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Sample records for active vibration damper

  1. Active Inertial Vibration Isolators And Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren; Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Report describes development of active inertial vibration isolators and dampers in which actuators electromagnet coils moving linearly within permanent magnetic fields in housings, somewhat as though massive, low-frequency voice coils in loudspeakers. Discusses principle of operation, electrical and mechanical considerations in design of actuators, characteristics of accelerometers, and frequency responses of control systems. Describes design and performance of one- and three-degree-of-freedom vibration-suppressing system based on concept.

  2. Vibration Control of Bridge Tower Under Construction Using Active Mass Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagaya, Hiroaki; Tamaki, Toshihiro; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Nagao, Yoichi; Yamaguchi, Kazunori

    For large structures such as towers of suspension bridges or cable-stayed bridges, we often need to suppress wind-induced vibration for safety. Especially in the construction stage, the structures have a low tolerance than completed ones. This paper discusses the active vibration dampers used to suppress wind-induced vibration of a tower of a suspension bridge during a construction. The active damper was used to suppress wind-induced vibration in multiple modes predicted by wind-tunnel test. The controller design of the dampers is based on H∞ robust control theory. At each erection step, we measured dynamic properties of towers to adjust parameters of the controller using active vibration exciters. The measured dynamic properties of active controlled structures are compared with those of non-controlled structures. The analysis of free vibration shows the suppression performance of active damper as expected in the controller design.

  3. Compact Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  4. Hermetically sealed vibration damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, D. G.

    1969-01-01

    Simple fluidic vibration damper for installation at each pivotal mounting between gimbals isolates inertial measuring units from external vibration and other disruptive forces. Installation between each of the three gimbal axes can dampen vibration and shock in any direction while permitting free rotation of the gimbals.

  5. Maximizing semi-active vibration isolation utilizing a magnetorheological damper with an inner bypass configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Wereley, Norman M.; Hu, Wei

    2015-05-07

    A single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) semi-active vibration control system based on a magnetorheological (MR) damper with an inner bypass is investigated in this paper. The MR damper employing a pair of concentric tubes, between which the key structure, i.e., the inner bypass, is formed and MR fluids are energized, is designed to provide large dynamic range (i.e., ratio of field-on damping force to field-off damping force) and damping force range. The damping force performance of the MR damper is modeled using phenomenological model and verified by the experimental tests. In order to assess its feasibility and capability in vibration control systems, the mathematical model of a SDOF semi-active vibration control system based on the MR damper and skyhook control strategy is established. Using an MTS 244 hydraulic vibration exciter system and a dSPACE DS1103 real-time simulation system, experimental study for the SDOF semi-active vibration control system is also conducted. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements.

  6. Maximizing semi-active vibration isolation utilizing a magnetorheological damper with an inner bypass configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Wereley, Norman M.; Hu, Wei

    2015-05-01

    A single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) semi-active vibration control system based on a magnetorheological (MR) damper with an inner bypass is investigated in this paper. The MR damper employing a pair of concentric tubes, between which the key structure, i.e., the inner bypass, is formed and MR fluids are energized, is designed to provide large dynamic range (i.e., ratio of field-on damping force to field-off damping force) and damping force range. The damping force performance of the MR damper is modeled using phenomenological model and verified by the experimental tests. In order to assess its feasibility and capability in vibration control systems, the mathematical model of a SDOF semi-active vibration control system based on the MR damper and skyhook control strategy is established. Using an MTS 244 hydraulic vibration exciter system and a dSPACE DS1103 real-time simulation system, experimental study for the SDOF semi-active vibration control system is also conducted. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements.

  7. Vibration dampers for cryogenic turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Olan, Emmanuel; Ibrahim, Azman Syed; Kascak, Albert F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development of effective and reliable minimum-weight and minimum-envelope vibration dampers for cryogenic turbines. To meet this objective, a high speed test rig was designed and fabricated, which is currently used to test a curved beam type damper. The operation, capacity, structural characteristics, measurement system, and safety features of the cryogenic damper test rig are discussed.

  8. Airfoil Vibration Dampers program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The Airfoil Vibration Damper program has consisted of an analysis phase and a testing phase. During the analysis phase, a state-of-the-art computer code was developed, which can be used to guide designers in the placement and sizing of friction dampers. The use of this computer code was demonstrated by performing representative analyses on turbine blades from the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) and High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The testing phase of the program consisted of performing friction damping tests on two different cantilever beams. Data from these tests provided an empirical check on the accuracy of the computer code developed in the analysis phase. Results of the analysis and testing showed that the computer code can accurately predict the performance of friction dampers. In addition, a valuable set of friction damping data was generated, which can be used to aid in the design of friction dampers, as well as provide benchmark test cases for future code developers.

  9. The Influence of Semi-active Dampers on the Vibration Behaviour of Passenger Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Sebastian; Brechter, Daniel; Janßen, Andreas; Mauch, Heiko

    The number of mechatronic components in modern car suspensions is increasing continuously to solve conflicts concerning design goals. Thus, changes in the vibration behaviour of the vehicle are caused. It needs to be ascertained whether this influence has to be taken into account when determining the fatigue life of a car and its components. Therefore, changes of the loads are studied in measurements and multi-body simulations of a passenger car with semi-active dampers. The evaluation of the forces at the wheel centre and at the shock absorber tower shows that different settings of semi-active dampers have an influence on fatigue life of the chassis and the car body. It is concluded that these effects need to be taken into account when determining fatigue life. Furthermore, multi-body simulations have been successfully applied to study the influence of semi-active dampers on the loads.

  10. Semi-active vibration absorber based on real-time controlled MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.

    2014-06-01

    A semi-active vibration absorber with real-time controlled magnetorheological damper (MR-SVA) for the mitigation of harmonic structural vibrations is presented. The MR damper force targets to realize the frequency and damping adaptations to the actual structural frequency according to the principle of the undamped vibration absorber. The relative motion constraint of the MR-SVA is taken into account by an adaptive nonlinear control of the internal damping of the MR-SVA. The MR-SVA is numerically and experimentally validated for harmonic excitation of the primary structure when the natural frequency of the passive mass spring system of the MR-SVA is correctly tuned to the targeted structural resonance frequency and when de-tuning is present. The results demonstrate that the MR-SVA outperforms the passive TMD at structural resonance frequency by at least 12.4% and up to 60.0%.

  11. High-Temperature Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Alan; Litwin, Joel; Krauss, Harold

    1987-01-01

    Device for damping vibrations functions at temperatures up to 400 degrees F. Dampens vibrational torque loads as high as 1,000 lb-in. but compact enough to be part of helicopter rotor hub. Rotary damper absorbs energy from vibrating rod, dissipating it in turbulent motion of viscous hydraulic fluid forced by moving vanes through small orifices.

  12. Evaluation of Vibration and Shock Attenuation Performance of a Suspension Seat with a Semi-Active Magnetorheological Fluid Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MCMANUS, S. J.; ST. CLAIR, K. A.; BOILEAU, P. É.; BOUTIN, J.; RAKHEJA, S.

    2002-05-01

    The potential benefits of a semi-active magnetorheological (MR) damper in reducing the incidence and severity of end-stop impacts of a low natural frequency suspension seat are investigated. The MR damper considered is a commercially developed product, referred to as “Motion Master semi-active damping system” and manufactured by Lord Corporation. The end-stop impact and vibration attenuation performance of a seat equipped with such a damper are evaluated and compared with those of the same seat incorporating a conventional damper. The evaluation is performed on a servo-hydraulic vibration exciter by subjecting the seat-damper combinations to a transient excitation with dominant frequency close to that of the seat and continuous random excitation class EM1 applicable to earth-moving machinery, and a more severe excitation realized by amplifying the EM1 excitation by 150%. Tests are performed for medium and firm settings of the MR damper and for seat height positions corresponding to mid-ride and ±2·54 and ±5·08 cm relative to mid-ride. The results indicate that significantly higher levels of transient excitation are necessary to induce end-stop impacts for the seat equipped with the MR damper, particularly when set for firm damping, the difference with the conventional damper being more pronounced for seat positions closer to the end-stops. Under the EM1 excitation, the results indicate that under conditions which would otherwise favour the occurrence of end-stop impacts for a seat equipped with a conventional damper, the use of the MR damper can result in considerably less severe impacts and correspondingly lower vibration exposure levels, particularly when positioned closer to its compression or rebound limit stop.

  13. Design of a stand-alone active damper for distributed control of vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinquemani, S.; Cazzulani, G.; Costa, A.; Resta, F.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of active vibration control is to enhance the performance of a system (eg. comfort, fatigue life, etc.) by limiting vibrations. One of the most effective technique to reach this goal is to increase the equivalent damping of the system and then the dissipation of the kinetic energy (the so called skyhook damping technique). Application of active vibration control often require a complex setup. When large structures are considered, it is often necessary to have a high number of sensors and actuators, suitably cabled, in addition to all the devices necessary to condition and amplify the signals of measurement and control and to execute in real time the control algorithms synthesized. This work arises from the need to simplify this situation, developing a standalone device that is able of carrying out operations of vibration control in an autonomous way, thus containing in itself an actuator, the sensors needed to evaluate the vibratory state of the structure, and a micro-controller embedding different control algorithm. The design of the smart damper covers many aspects and requires a strong integration of different disciplines. A prototype has been realized and tested on a vibrating structure. The experimental results show good performance in suppress vibration.

  14. Improving the vibration suppression capabilities of a magneto-rheological damper using hybrid active and semi-active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Irfan; Wagg, David; Sims, Neil D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid active and semi-active control method for vibration suppression in flexible structures. The method uses a combination of a semi-active device and an active control actuator situated elsewhere in the structure to suppress vibrations. The key novelty is to use the hybrid controller to enable the magneto-rheological damper to achieve a performance as close to a fully active device as possible. This is achieved by ensuring that the active actuator can assist the magneto-rheological damper in the regions where energy is required. In addition, the hybrid active and semi-active controller is designed to minimize the switching of the semi-active controller. The control framework used is the immersion and invariance control technique in combination with sliding mode control. A two degree-of-freedom system with lightly damped resonances is used as an example system. Both numerical and experimental results are generated for this system, and then compared as part of a validation study. The experimental system uses hardware-in-the-loop to simulate the effect of both the degrees-of-freedom. The results show that the concept is viable both numerically and experimentally, and improved vibration suppression results can be obtained for the magneto-rheological damper that approach the performance of an active device.

  15. Cable connected active tuned mass dampers for control of in-plane vibrations of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, B.; Basu, B.

    2014-11-01

    In-plane vibrations of wind turbine blades are of concern in modern multi-megawatt wind turbines. Today's turbines with capacities of up to 7.5 MW have very large, flexible blades. As blades have grown longer the increasing flexibility has led to vibration problems. Vibration of blades can reduce the power produced by the turbine and decrease the fatigue life of the turbine. In this paper a new active control strategy is designed and implemented to control the in-plane vibration of large wind turbine blades which in general is not aerodynamically damped. A cable connected active tuned mass damper (CCATMD) system is proposed for the mitigation of in-plane blade vibration. An Euler-Lagrangian wind turbine model based on energy formulation has been developed for this purpose which considers the structural dynamics of the system and the interaction between in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations and also the interaction between the blades and the tower including the CCATMDs. The CCATMDs are located inside the blades and are controlled by an LQR controller. The turbine is subject to turbulent aerodynamic loading simulated using a modification to the classic Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory with turbulence generated from rotationally sampled spectra. The turbine is also subject to gravity loading. The effect of centrifugal stiffening of the rotating blades has also been considered. Results show that the use of the proposed new active control scheme significantly reduces the in-plane vibration of large, flexible wind turbine blades.

  16. The effect of time delay on control stability of an electromagnetic active tuned mass damper for vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A.; Torres-Perez, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of time delays on the stability of a zero-placement position and velocity feedback law for a vibratory system comprising harmonic excitation equipped with an electromagnetic active tuned mass damper (ATMD). The purpose of the active control is broadening the vibration attenuation envelope of a primary mass to a higher frequency region identified as from 50±0.5Hz with a passive tuned mass damper (TMD) to a wider range of 50±5Hz with an ATMD. Stability conditions of the closed-loop system are determined by studying the position of the system closed-loop poles after the introduction of time delays for different excitation frequencies. A computer simulation of the model predicted that the proposed control system is subject to instability after a critical time delay margin dependent upon the frequency of excitation and the finding were experimentally validated. Three solutions are derived and experimentally tested for minimising the effect of time delays on the stability of the control system. The first solution is associated with the introduction of more damping in the absorber system. The second incorporates using a time-delayed ATMD by tuning its original natural resonant frequency to beyond the nominal operational frequency range of the composite system. The third involves an online gain tuning of filter coefficients in a dual arrangement of low-pass and high-pass filters to eliminate the effect time delays by manipulating the signal phase shifts.

  17. Viscous-pendulum damper suppresses structural vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1964-01-01

    The viscous pendulum damper consists of a cylinder containing round trays on which round lead slugs rest. When assembled, the container is filled with a viscous liquid and attached, with axis vertical, to the structure. The device permits varying the damping of structural vibrations.

  18. Viscoelastic Vibration Dampers for Turbomachine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2003-01-01

    Simple viscoelastic dampers have been invented for use on the root attachments of turbomachine blades. These dampers suppress bending- and torsion-mode blade vibrations, which are excited by unsteady aerodynamic forces during operation. In suppressing vibrations, these dampers reduce fatigue (thereby prolonging blade lifetimes) while reducing noise. These dampers can be installed in new turbomachines or in previously constructed turbomachines, without need for structural modifications. Moreover, because these dampers are not exposed to flows, they do not affect the aerodynamic performances of turbomachines. Figure 1 depicts a basic turbomachine rotor, which includes multiple blades affixed to a hub by means of dovetail root attachments. Prior to mounting of the blades, thin layers of a viscoelastic material are applied to selected areas of the blade roots. Once the blades have been installed in the hub and the rotor is set into rotation, centrifugal force compresses these layers between the mating load-bearing surfaces of the hub and the blade root. The layers of viscoelastic material provide load paths through which the vibration energy of the blade can be dissipated. The viscoelasticity of the material converts mechanical vibration energy into shear strain energy and then from shear strain energy to heat. Of the viscoelastic materials that have been considered thus far for this application, the one of choice is a commercial polyurethane that is available in tape form, coated on one side with an adhesive that facilitates bonding to blade roots. The thickness of the tape can be chosen to suit the specific application. The typical thickness of 0.012 in. (.0.3 mm) is small enough that the tape can fit in the clearance between the mating blade-root and hub surfaces in a typical turbomachine. In an experiment, a blade was mounted in a test fixture designed to simulate the blade-end conditions that prevail in a turbocompressor. Vibrations were excited in the blade by

  19. Testing a simple control law to reduce broadband frequency harmonic vibrations using semi-active tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    This paper is focused on the control problems related to semi-active tuned mass dampers (TMDs) used to reduce harmonic vibrations, specially involving civil structures. A simplified version of the phase control law is derived and its effectiveness is investigated and evaluated. The objective is to improve the functioning of control systems of this type by simplifying the measurement process and reducing the number of variables involved, making the control system more feasible and reliable. Because the control law is of ON/OFF type, combined with appropriate trigger conditions, the activity of the actuation system may be significantly reduced, which may be of few seconds a day in many practical cases, increasing the durability of the device and reducing its maintenance. Moreover, due to the ability of the control system to command the motion of the inertial mass, the semi-active TMD is relatively insensitive to its initial tuning, resulting in the capability of self-tuning and in the possibility of controlling several vibration modes of a structure over a significant broadband frequency.

  20. A variable hydraulic damper for vibration reduction in helicopter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Quan

    This study investigates the potential aeronautical application of structural control technology developed in earthquake engineering to reduce the vibration of helicopter blades. The major objective is to evaluate and to apply the semi-active control method. Reducing vibrations for helicopter blades is quite similar to the approach of earthquake protective systems. We need not regulate the displacement of blades to a certain value, or to force the blade vibration to track given time histories. Instead, we only want to limit the vibration level within an acceptable range. Conventional blade vibration reduction by adding passive damping is ineffective. In this study, the concept of semi-active control is developed and successfully applied. The control philosophy is, first, to change the system stiffness so as to avoid resonance, to reduce input energy, and to lower the blade's displacement. The damping is applied to further reduce the response, to dissipate the imposed energy, and to minimize the structural damage. The semi-active control system originally developed for earthquake engineering application is modified to reduce the blade vibration. As the essential element of semi-active control technology, a variable hydraulic damper is designed. Simulations are carried out to develop a mechanical model for the variable hydraulic damper. In the simulation, several nonlinearities are considered such as Karnopp friction model and cubic stiffness model. The superior performance by a variable damper is quantitatively observed from damper component tests, damper fatigue tests, and blade dynamic tests. The simulation results correlate well with experiments in both the force-displacement relation and the force-velocity relation. Based on the mechanical model, a Kelvin-Voigt type of analytical model is developed, which is used in the finite element analysis of the blade with the variable damper. It is shown that the analytical model predicts the behavior of the damper measured

  1. Effect of the active damper coil system on the lateral displacement of the magnetically levitated bogie

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, S.; Ohsaki, H.; Masada, E.

    1999-09-01

    Numerical simulation of the superconducting magnetically levitated bogie (JR Maglev) has been studied. The active damper coil system is introduced. In this levitation system, the interaction between levitation and guidance is strong. This active damper coil system is designed for reducing the vertical vibration of the bogie. Using the numerical simulation, its effect on the lateral displacement of the bogie is assessed. The active damper coil system for the vertical vibration is shown to works as a passive damper for the lateral vibration.

  2. String vibration dampers do not reduce racket frame vibration transfer to the forearm.

    PubMed

    Li, F X; Fewtrell, D; Jenkins, M

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of string vibration damping devices on reducing racket frame vibration transfer to the forearm. Twenty participants volunteered to hold a tennis racket stationary in a forehand and backhand stroking position while tennis balls were fired at 20 m x s(-1) towards two impact locations, the node of vibration and the dead spot. A three-way analysis of variance with repeated measures on damping condition, impact location and stroke condition was performed on the data. The resonant frequency of the hand-held racket was found to be approximately 120 Hz. No significant differences in amplitude of vibration at the resonant frequency were found for the wrist or the elbow when damped and non-damped impacts were compared. Impacts at the dead spot produced greater amplitudes of vibration (P < 0.01) but no interaction between impact location and string dampers was evident. The string dampers had no effect on the grip force used or the muscle electrical activity in the forearm after impact. In conclusion, we found that string dampers do not reduce the amount of racket frame vibration received at the forearm. We suggest that string dampers remain a popular accessory among tennis players because of their acoustic effects and psychological support rather than any mechanical advantage. PMID:15801498

  3. String vibration dampers do not reduce racket frame vibration transfer to the forearm.

    PubMed

    Li, F X; Fewtrell, D; Jenkins, M

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of string vibration damping devices on reducing racket frame vibration transfer to the forearm. Twenty participants volunteered to hold a tennis racket stationary in a forehand and backhand stroking position while tennis balls were fired at 20 m x s(-1) towards two impact locations, the node of vibration and the dead spot. A three-way analysis of variance with repeated measures on damping condition, impact location and stroke condition was performed on the data. The resonant frequency of the hand-held racket was found to be approximately 120 Hz. No significant differences in amplitude of vibration at the resonant frequency were found for the wrist or the elbow when damped and non-damped impacts were compared. Impacts at the dead spot produced greater amplitudes of vibration (P < 0.01) but no interaction between impact location and string dampers was evident. The string dampers had no effect on the grip force used or the muscle electrical activity in the forearm after impact. In conclusion, we found that string dampers do not reduce the amount of racket frame vibration received at the forearm. We suggest that string dampers remain a popular accessory among tennis players because of their acoustic effects and psychological support rather than any mechanical advantage.

  4. Application of impact dampers in vibration control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akl, Fred A.; Butt, Aamir S.

    1995-01-01

    Impact dampers belong to the category of passive vibration devices used to attenuate the vibration of discrete and continuous systems. An impact damper generally consists of a mass which is allowed to travel freely between two defined stops. Under the right conditions, the vibration of the structure to which the impact damper is attached will cause the mass of the impact damper to strike the structure. Previous analytical and experimental research work on the effect of impact dampers in attenuating the vibration of discrete and continuous systems have demonstrated their effectiveness. It has been shown in this study that impact dampers can increase the intrinsic damping of a lightly-damped flexible structure. The test structure consists of a slender flexible beam supported by a pin-type support at one end and supported by a linear helical flexible spring at another location. Sinusoidal excitation spanning the first three natural frequencies was applied in the horizontal plane. The orientation of the excitation and the test structure in the horizontal plane minimizes the effect of gravity on the behavior of the test structure. The excitation was applied using a linear sine sweep technique. The span of the test structure, the mass of the impact damper, the distance of travel, and the location of the impact damper along the span of the test structure were varied. The damping ratio are estimated for sixty test configurations. The results show that the impact damper significantly increases the damping ratio of the test structure. Statistical analysis of the results using the method of multiple linear regression indicates that a reasonable fit has been accomplished. It is concluded that additional experimental analysis of flexible structures in microgravity environment is needed in order to achieve a better understanding of the behavior of impact damper under conditions of microgravity. Numerical solution of the behavior of flexible structures equipped with impact

  5. Optimal damper location in the vibration control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, B. P.; Pilkey, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of finding the optimal location of active dampers for the vibration control of space structures is investigated. The optimal location is where maximum damping can be introduced to a particular vibration mode. To this end, classical root locus techniques are used to study the effect on eigenvalues of placing a damper on an undamped structure. An efficient formulation is derived which avoids the solution of the damped eigenvalue problem. Based on the observation of the results for a free-free beam model, a Minimum Constrained Frequency Criterion (MCFC) for locating the optimal damper location is proposed.

