulation of active vibration control on the first three order vibration modes is also conducted in this paper. The simulation result matches experimental result very well. Both experimental and numerical results indicate that the independent modal control method using piezoelectric patch as driving element is a very effective approach to realize vibration suppression, which has promising applications in aerospace field.

  17. Study on active vibration control for high order mode of flexible beam using smart material piezoelectric ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Da-fang; Huang, Liang; Mu, Meng; Wang, Yue-wu; Wu, Shuang

    2012-04-01

    In order to reduce effective load and lower the launch cost, many light-weight flexible structures are employed in spacecraft. The research of active control on flexible structural vibration is very important in spacecraft design. Active vibration control on a flexible beam with smart material piezoelectric pieces bonded in surface is investigated experimentally using independent modal space control method, which is able to control the first three modes independently. A comparison between the systems responses before and after control indicates that the modal damping of flexible structure is greatly improved after active control is performed, indicating remarkable vibration suppression effect. Dynamic equation of the flexible beam is deducted by Hamilton principle, and numerical simulation of active vibration control on the first three order vibration modes is also conducted in this paper. The simulation result matches experimental result very well. Both experimental and numerical results indicate that the independent modal control method using piezoelectric patch as driving element is a very effective approach to realize vibration suppression, which has promising applications in aerospace field.

  18. Non-probabilistic stability reliability measure for active vibration control system with interval parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Wang, Lei; Fan, Weichao; Qiu, Zhiping

    2017-01-01

    A systematic non-probabilistic reliability analysis procedure for structural vibration active control system with unknown-but-bounded parameters is proposed. The state-space representation of active vibration control system with uncertain parameters is presented. Compared with the robust control theory, which is always over-conservative, the reliability-based analysis method is more suitable to deal with uncertain problem. Stability is the core of the closed-loop feedback control system design, so stability criterion is adopted to act as the limited state function for reliability analysis. The uncertain parameters without enough samples are modeled as interval variables. Interval perturbation method is employed to estimate the interval bounds of eigenvalues, which can be used to characterize the stability of the closed-loop active control system. Formulation of defining the reliability of active control system based on stability is discussed. A novel non-probabilistic reliability measurement index is discussed and used to determine the probability of the stability based on the area ratio. The feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method are demonstrated by two numerical examples.

  19. Test and theory for piezoelectric actuator-active vibration control of rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, A. B.; Lin, R. R.; Alexander, R. M.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, J.

    1989-01-01

    The application of piezoelectric actuators for active vibration control (AVC) of rotating machinery is examined. Theory is derived and the resulting predictions are shown to agree closely with results of tests performed on an air turbine driven-overhung rotor. The test results show significant reduction in unbalance, transient and sub-synchronous responses. Results from a 30-hour endurance test support the AVD system reliability. Various aspects of the electro-mechanical stability of the control system are also discussed and illustrated. Finally, application of the AVC system to an actual jet engine is discussed.

  20. Implementation of an active vibration damping system for the SOFIA telescope assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Paul C.; Keas, Paul J.

    2014-07-01

    The NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) employs a 2.5-meter reflector telescope in a Boeing 747SP. The image stability goal for SOFIA is 0.2 arc-seconds. An active damping control system is being developed for SOFIA to reduce image jitter and degradation due to resonance of the telescope assembly. We describe the vibration control system design and implementation in hardware and software. The system's unique features enabling system testing, control system design, and online health monitoring will also be presented.

  1. Active vibration absorber for the CSI evolutionary model - Design and experimental results. [Controls Structures Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstrations to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility has been developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The paper discusses the design of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. Experimental results in the presence of these factors are presented and discussed. The robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated.

  2. Active Control of Vibrations and Noise of Double Wall Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.-Y.; Vaicaitis, R.

    1998-10-01

    Active control of vibrations and noise transmissions of double wall composite cylindrical shells using pairs of spatially discrete piezoelectric actuators is investigated. The velocity feedback and sound pressure rate feedback control procedures are developed. The inner and outer shells which are separated by a soft core are modelled by Love's thin shell theory for laminate composite materials and the inputs are taken as stationary random pressures and/or random point forces. A galerkin-like procedure is used to obtain solutions of the governing structural-acoustic equations. Parametric studies are performed to demonstrate the effect of actuator placement, actuator size, control gains, spillover, structural and acoustic damping characteristics

  3. How does high-frequency sound or vibration activate vestibular receptors?

    PubMed

    Curthoys, I S; Grant, J W

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism by which vestibular neural phase locking occurs and how it relates to classical otolith mechanics is unclear. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that sound and vibration both cause fluid pressure waves in the inner ear and that it is these pressure waves which displace the hair bundles on vestibular receptor hair cells and result in activation of type I receptor hair cells and phase locking of the action potentials in the irregular vestibular afferents, which synapse on type I receptors. This idea has been suggested since the early neural recordings and recent results give it greater credibility.

  4. Test rig with active damping control for the simultaneous evaluation of vibration control and energy harvesting via piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetto, S.; Rohlfing, J.; Infante, F.; Mayer, D.; Herold, S.

    2016-09-01

    Piezoelectric transducers can be used to harvest electrical energy from structural vibrations in order to power continuously operating condition monitoring systems local to where they operate. However, excessive vibrations can compromise the safe operation of mechanical systems. Therefore, absorbers are commonly used to control vibrations. With an integrated device, the mechanical energy that otherwise would be dissipated can be converted via piezoelectric transducers. Vibration absorbers are designed to have high damping factors. Hence, the integration of transducers would lead to a low energy conversion. Efficient energy harvesters usually have low damping capabilities; therefore, they are not effective for vibration suppression. Thus, the design of an integrated device needs to consider the two conflicting requirements on the damping. This study focuses on the development of a laboratory test rig with a host structure and a vibration absorber with tunable damping via an active relative velocity feedback. A voice coil actuator is used for this purpose. To overcome the passive damping effects of the back electromagnetic force a novel voltage feedback control is proposed, which has been validated both in simulation and experimentally. The aim of this study is to have a test rig ready for the introduction of piezo-transducers and available for future experimental evaluations of the damping effect on the effectiveness of vibration reduction and energy harvesting efficiency.

  5. Active vibration control of a composite wing model using PZT sensors/actuators and virtex: 4 FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Shashikala; Venkatasubramanyam, D. V.; Krishnan, Bharath; Pavate, Aravind; Kabra, Hemant

    2009-07-01

    The reduction of vibration in Aircraft/Aerospace structures as well as helicopter fuselage is becoming increasingly important. A traditional approach to vibration control uses passive techniques which are relatively large, costly and ineffective at low frequencies. Active Vibration Control (AVC), apart from having benefits in size, weight, volume and cost, efficiently attenuates low frequency vibration. Hitherto this was being achieved using high speed Digital Signal Processors (DSPs). But the throughput requirements of general purpose DSPs have increased very much and the Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) have emerged as an alternative. The silicon resources of an FPGA lead to staggering performance gains i.e. they are 100 times faster than DSPs. In the present paper Active Vibration Control of a Composite Research Wing Model is investigated using Piezo electric patches as sensors and PZT bimorph actuators collocated on the bottom surface as secondary actuators. Attempt has been made to realize the State - of - the - Art Active Vibration Controller using the Xilinx System Generator on VIRTEX - 4 FPGA. The control has been achieved by implementing the Filtered-X Least Mean Square (FXLMS) based adaptive filter on the FPGA. Single channel real time control has been successfully implemented & tested on the composite research wing model.

  6. An investigation into active vibration isolation based on predictive control: Part I: Energy source control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, H. Z.; Zheng, G. T.; Liu, Z. G.

    2006-09-01

    We report the results of a recent study for the active vibration isolation with whole-spacecraft vibration isolation as an application background into which three parts are divided: (i) energy source control, (ii) nonlinearity and time delay, (iii) implementation and experiment. This paper is the first in this three-part series report, which presents theoretical and experimental investigations into pressure tracking system for energy source control of the isolator. Considering the special environment of the rocket and expected characteristics of actuators, where the isolator will be arranged between the rocket and the spacecraft, pneumatic actuator is proposed to realize the active isolation control. In order to improve the dynamic characteristics of the pneumatic isolator, a cascade control algorithm with double loop structure and predictive control algorithm for pressure tracking control of the inner loop are proposed. In the current paper, a pressure tracking control system using model predictive control (MPC) is studied first. A pneumatic model around pressure work point is built firstly by simplifying the flow equation of valve's orifices and pressure differential equation of the chambers. With this model, an MPC algorithm in the state space is developed, and problems including control parameter choice and command horizon generator are discussed in detail. In addition, by adding model error correction loop and velocity compensation feedback, effects of model uncertainty and volume variation of chambers are reduced greatly. Thus with this design, the real-time pressure tracking can be guaranteed, and so that the active control system can work at higher frequency range.

  7. Design and analysis of supporting structure with smart struts for active vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeongil; Washington, Gregory N.; Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    This research investigates a supporting structure with smart struts under a vibratory load. In the case of most rotorcraft, structure-borne noise and vibration transmitted from the gearbox contains multiple spectral elements and higher frequencies, which include gear mesh frequencies and their side bands. In order to manage this issue, significant research have been devoted to active smart struts which have tunable stiffness such that a higher level of attenuation is possible. However, present techniques on active control are restricted mostly to the control of single or multiple sinusoids and thus these are not applicable to manage modulated and multi-spectral signals. Therefore, enhanced control algorithms are required in order to achieve simultaneous attenuation of gear mesh frequencies and their side bands. Proposed algorithms employing two nonlinear methods and one model-based technique are examined in this study. Their performance is verified by comparing with conventional algorithms. Moreover, these algorithms are implemented to exhibit whether they are feasible to narrowband or broadband control through experiments with a single smart strut. Novel methodologies are expected to be applied to several active vibration and noise control practices such as vehicles and other engineering structures.

  8. Determination of absolute configuration of chiral molecules using vibrational optical activity: a review.

    PubMed

    He, Yanan; Wang, Bo; Dukor, Rina K; Nafie, Laurence A

    2011-07-01

    Determination of the absolute handedness, known as absolute configuration (AC), of chiral molecules is an important step in any field related to chirality, especially in the pharmaceutical industry. Vibrational optical activity (VOA) has become a powerful tool for the determination of the AC of chiral molecules in the solution state after nearly forty years of evolution. VOA offers a novel alternative, or supplement, to X-ray crystallography, permitting AC determinations on neat liquid, oil, and solution samples without the need to grow single crystals of the pure chiral sample molecules as required for X-ray analysis. By comparing the sign and intensity of the measured VOA spectrum with the corresponding ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculated VOA spectrum of a chosen configuration, one can unambiguously assign the AC of a chiral molecule. Comparing measured VOA spectra with calculated VOA spectra of all the conformers can also provide solution-state conformational populations. VOA consists of infrared vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA). Currently, VCD is used routinely by researchers in a variety of backgrounds, including molecular chirality, asymmetric synthesis, chiral catalysis, drug screening, pharmacology, and natural products. Although the application of ROA in AC determination lags behind that of VCD, with the recent implementation of ROA subroutines in commercial quantum chemistry software, ROA will in the future complement VCD for AC determination. In this review, the basic principles of the application of VCD to the determination of absolute configuration in chiral molecules are described. The steps required for VCD spectral measurement and calculation are outlined, followed by brief descriptions of recently published papers reporting the determination of AC in small organic, pharmaceutical, and natural product molecules.

  9. Vibration control of a nonlinear quarter-car active suspension system by reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucak, İ. Ö.; Öz, H. R.

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the investigation of performance of a nonlinear quarter-car active suspension system with a stochastic real-valued reinforcement learning control strategy. As an example, a model of a quarter car with a nonlinear suspension spring subjected to excitation from a road profile is considered. The excitation is realised by the roughness of the road. The quarter-car model to be considered here can be approximately described as a nonlinear two degrees of freedom system. The experimental results indicate that the proposed active suspension system suppresses the vibrations greatly. A simulation of a nonlinear quarter-car active suspension system is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and examine the performance of the learning control algorithm.

  10. Active member vibration control experiment in a KC-135 reduced gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C. R.; Lurie, B. J.; Chen, G.-S.; Swanson, A. D.

    1991-01-01

    An active member vibration control experiment in a KC-135 reduced gravity environment was carried out by the Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Two active members, consisting of piezoelectric actuators, displacement sensors, and load cells, were incorporated into a 12-meter, 104 kg box-type test structure. The active member control design involved the use of bridge (compound) feedback concept, in which the collocated force and velocity signals are feedback locally. An impact-type test was designed to accommodate the extremely short duration of the reduced gravity testing window in each parabolic flight. The moving block analysis technique was used to estimate the modal frequencies and dampings from the free-decay responses. A broadband damping performance was demonstrated up to the ninth mode of 40 Hz. The best damping performance achieved in the flight test was about 5 percent in the fourth mode of the test structure.

  11. Fuzzy-Logic Based Vibration Suppression Control Experiments on Active Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, M. K.; Sciulli, D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the fuzzy-logic based vibration suppression control of active structures equipped with piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The control methodology is based on the fuzzy logic control of the variable structures system type. The sufficient condition for the closed-loop stability of the decentralized fuzzy control for the system equipped with collocated sensors and actuators is derived from the sufficient condition of the decentralized collocated variable system control. Hence, it is concluded that the fuzzy control is in fact the variation of the variable structure system control in this case. Comparison of the variable structure system to the fuzzy control leads to a new fuzzy rule of the vibration suppression of the active structure equipped with collocated sensors and actuators. It is shown that the fuzzy-logic control can be designed for the collocated system without any knowledge of the system to be controlled. However, this may not be true in the case of multi-input and multi-output non-collocated systems. All the developments are demonstrated by means of a real-time fuzzy control experiment on the cantilever beam with surface-bonded piezoceramic sensors and actuators.

  12. Structural, topological and vibrational properties of an isothiazole derivatives series with antiviral activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Davide; Márquez, María J.; Márquez, María B.; Brandán, Silvia A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural, topological and vibrational properties of an isothiazole derivatives series with antiviral activities in gas and aqueous solution phases were studied by using DFT calculations. The self consistent reaction field (SCRF) method was combined with the polarized continuum (PCM) model in order to study the solvent effects and to predict their reactivities and behaviours in both media. Thus, the 3-mercapto-5-phenyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (I), 3-methylthio-5-phenyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (II), 3-Ethylthio-5-phenyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (III), S-[3-(4-cyano-5-phenyl)isothiazolyl] ethyl thiocarbonate (IV), 5-Phenyl-3-(4-cyano-5-phenylisothiazol-3-yl) disulphanyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (V) and 1,2-Bis(4-cyano-5-phenylisothiazol-3-yl) sulphanyl Ethane (VI) derivatives were studied by using the hybrid B3LYP/6-31G* method. All the properties were compared and analyzed in function of the different R groups linked to the thiazole ring. This study clearly shows that the high polarity of (I) probably explains its elevated antiviral activity due to their facility to traverse biological membranes more rapidly than the other ones while in the (IV) and (V) derivatives the previous hydrolysis of both bonds increasing their antiviral properties inside the cell probably are related to their low S-R bond order values. In addition, the complete vibrational assignments and force constants are presented.

  13. Vibration Control by a Shear Type Semi-active Damper Using Magnetorheological Grease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Toshihiko; Misaki, Hirotaka

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes semi-active vibration control by a controllable damper with high reliability and wide dynamic range using magnetorheological (MR) grease. Some types of cylindrical controllable dampers based on pressure difference between chambers in the dampers using “MR fluid”, whose rheological properties can be varied by applying a magnetic field, have been reported as a semi-active device. However, there are some challenging issues of them. One is to improve dispersion stability. The particles dispersed in MR fluid would make sedimentation after a period. Another is to expand dynamic range. Since cylindrical dampers require sealing elements because of pressure difference in the dampers, the dynamic range between the maximum and minimum damping force according to a magnetic field is reduced. In this study, a controllable damper using the MR effect was proposed and its performance was experimentally verified to improve the dispersion stability by using “MR grease”, which includes grease as the carrier of magnetic particles, and to expand the dynamic range by adopting a shear type structure not requiring sealing elements. Furthermore, semiactive vibration control experiments by the MR grease damper using a simple algorithm based on the skyhook damper scheme were conducted and its performance was investigated.

  14. Active alignment and vibration control system for a large airborne optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienholz, David A.

    2000-04-01

    Airborne optical or electro-optical systems may be too large for all elements to be mounted on a single integrating structure, other than the aircraft fuselage itself. An active system must then be used to maintain the required alignment between elements. However the various smaller integrating structures (benches) must still be isolated from high- frequency airframe disturbances that could excite resonances outside the bandwidth of the alignment control system. The combined active alignment and vibration isolation functions must be performed by flight-weight components, which may have to operate in vacuum. A testbed system developed for the Air Force Airborne Laser program is described. The payload, a full-scale 1650-lb simulated bench, is mounted in six degrees- of-freedom to a vibrating platform by a set of isolator- actuators. The mounts utilize a combination of pneumatics and magnetics to perform the dual functions of low-frequency alignment and high-frequency isolation. Test results are given and future directions for development are described.

  15. Importance of backbone angles versus amino acid configurations in peptide vibrational Raman optical activity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Carmen; Ruud, Kenneth; Reiher, Markus

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we investigate whether the differential scattering of right- and left-circularly polarized light in peptide Raman optical activity spectra are uniquely dominated by the backbone conformation, or whether the configurations of the individual amino acid also play a significant role. This is achieved by calculating Raman optical activity spectra using density functional theory for four structurally related peptides with a common backbone conformation, but with different sequences of amino acid configurations. Furthermore, the ROA signals of the amide normal modes are decomposed into contributions from groups of individual atoms. It is found that the amino acid configuration has a considerable influence on the ROA peaks in the amide I, II, and III regions, although the local decomposition reveals that the side-chain atoms only contribute to those peaks directly in the case of the amide II vibrations. Furthermore, small changes in the amide normal modes may lead to large and irregular modifications in the ROA intensity differences, making it difficult to establish transferable ROA intensity differences even for structurally similar vibrations.

  16. Vibrational spectroscopic, structural and nonlinear optical activity studies on 6-aminonicotinamide: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Rekha, T. N.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 6-aminonicotinamide (ANA) using potential energy surface scan method and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The theoretical vibrational frequencies were calculated for the optimized geometry using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. The Mulliken atomic charge values were calculated. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intermolecular charge transfer studies and the related molecular properties were calculated. The ultraviolet-visible spectrum was simulated for both in the gas phase and liquid phase (ethanol) and the л to л* electronic transition was predicted. The nonlinear optical (NLO) activity was studied by means of the first order hyperpolarizability value, which was 8.61 times greater than the urea and the natural bond orbital analysis was also performed to confirm the NLO activity of the molecule. Hence, the ANA molecule is a promising candidate for the NLO materials.

  17. Effect of sympathetic nervous system activation on the tonic vibration reflex in rabbit jaw closing muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, C; Deriu, F; Passatore, M

    1993-01-01

    1. In precollicular decerebrate rabbits we investigated the effect of sympathetic stimulation, at frequencies within the physiological range, on the tonic vibration reflex (TVR) elicited in jaw closing muscles by small amplitude vibrations applied to the mandible (15-50 microns, 150-180 Hz). The EMG activity was recorded bilaterally from masseter muscle and the force developed by the reflex was measured through an isometric transducer connected with the mandibular symphysis. 2. Unilateral stimulation of the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic by the TVR, and a marked decrease or disappearance of the ipsilateral EMG activity. No significant changes were detected in the EMG contralateral to the stimulated nerve. Bilateral CSN stimulation reduced by 60-90% the force reflexly produced by the jaw closing muscles and strongly decreased or suppressed EMG activity on both sides. This effect was often preceded by a transient TVR enhancement, very variable in amplitude and duration, which was concomitant with the modest increase in pulmonary ventilation induced by the sympathetic stimulation. 3. During bilateral CSN stimulation, an increase in the vibration amplitude by a factor of 1.5-2.5 was sufficient to restore the TVR reduced by sympathetic stimulation. 4. The depressant action exerted by sympathetic activation on the TVR is mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors, since it was almost completely abolished by the I.V. administration of either phentolamine or prazosin, this last drug being a selective antagonist of alpha 1-adrenoceptors. The sympathetically induced decrease in the TVR was not mimicked by manoeuvres producing a large and sudden reduction or abolition of the blood flow to jaw muscles, such as unilateral or bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. 5. The effect of sympathetic stimulation was not significantly modified after denervation of the inferior dental arch and/or anaesthesia of the temporomandibular joint, i.e. after having reduced

  18. Application of piezoelectric actuators for vibration reduction in the F-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Ortiz, Juan Ramon

    2001-07-01

    Buffet excitation on the F-15 aircraft at high angles of attack reduces the life cycle of the vertical tails and the readiness of the aircraft. Previous studies have demonstrated a reduction on vibration to up to 50% with the application of active control systems to the twin tail structure of the F-15. This study applies the concept of noise cancellation in vibrating structures. A 4.7% scaled F-15 wind tunnel model with piezoelectric actuators and sensors embedded in the vertical tail structure is used for the development of a mathematical plant model and experimental evaluation of various control systems. System identification of the 4.7% scaled F-15 vertical tail model resulted in a single input single output state space model that successfully identified the 1st bending, 2nd bending and 3rd bending modes on the structure. Noise cancellation control, optimal control and proportional integral derivative control were implemented with a digital controller to reduce vibrations in the structure. Power spectral densities show reductions of up to 80% attenuation in the structure with the application of the closed loop feedforward controller noise cancellation concept. An analysis of wind tunnel models, piezoelectric materials, structural dynamics, system identification, digital signal processing, control system implementation and experimental validation was performed during this research and lead to an integrated study that could impact the sustainment of the aircraft.

  19. A six-axis hybrid vibration isolation system using active zero-power control supported by passive weight support mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emdadul Hoque, Md.; Mizuno, Takeshi; Ishino, Yuji; Takasaki, Masaya

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a six-degree-of-freedom hybrid vibration isolation system integrated with an active negative suspension, an active-passive positive suspension and a passive weight support mechanism. The aim of the research consists in maximizing the system and control performances, and minimizing the system development and maintenance costs. The vibration isolation system is, fundamentally, developed by connecting an active negative suspension realized by zero-power control in series with an active-passive positive suspension. The system could effectively isolate ground vibrations in addition to suppress the effect of on-board generated direct disturbances of the six-axis motions, associated with vertical and horizontal directions. The system is further reinforced by introducing a passive weight support mechanism in parallel with the basic system. The modified system with zero-power control allows simplified design of the isolation table without power consumption. It also offers enhanced performance on direct disturbance suppression and large payload supporting capabilities, without degrading transmissibility characteristics. A mathematical model of the system is presented and, therefore, analyzed to demonstrate that zero-compliance to direct disturbance could be generated by the developed system. Experimental demonstrations validate the proposed concept that exhibits high stiffness of the isolation table to static and dynamic direct disturbances, and good transmissibility characteristics against ground vibration. Further improvements of the vibration isolation system and the control system are discussed as well.

  20. Active control of aircraft cabin noise and vibration using a physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Desheng

    In this thesis, active noise and vibration control of aircraft cabins is investigated, in which aircraft cabins are modeled as a cylindrical shell with a floor partition. As the first step toward a successful control strategy, a structural acoustic coupling analysis of the investigated structure is carried out. A new method called "Radiation Efficiency Analysis of Structural Modes (REASM)", suitable for enclosures with irregular shapes, is proposed and applied in the current analysis. Then, the optimal design of control systems consisting of PZT actuators and PVDF error sensors is discussed. A novel design method for PVDF error sensors called "GA-based method" is introduced and shown to be very effective when complex structures are involved. Finally, an active control system is implemented on a scaled laboratory aircraft-cabin model. Both the simulation and experimental results show the great potential of using piezoelectric transducers in noise control and the significant performance improvement achieved through optimal design.

  1. Finite Element Formulation and Active Vibration Control Study on Beams Using Smart Constrained Layer Damping (scld) Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BALAMURUGAN, V.; NARAYANAN, S.

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the active vibration control of beams with smart constrained layer damping (SCLD) treatment. SCLD design consists of viscoelastic shear layer sandwiched between two layers of piezoelectric sensors and actuator. This composite SCLD when bonded to a vibrating structure acts as a smart treatment. The sensor piezoelectric layer measures the vibration response of the structure and a feedback controller is provided which regulates the axial deformation of the piezoelectric actuator (constraining layer), thereby providing adjustable and significant damping in the structure. The damping offered by SCLD treatment has two components, active action and passive action. The active action is transmitted from the piezoelectric actuator to the host structure through the viscoelastic layer. The passive action is through the shear deformation in the viscoelastic layer. The active action apart from providing direct active control also adjusts the passive action by regulating the shear deformation in the structure. The passive damping component of this design eliminates spillover, reduces power consumption, improves robustness and reliability of the system, and reduces vibration response at high-frequency ranges where active damping is difficult to implement. A beam finite element model has been developed based on Timoshenko's beam theory with partially covered SCLD. The Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method has been used to model the viscoelastic layer. The dissipation co-ordinates, defined using GHM approach, describe the frequency-dependent viscoelastic material properties. Models of PCLD and purely active systems could be obtained as a special case of SCLD. Using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control, the effects of the SCLD on vibration suppression performance and control effort requirements are investigated. The effects of the viscoelastic layer thickness and material properties on the vibration control performance are investigated.