  6. Simulation study of semi-active control of stay cable using MR damper under wind loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiangyun; Huang, Hongwei; Sun, Limin

    2013-04-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the effectiveness of MR damper for vibration mitigation of stay cable under complex wind excitations. The MR damper, RD-1005-03, provided by Lord Company was used, a semi-active control algorithm based on the universal design curve for linear dampers and the bilinear mechanical model of the MR damper was developed, and simulation study was carried out for the cable-MR damper system. Firstly, fluctuating wind field was generated using the method of weighted amplitude wave superposition (WAWS) and Kaimal spectrum and the time-history sample curve of turbulent wind speed of stay cable was obtained. Then the dynamic response of the cable-MR damper system was computed with the proposed semi-active control algorithm applied for mitigating the vibration of stay cable. Finally, the effectiveness of MR damper for controlling cable vibration was assessed by comparing the dynamic responses of stay cable before and after damper installation.

  7. Design and vibration control of military vehicle suspension system using magnetorheological damper and disc spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sung Hoon; Seong, Min-Sang; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-06-01

    This paper proposes a new type of magnetorheological (MR) fluid based suspension system and applies it to military vehicles for vibration control. The suspension system consists of a gas spring, a MR damper and a safety passive damper (disc spring). Firstly, a dynamic model of the MR damper is derived by considering the pressure drop due to the viscosity and the yield stress of the MR fluid. A dynamic model of the disc spring is then established for its evaluation as a safety damper with respect to load and pressure. Secondly, a full military vehicle is adopted for the integration of the MR suspension system. A skyhook controller associated with a semi-active actuating condition is then designed to reduce the imposed vibration. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MR suspension system, a computer simulation is undertaken showing the vibration control performance of such properties as vertical displacement and pitch angle, evaluated for a bumpy road profile.

  8. Experimental study of a self-powered and sensing MR-damper-based vibration control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiński, Bogdan

    2011-10-01

    The paper deals with a semi-active vibration control system based on a magnetorheological (MR) damper. The study outlines the model and the structure of the system, and describes its experimental investigation. The conceptual design of this system involves harvesting energy from structural vibrations using an energy extractor based on an electromagnetic transduction mechanism (Faraday's law). The system consists of an electromagnetic induction device (EMI) prototype and an MR damper of RD-1005 series manufactured by Lord Corporation. The energy extracted is applied to control the damping characteristics of the MR damper. The model of the system was used to prove that the proposed vibration control system is feasible. The system was realized in the semi-active control strategy with energy recovery and examined through experiments in the cases where the control coil of the MR damper was voltage-supplied directly from the EMI or voltage-supplied via the rectifier, or supplied with a current control system with two feedback loops. The external loop used the sky-hook algorithm whilst the internal loop used the algorithm switching the photorelay, at the output from the rectifier. Experimental results of the proposed vibration control system were compared with those obtained for the passive system (MR damper is off-state) and for the system with an external power source (conventional system) when the control coil of the MR damper was supplied by a DC power supply and analogue voltage amplifier or a DC power supply and a photorelay. It was demonstrated that the system is able to power-supply the MR damper and can adjust itself to structural vibrations. It was also found that, since the signal of induced voltage from the EMI agrees well with that of the relative velocity signal across the damper, the device can act as a 'velocity-sign' sensor.

  9. Semi-active control of stay cables using nonlinear friction damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiping; Sun, Limin

    2013-04-01

    Stay cables of long span cable-stayed bridges are easy to vibrate under wind or wind/rain loads owning to their very low inherent damping. To install cable dampers near to the anchorages of cable has become a common practice for cable vibration control of cable-stayed bridge structures. The performance of passive linear viscous dampers has been widely studied. However, even the optimal passive device can only add a small amount of damping to the cable when attached a reasonable distance from the cable anchorage. This paper investigates the potential for improved damping using semiactive devices based on nonlinear frictional type of dampers. The equations of motion of a cable with a friction damper were derived using an assumed modes approach and the analytical solution for the motion equations was obtained. The results show that the friction damper evokes linearly decaying of free vibrations of the cable as long as the damper does not lock the cable. The equivalent modal damping ratio of cable with the friction damper is strongly amplitude dependent. Based on the characteristics of friction damper, the authors proposed a semi-active control strategy for cable control with dampers. According to the semi-active control law, the damper force has to be adjusted in proportion to the cable amplitude at damper position. The effectiveness of passive linear viscous dampers is reviewed. The response of a cable with passive and semi-active dampers is studied. The response with a semi-active damper is found to be dramatically reduced compared to the optimal passive linear viscous damper, thus demonstrating the potential benefits using a semi-active damper for absorbing cable vibratory energy.

  10. Quasi-active suspension design using magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Jack N.; Neild, Simon A.; Wagg, David J.

    2011-05-01

    Quasi-active damping is a method of coupled mechanical and control system design using multiple semi-active dampers. By designing the systems such that the desired control force may always be achieved using a combination of the dampers, quasi-active damping seeks to approach levels of vibration isolation achievable through active damping, whilst retaining the desirable attributes of semi-active systems. In this article a design is proposed for a quasi-active, base-isolating suspension system. Control laws are firstly defined in a generalised form, where semi-active dampers are considered as idealised variable viscous dampers. This system is used to demonstrate in detail the principles of quasi-active damping, in particular the necessary interaction between mechanical and control systems. It is shown how such a system can produce a tunable, quasi-active region in the frequency response of very low displacement transmissibility. Quasi-active control laws are then proposed which are specific for use with magnetorheological dampers. These are validated in simulation using a realistic model of the damper dynamics, again producing a quasi-active region in the frequency response. Finally, the robustness of the magnetorheological, quasi-active suspension system is demonstrated.

  11. Vibration power generator for a linear MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiński, Bogdan

    2010-10-01

    The paper describes the structure and the results of numerical calculations and experimental tests of a newly developed vibration power generator for a linear magnetorheological (MR) damper. The generator consists of permanent magnets and coil with foil winding. The device produces electrical energy according to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. This energy is applied to vary the damping characteristics of the MR damper attached to the generator by the input current produced by the device. The objective of the numerical calculations was to determine the magnetic field distribution in the generator as well as the electric potential and current density in the generator's coil during the idle run and under the load applied to the MR damper control coil. The results of the calculations were used during the design and manufacturing stages of the device. The objective of the experimental tests carried out on a dynamic testing machine was to evaluate the generator's efficiency and to compare the experimental and predicted data. The experimental results demonstrate that the engineered device enables a change in the kinetic energy of the reciprocal motion of the MR damper which leads to variations in the damping characteristics. That is why the generator may be used to build up MR damper based vibration control systems which require no external power.

  12. On a Self-Tuning Impact Vibration Damper for Rotating Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Bagley, Ronald L.; Mehmed, Oral; Choi, Ben (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A self-tuning impact damper is investigated analytically and experimentally as a device to inhibit vibration and increase the fatigue life of rotating components in turbomachinery. High centrifugal loads in rotors can inactivate traditional impact dampers because of friction or misalignment of the damper in the g-field. Giving an impact damper characteristics of an acceleration tuned-mass damper enables the resulting device to maintain damper mass motion and effectiveness during high-g loading. Experimental results presented here verify that this self-tuning impact damper can be designed to follow an engine order line. damping rotor component resonance crossings.

  13. The effect of tennis racket string vibration dampers on racket handle vibrations and discomfort following impacts.

    PubMed

    Stroede, C L; Noble, L; Walker, H S

    1999-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of the use of tennis racket string vibration dampers on racket handle vibrations, and perceptions of hand and arm discomfort experienced by tennis players owing to stationary racket impacts. Twenty tennis players (10 males, 10 females) aged 18-29 years volunteered for the study. Two different racket models were impacted at the geometric centre of the racket face and 100 mm distal to the centre both with and without string vibration dampers in place. The participants could neither see nor hear the impacts, and they indicated their discomfort immediately after each impact using a visual analogue scale. An analysis of variance (2 x 2 x 2 factorial) was performed on the scaled discomfort ratings with the factors damping condition, racket type and impact location. No significant differences in discomfort ratings between damped and undamped impacts or between the two racket types were found. Also, central impacts were found to be more comfortable than impacts 100 mm distal to the centre (P< 0.05). There were no significant interaction effects. Vibration traces from an accelerometer mounted on the racket handle revealed that string vibration dampers quickly absorbed high-frequency string vibration without attenuating the lower-frequency frame vibration. In conclusion, we found no evidence to support the contention that string vibration dampers reduce hand and arm impact discomfort.

  14. Shock and vibration control systems using a self-sensing magnetorheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Wang, Dai-Hua

    2014-04-01

    The theoretical analysis and the prototype testing of the integrated relative displacement self-sensing magnetorheological damper (IRDSMRD) indicate that the controllable damping force performance and the relative displacement sensing performance influence each other for varying applied currents. Aiming at verifying the feasibility and capability of the IRDSMRD to constitute semi-active shock and vibration control systems, this study presents a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) shock and vibration control system based on the IRDSMRD. The mathematical model of the IRDSMRD, including the control damping force and the linearity of the integrated relative displacement sensor (IRDS), is established, and the governing equation for the SDOF system based on the IRDSMRD is derived. A skyhook control algorithm is utilized to improve the shock and vibration control performance of the SDOF semi-active control systems. The simulated control performances of the SDOF systems individually using the IRDSMRD without any extra-set dynamic sensor, the conventional MR damper with a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), and the passive damper, under shock loads due to vertical pulses (the maximum initial velocity is as high as 10 m/s), and sinusoidal vibrations with a frequency range of 0-25 Hz, are evaluated, compared, and analyzed.

  15. A magnetic damper for first mode vibration reduction in multimass flexible rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasarda, M. E. F.; Allaire, P. E.; Humphris, R. R.; Barrett, L. E.

    1989-01-01

    Many rotating machines such as compressors, turbines and pumps have long thin shafts with resulting vibration problems, and would benefit from additional damping near the center of the shaft. Magnetic dampers have the potential to be employed in these machines because they can operate in the working fluid environment unlike conventional bearings. An experimental test rig is described which was set up with a long thin shaft and several masses to represent a flexible shaft machine. An active magnetic damper was placed in three locations: near the midspan, near one end disk, and close to the bearing. With typical control parameter settings, the midspan location reduced the first mode vibration 82 percent, the disk location reduced it 75 percent and the bearing location attained a 74 percent reduction. Magnetic damper stiffness and damping values used to obtain these reductions were only a few percent of the bearing stiffness and damping values. A theoretical model of both the rotor and the damper was developed and compared to the measured results. The agreement was good.

  16. Semi-active control of a landing gear system using magnetrorheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Y. J.; Park, M. K.; Choi, J. W.; Yamane, R.

    2007-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the applicability of the developed MR damper to the landing gear system for the attenuating undesired shock and vibration in the landing and taxing phases. First of all, the experimental model of the MR damper is derived based on the results of performance evaluations. Next, a simplified skyhook controller, which is one of the most straightforward, but effective approaches for improving ride comport in vehicles with active suspensions, is formulated. Finally, the vibration control performances of the landing gear system using the MR damper are theoretically evaluated in the landing phase of the aircraft. A series of simulation analyses show that the proposed MR damper with the skyhook controller is effective for suppressing undesired vibration of the aircraft body.

  17. Vibration suppression of printed circuit boards using an external particle damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramuthuvel, P.; Sairajan, K. K.; Shankar, K.

    2016-03-01

    Particle damping is an effective method of passive vibration control, of recent research interest. The novel use of particle damper capsule on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) and the development of Radial Basis Function neural network to accurately predict the acceleration response is presented here. The prediction of particle damping using this neural network is studied in comparison with the Back Propagation Neural network. Extensive experiments are carried out on a PCB for different combinations of particle damper parameters such as particle size, particle density, packing ratio, and the input force during the primary modes of vibration and the obtained results are used for training and testing of neural networks. Based on the prediction from the better trained network, useful design guidelines for the particle damper suitable for PCB are arrived at. The effectiveness of particle dampers for vibration suppression of PCB under random vibration environment is demonstrated based on these design guidelines.

  18. Cable vibration control with both lateral and rotational dampers attached at an intermediate location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Sun, Limin; Nagarajaiah, Satish

    2016-09-01

    Lateral dampers have been extensively studied and implemented for supplementing modal damping in cable vibration mitigation. When considering the cable flexural stiffness that is actually present, albeit small, there is another degree of freedom of the cable at the lateral damper, namely the rotation, that can be constrained by a rotational damper to achieve larger additional damping. This is of particular significance for long cables where the near-anchorage lateral damper alone is usually insufficient. The problem of a cable with bending stiffness, attached with both lateral and rotational dampers at an intermediate point, is therefore considered in this study. The characteristic equation of the resulting system is formulated by assembling the dynamic stiffness from the two segments divided by the damper, which is subsequently solved using argument principle method. Dynamics of the controlled system is thus discussed in general through parametric analysis. For the case where the damper location is close to the anchorage, asymptotic solutions for complex frequency and damping ratio are provided; explicit formulas for determining the optimal damper coefficients are also derived. It is found that when the lateral and rotational damper coefficients are properly balanced, the proposed strategy can achieve up to 30 percent damping enhancement compared to the case with only the lateral damper, in practical cable bending stiffness range.

  19. Digital active material processing platform effort (DAMPER), SBIR phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    Applied Technology Associates, Inc., (ATA) has demonstrated that inertial actuation can be employed effectively in digital, active vibration isolation systems. Inertial actuation involves the use of momentum exchange to produce corrective forces which act directly on the payload being actively isolated. In a typical active vibration isolation system, accelerometers are used to measure the inertial motion of the payload. The signals from the accelerometers are then used to calculate the corrective forces required to counteract, or 'cancel out' the payload motion. Active vibration isolation is common technology, but the use of inertial actuation in such systems is novel, and is the focus of the DAMPER project. A May 1991 report was completed which documented the successful demonstration of inertial actuation, employed in the control of vibration in a single axis. In the 1 degree-of-freedom (1DOF) experiment a set of air bearing rails was used to suspend the payload, simulating a microgravity environment in a single horizontal axis. Digital Signal Processor (DSP) technology was used to calculate in real time, the control law between the accelerometer signals and the inertial actuators. The data obtained from this experiment verified that as much as 20 dB of rejection could be realized by this type of system. A discussion is included of recent tests performed in which vibrations were actively controlled in three axes simultaneously. In the three degree-of-freedom (3DOF) system, the air bearings were designed in such a way that the payload is free to rotate about the azimuth axis, as well as translate in the two horizontal directions. The actuator developed for the DAMPER project has applications beyond payload isolation, including structural damping and source vibration isolation. This report includes a brief discussion of these applications, as well as a commercialization plan for the actuator.

  20. Potential of viscous dampers for vibration mitigation of transmission overhead lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassam, A.; Soltani, Amir

    2015-04-01

    One of the important parameters in the design of transmission lines is the evaluation of the susceptibility of these cables to vibrations and if necessary, providing proper means to mitigate these vibrations. Transmission lines are especially susceptible to vibrations as a result of their light weight. Viscous dampers are one of the tools that can be applied to mitigate cable vibrations. However, the damping ratio obtained by these dampers is very limited. The present study provides a finite element formulation for an isoparametric cable element. A comparison is made between the results of presented approach with finite series method to validate the model. Additionally, a comparison is made between linear and non-linear behavior of a cable under sweep sinusoidal excitations with different amplitudes. Finally, a case study is conducted to investigate the potential of additional damping provided by a third viscous damper for the case in which two rubber bushings are already attached to the cable near the anchorages. Based on this case study, the dependency between the third damper location and optimum viscosity for maximum vibration mitigation that can be given to a cable with rubber bushings is investigated. The results of the present study show that although rubber bushings may help mitigating vibrations, they reduce the effect of additional damping devices. Additionally, for non-sagged cables, the nonlinearity is negligible in moderate vibrations. Lastly, if the third damper viscosity is selected properly, it can be very effective in further mitigating the vibrations amplitudes.

  1. Membrane-type resonator as an effective miniaturized tuned vibration mass damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liang; Au-Yeung, Ka Yan; Yang, Min; Tang, Suet To; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2016-08-01

    Damping of low frequency vibration by lightweight and compact devices has been a serious challenge in various areas of engineering science. Here we report the experimental realization of a type of miniature low frequency vibration dampers based on decorated membrane resonators. At frequency around 150 Hz, two dampers, each with outer dimensions of 28 mm in diameter and 5 mm in height, and a total mass of 1.78 g which is less than 0.6% of the host structure (a nearly free-standing aluminum beam), can reduce its vibrational amplitude by a factor of 1400, or limit its maximum resonance quality factor to 18. Furthermore, the conceptual design of the dampers lays the foundation and demonstrates the potential of further miniaturization of low frequency dampers.

  2. Semi-active control of seat suspension with MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. J.; Fu, J.; Yu, M.; Peng, Y. X.

    2013-02-01

    The vibration control of a seat suspension system with magnetorheological (MR) damper is investigated in this study. Firstly, a dynamical model of the seat suspension system with parameter uncertainties (such as mass, stiffness, damping) and actuator saturation is established. Secondly, based on Lyapunov functional theory and considering constraint conditions for damping force, the semi-active controller is designed, and the controller parameters are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which guarantees performance index. Finally, compared control strategy and the passive, skyhook control strategy, the simulation results in time and frequency domains demonstrate the proposed approach can achieve better vertical acceleration attenuation for the seat suspension system and improve ride comfort.

  3. The Effects of Manufacturing Tolerances on the Vibration of Aero-engine Rotor-damper Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, J. E. H.; Holmes, R.

    1991-01-01

    A range of rotor assemblies incorporating one and two squeeze film dampers with various static misalignments is investigated. Waterfall diagrams are constructed which demonstrate the effects of such misalignment and damper support flexibility on the nature and severity of subsynchronous resonance and jump phenomena. Vibration signatures of similar rotor-bearing assemblies are shown to contrast strongly due to different accumulations of tolerances during manufacture, fitting, and operation.

  4. Semi-active friction damper for buildings subject to seismic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan S.; Solarte, Alexander; Gomez, Daniel; Marulanda, Johannio; Thomson, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Structural control systems are considered an effective alternative for reducing vibrations in civil structures and are classified according to their energy supply requirement: passive, semi-active, active and hybrid. Commonly used structural control systems in buildings are passive friction dampers, which add energy dissipation through damping mechanisms induced by sliding friction between their surfaces. Semi-Active Variable Friction Dampers (SAVFD) allow the optimum efficiency range of friction dampers to be enhanced by controlling the clamping force in real time. This paper describes the development and performance evaluation of a low-cost SAVFD for the reduction of vibrations of structures subject to earthquakes. The SAVFD and a benchmark structural control test structure were experimentally characterized and analytical models were developed and updated based on the dynamic characterization. Decentralized control algorithms were implemented and tested on a shaking table. Relative displacements and accelerations of the structure controlled with the SAVFD were 80% less than those of the uncontrolled structure

  5. A new vibration isolation bed stage with magnetorheological dampers for ambulance vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Hee Dong; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-01-01

    The vibration experienced in an ambulance can lead to secondary injury to a patient and discourage a paramedic from providing emergency care. In this study, with the goal of resolving this problem, a new vibration isolation bed stage associated with magnetorheological (MR) dampers is proposed to ensure ride quality as well as better care for the patient while he/she is being transported. The bed stage proposed in this work can isolate vibrations in the vertical, rolling and pitching directions to reflect the reality that occurs in the ambulance. Firstly, an appropriate-sized MR damper is designed based on the field-dependent rheological properties of MR fluid, and the damping force characteristics of a MR damper are evaluated as a function of the current. A mechanical model of the proposed vibration isolation bed stage is then established to derive the governing equations of motion. Subsequently, a sliding mode controller is formulated to control the vibrations caused from the imposed excitation signals; those signals are directly measured using a real ambulance subjected to bump-and-curve road conditions. Using the controller based on the dynamic motion of the bed stage, the vibration control performance is evaluated in both the vertical and pitch directions. It is demonstrated that the magnitude of the vibration in the patient compartment of the ambulance can be significantly reduced by applying an input current to the MR dampers installed for the new bed stage.

  6. Free vibrations of a taut cable with a general viscoelastic damper modeled by fractional derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Limin; Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This study extends dynamic understanding of a taut cable with a viscous damper at arbitrary location to that with a general linear viscoelastic (VE) damper portrayed by a five-parameter fractional derivative model (FDM). The FDM is able to describe a generalized relationship between force and deformation of viscoelastic dampers (material) in a wide frequency range, which can simulate a practical damper including its support condition or a secondary tie between neighboring cables. Free vibrations of the passively controlled cable system have then been formulated analytically through complex modal analysis. For the restricted case that the FDM is installed close to one cable anchorage, asymptotic solutions for the system complex frequency and modal damping are presented; explicit formulas have also been derived to determine the maximal attainable damping and corresponding optimum FDM parameters, based on which effects of frequency-dependent damper properties are appreciated. Considering the FDM located at arbitrary location, the three distinct regimes of frequency evolutions observed for a cable with a viscous damper have been generalized to that with a VE damper; also, new characteristics of the regime diagram and the frequency evolution in each regime are observed.

  7. Experimental evaluation of a tuned electromagnetic damper for vibration control of cryogenic turbopump rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a passive tuned electromagnetic damper that could be used for damping rotor vibrations in cryogenic turbopumps for rocket engines. The tests were performed in a rig that used liquid nitrogen to produce cryogenic turbopump temperatures. This damper is most effective at cryogenic temperatures and is not a viable damper at room temperature. The unbalanced amplitude response of the rotor shaft was measured for undamped (baseline) and damped conditions at the critical speeds of the rotor (approx. 5900 to 6400 rpm) and the data were compared. The tests were performed for a speed range between 900 and 10 000 rpm. The tests revealed that the damper is very effective for damping single-mode narrow bandwidth amplitude response but is less effective in damping broadband response or multimode amplitude response.

  8. Vibration Reduction of Helicopter Blade Using Variable Dampers: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George C.; Liang, Zach; Gan, Quan; Niu, Tiecheng

    2002-01-01

    In the report, the investigation of controlling helicopter-blade lead-lag vibration is described. Current practice of adding passive damping may be improved to handle large dynamic range of the blade with several peaks of vibration resonance. To minimize extra-large damping forces that may damage the control system of blade, passive dampers should have relatively small damping coefficients, which in turn limit the effectiveness. By providing variable damping, a much larger damping coefficient to suppress the vibration can be realized. If the damping force reaches the maximum allowed threshold, the damper will be automatically switched into the mode with smaller damping coefficient to maintain near-constant damping force. Furthermore, the proposed control system will also have a fail-safe feature to guarantee the basic performation of a typical passive damper. The proposed control strategy to avoid resonant regions in the frequency domain is to generate variable damping force in combination with the supporting stiffness to manipulate the restoring force and conservative energy of the controlled blade system. Two control algorithms are developed and verified by a prototype variable damper, a digital controller and corresponding algorithms. Primary experiments show good potentials for the proposed variable damper: about 66% and 82% reductions in displacement at 1/3 length and the root of the blade respectively.

  9. Optimal design of a shear magnetorheological damper for turning vibration suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Zhang, Y. L.

    2013-09-01

    The intelligent material, so-called magnetorheological (MR) fluid, is utilized to control turning vibration. According to the structure of a common lathe CA6140, a shear MR damper is conceived by designing its structure and magnetic circuit. The vibration suppression effect of the damper is proved with dynamic analysis and simulation. Further, the magnetic circuit of the damper is optimized with the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). In the optimization course, the area of the magnetic circuit and the damping force are considered. After optimization, the damper’s structure and its efficiency of electrical energy consumption are improved. Additionally, a comparative study on damping forces acquired from the initial and optimal design is conducted. A prototype of the developed MR damper is fabricated and magnetic tests are performed to measure the magnetic flux intensities and the residual magnetism in four damping gaps. Then, the testing results are compared with the simulated results. Finally, the suppressing vibration experimental system is set up and cylindrical turning experiments are performed to investigate the working performance of the MR damper.

  10. Magnetorheological composites as semi-active elements of dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleta, Jerzy; Lewandowski, Daniel; Zając, Piotr; Kustroń, Pawel

    2009-02-01

    An original magnetorheological composite (MRC) with porous elastomeric matrix and filled with magnetorheological fluid was created at the work. It was used later on to build a damper working in the shearing mode without friction against external surfaces of the so-called skid. This prototype construction was used for damping free vibrations in the beam. An analysis of the effectiveness in the magnetic field function steering the damper was performed. As a result an important relationship between the change of damping in the material under the influence of the magnetic field and the length of time needed for damping the vibrations in the beam was demonstrated.

  11. A nonlinear auxetic structural vibration damper with metal rubber particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanhong; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Zhang, Dayi; Zhu, Bin; Chen, Lulu; Hong, Jie

    2013-08-01

    The work describes the mechanical performance of a metal rubber particles (MRP) damper design based on an auxetic (negative Poisson’s ratio) cellular configuration. The auxetic damper configuration is constituted by an anti-tetrachiral honeycomb, where the cylinders are filled with the MRP material. The MRP samples have been subjected to quasi-static loading to measure the stiffness and loss factor from the static hysteresis curve. A parametric experimental analysis has been carried out to investigate the effect of relative density and filling percentage on the static performance of the MRP, and to identify design guidelines for best use of MRP devices. An experimental assessment of the integrated auxetic-MRP damper concept has been provided through static and dynamic force response techniques.

  12. A calculation method for torsional vibration of a crankshafting system with a conventional rubber damper by considering rubber form

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Tomoaki; Honda, Yasuhiro; Wakabayashi, Katsuhiko; Iwamoto, Shoichi

    1996-09-01

    The cheap and compact rubber dampers of shear-type have been widely employed as the torsional vibration control of the crankshaft system of high-speed, automobile diesel engines. The conventional rubber dampers have various rubber forms owing to the thorough investigation of optimum dampers in the design stage. Their rubber forms can be generally grouped into three classes such as the disk type, the bush type and the composite type. The disk type and the bush type rubber dampers are called the basic-pattern rubber dampers hereafter. The composite type rubber part is supposed to consist of the disk type and the bush type parts, regarded respectively as the basic patterns of the rubber part, at large. The dynamic characteristics of the vibration isolator rubber depend generally on temperature, frequency, strain amplitude, shape and size effect,s so it is difficult to estimate accurately their characteristics. With the present technical level, it is also difficult to determine the suitable rubber geometry which optimizes the vibration control effect. The study refers to the calculation method of the torsional vibration of a crankshaft system with a shear-type rubber damper having various rubber forms in order to offer the useful method for optimum design. In this method, the rheological formula of the three-element Maxwell model, from which the torsional stiffness and the damping coefficient of the damper rubber part in the equivalent vibration system are obtained, are adopted in order to decide the dynamic characteristics of the damper rubber part.

  13. Semi-active H∞ control of high-speed railway vehicle suspension with magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Lu-Hang; Gong, Xing-Long; Xuan, Shou-Hu; Guo, Chao-Yang

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, semi-active H∞ control with magnetorheological (MR) dampers for railway vehicle suspension systems to improve the lateral ride quality is investigated. The proposed semi-active controller is composed of a H∞ controller as the system controller and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) inverse MR damper model as the damper controller. First, a 17-degree-of-freedom model for a full-scale railway vehicle is developed and the random track irregularities are modelled. Then a modified Bouc-Wen model is built to characterise the forward dynamic characteristics of the MR damper and an inverse MR damper model is built with the ANFIS technique. Furthermore, a H∞ controller composed of a yaw motion controller and a rolling pendulum motion (lateral motion+roll motion) controller is established. By integrating the H∞ controller with the ANFIS inverse model, a semi-active H∞ controller for the railway vehicle is finally proposed. Simulation results indicate that the proposed semi-active suspension system possesses better attenuation ability for the vibrations of the car body than the passive suspension system.

  14. Analytical and experimental investigation on a multiple-mass-element pendulum impact damper for vibration mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Philipp; Caracoglia, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Impact dampers are often used in the field of civil, mechanical and aerospace engineering for reducing structural vibrations. The behavior of this type of passive control device has been investigated for several decades. In this research a distributed-mass impact damper, similar to the "chain damper" used in wind engineering, has been examined and applied to the vibration reduction on a slender line-like structural element (stay-cable). This study is motivated by a practical problem and describes the derivation of a reduced-order model for explaining the behavior, observed during a field experiment on a prototype system. In its simplest form, the dynamics of the apparatus is modeled as a "resilient damper", composed of mass-spring-dashpot secondary elements, attached to the primary structure. Various sources of excitation are analyzed: free vibration, external harmonic force and random excitation. The proposed model is general and potentially applicable to the analysis of several structural systems. The study also shows that the model can adequately describe and explain the experimentally observed behavior.

  15. Vibration Characteristics of Squeeze Film Damper during Maneuver Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siji; Liao, Mingfu; Li, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The rotor systems of an aero engine will endure additional centrifugal force and gyroscopic moment during maneuver flight. A maneuver fly mechanical simulator is designed and experimental investigations on dynamics of squeeze film damper (SFD) under the different additional centrifugal force and gyroscopic moment are carried out. The results show that the maneuver flight weaken effectiveness of the SFD, the additional centrifugal force and gyroscopic moment caused by maneuver flight will change film damping, film stiffness. And the influence of maneuver flight can be effective relieved by increasing the film clearance.

  16. Design, testing, and model validation of an MR squeeze-flow vibration damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Neil D.; Stanway, Roger; Johnson, Andrew R.; Mellor, Phillip

    2001-07-01

    Ongoing research at the University of Sheffield is currently concerned with the design and construction of magneto- rheological (MR) squeeze-flow vibration damper. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of employing such a device as the key component in a controllable vibration isolator. The work also demonstrated the inadequacies of existing mathematical models which do not account for the observed behavior of MR fluids in squeeze flow. In parallel with investigations into the behavior of MR dampers, a collaborative programme between the Universities of Liverpool and Sheffield is also in progress. Here attention is focussed on ER fluids in squeeze-flow and a new test facility has been constructed for use in the development and validation of mathematical models. It is anticipated that this collaborative programme will assist in the development of both ER and MR squeeze-flow models. In this paper, the authors present a summary of progress to date.

  17. Robust semi-active control for uncertain structures and smart dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeganeh Fallah, Arash; Taghikhany, Touraj

    2014-09-01

    Recent developments in semi-active control technology have led to its application in civil infrastructures as an efficient strategy to protect susceptible structures against seismic and wind induced vibration. The reliable and robust performance of semi-active systems depends on the level of uncertainties in the structural parameters as well as on the sensors’ measurement and on smart mechanical dampers. A common source of uncertainties in semi-active control devices is related to the inherent nonlinear nature of these devices, thermal variation, or their malfunctioning. This study deals with the robust H∞ control problem and aims to model different sources of uncertainty. The uncertainty of the structural model and damper force are assumed to be norm bounded random variables. By using linear fractional transformation (LFT), the uncertain part of the system is decoupled from the nominal parameters of the system. The robust H∞ controller is designed to achieve consistent performance in structures including nominal and perturbed dynamics. Additionally, to reduce the uncertainty of the damper force, an inverse model of the magnetorheological (MR) damper is developed based on an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The robustness of the proposed algorithm is validated by numerical simulations.

  18. Dynamics of a passive micro-vibration isolator based on a pretensioned plane cable net structure and fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanhao; Lu, Qi; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Zhiyi

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses dynamic modelling and experiments on a passive vibration isolator for application in the space environment. The isolator is composed of a pretensioned plane cable net structure and a fluid damper in parallel. Firstly, the frequency response function (FRF) of a single cable is analysed according to the string theory, and the FRF synthesis method is adopted to establish a dynamic model of the plane cable net structure. Secondly, the equivalent damping coefficient of the fluid damper is analysed. Thirdly, experiments are carried out to compare the plane cable net structure, the fluid damper and the vibration isolator formed by the net and the damper, respectively. It is shown that the plane cable net structure can achieve substantial vibration attenuation but has a great amplification at its resonance frequency due to the light damping of cables. The damping effect of fluid damper is acceptable without taking the poor carrying capacity into consideration. Compared to the plane cable net structure and the fluid damper, the isolator has an acceptable resonance amplification as well as vibration attenuation.

  19. Effect of magneto rheological damper on tool vibration during hard turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, P. Sam; Varadarajan, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the concept of hard turning has gained considerable attention in metal cutting as it can apparently replace the traditional process cycle of turning, heat treating, and finish grinding for assembly of hard wear resistant steel parts. The present investigation aims at developing a magneto rheological (MR) fluid damper for suppressing tool vibration and promoting better cutting performance during hard turning. The magneto rheological Fluid acts as a viscoelastic spring with non-linear vibration characteristics that are controlled by the composition of the magneto rheological fluid, the shape of the plunger and the electric parameters of the magnetizing field. Cutting experiments were conducted to arrive at a set of electrical, compositional and shape parameters that can suppress tool vibration and promote better cutting performance during turning of AISI 4340 steel of 46 HRC with minimal fluid application using hard metal insert with sculptured rake face. It was observed that the use of MR fluid damper reduces tool vibration and improves the cutting performance effectively. Also commercialization of this idea holds promise to the metal cutting industry.

  20. Magnetostrictive Vibration Damper and Energy Harvester for Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Zhangxian; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrations generated by machine driveline components can cause excessive noise and structural damage. Magnetostrictive materials, including Galfenol (iron-gallium alloys) and Terfenol-D (terbium-iron-dysprosium alloys), are able to convert mechanical energy to magnetic energy. A magnetostrictive vibration ring is proposed, which generates electrical energy and dampens vibration, when installed in a machine driveline. A 2D axisymmetric finite element (FE) model incorporating magnetic, mechanical, and electrical dynamics is constructed in COMSOL Multiphysics. Based on the model, a parametric study considering magnetostrictive material geometry, pickup coil size, bias magnet strength, flux path design, and electrical load is conducted to maximize loss factor and average electrical output power. By connecting various resistive loads to the pickup coil, the maximum loss factors for Galfenol and Terfenol-D due to electrical energy loss are identified as 0.14 and 0.34, respectively. The maximum average electrical output power for Galfenol and Terfenol-D is 0.21 W and 0.58 W, respectively. The loss factors for Galfenol and Terfenol-D are increased to 0.59 and 1.83, respectively, by using an L-C resonant circuit.

  1. Magnetostrictive vibration damper and energy harvester for rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhangxian; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2015-04-01

    Vibrations generated by machine driveline components can cause excessive noise and structural dam- age. Magnetostrictive materials, including Galfenol (iron-gallium alloys) and Terfenol-D (terbium-iron- dysprosium alloys), are able to convert mechanical energy to magnetic energy. A magnetostrictive vibration ring is proposed, which generates electrical energy and dampens vibration, when installed in a machine driveline. A 2D axisymmetric finite element (FE) model incorporating magnetic, mechanical, and electrical dynamics is constructed in COMSOL Multiphysics. Based on the model, a parametric study considering magnetostrictive material geometry, pickup coil size, bias magnet strength, flux path design, and electrical load is conducted to maximize loss factor and average electrical output power. By connecting various resistive loads to the pickup coil, the maximum loss factors for Galfenol and Terfenol-D due to electrical energy loss are identified as 0.14 and 0.34, respectively. The maximum av- erage electrical output power for Galfenol and Terfenol-D is 0.21 W and 0.58 W, respectively. The loss factors for Galfenol and Terfenol-D are increased to 0.59 and 1.83, respectively, by using an L-C resonant circuit.

  2. Active control of train bogies with MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotoohi, Abbas; Yousefi-Koma, Aghil; Yasrebi, Naser

    2006-03-01

    This research is conducted to demonstrate the advantages of skyhook semi-active dampers in railway vehicle suspension systems. This semi- active suspension system consists of four actuators on each bogie that locate in the secondary suspension position instead of passive dampers. Employing equations of skyhook control scheme, the semi- active damping force (actuator force) is determined by absolute velocity of car body instead of relative velocity. An integration of a control design tool, i.e. MATLAB, together with a tool for railway vehicle simulation, i.e. ADAMS/Rail is utilized for modeling and control analysis simultaneously. Analysis has been performed on a traditional bogie model with passive secondary suspension and on a new bogie model with semi-active suspension. The effects of suspension system on displacement and acceleration in passenger seats have been investigated in various points of car body. Results show that the semi-active suspension improves the ride comfort by reducing accelerations, in comparison with passive model. Finally, according to the damper force obtained from Sky-hook controller, a Magnetorheological (MR) damper has been designed for the semi-active suspension system.

  3. Combined passive magnetic bearing element and vibration damper

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium and dampen transversely directed vibrations. Mechanical stabilizers are provided to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. In a improvement over U.S. Pat. No. 5,495,221, a magnetic bearing element is combined with a vibration damping element to provide a single upper stationary dual-function element. The magnetic forces exerted by such an element, enhances levitation of the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations, and suppresses the effects of unbalance or inhibits the onset of whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. Concurrently, this equilibrium is made stable against displacement-dependent drag forces of the rotating object from its equilibrium position.

  4. Inverse neuro-fuzzy MR damper model and its application in vibration control of vehicle suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Lu-Hang; Gong, Xing-Long; Guo, Chao-Yang; Xuan, Shou-Hu

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a magneto-rheological (MR) damper-based semi-active controller for vehicle suspension is developed. This system consists of a linear quadratic Gauss (LQG) controller as the system controller and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) inverse model as the damper controller. First, a modified Bouc-Wen model is proposed to characterise the forward dynamic characteristics of the MR damper based on the experimental data. Then, an inverse MR damper model is built using ANFIS technique to determine the input current so as to gain the desired damping force. Finally, a quarter-car suspension model together with the MR damper is set up, and a semi-active controller composed of the LQG controller and the ANFIS inverse model is designed. Simulation results demonstrate that the desired force can be accurately tracked using the ANFIS technique and the semi-active controller can achieve competitive performance as that of active suspension.

  5. Active damping of spacecraft structural appendage vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An active vibration damper system, for bending in two orthogonal directions and torsion, in each of three mutually perpendicular axes is located at the extremities of the flexible appendages of a space platform. The system components for each axis includes: an accelerometer, filtering and signal processing apparatus, and a DC motor-inertia wheel torquer. The motor torquer, when driven by a voltage proportional to the relative vibration tip velocity, produces a reaction torque for opposing and therefore damping a specific modal velocity of vibration. The relative tip velocity is obtained by integrating the difference between the signal output from the accelerometer located at the end of the appendage with the output of a usually carried accelerometer located on a relatively rigid body portion of the space platform. A selector switch, with sequential stepping logic or highest modal vibration energy logic, steps to another modal tip velocity channel and receives a signal voltage to damp another vibration mode. In this manner, several vibration modes can be damped with a single sensor/actuator pair. When a three axis damper is located on each of the major appendages of the platform, then all of the system vibration modes can be effectively damped.

  6. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  7. Semi-active sliding mode control of vehicle suspension with magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Enrong; Zhang, Ning; Min, Fuhong; Subash, Rakheja; Su, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    The vehicle semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological damper(MRD) has been a hot topic since this decade, in which the robust control synthesis considering load variation is a challenging task. In this paper, a new semi-active controller based upon the inverse model and sliding mode control (SMC) strategies is proposed for the quarter-vehicle suspension with the magneto-rheological (MR) damper, wherein an ideal skyhook suspension is employed as the control reference model and the vehicle sprung mass is considered as an uncertain parameter. According to the asymptotical stability of SMC, the dynamic errors between the plant and reference systems are used to derive the control damping force acquired by the MR quarter-vehicle suspension system. The proposed modified Bouc-wen hysteretic force-velocity ( F- v) model and its inverse model of MR damper, as well as the proposed continuous modulation (CM) filtering algorithm without phase shift are employed to convert the control damping force into the direct drive current of the MR damper. Moreover, the proposed semi-active sliding mode controller (SSMC)-based MR quarter-vehicle suspension is systematically evaluated through comparing the time and frequency domain responses of the sprung and unsprung mass displacement accelerations, suspension travel and the tire dynamic force with those of the passive quarter-vehicle suspension, under three kinds of varied amplitude harmonic, rounded pulse and real-road measured random excitations. The evaluation results illustrate that the proposed SSMC can greatly suppress the vehicle suspension vibration due to uncertainty of the load, and thus improve the ride comfort and handling safety. The study establishes a solid theoretical foundation as the universal control scheme for the adaptive semi-active control of the MR full-vehicle suspension decoupled into four MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension systems.

  8. Dual clearance squeeze film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A dual clearance hydrodynamic liquid squeeze film damper for a gas turbine engine is described. Under normal operating conditions, the device functions as a conventional squeeze film damper, using only one of its oil films. When an unbalance reaches abusive levels, as may occur with a blade loss or foreign object damage, a second, larger clearance film becomes active, controlling vibration amplitudes in a near optimum manner until the engine can be safely shut down and repaired.

  9. Design and implementation of two-degree-of-freedom tuned mass damper in milling vibration mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yiqing; Dai, Wei; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The tuned mass damper (TMD) has been applied to the machining vibration control widely, and it is categorized into several groups depending on the available degrees of freedom (DOF). Previous works have been mostly focused on the application of single-DOF TMD, but it is revealed that the damping performance could be further promoted by multiple-DOFs TMD. A two-DOF TMD for the milling vibration mitigation is investigated. The TMD possessing translation and rotation motion is designed with tunable stiffness and damping, and the design parameters are optimized numerically based on the H∞ criterion. The TMD is implemented on a workpiece fixture with single dominant mode, and the experimentally tuned frequency response function (FRF) has 80.8 percent reduction on the amplitude of the flexible mode. Spindle speeds corresponding to the resonance and chatter vibrations are selected for the machining tests. The measured vibrations and surface quality validate the improvement of the machining stability by the TMD, and the critical depth of cut is increased at least two folds.