  2. Cancellation of a planned movement in monkey motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Alexa; Grammont, Franck; MacKay, William A

    2006-02-27

    Abruptly stopping a planned movement before it has even begun can be crucial to retarding a premature action. In the monkey motor cortex, we report herein that rapid cancellation of a prepared motor act involved the brief activation of neurons representing a movement in the opposite direction (anti-directional activity). When an expected GO signal failed to occur, this opposing anti-directional discharge appeared. It coincided in time with the cessation of the motor cortical activity preparing the requested arm reach. We suggest that functional interactions between subpopulations of neurons eliciting movements in opposite directions could rapidly alter population dynamics, and therefore be used to abruptly cancel a planned movement.

  3. [EFFECTS OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION TRAINING ON BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL FITNESS IN RECREATIONALLY ACTIVE YOUNG ADULTS].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pardo, Esmeraldo; Martínez-Ruiz, Enrique; Alcaraz, Pedro E; Rubio-Arias, Jacobo A

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, it has been suggested that whole- body vibration training (WBV) may increase neuromuscular performance and consequently affect the muscular improvement as either acute response to vibration or chronic adaptation training. Vibrating platforms generate frequencies from 5-45 Hz and vertical oscillations of 1-11 mm peak to peak, affecting more or less intensity acceleration changing by combining frequency and amplitude. Vibration training, in a session as various offers different results in regard to changes in body composition and in increasing the vertical jump, sprint, and the different manifestations of force development. These promising results await further research to establish parameters (duration, frequency and amplitude) with vibration stimulation in young active subjects. This literature review provides an update on the scientific evidence on the body vibrations in order to answer the question whether WBV, meaning the exercise by increasing the gravitational load collection, is a treatment option if the aim is to improve neuromuscular function, flexibility, balance, agility, coordination and body composition.

  4. Experimental testing of a semi-active control scheme for vibration suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniwangsa, Wendy; Kelly, James M.

    1997-05-01

    An experimental investigation was performed on a semi-active control scheme that uses the rheological properties of electro-rheological fluids (ER-fluids) in squeeze-flow mode to control the dynamic behavior of single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems. The reversible and very rapid changes in the mechanical properties of the fluid under variable voltage are exploited by using a control scheme that automatically turns 'on' and 'off' the electrical field as loads are applied. This control scheme rapidly adapts to any changes in the mechanical properties of the system, reducing the response of the structure for a wide range of excitation frequencies. The ER- fluid used in this study, Zeolite in silicone oil, was subjected to an electrical field range from one to five kV/mm. Tests were carried out for the 'off' system, the 'on' system, and the controlled system, and the experimental and analytical results were compared. The experimental results show that this control scheme is effective for reducing the vibration of the system. Other types of ER-fluid should be tested using this control scheme to investigate the most effective fluid for vibration suppression.

  5. Shape and vibration control of active laminated plates for RF and optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punhani, Amitesh; Washington, Gregory N.

    2006-03-01

    Active shape and vibration control of large structures have long been desired for many practical applications. PVDF being one of the most suitable materials for these applications due to its strong piezoelectric properties and availability in thin sheets has been the focal point of most researchers in this area. Most of the research has been done to find an open loop solution, which would be able to shape the structure as per the desired requirements in an ideal atmosphere. Unmodeled dynamics and external disturbances prevent the open loop (no feedback) solution from achieving the desired shape. This research develops a dynamic model of a laminated plate consisting of two layers of PVDF film joined with a layer of epoxy. The orthotropic properties of PVDF have been modeled and the epoxy layer is considered to be isotropic. A general control model is developed, which would work for most boundary conditions and developed for a simply supported beam with patch actuators. The methodology is then extended for a simply supported laminated plate. This model could be used for real time dynamic disturbance rejection and shape and vibration control of the structure.

  6. Control of seismic and operational vibrations of rotating machines using semi-active mounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Soong, T. T.

    2004-06-01

    A dual isolation problem for rotating machines consists of isolation of housing structures from the machine vibrations and protection of machines during an earthquake to maintain their functionality. Desirable characteristics of machine mounts for the above two purposes can differ significantly due to difference in nature of the excitation and performance criteria in the two situations. In this paper, relevant response quantities are identified that may be used to quantify performance and simplified models of rotating machines are presented using which these relevant response quantities may be calculated. Using random vibration approach with a stationary excitation, it is shown that significant improvement in seismic performance is achievable by proper mount design. Results of shaking table experiments performed with a realistic setup using a centrifugal pump are presented. It is concluded that a solution to this dual isolation problem lies in a semi-active mount capable switching its properties from ‘operation-optimum’ to ‘seismic-optimum’ at the onset of a seismic event.

  7. Time-domain filtered-x-Newton narrowband algorithms for active isolation of frequency-fluctuating vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; He, Lin; Shuai, Chang-geng; Wang, Fei

    2016-04-01

    A time-domain filtered-x Newton narrowband algorithm (the Fx-Newton algorithm) is proposed to address three major problems in active isolation of machinery vibration: multiple narrowband components, MIMO coupling, and amplitude and frequency fluctuations. In this algorithm, narrowband components are extracted by narrowband-pass filters (NBPF) and independently controlled by multi-controllers, and fast convergence of the control algorithm is achieved by inverse secondary-path filtering of the extracted sinusoidal reference signal and its orthogonal component using L×L numbers of 2nd-order filters in the time domain. Controller adapting and control signal generation are also implemented in the time domain, to ensure good real-time performance. The phase shift caused by narrowband filter is compensated online to improve the robustness of control system to frequency fluctuations. A double-reference Fx-Newton algorithm is also proposed to control double sinusoids in the same frequency band, under the precondition of acquiring two independent reference signals. Experiments are conducted with an MIMO single-deck vibration isolation system on which a 200 kW ship diesel generator is mounted, and the algorithms are tested under the vibration alternately excited by the diesel generator and inertial shakers. The results of control over sinusoidal vibration excited by inertial shakers suggest that the Fx-Newton algorithm with NBPF have much faster convergence rate and better attenuation effect than the Fx-LMS algorithm. For swept, frequency-jumping, double, double frequency-swept and double frequency-jumping sinusoidal vibration, and multiple high-level harmonics in broadband vibration excited by the diesel generator, the proposed algorithms also demonstrate large vibration suppression at fast convergence rate, and good robustness to vibration with frequency fluctuations.

  8. The association of flares to cancelling magnetic features on the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livi, Silvia H. B.; Martin, Sara; Wang, Haimin; Ai, Guoxiang

    1989-01-01

    Previous work relating flares to evolutionary changes of photospheric solar magnetic fields are reviewed and reinterpreted in the light of recent observations of canceling magnetic fields. The results show that cancelation happens with fields spanning a wide range of magnetic field strengths. Flares of all magnitudes begin adjacent to cancelation sites, whether the associated active region as a whole is developing or decaying. Both small and big flares are initiated near canceling sites, from the microflares associated with ephemeral regions to the kernels of the great flares. Canceling magnetic flux is observed or deduced to be the common denominator among all observed associations of flares to changing magnetic fields. It is proposed that canceling magnetic fields are a necessary evolutionary condition for the initiation of solar flares.

  9. Effect of Vibration Frequency on Serratus Anterior Muscle Activity during Performance of the Push-up Plus with a Redcord Sling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui-Ryong; Oh, Jae-Seop; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect of vibration at various frequencies on serratus anterior (SA) muscle activity. [Subjects] Ten male subjects were recruited. [Methods] The subjects performed the push-up plus exercise supported by straps above the surface and vertical ropes in the Redcord sling. During the push-up plus, vibrations of 0, 30, 50, or 90 Hz were applied to the Redcord sling using a mechanical vibration apparatus attached to the rope. SA muscle activity was recorded using electromyography. [Results] SA muscle activity at the 50 Hz vibration frequency was significantly higher than that of no vibration. [Conclusion] Performing the push-up plus using a Redcord sling with mechanical vibration of 50 Hz effectively increased SA muscle activity.

  10. Improved training of neural networks for the nonlinear active control of sound and vibration.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, M; Paillard, B; Le Dinh, C T

    1999-01-01

    Active control of sound and vibration has been the subject of a lot of research in recent years, and examples of applications are now numerous. However, few practical implementations of nonlinear active controllers have been realized. Nonlinear active controllers may be required in cases where the actuators used in active control systems exhibit nonlinear characteristics, or in cases when the structure to be controlled exhibits a nonlinear behavior. A multilayer perceptron neural-network based control structure was previously introduced as a nonlinear active controller, with a training algorithm based on an extended backpropagation scheme. This paper introduces new heuristical training algorithms for the same neural-network control structure. The objective is to develop new algorithms with faster convergence speed (by using nonlinear recursive-least-squares algorithms) and/or lower computational loads (by using an alternative approach to compute the instantaneous gradient of the cost function). Experimental results of active sound control using a nonlinear actuator with linear and nonlinear controllers are presented. The results show that some of the new algorithms can greatly improve the learning rate of the neural-network control structure, and that for the considered experimental setup a neural-network controller can outperform linear controllers.

  11. Active vibration control of structure by Active Mass Damper and Multi-Modal Negative Acceleration Feedback control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Don-Ho; Shin, Ji-Hwan; Lee, HyunWook; Kim, Seoug-Ki; Kwak, Moon K.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an Active Mass Damper (AMD) consisting of an AC servo motor, a movable mass connected to the AC servo motor by a ball-screw mechanism, and an accelerometer as a sensor for vibration measurement were considered. Considering the capability of the AC servo motor which can follow the desired displacement accurately, the Negative Acceleration Feedback (NAF) control algorithm which uses the acceleration signal directly and produces the desired displacement for the active mass was proposed. The effectiveness of the NAF control was proved theoretically using a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system. It was found that the stability condition for the NAF control is static and it can effectively increase the damping of the target natural mode without causing instability in the low frequency region. Based on the theoretical results of the SDOF system, the Multi-Modal NAF (MMNAF) control is proposed to suppress the many natural modes of multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems using a single AMD. It was proved both theoretically and experimentally that the MMNAF control can suppress vibrations of the MDOF system.

  12. 77 FR 19747 - Proposed Cancelation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Proposed Cancelation of the Air Taxi Authority Of VIH Cougar Helicopters, Inc... cause why it should not issue an order finding that VIH Cougar Helicopters, Inc. is not a U.S....

  13. 47 CFR 213.3 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cancellation. 213.3 Section 213.3 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CORRESPONDENCE TELECOMMUNICATIONS PRECEDENCE SYSTEM § 213.3 Cancellation. This circular cancels: (a)...

  14. 47 CFR 213.3 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cancellation. 213.3 Section 213.3 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CORRESPONDENCE TELECOMMUNICATIONS PRECEDENCE SYSTEM § 213.3 Cancellation. This circular cancels: (a)...

  15. 47 CFR 213.3 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cancellation. 213.3 Section 213.3 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CORRESPONDENCE TELECOMMUNICATIONS PRECEDENCE SYSTEM § 213.3 Cancellation. This circular cancels: (a)...

  16. 47 CFR 213.3 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cancellation. 213.3 Section 213.3 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CORRESPONDENCE TELECOMMUNICATIONS PRECEDENCE SYSTEM § 213.3 Cancellation. This circular cancels: (a)...

  17. 47 CFR 213.3 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cancellation. 213.3 Section 213.3 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CORRESPONDENCE TELECOMMUNICATIONS PRECEDENCE SYSTEM § 213.3 Cancellation. This circular cancels: (a)...

  18. 7 CFR 1942.12 - Loan cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be cancelled. The borrower's attorney and engineer/architect, if any, should be notified of the cancellation. The Rural Development Manager may provide the borrower's attorney and engineer/architect with a... Affairs and Public Information by telephone or electronic mail and give the reasons for such cancellation....

  19. 7 CFR 1942.12 - Loan cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be cancelled. The borrower's attorney and engineer/architect, if any, should be notified of the cancellation. The Rural Development Manager may provide the borrower's attorney and engineer/architect with a... Affairs and Public Information by telephone or electronic mail and give the reasons for such cancellation....

  20. 7 CFR 1942.12 - Loan cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... be cancelled. The borrower's attorney and engineer/architect, if any, should be notified of the cancellation. The Rural Development Manager may provide the borrower's attorney and engineer/architect with a... Affairs and Public Information by telephone or electronic mail and give the reasons for such cancellation....

  1. 7 CFR 1942.12 - Loan cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be cancelled. The borrower's attorney and engineer/architect, if any, should be notified of the cancellation. The Rural Development Manager may provide the borrower's attorney and engineer/architect with a... Affairs and Public Information by telephone or electronic mail and give the reasons for such cancellation....

  2. 7 CFR 1942.12 - Loan cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be cancelled. The borrower's attorney and engineer/architect, if any, should be notified of the cancellation. The Rural Development Manager may provide the borrower's attorney and engineer/architect with a... Affairs and Public Information by telephone or electronic mail and give the reasons for such cancellation....

  3. 34 CFR 674.52 - Cancellation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cancellation procedures. 674.52 Section 674.52... EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Loan Cancellation § 674.52 Cancellation... borrower, or, if the borrower is the spouse of an eligible public servant as defined in § 674.64(a)(1),...

  4. Non-symmetrical semi-active vibration control based on synchronized switching damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Zhang, Jin; Nie, Hong; Cheng, Li

    2014-04-01

    An unsymmetrical switch circuit is designed for semi-active control method based on synchronized switching damping principle of piezoelectric actuators. A bypass capacitor and an additional switch are used to realize unsymmetrical bipolar voltage. The control logic of the switches is introduced in detail and the switched voltages, which directly influence the control performance, are derived as functions of the vibration amplitude and the outputs of the voltage sources. Simulations were carried out to verify the design circuit and the theoretical results of the switched voltage. The voltage ratio increases with increasing bypass capacitance, but its increasing rate decreases. The results show that large bypass capacitor is needed to realize a voltage ratio of 3, which is common in some piezoelectric actuator such as MFC.

  5. Real-time moving horizon estimation for a vibrating active cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahpouri, Mohammad; Takács, Gergely; Rohaľ-Ilkiv, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Vibrating structures may be subject to changes throughout their operating lifetime due to a range of environmental and technical factors. These variations can be considered as parameter changes in the dynamic model of the structure, while their online estimates can be utilized in adaptive control strategies, or in structural health monitoring. This paper implements the moving horizon estimation (MHE) algorithm on a low-cost embedded computing device that is jointly observing the dynamic states and parameter variations of an active cantilever beam in real time. The practical behavior of this algorithm has been investigated in various experimental scenarios. It has been found, that for the given field of application, moving horizon estimation converges faster than the extended Kalman filter; moreover, it handles atypical measurement noise, sensor errors or other extreme changes, reliably. Despite its improved performance, the experiments demonstrate that the disadvantage of solving the nonlinear optimization problem in MHE is that it naturally leads to an increase in computational effort.

  6. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. II - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, V. L.; Fuller, C. R.; Silcox, R. J.; Brown, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Actively controlled harmonic force inputs were applied experimentally to reduce the sound transmitted through an elastic circular plate. The control implementation used a time domain least mean square adaptive algorithm with two error sensors. The control forces were applied directly to the plate by point force vibration inputs, while the error information and performance were measured in the radiated acoustic field by microphones. Test cases were also performed in which the error sensors were accelerometers mounted on the plate. When accelerometers were used as error sensors, the controller performance was degraded; leading to the conclusion that minimizing plate motion does not necessarily lead to an associated decrease in radiated sound levels. In contrast, the results show excellent attenuation of the transmitted sound field when microphone error sensors were used. This result was consistent over a range of frequencies. In addition, the experimental results are compared to previously derived analytical results and the effect of using a point or global minimization scheme is discussed.

  7. Active vibration absorber for CSI evolutionary model: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstration to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility was developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The design is discussed of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. The primary performance objective considered is damping augmentation of the first nine structural modes. Comparison of experimental and predicted closed loop damping is presented, including test and simulation time histories for open and closed loop cases. Although the simulation and test results are not in full agreement, robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated. The basic advantage of this second order controller design is that the stability of the controller is model independent.

  8. Suppression of two-dimensional vortex-induced vibration with active velocity feedback controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Srinil, N.

    2016-09-01

    Vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) establish key design parameters for offshore and subsea structures subject to current flows. Understanding and predicting VIV phenomena have been improved in recent years. Further, there is a need to determine how to effectively and economically mitigate VIV effects. In this study, linear and nonlinear velocity feedback controllers are applied to actively suppress the combined cross-flow and in-line VIV of an elastically-mounted rigid circular cylinder. The strongly coupled fluid-structure interactions are numerically modelled and investigated using a calibrated reduced-order wake oscillator derived from the vortex strength concept. The importance of structural geometrical nonlinearities is studied which highlights the model ability in matching experimental results. The effectiveness of linear vs nonlinear controllers are analysed with regard to the control direction, gain and power. Parametric studies are carried out which allow us to choose the linear vs nonlinear control, depending on the target controlled amplitudes and associated power requirements.

  9. An analytical derivative procedure for the calculation of vibrational Raman optical activity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liégeois, Vincent; Ruud, Kenneth; Champagne, Benoît

    2007-11-01

    We present an analytical time-dependent Hartree-Fock algorithm for the calculation of the derivatives of the electric dipole-magnetic dipole polarizability with respect to atomic Cartesian coordinates. Combined with analogous procedures to determine the derivatives of the electric dipole-electric dipole and electric dipole-electric quadrupole polarizabilities, it enables a fully analytical evaluation of the three frequency-dependent vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) invariants within the harmonic approximation. The procedure employs traditional non-London atomic orbitals, and the gauge-origin dependence of the VROA intensities has, therefore, been assessed for the commonly used aug-cc-pVDZ and rDPS:3-21G basis sets.

  10. Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational force inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders is analytically and experimentally studied. The primary (noise) field in the cylinder model is generated by the coupled dynamic response of the shell under loading by a single exterior acoustic source. Control of the interior sound field is achieved by applying vibrational force inputs directly to the shell wall. Action of the point controllers serve to increase the input impedance of select structural modes of the shell which are well-coupled to the interior acoustic cavity, thus substantially reducing sound transmission into the cavity. Spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 30 dB are demonstrated for acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity. Twin controller configurations are presented which demonstrate the ability to independently control orthogonal modes of the interior acoustic space. Benefits and drawbacks of this new methodology for noise control are discussed and clearly demonstrated.

  11. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an actively controlled partial span trailing edge flap located on the blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes an analytical study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap located on the blade. The vibration reduction produced by the actively controlled flap (ACF) is compared with that obtained using individual blade control (IBC), in which the entire blade is oscillated in pitch. For both cases a deterministic feedback controller is implemented to reduce the 4/rev hub loads. For all cases considered, the ACF produced vibration reduction comparable with that obtained using IBC, but consumed only 10-30% of the power required to implement IBC. A careful parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of blade torsional stiffness, spanwise location of the control flap, and hinge moment correction on the vibration reduction characteristics of the ACF. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach to vibration reduction. It should be emphasized than the ACF, used together with a conventional swashplate, is completely decoupled from the primary flight control system and thus it has no influence on the airworthiness of the helicopter. This attribute is potentially a significant advantage when compared to IBC.

  12. Distinct Skeletal Muscle Gene Regulation from Active Contraction, Passive Vibration, and Whole Body Heat Stress in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael A.; Kimball, Amy L.; McHenry, Colleen L.; Suneja, Manish; Yen, Chu-Ling; Sharma, Arpit; Shields, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exercise regulates several important metabolic genes in humans. We know little about the effects of environmental stress (heat) and mechanical stress (vibration) on skeletal muscle. Passive mechanical stress or systemic heat stress are often used in combination with many active exercise programs. We designed a method to deliver a vibration stress and systemic heat stress to compare the effects with active skeletal muscle contraction. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine whether active mechanical stress (muscle contraction), passive mechanical stress (vibration), or systemic whole body heat stress regulates key gene signatures associated with muscle metabolism, hypertrophy/atrophy, and inflammation/repair. Methods: Eleven subjects, six able-bodied and five with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) participated in the study. The six able-bodied subjects sat in a heat stress chamber for 30 minutes. Five subjects with SCI received a single dose of limb-segment vibration or a dose of repetitive electrically induced muscle contractions. Three hours after the completion of each stress, we performed a muscle biopsy (vastus lateralis or soleus) to analyze mRNA gene expression. Results: We discovered repetitive active muscle contractions up regulated metabolic transcription factors NR4A3 (12.45 fold), PGC-1α (5.46 fold), and ABRA (5.98 fold); and repressed MSTN (0.56 fold). Heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05); while vibration induced FOXK2 (2.36 fold change; p < 0.05). Vibration similarly caused a down regulation of MSTN (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05), but to a lesser extent than active muscle contraction. Vibration induced FOXK2 (p < 0.05) while heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold) and ANKRD1 genes (0.51 fold; p < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings support a distinct gene regulation in response to heat stress, vibration, and muscle contractions. Understanding these responses may assist in developing regenerative

  13. Enhanced Cancelable Biometrics for Online Signature Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Daigo; Inuma, Manabu; Shikata, Junji; Otsuka, Akira

    Cancelable approaches for biometric person authentication have been studied to protect enrolled biometric data, and several algorithms have been proposed. One drawback of cancelable approaches is that the performance is inferior to that of non-cancelable approaches. In this paper, we propose a scheme to improve the performance of a cancelable approach for online signature verification. Our scheme generates two cancelable dataset from one raw dataset and uses them for verification. Preliminary experiments were performed using a distance-based online signature verification algorithm. The experimental results show that our proposed scheme is promising.

  14. Lower Arm Muscle Activation during Indirect-Localized Vibration: The Influence of Skill Levels When Applying Different Acceleration Loads

    PubMed Central

    Padulo, Johnny; Di Giminiani, Riccardo; Dello Iacono, Antonio; Zagatto, Alessandro M.; Migliaccio, Gian M.; Grgantov, Zoran; Ardigò, Luca P.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the electromyographic response to synchronous indirect-localized vibration interventions in international and national table tennis players. Twenty-six male table tennis players, in a standing position, underwent firstly an upper arms maximal voluntary contraction and thereafter two different 30-s vibration interventions in random order: high acceleration load (peak acceleration = 12.8 g, frequency = 40 Hz; peak-to-peak displacement = 4.0 mm), and low acceleration load (peak acceleration = 7.2 g, frequency = 30 Hz, peak-to-peak displacement = 4.0 mm). Surface electromyography root mean square from brachioradialis, extensor digitorum, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor digitorum superficialis recorded during the two vibration interventions was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction recording. Normalized surface electromyography root mean square was higher in international table tennis players with respect to national ones in all the interactions between muscles and vibration conditions (P < 0.05), with the exception of flexor carpi radialis (at low acceleration load, P > 0.05). The difference in normalized surface electromyography root mean square between international table tennis players and national ones increased in all the muscles with high acceleration load (P < 0.05), with the exception of flexor digitorum superficialis (P > 0.05). The muscle activation during indirect-localized vibration seems to be both skill level and muscle dependent. These results can optimize the training intervention in table tennis players when applying indirect-localized vibration to lower arm muscles. Future investigations should discriminate between middle- and long-term adaptations in response to specific vibration loads. PMID:27378948

  15. Active-passive hybrid piezoelectric network-based smart structures for vibration controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Meng-Shiun

    1998-12-01

    This thesis investigates the active-passive hybrid piezoelectric network (APPN) based adaptive structures for vibration and noise controls. It consists of three parts: (1) investigation of active piezoelectric actuators with passive networks to achieve hybrid damping; (2) integration of active-passive hybrid piezoelectric networks with active constrained layer treatments; (3) development of a coupled robust control/optimization process for the active-passive adaptive structures. The partial differential equations of motion of a beam structure with piezoelectric network are derived via Hamilton's principle. The Galerkin's method is employed to discretize and analyze the model in time domain. The open loop analysis shows that the shunt circuit can provide passive damping as well as enhance the active action around the tuned frequency. Therefore, the integrated APPN design is more effective than a system with separated active and passive elements. A bench top test is performed to verify the open loop behavior of the APPN, purely active and separated systems. It is shown that the experimental observations agree with the analytical findings. It is also recognized that a concurrent design/control method is needed to ensure that the passive and active actions are optimally synthesized. Such a method is developed and presented. The characteristics of the closed-loop system are analyzed. The APPN concepts are further illustrated on a ring structure with multiple actuators and sensors. The concurrent design/control method is modified to include a Kalman filter, which is employed to estimate the states from piezoelectric sensor measurements. Analysis results indicate that the APPN approach can suppress vibration and noise radiation effectively, and it can achieve better performance with less control effort as compared to a purely active system. It is illustrated that the performance difference between the APPN and purely active cases becomes smaller as the excitation

  16. Active vibration control of Flexible Joint Manipulator using Input Shaping and Adaptive Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. P.; Luo, B.; Huang, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a vibration control strategy for a two-link Flexible Joint Manipulator (FJM) with a Hexapod Active Manipulator (HAM). A dynamic model of the multi-body, rigid-flexible system composed of an FJM, a HAM and a spacecraft was built. A hybrid controller was proposed by combining the Input Shaping (IS) technique with an Adaptive-Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller (APADRC). The controller was used to suppress the vibration caused by external disturbances and input motions. Parameters of the APADRC were adaptively adjusted to ensure the characteristic of the closed loop system to be a given reference system, even if the configuration of the manipulator significantly changes during motion. Because precise parameters of the flexible manipulator are not required in the IS system, the operation of the controller was sufficiently robust to accommodate uncertainties in system parameters. Simulations results verified the effectiveness of the HAM scheme and controller in the vibration suppression of FJM during operation.