  10. Analysis and testing of an inner bypass magnetorheological damper for shock and vibration mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Hu, Wei; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-04-01

    Aiming at fundamentally improving the performance of MR dampers, including maximizing dynamic range (i.e., ratio of field-on to field-off damping force) while simultaneously minimizing field-off damping force, this study presents the principle of an inner bypass magnetorheological damper (IBMRD). The IBMRD is composed of a pair of twin tubes, i.e., the inner tube and outer concentric tube, a movable piston-shaft arrangement, and an annular MR fluid flow gap sandwiched between the concentric tubes. In the IBMRD, the inner tube serves simultaneously as the guide for the movable piston and the bobbin for the electromagnetic coil windings, and five active rings on the inner tube, annular MR fluid flow gap, and outer tube forms five closed magnetic circuits. The annular fluid flow gap is an inner bypass annular valve where the rheology of the MR fluids, and hence the damping force of the MR damper, is controlled. Based on the structural principle of the IBMRD, the IBMRD is configured and its finite element analysis (FEA) is implemented. After theoretically constructing the hydro-mechanical model for the IBMRD, its mathematical model is established using a Bingham-plastic nonlinear fluid model. The characteristics of the IBMRD are theoretically evaluated and compared to those of a conventional piston-bobbin MR damper with an identical active length and cylinder diameter. In order to validate the theoretical results predicted by the mathematical model, the prototype IBMRD is designed, fabricated, and tested. The servo-hydraulic testing machine (type: MTS 810) and rail-guided drop tower are used to provide sinusoidal displacement excitation and shock excitation to the IBMRD, respectively.

  11. Frequency domain control based on quantitative feedback theory for vibration suppression in structures equipped with magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapateiro, Mauricio; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Luo, Ningsu; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.

    2009-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of designing quantitative feedback theory (QFT) based controllers for the vibration reduction in a structure equipped with an MR damper. In this way, the controller is designed in the frequency domain and the natural frequencies of the structure can be directly accounted for in the process. Though the QFT methodology was originally conceived of for linear time invariant systems, it can be extended to nonlinear systems. A new methodology is proposed for characterizing the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the MR damper through the uncertainty template in the Nichols chart. The resulting controller performance is evaluated in a real-time hybrid testing experiment.

  12. Vibration isolating properties of uncentralized squeeze-film damper bearings supporting a flexible rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Cookson, R.A.; Kossa, S.S.

    1981-10-01

    An analytic approach to the study of uncentralized squeeze-film damper bearings in terms of nondimensional system parameters is presented. A theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate the ability of the bearing to reduce vibration amplitude and transmitted force produced by simple unbalance in the rotor or nearness to a critical speed. Four simultaneous nonlinear differential equations are developed to reach a steady state solution from a nondimensional form of the equations of motion. Predictions are made and compared with results from tests with a flexible rotor using various journals and outer squeeze-film rings during rotational speeds up to 17,000 rpm. Results are diagrammed and photographs of the orbits are presented. The close match between the predicted orbits of the disk and journal centers with the experimental data indicates that the theoretical method employed yields an accurate description of the true situation.

  13. Design and parametric study on energy harvesting from bridge vibration using tuned dual-mass damper systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeya, Kouichi; Sasaki, Eiichi; Kobayashi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A bridge vibration energy harvester has been proposed in this paper using a tuned dual-mass damper system, named hereafter Tuned Mass Generator (TMG). A linear electromagnetic transducer has been applied to harvest and make use of the unused reserve of energy the aforementioned damper system absorbs. The benefits of using dual-mass systems over single-mass systems for power generation have been clarified according to the theory of vibrations. TMG parameters have been determined considering multi-domain parameters, and TMG has been tuned using a newly proposed parameter design method. Theoretical analysis results have shown that for effective energy harvesting, it is essential that TMG has robustness against uncertainties in bridge vibrations and tuning errors, and the proposed parameter design method for TMG has demonstrated this feature.

  14. Dual-Functional Energy-Harvesting and Vibration Control: Electromagnetic Resonant Shunt Series Tuned Mass Dampers.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lei; Cui, Wen

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel retrofittable approach for dual-functional energy-harvesting and robust vibration control by integrating the tuned mass damper (TMD) and electromagnetic shunted resonant damping. The viscous dissipative element between the TMD and primary system is replaced by an electromagnetic transducer shunted with a resonant RLC circuit. An efficient gradient based numeric method is presented for the parameter optimization in the control framework for vibration suppression and energy harvesting. A case study is performed based on the Taipei 101 TMD. It is found that by tuning the TMD resonance and circuit resonance close to that of the primary structure, the electromagnetic resonant-shunt TMD achieves the enhanced effectiveness and robustness of double-mass series TMDs, without suffering from the significantly amplified motion stroke. It is also observed that the parameters and performances optimized for vibration suppression are close to those optimized for energy harvesting, and the performance is not sensitive to the resistance of the charging circuit or electrical load.

  15. Dual-Functional Energy-Harvesting and Vibration Control: Electromagnetic Resonant Shunt Series Tuned Mass Dampers.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lei; Cui, Wen

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel retrofittable approach for dual-functional energy-harvesting and robust vibration control by integrating the tuned mass damper (TMD) and electromagnetic shunted resonant damping. The viscous dissipative element between the TMD and primary system is replaced by an electromagnetic transducer shunted with a resonant RLC circuit. An efficient gradient based numeric method is presented for the parameter optimization in the control framework for vibration suppression and energy harvesting. A case study is performed based on the Taipei 101 TMD. It is found that by tuning the TMD resonance and circuit resonance close to that of the primary structure, the electromagnetic resonant-shunt TMD achieves the enhanced effectiveness and robustness of double-mass series TMDs, without suffering from the significantly amplified motion stroke. It is also observed that the parameters and performances optimized for vibration suppression are close to those optimized for energy harvesting, and the performance is not sensitive to the resistance of the charging circuit or electrical load. PMID:23918165

  16. Dual-Actuator Active Vibration-Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Kiraly, Louis J.; Montague, Gerald T.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Manchala, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Dual-actuator active vibration-control (DAAVC) system is developmental system of type described in "Active Vibration Dampers for Rotating Machinery" (LEW-15427). System features sensors and actuators positioned and oriented at bearings to measure and counteract vibrations of shaft along either of two axes perpendicular to axis of rotation. Effective in damping vibrations of helicopter-engine test stand, making it safer to operate engine at speeds near and above first resonance of engine/test-stand system. Opens new opportunities for engine designers to draw more power from engine, and concept applicable to other rotating machines.

  17. Performance analysis of a semi-active railway vehicle suspension featuring MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwan-Choong; Choi, Seung-Bok; Lee, Gyu-Seop; An, Chae-Hun; You, Won-Hee

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents performance analysis of semi-active railway vehicle suspension system using MR damper. In order to achieve this goal, a mathematical dynamic model of railway vehicle is derived by integrating car body, bogie frame and wheel-set which can be able to represent lateral, yaw and roll motion. Based on this model, the dynamic range of MR damper at the railway secondary suspension system and design parameters of MR damper are calculated. Subsequently, control performances of railway vehicle including car body lateral motion and acceleration of MR damper are evaluated through computer simulations. Then, the MR damper is manufactured to be retrofitted with the real railway vehicle and its characteristics are experimentally measured. Experimental performance of MR damper is assessed using test rig which is composed of a car body and two bogies.

  18. Performance of tuned liquid column dampers considering maximum liquid motion in seismic vibration control of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Debbarma, Rama; Marano, Giuseppe Carlo

    2012-03-01

    The optimum design of tuned liquid column damper (TLCD) is usually performed by minimizing the maximum response of structure subjected to stochastic earthquake load without imposing any restrictions on the possible maximum oscillation of the liquid within the vertical column. However, during strong earthquake motion, the maximum oscillation of vertical column of liquid may be equal to or greater than that of the container pipe. Consequently the physical behavior of the hydraulic system may change largely reducing its efficiency. The present study deals with the optimization of TLCD parameters to minimize the vibration effect of structures addressing the limitation on such excessive liquid displacement. This refers to the design of optimum TLCD system which not only assure maximum possible performance in terms of vibration mitigation, but also simultaneously put due importance to the natural constrained criterion of excessive lowering of liquid in the vertical column of TLCD. The constraint is imposed by limiting the maximum displacement of the liquid to the vertical height of the container. Numerical study is performed to elucidate the effect of constraint condition on the optimum parameters and overall performance of TLCD system of protection.

  19. Vibration control of bridge subjected to multi-axle vehicle using multiple tuned mass friction dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisal, Alka Y.; Jangid, R. S.

    2016-06-01

    The effectiveness of tuned mass friction damper (TMFD) in reducing undesirable resonant response of the bridge subjected to multi-axle vehicular load is investigated. A Taiwan high-speed railway (THSR) bridge subjected to Japanese SKS (Salkesa) train load is considered. The bridge is idealized as a simply supported Euler-Bernoulli beam with uniform properties throughout the length of the bridge, and the train's vehicular load is modeled as a series of moving forces. Simplified model of vehicle, bridge and TMFD system has been considered to derive coupled differential equations of motion which is solved numerically using the Newmark's linear acceleration method. The critical train velocities at which the bridge undergoes resonant vibration are investigated. Response of the bridge is studied for three different arrangements of TMFD systems, namely, TMFD attached at mid-span of the bridge, multiple tuned mass friction dampers (MTMFD) system concentrated at mid-span of the bridge and MTMFD system with distributed TMFD units along the length of the bridge. The optimum parameters of each TMFD system are found out. It has been demonstrated that an optimized MTMFD system concentrated at mid-span of the bridge is more effective than an optimized TMFD at the same place with the same total mass and an optimized MTMFD system having TMFD units distributed along the length of the bridge. However, the distributed MTMFD system is more effective than an optimized TMFD system, provided that TMFD units of MTMFD system are distributed within certain limiting interval and the frequency of TMFD units is appropriately distributed.

  20. Semi-active control of torsional vibrations using an MR fluid brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Keith A.; Ye, Shaochun

    2004-07-01

    Control of torsional vibrations in an automotive crankshaft is a classical vibration control problem. The most common solution is to mount a crankshaft damper at one end of the crankshaft. Typical crankshaft dampers are composed of parallel stiffness and damping elements connecting a rotational inertia to the crankshaft. Appropriate design of the damper elements may result in substantial crankshaft vibration. Conventional couplings include elastomeric spring-damper elements and purely viscous fluid couplings. While those approaches result in satisfactory reduction of crankshaft vibration, it may be that a semi-active approach can achieve improved performance. To that end, an investigation of a semi-active crankshaft damper using magneto-rheological (MR) fluid has been initiated. A torsional MR fluid brake was obtained and applied to a scale model of a crankshaft for a common eight-cylinder engine. Experiments were performed with the MR brake as a fixed-friction device. In addition, a simple stick-slip control algorithm was developed such that the MR brake became an on-line variable friction device. While a good deal of work remains to be performed in future efforts, the preliminary experimental results have demonstrated that a torsional damper composed of an MR fluid brake has potential application in the field of torsional vibration control.

  1. An investigation on a semi-active magnetorheological tuned liquid column damper (MR-TLCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. X.; Wang, X. Y.

    2016-04-01

    this paper, a novel semi-active magnetorheological tuned liquid column damper (MR-TLCD) device combining tuned liquid column damper (TLCD) and magnetorheological damper (MRD) is devised for wind or earthquake vibration control of civil structures. In this device, a traditional moving head loss in the TLCD is replaced with a controlled MRD in the bottom or one side of the vertical column, which can easily and rapidly adjust the damping of the device. A semi-active experimental prototype MR-TLCD consisting of a shear rotary MRD and a TLCD is built. Based on the four basic presumptions, a dynamic model of the devised MR-TLCD is established using the Lagrange equation. In this equation, the formula of MRD employs the Bingham Boltzmann model. The natural frequency of the MR-TLCD is determined by the total central length and spring stiffness. It is worth noting that the natural frequency differs with the simple TLCD, because the device adds a joint spring. An equivalent linear damping expression is developed under harmonic excitation, and its mechanical model is developed using the equivalent period displacement and the coulomb friction force of MRD. At the same time, the equivalent damping can be adjusted by the real-time applied current, which can achieve the semi-active control performance. To validate the proposed frequency and damping model, Experimental test is conducted on a section area 150mm × 150mm and a total length 2.24m of the MR-TLCD dimensions. Comparisons are made between predicted and measured TLCD liquid surface displacement motion. The result shows the error of its nature frequency is only 2.29%.

  2. An enhanced nonlinear damping approach accounting for system constraints in active mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venanzi, Ilaria; Ierimonti, Laura; Ubertini, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    Active mass dampers are a viable solution for mitigating wind-induced vibrations in high-rise buildings and improve occupants' comfort. Such devices suffer particularly when they reach force saturation of the actuators and maximum extension of their stroke, which may occur in case of severe loading conditions (e.g. wind gust and earthquake). Exceeding actuators' physical limits can impair the control performance of the system or even lead to devices damage, with consequent need for repair or substitution of part of the control system. Controllers for active mass dampers should account for their technological limits. Prior work of the authors was devoted to stroke issues and led to the definition of a nonlinear damping approach, very easy to implement in practice. It consisted of a modified skyhook algorithm complemented with a nonlinear braking force to reverse the direction of the mass before reaching the stroke limit. This paper presents an enhanced version of this approach, also accounting for force saturation of the actuator and keeping the simplicity of implementation. This is achieved by modulating the control force by a nonlinear smooth function depending on the ratio between actuator's force and saturation limit. Results of a numerical investigation show that the proposed approach provides similar results to the method of the State Dependent Riccati Equation, a well-established technique for designing optimal controllers for constrained systems, yet very difficult to apply in practice.

  3. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  4. Semi-active control of automotive suspension systems with magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Hiu Fung; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2001-08-01

    Vibration in today's increasingly high-speed vehicles including automobiles severely affects their ride comfort and safety. The objective of this paper is to develop and study automotive suspension systems with magneto-rheological (MR) fluid dampers for vibration control in order to improve the passenger's comfort and safety. A two degree-of-freedom quarter car model is considered. A mathematical model of MR fluid damper is adopted. In this study, a sliding mode controller is developed by considering loading uncertainty to result in a robust control system. Two kinds of excitations are inputted in order to investigate the performance of the suspension system. The vibration responses are evaluated in both time and frequency domains. Compared to the passive system, the acceleration of the sprung mass is significantly reduced for the system with a controlled MR damper. Under random excitation, the ability of the MR fluid damper to reduce both peak response and root-mean-square response is also shown. The effectiveness of the MR suspension system is also demonstrated via hardware-in-the-loop simulation. The results of this study can be used to develop guidelines to effectively integrate automotive suspensions with MR dampers.

  5. Experimental Study on a Tuned-Mass Damper of Offshore for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Zhao, Xilu; Zheng, Rencheng

    2016-09-01

    With the development of industry, oceanic oil production is one of the most important energy resources. Normally, offshore platform, located in the hostile environment, is easily subjected to unstable environmental loading, such as wind, wave, ice, and earthquake, and it becomes a critical problem to ensure the stability of offshore platform for safely engineering operations. In recent years, tuned-mass damper (TMD) technology has been adopted to reduce vibrations from wind and earthquake influences. Due to the complexity of earthquake excitations, most of researchers were focused on controlling response of structures under wind loads; however, less attention has been put on controlling earthquake response. Therefore, this study concentrates on the seismic reduction of offshore platform by application of a TMD system, and a comprehensively experimental study was processed to validate its effectiveness exposed to different earthquake. A 4-column offshore platform was built according to the actual size of approximately 1:200 ratios, and a TMD system was prepared for the experiment. By the different performance analyses, experimental results indicated that the proposed TMD system can effectively suppress the earthquake stimulus and keep the stability of offshore platform.

  6. Robust optimum design of tuned mass dampers devices in random vibrations mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marano, Giuseppe Carlo; Sgobba, Sara; Greco, Rita; Mezzina, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    One of the most widely adopted and studied strategies for vibration control both in civil and in mechanical engineering is based on the use of tuned mass dampers (TMD) devices. Many conventional optimization criteria of mechanical parameters have been proposed, based on different approaches typically of a "conventional" type; in other words, they are based on the implicit assumption that all parameters involved are deterministically known. Removing this hypothesis means to convert a conventional optimization into a robust one, so that the solution must be able not only to minimize a performance but also to limit its variation induced by uncertainty in system parameters. In this work, a robust optimal design criterion for a single TMD device is proposed. The analyzed case concerns the structural vibration control of a main system subject to stochastic dynamic loads by a single linear TMD. The dynamic input is represented by a random base acceleration, modelled by a stationary filtered white noise process. It is assumed that not only mechanical parameters regarding main structure and TMD but also input spectral contents are affected by uncertainty. The problem is treated characterizing all uncertain parameters by a nominal mean value and a variance. It is also assumed that all these parameters are statistically independent. The protected main structure covariance displacement (dimensionless by dividing for the unprotected one) is adopted as the deterministic objective function (OF). Its mean and standard deviation are evaluated to perform the robust design. Robustness is formulated as a multiobjective optimization problem, in which both the mean and the standard deviations of the deterministic OF are minimized. Comparisons with a conventional approach based on the same OF show that the robust approach induces a significant improvement in performance stability.

  7. Robust hybrid mass damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, C.; Chesné, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the design of a hybrid mass damper (HMD) is proposed for the reduction of the resonant vibration amplitude of a multiple degree-of-freedom structure. HMD includes both passive and active elements. Combining these elements the system is fail-safe and its performances are comparable to usual purely active systems. The control law is a revisited direct velocity feedback. Two zeros are added to the controller to interact with the poles of the plant. The developed control law presents the particularity to be simple and hyperstable. The proposed HMD is compared to other classical control approaches for similar purpose in term of vibration attenuation, power consumption and stroke.

  8. Seismic response of torsionally coupled building with passive and semi-active stiffness dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mevada, Snehal V.; Jangid, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The seismic response of single-storey, one-way asymmetric building with passive and semi-active variable stiffness dampers is investigated. The governing equations of motion are derived based on the mathematical model of asymmetric building. The seismic response of the system is obtained by numerically solving the equations of motion using state-space method under different system parameters. The switching and resetting control laws are considered for the semi-active devices. The important parameters considered are eccentricity ratio of superstructure, uncoupled lateral time period and ratio of uncoupled torsional to lateral frequency. The effects of these parameters are investigated on peak lateral, torsional and edge displacements and accelerations as well as on damper control forces. The comparative performance is investigated for asymmetric building installed with passive stiffness and semi-active stiffness dampers. It is shown that the semi-active stiffness dampers reduce the earthquake-induced displacements and accelerations significantly as compared to passive stiffness dampers. Also, the effects of torsional coupling on effectiveness of passive dampers in reducing displacements and accelerations are found to be more significant to the variation of eccentricity as compared to semi-active stiffness dampers.

  9. Experimental investigation on seismic response control of adjacent buildings using semi-active MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yi-Qing; Liu, H. J.; Ko, Jan Ming

    2002-06-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on semi-active seismic response control of adjacent building structures using magneto-rheological (MR) dampers. A 1:15 scaled adjacent structural system consisting of a 12-story building model and an 8-story building model was tested on shaking table with MR damper passive and semi-active control. An MR damper with large stroke is specifically designed for this study. After experimentally identifying dynamic characteristics of the individual MR damper and the uncontrolled structural models, the two building models are interconnected with the MR damper at different floors and semi-active control is implemented using the dSPACE DS1005 real-time control system. The structures are excited on their base by a shaking table imposing sweep sine excitation and El Centro earthquake excitation. A stochastic optimal control strategy proposed by the authors is applied through the dSPACE system and its MATLAB environment to accomplish real-time semi-active control from the measurement of displacement and velocity responses at each floor. This control strategy results in a dissipative energy control with its feedback control force being a nonlinear generalized damping force. The structural response under semi-active control is compared with that by using the MR damper as a passive device without voltage input. Different MR damper installation locations are addressed in the experimental study to search for maximum response mitigation capability.

  10. Testing coupled rotor blade lag damper vibration using real-time dynamic substructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, M. I.; Wagg, D. J.; Neild, S. A.; Bunniss, P.; Lieven, N. A. J.; Crewe, A. J.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we present new results from laboratory tests of a helicopter rotor blade coupled with a lag damper from the EH101 helicopter. Previous modelling of this combined system has been purely numerical. However, this has proved challenging due to the nonlinear behaviour of the dampers involved—the fluid filled lag damper is known to have approximate piecewise linear force-velocity characteristics, due to blow-off valves which are triggered at a certain force level, combined with a strongly hysteretic dynamic profile. The novelty of the results presented here, is that the use of a hybrid numerical-experimental testing technique called real-time dynamic substructuring, allowed a numerical model of the rotor to be combined with the physical testing of a flight certified lag damper unit. These hybrid tests, which are similar in concept to hardware-in-the-loop, were carried out in real-time such that there is bi-directional coupling between the numerical blade model and the experimental lag damper. The new results obtained from these tests (for steady-state flight conditions) reveal how the inclusion of a real damper produces a more realistic representation of the dynamic characteristics of the overall blade system (during operational flight conditions) than numerical modelling alone.

  11. Modeling of Semi-Active Vehicle Suspension with Magnetorhological Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasa, Richard; Danko, Ján; Milesich, Tomáš; Magdolen, Ľuboš

    2014-12-01

    Modeling of suspension is a current topic. Vehicle users require both greater driving comfort and safety. There is a space to invent new technologies like magnetorheological dampers and their control systems to increase these conflicting requirements. Magnetorheological dampers are reliably mathematically described by parametric and nonparametric models. Therefore they are able to reliably simulate the driving mode of the vehicle. These simulations are important for automotive engineers to increase vehicle safety and passenger comfort.

  12. Damping force control of frictionless MR damper associated with hysteresis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, M. S.; Choi, S. B.; Kim, C. H.