  17. Active pneumatic vibration isolation system using negative stiffness structures for a vehicle seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danh, Le Thanh; Ahn, Kyoung Kwan

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, an active pneumatic vibration isolation system using negative stiffness structures (NSS) for a vehicle seat in low excitation frequencies is proposed, which is named as an active system with NSS. Here, the negative stiffness structures (NSS) are used to minimize the vibratory attraction of a vehicle seat. Owing to the time-varying and nonlinear behavior of the proposed system, it is not easy to build an accurate dynamic for model-based controller design. Thus, an adaptive intelligent backstepping controller (AIBC) is designed to manage the system operation for high-isolation effectiveness. In addition, an auxiliary control effort is also introduced to eliminate the effect of the unpredictable perturbations. Moreover, a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) model is utilized to estimate the optimal gain of the auxiliary control effort. Final control input and the adaptive law for updating coefficients of the approximate series can be obtained step by step using a suitable Lyapunov function. Afterward, the isolation performance of the proposed system is assessed experimentally. In addition, the effectiveness of the designed controller for the proposed system is also compared with that of the traditional backstepping controller (BC). The experimental results show that the isolation effectiveness of the proposed system is better than that of the active system without NSS. Furthermore, the undesirable chattering phenomenon in control effort is quite reduced by the estimation mechanism. Finally, some concluding remarks are given at the end of the paper.

  18. Robust-adaptive active vibration control of alloy and flexible matrix composite rotorcraft drivelines via magnetic bearings: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmidt, Hans A.

    This thesis explores the use of Active Magnetic Bearing (AMB) technology and newly emerging Flexible Matrix Composite (FMC) materials to advance the state-of-the-art of rotorcraft and other high performance driveline systems. Specifically, two actively controlled tailrotor driveline configurations are explored. The first driveline configuration (Configuration I) consists of a multi-segment alloy driveline connected by Non-Constant-Velocity (NCV) flexible couplings and mounted on non-contact AMB devices. The second configuration (Configuration II) consists of a single piece, rigidly coupled, FMC shaft supported by AMBs. For each driveline configuration, a novel hybrid robust-adaptive vibration control strategy is theoretically developed and experimentally validated based on the specific driveline characteristics and uncertainties. In the case of Configuration I, the control strategy is based on a hybrid design consisting of a PID feedback controller augmented with a slowly adapting, Multi-Harmonic Adaptive Vibration Control (MHAVC) input. Here, the control is developed to ensure robustness with respect to the driveline operating conditions e.g. driveline misalignment, load-torque, shaft speed and shaft imbalance. The analysis shows that the hybrid PID/MHAVC control strategy achieves multi-harmonic suppression of the imbalance, misalignment and load-torque induced driveline vibration over a range of operating conditions. Furthermore, the control law developed for Configuration II is based on a hybrid robust Hinfinity feedback/Synchronous Adaptive Vibration Control (SAVC) strategy. Here, the effects of temperature dependent FMC material properties, rotating-frame damping and shaft imbalance are considered in the control design. The analysis shows that the hybrid Hinfinity/SAVC control strategy guarantees stability, convergence and imbalance vibration suppression under the conditions of bounded temperature deviations and unknown imbalance. Finally, the robustness and

  19. Low vibration microminiature split Stirling cryogenic cooler for infrared aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, A.; Zechtzer, S.; Pundak, N.; Kirkconnel, C.; Freeman, J.; Riabzev, S.

    2011-06-01

    The operation of the thermo-mechanical unit of a cryogenic cooler may originate a resonant excitation of the spacecraft frame, optical bench or components of the optical train. This may result in degraded functionality of the inherently vibration sensitive space-borne infrared imager directly associated with the cooler or neighboring instrumentation typically requiring a quiet micro-g environment. The best practice for controlling cooler induced vibration relies on the principle of active momentum cancellation. In particular, the pressure wave generator typically contains two oppositely actuated piston compressors, while the single piston expander is counterbalanced by an auxiliary active counter-balancer. Active vibration cancellation is supervised by a dedicated DSP feed-forward controller, where the error signals are delivered by the vibration sensors (accelerometers or load cells). This can result in oversized, overweight and overpriced cryogenic coolers with degraded electromechanical performance and impaired reliability. The authors are advocating a reliable, compact, cost and power saving approach capitalizing on the combined application of a passive tuned dynamic absorber and a low frequency vibration isolator. This concept appears to be especially suitable for low budget missions involving mini and micro satellites, where price, size, weight and power consumption are of concern. The authors reveal the results of theoretical study and experimentation on the attainable performance using a fullscale technology demonstrator relying on a Ricor model K527 tactical split Stirling cryogenic cooler. The theoretical predictions are in fair agreement with the experimental data. From experimentation, the residual vibration export is quite suitable for demanding wide range of aerospace applications. The authors give practical recommendations on heatsinking and further maximizing performance.

  20. H.R. 73: A Bill to protect the ecologically fragile coastal resources of south Florida by prohibiting offshore oil and gas activities and by cancelling Federal leases in the area of the Outer Continental Shelf adjacent to the south Florida coast. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 73, A Bill to protect the ecologically fragile coastal resources of south Florida by prohibiting offshore oil and gas activities and by cancelling Federal leases in the area of the Outer Continental Shelf adjacent to south Florida. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 4, 1995.

  1. The reduction of rotorcraft power and vibration using optimally controlled active gurney flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Eui Sung

    The main topic of the present study is the application of active control scheme for the reduction of rotorcraft main rotor power reduction and vibratory load. When the helicopter is operated near its flight boundary, the required power and vibratory loads rapidly increases which impose a limit on the helicopter operation. Various methods were proposed and studied in order to achieve performance improvement under such operating condition. The effect of active control scheme was examined for its impact on the performance improvement and vibration reduction in the present study. Numerical simulations are based on the UH-60A Blackhawk helicopter with an active Gurney flap spanning from 70%R to 80%R of the main rotor. For obtaining the aeroelastic response of the rotor blade, finite element method was used to represent elastic blade. The aerodynamic loads acting on the blade are provided by CFD based 2D lookup table. Prescribed wake model was used to resolve the induced inflow over the rotor disk. The unsteady aerodynamic behavior due to the higher harmonic actuation of active Gurney flap was resolved by the time-domain unsteady aerodynamic model. The first part of preliminary study covers parametric study using Gurney flap. Starting with simple rigid blade representation of the rotor blade, the effect of 1/rev Gurney flap actuation was examined on three different gross weights. The effect of active Gurney flap width, the chordwise location of active Gurney flap, the effect of unsteady aerodynamic model, and the effect of 2/rev actuation frequency were examined. The second part of preliminary study was conducted with the elastic blade model to include the effect of torsion dynamics. Performance improvement using active Gurney flap was examined for maximizing thrust capability at two flight speeds. 1/rev Gurney flap actuation increased the gross weight capability up to 1,000 lbs. Also, 1/rev actuation of Gurney flap increased maximum altitude limit of baseline rotor by 1

  2. Phase of shear vibrations within cochlear partition leads to activation of the cochlear amplifier.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Jessica S; Chadwick, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Since Georg von Bekesy laid out the place theory of the hearing, researchers have been working to understand the remarkable properties of mammalian hearing. Because access to the cochlea is restricted in live animals, and important aspects of hearing are destroyed in dead ones, models play a key role in interpreting local measurements. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) models are attractive because they are analytically tractable, appropriate to the oblong geometry of the cochlea, and can predict wave behavior over a large span of the cochlea. Interest in the role the tectorial membrane (TM) plays in cochlear tuning led us to develop models that directly interface the TM with the cochlear fluid. In this work we add an angled shear between the TM and reticular lamina (RL), which serves as an input to a nonlinear active force. This feature plus a novel combination of previous work gives us a model with TM-fluid interaction, TM-RL shear, a nonlinear active force and a second wave mode. The behavior we get leads to the conclusion the phase between the shear and basilar membrane (BM) vibration is critical for amplification. We show there is a transition in this phase that occurs at a frequency below the cutoff, which is strongly influenced by TM stiffness. We describe this mechanism of sharpened BM velocity profile, which demonstrates the importance of the TM in overall cochlear tuning and offers an explanation for the response characteristics of the Tectb mutant mouse.

  3. The Effect of a Single Session of Whole-Body Vibration Training in Recreationally Active Men on the Excitability of the Central and Peripheral Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewska, Daria; Piecha, Magdalena; Błaszczak, Edward; Król, Piotr; Smykla, Agnieszka; Juras, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Vibration training has become a popular method used in professional sports and recreation. In this study, we examined the effect of whole-body vibration training on the central nervous system and muscle excitability in a group of 28 active men. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of two experimental groups with different variables of vibrations. The chronaximetry method was used to evaluate the effect of a single session of whole-body vibration training on the excitability of the rectus femoris and brachioradialis muscles. The examination of the fusing and flickering frequencies of the light stimulus was performed. An increase in the excitability of the quadriceps femoris muscle due to low intensity vibrations (20 Hz frequency, 2 mm amplitude) was noted, and a return to the initial values was observed 30 min after the application of vibration. High intensity vibrations (60 Hz frequency, 4 mm amplitude) caused elongations of the chronaxy time; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Neither a low intensity vibration amplitude of 2 mm (frequency of 20 Hz) nor a high intensity vibration amplitude of 4 mm (frequency of 60 Hz) caused a change in the excitability of the central nervous system, as revealed by the average frequency of the fusing and flickering of the light stimulus. A single session of high intensity whole-body vibration did not significantly decrease the excitability of the peripheral nervous system while the central nervous system did not seem to be affected. PMID:25114735

  4. Active tuning of vibration and wave propagation in elastic beams with periodically placed piezoelectric actuator/sensor pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengming; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Liu, Chunchuan

    2017-04-01

    A novel strategy is proposed to actively tune the vibration and wave propagation properties in elastic beams. By periodically placing the piezoelectric actuator/sensor pairs along the beam axis, an active periodic beam structure which exhibits special vibration and wave propagation properties such as the frequency pass-bands and stop-bands (or band-gaps) is developed. Hamilton's principle is applied to establish the equations of motion of the sub-beam elements i.e. the unit-cells, bonded by the piezoelectric patches. A negative proportional feedback control strategy is employed to design the controllers which can provide a positive active stiffness to the beam for a positive feedback control gain, which can increase the stability of the structural system. By means of the added positive active stiffness, the periodicity or the band-gap property of the beam with periodically placed piezoelectric patches can be actively tuned. From the investigation, it is shown that better band-gap characteristics can be achieved by using the negative proportional feedback control. The band-gaps can be obviously broadened by properly increasing the control gain, and they can also be greatly enlarged by appropriately designing the structural sizes of the controllers. The control voltages applied on the piezoelectric actuators are in reasonable and controllable ranges, especially, they are very low in the band-gaps. Thus, the vibration and wave propagation behaviors of the elastic beam can be actively controlled by the periodically placed piezoelectric patches.

  5. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; ...

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  6. Active vibrations of 1-cyanonaphthalene cation studied by mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivatare, Vidya; Tzeng, Sheng Yuan; Tzeng, Wen Bih

    2013-02-01

    We apply the two-color resonant two-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopic technique to record the cation spectra of 1-cyanonaphthalene via four intermediate vibronic levels. The adiabatic ionization energy is determined to be 69 466 ± 5 cm-1. The distinct bands at 416, 472, 516, 669, and 852 cm-1 result from in-plane ring deformation vibrations of the cation. Analysis of these MATI spectra suggests that the molecular geometry and vibrational coordinates of the observed vibrations of the cation in the ground D0 state resemble those of the neutral in the electronically excited S1 state.

  7. Cyclic modulation of semi-active controllable dampers for tonal vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, P.; Gandhi, F.

    2004-08-01

    The present study examines the potential of using a semi-active controllable damper, whose damping coefficient can be modulated in real time, for tonal vibration isolation applications. A frequency-domain control algorithm is developed for determining the damping coefficient variation (at twice the disturbance frequency) that minimizes the force transmitted to the support at the disturbance frequency. The effectiveness of open-loop, closed-loop, and adaptive controllers in rejecting the transmitted disturbances are evaluated. The results of the study indicate that when limits in damping coefficient variation are considered, the support force could be reduced by about an additional 30%, beyond the levels due to the passive isolation characteristics (no cyclic damping modulation). When the disturbance phase changes during operation, the effectiveness of the open-loop controller is rapidly degraded. While the closed-loop controller (with inputs based on current levels of force transmitted to the support) performed better, there was still some degradation in performance, and transmitted support forces were not reduced to levels prior to the change in disturbance phase. The results show that for the semi-active system to retain its effectiveness in rejecting disturbances, a closed-loop, adaptive controller (with on-line system identification) is required; even when there is only a change in disturbance, and no change in basic system properties. An explanation for this phenomenon, related to the bi-linear nature of the semi-active system, is provided. Cyclic modulations in the damping coefficient were more effective in reducing the transmitted forces at the disturbance frequency than simply reducing the baseline damping coefficient (to improve the passive isolation characteristics).

  8. NIST torsion oscillator viscometer response: Performance on the LeRC active vibration isolation platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1992-01-01

    Critical point viscosity measurements are limited to their reduced temperature approach to T(sub c) in an Earth bound system, because of density gradients imposed by gravity. Therefore, these classes of experiments have been proposed as good candidates for 'microgravity' science experiments where this limitation is not present. The nature of these viscosity measurements dictate hardware that is sensitive to low frequency excitations. Because of the vibratory acceleration sensitivity of a torsion oscillator viscometer, used to acquire such measurements, a vibration isolation sensitivity test was performed on candidate 'microgravity' hardware to study the possibility of meeting the stringent oscillatory sensitivity requirements of a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) torsion oscillator viscometer. A prototype six degree of freedom active magnetic isolation system, developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, was used as the isolation system. The ambient acceleration levels of the platform were reduced to the noise floor levels of its control sensors, about one microgravity in the 0.1 to 10 Hz bandwidth.

  9. Active vibration control of a full scale aircraft wing using a reconfigurable controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Shashikala; Renjith Kumar, T. G.; Raja, S.; Dwarakanathan, D.; Subramani, H.; Karthikeyan, C.

    2016-01-01

    This work highlights the design of a Reconfigurable Active Vibration Control (AVC) System for aircraft structures using adaptive techniques. The AVC system with a multichannel capability is realized using Filtered-X Least Mean Square algorithm (FxLMS) on Xilinx Virtex-4 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in Very High Speed Integrated Circuits Hardware Description Language, (VHDL). The HDL design is made based on Finite State Machine (FSM) model with Floating point Intellectual Property (IP) cores for arithmetic operations. The use of FPGA facilitates to modify the system parameters even during runtime depending on the changes in user's requirements. The locations of the control actuators are optimized based on dynamic modal strain approach using genetic algorithm (GA). The developed system has been successfully deployed for the AVC testing of the full-scale wing of an all composite two seater transport aircraft. Several closed loop configurations like single channel and multi-channel control have been tested. The experimental results from the studies presented here are very encouraging. They demonstrate the usefulness of the system's reconfigurability for real time applications.

  10. The Modelling and Vibration Control of Beams with Active Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, Y. M.; LI, Z. F.; HUA, H. X.; FU, Z. F.; LIU, T. X.

    2001-08-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is combined with the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) model of viscoelastic materials (VEM) to model a cantilever beam with active constrained layer damping treatments. This approach avoids time-consuming iteration in solving modal frequencies, modal damping ratios and responses. But the resultant finite element (FE) model has too many degrees of freedom (d.o.f.s) from the point of view of control, nor is it observable and controllable. A new model reduction procedure is proposed. An iterative dynamic condensation is performed in the physical space, and Guyan condensation is taken as an initial iteration approximation. A reduced order model (ROM) of suitable size emerges, but it is still not observable and controllable. Accordingly, a robust model reduction method is then employed in the state space. A numerical example proves that this procedure reduces the model and assures the stability, controllability and observability of the final reduced order model (FROM). Finally, a controller is designed by linear-quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method based on the FROM. The vibration attenuation is evident

  11. Vibrational optical activity of chiral carbon nanoclusters treated by a generalized π-electron method

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Péter R.; Surján, Péter R.; Szabados, Ágnes

    2014-01-28

    Cross sections of inelastic light scattering accompanied by vibronic excitation in large conjugated carbon structures is assessed at the π-electron level. Intensities of Raman and vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) spectra of fullerenes are computed, relying on a single electron per atom. When considering only first neighbor terms in the Hamiltonian (a tight-binding (TB) type or Hückel-model), Raman intensities are captured remarkably well, based on comparison with frequency-dependent linear response of the self-consistent field (SCF) method. Resorting to π-electron levels when computing spectral intensities brings a beneficial reduction in computational cost as compared to linear response SCF. At difference with total intensities, the first neighbor TB model is found inadequate for giving the left and right circularly polarized components of the scattered light, especially when the molecular surface is highly curved. To step beyond first neighbor approximation, an effective π-electron Hamiltonian, including interaction of all sites is derived from the all-electron Fockian, in the spirit of the Bloch-equation. Chiroptical cross-sections computed by this novel π-electron method improve upon first-neighbor TB considerably, with no increase in computational cost. Computed VROA spectra of chiral fullerenes, such as C{sub 76} and C{sub 28}, are reported for the first time, both by conventional linear response SCF and effective π-electron models.

  12. Dynamic behavior of time-delayed acceleration feedback controller for active vibration control of flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fang; Chen, Wei-dong; Shao, Min-qiang

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses the design problem of the controller with time-delayed acceleration feedback. On the basis of the reduction method and output state-derivative feedback, a time-delayed acceleration feedback controller is proposed. Stability boundaries of the closed-loop system are determined by using Hurwitz stability criteria. Due to the introduction of time delay into the controller with acceleration feedback, the proposed controller has the feature of not only changing the mass property but also altering the damping property of the controlled system in the sense of equivalent structural modification. With this feature, the closed-loop system has a greater logarithmic decrement than the uncontrolled one, and in turn, the control behavior can be improved. In this connection, the time delay in the acceleration feedback control is a positive factor when satisfying some given conditions and it could be actively utilized. On the ground of the analysis, the developed controller is implemented on a cantilever beam for different controller gain-delay combinations, and the control performance is evaluated with the comparison to that of pure acceleration feedback controller. Simulation and experimental results verify the ability of the controller to attenuate the vibration resulting from the dominant mode.

  13. Application of a Broadband Active Vibration Control System to a Helicopter Trim Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Schiller, Noah H.; Simon, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses testing of a broadband active vibration control concept on an interior trim panel in a helicopter cabin mockup located at ONERA's Centre de Toulouse. The control system consisted of twelve diamond-shaped piezoelectric actuators distributed around a 1.2m x 1.2m trim panel. Accelerometers were mounted at the four vertices of each diamond. The aspect ratio of the diamond was based on the dielectric constants of the piezoelectric material in order to create an actuator-sensor pair that was collocated over a broad frequency range. This allowed robust control to be implemented using simple, low power analog electronics. Initial testing on a thick acrylic window demonstrated the capability of the controller, but actuator performance was less satisfactory when mounted on a composite sandwich trim panel. This may have been due to the orthotropic nature of the trim panel, or due to its much higher stiffness relative to the acrylic window. Insights gained from a finite element study of the actuator-sensor-structural system are discussed.

  14. Identification of the optically active vibrational modes in the photoluminescence of MEH-PPV films.

    PubMed

    da Silva, M A T; Dias, I F L; Duarte, J L; Laureto, E; Silvestre, I; Cury, L A; Guimarães, P S S

    2008-03-07

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence properties of a thin film of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2(')-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene-vinylene], MEH-PPV, fabricated by spin coating, is analyzed. The evolution with temperature of the peak energy of the purely electronic transition, of the first vibronic band, of the effective conjugation length, and of the Huang-Rhys factors are discussed. The asymmetric character of the pure electronic transition peak and the contribution of the individual vibrational modes to the first vibronic band line shape are considered by a model developed by Cury et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 3836 (2004)]. The temperature dependence of the Huang-Rhys factors of the main vibrational modes pertaining to the first vibronic band allows us to identify two competing vibrational modes. These results show that the electron coupling to different vibrational modes depends on temperature via reduction of thermal disorder.

  15. Vibrational Study of Melatonin and its Radioprotective Activity towards Hydroxyl Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Kaur, Sarvpreet; Saini, G. S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Vibrational study of Melatonin (N-acetyl 5-methoxytrypatamin) was done using FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. DFT calculations were employed to the structural analysis of melatonin and to the end products. The theoretical calculations confirmed the different observed vibrational modes. The optimized structure energy calculations of the different end products confirmed the most probable site of the hydroxyl radical attack is the hydrogen attached to nitrogen present in the indole ring.

  16. Passive magnetic field cancellation device by multiple high-Tc superconducting coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Zou, S.; Han, Z.; Qu, T.-M.

    2010-04-01

    A passive magnetic field cancellation device (PMFCD) is designed. The PMFCD could automatically cancel the field as an active cancellation system did; however it requires no power sources and feedback systems. The capability of the PMFCD is based on the principle that a closed loop can resist flux variation and keep the flux constant inside. The closed loop in the PMFCD is formed by connecting two pairs of high temperature superconductor Helmholtz coils with different radii in series. More important thing is that the ratio of the radius and the turn number between the coils has to satisfy a number of conditions, with which 100% cancellation can be reached. Theoretical methods to obtain the turn number ratio and radius ratio are the major part of the paper. Numerical simulation was followed, aiming to evaluate field distribution under a cancellation state and correct the theoretical values.

  17. Dynamic modelling and active vibration controller design for a cylindrical shell equipped with piezoelectric sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Heo, Seok; Jeong, Moonsan

    2009-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamic modelling, active vibration controller design and experiments for a cylindrical shell equipped with piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The dynamic model was derived by using Rayleigh-Ritz method based on the Donnel-Mushtari shell theory. The actuator equations which relate the applied voltages to the generalized force and sensor equations which relate the generalized displacements to the sensor output voltages for the piezoelectric wafer were derived based on the pin-force model. The equations of motion along with the piezoelectric sensor equations were then reduced to modal forms considering the modes of interest. An aluminium shell was fabricated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the modelling and control techniques. The boundary conditions at both ends of the shell were assumed to be a shear diaphragm in the numerical analysis. Theoretical natural frequencies of the aluminium shell were then calculated and compared to experimental result. They were in good agreement with experimental result for the first two free-vibration modes. The multi-input and multi-output positive position feedback controller, which can cope with the first two vibration modes, was designed based on the block-inverse theory and was implemented digitally using the DSP board. The experimental results showed that vibrations of the cylindrical shell can be successfully suppressed by the piezoelectric actuator and the proposed controller.

  18. Reduction of structural weight, costs and complexity of a control system in the active vibration reduction of flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper concerns the active vibration reduction of a flexible structure with discrete piezoelectric sensors and actuators in collocated pairs bonded to its surface. In this study, a new fitness and objective function is proposed to determine the optimal number of actuators, based on variations in the average closed loop dB gain margin reduction for all of the optimal piezoelectric pairs and on the modes that are required to be attenuated using the optimal linear quadratic control scheme. The aim of this study is to find the minimum number of optimally located sensor/actuator pairs, which can achieve the same vibration reduction as a greater number, in order to reduce the cost, complexity and power requirement of the control system. This optimization was done using a genetic algorithm. The technique may be applied to any lightly damped structure, and is demonstrated here by attenuating the first six vibration modes of a flat cantilever plate. It is shown that two sensor/actuator pairs, located and controlled optimally, give almost the same vibration reduction as ten pairs. These results are validated by comparing the open and closed loop time responses and actuator feedback voltages for various numbers of piezoelectric pairs using the ANSYS finite element package and a proportional differential control scheme.

  19. 34 CFR 674.59 - Cancellation for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cancellation for military service. 674.59 Section 674... Cancellation for military service. (a) Cancellation on a Defense loan. (1) An institution must cancel up to 50... fraction of a year beyond a complete year of service, does not qualify for military cancellation....

  20. 34 CFR 674.59 - Cancellation for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cancellation for military service. 674.59 Section 674... Cancellation for military service. (a) Cancellation on a Defense loan. (1) An institution must cancel up to 50... fraction of a year beyond a complete year of service, does not qualify for military cancellation....

  1. 34 CFR 674.59 - Cancellation for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cancellation for military service. 674.59 Section 674... Cancellation for military service. (a) Cancellation on a Defense loan. (1) An institution must cancel up to 50... fraction of a year beyond a complete year of service, does not qualify for military cancellation....

  2. Structural, vibrational spectroscopic and nonlinear optical activity studies on 2-hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-06-01

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 2-Hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine molecule using potential energy surface scan and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The vibrational frequencies and Mulliken atomic charge distribution were calculated for the optimized geometry of the molecule using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intramolecular charge transfer studies and the calculation of ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity index and softness values of the title molecule were carried out. The nonlinear optical activity of the molecule was studied by means of first order hyperpolarizability, which was computed as 7.64 times greater than urea. The natural bond orbital analysis was performed to confirm the nonlinear optical activity of the molecule.

  3. Structural, vibrational spectroscopic and nonlinear optical activity studies on 2-hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine: A DFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2015-06-24

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 2-Hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine molecule using potential energy surface scan and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The vibrational frequencies and Mulliken atomic charge distribution were calculated for the optimized geometry of the molecule using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intramolecular charge transfer studies and the calculation of ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity index and softness values of the title molecule were carried out. The nonlinear optical activity of the molecule was studied by means of first order hyperpolarizability, which was computed as 7.64 times greater than urea. The natural bond orbital analysis was performed to confirm the nonlinear optical activity of the molecule.

  4. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  5. Helicopter rotor blade design for minimum vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of blade design parameters in rotor vibratory response and the design of a minimum vibration blade based upon this understanding are examined. Various design approaches are examined for a 4 bladed articulated rotor operating at a high speed flight condition. Blade modal shaping, frequency placement, structural and aerodynamic coupling, and intermodal cancellation are investigated to systematically identify and evaluate blade design parameters that influence blade airloads, blade modal response, hub loads, and fuselage vibration. The relative contributions of the various components of blade force excitation and response to the vibratory hub loads transmitted to the fuselage are determined in order to isolate primary candidates for vibration alleviation. A blade design is achieved which reduces the predicted fuselage vibration from the baseline blade by approximately one half. Blade designs are developed that offer significant reductions in vibration (and fatigue stresses) without resorting to special vibration alleviation devices, radical blade geometries, or weight penalties.

  6. Active constrained layer damping of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded plates using piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Satyajit; Ray, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis has been presented for functionally graded (FG) plates integrated with a patch of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment and subjected to a temperature field. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of the piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composite (PFRC) material. The temperature field is assumed to be spatially uniform over the substrate plate surfaces and varied through the thickness of the host FG plates. The temperature-dependent material properties of the FG substrate plates are assumed to be graded in the thickness direction of the plates according to a power-law distribution while the Poisson's ratio is assumed to be a constant over the domain of the plate. The constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. Based on the first-order shear deformation theory, a three-dimensional finite element model has been developed to model the open-loop and closed-loop nonlinear dynamics of the overall FG substrate plates under the thermal environment. The analysis suggests the potential use of the ACLD treatment with its constraining layer made of the PFRC material for active control of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates in the absence or the presence of the temperature gradient across the thickness of the plates. It is found that the ACLD treatment is more effective in controlling the geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates than in controlling their linear vibrations. The analysis also reveals that the ACLD patch is more effective for controlling the nonlinear vibrations of FG plates when it is attached to the softest surface of the FG plates than when it is bonded to the stiffest surface of the plates. The effect of piezoelectric fiber orientation in the active constraining PFRC layer on the damping characteristics of the overall FG plates is also discussed.

  7. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  8. 34 CFR 674.52 - Cancellation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the teaching is full-time. However, it shall grant the cancellation if one school official certifies that a teacher worked full-time for a full academic year. (ii) An institution may refuse a request for... borrower meets the conditions for the cancellation requested. (b) Part-time employment. (1)(i)...

  9. 25 CFR 227.28 - Cancellations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cancellations. 227.28 Section 227.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.28 Cancellations. Leases shall...

  10. 25 CFR 227.28 - Cancellations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cancellations. 227.28 Section 227.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.28 Cancellations. Leases shall...

  11. 25 CFR 227.28 - Cancellations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Cancellations. 227.28 Section 227.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.28 Cancellations. Leases shall...

  12. 43 CFR 3601.62 - Cancellation procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL MATERIALS DISPOSAL Mineral Materials Disposal; General Provisions Contract and Permit Cancellation § 3601.62 Cancellation procedure. (a... notice under paragraph (a) of this section, or if delivery of the notice is refused, or not completed...

  13. 43 CFR 3601.62 - Cancellation procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL MATERIALS DISPOSAL Mineral Materials Disposal; General Provisions Contract and Permit Cancellation § 3601.62 Cancellation procedure. (a... notice under paragraph (a) of this section, or if delivery of the notice is refused, or not completed...

  14. 25 CFR 227.28 - Cancellations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cancellations. 227.28 Section 227.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.28 Cancellations. Leases shall...

  15. 25 CFR 227.28 - Cancellations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cancellations. 227.28 Section 227.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.28 Cancellations. Leases shall...

  16. 29 CFR 4.190 - Contract cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Contract cancellation. 4.190 Section 4.190 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor LABOR STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS Enforcement § 4.190 Contract cancellation. (a) As provided in section 3 of the Act, where a violation is found of any contract...

  17. Integrating finite elements with optimal control to simulate active vibrations attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, S.; Szyszkowski, W.

    2016-12-01

    Continuous mechanical systems controlled by discrete actuators are inherently under-actuated and involve second-order non-holonomic constraints. A method of simulating optimal vibrations attenuation for such systems is proposed, in which the system is modeled by the finite elements (with possibly a large number of DOFs) and Pontryagin's Principle is applied to control several significant vibration modes by a small number of discrete actuators. For an assumed set of actuators the complete dynamic response of the system can be obtained, as well as the rate and effort parameters to evaluate efficiency of the whole attenuation process.

  18. Six-degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation using a Stewart platform mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Zheng; Haynes, Leonard S.

    1993-01-01

    The design and control problems of a class of multidegree-of-freedom vibration isolation systems (VISs) based on a Stewart platform mechanism are studied. A prototype of a six-degree-of-freedom VIS for precision control of a wide range of space-based structures implemented in Intelligent Automation, Inc. is described. The feasibility of using a Stewart platform to achieve 6-degree-of-freedom vibration control in space applications is shown. A new Terfenol-D actuator characterized by significantly longer stroke than any commercially available Terfenol-D actuator and direct flux and strain sensors integral to the actuator is described.

  19. State selective vibrational (2ν3) activation of the chemisorption of methane on Pt (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J.; Conjusteau, A.; Scoles, G.; Bernasek, S. L.

    2001-03-01

    The state-selective dissociative sticking coefficient on Pt(111) surfaces for CH4 in the 2ν3 J=1,2 ro-vibrational levels has been measured using thermal energy atomic scattering. Continuous wave laser excitation of a molecular beam of CH4 seeded in He with a 1.5 μm color center laser, tunable around 6000 cm-1 and coupled to the beam by means of a resonant build-up cavity, allows pumping of up to 11% of the molecules to the excited ro-vibrational state. The laser/molecular beam combination allows precise control over the translational energy as well as the vibrational state of the methane that impinges on the clean Pt(111) surface. The intensity of the specular reflection of the incident helium beam is used to quantitatively monitor the coverage of chemisorbed methane on the platinum surface as a function of time (exposure). The sticking coefficient (S0) of CH4 with 5.4 kJ/mol normal translational energy is found to increase from 6.2×10-6 to 1.8×10-4 upon 2ν3 excitation (the overtone of the asymmetric stretch of methane). This represents a ˜30 fold enhancement in reactivity of the methane with the Pt(111) surface upon vibrational excitation. We also measured the changes of S0 obtained by varying the nozzle temperature and methane concentration over a tenfold range of energy. We find that 72 kJ/mol of vibrational energy in the excited CH4 is approximately equivalent to at least 30 kJ/mol of normal translational energy. This corresponds to a utilization efficiency of the 2ν3 vibrational energy of greater than 40%. In the only other measurement of this kind published in the literature, [L. B. F. Juurlink, P. R. McCabe, R. R. Smith, C. L. DiCologero, and A. L. Utz, Phys. Rev Lett. 83, 868 (1999)] for the fundamental (v=1) excitation of ν3 of CH4 on Ni(100) surfaces, a comparable value for the vibrational energy utilization efficiency was found (59%). Further work is necessary to determine if this result is general and if and how it may change by changing the

  20. Laser vibrational overtone activation of ethyl acrylate/benzoyl peroxide mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinevich, Oleg; Snavely, D. L.

    1999-04-01

    Intra- and extracavity laser vibrational overtone polymerization of ethyl acrylate/benzoyl peroxide mixture has been demonstrated. Five photolysis wavenumbers on and near the fifth CH stretch overtone absorption of benzoyl peroxide was investigated. The polymer yield was monitored by observing the decrease in the intensity ratio of the olefinic/methyl and methylenic first CH stretch overtone absorptions of ethyl acrylate. The rate of the polymerization did not depend on the photolysis wavenumber. Molecular weights of the overtone initiated polymers were an order of magnitude larger than those obtained by thermal polymerization. The polymerization rate is compared to the intracavity laser vibrational overtone polymerization of methyl methacrylate.

  1. Relationship Between Lower Limb Muscle Activity and Platform Acceleration During Whole-Body Vibration Exercise.

    PubMed

    Lienhard, Karin; Vienneau, Jordyn; Nigg, Sandro; Meste, Olivier; Colson, Serge S; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of different magnitudes and directions of the vibration platform acceleration on surface electromyography (sEMG) during whole-body vibration (WBV) exercises. Therefore, a WBV platform was used that delivers vertical vibrations by a side-alternating mode, horizontal vibrations by a circular mode, and vibrations in all 3 planes by a dual mode. Surface electromyography signals of selected lower limb muscles were measured in 30 individuals while they performed a static squat on a vibration platform. The WBV trials included 2 side-alternating trials (Side-L: 6 Hz, 2.5 mm; Side-H: 16 Hz, 4 mm), 2 circular trials (Circ-L: 14 Hz, 0.8 mm; Circ-H: 43 Hz, 0.8 mm), and 4 dual-mode trials that were the combinations of the single-mode trials (Side-L/Circ-L, Side-L/Circ-H, Side-H/Circ-L, Side-H/Circ-H). Furthermore, control trials without vibration were assessed, and 3-dimensional platform acceleration was quantified during the vibration. Significant increases in the root mean square of the sEMG (sEMGRMS) compared with the control trial were found in most muscles for Side-L/Circ-H (+17 to +63%, p ≤ 0.05), Side-H/Circ-L (+7 to +227%, p ≤ 0.05), and Side-H/Circ-H (+21 to +207%, p < 0.01) and in the lower leg muscles for Side-H (+35 to +138%, p ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, only the vertical platform acceleration showed a linear relationship (r = 0.970, p < 0.001) with the averaged sEMGRMS of the lower limb muscles. Significant increases in sEMGRMS were found with a vertical acceleration threshold of 18 m·s(-2) and higher. The present results emphasize that WBV exercises should be performed on a platform that induces vertical accelerations of 18 m·s(-2) and higher.

  2. Active vibration reduction of a flexible structure bonded with optimised piezoelectric pairs using half and quarter chromosomes in genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    The optimal placement of sensors and actuators in active vibration control is limited by the number of candidates in the search space. The search space of a small structure discretized to one hundred elements for optimising the location of ten actuators gives 1.73 × 1013 possible solutions, one of which is the global optimum. In this work, a new quarter and half chromosome technique based on symmetry is developed, by which the search space for optimisation of sensor/actuator locations in active vibration control of flexible structures may be greatly reduced. The technique is applied to the optimisation for eight and ten actuators located on a 500×500mm square plate, in which the search space is reduced by up to 99.99%. This technique helps for updating genetic algorithm program by updating natural frequencies and mode shapes in each generation to find the global optimal solution in a greatly reduced number of generations. An isotropic plate with piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs bonded to its surface was investigated using the finite element method and Hamilton's principle based on first order shear deformation theory. The placement and feedback gain of ten and eight sensor/actuator pairs was optimised for a cantilever and clamped-clamped plate to attenuate the first six modes of vibration, using minimization of linear quadratic index as an objective function.

  3. Evans hole and non linear optical activity in Bis(melaminium) sulphate dihydrate: A vibrational spectral study.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, V R; Binoy, J; Dawn Dharma Roy, S; Marchewka, M K; Jayakumar, V S

    2015-01-01

    Bis(melaminium) sulphate dihydrate (BMSD), an interesting melaminium derivative for nonlinear optical activity, has been subjected to vibrational spectral analysis using FT IR and FT Raman spectra. The analysis has been aided by the Potential Energy Distribution (PED) of vibrational spectral bands, derived using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The geometry is found to correlate well with the XRD structure and the band profiles for certain vibrations in the finger print region have been theoretically explained using Evans hole. The detailed Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis of the hydrogen bonding in BMSD has also been carried out to understand the correlation between the stabilization energy of hyperconjugation of the lone pair of donor with the σ(∗) orbital of hydrogen-acceptor bond and the strength of hydrogen bond. The theoretical calculation shows that BMSD has NLO efficiency, 2.66 times that of urea. The frontier molecular orbital analysis points to a charge transfer, which contributes to NLO activity, through N-H…O intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the melaminium ring and the sulphate. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) mapping has also been performed for the detailed analysis of the mutual interactions between melaminium ring and sulphate ion.

  4. Multiple-source multiple-harmonic active vibration control of variable section cylindrical structures: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxin; Chen, Xuefeng; Gao, Jiawei; Zhang, Xingwu

    2016-12-01

    Air vehicles, space vehicles and underwater vehicles, the cabins of which can be viewed as variable section cylindrical structures, have multiple rotational vibration sources (e.g., engines, propellers, compressors and motors), making the spectrum of noise multiple-harmonic. The suppression of such noise has been a focus of interests in the field of active vibration control (AVC). In this paper, a multiple-source multiple-harmonic (MSMH) active vibration suppression algorithm with feed-forward structure is proposed based on reference amplitude rectification and conjugate gradient method (CGM). An AVC simulation scheme called finite element model in-loop simulation (FEMILS) is also proposed for rapid algorithm verification. Numerical studies of AVC are conducted on a variable section cylindrical structure based on the proposed MSMH algorithm and FEMILS scheme. It can be seen from the numerical studies that: (1) the proposed MSMH algorithm can individually suppress each component of the multiple-harmonic noise with an unified and improved convergence rate; (2) the FEMILS scheme is convenient and straightforward for multiple-source simulations with an acceptable loop time. Moreover, the simulations have similar procedure to real-life control and can be easily extended to physical model platform.

  5. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds in hetero-complexes of biologically active aromatic molecules probed by the methods of vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Semenov, M A; Blyzniuk, Iu N; Bolbukh, T V; Shestopalova, A V; Evstigneev, M P; Maleev, V Ya

    2012-09-01

    By the methods of vibrational spectroscopy (Infrared and Raman) the investigation of the hetero-association of biologically active aromatic compounds: flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), ethidium bromide (EB) and proflavine (PRF) was performed in aqueous solutions. It was shown that between the functional groups (CO and NH(2)) the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed in the hetero-complexes FMN-EB and FMN-PRF, additionally stabilizing these structures. An estimation of the enthalpy of Н-bonding obtained from experimental shifts of carbonyl vibrational frequencies has shown that the H-bonds do not dominate in the magnitude of experimentally measured total enthalpy of the hetero-association reactions. The main stabilization is likely due to intermolecular interactions of the molecules in these complexes and their interaction with water environment.

  6. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds in hetero-complexes of biologically active aromatic molecules probed by the methods of vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, M. A.; Blyzniuk, Iu. N.; Bolbukh, T. V.; Shestopalova, A. V.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Maleev, V. Ya.

    2012-09-01

    By the methods of vibrational spectroscopy (Infrared and Raman) the investigation of the hetero-association of biologically active aromatic compounds: flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), ethidium bromide (EB) and proflavine (PRF) was performed in aqueous solutions. It was shown that between the functional groups (Cdbnd O and NH2) the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed in the hetero-complexes FMN-EB and FMN-PRF, additionally stabilizing these structures. An estimation of the enthalpy of Н-bonding obtained from experimental shifts of carbonyl vibrational frequencies has shown that the H-bonds do not dominate in the magnitude of experimentally measured total enthalpy of the hetero-association reactions. The main stabilization is likely due to intermolecular interactions of the molecules in these complexes and their interaction with water environment.

  7. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  8. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  9. Vibrational study of a nucleoside analogue with antiviral activity, 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine, CDU.

    PubMed

    Bailey, L; Navarro, R; Hernanz, A

    1999-01-01

    The experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine have been assigned on the basis of normal coordinate analyses, in the light of observed and calculated wavenumbers and isotopic shifts. The results indicate that virtually all normal modes of IDU involve some degree of vibrational coupling between the chlorouracil base and the deoxyribose moiety.

  10. Thermal Vibrational Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershuni, G. Z.; Lyubimov, D. V.

    1998-08-01

    Recent increasing awareness of the ways in which vibrational effects can affect low-gravity experiments have renewed interest in the study of thermal vibrational convection across a wide range of fields. For example, in applications where vibrational effects are used to provide active control of heat and mass transfer, such as in heat exchangers, stirrers, mineral separators and crystal growth, a sound understanding of the fundamental theory is required. In Thermal Vibrational Convection, the authors present the theory of vibrational effects caused by a static gravity field, and of fluid flows which appear under vibration in fluid-filled cavities. The first part of the book discusses fluid-filled cavities where the fluid motion only appears in the presence of temperature non-uniformities, while the second considers those situations where the vibrational effects are caused by a non-uniform field. Throughout, the authors concentrate on consideration of high frequency vibrations, where averaging methods can be successfully applied in the study of the phenomena. Written by two of the pioneers in this field, Thermal Vibrational Convection will be of great interest to scientists and engineers working in the many areas that are concerned with vibration, and its effect on heat and mass transfer. These include hydrodynamics, hydro-mechanics, low gravity physics and mechanics, and geophysics. The rigorous approach adopted in presenting the theory of this fascinating and highly topical area will facilitate a greater understanding of the phenomena involved, and will lead to the development of more and better-designed experiments.

  11. Simulated vibrational sum frequency generation from a multilayer thin film system with two active interfaces.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Daniel B; Massari, Aaron M

    2013-04-21

    In the field of surface-specific vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFG) on organic thin films, optical interferences combined with the two-interface problem presents a challenge in terms of qualitative assessment of the data and quantitative modeling. The difficulty is amplified when considering systems comprised of more than a single material thin film layer. Recently, in our lab we have developed a generalized model that describes thin film interference in interface-specific nonlinear optical spectroscopies from arbitrary multilayer systems. Here, we apply the model to simulate VSFG spectra from the simplest multilayer: a system of two thin films, one of which is an organic small molecule and the other is a dielectric layer on a semiconductor substrate system where we idealize that the organic interfaces are equally VSFG active. Specifically, we consider the molecule N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) deposited on a silicon wafer with a thermally grown oxide dielectric. We present results for the four polarization experiments that sample the nonzero nonlinear susceptibility elements of macroscopically centrosymmetric materials (ssp, sps, pss, and ppp) and in two mIR frequency windows (the imide carbonyl stretches around 1680 cm(-1) and the alkyl stretches around 2900 cm(-1)) as a function of both thin film thicknesses with fixed input beam angles. We use frequency dependent refractive indices for all materials. The goal is to illustrate some of the intricacies contained in the intensity data of such systems. Of particular interest is the effect of the relative polar orientation of modes at the interfaces and the possibility of designing a system where the collected signal is exclusively attributable to a single interface. Our calculations indicate that in order to unambiguously identify the relative polar orientation one must experimentally vary an additional system parameter such as thin film thickness or input beam angle

  12. A comparative study of changes operated by sympathetic nervous system activation on spindle afferent discharge and on tonic vibration reflex in rabbit jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Passatore, M; Deriu, F; Grassi, C; Roatta, S

    1996-03-07

    The effect of sympathetic activation on the spindle afferent response to vibratory stimuli eliciting the tonic vibration reflex in jaw closing muscles was studied in precollicularly decerebrate rabbits. Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk, at frequencies within the physiologic range, consistently induced a decrease in spindle response to muscle vibration, which was often preceded by a transient enhancement. Spindle discharge was usually correlated with the EMG activity in the masseter muscle and the tension reflexly developed by jaw muscles. The changes in spindle response to vibration were superimposed on variations of the basal discharge which exhibited different patterns in the studied units, increases in the firing rate being more frequently observed. These effects were mimicked by close arterial injection of the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Data presented here suggest that sympathetically-induced modifications of the tonic vibration reflex are due to changes exerted on muscle spindle afferent information.

  13. Piezoelectric actuator models for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Lefebvre, Sylvie

    1993-01-01

    Analytical models for piezoelectric actuators, adapted from flat plate concepts, are developed for noise and vibration control applications associated with vibrating circular cylinders. The loadings applied to the cylinder by the piezoelectric actuators for the bending and in-plane force models are approximated by line moment and line force distributions, respectively, acting on the perimeter of the actuator patch area. Coupling between the cylinder and interior acoustic cavity is examined by studying the modal spectra, particularly for the low-order cylinder modes that couple efficiently with the cavity at low frequencies. Within the scope of this study, the in-plane force model produced a more favorable distribution of low-order modes, necessary for efficient interior noise control, than did the bending model.

  14. An investigation of an active landing gear system to reduce aircraft vibrations caused by landing impacts and runway excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Xing, J. T.; Price, W. G.; Li, Weiji

    2008-10-01

    A mathematical model is developed to control aircraft vibrations caused by runway excitation using an active landing gear system. Equations are derived to describe the integrated aircraft-active system. The nonlinear characteristics of the system are modelled and it is actively controlled using a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) strategy. The performance of this system and its corresponding passive system are compared using numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the impact loads and the vertical displacement of the aircraft's centre of gravity caused by landing and runway excitations are greatly reduced using the active system, which result in improvements to the performance of the landing gear system, benefits the aircraft's fatigue life, taxiing performance, crew/passenger comfort and reduces requirements on the unevenness of runways.

  15. 18 CFR 4.83 - Cancellation and loss of priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... opportunity for hearing. Cancellation of a permit will result in loss of the permittee's priority of... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cancellation and loss... Permit § 4.83 Cancellation and loss of priority. (a) The Commission may cancel a preliminary permit...

  16. 18 CFR 4.83 - Cancellation and loss of priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... opportunity for hearing. Cancellation of a permit will result in loss of the permittee's priority of... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cancellation and loss... Permit § 4.83 Cancellation and loss of priority. (a) The Commission may cancel a preliminary permit...

  17. New cancellation technique for electromagnetic induction sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Waymond R., Jr.; Malluck, Michael

    2005-06-01

    A new technique is presented for canceling the coupling between the coils of an electromagnetic induction sensor while using simple dipole detection coils. A secondary bucking transformer is used to cancel the coupling between the coils. The technique allows the cancellation that can be obtained using a quadrupole receive coil while maintaining the depth sensitivity and simple detection zone of a dipole coil. Simple circuit models for the sensor with some of the important parasitic effects are developed. An experimental model is developed and used to demonstrate the technique. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate more than 75 dB of cancellation up to 100 kHz and the response of the sensor to a few targets.

  18. Testing a simple control law to reduce broadband frequency harmonic vibrations using semi-active tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    This paper is focused on the control problems related to semi-active tuned mass dampers (TMDs) used to reduce harmonic vibrations, specially involving civil structures. A simplified version of the phase control law is derived and its effectiveness is investigated and evaluated. The objective is to improve the functioning of control systems of this type by simplifying the measurement process and reducing the number of variables involved, making the control system more feasible and reliable. Because the control law is of ON/OFF type, combined with appropriate trigger conditions, the activity of the actuation system may be significantly reduced, which may be of few seconds a day in many practical cases, increasing the durability of the device and reducing its maintenance. Moreover, due to the ability of the control system to command the motion of the inertial mass, the semi-active TMD is relatively insensitive to its initial tuning, resulting in the capability of self-tuning and in the possibility of controlling several vibration modes of a structure over a significant broadband frequency.

  19. Parameter Identification of Long Stroke and Short Stroke MR Damper for its Use in Semi-Active Vibration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathi Priya, C.; Gopalakrishnan, N.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) dampers are devices that can be used for structural vibration reduction under seismic excitation. These devices are used in semi-active control which require less power compared to active devices and offer high reliability compared to passive devices. Despite the advantages of MR damper, use of these dampers in an effective way in a structure is highly challenging and a precise modelling is required as these dampers are highly non-linear. Among the parametric models available, Bouc-Wen model is widely used because of its effective modelling of the hysteretic force-velocity curve of MR damper. The parameters of Bouc-Wen model are damper dependent and hence need to be identified before utilising the damper for further simulation studies. In this work, the parametric identification of Bouc-Wen model for commercially available long stroke and short stroke MR damper (RD 8040-1 and RD 8041-1) is done. For this, experimental characterization of the dampers are carried out using hydraulic actuators mounted on a self-restraining frame. The damper is driven harmonically in the testing setup at various combinations of frequency, amplitude, current and displacement. Using the experimental characterization, parameters of Bouc-Wen model are identified by Levenberg-Marquardt optimization Algorithm (LMA). The identified parameters are validated by comparing with the experimental results. The identified parameters are believed to be worthwhile for the use of these MR dampers in further studies of real-time semi-active vibration control of structures.