    2013-02-01

    This study presents hysteresis modelling and damping force control of the frictionless magnetorheological (MR) damper for semiconductor manufacturing stage. The vibration sources of the semiconductor stage can be classified as two. The one is environmental vibration from the floor, and the other is transient vibration occurred from the stage moving. The transient vibration has serious adverse effect to the process because the vibration scale is quite larger than other vibrations. Therefore, in this research, the semi-active MR damper which can control the transient vibration is devised. In addition, the stage needs to be isolated from tiny vibration to achieve high grade vibration level. At the high frequency range, MR damper acts like a rigid body if the dry friction exists. So the tiny vibration is transferred to the stage directly. Therefore, a dry friction of the MR damper must be removed. In order to achieve this goal, a frictionless MR damper is originally designed. After then, a designed MR damper is manufactured and it's damping force characteristics and hysteresis behaviors are evaluated by experiment. The biviscous hysteresis model of MR damper is formulated and its accuracies are evaluated. Finally, damping force control performances using the hysteresis model is experimentally evaluated.

  13. Parameter identification for active mass damper controlled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. C.; Wang, J. F.; Lin, C. C.

    2016-09-01

    Active control systems have already been installed in real structures and are able to decrease the wind- and earthquake-induced responses, while the active mass damper (AMD) is one of the most popular types of such systems. In practice, an AMD is generally assembled in- situ along with the construction of a building. In such a case, the AMD and the building is coupled as an entire system. After the construction is completed, the dynamic properties of the AMD subsystem and the primary building itself are unknown and cannot be identified individually to verify their design demands. For this purpose, a methodology is developed to obtain the feedback gain of the AMD controller and the dynamic properties of the primary building based on the complex eigen-parameters of the coupled building-AMD system. By means of the theoretical derivation in state-space, the non-classical damping feature of the system is characterized. This methodology can be combined with any state-space based system identification technique as a procedure to achieve the goal on the basis of the acceleration measurements of the building-AMD system. Results from numerical verifications show that the procedure is capable of extracting parameters and is applicable for AMD implementation practices.

  14. Self-Tuning Impact Dampers Designed for Turbomachinery Blade Vibration Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Mehmed, Oral

    2002-01-01

    Turbomachinery blades are subject to aerodynamic forces that can lead to high-cycle-fatigue (HCF) failures. These failures will only increase as engineers begin to design blades without shrouds or as integrally bladed disks (blisks). These new designs will decrease blade damping significantly because the mechanical damping from shroud and blade joints will be eliminated. Also, it is difficult to design dampers for the engine environment with its extremely high centrifugal loads and high temperatures. The self-tuning impact damper has been designed to provide the additional damping required to avoid HCF while withstanding the harsh engine environment. In addition, the damper is placed within the engine blade itself rather than external to it.

  15. Vibration attenuation of rotating machines by application of magnetorheological dampers to minimize energy losses in the rotor support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapoměl, J.; Ferfecki, P.

    2016-09-01

    A frequently used technological solution for minimization of undesirable effects caused by vibration of rotating machines consists in placing damping devices in the rotor supports. The application of magnetorheological squeeze film dampers enables their optimum performance to be achieved in a wide range of rotating speeds by adapting their damping effect to the current operating conditions. The damping force, which is produced by squeezing the layer of magnetorheological oil, can be controlled by changing magnetic flux passing through the lubricant. The force acting between the rotor and its frame is transmitted through the rolling element bearing, the lubricating layer and the squirrel spring. The loading of the bearing produces a time variable friction moment, energy losses, uneven rotor running, and has an influence on the rotor service life and the current fluctuation in electric circuits. The carried out research consisted in the development of a mathematical model of a magnetorheological squeeze film damper, its implementation into the computational models of rotor systems, and in performing the study on the dependence of the energy losses and variation of the friction moment on the damping force and its control. The new and computationally stable mathematical model of a magnetorheological squeeze film damper, its implementation in the computational models of rigid rotors and learning more on the energy losses generated in the rotor supports in dependence on the damping effect are the principal contributions of this paper. The results of the computational simulations prove that a suitable control of the damping force enables the energy losses to be reduced in a wide velocity range.

  16. A semi-active control suspension system for railway vehicles with magnetorheological fluid dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiukun; Zhu, Ming; Jia, Limin

    2016-07-01

    The high-speed train has achieved great progress in the last decades. It is one of the most important modes of transportation between cities. With the rapid development of the high-speed train, its safety issue is paid much more attention than ever before. To improve the stability of the vehicle with high speed, extra dampers (i.e. anti-hunting damper) are used in the traditional bogies with passive suspension system. However, the curving performance of the vehicle is undermined due to the extra lateral force generated by the dampers. The active suspension systems proposed in the last decades attempt to solve the vehicle steering issue. However, the active suspension systems need extra actuators driven by electrical power or hydraulic power. There are some implementation and even safety issues which are not easy to be overcome. In this paper, an innovative semi-active controlled lateral suspension system for railway vehicles is proposed. Four magnetorheological fluid dampers are fixed to the primary suspension system of each bogie. They are controlled by online controllers for enhancing the running stability on the straight track line on the one hand and further improving the curving performance by controlling the damper force on the other hand. Two control strategies are proposed in the light of the pure rolling concept. The effectiveness of the proposed strategies is demonstrated by SIMPACK and Matlab co-simulation for a full railway vehicle with two conventional bogies.

  17. Design and testing of a magnetorheological damper to control both vibration and shock loads for a vehicle crew seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becnel, Andrew; Hu, Wei; Hiemenz, Gregory J.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2010-04-01

    A magnetorheological shock absorber (MRSA) prototype is designed, fabricated and tested to integrate semiactive shock and vibration mitigation technology into the existing Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV) forward seating positions. Utilizing Bingham-Plastic (BP) constitutive fluid relationships and a steady state fluid flow model, the MR valve parameters are determined using magnetic circuit analysis, and subsequently validated via electromagnetic finite element analysis (FEA). Low speed (up to 0.9 m/s) simulations of normal vibration mode operation are conducted on the MRSA prototype using single frequency sinusoidal displacements by a servohydraulic testing machine. The high speed (up to 2.2 m/s) design procedure is verified by using a rail-guided drop test stand to impact a known payload mass onto the damper shaft. A refined hydromechanical model of the MRSA under both cyclic and impact loadings is developed and validated using the measured test data. This ratedependent, mechanisms-based model predicts the time response of the MRSA under both loading conditions. The hydromechanical analysis marks a significant improvement over previous linear models. Key design considerations for the MRSA to accommodate both vibration and shock spectra using a single MR device are presented.

  18. Enhanced damping for bridge cables using a self-sensing MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. H.; Lam, K. H.; Ni, Y. Q.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates enhanced damping for protecting bridge stay cables from excessive vibration using a newly developed self-sensing magnetorheological (MR) damper. The semi-active control strategy for effectively operating the self-sensing MR damper is formulated based on the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control by further considering a collocated control configuration, limited measurements and nonlinear damper dynamics. Due to its attractive feature of sensing-while-damping, the self-sensing MR damper facilitates the collocated control. On the other hand, only the sensor measurements from the self-sensing device are employed in the feedback control. The nonlinear dynamics of the self-sensing MR damper, represented by a validated Bayesian NARX network technique, are further accommodated in the control formulation to compensate for its nonlinearities. Numerical and experimental investigations are conducted on stay cables equipped with the self-sensing MR damper operated in passive and semi-active control modes. The results verify that the collocated self-sensing MR damper facilitates smart damping for inclined cables employing energy-dissipative LQG control with only force and displacement measurements at the damper. It is also demonstrated that the synthesis of nonlinear damper dynamics in the LQG control enhances damping force tracking efficiently, explores the features of the self-sensing MR damper, and achieves better control performance over the passive MR damping control and the Heaviside step function-based LQG control that ignores the damper dynamics.

  19. A regenerative damper with MR fluids working between gear transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yan; Chen, Chao; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2013-04-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) dampers are used for semi-active vibration control of various dynamic systems. Existing MR dampers are usually cylinder-piston based design, which may limit the shapes and have constraints to the design of MR devices. In this paper, we propose a new MR-fluid working operation, in which MR fluids work between gear transmissions. This operation could provide more design flexibility. A prototype of the regenerative damper with MR fluids working between gear transmissions was designed, fabricated, and tested. This MR damper has the capability of power generation and velocity sensing. The feasibilities of the controllable MR damping force, power generation and velocity sensing are experimentally verified. The results of this research would be beneficial to advance the design and multiple functions of MR dampers while not limited to traditional piston-type design.

  20. An electroviscous damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolajsen, Jorgen L.; Hoque, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    A new type of vibration damper for rotor systems was developed and tested. The damper contains electroviscous fluid which solidifies and provides Coulomb damping when an electric voltage is imposed across the fluid. The damping capacity is controlled by the voltage. The damper was incorporated in a flexible rotor system and found to be able to damp out high levels of unbalanced excitation. Other proven advantages include controllability, simplicity, and no requirement for oil supply. Still unconfirmed are the capabilities to eliminate critical speeds and to suppress rotor instabilities.

  1. Vibration control of flexible beams using an active hinge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudney, H. H., Jr.; Inman, D. J.; Horner, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    The use of an active hinge to attenuate the transverse vibrations of a flexible beam is examined. A slender aluminum beam is suspended vertically, cantilevered at the top. An active hinge is placed at the node of the second vibration mode. The active hinge consists of a torque motor, strain gauge, and tachometer. A control law is implemented using both beam-bending strain and the relative angular velocity measured at this hinge, thereby configuring the hinge to act as an active damper. Results from implementing this control law show little improvement in the first mode damping ratio, 130 percent increase in the second mode damping ratio, and 180 percent increase in the third mode damping ratio. The merits of using a motor with a gearbox are discussed.

  2. Thermally conductive metal wool-silicone rubber material can be used as shock and vibration damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hough, W. W.

    1964-01-01

    Bronze wool pads, impregnated with silicon rubber, meet the requirement for a thermally conductive, shock and vibration absorbing material. They serve as spacers in equipment mounting and are resistant to high temperatures.

  3. Novel design of a self powered and self sensing magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftahul Ferdaus, Mohammad; Rashid, M. M.; Bhuiyan, M. M. I.; Muthalif, Asan Gani Bin Abdul; Hasan, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) dampers are semi-active control devices and use MR fluids. Magneto-rheological dampers have successful applications in mechatronics engineering, civil engineering and numerous areas of engineering. At present, traditional MR damper systems, require a isolated power supply and dynamic sensor. This paper presents the achievability and accuracy of a self- powered and self-sensing magneto-rheological damper using harvested energy from the vibration and shock environment in which it is deployed and another important part of this paper is the increased yield stress of the Magneto rheological Fluids. Magneto rheological fluids using replacement of glass beads for Magnetic Particles to surge yield stress is implemented here. Clearly this shows better result on yield stress, viscosity, and settling rate. Also permanent magnet generator (PMG) is designed and attached to a MR damper. For evaluating the self-powered MR damper's vibration mitigating capacity, an Engine Mount System using the MR damper is simulated. The ideal stiffness of the PMG for the Engine Mount System (EMS) is calculated by numerical study. The vibration mitigating performance of the EMS employing the self-powered & self sensing MR damper is theoretically calculated and evaluated in the frequency domain.

  4. Active vibration isolation of macro-micro motion stage disturbances using a floating stator platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lufan; Long, Zhili; Cai, Jiandong; Liu, Yang; Fang, Jiwen; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-10-01

    Macro-micro motion stage is mainly applied in microelectronics manufacturing to realize a high-acceleration, high-speed and nano-positioning motion. The high acceleration and nano-positioning accuracy would be influenced by the vibration of the motion stage. In the paper, a concept of floating stage is introduced in the macro-micro motion for isolating vibration disturbances. The design model of the floating stage is established and its theoretical analyses including natural frequency, transient and frequency response analyses are investigated, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the floating stator platform as a vibration isolator for the macro-micro motion stage. Moreover, an optimal design of the floating stator is conducted and then verified by experiments. In order to characterize and quantify the performance of isolation obtained from the traditional fixed stator and the floating stator, the acceleration responses at different accelerations, speeds and displacements are measured in x, y and z directions. The theoretical and experimental analyses in time and frequency domains indicate that the floating stator platform is effective to actively isolate the vibration in the macro-micro motion stage. In macro-micro motion stage, high acceleration motion is provided by VCM. Vibration is induced from VCM, that is, VCM is a source system, the vibration response or force is felt by a receiver system. Generally, VCM is fixed on the base, which means that the base is the receiver system which absorbs or transfers the vibration. However, the vibration cannot completely disappear and the base vibration is inevitable. In the paper, a floated stator platform as isolation system is developed to decrease or isolate vibration between VCM and base. The floated stator platform consists of damper, stopper, floated lock, spring, limiter, sub base, etc. Unlike the traditional stator of VCM fixed on the base, the floated stator can be moved on the linear guide under vibration

  5. Experimental and numerical investigations on the performance of particle dampers attached to a primary structure undergoing free vibration in the horizontal and vertical directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanrong; Liu, Bin; Tian, Aimei; Tang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Particle damping (PD) has been well known for its simplicity and high efficiency in attenuating structure vibration. Recent studies on PD have focused mainly on new types of dampers and applications. Meanwhile, excitation applied to the primary structure is still limited to either horizontal or vertical direction, perpendicular or parallel to gravity. In this study, the characteristics of PD under horizontal-vertical excitations (HVE) are investigated numerically and experimentally. The particle damper, which is attached to the top free end of an L-shaped cantilever beam, is simultaneously excited in the horizontal and vertical directions in the context of free decay. An equivalent model capable of motion in both the horizontal and vertical directions is generated. Given an initial displacement disturbance, this model starts vibrating freely in the vertical plane. A code based on the 3D discrete element method is programmed, and the high coincidence between the numerical and experimental results shows that this equivalent model is capable of high-fidelity simulation for PD under HVE. Parametric studies have been implemented to characterize the basic nonlinear damping capacity of particle dampers under this new operating condition. The effects of seven dimensionless independent parameters on the specific damping capacity (SDC) are investigated, including dimensionless acceleration amplitude, particle mass ratio, dimensionless horizontal and vertical impact clearances, coefficients of friction and restitution, and amplitude ratio of the horizontal excitation to the vertical excitation. The results show that the basic damping properties of PD under HVE are similar to those of PD under only vertical excitation. However, PD under HVE signifies its own characteristics because of the existence of horizontal excitation: (1) The impact clearances in both the horizontal and vertical directions have significant effects on the SDC because of the significant increase in oblique

  6. Concept study of a novel energy harvesting-enabled tuned mass-damper-inerter (EH-TMDI) device for vibration control of harmonically-excited structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Jonathan; Giaralis, Agathoklis

    2016-09-01

    A novel dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) configuration is introduced for simultaneous vibration suppression and energy harvesting from oscillations typically exhibited by large-scale low-frequency engineering structures and structural components. The proposed configuration, termed energy harvesting-enabled tuned mass-damper-inerter (EH-TMDI) comprises a mass grounded via an in-series electromagnetic motor (energy harvester)-inerter layout, and attached to the primary structure through linear spring and damper in parallel connection. The governing equations of motion are derived and solved in the frequency domain, for the case of harmonically-excited primary structures, here modelled as damped single-degree- of-freedom (SDOF) systems. Comprehensive parametric analyses proved that by varying the mass amplification property of the grounded inerter, and by adjusting the stiffness and the damping coefficients using simple optimum tuning formulae, enhanced vibration suppression (in terms of primary structure peak displacement) and energy harvesting (in terms of relative velocity at the terminals of the energy harvester) may be achieved concurrently and at nearresonance frequencies, for a fixed attached mass. Hence, the proposed EH-TMDI allows for relaxing the trade-off between vibration control and energy harvesting purposes, and renders a dual-objective optimisation a practically-feasible, reliable task.

  7. Semi-active damping with negative stiffness for multi-mode cable vibration mitigation: approximate collocated control solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.; Distl, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper derives an approximate collocated control solution for the mitigation of multi-mode cable vibration by semi-active damping with negative stiffness based on the control force characteristics of clipped linear quadratic regulator (LQR). The control parameters are derived from optimal modal viscous damping and corrected in order to guarantee that both the equivalent viscous damping coefficient and the equivalent stiffness coefficient of the semi-active cable damper force are equal to their desired counterparts. The collocated control solution with corrected control parameters is numerically validated by free decay tests of the first four cable modes and combinations of these modes. The results of the single-harmonic tests demonstrate that the novel approach yields 1.86 times more cable damping than optimal modal viscous damping and 1.87 to 2.33 times more damping compared to a passive oil damper whose viscous damper coefficient is optimally tuned to the targeted mode range of the first four modes. The improvement in case of the multi-harmonic vibration tests, i.e. when modes 1 and 3 and modes 2 and 4 are vibrating at the same time, is between 1.55 and 3.81. The results also show that these improvements are obtained almost independent of the cable anti-node amplitude. Thus, the proposed approximate real-time applicable collocated semi-active control solution which can be realized by magnetorheological dampers represents a promising tool for the efficient mitigation of stay cable vibrations.

  8. Demonstrating the Effect of Particle Impact Dampers on the Random Vibration Response and Fatigue Life of Printed Wiring Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Montgomery, Randall; Geist, David; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In a recent experimental study, small Particle Impact Dampers (PID) were bonded directly to the surface of printed circuit board (PCB) or printed wiring assemblies (PWA), reducing the random vibration response and increasing the fatigue life. This study provides data verifying practicality of this approach. The measured peak strain and acceleration response of the fundamental out of plane bending mode was significantly attenuated by adding a PID device. Attenuation of this mode is most relevant to the fatigue life of a PWA because the local relative displacements between the board and the supported components, which ultimately cause fatigue failures of the electrical leads of the board-mounted components are dominated by this mode. Applying PID damping at the board-level of assembly provides mitigation with a very small mass impact, especially as compared to isolation at an avionics box or shelf level of assembly. When compared with other mitigation techniques at the PWA level (board thickness, stiffeners, constrained layer damping), a compact PID device has the additional advantage of not needing to be an integral part of the design. A PID can simply be bonded to heritage or commercial off the shelf (COTS) hardware to facilitate its use in environments beyond which it was originally qualified. Finite element analysis and test results show that the beneficial effect is not localized and that the attenuation is not due to the simple addition of mass. No significant, detrimental reduction in frequency was observed. Side-by-side life testing of damped and un-damped boards at two different thicknesses (0.070" and 0.090") has shown that the addition of a PID was much more significant to the fatigue life than increasing the thickness. High speed video, accelerometer, and strain measurements have been collected to correlate with analytical results.

  9. Nano-micro composite magnetic fluids: Magnetic and magnetorheological evaluation for rotating seal and vibration damper applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinică, Oana; Susan-Resiga, Daniela; Bălănean, Florica; Vizman, Daniel; Socoliuc, Vlad; Vékás, Ladislau

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, static magnetic properties and magnetorheological behavior of a set of 12 nano-micro composite magnetic fluids (CMFs) were studied. The samples with a ferromagnetic particle volume fraction ranging in a large interval φFe = (1 ÷ 44) % were prepared by adding carbonyl iron powder in a highly concentrated transformer oil-based ferrofluid (FF). The ferrofluid has the magnetite volume fraction of φFe3O4 = 22.90 % and saturation magnetization of Ms = 74 kA / m (930 Gs). No further additives were used in order to prevent sedimentation. It was noticed an increase of the static yield stress, of about 3 orders of magnitude, with the increase of the total solid volume fraction of samples and with the increase of the magnetic field, which varied between 0 kA/m and 950 kA/m. The dynamic yield stress (Herschel-Bulkley model) τHB of the samples strongly increases with the magnetic field and shows a slight tendency of saturation for higher intensities of the magnetic field. There is a less pronounced increase of τHB, about an order of magnitude with the increasing volume fraction of the iron particles. The relative viscosity increase induced by the magnetic field reaches a maximum for both considered shear rates: γ ṡ = 7.85s-1 and γ ṡ = 88.41s-1 and it was revealed an optimal volume fraction of Fe particles, φFe = 20 % , corresponding to a total volume fraction of φtot ≈ 38 % , at which the magnetoviscous effect has its maximum value. The magnetic properties and also the magnetorheological and the magnetoviscous behavior of highly concentrated ferrofluid-based CMFs can be controlled by the addition of iron microparticles in order to attain the optimal concentration for the envisaged engineering applications, rotating seals and magnetorheological vibration dampers.

  10. A self-sensing magnetorheological damper with power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) dampers are promising for semi-active vibration control of various dynamic systems. In the current MR damper systems, a separate power supply and dynamic sensor are required. To enable the MR damper to be self-powered and self-sensing in the future, in this paper we propose and investigate a self-sensing MR damper with power generation, which integrates energy harvesting, dynamic sensing and MR damping technologies into one device. This MR damper has self-contained power generation and velocity sensing capabilities, and is applicable to various dynamic systems. It combines the advantages of energy harvesting—reusing wasted energy, MR damping—controllable damping force, and sensing—providing dynamic information for controlling system dynamics. This multifunctional integration would bring great benefits such as energy saving, size and weight reduction, lower cost, high reliability, and less maintenance for the MR damper systems. In this paper, a prototype of the self-sensing MR damper with power generation was designed, fabricated, and tested. Theoretical analyses and experimental studies on power generation were performed. A velocity-sensing method was proposed and experimentally validated. The magnetic-field interference among three functions was prevented by a combined magnetic-field isolation method. Modeling, analysis, and experimental results on damping forces are also presented.

  11. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string using a magnetorheological damper

    DOEpatents

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth; Burgess, Daniel E.; Barbely, Jason R.

    2012-01-03

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a magnetorheological fluid valve assembly having a supply of a magnetorheological fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil for inducing a magnetic field that alters the resistance of the magnetorheological fluid to flow between the first and second chambers, thereby increasing the damping provided by the valve. A remnant magnetic field is induced in one or more components of the magnetorheological fluid valve during operation that can be used to provide the magnetic field for operating the valve so as to eliminate the need to energize the coils during operation except temporarily when changing the amount of damping required, thereby eliminating the need for a turbine alternator power the magnetorheological fluid valve. A demagnetization cycle can be used to reduce the remnant magnetic field when necessary.

  12. Nutation damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A nutation damper for use on a spinning body is disclosed. The damper is positioned parallel to the spin axis of the body and radially displaced therefrom. The damper is partially filled with a fluid and contains a porous media to impede the flow of the fluid induced by nutation.

  13. Design of a new adaptive fuzzy controller and its application to vibration control of a vehicle seat installed with an MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phu, Do Xuan; Shin, Do Kyun; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive fuzzy controller featuring a combination of two different control methodologies: H infinity control technique and sliding mode control. It is known that both controllers are powerful in terms of high performance and robust stability. However, both control methods require an accurate dynamic model to design a state variable based controller in order to maintain their advantages. Thus, in this work a fuzzy control method which does not require an accurate dynamic model is adopted and two control methodologies are integrated to maintain the advantages even in an uncertain environment of the dynamic system. After a brief explanation of the interval type 2 fuzzy logic, a new adaptive fuzzy controller associated with the H infinity control and sliding mode control is formulated on the basis of Lyapunov stability theory. Subsequently, the formulated controller is applied to vibration control of a vehicle seat equipped with magnetorheological fluid damper (MR damper in short). An experimental setup for realization of the proposed controller is established and vibration control performances such as acceleration at the driver’s seat are evaluated. In addition, in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller, a comparative work with two existing controllers is undertaken. It is shown through simulation and experiment that the proposed controller can provide much better vibration control performance than the two existing controllers.

  14. Fuzzy logic control of the building structure with CLEMR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Cheng; Xu, Zhao-Dong; Huang, Xing-Huai; Zhu, Jun-Tao

    2013-04-01

    The semi-active control technology has been paid more attention in the field of structural vibration control due to its high controllability, excellent control effect and low power requirement. When semi-active control device are used for vibration control, some challenges must be taken into account, such as the reliability and the control strategy of the device. This study presents a new large tonnage compound lead extrusion magnetorheological (CLEMR) damper, whose mathematical model is introduced to describe the variation of damping force with current and velocity. Then a current controller based on the fuzzy logic control strategy is designed to determine control currents of the CLEMR dampers rapidly. A ten-floor frame structure with CLEMR dampers using the fuzzy logic control strategy is built and calculated by using MATLAB. Calculation results show that CLEMR dampers can reduce the seismic responses of structures effectively. Calculation results of the fuzzy logic control strategy are compared with those of the semi-active limit Hrovat control structure, the passive-off control structure, and the uncontrolled structure. Comparison results show that the fuzzy logic control strategy can determine control currents of CLEMR dampers quickly and can reduce seismic responses of the structures more effectively than the passive-off control strategy and the uncontrolled structure.

  15. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  16. Active vibration attenuating seat suspension for an armored helicopter crew seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztein, Pablo Javier

    An Active Vibration Attenuating Seat Suspension (AVASS) for an MH-60S helicopter crew seat is designed to protect the occupants from harmful whole-body vibration (WBV). Magnetorheological (MR) suspension units are designed, fabricated and installed in a helicopter crew seat. These MR isolators are built to work in series with existing Variable Load Energy Absorbers (VLEAs), have minimal increase in weight, and maintain crashworthiness for the seat system. Refinements are discussed, based on testing, to minimize friction observed in the system. These refinements include the addition of roller bearings to replace friction bearings in the existing seat. Additionally, semi-active control of the MR dampers is achieved using special purpose built custom electronics integrated into the seat system. Experimental testing shows that an MH-60S retrofitted with AVASS provides up to 70.65% more vibration attenuation than the existing seat configuration as well as up to 81.1% reduction in vibration from the floor.

  17. Semi-active magnetorheological seat suspensions for enhanced crashworthiness and vibration isolation of rotorcraft seats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemenz, Gregory J.

    current state-of-the-art rotorcraft seat suspensions which can provide no better than 20% risk of occupant injury. Finally, an MR-based seat suspension designed solely for the purposes of vibration isolation was designed, analyzed, and experimentally demonstrated. MR dampers were integrated into the current crashworthy SH-60 crew seat with minimal weight impact such that the original crashworthy capabilities were maintained. Then, utilizing semi-active control, experimental vibration testing demonstrated that the system reduced vertical cockpit vibrations transmitted to the occupant by 76%. This is a significant advance over current state-of-the-art rotorcraft seats which provide no attenuation of cockpit vibrations.

  18. Comparisons of the dynamic characteristics of magnetorheological and hydraulic dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Oyadiji, S. O.

    2015-04-01

    A magnetorheological (MR) damper can adapt its dynamic performance to the vibration environment by controlling the current applied. Compared to other types of dampers, the MR damper has a wider range of dynamic characteristics. Two different dampers: hydraulic, and MR dampers were tested under forced sinusoidal excitations of low to high frequencies. Also, different currents were applied on the MR damper to investigate its performance under varying electromagnetic fields. The results reveal that the two dampers have nonlinear dynamic characteristics and that characteristics of the hydraulic damper are different from those of the MR damper. The hydraulic damper provides slight nonlinear damping force whereas the MR damper shows a strong nonlinear property. In addition, the hydraulic damper is designed to provide an asymmetric damping force of rebound and compression whereas the MR damper provides a symmetric damping force. In the experiments conducted, the excitation frequency was varied from 3 Hz to 11 Hz and the amplitude from 2.5 mm to 12 mm. For the hydraulic damper, the lowest compression damping force only increases by about 0.54 kN while the rebound force increases by about 1.9 kN. In contrast, the variations of compression and rebound forces of the MR damper are 1.9 and 2.0 kN, respectively. Furthermore, the damping force of the MR damper increases as the current increases from 0 to 0.75 A.

  19. Analysis of Train Suspension System Using MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RamaSastry, DVA; Ramana, K. V.; Mohan Rao, N.; Siva Kumar, SVR; Priyanka, T. G. L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with introducing MR dampers to the Train Suspension System for improving the ride comfort of the passengers. This type of suspension system comes under Semi-active suspension system which utilizes the properties of MR fluid to damp the vibrations. In case of high speed trains, the coach body is subjected to vibrations due to vertical displacement, yaw and pitch movements. When the body receives these disturbances from the ground,the transmission of vibrations to the passenger increases which affect the ride comfort. In this work, the equations of motion of suspension system are developed for both conventional passive system and semi-active system and are modelled in Matlab/Simulink and analysis has been carried out. The passive suspension system analysis shows that it is taking more time to damp the vibrations and at the same time the transmissibility of vibrations is more.Introducing MR dampers,vertical and angular displacements of the body are computed and compared. The results show that the introduction of MR dampers into the train suspension system improves ride comfort.

  20. Feasibility study of self-powered magnetorheological damper systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2012-04-01

    This paper is aimed to provide a feasibility study of self-powered magnetorheological (MR) damper systems, which could convert vibration and shock energy into electrical energy to power itself under control. The self-powered feature could bring merits such as higher reliability, energy saving, and less maintenance for the MR damper systems. A self-powered MR damper system is proposed and modeled. The criterion whether the MR damper system is self-powered or not is proposed. A prototype of MR damper with power generation is designed, fabricated, and tested. The modeling of this damper is experimentally validated. Then the damper is applied to a 2 DOF suspension system under on-off skyhook controller, to obtain the self-powered working range and vibration control performance. Effects of key factors on the self-powered MR damper systems are studied. Design considerations are given in order to increase the self-powered working range.

  1. Influence analysis of time delay to active mass damper control system using pole assignment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Xing, H. B.; Lu, W.; Li, Z. H.; Chen, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    To reduce the influence of time delay on the Active Mass Damper (AMD) control systems, influence analysis of time delay on system poles and stability is applied in the paper. A formula of the maximum time delay for ensuring system stability is established, by which the influence analysis of control gains on system stability is further arisen. In addition, the compensation controller is designed based on the given analysis results and pole assignment. A numerical example and an experiment are illustrated to verify that the performance of time-delay system. The result is consistent to that of the long-time delay control system, as well as to proof the better effectiveness of the new method proposed in this article.

  2. Actively Controlled Magnetic Vibration-Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinky, Carlos M.; Logsdon, Kirk A.; Wbomski, Joseph F.; Brown, Gerald V.

    1993-01-01

    Prototype magnetic suspension system with active control isolates object from vibrations in all six degrees of freedom at frequencies as low as 0.01 Hz. Designed specifically to protect instruments aboard spacecraft by suppressing vibrations to microgravity levels; basic control approach used for such terrestrial uses as suppression of shocks and other vibrations in trucks and railroad cars.

  3. The damper placement problem for large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1992-01-01

    The damper placement problem for large flexible space truss structures is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem. The objective is to determine the p truss members of the structure to replace with active (or passive) dampers so that the modal damping ratio is as large as possible for all significant modes of vibration. Equivalently, given a strain energy matrix with rows indexed on the modes and the columns indexed on the truss members, we seek to find the set of p columns such that the smallest row sum, over the p columns, is maximized. We develop a tabu search heuristic for the damper placement problems on the Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) Phase 1 Evolutionary Model (10 modes and 1507 truss members). The resulting solutions are shown to be of high quality.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigations on the dynamic response of turbine blades with tip pin dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, S.; Berruti, T.; Cosi, L.

    2016-09-01

    Friction dampers are used to reduce vibration amplitude of turbine blades. The dynamics of these assemblies (blades + dampers) is nonlinear and the analysis is challenging from both the experimental and the numerical point of view. The study of the dynamics of blades with a tip damper is the aim of the present paper. The blades with axial-entry fir tree attachment carry a damper in a pocket between the blade covers. Pin dampers significantly affect the resonance frequency of the first blade bending mode and introduces non linearity due to friction contacts. A test rig, made of two blades held in a fixture by an hydraulic press with one damper between the blades was used for the experimental activity. Three different types of dampers (cylindrical, asymmetrical, wedge) have been experimentally investigated and experiments have shown that asymmetrical damper performs better than the others. The response of the blades with the asymmetrical damper was then simulated with a non linear code based on the Harmonic Balance Method (HBM). In the analysis, both the blade and the damper are modelled with the Finite Elements and then the matrices reduced with the Craig- Bampton Component Mode Synthesis (CB-CMS), while the periodical contact forces are modelled with state-of-the-art node-to-node contact elements. Numerical analysis has shown a strong influence of the actual extent of the contact area on the dynamics of the assembly. A model updating process was necessary. In the end, the numerical predictions match very well with the experimental curves.

  5. Dampers for Stationary Labyrinth Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Aini, Yehia; Mitchell, William; Roberts, Lawrence; Montgomery, Stuart; Davis, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Vibration dampers have been invented that are incorporated as components within the stationary labyrinth seal assembly. These dampers are intended to supplement other vibration-suppressing features of labyrinth seals in order to reduce the incidence of high-cycle-fatigue failures, which have been known to occur in the severe vibratory environments of jet engines and turbopumps in which labyrinth seals are typically used. A vibration damper of this type includes several leaf springs and/or a number of metallic particles (shot) all held in an annular seal cavity by a retaining ring. The leaf springs are made of a spring steel alloy chosen, in conjunction with design parameters, to maintain sufficient preload to ensure effectiveness of damping at desired operating temperatures. The cavity is vented via a small radial gap between the retaining ring and seal housing. The damping mechanism is complex. In the case of leaf springs, the mechanism is mainly friction in the slippage between the seal housing and individual dampers. In the case of a damper that contains shot, the damping mechanism includes contributions from friction between individual particles, friction between particles and cavity walls, and dissipation of kinetic energy of impact. The basic concept of particle/shot vibration dampers has been published previously; what is new here is the use of such dampers to suppress traveling-wave vibrations in labyrinth seals. Damping effectiveness depends on many parameters, including, but not limited to, coefficient of friction, mode shape, and frequency and amplitude of vibrational modes. In tests, preloads of the order of 6 to 15 lb (2.72 to 6.8 kilograms) per spring damper were demonstrated to provide adequate damping levels. Effectiveness of shot damping of vibrations having amplitudes from 20 to 200 times normal terrestrial gravitational acceleration (196 to 1,960 meters per square second) and frequencies up to 12 kHz was demonstrated for shot sizes from 0.032 to

  6. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  7. Application of particle damper on electronic packages for spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramuthuvel, P.; Shankar, K.; Sairajan, K. K.

    2016-10-01

    Particle damping is an effective method of passive vibration control, which is of recent research interest. This paper presents a novel application of particle damper on an electronic package of a spacecraft, tested at ISRO Satellite Centre. The effectiveness of particle damper on the random vibration response of electronic package for spacecraft application exposed to random vibration environments experienced during the launch is studied. The use of particle damper under shock environments are also demonstrated. Optimal particle damper parameters were used based on the design guidelines derived from previous publications of the authors. The comparison of particle damper effectiveness under random vibration loads with respect to the shape of the particle damper capsule and packing ratio are also examined.

  8. Semi-active tuned liquid column damper implementation with real-time hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riascos, Carlos; Marulanda Casas, Johannio; Thomson, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Real-time hybrid simulation (RTHS) is a modern cyber-physical technique used for the experimental evaluation of complex systems, that treats the system components with predictable behavior as a numerical substructure and the components that are difficult to model as an experimental substructure. Therefore it is an attractive method for evaluation of the response of civil structures under earthquake, wind and anthropic loads. In this paper, the response of three-story shear frame controlled by a tuned liquid column damper (TLCD) and subject to base excitation is considered. Both passive and semi-active control strategies were implemented and are compared. While the passive TLCD achieved a reduction of 50% in the acceleration response of the main structure in comparison with the structure without control, the semi-active TLCD achieved a reduction of 70%, and was robust to variations in the dynamic properties of the main structure. In addition, a RTHS was implemented with the main structure modeled as a linear, time-invariant (LTI) system through a state space representation and the TLCD, with both control strategies, was evaluated on a shake table that reproduced the displacement of the virtual structure. Current assessment measures for RTHS were used to quantify the performance with parameters such as generalized amplitude, equivalent time delay between the target and measured displacement of the shake table, and energy error using the measured force, and prove that the RTHS described in this paper is an accurate method for the experimental evaluation of structural control systems.

  9. Regenerative magnetorheological dampers for vehicle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Zou, Li; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2015-04-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) dampers are promising for vehicle suspensions, by virtue of their adaptive properties. During the everyday use of vehicles, a lot of energy is wasted due to the energy dissipation by dampers under the road irregularities. On the other hand, extra batteries are required for the current MR damper systems. To reduce the energy waste and get rid of the dependence on extra batteries, in this paper, regenerative MR dampers are proposed for vehicle suspensions, which integrate energy harvesting and controllable damping functions. The wasted vibration energy can be converted into electrical energy and power the MR damper coil. A regenerative MR damper for vehicle suspensions is developed. Damping force and power generation characteristics of the regenerative MR damper were modeled and analyzed. Then the damper is applied to a 2 DOF suspension system for system simulation under various road conditions. Simulation results show that riding comfort can be significantly improved, while harvesting energy for other use in addition to supply power for the controlled MR damper.

  10. Simulation of adaptive semi-active magnetorheological seat damper for vehicle occupant blast protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Murugan, Muthuvel; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates a lumped-parameter human body model which includes lower leg in seated posture within a quarter-car model for blast injury assessment simulation. To simulate the shock acceleration of the vehicle, mine blast analysis was conducted on a generic land vehicle crew compartment (sand box) structure. For the purpose of simulating human body dynamics with non-linear parameters, a physical model of a lumped-parameter human body within a quarter car model was implemented using multi-body dynamic simulation software. For implementing the control scheme, a skyhook algorithm was made to work with the multi-body dynamic model by running a co-simulation with the control scheme software plug-in. The injury criteria and tolerance levels for the biomechanical effects are discussed for each of the identified vulnerable body regions, such as the relative head displacement and the neck bending moment. The desired objective of this analytical model development is to study the performance of adaptive semi-active magnetorheological damper that can be used for vehicle-occupant protection technology enhancements to the seat design in a mine-resistant military vehicle.

  11. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  12. Nondimensional analysis of semi-active electrorheological and magnetorheological dampers using approximate parallel plate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wereley, Norman M.; Pang, Li

    1998-10-01

    We develop nonlinear quasi-steady electrorheological (ER) and magnetorheological (MR) damper models using an idealized Bingham plastic shear flow mechanism. Dampers with cylindrical geometry are investigated, where damping forces are developed in an annular bypass via Couette (shear mode), Poiseuille (flow mode) flow, or combined Couette and Poiseiulle flow (mixed mode). Models are based on parallel plate or rectangular duct geometry, and are compared to our prior 1D axisymmetric models. Three nondimensional groups are introduced for damper analysis, namely, the Bingham number, 0964-1726/7/5/015/img1, the nondimensional plug thickness, 0964-1726/7/5/015/img2, and the area coefficient defined as the ratio of the piston head area, 0964-1726/7/5/015/img3, to the cross-sectional area of the annular bypass, 0964-1726/7/5/015/img4. The approximate parallel plate analysis compares well with the 1D axisymmetric analysis when the Bingham number is small, or 0964-1726/7/5/015/img5, or the nondimensional plug thickness is small, 0964-1726/7/5/015/img6. Damper performance is characterized in terms of the damping coefficient, which is the ratio of the equivalent viscous damping constant, 0964-1726/7/5/015/img7, to the Newtonian viscous damping constant, C. In shear mode, the damping coefficient is a linear function of the Bingham number. In flow mode, the damping coefficient is a function of the nondimensional plug thickness only. For the mixed mode damper, the damping coefficient reduces to that for the flow mode case when the area coefficient is large. The quasi-steady damping coefficient versus nondimensional plug thickness diagram is experimentally validated using measured 10 Hz hysteresis cycles for a electrorheological mixed mode damper.

  13. Performance evaluation on vibration control of MR landing gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. Y.; Nam, Y. J.; Yamane, R.; Park, M. K.

    2009-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the applicability of the developed MR damper to the landing gear system for the attenuating undesired shock and vibration in the landing and taxing phases. First of all, the experimental model of the MR damper is derived based on the results of performance evaluations. Next, a simplified skyhook controller, which is one of the most straightforward, but effective approaches for improving ride comport in vehicles with active suspensions, is formulated. Then, the vibration control performances of the landing gear system using the MR damper are theoretically evaluated in the landing phase of the aircraft. A series of simulation analyses show that the proposed MR damper with the skyhook controller is effective for suppressing undesired vibration of the aircraft body. Finally, the effectiveness of the simulation results are additionally verified via HILS (Hardware-in-the-loop-simulation) method.

  14. Electromagnetic dampers for cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Dirusso, Eliseo

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic turbomachinery of the type used to pump high-pressure liquid hydrogen at -423 F and liquid oxygen at -297 F to the main engines of the Space Shuttle are subjected to lateral rotor vibrations from unbalance forces and transient loads. Conventional dampers which utilize viscous fluids such as lubricating oil cannot be used in turbopumps because the bearing components are filled with either liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen, which have viscosity comparable to air and, therefore, are not effective in viscous dampers. Electromagentic dampers are currently being explored as a means of providing damping in cryogenic turbopumps because their damping effectiveness increases as temperature decreases and because they are compatible with the liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen in the turbopumps.

  15. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. PMID:17205741

  16. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations.

  17. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  18. Analysis and testing of an integrated semi-active seat suspension for both longitudinal and vertical vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Jiang, Peng; Pan, Hui; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-04-01

    An integrated semi-active seat suspension for both longitudinal and vertical vibration control is analyzed and tested in this paper. The seat suspension consists of a switching mechanism transforming both longitudinal and vertical motions into a rotary motion and a real-time damping-controllable system-a rotary magnetorheological (MR) damper working in pure shear mode and its corresponding control system. The switching mechanism employs the parallelogram frames as a motion guide which keeps the seat moving longitudinally and vertically. At the same time, both longitudinal and vertical motions are transformed into a reciprocating rotary motion that is transmitted to the rotary MR damper after an amplification by a gear mechanism. Both the longitudinal and vertical vibrations can be attenuated in real time through controlling the damping force (or torque) of the rotary MR damper. The mathematical model of the seat suspension system is established, simulated, and analyzed. The experimental test based on the test rig in Hefei University of Technology is implemented, and the results of simulation and experimental test are compared and analyzed.

  19. Earthquake response reduction of mid-story isolated system due to semi-active control using magnetorheological rotary inertia mass damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Mai; Yoshida, Shohei; Fujitani, Hideo; Sato, Yusuke

    2015-04-01

    The dynamic characteristics of mid-story isolated buildings and seismic response reduction due to a semi-active control system were investigated using a three-lumped-mass model that simplified the sixteen story building with an isolation layer in the sixth story. A semi-active control method using a rotary inertia mass damper filled with magnetorheological fluid (MR fluid) was proposed. The damper shows both mass amplification effect due to rotational inertia and variable damping effect due to the MR fluid. The damping force is controlled by the strength of the magnetic field that is applied to the MR fluid. It is determined by using the electric current, which is calculated by the proposed semi-active control method based on the velocity of the isolation layer relative to the layer just underneath it. Real-time hybrid tests using an actual damper and simulations using a building model were conducted to check the damper model; the test results were in good agreement with the simulation results. The simulation results suggest that the response displacement of the structure above the isolation layer is significantly reduced, without increasing the response acceleration of the entire structure against near-fault pulse and long-period ground motions. The proposed semi-active control using an MR rotary inertia mass damper was confirmed to be effective for mid-story isolated buildings.