  20. The effect of the shoulder stability exercise using resistant vibration stimulus on forward head posture and muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kang, Jong Ho; Lee, Hyo Taek

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze shoulder stabilization using resistant vibration stimulus during bodyblade exercise followed by forward head posture improvement. [Subjects and Methods] Craniovertebral angle and cranial rotation angle were measured with 24 patients who were diagnosed with forward head posture. The experimental group conducted bodyblade exercise for 6 weeks and all patients received conventional physical therapy. The craniovertebral angle and cranial rotation angle were measured using a diagnostic imaging device to measure the change in forward head posture. Sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius and serratus anterior muscle activity were measured using surface electromyography, voluntary contraction was converting into a percentage and mean value was calculated. [Results] The experimental group showed a significant increase in the comparison of the results of both groups before and after the intervention. The comparing group showed no significant difference. The experimental group showed the significant difference in mean value after the intervention in the comparison between the groups. [Conclusion] Resistant vibration stimulus by bodyblade controlled shoulder muscle activity causing scapular stabilization followed by neck position stability improvement. Rehabilitation program that activates whole kinetic chain of proximal and distal muscles such as bodyblade will show more effective improvement when choosing rehabilitation program for neck and shoulder disease clinically. PMID:27942122

  1. Effective Topological Charge Cancelation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mesarec, Luka; Góźdź, Wojciech; Iglič, Aleš; Kralj, Samo

    2016-01-01

    Topological defects (TDs) appear almost unavoidably in continuous symmetry breaking phase transitions. The topological origin makes their key features independent of systems’ microscopic details; therefore TDs display many universalities. Because of their strong impact on numerous material properties and their significant role in several technological applications it is of strong interest to find simple and robust mechanisms controlling the positioning and local number of TDs. We present a numerical study of TDs within effectively two dimensional closed soft films exhibiting in-plane orientational ordering. Popular examples of such class of systems are liquid crystalline shells and various biological membranes. We introduce the Effective Topological Charge Cancellation mechanism controlling localised positional assembling tendency of TDs and the formation of pairs {defect, antidefect} on curved surfaces and/or presence of relevant “impurities” (e.g. nanoparticles). For this purpose, we define an effective topological charge Δmeff consisting of real, virtual and smeared curvature topological charges within a surface patch Δς identified by the typical spatially averaged local Gaussian curvature K. We demonstrate a strong tendency enforcing Δmeff → 0 on surfaces composed of Δς exhibiting significantly different values of spatially averaged K. For Δmeff ≠ 0 we estimate a critical depinning threshold to form pairs {defect, antidefect} using the electrostatic analogy. PMID:27250777

  2. Jamming cancellation algorithm for wideband imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yibin; Yu, Kai-Bor

    1998-10-01

    We describe a jamming cancellation algorithm for wide-band imaging radar. After reviewing high range resolution imaging principle, several key factors affecting jamming cancellation performances, such as the 'instantaneous narrow-band' assumption, bandwidth, de-chirped interference, are formulated and analyzed. Some numerical simulation results, using a hypothetical phased array radar and synthetic point targets, are presented. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Satellites of Xe transitions induced by infrared active vibrational modes of CF4 and C2F6 molecules.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Vadim A; Schwentner, Nikolaus

    2011-07-28

    Absorption and luminescence excitation spectra of Xe/CF(4) mixtures were studied in the vacuum UV region at high resolution using tunable synchrotron radiation. Pressure-broadened resonance bands and bands associated with dipole-forbidden states of the Xe atom due to collision-induced breakdown of the optical selection rules are reported. The spectra display in addition numerous satellite bands corresponding to transitions to vibrationally excited states of a Xe-CF(4) collisional complex. These satellites are located at energies of Xe atom transition increased by one quantum energy in the IR active v(3) vibrational mode of CF(4) (v(3) = 1281 cm(-1)). Satellites of both resonance and dipole-forbidden transitions were observed. Satellites of low lying resonance states are spectrally broad bands closely resembling in shape their parent pressure-broadened resonance bands. In contrast, satellites of dipole-forbidden states and of high lying resonance states are spectrally narrow bands (FWHM ∼10 cm(-1)). The satellites of dipole-forbidden states are orders of magnitude stronger than transitions to their parent states due to collision-induced breakdown of the optical selection rules. These satellites are attributed to a coupling of dipole-forbidden and resonance states induced by the electric field of the transient CF(4) (v(3) = 0 ↔ v(3) = 1) dipole. Similar satellites are present in spectra of Xe/C(2)F(6) mixtures where these bands are induced by the IR active v(10) mode of C(2)F(6). Transitions to vibrationally excited states of Xe-CF(4)(C(2)F(6)) collision pairs were also observed in two-photon LIF spectra.

  4. Active Vibration Control of Elastic Beam by Means of Shape Memory Alloy Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Q.; Levy, C.

    1996-01-01

    The mathematical model of a flexible beam covered with shape memory alloy (SMA) layers is presented. The SMA layers are used as actuators, which are capable of changing their elastic modulus and recovery stress, thus changing the natural frequency of, and adjusting the excitation to, the vibrating beam. The frequency factor variation as a function of SMA Young's modulus, SMA layer thickness and beam thickness is discussed. Also control of the beam employing an optimal linear control law is evaluated. The control results indicate how the system reacts to various levels of excitation input through the non-homogeneous recovery shear term of the governing differential equation.

  5. Active Vibration Reduction of Titanium Alloy Fan Blades (FAN1) Using Piezoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Kauffman, Jeffrey; Duffy, Kirsten; Provenza, Andrew; Morrison, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this paper, a digital resonant control technique emulating passive shunt circuits is used to demonstrate vibration reduction of FAN1 Ti real fan blade at the several target modes. Single-mode control and multi-mode control using one piezoelectric material are demonstrated. Also a conceptual study of how to implement this digital control system into the rotating fan blade is discussed.

  6. Lateral vibration control of a flexible overcritical rotor via an active gas bearing - Theoretical and experimental comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierart, Fabian G.; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-11-01

    The lack of damping of radial gas bearings leads to high vibration levels of a rotor supported by this type of bearing when crossing resonant areas. This is even more relevant for flexible rotors, as studied in this work. In order to reduce these high vibration levels, an active gas bearing is proposed. The control action of this active bearing is selected based on two different strategies: a simple proportional integral derivative controller and an optimal controller. Both controllers are designed based on a theoretical model previously presented. The dynamics of the flexible rotor are modelled aided by the finite element method and the rotor-fluid interaction in the gas bearing is included using the solution of a modified version of the Reynolds equation for compressible fluids, taking into account the piezoelectrically controlled jet action. Performance and accuracy of both model-based controllers are compared against experimental results, showing good agreement. Theoretical and experimental results show a significant increase in the damping ratio of the system, enabling the flexible rotor to run safely across the critical speeds and up to 12,000 rev/min, i.e. 50 percent over the second critical speed without any instability problems.

  7. A comparison of energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of protonated and sodiated high mannose N-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Aboufazeli, Forouzan; Kolli, Venkata; Dodds, Eric D

    2015-04-01

    Fragmentation of glycopeptides in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) plays a pivotal role in site-specific protein glycosylation profiling by allowing specific oligosaccharide compositions and connectivities to be associated with specific loci on the corresponding protein. Although MS/MS analysis of glycopeptides has been successfully performed using a number of distinct ion dissociation methods, relatively little is known regarding the fragmentation characteristics of glycopeptide ions with various charge carriers. In this study, energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation was examined via collision-induced dissociation for a group of related high mannose tryptic glycopeptides as their doubly protonated, doubly sodiated, and hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions. The doubly protonated glycopeptide ions with various compositions were found to undergo fragmentation over a relatively low but wide range of collision energies compared with the doubly sodiated and hybrid charged ions, and were found to yield both glycan and peptide fragmentation depending on the applied collision energy. By contrast, the various doubly sodiated glycopeptides were found to dissociate over a significantly higher but narrow range of collision energies, and exhibited only glycan cleavages. Interestingly, the hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions were consistently the most stable of the precursor ions studied, and provided fragmentation information spanning both the glycan and the peptide moieties. Taken together, these findings illustrate the influence of charge carrier over the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of glycopeptides, and serve to suggest potential strategies that exploit the analytically useful features uniquely afforded by specific charge carriers or combinations thereof.

  8. A Comparison of Energy-Resolved Vibrational Activation/Dissociation Characteristics of Protonated and Sodiated High Mannose N-Glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboufazeli, Forouzan; Kolli, Venkata; Dodds, Eric D.

    2015-04-01

    Fragmentation of glycopeptides in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) plays a pivotal role in site-specific protein glycosylation profiling by allowing specific oligosaccharide compositions and connectivities to be associated with specific loci on the corresponding protein. Although MS/MS analysis of glycopeptides has been successfully performed using a number of distinct ion dissociation methods, relatively little is known regarding the fragmentation characteristics of glycopeptide ions with various charge carriers. In this study, energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation was examined via collision-induced dissociation for a group of related high mannose tryptic glycopeptides as their doubly protonated, doubly sodiated, and hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions. The doubly protonated glycopeptide ions with various compositions were found to undergo fragmentation over a relatively low but wide range of collision energies compared with the doubly sodiated and hybrid charged ions, and were found to yield both glycan and peptide fragmentation depending on the applied collision energy. By contrast, the various doubly sodiated glycopeptides were found to dissociate over a significantly higher but narrow range of collision energies, and exhibited only glycan cleavages. Interestingly, the hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions were consistently the most stable of the precursor ions studied, and provided fragmentation information spanning both the glycan and the peptide moieties. Taken together, these findings illustrate the influence of charge carrier over the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of glycopeptides, and serve to suggest potential strategies that exploit the analytically useful features uniquely afforded by specific charge carriers or combinations thereof.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopic, structural and nonlinear optical activity studies on 2-amino-3-chloro-5-trifluoromethyl pyridine: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Rekha, T. N.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 2-amino-3-chloro-5-trifluoromethylpyridine using potential energy surface (PES) scan and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The theoretical vibrational frequencies were calculated for the optimized geometry using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program package. The Mulliken atomic charge values were calculated. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intermolecular charge transfer studies and the calculation of ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity index and softness of the molecule were carried out. The nonlinear optical (NLO) activity was studied and the first order hyperpolarizability value was computed, which was 3.48 times greater than the urea. The natural bond orbital analysis was also performed to confirm the NLO activity of the molecule. Hence, the ACTP molecule is a promising candidate for NLO materials.

  10. Modeling energy transport in a cantilevered Euler-Bernoulli beam actively vibrating in Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, Cassio T.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2014-04-01

    When a mechanical and/or structural component is immersed in a fluid and it vibrates, the reasonable assumption is that part of the energy is transmitted to the adjacent media. For some engineering applications the energy transport between these two domains, i.e., structure and fluid, plays a central role. The work presented in this paper is focused on discussing the energy transport in beam-like structures as they can be used to represent flexible swimmers (fish-like pulsating mechanisms) in their simplest form. In order to expose the role of each of the fluid and beam properties effecting the energy transfer process, a simplified analytical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is derived. After analysis of the resulting coupled-systems' damping coefficient, a new energy transport component is added to the initial Euler-Bernoulli beam equation; a term associated with diffusion (fluid viscosity). In addition our modeling results in an added mass term, a characteristic consistent with previous literature. While deriving the model, an important assumption is made: beam mode shapes are not significantly affected by the domains' interaction. This hypothesis is experimentally tested in two different fluid media and confirmed to be reasonable for the first three vibration mode shapes.

  11. Design of a Long-Stroke Noncontact Electromagnetic Actuator for Active Vibration Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, Bibhuti; Allaire, Paul E.

    1996-01-01

    A long-stroke moving coil Lorentz Actuator was designed for use in a microgravity vibration isolation experiment. The final design had a stroke of 5.08 cm (2 in) and enough force capability to isolate a mass of the order of 22.7-45.4 kg. A simple dynamic magnetic circuit analysis, using an electrical analog, was developed for the initial design of the actuator. A neodymium-iron-boron material with energy density of 278 T-kA/m (35 MGOe) was selected to supply the magnetic field. The effect of changes in the design parameters of core diameter, shell outer diameter, pole face length, and coil wire layers were investigated. An extensive three-dimensional finite element analysis was carried out to accurately determine linearity with regard to axial position of the coil and coil current levels. The actuator was constructed and tested on a universal testing machine. Example plots are shown, indicating good linearity over the stroke of approximately 5.08 cm (2 in) and a range of coil currents from -1.5 A to +1.5 A. The actuator was then used for the microgravity vibration isolation experiments, described elsewhere.

  12. Wetting Behavior in Ultrasonic Vibration-Assisted Brazing of Aluminum to Graphite Using Sn-Ag-Ti Active Solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei-Yuan; Liu, Sen-Hui; Liu, Xin-Ya; Shao, Jia-Lin; Liu, Min-Pen

    2015-03-01

    In this study, Sn-Ag-Ti ternary alloy has been used as the active solder to braze pure aluminum and graphite in atmospheric conditions using ultrasonic vibration as an aid. The authors studied the formation, composition and decomposition temperature of the surface oxides of the active solder under atmospheric conditions. In addition, the wettability of Sn-5Ag-8Ti active solder on the surface of pure aluminum and graphite has also been studied. The results showed that the major components presented in the surface oxides formed on the Sn-5Ag-8Ti active solder under ambient conditions are TiO, TiO2, Ti2O3, Ti3O5 and SnO2. Apart from AgO and Ag2O2, which can be decomposed at the brazing temperature (773 K), other oxides will not be decomposed. The oxide layer comprises composite oxides and it forms a compact layer with a certain thickness to enclose the melted solder, which will prevent the liquid solder from wetting the base metals at the brazing temperature. After ultrasonic vibration, the oxide layer was destroyed and the liquid solder was able to wet and spread out around the base materials. Furthermore, better wettability of the active solder was observed on the surface of graphite and pure aluminum at the brazing temperature of 773-823 K using ultrasonic waves. The ultrasonic wave acts as the dominant driving factor which promotes the wetting and spreading of the liquid solder on the surface of graphite and aluminum to achieve a stable and reliable brazed joint.

  13. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  14. Active shunt capacitance cancelling oscillator circuit

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2003-09-23

    An oscillator circuit is disclosed which can be used to produce oscillation using a piezoelectric crystal, with a frequency of oscillation being largely independent of any shunt capacitance associated with the crystal (i.e. due to electrodes on the surfaces of the crystal and due to packaging and wiring for the crystal). The oscillator circuit is based on a tuned gain stage which operates the crystal at a frequency, f, near a series resonance frequency, f.sub.S. The oscillator circuit further includes a compensation circuit that supplies all the ac current flow through the shunt resistance associated with the crystal so that this ac current need not be supplied by the tuned gain stage. The compensation circuit uses a current mirror to provide the ac current flow based on the current flow through a reference capacitor that is equivalent to the shunt capacitance associated with the crystal. The oscillator circuit has applications for driving piezoelectric crystals for sensing of viscous, fluid or solid media by detecting a change in the frequency of oscillation of the crystal and a resonator loss which occur from contact of an exposed surface of the crystal by the viscous, fluid or solid media.

  15. 20 and 3D Numerical Simulations of Flux Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Linton, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancellation of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere and chromosphere has been linked observationally and theoretically to a broad range of solar activity, from filament channel formation to CME initiation. Because this phenomenon is typically measured at only a single layer in the atmosphere, in the radial (line of sight) component of the magnetic field, the actual processes behind this observational signature are ambiguous. It is clear that reconnection is involved in some way, but the location of the reconnection sites and associated connectivity changes remain uncertain in most cases. We are using numerical modeling to demystify flux cancellation, beginning with the simplest possible configuration: a subphotospheric Lundquist flux tube surrounded by a potential field, immersed in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere, spanning many orders of magnitude in plasma beta. In this system, cancellation is driven slowly by a 2-cell circulation pattern imposed in the convection zone, such that the tops of the cells are located around the beta= 1 level (Le., the photosphere) and the flows converge and form a downdraft at the polarity inversion line; note however that no flow is imposed along the neutral line. We will present the results of 2D and 3D MHD-AMR simulations of flux cancellation, in which the flux at the photosphere begins in either an unsheared or sheared state. In all cases, a lOW-lying flux rope is formed by reconnection at the polarity inversion line within a few thousand seconds. The flux rope remains stable and does not rise, however, in contrast to models which do not include the presence of significant mass loading.

  16. 2D and 3D Numerical Simulations of Flux Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Linton, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancellation of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere and chromosphere has been linked observationally and theoretically to a broad range of solar activity, from filament channel formation to CME initiation. Because this phenomenon is typically measured at only a single layer in the atmosphere, in the radial (line of sight) component of the magnetic field, the actual processes behind this observational signature are ambiguous. It is clear that reconnection is involved in some way, but the location of the reconnection sites and associated connectivity changes remain uncertain in most cases. We are using numerical modeling to demystify flux cancellation, beginning with the simplest possible configuration: a subphotospheric Lundquist flux tube surrounded by a potential field, immersed in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere, spanning many orders of magnitude in plasma beta. In this system, cancellation is driven slowly by a 2-cell circulation pattern imposed in the convection zone, such that the tops of the cells are located around the beta=1 level (i.e., the photosphere) and the flows converge and form a downdraft at the polarity inversion line; note however that no flow is imposed along the neutral line. We will present the results of 2D and 3D MHD-AMR simulations of flux cancellation, in which the flux at the photosphere begins in either an unsheared or sheared state. In all cases, a low-lying flux rope is formed by reconnection at the polarity inversion line within a few thousand seconds. The flux rope remains stable and does not rise, however, in contrast to models which do not include the presence of significant mass loading.

  17. Active-passive hybrid vibration control study in plates using enhanced smart constrained layer damping (ESCLD) treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, V.; Narayanan, S.

    2003-10-01

    In the present paper, the active-passive hybrid vibration control performance due to Enhanced Smart Constrained Layer Damping (ESCLD) treatment as proposed by Liao and Wang on plate like structures has been considered. This treatment consists of a viscoelastic layer constrained between a smart piezoelectric layer and the base structure being controlled. Also, the smart constraining layer is clamped to the base structure. This type of damping treatment has got both active and passive component of damping. The passive damping is through cyclic shearing of viscoelastic constrained layer which is further enhanced by activating the smart piezoelectric constraining layer and the active component of the damping is through the transfer of control moments from the piezoelectric layer to the base structure through the viscoelastic layer and also bypassed through the clamps. A plate finite element has been formulated using first order shear deformation theory, including the effect of transverse shear and rotary inertia. The effect of the viscoelastic shear layer and piezoelectric constraining layer on the mass and stiffness has been included in the model. The viscoelastic shear layer is modeled usig Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method, which is a time domain approach. The clamps (edge elements) are modeled as equivalent springs connecting the smart piezoelectric constraining layer with the structure to be controlled. LQR optimal control strategy is used to obtain optimal control gains. The effect of the viscoelastic material properties (shear modulus and loss factor) on the hybrid vibration control performance is studied for both SCLD (without edge elements) and ESCLD systems.

  18. Analysis and testing of an integrated semi-active seat suspension for both longitudinal and vertical vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Jiang, Peng; Pan, Hui; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-04-01

    An integrated semi-active seat suspension for both longitudinal and vertical vibration control is analyzed and tested in this paper. The seat suspension consists of a switching mechanism transforming both longitudinal and vertical motions into a rotary motion and a real-time damping-controllable system-a rotary magnetorheological (MR) damper working in pure shear mode and its corresponding control system. The switching mechanism employs the parallelogram frames as a motion guide which keeps the seat moving longitudinally and vertically. At the same time, both longitudinal and vertical motions are transformed into a reciprocating rotary motion that is transmitted to the rotary MR damper after an amplification by a gear mechanism. Both the longitudinal and vertical vibrations can be attenuated in real time through controlling the damping force (or torque) of the rotary MR damper. The mathematical model of the seat suspension system is established, simulated, and analyzed. The experimental test based on the test rig in Hefei University of Technology is implemented, and the results of simulation and experimental test are compared and analyzed.

  19. Guitars, Keyboards, Strobes, and Motors -- From Vibrational Motion to Active Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randall; Carlson, John; Asadi-Zeydabadi, Masoud; Busley, Brad; Law-Balding, Katie; Juengel, Mattea

    2013-01-01

    Physics First is offered to ninth graders at high schools in Aurora, CO. A unique new asset of this school system is an embedded research lab called the "Innovation Hyperlab." The goal of the lab is to connect secondary school teaching to ongoing university scientific research, supporting the school district's aim to create opportunities to integrate P-20 (preschool to graduate school) learning. This paper is an example of how we create research connections in the context of introductory physics lessons on vibrations and waves. Key to the process is the use of several different types of technical resources, hence the name "hyperlab." Students learn many practical experimental techniques, reinforcing their knowledge of fundamentals and preparing them to work effectively on open-ended research or engineering projects.

  20. Vibration activity evaluation of double-span rotor at rundown caused by its initial curvature and residual unbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuk, A. G.; Volokhovskaya, O. A.

    2017-01-01

    The work is dedicated to the study of vibration activity of double-span rotor of turbine unit (TU) consisting of a high-pressure rotor and a rotor of medium-low pressure rotor combined with it (HPR—MLPR system) at the lowest critical rotational frequencies at rundown. When using the design model of the system, it was assumed that the rotors were installed on anisotropic elastic-damper supports, tied among themselves by a rigid clutch, and having the initial curvature (nonremovable initial deflection) and the residual unbalances in both spans. Two types of bearings were considered-elliptical and six-shoe segmental bearings. It was believed that the initial deflection during operation or as a result of noncompliance of start-up conditions initially gets only HPR and the axis shape of unloaded HPR is known and it is a flat curve. The resultant curve of nonremovable deflection of the HPR-MLPR system occurring after installing the shafting into the bearings was also considered flat and located in the same plane as the initial deflection of HPR. The cases of additional presence with the rotors of concentrated residual unbalances in the middle of each span are considered. The case of availability with both rotors of the shafting antisymmetric point unbalances on each of the spans was not considered in this work. The values of each of the factors of vibration activity (of the initial deflection of HPR and residual unbalances of both rotors) were chosen to be equal to the maximum permissible established by the active in the practice of TU operation limitations on the maximum values of the initial deflection of thermally unstable rotor and its residual unbalances. The influence of location of residual unbalances in relation to the initial deflection curve of HPR-MLPR system on the total amplitudes of transient vibrations caused by both excitation factors in the reference points of the system at TU rundown was investigated. It was established that, at the unfavorable

  1. Improved CDMA Performance Using Parallel Interference Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin; Divsalar, Dariush

    1995-01-01

    This report considers a general parallel interference cancellation scheme that significantly reduces the degradation effect of user interference but with a lesser implementation complexity than the maximum-likelihood technique. The scheme operates on the fact that parallel processing simultaneously removes from each user the interference produced by the remaining users accessing the channel in an amount proportional to their reliability. The parallel processing can be done in multiple stages. The proposed scheme uses tentative decision devices with different optimum thresholds at the multiple stages to produce the most reliably received data for generation and cancellation of user interference. The 1-stage interference cancellation is analyzed for three types of tentative decision devices, namely, hard, null zone, and soft decision, and two types of user power distribution, namely, equal and unequal powers. Simulation results are given for a multitude of different situations, in particular, those cases for which the analysis is too complex.

  2. Flux Cancellation Leading to CME Filament Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popescu, Roxana M.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filaments are strands of relatively cool, dense plasma magnetically suspended in the lower density hotter solar corona. They trace magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) in the photosphere below, and are supported against gravity at heights of up to approx.100 Mm above the chromosphere by the magnetic field in and around them. This field erupts when it is rendered unstable, often by magnetic flux cancellation or emergence at or near the PIL. We have studied the evolution of photospheric magnetic flux leading to ten observed filament eruptions. Specifically, we look for gradual magnetic changes in the neighborhood of the PIL prior to and during eruption. We use Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), both on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), to study filament eruptions and their photospheric magnetic fields. We examine whether flux cancellation or/and emergence leads to filament eruptions. We find that continuous flux cancellation was present at the PIL for many hours prior to each eruption. We present two CME-producing eruptions in detail and find the following: (a) the pre-eruption filament-holding core field is highly sheared and appears in the shape of a sigmoid above the PIL; (b) at the start of the eruption the opposite arms of the sigmoid reconnect in the middle above the site of (tether-cutting) flux cancellation at the PIL; (c) the filaments first show a slow-rise, followed by a fast-rise as they erupt. We conclude that these two filament eruptions result from flux cancellation in the middle of the sheared field, and thereafter evolve in agreement with the standard model for a CME/flare filament eruption from a closed bipolar magnetic field [flux cancellation (van Ballegooijen and Martens 1989 and Moore and Roumelrotis 1992) and runaway tether-cutting (Moore et. al 2001)].

  3. CancellationTools: All-in-one software for administration and analysis of cancellation tasks.

    PubMed

    Dalmaijer, Edwin S; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Cornelissen, Tim H W; Husain, Masud

    2015-12-01

    In a cancellation task, a participant is required to search for and cross out ("cancel") targets, which are usually embedded among distractor stimuli. The number of cancelled targets and their location can be used to diagnose the neglect syndrome after stroke. In addition, the organization of search provides a potentially useful way to measure executive control over multitarget search. Although many useful cancellation measures have been introduced, most fail to make their way into research studies and clinical practice due to the practical difficulty of acquiring such parameters from traditional pen-and-paper measures. Here we present new, open-source software that is freely available to all. It allows researchers and clinicians to flexibly administer computerized cancellation tasks using stimuli of their choice, and to directly analyze the data in a convenient manner. The automated analysis suite provides output that includes almost all of the currently existing measures, as well as several new ones introduced here. All tasks can be performed using either a computer mouse or a touchscreen as an input device, and an online version of the task runtime is available for tablet devices. A summary of the results is produced in a single A4-sized PDF document, including high quality data visualizations. For research purposes, batch analysis of large datasets is possible. In sum, CancellationTools allows users to employ a flexible, computerized cancellation task, which provides extensive benefits and ease of use.

  4. Active vibration control of functionally graded beams with piezoelectric layers based on higher order shear deformation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendine, K.; Boukhoulda, F. B.; Nouari, M.; Satla, Z.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on a study of active vibration control of functionally graded beams with upper and lower surface-bonded piezoelectric layers. The model is based on higher-order shear deformation theory and implemented using the finite element method (FEM). The proprieties of the functionally graded beam (FGB) are graded along the thickness direction. The piezoelectric actuator provides a damping effect on the FGB by means of a velocity feedback control algorithm. A Matlab program has been developed for the FGB model and compared with ANSYS APDL. Using Newmark's method numerical solutions are obtained for the dynamic equations of FGB with piezoelectric layers. Numerical results show the effects of the constituent volume fraction and the influence the feedback control gain on the frequency and dynamic response of FGBs.