  20. Simulation studies for multichannel active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Shashikala; Balasubramaniam, R.; Praseetha, K. K.

    2003-10-01

    Traditional approach to vibration control uses passive techniques, which are relatively large, costly and ineffective at low frequencies. Active Vibration Control (AVC) is used to overcome these problems & in AVC additional sources (secondary) are used to cancel vibration from primary source based on the principle of superposition theorem Since the characteristics of the vibration source and environment are time varying, the AVC system must be adaptive. Adaptive systems have the ability to track time varying disturbances and provide optimal control over a much broader range of conditions than conventional fixed control systems. In multi channel AVC vibration fields in large dimensions are controlled & is more complicated. Therefore to actively control low frequency vibrations on large structures, multi channel AVC requires a control system that uses multiple secondary sources to control the vibration field simultaneously at multiple error sensor locations. The error criterion that can be directly measured is the sum of squares of outputs of number of sensors. The adaptive algorithm is designed to minimize this & the algorithm implemented is the "Multiple error LMS algorithm." The best known applications of multiple channel FXLMS algorithm is in real time AVC and system identification. More wider applications are in the control of propeller induced noise in flight cabin interiors. In the present paper the results of simulation studies carried out in MATLAB as well as on TMS320C32 DSP processor will be brought out for a two-channel case.

  1. Effects of the lower extremities muscle activation during muscular strength training on an unstable platform with magneto-rheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, YongJun; Choi, YounJung; Kim, JungJa; Kwan, TaeKyu; Kim, Nam-Gyun

    2009-03-01

    Adequate postural balance depends on the spatial and temporal integration of vestibular, visual, and somatosensory information. Especially, the musculoskeletal function (range of joint, flexibility of spine, muscular strength) is essential in maintaining the postural balance. Muscular strength training methods include the use of commercialized devices and repeatable resistance training tools (rubber band, ball, etc). These training systems cost high price and can't control of intensity. Thus we suggest a new training system which can adjust training intensity and indicate the center of pressure of a subject while the training was passively controlled by applying controlled electric current to the Magneto- Rheological damper. And we performed experimental studies on the muscular activities in the lower extremities during maintaining, moving and pushing exercises on an unstable platform with Magneto rheological dampers. A subject executed the maintaining, moving and pushing exercises which were displayed in a monitor. The electromyographic signals of the eight muscles in lower extremities were recorded and analyzed in the time and frequency domain: the muscles of interest were rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tensor fasciae latae, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, and soleus. The experimental results showed the difference of muscular activities at the four moving exercises and the nine maintaining exercises. The rate of the increase in the muscular activities was affected by the condition of the unstable platform with MR dampers for the maintaining and moving exercises. The experimental results suggested the choice of different maintaining and moving exercises could selectively train different muscles with varying intensity. Furthermore, the findings also suggested the training using this system can improve the ability of postural balance.

  2. Trust-region based instantaneous optimal semi-active control of long-span spatially extended structures with MRF-04K damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Li, Zhongxian; Ding, Yang

    2008-12-01

    In the field of civil engineering, magneto rheological fluid (MRF) damper-based semi-active control systems have received considerable attention for use in protecting structures from natural hazards such as strong earthquakes and high winds. In this paper, the MRF damper-based semi-active control system is applied to a long-span spatially extended structure and its feasibility is discussed. Meanwhile, a trust-region method based instantaneous optimal semi-active control algorithm (TIOC) is proposed to improve the performance of the semi-active control system in a multiple damper situation. The proposed TIOC describes the control process as a bounded constraint optimization problem, in which an optimal semiactive control force vector is solved by the trust-region method in every control step to minimize the structural responses. A numerical example of a railway station roof structure installed with MRF-04K dampers is presented. First, a modified Bouc-Wen model is utilized to describe the behavior of the selected MRF-04K damper. Then, two semi-active control systems, including the well-known clipped-optimal controller and the proposed TIOC controller, are considered. Based on the characteristics of the long-span spatially extended structure, the performance of the control system is evaluated under uniform earthquake excitation and travelling-wave excitation with different apparent velocities. The simulation results indicate that the MR fluid damper-based semi-active control systems have the potential to mitigate the responses of full-scale long-span spatially extended structures under earthquake hazards. The superiority of the proposed TIOC controller is demonstrated by comparing its control effectiveness with the clipped-optimal controller for several different cases.

  3. Numerical modeling of pendulum dampers in torsional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, P.R.; Shusto, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    Centrifugal pendulum-design dampers are utilized in torsional systems to reduce the vibration amplitude at certain objectionable torsional speeds. The damper is tuned by proper design of its mass, dimensions, and position on a carrier disk, which is rigidly attached to the torsional system. The effects of the pendulum damper on the response of the torsional system may be included by modifying the structural model to include a separate damper element representing each order of the pendulum damper. The stiffness and mass matrices for a damper element are dependent upon the order of vibration being dampened, the mass, and the geometry of the damper. A general form of the mass and stiffness equations for a simple centrifugal pendulum damper are derived from first principles using Lagrange's equations of motion. The analysis of torsional systems with pendulum dampers utilizing the mass and stiffness properties developed is included in the program SHAMS. SHAMS calculates the steady-state response of a system of springs and masses to harmonic loads using modal superposition. The response of a crankshaft system with and without the pendulum dampers are included as a case study.

  4. Semi-active friction tendons for vibration control of space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Hernán; Curadelli, Oscar; Ambrosini, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Semi-active vibration control systems are becoming popular because they offer both the reliability of passive systems and the versatility of active control without high power demands. In this work, a new semi-active control system is proposed and studied numerically. The system consists of variable-friction dampers linked to the structure through cables. Auxiliary soft springs in parallel with these friction dampers allow them to return to their initial pre-tensioned state. Using cables makes the system suitable for deployable, flexible and lightweight structures, such as space structures (spacecraft). A control system with three control laws applied to a single-degree-of-freedom structure is studied. Two of these laws are derived by using Lyapunov theory, whereas the third one is developed heuristically. In order to assess the performance of the control system, a parametric study is carried out through numerical simulations. An application of the proposed method to multi-degree-of-freedom structures is also presented and demonstrated through a numerical example. The system in semi-active mode is more effective than in passive mode and its effectiveness is less sensitive to loss of pre-tension.

  5. Semi-active vibration control in cable-stayed bridges under the condition of random wind load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, G.; Joonryong, Jeon

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims at an experimental study on the real-time vibration control of bridge structures using a semi-active vibration control method that has been in the spotlight recently. As structures are becoming larger and larger, structural harmful vibration caused by unspecified external forces such as earthquakes, gusts of wind, and collisions has been brought to attention as an important issue. These harmful vibrations can cause not only user anxiety but also severe structural damage or even complete failure of structures. Therefore, in view of structural safety and economical long-term maintenance, real-time control technology of the harmful structural vibration is urgently required. In this paper, a laboratory-scale model of a cable-stayed bridge was built, and a shear-type MR damper and a semi-active vibration control algorithm (Lyapunov and clipped optimal) were applied for the control of harmful vibration of the model bridge, in real time. On the basis of the test results, each semi-active control algorithm was verified quantitatively.

  6. Non-linear identification of a squeeze-film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanway, Roger; Mottershead, John; Firoozian, Riaz

    1987-01-01

    Described is an experimental study to identify the damping laws associated with a squeeze-film vibration damper. This is achieved by using a non-linear filtering algorithm to process displacement responses of the damper ring to synchronous excitation and thus to estimate the parameters in an nth-power velocity model. The experimental facility is described in detail and a representative selection of results is included. The identified models are validated through the prediction of damper-ring orbits and comparison with observed responses.

  7. Principle and validation of modified hysteretic models for magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Chen, Peng; Qian, Li-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) dampers, semi-active actuators for vibration and shock control systems, have attracted increasing attention during the past two decades. However, it is difficult to establish a precise mathematical model for the MR dampers and their control systems due to their intrinsic strong nonlinear hysteretic behavior. A phenomenological model based on the Bouc-Wen model can be used to effectively describe the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the MR dampers, but the structure of the phenomenological model is complex and the Bouc-Wen model is functionally redundant. In this paper, based on the phenomenological model, (1) a normalized phenomenological model is derived through incorporating a ‘normalization’ concept, and (2) a restructured model, also incorporating the ‘normalization’ concept, is proposed and realized. In order to demonstrate this, a multi-islands genetic algorithm (GA) is employed to identify the parameters of the restructured model, the normalized phenomenological model, and the phenomenological model. The performance of the three models for describing and predicting the damping force characteristics of the MR dampers are compared and analyzed using the identified parameters. The research results indicate that, as compared with the phenomenological model and the normalized phenomenological model, (1) the restructured model can not only effectively decrease the number of the model parameters and reduce the complexity of the model, but can also describe the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of MR dampers more accurately, and (2) the meanings of several model parameters of the restructured model are clearer and the initial ranges of the model parameters are more explicit, which is of significance for parameter identification.

  8. Quantifying ant activity using vibration measurements.

    PubMed

    Oberst, Sebastian; Baro, Enrique Nava; Lai, Joseph C S; Evans, Theodore A

    2014-01-01

    Ant behaviour is of great interest due to their sociality. Ant behaviour is typically observed visually, however there are many circumstances where visual observation is not possible. It may be possible to assess ant behaviour using vibration signals produced by their physical movement. We demonstrate through a series of bioassays with different stimuli that the level of activity of meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus) can be quantified using vibrations, corresponding to observations with video. We found that ants exposed to physical shaking produced the highest average vibration amplitudes followed by ants with stones to drag, then ants with neighbours, illuminated ants and ants in darkness. In addition, we devised a novel method based on wavelet decomposition to separate the vibration signal owing to the initial ant behaviour from the substrate response, which will allow signals recorded from different substrates to be compared directly. Our results indicate the potential to use vibration signals to classify some ant behaviours in situations where visual observation could be difficult.

  9. Stochastic seismic response of building with super-elastic damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gur, Sourav; Mishra, Sudib Kumar; Roy, Koushik

    2016-05-01

    Hysteretic yield dampers are widely employed for seismic vibration control of buildings. An improved version of such damper has been proposed recently by exploiting the superelastic force-deformation characteristics of the Shape-Memory-Alloy (SMA). Although a number of studies have illustrated the performance of such damper, precise estimate of the optimal parameters and performances, along with the comparison with the conventional yield damper is lacking. Presently, the optimal parameters for the superelastic damper are proposed by conducting systematic design optimization, in which, the stochastic response serves as the objective function, evaluated through nonlinear random vibration analysis. These optimal parameters can be employed to establish an initial design for the SMA-damper. Further, a comparison among the optimal responses is also presented in order to assess the improvement that can be achieved by the superelastic damper over the yield damper. The consistency of the improvements is also checked by considering the anticipated variation in the system parameters as well as seismic loading condition. In spite of the improved performance of super-elastic damper, the available variant of SMA(s) is quite expensive to limit their applicability. However, recently developed ferrous SMA are expected to offer even superior performance along with improved cost effectiveness, that can be studied through a life cycle cost analysis in future work.

  10. Booster's coupled bunch damper upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    William A. Pellico and D. W. Wildman

    2003-08-14

    A new narrowband active damping system for longitudinal coupled bunch (CB) modes in the Fermilab Booster has recently been installed and tested. In the past, the Booster active damper system consisted of four independent front-ends. The summed output was distributed to the 18, h=84 RF accelerating cavities via the RF fan-out system. There were several problems using the normal fan-out system to deliver the longitudinal feedback RF. The high power RF amplifiers normally operate from 37 MHz to 53 MHz whereas the dampers operate around 83MHz. Daily variations in the tuning of the RF stations created tuning problems for the longitudinal damper system. The solution was to build a dedicated narrowband, Q {approx} 10, 83MHz cavity powered with a new 3.5kW solid-state amplifier. The cavity was installed in June 2002 and testing of the amplifier and damper front-end began in August 2002. A significant improvement has been made in both operational stability and high intensity beam damping. At present there are five CB modes being damped and a sixth mode module is being built. The new damper hardware is described and data showing the suppression of the coupled-bunch motion at high intensity is presented.

  11. Configuration optimization of dampers for adjacent buildings under seismic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigdeli, Kasra; Hare, Warren; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2012-12-01

    Passive coupling of adjacent structures is known to be an effective method to reduce undesirable vibrations and structural pounding effects. Past results have shown that reducing the number of dampers can considerably decrease the cost of implementation and does not significantly decrease the efficiency of the system. The main objective of this study was to find the optimal arrangement of a limited number of dampers to minimize interstorey drift. Five approaches to solving the resulting bi-level optimization problem are introduced and examined (exhaustive search, inserting dampers, inserting floors, locations of maximum relative velocity and a genetic algorithm) and the numerical efficiency of each method is examined. The results reveal that the inserting damper method is the most efficient and reliable method, particularly for tall structures. It was also found that increasing the number of dampers does not necessarily increase the efficiency of the system. In fact, increasing the number of dampers can exacerbate the dynamic response of the system.

  12. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  13. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  14. Vibrational Raman optical activity of ketose monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Alasdair F.; Hecht, Lutz; Barron, Laurence D.

    1995-07-01

    The vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the four ketose sugars D-fructose, L-sorbose, D-tagatose and D-psicose in aqueous solution, which have been measured in backscattering in the range ≈250-1500 cm -1, are reported. These results are combined with those from a previous ROA study of aldose and pentose sugars in an attempt to establish new vibrational assignments and to verify old ones. The high information content of these spectra provides a new perspective on all the central features of monosaccharide stereochemistry including dominant anomeric configuration, ring conformation, exocyclic CH 2OH group conformation and relative disposition of the hydroxyl groups around the ring.

  15. Active isolation of vibrations with adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guigou, C.; Fuller, C. R.; Wagstaff, P. R.

    1991-01-01

    Vibration transmission in structures is controlled by means of a technique which employs distributed arrays of piezoelectric transducers bonded to the supporting structure. Distributed PVDF piezoelectric strips are employed as error sensors, and a two-channel feedforward adaptive LMS algorithm is used for minimizing error signals and thereby controlling the structure. A harmonic force input excites a thick plate, and a receiving plate is configured with three pairs of piezoelectric actuators. Modal analyses are performed to determine the resonant frequencies of the system, and a scanning laser vibrometer is used to study the shape of the response of the receiving plate during excitation with and without the control algorithm. Efficient active isolation of the vibrations is achieved with modal suppression, and good control is noted in the on-resonance cases in which increased numbers of PVDF sensors and piezoelectric actuators are employed.

  16. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-08-31

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed.

  17. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-10-13

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed. The month of June, 2004 was primarily occupied with the writing of the Phase I Final Report, the sole deliverable of Phase I, which will be submitted in the next quarter. Redesign of the laboratory prototype and design of the downhole (Phase II) prototype was begun.

  18. Skyhook-based semi-active control of full-vehicle suspension with magneto-rheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Enrong; Min, Fuhong; Subash, Rakheja; Su, Chunyi

    2013-05-01

    The control study of vehicle semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological (MR) dampers has been attracted much attention internationally. However, a simple, real time and easy implementing semi-active controller has not been proposed for the MR full-vehicle suspension system, and a systematic analysis method has not been established for evaluating the multi-objective suspension performances of MR full-vehicle vertical, pitch and roll motions. For this purpose, according to the 7-degree of freedom (DOF) full-vehicle dynamic system, a generalized 7-DOF MR and passive full-vehicle dynamic model is set up by employing the modified Bouc-wen hysteretic force-velocity ( F-v) model of the MR damper. A semi-active controller is synthesized to realize independent control of the four MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension systems in the full-vehicle, which is on the basis of the proposed modified skyhook damping scheme of MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension system. The proposed controller can greatly simplify the controller design complexity of MR full-vehicle suspension and has merits of easy implementation in real application, wherein only absolute velocities of sprung and unsprung masses with reference to the road surface are required to measure in real time when the vehicle is moving. Furthermore, a systematic analysis method is established for evaluating the vertical, pitch and roll motion properties of both MR and passive full-vehicle suspensions in a more realistic road excitation manner, in which the harmonic, rounded pulse and real road measured random signals with delay time are employed as different road excitations inserted on the front and rear two wheels, by considering the distance between front and rear wheels in full-vehicle. The above excitations with different amplitudes are further employed as the road excitations inserted on left and right two wheels for evaluating the roll motion property. The multi-objective suspension performances of ride comfort and

  19. Experimental study of uncentralized squeeze film dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The vibration response of a rotor system supported by a squeeze film damper (SFD) was experimentally investigated in order to provide experimental data in support of the Rotor/Stator Interactive Finite Element theoretical development. Part of the investigation required the designing and building of a rotor/SFD system that could operate with or without end seals in order to accommodate different SFD lengths. SFD variables investigated included clearance, eccentricity mass, fluid pressure, and viscosity and temperature. The results show inlet pressure, viscosity and clearance have significant influence on the damper performance and accompanying rotor response.

  20. Tuning the vibration of a rotor with shape memory alloy metal rubber supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanhong; Zhang, Qicheng; Zhang, Dayi; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Liu, Baolong; Hong, Jie

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes a novel smart rotor support damper with variable stiffness made with a new multifunctional material - the shape memory alloy metal rubber (SMA-MR). SMA-MR gives high load bearing capability (yield limit up to 100 MPa and stiffness exceeding 1e8 N/m), high damping (loss factor between 0.15 and 0.3) and variable stiffness (variation of 2.6 times between martensite and austenite phases). The SMA-MR has been used to replace a squeeze film damper and combined with an elastic support. The mechanical performance of the smart support damper has been investigated at room and high temperatures on a rotor test rig. The vibration tuning capabilities of the SMA-MR damper have been evaluated through FEM simulations and experimental tests. The study shows the feasibility of using the SMA-MR material for potential applications of active vibration control at different temperatures in rotordynamics systems.

  1. Active mass damper system for high-rise buildings using neural oscillator and position controller considering stroke limitation of the auxiliary mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongu, J.; Iba, D.; Nakamura, M.; Moriwaki, I.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a problem-solving method for the stroke limitation problem, which is related to auxiliary masses of active mass damper systems for high-rise buildings. The proposed method is used in a new simple control system for the active mass dampers mimicking the motion of bipedal mammals, which has a neural oscillator synchronizing with the acceleration response of structures and a position controller. In the system, the travel distance and direction of the auxiliary mass of the active mass damper is determined by reference to the output of the neural oscillator, and then, the auxiliary mass is transferred to the decided location by using a PID controller. The one of the purpose of the previouslyproposed system is stroke restriction problem avoidance of the auxiliary mass during large earthquakes by the determination of the desired value within the stroke limitation of the auxiliary mass. However, only applying the limited desired value could not rigorously restrict the auxiliary mass within the limitation, because the excessive inertia force except for the control force produced by the position controller affected on the motion of the auxiliary mass. In order to eliminate the effect on the auxiliary mass by the structural absolute acceleration, a cancellation method is introduced by adding a term to the control force of the position controller. We first develop the previously-proposed system for the active mass damper and the additional term for cancellation, and verity through numerical experiments that the new system is able to operate the auxiliary mass within the restriction during large earthquakes. Based on the comparison of the proposed system with the LQ system, a conclusion was drawn regarding which the proposed neuronal system with the additional term appears to be able to limit the stroke of the auxiliary mass of the AMD.

  2. Vibrational Raman optical activity of biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, L. D.; Gargaro, A. R.; Hecht, Lutz; Wen, Z. Q.; Hug, W.

    1991-05-01

    Advances in Raman optical activity (ROA) instrumentation based on the employment of a backscattering geometry together with a cooled CCD detector have now enhanced the sensitivity to the level necessary to provide vibrational ROA spectra of biological molecules in aqueous solution. Preliminary results on peptides and proteins show features originating in coupled Ca-H and N-H deformations of the peptide backbone which appear to be sensitive to the secondary conformation. Also carbohydrates show many features that appear to be characteristic of the central aspects of carbohydrate architecture with effects from the glycosidic link in di- and oligosaccharides particularly prominent. 1.

  3. Using magnetorheological fluids in an innovative hybrid bicycle damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiao, Y. J.; Nguyen, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetorheological fluids are capable of changing their viscosity quickly. This can provide good controllability and fast dynamic response. A conventional passive suspension system with air spring or hydraulic damper has simple design and financial benefit for bicycles, but its operation is uncontrollable and non-adaptive. This paper presented a semi-active hybrid bicycle suspension system which combines conventional air spring and a new magnetorheological damping brake together to reduce vibration of a bicycle. A multi-layer magnetorheological brake and linkage mechanism are connected to bike fork to form the adaptive damping part of the innovative hybrid suspension system. The simulation results proved that the semi-active suspension system can reduce bike vibration effectively.

  4. Magnetic bearings for vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweitzer, G.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is presented on the research of the Institute of Mechanics of the ETH in the field of vibration control with magnetic bearings. It shows a method for modelling an elastic rotor so that it can be represented by a low order model amenable to control techniques. It deals with the control law and spill-over effects, and it also discusses experimental results for an active resonance damper.