  5. Active vibration control of a ring-stiffened cylindrical shell in contact with unbounded external fluid and subjected to harmonic disturbance by piezoelectric sensor and actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Yang, Dong-Ho

    2013-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the suppression of vibrations and radiated sound of a ring-stiffened circular cylindrical shell in contact with unbounded external fluid by means of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The dynamic model of a circular cylindrical shell based on the Sanders shell theory was considered together with a ring stiffener model. The mass and stiffness matrices for a ring stiffener were newly derived in this study and added to the mass and stiffness matrices of the cylindrical shell, respectively. The fluid-added mass matrix, which was derived by using the baffled shell theory, was also added to the mass matrix. Finally, the equations representing the piezoelectric sensor measurement and piezoelectric actuation complete the theoretical model for the addressed problem. The natural vibration characteristics of the ring-stiffened cylindrical shell both in air and in water were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical predictions were in good agreement with the experimental results. An active vibration controller which can cope with a harmonic disturbance was designed by considering the modified higher harmonic control, which is, in fact, a band rejection filter. An active vibration control experiment on the submerged cylindrical shell was carried out in a water tank and the digital control system was used. The experimental results showed that both vibrations and radiation sound of the submerged cylindrical shell were suppressed by a pair of piezoelectric sensor and actuator.

  6. Adaptive vibration control using synchronous demodulation with machine tool controller motor commutation

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, David James

    2008-05-13

    A control system and method for actively reducing vibration in a spindle housing caused by unbalance forces on a rotating spindle, by measuring the force-induced spindle-housing motion, determining control signals based on synchronous demodulation, and provide compensation for the measured displacement to cancel or otherwise reduce or attenuate the vibration. In particular, the synchronous demodulation technique is performed to recover a measured spindle housing displacement signal related only to the rotation of a machine tool spindle, and consequently rejects measured displacement not related to spindle motion or synchronous to a cycle of revolution. Furthermore, the controller actuates at least one voice-coil (VC) motor, to cancel the original force-induced motion, and adapts the magnitude of voice coil signal until this measured displacement signal is brought to a null. In order to adjust the signal to a null, it must have the correct phase relative to the spindle angle. The feedback phase signal is used to adjust a common (to both outputs) commutation offset register (offset relative to spindle encoder angle) to force the feedback phase signal output to a null. Once both of these feedback signals are null, the system is compensating properly for the spindle-induced motion.

  7. GENERALIZED SIDELOBE CANCELLER FOR MAGNETOENCEPHALOGRAPHY ARRAYS.

    PubMed

    Mosher, John C; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Hui, Hua Brian; Burgess, Richard C; Leahy, Richard M

    2009-08-07

    In the last decade, large arrays of sensors for magnetoencephalography (MEG) (and electroencephalography (EEG)) have become more commonplace, allowing new opportunities for the application of beamforming techniques to the joint problems of signal estimation and noise reduction. We introduce a new approach to noise cancellation, the generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC), itself an alternative to the linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) algorithm. The GSC framework naturally fits within the other noise reduction techniques that employ real or virtual reference arrays. Using expository human subject data with strong environmental and biological artifacts, we demonstrate a straightforward sequence of steps for practical noise filtering, applicable to any large array sensor design.

  8. Noise cancellation of memristive neural networks.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shiping; Zeng, Zhigang; Huang, Tingwen; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates noise cancellation problem of memristive neural networks. Based on the reproducible gradual resistance tuning in bipolar mode, a first-order voltage-controlled memristive model is employed with asymmetric voltage thresholds. Since memristive devices are especially tiny to be densely packed in crossbar-like structures and possess long time memory needed by neuromorphic synapses, this paper shows how to approximate the behavior of synapses in neural networks using this memristive device. Also certain templates of memristive neural networks are established to implement the noise cancellation.

  9. Characterization of Multilayer Piezoelectric Actuators for Use in Active Isolation Mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Hooker, Matthew W.

    1997-01-01

    Active mounts are desirable for isolating spacecraft science instruments from on-board vibrational sources such as motors and release mechanisms. Such active isolation mounts typically employ multilayer piezoelectric actuators to cancel these vibrational disturbances. The actuators selected for spacecraft systems must consume minimal power while exhibiting displacements of 5 to 10 micron under load. This report describes a study that compares the power consumption, displacement, and load characteristics of four commercially available multilayer piezoelectric actuators. The results of this study indicate that commercially available actuators exist that meet or exceed the design requirements used in spacecraft isolation mounts.

  10. Quantitative analysis of the temperature dependency in Raman active vibrational modes of molybdenum disulfide atomic layers.

    PubMed

    Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, J

    2013-10-21

    Raman spectroscopy is utilized to quantify the temperature dependency of the vibrational modes in molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) atomic layers. These analyses are essential for understanding the structural properties and phononic behaviors of this two-dimensional (2D) material. We quantitatively analyze the temperature dependent shifts of the Raman peak positions in the temperature range from 300 to 550 K, and find that both planar and out-of-plane characteristic modes are highly sensitive to temperature variations. This temperature dependency is linear and can be fully explained by the first-order temperature coefficient. Using a semi-quantitative model, we evaluate the contributions of the material's thermal expansion and intrinsic temperature effects to this dependency. We reveal that the dominating source of shift in the peak position of planar mode E2g(1) for samples of all thicknesses investigated is the four-phonon process. In addition to the four-phonon process, thermal expansion plays a significant role in the temperature dependency of the out-of-plane mode, A1g. The thickness dependency of the temperature coefficient for MoS2 and a drastic change in behaviors of samples from bi- to single-layered are also demonstrated. We further explore the role of defects in the thermal properties of MoS2 by examining the temperature dependency of Raman modes in CVD-grown samples.

  11. Is Two Better than One? Limb Activation Treatment Combined with Contralesional Arm Vibration to Ameliorate Signs of Left Neglect

    PubMed Central

    Pitteri, Marco; Arcara, Giorgio; Passarini, Laura; Meneghello, Francesca; Priftis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the effects of the Limb Activation Treatment (LAT) alone and in combination with the Contralateral Arm Vibration (CAV) on left neglect (LN) rehabilitation. We conceived them as techniques that both prompt the activation of the lesioned right hemisphere because of the activation (with the LAT as an active technique) and the stimulation (with the CAV as a passive technique) of the left hemibody. To test the effect of the simultaneous use of these two techniques (i.e., LAT and CAV) on visuo-spatial aspects of LN, we described the case of an LN patient (GR), who showed high intra-individual variability (IIV) in performance. Given the high IIV of GR, we used an ABAB repeated-measures design to better define the effectiveness of the combined application of LAT and CAV, as a function of time. The results showed an improvement of GR’s performance on the Bells test following the combined application of LAT and CAV, with respect to the application of LAT alone. We did not find, however, significant effects of treatment on two other LN tests (i.e., Line bisection and Picture scanning). We propose that the combined application of LAT and CAV can be beneficial for some aspects of LN. PMID:23966926

  12. 75 FR 33628 - National Cancer Institute; Cancellation of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Cancellation of Meeting Notice is hereby given of the cancellation of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials...

  13. 78 FR 15977 - Sunshine Act Meetings; Cancellation Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meetings; Cancellation Notice OPIC March 13, 2013 Public Hearing Cancellation. OPIC's..., OPIC Corporate Secretary. BILLING CODE 3210-01-P...

  14. Discussions on the Cancellation Effect on a Circular Orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Rui Li; Ya. S. Derbenev

    2005-05-01

    In this study, we discuss some controversial points raised concerning the cancellation effect for transverse dynamics on a curved orbit, and show how they can be perceived from the view point of the cancellation picture.

  15. 77 FR 33203 - Equity and Excellence Commission, Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Equity and Excellence Commission, Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: U.S. Department of Education. ACTION: Notice; Advisory Committee Meeting Cancellation. SUMMARY: The Department of Education gives notice of...

  16. 77 FR 27072 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee scheduled for May 31, 2012, is canceled. This meeting was announced in...

  17. 75 FR 5333 - Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee scheduled for February 24, 2010, is cancelled. This...

  18. 75 FR 36101 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee scheduled for June 28, 2010, is cancelled. This...

  19. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  20. The effects of passive stretching plus vibration on strength and activation of the plantar flexors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Mosier, Eric M

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the effects of passive stretching only (PS+CON) and passive stretching with the addition of continuous vibration (VIB) during post-passive stretching tests (PS+VIB) on peak torque (PT), percent voluntary inactivation (%VI), single stimulus twitch torque (TTSINGLE), and doublet stimuli twitch torque (TTDOUBLET) of the plantar flexors at a short (20° plantar flexion (PF)) and long muscle length (15° dorsiflexion (DF)). Fourteen healthy men (age = 22 ± 3 years) performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions at PF and DF, and passive range of motion (PROM) assessments before and after 8 × 30-s passive stretches without (PS+CON) or with VIB (PS+VIB) administered continuously throughout post-passive stretching tests. The passive properties of the muscle tendon unit were assessed pre- and post-passive stretching via PROM, passive torque (PASSTQ), and musculotendinous stiffness (MTS) measurements. PT, TTSINGLE, and TTDOUBLET decreased, whereas, %VI increased following passive stretching at PF and DF (P < 0.05) with no significant differences between PS+CON and PS+VIB. PASSTQ and MTS decreased while PROM increased post-passive stretching during both trials (P < 0.05). The stretching-induced force/torque deficit and increases in %VI were evident following passive stretching at short and long muscle lengths. Although not statistically significant, effect size calculations suggested large and moderate differences in the absolute changes in PT (Cohen's d = 1.14) and %VI (Cohen's d = 0.54) from pre- to post-passive stretching between treatments, with PS+VIB having greater decreases of PT and higher %VI than PS+CON. The decrement in PT following passive stretching may be primarily neural in origin.

  1. Placement of piezoelectric actuators for active control of vibration using modal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuegeng

    1998-12-01

    An equation is derived to model the piezoelectric actuators incorporation with flexible structures. This equation permits the comparison of the performance indices over the entire structure for a piezoelectric actuator with constant area, which is unachievable if the Finite Element Method is used for complicated structures. An index has been developed for placement of piezoelectric actuator for control of vibration of a flexible structure. This index is derived from the definition of H2 norm. Computation of the proposed index requires only the natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of the structures of interest. The method is well suited to large structure application because of the simplicity of the calculation. The proposed index is valid either for point sensor and actuator or for distributed types such as piezoelectric. Application of the method for different combinations of sensors and actuators has been discussed. Both piezoelectric patch and piezoelectric fiber actuators are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed index. The comparison of H2 and H infinity norms shows good agreement for beam and plate models with single, three, and six modes. The comparison of H2 and Hinfinity norms is also made for a cantilevered beam with fixed sensor location, and a simply supported plate with a piezoelectric fiber actuator. Agreement between those two norms as well as the proposed index is demonstrated through all the cases. Imbedded piezoelectric fiber actuators, which, are able to supply anisotropic control actuation, have an optimal fiber orientation, which is related to different structures, but independent of the volume fraction of the PZT fibers. Piezoelectric fiber actuator with volume fraction nuf < 1 creates twisting moment, which has better performance than that of a monolithic piezoelectric patch actuator in control of twisting mode.

  2. Instrumental Dependent Dissociations of n-Propyl/Isopropyl Phosphonate Isomers: Evaluation of Resonant and Non-Resonant Vibrational Activations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennaceur, Chafia; Afonso, Carlos; Alves, Sandra; Bossée, Anne; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-08-01

    Structural elucidation and distinction of isomeric neurotoxic agents remain a challenge. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used for this purpose in particular if a "diagnostic" product ion is observed. Different vibrational activation methods were investigated to enhance formation of diagnostic ions through consecutive processes from O,O-dialkyl alkylphosphonates. Resonant and non-resonant collisional activation and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) were used with different mass spectrometers: a hybrid quadrupole Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (Qh-FTICR) and a hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap (LTQ/Orbitrap). Double resonance (DR) experiments, in ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell, were used for unambiguous determination of direct intermediate yielding diagnostic ions. From protonated n-propyl and isopropyl O-O-dialkyl-phosphonates, a diagnostic m/ z 83 ion characterizes the isopropyl isomer. This ion is produced through consecutive dissociation processes. Conditions to favor its formation and observation using different activation methods were investigated. It was shown that with the LTQ, consecutive experimental steps of isolation/activation with modified trapping conditions limiting the low mass cut off (LMCO) effect were required, whereas with FT-ICR by CID and IRMPD the diagnostic ion detection was provided only by one activation step. Among the different investigated activation methods it was shown that by using low-pressure conditions or using non-resonant methods, efficient and fast differentiation of isomeric neurotoxic agents was obtained. This work constitutes a unique comparison of different activation modes for distinction of isomers showing the instrumental dependence characteristic of the consecutive processes. New insights in the dissociation pathways were obtained based on double-resonance IRMPD experiments using a FT-ICR instrument with limitation at low mass values.

  3. Instrumental dependent dissociations of n-propyl/isopropyl phosphonate isomers: evaluation of resonant and non-resonant vibrational activations.

    PubMed

    Bennaceur, Chafia; Afonso, Carlos; Alves, Sandra; Bossée, Anne; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-08-01

    Structural elucidation and distinction of isomeric neurotoxic agents remain a challenge. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used for this purpose in particular if a "diagnostic" product ion is observed. Different vibrational activation methods were investigated to enhance formation of diagnostic ions through consecutive processes from O,O-dialkyl alkylphosphonates. Resonant and non-resonant collisional activation and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) were used with different mass spectrometers: a hybrid quadrupole Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (Qh-FTICR) and a hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap (LTQ/Orbitrap). Double resonance (DR) experiments, in ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell, were used for unambiguous determination of direct intermediate yielding diagnostic ions. From protonated n-propyl and isopropyl O-O-dialkyl-phosphonates, a diagnostic m/z 83 ion characterizes the isopropyl isomer. This ion is produced through consecutive dissociation processes. Conditions to favor its formation and observation using different activation methods were investigated. It was shown that with the LTQ, consecutive experimental steps of isolation/activation with modified trapping conditions limiting the low mass cut off (LMCO) effect were required, whereas with FT-ICR by CID and IRMPD the diagnostic ion detection was provided only by one activation step. Among the different investigated activation methods it was shown that by using low-pressure conditions or using non-resonant methods, efficient and fast differentiation of isomeric neurotoxic agents was obtained. This work constitutes a unique comparison of different activation modes for distinction of isomers showing the instrumental dependence characteristic of the consecutive processes. New insights in the dissociation pathways were obtained based on double-resonance IRMPD experiments using a FT-ICR instrument with limitation at low mass values.

  4. Method for Canceling Ionospheric Doppler Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1982-01-01

    Unified transponder system with hydrogen-maser oscillators at both stations can compensate for both motional and ionospheric components of Doppler shift. Appropriate choices of frequency shift in output of mixer m3. System exploits proportionality between dispersive component of frequency shift and reciprocal of frequency to achieve cancellation of dispersive component at output.

  5. 77 FR 16567 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Cancellation OPIC March 21, 2012 Public Hearing OPIC's Sunshine Act notice..., or via email at Connie.Downs@opic.gov . Dated: March 19, 2011. Connie M. Downs, OPIC...

  6. 25 CFR 213.40 - Cancellations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... section 3 of the act of May 27, 1908 (35 Stat. 312). Removal of Restrictions ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cancellations. 213.40 Section 213.40 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS...

  7. 7 CFR 1956.70 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Cancellation. 1956.70 Section 1956.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) DEBT SETTLEMENT Debt Settlement-Farm Loan Programs and Multi-Family Housing §...

  8. 43 CFR 3108.3 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL AND GAS LEASING Relinquishment, Termination... law, the regulations issued thereunder, or the lease, the lease may be canceled by the Secretary, if the leasehold does not contain a well capable of production of oil or gas in paying quantities, or...

  9. Experimental Demonstration of Underwater Acoustic Scattering Cancellation

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Charles A.; Martin, Theodore P.; Guild, Matthew D.; Layman, Christopher N.; Naify, Christina J.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    We explore an acoustic scattering cancellation shell for buoyant hollow cylinders submersed in a water background. A thin, low-shear, elastic coating is used to cancel the monopole scattering from an air-filled, neutrally buoyant steel shell for all frequencies where the wavelength is larger than the object diameter. By design, the uncoated shell also has an effective density close to the aqueous background, independently canceling its dipole scattering. Due to the significantly reduced monopole and dipole scattering, the compliant coating results in a hollow cylindrical inclusion that is simultaneously impedance and sound speed matched to the water background. We demonstrate the proposed cancellation method with a specific case, using an array of hollow steel cylinders coated with thin silicone rubber shells. These experimental results are matched to finite element modeling predictions, confirming the scattering reduction. Additional calculations explore the optimization of the silicone coating properties. Using this approach, it is found that scattering cross-sections can be reduced by 20 dB for all wavelengths up to k0a = 0.85. PMID:26282067

  10. Measurement of drag and its cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBra, D. B.; Conklin, J. W.

    2011-05-01

    The design of drag cancellation missions of the future will take advantage of the technology experience of the past. The importance of data for modeling of the atmosphere led to at least six types of measurement: (a) balloon flights, (b) missile-launched falling spheres, (c) the 'cannonball' satellites of Ken Champion with accelerometers for low-altitude drag measurement (late 1960s and early 1970s), (d) the Agena flight of LOGACS (1967), a Bell MESA accelerometer mounted on a rotating platform to spectrally shift low-frequency errors in the accelerometer, (e) a series of French low-level accelerometers (e.g. CACTUS, 1975), and (f) correction of differential accelerations for drag errors in measuring gravity gradient on a pair of satellites (GRACE, 2002). The independent invention of the drag-free satellite concept by Pugh and Lange (1964) to cancel external disturbance added implementation opportunities. Its first flight application was for ephemeris prediction improvement with the DISCOS flight (1972)—still the only extended free test mass flight. Then successful flights for reduced disturbance environment for science measurement with gyros on GP-B (2004) and for improved accuracy in geodesy and ocean studies (GOCE, 2009) each using accelerometer measurements to control the drag-canceling thrust. LISA, DECIGO, BBO and other gravity wave-measuring satellite systems will push the cancellation of drag to new levels.

  11. Experimental Demonstration of Underwater Acoustic Scattering Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Charles A.; Martin, Theodore P.; Guild, Matthew D.; Layman, Christopher N.; Naify, Christina J.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2015-08-01

    We explore an acoustic scattering cancellation shell for buoyant hollow cylinders submersed in a water background. A thin, low-shear, elastic coating is used to cancel the monopole scattering from an air-filled, neutrally buoyant steel shell for all frequencies where the wavelength is larger than the object diameter. By design, the uncoated shell also has an effective density close to the aqueous background, independently canceling its dipole scattering. Due to the significantly reduced monopole and dipole scattering, the compliant coating results in a hollow cylindrical inclusion that is simultaneously impedance and sound speed matched to the water background. We demonstrate the proposed cancellation method with a specific case, using an array of hollow steel cylinders coated with thin silicone rubber shells. These experimental results are matched to finite element modeling predictions, confirming the scattering reduction. Additional calculations explore the optimization of the silicone coating properties. Using this approach, it is found that scattering cross-sections can be reduced by 20 dB for all wavelengths up to k0a = 0.85.

  12. Database Cancellation: The "Hows" and "Whys"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Database cancellation is one of the most difficult tasks performed by a librarian. This may seem counter-intuitive but, psychologically, it is certainly true. When a librarian or a team of librarians has invested a great deal of time doing research, talking to potential users, and conducting trials before deciding to subscribe to a database, they…

  13. 25 CFR 213.40 - Cancellations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.40 Cancellations. (a) When, in the opinion... or of the applicable regulations, or if mining operations are conducted wastefully and without regard to good mining practice, the Secretary of the Interior shall have the right at any time after 30...

  14. 25 CFR 213.40 - Cancellations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.40 Cancellations. (a) When, in the opinion... or of the applicable regulations, or if mining operations are conducted wastefully and without regard to good mining practice, the Secretary of the Interior shall have the right at any time after 30...

  15. 25 CFR 23.53 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cancellation. 23.53 Section 23.53 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT General and Uniform...) Violated the rights as specified in § 23.49 or endangered the health, safety, or welfare of any person;...

  16. 25 CFR 23.53 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Cancellation. 23.53 Section 23.53 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT General and Uniform Grant... rights as specified in § 23.49 or endangered the health, safety, or welfare of any person; or (3)...

  17. 25 CFR 23.53 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cancellation. 23.53 Section 23.53 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT General and Uniform...) Violated the rights as specified in § 23.49 or endangered the health, safety, or welfare of any person;...

  18. 25 CFR 23.53 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cancellation. 23.53 Section 23.53 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT General and Uniform...) Violated the rights as specified in § 23.49 or endangered the health, safety, or welfare of any person;...

  19. 25 CFR 23.53 - Cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cancellation. 23.53 Section 23.53 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT General and Uniform...) Violated the rights as specified in § 23.49 or endangered the health, safety, or welfare of any person;...

  20. Antimicrobial activity, structural evaluation and vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) study of pyrrole containing vinyl derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. N.; Rawat, Poonam; Sahu, Sangeeta; Kumar, Yashvinder

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present structural and vibrational study of three vinylpyrrole derivatives: 2-Cyano-3-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-acrylamide (CPA), 1-(1H-Pyrrol-2-yl)-Pent-1-en-3-one (PP) and 1-(1H-Pyrrol-2-yl)-but-1-en-3-one (PB), using ab initio, DFT and experimental approaches. The quantum chemical calculation have been performed on B3LYP method and 6-311 + G(d,p) basis set. The experimental FT-IR and Raman wavenumbers were compared with the respective theoretical values obtained from DFT calculations and found to agree well. The experimental FT-IR and Raman study clearly indicate that the compound exist as dimer in solid state. The binding energies of (CPA), (PP) and (PB) dimers are found to be 20.95, 18.75 and 19.18 kcal/mol, respectively. The vibrational analysis shows red shifts in vN-H and vCdbnd O stretching as result of dimer formation. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. Topological and energetic parameters reveal the nature of interactions in dimer. The local electronic descriptors analyses were used to predict the reactive sites in the molecule. Calculated first static hyperpolarizability of CPA, PP and PB is found to be 10.41 × 10- 30, 18.93 × 10- 30, 18.29 × 10- 30 esu, respectively, shows that investigated molecules will have non-linear optical response and might be used as non-linear optical (NLO) material. These vinylpyrrole compounds (CPA), (PP) and (PB) showed antifungal and antibacterial activity against Aspergillus niger and gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtili.

  1. 30 CFR 256.77 - Cancellation of leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cancellation of leases. 256.77 Section 256.77... OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Termination of Leases § 256.77 Cancellation of leases. (a) Any nonproducing lease issued under the act may be cancelled by the authorized officer whenever...

  2. 75 FR 40825 - Clofencet; Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ... the registrant Monsanto Company to voluntarily cancel all these product registrations. These are the... notice a cancellation order granting the requested cancellations. Any distribution, sale, or use of the... public interested in the sale, distribution, or use of pesticides. Since others also may be...

  3. 32 CFR 1615.8 - Cancellation of registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cancellation of registration. 1615.8 Section... ADMINISTRATION OF REGISTRATION § 1615.8 Cancellation of registration. The Director of Selective Service may cancel the registration of any particular registrant or of a registrant who comes within a...

  4. 26 CFR 301.6804-1 - Attachment and cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Attachment and cancellation. 301.6804-1 Section 301.6804-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE... Attachment and cancellation. For provisions relating to the attachment and cancellation of specific...

  5. 18 CFR 4.83 - Cancellation and loss of priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DETERMINATION OF PROJECT COSTS Application for Preliminary Permit; Amendment and Cancellation of Preliminary Permit § 4.83 Cancellation and loss of priority. (a) The Commission may cancel a preliminary permit after... application for a license for the proposed project. (b) Failure of a permittee to file an...

  6. 18 CFR 4.83 - Cancellation and loss of priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DETERMINATION OF PROJECT COSTS Application for Preliminary Permit; Amendment and Cancellation of Preliminary Permit § 4.83 Cancellation and loss of priority. (a) The Commission may cancel a preliminary permit after... application for a license for the proposed project. (b) Failure of a permittee to file an...

  7. 48 CFR 14.209 - Cancellation of invitations before opening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the bids shall be purged from primary and backup data storage systems. (c) The notice of cancellation... REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Solicitation of Bids 14.209 Cancellation of invitations before opening. (a) The cancellation of an invitation for bids usually involves a loss of...

  8. 48 CFR 14.209 - Cancellation of invitations before opening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the bids shall be purged from primary and backup data storage systems. (c) The notice of cancellation... REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Solicitation of Bids 14.209 Cancellation of invitations before opening. (a) The cancellation of an invitation for bids usually involves a loss of...

  9. 48 CFR 14.209 - Cancellation of invitations before opening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the bids shall be purged from primary and backup data storage systems. (c) The notice of cancellation... REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Solicitation of Bids 14.209 Cancellation of invitations before opening. (a) The cancellation of an invitation for bids usually involves a loss of...

  10. 48 CFR 14.209 - Cancellation of invitations before opening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the bids shall be purged from primary and backup data storage systems. (c) The notice of cancellation... REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Solicitation of Bids 14.209 Cancellation of invitations before opening. (a) The cancellation of an invitation for bids usually involves a loss of...

  11. 78 FR 68779 - Controlled Group Regulation Examples; Hearing Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... investment companies. DATES: The public hearing originally scheduled for December 9, 2013 at 10 a.m. is... Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Cancellation of a notice of public hearing on proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: This document cancels a public hearing on proposed...

  12. 37 CFR 2.111 - Filing petition for cancellation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... fee insufficient to pay for one person to petition for cancellation against at least one class in the... accompanied by fees sufficient to pay for one person to petition for cancellation against at least one class... for one person to petition for cancellation of the registration in at least one class but...

  13. Vibrational imaging of glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fanghao; Chen, Zhixing; Zhang, Luyuan; Shen, Yihui; Wei, Lu; Min, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is consumed as an energy source by virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. Its uptake activity closely reflects the cellular metabolic status in various pathophysiological transformations, such as diabetes and cancer. Extensive efforts such as positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence microscopy have been made to specifically image glucose uptake activity but all with technical limitations. Here, we report a new platform to visualize glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues with subcellular resolution and minimal perturbation. A novel glucose analogue with a small alkyne tag (carbon-carbon triple bond) is developed to mimic natural glucose for cellular uptake, which can be imaged with high sensitivity and specificity by targeting the strong and characteristic alkyne vibration on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope to generate a quantitative three dimensional concentration map. Cancer cells with differing metabolic characteristics can be distinguished. Heterogeneous uptake patterns are observed in tumor xenograft tissues, neuronal culture and mouse brain tissues with clear cell-cell variations. Therefore, by offering the distinct advantage of optical resolution but without the undesirable influence of bulky fluorophores, our method of coupling SRS with alkyne labeled glucose will be an attractive tool to study energy demands of living systems at the single cell level.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy [FTIR and FTRaman] investigation, computed vibrational frequency analysis and IR intensity and Raman activity peak resemblance analysis on 4-chloro 2-methylaniline using HF and DFT [LSDA, B3LYP and B3PW91] calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, S; Periandy, S

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-chloro-2-methylaniline (4CH2MA) have been recorded in the range of 4000-100 cm(-1). The fundamental modes of vibrational frequencies of 4CH2MA are assigned. All the geometrical parameters have been calculated by HF and DFT (LSDA, B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31G (d, p) and 6-311G (d, p) basis sets. Optimized geometries of the molecule have been interpreted and compared with the reported experimental values for aniline and some substituted aniline. The harmonic and anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers, IR intensities and Raman activities are calculated at the same theory levels used in geometry optimization. The calculated frequencies are scaled and compared with experimental values. The scaled vibrational frequencies at LSDA/B3LYP/6-311G (d, p) seem to coincide with the experimentally observed values with acceptable deviations. The impact of substitutions on the benzene structure is investigated. The molecular interactions between the substitutions (Cl, CH(3) and NH(2)) are also analyzed.

  15. Interstitial fluid flow in canaliculi as a mechanical stimulus for cancellous bone remodeling: in silico validation.

    PubMed

    Kameo, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Taiji

    2014-08-01

    Cancellous bone has a dynamic 3-dimensional architecture of trabeculae, the arrangement of which is continually reorganized via bone remodeling to adapt to the mechanical environment. Osteocytes are currently believed to be the major mechanosensory cells and to regulate osteoclastic bone resorption and osteoblastic bone formation in response to mechanical stimuli. We previously developed a mathematical model of trabecular bone remodeling incorporating the possible mechanisms of cellular mechanosensing and intercellular communication in which we assumed that interstitial fluid flow activates the osteocytes to regulate bone remodeling. While the proposed model has been validated by the simulation of remodeling of a single trabecula, it remains unclear whether it can successfully represent in silico the functional adaptation of cancellous bone with its multiple trabeculae. In the present study, we demonstrated the response of cancellous bone morphology to uniaxial or bending loads using a combination of our remodeling model with the voxel finite element method. In this simulation, cancellous bone with randomly arranged trabeculae remodeled to form a well-organized architecture oriented parallel to the direction of loading, in agreement with the previous simulation results and experimental findings. These results suggested that our mathematical model for trabecular bone remodeling enables us to predict the reorganization of cancellous bone architecture from cellular activities. Furthermore, our remodeling model can represent the phenomenological law of bone transformation toward a locally uniform state of stress or strain at the trabecular level.

  16. A high pressure study of the eigenvectors of the infra-red active vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine.

    PubMed

    Starkey, Carl A; Lee, Scott A; Anderson, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    High-pressure infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine at 298 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as adenosine have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is that it is a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of these vibrational modes. Stretching modes, which are predominantly internal to the molecule, have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Particular attention is paid to modes in the 800-1000 cm(-1) range since modes in that region of the vibrational spectrum are found to be sensitive to the conformation of double-helical DNA. Since the sugar pucker is different for the various conformations of DNA, this fact suggests that these modes involve the motion of atoms in the sugar group. The vibrations of the hydrogen atoms are also of interest to study since the vibrational frequency of hydrogen atoms involved in hydrogen bonds has a negative pressure derivative. Such behavior clearly shows which hydrogen atoms are involved in hydrogen bonding.

  17. Mechanical Properties of a Single Cancellous Bone Trabeculae Taken from Bovine Femur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoki, Shinichi; Sato, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Kazuto; Katayama, Tsutao

    The increase of patients with osteoporosis is becoming a social problem, thus it is an urgent issue to find its prevention and treatment methods. Since cancellous bone is metabolically more active than cortical bone, cancellous bone is often used for diagnosis of osteoporosis and has received much attention within the study of bone. Bone is a hierarchically structured material and its mechanical properties vary at different structural levels, therefore it is important to break down the mechanical testing of bone according to the various levels within bone material. Mechanical properties of cancellous bone is said to be depended on quantities and orientation of trabecular bone. It is supposed that mechanical properties of trabecular bone are constant without depending on any structural arrangement and parts. However, such assumption has not been established in studies of trabecular bone. Furthermore test results have a large margin of error caused by insufficient shape assessment. In this study, three point bending tests of single cancellous bone trabeculae extracted from bovine femur were conducted to evaluate the effects of directions to the femur major axis direction on the mechanical properties. X-ray μCT was used to obtain shape of trabecular bone specimens. Furthermore compression tests of cancellous bone specimens, which were extracted in 10mm cubic geometry, were conducted for evaluation of directional properties.There were small difference in the elastic modulus of the trabecular bones which were extracted in parallel and in perpendicular to the major axis of femur. Considering from the results that the cancellous bone specimens, which were extracted in 10mm cubic geometry, have different elastic properties depending on the tested directions; the bone structure has larger influence than bone material property on the mechanical properties of cancellous bone.

  18. Temporal features of human tendon vibration illusions.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Christina T; Gomi, Hiroaki; Haggard, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Muscle spindles provide information about the position and movement of our bodies. One method for investigating spindle signals is tendon vibration. Vibration of flexor tendons can produce illusions of extension, and vibration of extensor tendons can produce illusions of flexion. Here we estimate the temporal resolution and persistence of these illusions. In Experiments 1 and 2, sequences of alternating vibration of wrist flexor and extensor tendons produced position illusions that varied with alternation period. When vibrations alternated at 1 Hz or slower, perceived position at the end of the sequence depended on the last vibration. When vibrations alternated every 0.3 s, perceived position was independent of the last vibration. Experiment 2 verified and extended these results using more trials and concurrent electromyographic recording. Although tendon vibrations sometimes induce reflexive muscle activity, we found no evidence that such activity contributed to these effects. Experiment 3 investigated how long position sense is retained when not updated by current information from spindles. Our first experiments suggested that vibrating antagonistic tendons simultaneously could produce conflicting inputs, leaving position sense reliant on memory of position prior to vibration onset. We compared variability in position sense after different durations of such double vibration. After 12 s of double vibration, variability across trials exceeded levels predicted from vibrations of flexor or extensor tendons alone. This suggests that position sense memory had decayed too much to substitute for the current conflicting sensory information. Together, our results provide novel, quantitative insight into the temporal properties of tendon vibration illusions.

  19. The effect of time delay on control stability of an electromagnetic active tuned mass damper for vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A.; Torres-Perez, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of time delays on the stability of a zero-placement position and velocity feedback law for a vibratory system comprising harmonic excitation equipped with an electromagnetic active tuned mass damper (ATMD). The purpose of the active control is broadening the vibration attenuation envelope of a primary mass to a higher frequency region identified as from 50±0.5Hz with a passive tuned mass damper (TMD) to a wider range of 50±5Hz with an ATMD. Stability conditions of the closed-loop system are determined by studying the position of the system closed-loop poles after the introduction of time delays for different excitation frequencies. A computer simulation of the model predicted that the proposed control system is subject to instability after a critical time delay margin dependent upon the frequency of excitation and the finding were experimentally validated. Three solutions are derived and experimentally tested for minimising the effect of time delays on the stability of the control system. The first solution is associated with the introduction of more damping in the absorber system. The second incorporates using a time-delayed ATMD by tuning its original natural resonant frequency to beyond the nominal operational frequency range of the composite system. The third involves an online gain tuning of filter coefficients in a dual arrangement of low-pass and high-pass filters to eliminate the effect time delays by manipulating the signal phase shifts.

  20. Analysis and minimization of power flow in a mechanical vibration isolation system using a hybrid (active/passive) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdic, Peter C.; Houston, Brian H.; Corsaro, Robert D.; Judge, John A.

    2002-11-01

    Implementation of active control techniques in mechanical vibration isolation systems has been a challenging problem for a number of years where numerous physical control laws have been explored. An energy-based approach to the problem involving the energy transfer or power flow through the mount into the base structure is a first-principles approach to developing control laws and evaluating the system performance. A lumped-parameter model of a passive-active hybrid isolation mount has been developed and validated with experimental data. The mount device has a conventional passive compliant spring, embedded force and velocity sensors, and a piezoceramic actuation layer. This study investigates a complete set of possible layer configurations, that is, the optimal placement of sensors and actuator relative to the passive compliant isolator element. A number of different local physical control laws are examined and the level of power flow through the mount is used to evaluate the performance for the matrix of possible implementations. These results will be discussed with particular emphasis placed on the optimal control configuration and laws, and the related physics. a)Also with SFA, Inc., Largo, MD 20774.

  1. Performance comparison of optical interference cancellation system architectures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Maddie; Chang, Matt; Deng, Yanhua; Prucnal, Paul R

    2013-04-10

    The performance of three optics-based interference cancellation systems are compared and contrasted with each other, and with traditional electronic techniques for interference cancellation. The comparison is based on a set of common performance metrics that we have developed for this purpose. It is shown that thorough evaluation of our optical approaches takes into account the traditional notions of depth of cancellation and dynamic range, along with notions of link loss and uniformity of cancellation. Our evaluation shows that our use of optical components affords performance that surpasses traditional electronic approaches, and that the optimal choice for an optical interference canceller requires taking into account the performance metrics discussed in this paper.

  2. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, James M.; Barney, Patrick S.; Parker, Gordon G.; Smith, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  3. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  4. Modal Analysis and Active Vibration Control of the Naval Postgraduate School Space Truss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    Reduction Project (0704-0188) Washington DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 1998 3 . REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...Characteristics 10 3 . Installation of LPACT and Design Modifications to the NPS Truss 15 C. THE ACTIVE STRUT ASSEMBLY 17 1. Introduction 17 2. Fundamentals...of Piezoelectric Strut Operation 19 3 . Piezoelectric Strut Operating Characteristics 24 4. PCB Piezotronics Force Sensor 28 5. Active Strut Design

  5. Quasi-modal vibration control by means of active control bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.; Fleming, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper investigates a design method of an active control bearing system with only velocity feedback. The study provides a new quasi-modal control method for a control system design of an active control bearing system in which feedback coefficients are determined on the basis of a modal analysis. Although the number of sensors and actuators is small, this quasi-modal control method produces a control effect close to an ideal modal control.

  6. Two Types of Magnetic Flux Cancellation in the Solar Eruption of 2007 May 20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterlin, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Mason, Helen

    2010-01-01

    We study a solar eruption of 2007 May 20, in an effort to understand the cause of the eruption's onset. The event produced a GOES class B6.7 flare peaking at 05:56 UT, while ejecting a surge/filament and producing a coronal mass ejection (CME). We examine several data sets, including H-alpha images from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode, EUV images from TRACE, and line-of-sight magnetograms from SOHO/MDI. Flux cancelation occurs among two different sets of flux elements inside of the erupting active region: First, for several days prior to eruption, opposite-polarity sunspot groups inside the region move toward each other, leading to the cancelation of approximately 10^{21} Mx of flux over three days. Second, within hours prior to the eruption, positive-polarity moving magnetic features (MMFs) flowing out of the positive-flux spots at approximately 1 kilometer per second repeatedly cancel with field inside a patch of negative-polarity flux located north of the sunspots. The filament erupts as a surge whose base is rooted in the location where the MMF cancelation occurs, while during the eruption that filament flows out along the polarity inversion line between the converging spot groups. We conclude that a plausible scenario is that the converging spot fields brought the magnetic region to the brink of instability, and the MMF cancelation pushed the system "over the edge." triggering the eruption.

  7. On the rejection of vibrations in adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradore, Riccardo; Pettazzi, Lorenzo; Fedrigo, Enrico; Clare, Richard

    2012-07-01

    In modern adaptive optics systems, lightly damped sinusoidal oscillations resulting from telescope structural vibrations have a significant deleterious impact on the quality of the image collected at the detector plane. Such oscillations are often at frequencies beyond the bandwidth of the wave-front controller that therefore is either incapable of rejecting them or might even amplify their detrimental impact on the overall AO performance. A technique for the rejection of periodic disturbances acting at the output of unknown plants, which has been recently presented in literature, has been adapted to the problem of rejecting vibrations in AO loops. The proposed methodology aims at estimating phase and amplitude of the harmonic disturbance together with the response of the unknown plant at the frequency of vibration. On the basis of such estimates, a control signal is generated to cancel out the periodic perturbation. Additionally, the algorithm can be easily extended to cope with unexpected time variations of the vibrations frequency by adding a frequency tracking module based either on a simple PLL architecture or on a classical extended Kalman filter. Oversampling can be also easily introduced to efficiently correct for vibrations approaching the sampling frequency. The approach presented in this contribution is compared against a different algorithm for vibration rejection available in literature, in order to identify drawbacks and advantages. Finally, the performance of the proposed vibration cancellation technique has been tested in realistic scenarios defined exploiting tip/tilt measurements from MACAO and NACO

  8. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  9. Active Vibration Control of a Large Flexible Manipulator by Inertial Force and Joint Torque. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Han

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency and positional accuracy of a lightweight flexible manipulator are limited by its flexural vibrations, which last after a gross motion is completed. The vibration delays subsequent operations. In the proposed work, the vibration is suppressed by inertial force of a small arm in addition to the joint actuators and passive damping treatment. The proposed approach is: (1) Dynamic modeling of a combined system, a large flexible manipulator and a small arm, (2) Determination of optimal sensor location and controller algorithm, and (3) Verification of the fitness of model and the performance of controller.

  10. Wave cancellation small waterplane multihull ships

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.C.; Wilson, M.B.

    1994-12-31

    A new patented wave cancellation multihull ship concept (Hsu, 1993) is presented. Such ships consist of various arrangements of tapered hull elements. The tapered hull design provides a small waterplane area for enhanced seakeeping while producing smaller surface disturbances. In addition, proper arrangement of hull elements provides favorable wave interference effects. The saving in effective horsepower with a realistic wave cancellation tri-hull arrangement, was found to be about 30 percent compared to small waterplane area twin-hull ships. Power reductions of this magnitude translate to considerably fuel consumptions and improved range. Applications to several ship types, such as for fast ferries, cruise and container ships, appear promising, wherever good seakeeping, large deck space and high speed in the design.

  11. Active control of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded laminated composite plates using piezoelectric fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Satyajit; Ray, M. C.

    2009-08-01

    This paper deals with the geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis of functionally graded (FG) laminated composite plates integrated with a patch of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of the piezoelectric fiber reinforced composite (PFRC) material. Each layer of the substrate FG laminated composite plate is made of fiber-reinforced composite material in which the fibers are longitudinally aligned in the plane parallel to the top or bottom surface of the layer and the layer is assumed to be graded in the thickness direction by way of varying the fiber orientation angle across its thickness according to a power-law. The novelty of the present work is that, unlike the traditional laminated composite plates, the FG laminated composite plates are constructed in such a way that the continuous variation of material properties and stresses across the thickness of the plates is achieved. The constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. Based on the first-order shear deformation (FSDT) theory, a finite element model has been developed to model the open-loop and closed-loop nonlinear dynamics of the overall FG laminated composite plates. Both symmetric and asymmetric FG laminated composite plates are considered as the substrate plates for presenting the numerical results. The analysis suggests the potential use of the ACLD treatment with its constraining layer made of the PFRC material for active control of geometrically nonlinear forced vibrations of FG laminated composite plates. The effect of piezoelectric fiber orientation in the active constraining PFRC layer on the damping characteristics of the overall FG plates is also investigated.

  12. Semi-active vibration control based on unsymmetrical synchronized switch damping: Analysis and experimental validation of control performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Cheng, Li; Nie, Hong

    2016-05-01

    In semi-active synchronized switch damping (SSD) approaches for structural vibration control, the damping effect is achieved by properly switching the voltage on the piezoelectric actuators. Unsymmetrical SSD switch circuit has been designed in the previous paper to increase the effective voltage range on the PZT actuator for improvement of the control performance. In this study, analysis and experimental validation of control performance of a synchronized switch damping system based on the unsymmetrical switch circuit are carried out. First the model of an unsymmetrical SSD system is presented and the working principle is introduced. The general expression of the switched voltage on the piezoelectric actuator is derived. Based on its periodicity in steady-state control, the harmonic components of the actuator voltage are derived using Fourier series expansion. Next, the displacement response of the system is derived under combined actions of the excitation and switched voltage. Finally, a setup of a flexible beam with unsymmetrical switch circuit is used to demonstrate the control performance under different voltage sources and to verify the theoretical results. The results show that the control performance mainly depends on the voltage range on the PZT. A higher effective voltage range can be generated in unsymmetrical SSDV than in symmetrical SSDV and better control performance can be achieved at the same negative actuator voltage. The unsymmetrical SSDV makes better utilization of the actuator capability.

  13. A Sheep Model for Cancellous Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Angad; Pelletier, Matthew Henry; Yu, Yan; Christou, Chris; Walsh, William Robert

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate well-characterized bone defect animal models remain essential for preclinical research. This pilot study demonstrates a relevant animal model for cancellous bone defect healing. Three different defect diameters (8, 11, 14 mm) of fixed depth (25 mm) were compared in both skeletally immature (18-month-old) and aged sheep (5-year-old). In each animal, four defects were surgically created and placed in the cancellous bone of the medial distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses bilaterally. Animals were euthanized at 4 weeks post-operatively to assess early healing and any biological response. Defect sites were graded radiographically, and new bone formation quantified using μCT and histomorphometry. Fibrous tissue was found within the central region in most of the defects with woven bone normally forming near the periphery of the defect. Bone volume fraction [bone volume (BV)/TV] significantly decreased with an increasing defect diameter. Actual BV, however, increased with defect diameter. Bone ingrowth was lower for all defect diameters in the aged group. This pilot study proposes that the surgical creation of 11 mm diameter defects in the proximal tibial and distal femoral epiphyses of aged sheep is a suitable large animal model to study early healing of cancellous bone defects. The refined model allows for the placement of four separate bone defects per animal and encourages a reduction in animal numbers required for preclinical research. PMID:25593961

  14. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and endothelin-1 production in human endothelial cells exposed to vibration

    PubMed Central

    White, Charles R; Haidekker, Mark A; Stevens, Hazel Y; Frangos, John A

    2004-01-01

    Hand–arm vibration syndrome is a vascular disease of occupational origin and a form of secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. Chronic exposure to hand-held vibrating tools may cause endothelial injury. This study investigates the biomechanical forces involved in the transduction of fluid vibration in the endothelium. Human endothelial cells were exposed to direct vibration and rapid low-volume fluid oscillation. Rapid low-volume fluid oscillation was used to simulate the effects of vibration by generating defined temporal gradients in fluid shear stress across an endothelial monolayer. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and endothelin-1 (ET-1) release were monitored as specific biochemical markers for temporal gradients and endothelial response, respectively. Both vibrational methods were found to phosphorylate ERK1/2 in a similar pattern. At a fixed frequency of fluid oscillation where the duration of each pulse cycle remained constant, ERK1/2 phosphorylation increased with the increasing magnitude of the applied temporal gradient. However, when the frequency of flow oscillation was increased (thus decreasing the duration of each pulse cycle), ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated across all temporal gradient flow profiles. Fluid oscillation significantly stimulated ET-1 release compared to steady flow, and endothelin-1 was also attenuated with the increase in oscillation frequency. Taken together, these results show that both the absolute magnitude of the temporal gradient and the frequency/duration of each pulse cycle play a role in the biomechanical transduction of fluid vibrational forces in endothelial cells. Furthermore, this study reports for the first time a link between the ERK1/2 signal transduction pathway and transmission of vibrational forces in the endothelium. PMID:14724194

  15. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  16. Car driving with and without a movable back support: Effect on transmission of vibration through the trunk and on its consequences for muscle activation and spinal shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Idsart; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of a movable backrest on vibration transmission through the trunk during driving and on the physiological consequences thereof. Eleven healthy male subjects drove for about 1 h on normal roads with a movable and with a fixed backrest while surface electromyography (EMG) was measured at the level of the fifth lumbar vertebra (L5) and vertical accelerations were measured at the seat, backrest and at the spine at the levels of the second sacral vertebra (S2) and seventh cervical vertebra (C7). The movable backrest significantly reduced accelerations at C7 by up to 11.9% at the 5 Hz frequency band. The movable backrest also significantly reduced the coherence and transmission between S2 and C7 accelerations, but not the differential motion between these sensors. EMG at both sides of L5 was on average 28% lower when using the movable backrest. Spinal shrinkage was unaffected by backrest type. It is concluded that a movable backrest reduces the transmission of vibration through the trunk and that it reduces low back EMG. Car driving is associated with the risk of developing low back pain and this may be related to exposure to whole body vibration. This study found an effect of a simple ergonomics measure on the transmission of vibration through the trunk as well as on back muscle activation.

  17. A non-intrusive fluid-wave actuator and sensor pair for the active control of fluid-borne vibrations in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, M. J.; Elliott, S. J.; Pinnington, R. J.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes the design of a non-intrusive fluid-wave actuator and sensor pair for use in an active control system to control fluid-borne vibrations in pipework systems. Piping systems can be excited by sources such as pumps and compressors and vibrational energy can propagate both in the pipe wall and the fluid. The transducers developed in this paper are designed only for the control of the fluid-borne vibrational energy. A theoretical framework is developed that integrates the transducers into the pipe and couples them to the motion of the fluid inside the pipe. A hydraulic actuator driven with a magnetostrictive element and fitted to a water-filled perspex pipe has been designed and tested. The sensor was made from piezoelectric elements fitted around the outer circumference of the pipe. Experimental results show that the actuator is capable of suppressing a propagating fluid-wave, but in doing so it increases the vibration of the pipe-wall in the vicinity of the actuator. When the sensor is employed as an error sensor together with the actuator in the frequency range 10 - 1000 Hz, a reduction in the fluid-wave amplitude of around 20 dB is possible.

  18. Exploring vibration control strategies for a footbridge with time-varying modal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Jose M.; Díaz, Ivan M.; Pereira, Emiliano; García-Palacios, Jaime H.; Wang, Xidong

    2016-09-01

    This paper explores different vibration control strategies for the cancellation of human-induced vibration of a structure with time-varying modal parameters. The motivation of this study is an urban stress-ribbon footbridge (Pedro Gomez Bosque, Valladolid, Spain) that, after a whole-year monitoring, it has been obtained that the natural frequency of a vibration mode at approximately 1.8 Hz (within the normal range of walking) changes up to 20%, mainly due to temperature variations. Thus, this paper takes the annual modal parameter estimates (aprox. 14000 estimations) of this mode and designs three control strategies: a) a tuned mass damper (TMD) tuned to the aforementioned mode using its most-repeated modal properties, b) a semi-active TMD with an on-off control law for the TMD damping, and c) an active mass damper designed using the well-known velocity feedback control strategy with a saturation nonlinearity. Illustrative results have been reported from this preliminary study.

  19. Lateral Vibration Attenuation by the Dynamic Adjustment of Bias Currents in Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Takeshi; Takasaki, Masaya; Ishino, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    Switching stiffness control is applied to attenuate vibration in the lateral directions in an active magnetic suspension system with electromagnets operated in differential mode. The magnetic suspension system using the attractive force between magnetized bodies is inherently unstable in the normal direction so that feedback control is necessary to achieve stable suspension. In contrast, it can be stable in the lateral directions due to the edge effects in the magnetic circuits. In several applications, such passive suspension is used in combination with the active one to reduce cost and space. However, damping in the lateral directions is generally small. As a result, induced vibrations in these directions are hardly attenuated. To suppress such vibration without any additional actuator (electromagnet), switching stiffness control is applied to an magnetic suspension system operated in the differential mode. The stiffness in the lateral direction is adjusted by varying the bias currents of an opposed pair of electromagnets located in the normal direction simultaneously according to the motion of the suspended object. When the varied bias currents are adjusted for the additive normal forces cancel each other, such control does not affect the suspension in the normal direction. The effectiveness of the proposed control methods is confirmed experimentally.

  20. 8 CFR 240.66 - Eligibility for special rule cancellation of removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Eligibility for special rule cancellation of removal. 240.66 Section 240.66 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION... convictions), or (a)(3) of section 237 of the Act (relating to criminal activity, document fraud, and...

  1. 8 CFR 240.66 - Eligibility for special rule cancellation of removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Eligibility for special rule cancellation of removal. 240.66 Section 240.66 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION... convictions), or (a)(3) of section 237 of the Act (relating to criminal activity, document fraud, and...

  2. 8 CFR 240.66 - Eligibility for special rule cancellation of removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Eligibility for special rule cancellation of removal. 240.66 Section 240.66 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION... convictions), or (a)(3) of section 237 of the Act (relating to criminal activity, document fraud, and...

  3. 75 FR 20009 - Development of NRC's Safety Culture Policy Statement: Cancellation of Public Workshops Scheduled...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... COMMISSION Development of NRC's Safety Culture Policy Statement: Cancellation of Public Workshops Scheduled... forging a consensus around the objectives, strategies, activities and measures that enhance safety culture... culture common terminology effort comprised of: (1) Development of a common safety culture definition;...

  4. 77 FR 62498 - Advisory Council on Dependents' Education; Meeting Cancellation Notice and Open Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... Federal Officer (DFO) for the Advisory Council on Dependents' Education, Mr. Joel K. Hansen, 4800 Mark... of the Secretary Advisory Council on Dependents' Education; Meeting Cancellation Notice and Open Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA), DoD. ACTION: Meeting...

  5. Active vibration control of beams using filtered-velocity feedback controllers with moment pair actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Changjoo; Hong, Chinsuk; Jeong, Weui Bong

    2013-06-01

    In this study, filtered-velocity feedback (FVF) control is proposed to stabilize a control system with a non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration. This method is applied to actively control a clamped beam with a sensor/moment pair actuator. Since the sensor/moment pair actuator is a non-collocated configuration, the control system experiences structural instability at high frequencies. Due to the roll-off property of the FVF controller, the high frequency structural instability problem can be overcome. Due to the second-order filter characteristics of the FVF controller, similar to a low pass filter, multimode disturbances can be controlled at the modes below the cut-off frequency. To verify the performance of the controller, the FVF controller is tuned to around 2 kHz, and the structural responses are successfully reduced by numerical and experimental approaches.

  6. Symmetry Breaking in Chiral Ionic Liquids Evidenced by Vibrational Optical Activity.

    PubMed

    Oulevey, Patric; Luber, Sandra; Varnholt, Birte; Bürgi, Thomas

    2016-09-19

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are receiving increasing interest for their use in synthetic laboratories and industry. Being composed of charged entities, they show a complex and widely unexplored dynamic behavior. Chiral ionic liquids (CILs) have a high potential as solvents for use in asymmetric synthesis. Chiroptical methods, owing to their sensitivity towards molecular conformation, offer unique possibilities to study the structure of these chiral ionic liquids. Raman optical activity proved particularly useful to study ionic liquids composed of amino acids and the achiral 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium counterion. We could substantiate, supported by selected theoretical methods, that the achiral counterion adopts an overall chiral conformation in the presence of chiral amino acid ions. These findings suggest that in the design of chiral ionic liquids for asymmetric synthesis, the structure of the achiral counter ion also has to be carefully considered.

  7. The effect of an active vibration stimulus according to different shoulder joint angles on functional reach and stability of the shoulder joint

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of an active vibration stimulus exercise according to shoulder joint angles on functional reach and stability of the shoulder joint. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy male students participated in this study. Upper limb length of each subject was measured to obtain normalized measurement values. The exercise groups were as follows: group I (n=10, shoulder joint angle of 90°), group II (n=10, shoulder joint angle of 130°), and group III (n=10, shoulder joint angle of 180°). After warm-up, an active vibration stimulus was applied to the subjects with a Flexi-Bar. The Functional Reach Test and Y-balance test were conducted for measurement of shoulder stability. [Results] Analysis of covariance was conducted with values before the intervention as covariates to analyze the differences among the groups in the two tests. There were significant differences among the groups. According to Bonferroni post hoc comparison, group I showed greater improvement than group III in the Functional Reach Test, and group II showed greater improvement than group I and group III in the Y-balance test. [Conclusion] The effect of the exercise with different shoulder joint angles revealed that the shoulder joint has a certain effective joint angle for its functionality and stability. In addition, application of an active vibration stimulus with a Flexi-Bar can be a very effective tool for improvement of functionality and stability of the shoulder joint. PMID:27134352

  8. Flux Cancellation and the Evolution of the Eruptive Filament of 2011 June 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardley, S. L.; Green, L. M.; Williams, D. R.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Valori, G.; Dacie, S.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate whether flux cancellation is responsible for the formation of a very massive filament resulting in the spectacular eruption on 2011 June 7. We analyze and quantify the amount of flux cancellation that occurs in NOAA AR 11226 and its two neighboring active regions (ARs 11227 & 11233) using line-of-sight magnetograms from the Heliospheric Magnetic Imager. During a 3.6 day period building up to the eruption of the filament, 1.7 × 1021 Mx, 21% of AR 11226's maximum magnetic flux, was canceled along the polarity inversion line (PIL) where the filament formed. If the flux cancellation continued at the same rate up until the eruption then up to 2.8 × 1021 Mx (34% of the AR flux) may have been built into the magnetic configuration that contains the filament plasma. The large flux cancellation rate is due to an unusual motion of the positive-polarity sunspot, which splits, with the largest section moving rapidly toward the PIL. This motion compresses the negative polarity and leads to the formation of an orphan penumbra where one end of the filament is rooted. Dense plasma threads above the orphan penumbra build into the filament, extending its length, and presumably injecting material into it. We conclude that the exceptionally strong flux cancellation in AR 11226 played a significant role in the formation of its unusually massive filament. In addition, the presence and coherent evolution of bald patches in the vector magnetic field along the PIL suggest that the magnetic field configuration supporting the filament material is that of a flux rope.

  9. The effects of vibration on explosive and reactive strength when applying individualized vibration frequencies.

    PubMed

    Di Giminiani, Riccardo; Tihanyi, Jozsef; Safar, Sandor; Scrimaglio, Renato

    2009-01-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of 8 weeks of whole-body vibrations on explosive and reactive leg strength. Thirty-three physically active students took part in the study and were randomly assigned to an individualized-vibration group, a fixed-vibration group or a control group. The frequency of vibration was set to 30 Hz for the fixed-vibration group, whereas the frequency for the individualized-vibration group was determined by monitoring the participants' EMGrms activity. The participants in the two vibration groups were exposed three times a week for 8 weeks to a series of 10 x 1-min whole-body vibrations with a 1-min pause between series of vibrations and a 4-min pause after the first five series of vibrations. Jump height in the squat jump increased significantly in all three groups (by 11% for the individualized-vibration group, p=0.001; by 3% for the fixed-vibration group, p=0.011; and by 2% for the control group, p=0.006), but countermovement jump height was not affected. In continuous rebound jumps by the individualized-vibration group, jumping height increased by 22% (p=0.006) and power increased by 18% (p=0.002). The results of this study suggest that the use of an individualized vibration frequency produces a greater response from the neuromuscular system and is more beneficial than vibrations at a fixed pre-selected frequency.

  10. Helioseismic Holography and a Study of the Process of Magnetic Flux Disappearance in Canceling Bipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles; Harvey, Karen L.; Braun, D.; Jones, H. P.; Penn, M.; Hassler, D.

    2001-01-01

    Project 1: We have developed and applied a technique of helioseismic holography along the lines of originally set out in our proposal. The result of the application of this diagnostic technique to solar activity and the quiet Sun has produced a number of important discoveries: (1) acoustic moats surrounding sunspots; (2) acoustic glories surround large active regions; (3) acoustic condensations beneath active regions; and (4) temporally-resolve acoustic images of a solar flare. These results have been published in a series of papers in the Astrophysical Journal. We think that helioseismic holography is now established as the most powerful and discriminating diagnostic in local helioseismology. Project 2: We conducted a collaborative observational program to define the physical character and magnetic geometry of canceling magnetic bipoles aimed at determining if the cancellation process is the result of submergence of magnetic fields. This assessment is based on ground-based observations combining photospheric and chromospheric magnetograms from NSO/KP, BBSO, and SOHO-MDI, and EUV and X-ray images from SOHO EIT/CDS, Yohkoh/SXT, and TRACE. Our study involves the analysis of data taken during three observing campaigns to define the height structure of canceling bipoles inferred from magnetic field and intensity images, and how this varies with time. We find that some canceling bipoles can be explained by the submerge of their magnetic flux. A paper on the results of this analysis will be presented at an upcoming scientific meeting and be written up for publication.

  11. Reduced elbow extension torque during vibrations.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Coza, Aurel; Nigg, Benno M

    2012-08-31

    Impact sports and vibration platforms trigger vibrations within soft tissues and the skeleton. Although the long-term effects of vibrations on the body have been studied extensively, the acute effects of vibrations are little understood. This study determined the influence of acute vibrations at different frequencies and elbow angles on maximal isometric elbow extension torque and muscle activity. Vibrations were generated by a pneumatic vibrator attached to the lever of a dynamometer, and were applied on the forearm of 15 healthy female subjects. The subjects were instructed to push maximally against the lever at three different elbow angles, while extension torque and muscle activity were quantified and compared between vibration and non-vibration (control) conditions. A change in vibration frequency had no significant effects on torque and muscle activity although vibrations in general decreased the maximal extension torque relative to the control by 1.8% (±5.7%, p>0.05), 7.4% (±7.9%, p<0.01), and 5.0% (±8.2%, p<0.01) at elbow angles of 60°, 90°, and 120°, respectively. Electromyographic activity increased significantly between ∼30% and 40% in both triceps and biceps with vibrations. It is speculated that a similar increase in muscle activity between agonist and antagonist, in combination with an unequal increase in muscle moment arms about the elbow joint, limit the maximal extension torque during exposure to vibrations. This study showed that maximal extension torque decreased during vibration exposure while muscle activity increased and suggests that vibrations may be counterproductive during activities requiring maximal strength but potentially beneficial for strength training.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  13. A semi-active H∞ control strategy with application to the vibration suppression of nonlinear high-rise building under earthquake excitations.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guiyun; Chen, Fuquan; Wu, Yingxiong

    2016-01-01

    Different from previous researches which mostly focused on linear response control of seismically excited high-rise buildings, this study aims to control nonlinear seismic response of high-rise buildings. To this end, a semi-active control strategy, in which H∞ control algorithm is used and magneto-rheological dampers are employed for an actuator, is presented to suppress the nonlinear vibration. In this strategy, a modified Kalman-Bucy observer which is suitable for the proposed semi-active strategy is developed to obtain the state vector from the measured semi-active control force and acceleration feedback, taking into account of the effects of nonlinearity, disturbance and uncertainty of controlled system parameters by the observed nonlinear accelerations. Then, the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy is applied to the ASCE 20-story benchmark building when subjected to earthquake excitation and compared with the other control approaches by some control criteria. It is indicated that the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy provides much better control performances by comparison with the semi-active MPC and Clipped-LQG control approaches, and can reduce nonlinear seismic response and minimize the damage in the buildings. Besides, it enhances the reliability of the control performance when compared with the active control strategy. Thus, the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy is suitable for suppressing the nonlinear vibration of high-rise buildings.

  14. Discussions on the Cancellation Effect on a Curved Orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Rui Li; Ya. S. Derbenev

    2005-05-16

    The canonical formulation and the cancellation effect for bunch dynamics under collective interaction on a curved orbit were presented in Ref. [*]. Some possible controversial representations of the cancellation effect were later addressed by Geloni et al.** In this study, we discuss all the points raised in Ref. [**] based on our canonical treatment, and show how these points can be perceived from the view point of the cancellation picture.

  15. Stochastic resonance whole body vibration increases perceived muscle relaxation but not cardiovascular activation: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Elfering, Achim; Burger, Christian; Schade, Volker; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV), including muscle relaxation and cardiovascular activation. METHODS Sixty-four healthy students participated. The participants were randomly assigned to sham SR-WBV training at a low intensity (1.5 Hz) or a verum SR-WBV training at a higher intensity (5 Hz). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and self-reported muscle relaxation were assessed before and immediately after SR-WBV. RESULTS Two factorial analyses of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant interaction between pre- vs post-SR-WBV measurements and SR-WBV conditions for muscle relaxation in the neck and back [F(1,55) = 3.35, P = 0.048, η2 = 0.07]. Muscle relaxation in the neck and back increased in verum SR-WBV, but not in sham SR-WBV. No significant changes between pre- and post-training levels of SBD, DBD and HR were observed either in sham or verum SR-WBV conditions. With verum SR-WBV, improved muscle relaxation was the most significant in participants who reported the experience of back, neck or shoulder pain more than once a month (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION A single session of SR-WBV increased muscle relaxation in young healthy individuals, while cardiovascular load was low. An increase in musculoskeletal relaxation in the neck and back is a potential mediator of pain reduction in preventive worksite SR-WBV trials. PMID:27900274

  16. 75 FR 54147 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    .... The cancellation was voluntarily requested by the registrant, Ticks and Mosquitoes, LLC., and accepted..., containing the chemicals calcium lactate and urea, was requested by the registrant, Ticks or...

  17. A new approach for cancelable iris recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Sui, Yan; Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Zou, Xukai

    2010-04-01

    The iris is a stable and reliable biometric for positive human identification. However, the traditional iris recognition scheme raises several privacy concerns. One's iris pattern is permanently bound with him and cannot be changed. Hence, once it is stolen, this biometric is lost forever as well as all the applications where this biometric is used. Thus, new methods are desirable to secure the original pattern and ensure its revocability and alternatives when compromised. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme which incorporates iris features, non-invertible transformation and data encryption to achieve "cancelability" and at the same time increases iris recognition accuracy.

  18. 21 CFR 1.235 - How and when do you cancel your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and faxed cancellations into its registration system, along with CD-ROM cancellations, as soon as... a confirmation. (e) Cancellation by CD-ROM for multiple submissions. If, for example, you do not... cancel your facilities' registrations using a CD-ROM. (1) Registrants submitting their cancellations...

  19. 21 CFR 1.235 - How and when do you cancel your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and faxed cancellations into its registration system, along with CD-ROM cancellations, as soon as... a confirmation. (e) Cancellation by CD-ROM for multiple submissions. If, for example, you do not... cancel your facilities' registrations using a CD-ROM. (1) Registrants submitting their cancellations...

  20. 21 CFR 1.235 - How and when do you cancel your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and faxed cancellations into its registration system, along with CD-ROM cancellations, as soon as... a confirmation. (e) Cancellation by CD-ROM for multiple submissions. If, for example, you do not... cancel your facilities' registrations using a CD-ROM. (1) Registrants submitting their cancellations...

  1. 21 CFR 1.235 - How and when do you cancel your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and faxed cancellations into its registration system, along with CD-ROM cancellations, as soon as... a confirmation. (e) Cancellation by CD-ROM for multiple submissions. If, for example, you do not... cancel your facilities' registrations using a CD-ROM. (1) Registrants submitting their cancellations...

  2. The effects of shoulder joint abduction angles on the muscle activity of the serratus anterior muscle and the upper trapezius muscle while vibrations are applied.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da-Eun; Moon, Dong-Chul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the ratio between the upper trapezius and the serratus anterior muscles during diverse shoulder abduction exercises applied with vibrations in order to determine the appropriate exercise methods for recovery of scapular muscle balance. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects voluntarily participated in this study. The subjects performed shoulder abduction at various shoulder joint abduction angles (90°, 120°, 150°, 180°) with oscillation movements. [Results] At 120°, all the subjects showed significant increases in the muscle activity of the serratus anterior muscle in comparison with the upper trapezius muscle. However, no significant difference was found at angles other than 120°. [Conclusion] To selectively strengthen the serratus anterior, applying vibration stimuli at the 120° shoulder abduction position is considered to be appropriate.

  3. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation experiment for semi-active vibration control of lateral vibrations of railway vehicle by magneto-rheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Lee, Jae-Ha; Yang, Dong-Ho; You, Won-Hee

    2014-07-01

    The active lateral suspension (ALS) of a train consists of either active or semi-active technologies. However, such an active system on a real railway vehicle is not easy to test because of cost and time. In this study, a hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS) system is developed to test the ALS. To this end, the dynamic model of a railway vehicle is equipped with the actuator, two bogies and four-wheel sets, and the ALS is used. The proposed HILS system consists of an alternating current servo motor connected to a ball-screw mechanism and a digital control system. The digital control system implements the dynamic model and the control algorithm. The design and manufacture of the HILS system are explained in detail. Both the passive damper and the magneto-rheological (MR) fluid damper are tested using the HILS system, where the sky-hook control algorithm was applied for the MR fluid damper. Experimental results show that the proposed HILS system can be effectively used for the performance estimation of the ALS.

  4. Low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration promotes the adhesion and the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells cultured on a hydroxyapatite-coated surface: The direct role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bailing; Lin, Tao; Yang, Xiaoxi; Li, Yiqiang; Xie, Denghui; Zheng, Wenhui; Cui, Haowen; Deng, Weimin; Tan, Xin

    2016-11-01

    The positive effect of low-magnitude, high‑frequency (LMHF) vibration on implant osseointegration has been demonstrated; however, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of LMHF vibration on the adhesion and the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) cultured on hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated surfaces in an in vitro model as well as to elucidate the molecular mechanism responsible for the effects of LMHF vibration on osteogenesis. LMHF vibration resulted in the increased expression of fibronectin, which was measured by immunostaining and RT-qPCR. Stimulation of BMSCs by LMHF vibration resulted in the rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton with more prominent F-actin. Moreover, the expression of β1 integrin, vinculin and paxillin was notably increased following LMHF stimulation. Scanning electron microscope observations revealed that there were higher cell numbers and more extracellular matrix attached to the HA-coated surface in the LMHF group. Alkaline phosphatase activity as well as the expression of osteogenic-specific genes, namely Runx2, osterix, collagen I and osteocalcin, were significantly elevated in the LMHF group. In addition, the protein expression of Wnt10B, β-catenin, Runx2 and osterix was increased following exposure to LMHF vibration. Taken together, the findings of this study indicate that LMHF vibration promotes the adhesion and the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs on HA-coated surfaces in vitro, and LMHF vibration may directly induce osteogenesis by activating the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway. These data suggest that LMHF vibration enhances the osseointegration of bone to a HA-coated implant, and provide a scientific foundation for improving bone-implant osseointegration through the application of LMHF vibration.

  5. Microsaccade production during saccade cancelation in a stop-signal task

    PubMed Central

    Godlove, David C.; Schall, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    We obtained behavioral data to evaluate two alternative hypotheses about the neural mechanisms of gaze control. The “fixation” hypothesis states that neurons in rostral superior colliculus (SC) enforce fixation of gaze. The “microsaccade” hypothesis states that neurons in rostral SC encode microsaccades rather than fixation per se. Previously reported neuronal activity in monkey SC during the saccade stop-signal task leads to specific, dissociable behavioral predictions of these two hypotheses. When subjects are required to cancel partially-prepared saccades, imbalanced activity spreads across rostral and caudal SC with a reliable temporal profile. The microsaccade hypothesis predicts that this imbalance will lead to elevated microsaccade production biased toward the target location, while the fixation hypothesis predicts reduced microsaccade production. We tested these predictions by analyzing the microsaccades produced by 4 monkeys while they voluntarily canceled partially prepared eye movements in response to explicit stop signals. Consistent with the fixation hypothesis and contradicting the microsaccade hypothesis, we found that each subject produced significantly fewer microsaccades when normal saccades were successfully canceled. The few microsaccades escaping this inhibition tended to be directed toward the target location. We additionally investigated interactions between initiating microsaccades and inhibiting normal saccades. Reaction times were longer when microsaccades immediately preceded target presentation. However, pre-target microsaccade production did not affect stop-signal reaction time or alter the probability of canceling saccades following stop signals. These findings demonstrate that imbalanced activity within SC does not necessarily produce microsaccades and add to evidence that saccade preparation and cancelation are separate processes. PMID:25448116

  6. Genetic algorithm based active vibration control for a moving flexible smart beam driven by a pneumatic rod cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Shi, Ming-li; Wang, Bin; Xie, Zhuo-wei

    2012-05-01

    A rod cylinder based pneumatic driving scheme is proposed to suppress the vibration of a flexible smart beam. Pulse code modulation (PCM) method is employed to control the motion of the cylinder's piston rod for simultaneous positioning and vibration suppression. Firstly, the system dynamics model is derived using Hamilton principle. Its standard state-space representation is obtained for characteristic analysis, controller design, and simulation. Secondly, a genetic algorithm (GA) is applied to optimize and tune the control gain parameters adaptively based on the specific performance index. Numerical simulations are performed on the pneumatic driving elastic beam system, using the established model and controller with tuned gains by GA optimization process. Finally, an experimental setup for the flexible beam driven by a pneumatic rod cylinder is constructed. Experiments for suppressing vibrations of the flexible beam are conducted. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pneumatic drive scheme and the adopted control algorithms are feasible. The large amplitude vibration of the first bending mode can be suppressed effectively.

  7. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, which is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.

  8. Systematic analyses of vibration noise of a vibration isolation system for high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopes.

    PubMed

    Iwaya, Katsuya; Shimizu, Ryota; Hashizume, Tomihiro; Hitosugi, Taro

    2011-08-01

    We designed and constructed an effective vibration isolation system for stable scanning tunneling microscopy measurements using a separate foundation and two vibration isolation stages (i.e., a combination of passive and active vibration isolation dampers). Systematic analyses of vibration data along the horizontal and vertical directions are present, including the vibration transfer functions of each stage and the overall vibration isolation system. To demonstrate the performance of the system, tunneling current noise measurements are conducted with and without the vibration isolation. Combining passive and active vibration isolation dampers successfully removes most of the vibration noise in the tunneling current up to 100 Hz. These comprehensive vibration noise data, along with details of the entire system, can be used to establish a clear guideline for building an effective vibration isolation system for various scanning probe microscopes and electron microscopes.

  9. A Novel Hybrid Error Criterion-Based Active Control Method for on-Line Milling Vibration Suppression with Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Gao, Robert X.; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Wang, Shibin

    2016-01-01

    Milling vibration is one of the most serious factors affecting machining quality and precision. In this paper a novel hybrid error criterion-based frequency-domain LMS active control method is constructed and used for vibration suppression of milling processes by piezoelectric actuators and sensors, in which only one Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is used and no Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) is involved. The correction formulas are derived by a steepest descent procedure and the control parameters are analyzed and optimized. Then, a novel hybrid error criterion is constructed to improve the adaptability, reliability and anti-interference ability of the constructed control algorithm. Finally, based on piezoelectric actuators and acceleration sensors, a simulation of a spindle and a milling process experiment are presented to verify the proposed method. Besides, a protection program is added in the control flow to enhance the reliability of the control method in applications. The simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is an effective and reliable way for on-line vibration suppression, and the machining quality can be obviously improved. PMID:26751448

  10. A Novel Hybrid Error Criterion-Based Active Control Method for on-Line Milling Vibration Suppression with Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Gao, Robert X; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Wang, Shibin

    2016-01-06

    Milling vibration is one of the most serious factors affecting machining quality and precision. In this paper a novel hybrid error criterion-based frequency-domain LMS active control method is constructed and used for vibration suppression of milling processes by piezoelectric actuators and sensors, in which only one Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is used and no Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) is involved. The correction formulas are derived by a steepest descent procedure and the control parameters are analyzed and optimized. Then, a novel hybrid error criterion is constructed to improve the adaptability, reliability and anti-interference ability of the constructed control algorithm. Finally, based on piezoelectric actuators and acceleration sensors, a simulation of a spindle and a milling process experiment are presented to verify the proposed method. Besides, a protection program is added in the control flow to enhance the reliability of the control method in applications. The simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is an effective and reliable way for on-line vibration suppression, and the machining quality can be obviously improved.

  11. 76 FR 41247 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... AGENCY Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations; Correction AGENCY: Environmental... Register of February 25, 2011, concerning the voluntary cancellation of multiple pesticide products. This document is being issued to correct the cancellations of two Phaeton Corporation pesticide products....

  12. 14 CFR 221.211 - Cancellation of suspended matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cancellation of suspended matter. 221.211 Section 221.211 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION... matter. When, pursuant to an order of the Department, the cancellation of rules, fares, charges, or...

  13. 14 CFR 221.211 - Cancellation of suspended matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cancellation of suspended matter. 221.211 Section 221.211 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION... matter. When, pursuant to an order of the Department, the cancellation of rules, fares, charges, or...

  14. 14 CFR 221.211 - Cancellation of suspended matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cancellation of suspended matter. 221.211 Section 221.211 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION... matter. When, pursuant to an order of the Department, the cancellation of rules, fares, charges, or...

  15. 14 CFR 221.211 - Cancellation of suspended matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cancellation of suspended matter. 221.211 Section 221.211 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION... matter. When, pursuant to an order of the Department, the cancellation of rules, fares, charges, or...

  16. 14 CFR 221.211 - Cancellation of suspended matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cancellation of suspended matter. 221.211 Section 221.211 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION... matter. When, pursuant to an order of the Department, the cancellation of rules, fares, charges, or...

  17. 77 FR 5012 - Rescission of Certain Product Cancellations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... rescind the cancellation of Baker Petrolite Corporation's (BPC) product, EPA Reg. No. 010707-00055; Bio... EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0014. Publicly available docket materials are available either in the electronic.... Additionally, this Notice rescinds the cancellations of BioSafe Systems' products, EPA Reg. Nos....

  18. 77 FR 8890 - National Cancer Institute Cancellation of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute Cancellation of Meeting Notice is hereby given of the cancellation of the National Cancer Institute Board of Scientific Advisors, March...

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