  5. Investigation on modeling and controability of a magnetorheological gun recoil damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongsheng; Wang, Juan; Wang, Jiong; Qian, Suxiang; Li, Yancheng

    2009-07-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluid as a new smart material has done well in the vibration and impact control engineering fields because of its good electromechanical coupling characteristics, preferable dynamic performance and higher sensitivity. And success of MRF has been apparent in many engineering applied fields, such as semi-active suspension, civil engineering, etc. So far, little research has been done about MR damper applied into the weapon system. Its primary purpose of this study is to identify its dynamic performance and controability of the artillery recoil mechanism equipped with MR damper. Firstly, based on the traditional artillery recoil mechanism, a recoil dynamic model is developed in order to obtain an ideal rule between recoil force and its stroke. Then, its effects of recoil resistance on the stability and firing accuracy of artillery are explored. Because MR gun recoil damper under high impact load shows a typical nonlinear character and there exists a shear-thinning phenomenon, to establish an accurate dynamic model has been a seeking aim of its design and application for MR damper under high impact load. Secondly, in this paper, considering its actual bearing load, an inertia factor was introduced to Herschel-Bulkley model, and some factor's effect on damping force are simulated and analyzed by using numerical simulation, including its dynamic performance under different flow coefficients and input currents. Finally, both of tests with the fixed current and different On-Off control algorithms have been done to confirm its controability of MR gun recoil damper under high impact load. Experimental results show its dynamic performances of the large-scale single-ended MR gun recoil damper can be changed by altering the applied currents and it has a good controllability.

  6. Dynamic behavior of stay cables with passive negative stiffness dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiang; Zhu, Songye; Li, Jin-Yang; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.

    2016-07-01

    This paper systematically investigates the dynamic behavior of stay cables with passive negative stiffness dampers (NSD) installed close to the cable end. A passive NSD is modeled as a combination of a negative stiffness spring and a viscous damper. Through both analytical and numerical approaches, parametric analysis of negative stiffness and viscous damping are conducted to systematically evaluate the vibration control performance of passive NSD on stay cables. Since negative stiffness is an unstable element, the boundary of passive negative stiffness for stay cables to maintain stability is also derived. Results reveal that the asymptotic approach is only applicable to passive dampers with positive or moderate negative stiffness, and loses its accuracy when a passive NSD possesses significant negative stiffness. It has been found that the performance of passive NSD can be much better than those of conventional viscous dampers. The superior control performance of passive NSD in cable vibration mitigation is validated through numerical simulations of a full-scale stay cable.

  7. Active vibration control using mechanical and electrical analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Perez, A.; Hassan, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical-electrical analogous circuit models are widely used in electromechanical system design as they represent the function of a coupled electrical and mechanical system using an equivalent electrical system. This research uses electrical circuits to establish a discussion of simple active vibration control principles using two scenarios: an active vibration isolation system and an active dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using a voice coil motor (VCM) actuator. Active control laws such as gain scheduling are intuitively explained using circuit analysis techniques. Active vibration control approaches are typically constraint by electrical power requirements. The electrical analogous is a fast approach for specifying power requirements on the experimental test platform which is based on a vibration shaker that provides the based excitation required for the single Degree- of-Freedom (1DoF) vibration model under study.

  8. A novel eddy current damper: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Babak; Khamesee, Mir Behrad; Golnaraghi, Farid

    2009-04-01

    A novel eddy current damper is developed and its damping characteristics are studied analytically and experimentally. The proposed eddy current damper consists of a conductor as an outer tube, and an array of axially magnetized ring-shaped permanent magnets separated by iron pole pieces as a mover. The relative movement of the magnets and the conductor causes the conductor to undergo motional eddy currents. Since the eddy currents produce a repulsive force that is proportional to the velocity of the conductor, the moving magnet and the conductor behave as a viscous damper. The eddy current generation causes the vibration to dissipate through the Joule heating generated in the conductor part. An accurate, analytical model of the system is obtained by applying electromagnetic theory to estimate the damping properties of the proposed eddy current damper. A prototype eddy current damper is fabricated, and experiments are carried out to verify the accuracy of the theoretical model. The experimental test bed consists of a one-degree-of-freedom vibration isolation system and is used for the frequency and transient time response analysis of the system. The eddy current damper model has a 0.1 m s-2 (4.8%) RMS error in the estimation of the mass acceleration. A damping coefficient as high as 53 Ns m-1 is achievable with the fabricated prototype. This novel eddy current damper is an oil-free, inexpensive damper that is applicable in various vibration isolation systems such as precision machinery, micro-mechanical suspension systems and structure vibration isolation.

  9. Vibrational Raman optical activity of biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, L. D.; Hecht, Lutz; Wen, Z. Q.; Ford, Steven J.; Bell, A. F.

    1993-06-01

    Advances in Raman optical activity (ROA) instrumentation based on the employment of a backscattering geometry together with a cooled backthinned CCD detector, a holographic notch filter, and a high-efficiency single-grating spectrograph have now enhanced the sensitivity to the level necessary to provide vibrational ROA spectra of most biological molecules in aqueous solution. Results on peptides and proteins show features originating in coupled C(alpha )-H and N-H deformations of the peptide backbone which appear to be sensitive to the secondary conformation including loop and turn structures. Also carbohydrates show many features characteristic of the central aspects of carbohydrate architecture, with effects from the glycosidic link in oligosaccharides particularly prominent. Preliminary ROA spectra of pyrimidine nucleosides appear to reflect the mutual orientation of the sugar and base rings and the dominant furanose conformations.

  10. Piezoelectric Power Requirements for Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Matthew C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the power consumption of piezoelectric actuators utilized for active vibration control. Analytical developments and experimental tests show that the maximum power required to control a structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is independent of the dynamics between the piezoelectric actuator and the host structure. The results demonstrate that for a perfectly-controlled system, the power consumption is a function of the quantity and type of piezoelectric actuators and the voltage and frequency of the control law output signal. Furthermore, as control effectiveness decreases, the power consumption of the piezoelectric actuators decreases. In addition, experimental results revealed a non-linear behavior in the material properties of piezoelectric actuators. The material non- linearity displayed a significant increase in capacitance with an increase in excitation voltage. Tests show that if the non-linearity of the capacitance was accounted for, a conservative estimate of the power can easily be determined.

  11. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  12. Viscous damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. C.

    1968-01-01

    Damping device exhibiting no hysteresis effect and capable of preload is used in place of a preload spring in an aneroid bellows to provide viscous damping. It operates about the action of a pressure sensing outer bellows attached to an active header above and a static header below.

  13. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-04-27

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. As a result of the lower than expected performance of the MR damper noted last quarter, several additional tests were conducted. These dealt with possible causes of the lack of dynamic range observed in the testing: additional damping from the oil in the Belleville springs; changes in properties of the MR fluid; and, residual magnetization of the valve components. Of these, only the last was found to be significant. By using a laboratory demagnetization apparatus between runs, a dynamic range of 10:1 was achieved for the damper, more than adequate to produce the needed improvements in drilling. Additional modeling was also performed to identify a method of increasing the magnetic field in the damper. As a result of the above, several changes were made in the design. Additional circuitry was added to demagnetize the valve as the field is lowered. The valve was located to above the Belleville springs to reduce the load placed upon it and offer a greater range of materials for its construction. In addition, to further increase the field strength, the coils were relocated from the mandrel to the outer housing. At the end of the quarter, the redesign was complete and new parts were on order. The project is approximately three months behind schedule at this time.

  14. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  15. Nonlinear longitudinal oscillations of fuel in rockets feed lines with gas-liquid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramov, K. V.; Filipkovsky, S.; Tonkonogenko, A. M.; Klimenko, D. V.

    2016-03-01

    The mathematical model of the fuel oscillations in the rockets feed lines with gas-liquid dampers is derived. The nonlinear model of the gas-liquid damper is suggested. The vibrations of fuel in the feed lines with the gas-liquid dampers are considered nonlinear. The weighted residual method is applied to obtain the finite degrees of freedom nonlinear model of the fuel oscillations. Shaw-Pierre nonlinear normal modes are applied to analyze free vibrations. The forced oscillations of the fuel at the principle resonances are analyzed. The stability of the forced oscillations is investigated. The results of the forced vibrations analysis are shown on the frequency responses.

  16. Significant Attenuation of Lightly Damped Resonances Using Particle Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Hunt, Ron; Knight, Joseph Brent

    2015-01-01

    When equipment designs must perform in a broad band vibration environment it can be difficult to avoid resonances that affect life and performance. This is especially true when an organization seeks to employ an asset from a heritage design in a new, more demanding vibration environment. Particle dampers may be used to provide significant attenuation of lightly damped resonances to assist with such a deployment of assets by including only a very minor set of modifications. This solution may be easier to implement than more traditional attenuation schemes. Furthermore, the cost in additional weight to the equipment can be very small. Complexity may also be kept to a minimum, because the particle dampers do not require tuning. Attenuating the vibratory response with particle dampers may therefore be simpler (in a set it and forget it kind of way) than tuned mass dampers. The paper will illustrate the use of an "equivalent resonance test jig" that can assist designers in verifying the potential resonance attenuation that may be available to them during the early trade stages of the design. An approach is suggested for transforming observed attenuation in the jig to estimated performance in the actual service design. KEY WORDS: Particle Damper, Performance in Vibration Environment, Damping, Resonance, Attenuation, Mitigation of Vibration Response, Response Estimate, Response Verification.

  17. An innovative magnetorheological damper for automotive suspension: from design to experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, Sadok; Cherif, Khaled; Mezghani, Lotfi; Thomas, Marc; Kotrane, Asma

    2005-08-01

    The development of a powerful new magnetorheological fluid (MRF), together with recent progress in the understanding of the behavior of such fluids, has convinced researchers and engineers that MRF dampers are among the most promising devices for semi-active automotive suspension vibration control, because of their large force capacity and their inherent ability to provide a simple, fast and robust interface between electronic controls and mechanical components. In this paper, theoretical and experimental studies are performed for the design, development and testing of a completely new MRF damper model that can be used for the semi-active control of automotive suspensions. The MR damper technology presented in this paper is based on a completely new approach where, in contrast to in the conventional solutions where the coil axis is usually superposed on the damper axis and where the inner cylindrical housing is part of the magnetic circuit, the coils are wound in a direction perpendicular to the damper axis. The paper investigates approaches to optimizing the dynamic response and provides experimental verification. Both experimental and theoretical results have shown that, if this particular model is filled with an 'MRF 336AG' MR fluid, it can provide large controllable damping forces that require only a small amount of energy. For a magnetizing system with four coils, the damping coefficient could be increased by up to three times for an excitation current of only 2 A. Such current could be reduced to less than 1 A if the magnetizing system used eight small cores. In this case, the magnetic field will be more powerful and more regularly distributed. In the presence of harmonic excitation, such a design will allow the optimum compromise between comfort and stability to be reached over different intervals of the excitation frequencies.

  18. Skylab viscous damper study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The proposed magnetically anchored viscous fluid damper can maintain the Skylab in a gravity-gradient stabilized mode at the anticipated reboost altitudes. The parameters influencing damper performance (and thereby affecting the degree of risk) are: (1) amount of skylab pitch bias in the orbit plane which will result from aerodynamic trim conditions of the post-reboost configuration Skylab; (2) the lowest altitude to which the post-reboost Skylab will be allowed to decay prior to the next rendezvous; (3) maximum allowable weight and size of the proposed damper in order to match shuttle/TRS mission constraints; (4) the amount of magnetic materials expected to be in the vicinity of the damper.

  19. Damping augmentation of helicopter rotors using magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongsheng

    This dissertation describes an investigation exploring the use of magnetorheological (MR) dampers to augment the stability of helicopter rotors. Helicopters with advanced soft in-plane rotors are susceptible to ground resonance instabilities due to the coupling of the lightly damped rotor lag modes and fuselage modes. Traditional passive lag dampers, such as hydraulic or elastomeric dampers, can be used to alleviate these instabilities. However, these passive dampers suffer from the disadvantages that they produce large damper loads in forward flight conditions. These damper forces increase fatigue loads and reduce component life. Thus, it is desirable to have lag dampers controllable or adaptable, so that the damper can apply loads only when needed. MR fluid based dampers have recently been considered for helicopter lag damping augmentation because the forces generated by these dampers can be controlled by an applied magnetic field. In this dissertation, control schemes to integrate MR dampers with helicopters are developed and the influences of the MR dampers on rotorcraft ground resonance are studied. Specifically, the MR dampers are incorporated into the ground resonance model in two ways: using a linear equivalent viscous damping and using a nonlinear damper model. The feasibility of using MR dampers to stabilize ground resonance is studied. The open loop on-off control is utilized where MR dampers are turned on over RPM where ground resonance occurs, and turned off otherwise. To further explore the damping control ability of MR dampers, the nonlinear semi-active closed loop feedback control strategies are developed: feedback linearization control and sliding mode control. The performance of the two control strategies is evaluated using two examples: to stabilize an unstable rotor and to augment the stability of a marginally stable rotor. In addition, the robustness of the closed loop control strategies is studied using two cases: damper degradation and

  20. Frequency analysis of a semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronic, Florin; Mihai, Ioan; Suciu, Cornel; Beniuga, Marius

    2015-02-01

    Suspension systems for motor vehicles are constantly evolving in order to ensure vehicle stability and traffic safety under all driving conditions. The present work aims to highlight the influence factors in the case of a quarter car model for semi-active suspensions. The functions that must be met by such suspension systems are first presented. Mathematical models for passive systems are first illustrated and then customized for the semi-active case. A simulation diagram was conceived for Matlab Simulink. The obtained simulation results allow conducting a frequency analysis of the passive and semi-active cases of the quarter car model. Various charts for Passive Suspension Transmissibility and for the Effect of Damping on Vertical Acceleration Response were obtained for both passive and semi-active situations. Analysis of obtained results allowed evaluating of the suspension systems behavior and their frequency dependence. Significant differences were found between the behaviors of passive and semi-active suspensions. It was found that semi-active suspensions ensure damping in accordance to the chosen control method, and are much more efficient than passive ones.

  1. Advanced magnetorheological damper with a spiral channel bypass valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, G.; Hu, W.; Wereley, N. M.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluid has a yield stress that is readily controllable using an applied magnetic field. MR dampers adjust this yield stress in a magnetic valve to accommodate a wide range of shock or vibration loads. In this study, the performance of an MR damper with a spiral channel bypass valve is examined. Three bypass damper configurations, i.e., a spiral channel, a spiral channel with beads, and a straight channel with beads, are subject to sinusoidal forcing at constant amplitude, while varying frequency, and applied field (current). These configurations are characterized using tortuosity and porosity parameters. The spiral channel without beads had the largest porosity and smallest tortuosity, which produced the smallest damper force, but the widest controllable damping range. The spiral channel with beads had the smallest porosity, and a comparable tortuosity, which produced the largest damping force, but similar controllable damping range to the straight channel with beads.

  2. Vibration attenuation of aircraft structures utilizing active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, Gregory S.; Whitehouse, Stephen R.; Mackaman, John R.

    1993-09-01

    The need for active vibration control for airborne laser systems was demonstrated during the late 1970s by the Airborne Laser Laboratory. Other possible applications include sonic fatigue alleviation, reduction of buffet induced fatigue, vibration control for embedded antennae, and active aeroelastic control. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of active vibration control technology and its application to aircraft. Classification of classic aircraft vibration problems and currently available solutions are used to provide a framework for the study. Current solutions are classified as being either passive or active and by the methodology (modal modification or addition) used to reduce vibration. Possible applications for this technology in aircraft vibration control are presented within this framework to demonstrate the increased versatility active materials technologies provide the designer. An in- depth study of an active pylon to reduce wing/store vibration is presented as an example. Finally, perceived gaps in the existing technology base are identified and both on-going and future research plans in these areas are discussed.

  3. Influence of MR damper modeling on vehicle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de-J Lozoya-Santos, Jorge; Morales-Menendez, Ruben; Ramirez-Mendoza, Ricardo A.; Vivas-Lopez, Carlos A.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of magneto-rheological damper modeling in vehicle dynamics analysis is studied. Several tests using CarSim™ compare a four-corner controlled semi-active suspension for two different magneto-rheological damper models. The magneto-rheological damper characteristics were identified from experimental data. A model-free controller discards the influence of control and emphasizes the compliance of the magneto-rheological damper model; the characteristics of the vehicle index performance considered were comfort, road holding, handling, roll and suspension deflection. The comparison for magneto-rheological damper dynamics and semi-active suspension covers the automotive bandwidth. The results show that high precision of a magneto-rheological damper model as an isolated feature is not enough. The magneto-rheological damper model, as a component of a vehicle suspension, needs to simulate with passive precision and variable damping forces. The findings exhibit the requisite of accurate models for evaluation of semi-active control systems in classic tests. The lack of the friction component in a magneto-rheological damper model leads to an overestimation in handling and stability.

  4. Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration-sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. A tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem, including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements, as well as a comparison or the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation is provided. The flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: suppression of transient accelerations by levitation, the microgravity vibration isolation mount, and the active rack isolation system are surveyed.

  5. Passive active vibration isolation systems to produce zero or infinite dynamic modulus: theoretical and conceptual design strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, J. T.; Xiong, Y. P.; Price, W. G.

    2005-09-01

    The application of mechanical springs connected in parallel and/or in series with active springs can produce dynamical systems characterised by infinite or zero value stiffness. This mathematical model is extended to more general cases by examining the dynamic modulus associated with damping, stiffness and mass effects. This produces a theoretical basis on which to design an isolation system with infinite or zero dynamic modulus, such that stiffness and damping may have infinite or zero values. Several theoretical designs using a mixture of passive and active systems connected in parallel and/or in series are proposed to overcome limitations of feedback gain experienced in practice to achieve an infinite or zero dynamic modulus. It is shown that such systems can be developed to reduce the weight supported by active actuators as demonstrated, for example, by examining suspension systems of very low natural frequency or with a very large supporting stiffness or with a viscous damper or a self-excited vibration oscillator. A more general system is created by combining these individual systems allowing adjustment of the supporting stiffness and damping using both displacement and velocity feedback controls. Frequency response curves show the effects of active feedback control on the dynamical behaviour of these systems. The theoretical design strategies presented can be applied to design feasible hybrid vibration control systems displaying increased control performance.

  6. Piezoelectric pushers for active vibration control of rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Kascak, Albert F.

    1988-01-01

    The active control of rotordynamic vibrations and stability by magnetic bearings and electromagnetic shakers have been discussed extensively in the literature. These devices, though effective, are usually large in volume and add significant weight to the stator. The use of piezoelectric pushers may provide similar degrees of effectiveness in light, compact packages. Tests are currently being conducted with piezoelectric pusher-based active vibration control. Results from tests performed on NASA test rigs as preliminary verification of the related theory are presented.

  7. Forced response of a cantilever beam with a dry friction damper attached. I - Theory. II - Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Schwartz, H. B.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the forced vibration response of a cantilevered beam with Coulomb damping nonlinearity is described. Viscous damping in the beam is neglected. Beam and dry friction damper configurations of interest for applications to turbine blade vibrations are considered. It is shown that the basic phenomena found by Dowell (1983) for a simply supported beam with an attached dry friction damper of specific geometry also apply to a cantilevered beam and a more general representation of the dry friction damper and its associated mass and stiffness.

  8. Calculation of multi-layer plate damper under one-axial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Yan; Lu, Zhang; Hong-Yuan, Jiang; Alexander, M. Ulanov

    2016-02-01

    A multi-layer damper with waved plates under one-axial load is considered. A method of theoretical calculation of its energy dissipation coefficient is proposed. An experimental research of own frequencies and vibration transfer ratios for different parameters of damper structure, harmonic vibration load and random load is performed. Results of this research are approximated by functions; it is possible to use these functions for the calculation of the damper too. Project supported by the Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities (Grant No. B07018).

  9. Active damping of vibrations in SCOLE excited by slewing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jiguan Gene

    1987-01-01

    Control simulations were performed to study active damping of vibrations in SCOLE excited by minimum-time rapid slewing. Highlights of the numerical results are presented. Some conclusions reached are: (1) modal-dashpot and modal-spring controllers provide quick and effective vibration control; (2) high gain problems can be avoided by proper selection of modeled modes and proper level of augmentation; (3) modal dashpots and modal springs are most effective during the initial period of large vibrations; and (4) line of sight error due solely to each mode excited by the disturbance provides a sound measure of importance of individual modes.

  10. Nutation Damper System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevilla, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Nutation Damper System is a three function mechanism designed for the Galileo Spacecraft, a spin stabilized deep-space probe to Jupiter. By damping the movement of a large deployable science boom acting as an outboard pendulum, the nutation damper rapidly stabilizes the spacecraft from dynamic irregularities. The system includes the boom deployment device and the ultra-low friction boom hinge. This paper describes the mechanism, the degree to which friction, stiction and lost motion have been eliminated, and the unique test methods that allow its performance to be measured.

  11. Eddy current damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. C.; Fink, R. A.; Rich, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    A high torque capacity eddy current damper used as a rate limiting device for a large solar array deployment mechanism is discussed. The eddy current damper eliminates the problems associated with the outgassing or leaking of damping fluids. It also provides performance advantages such as damping torque rates, which are truly linear with respect to input speed, continuous 360 degree operation in both directions of rotation, wide operating temperature range, and the capability of convenient adjustment of damping rates by the user without disassembly or special tools.

  12. Roller belleville spring damper

    SciTech Connect

    Hebel, J.B.

    1981-07-07

    A double acting damper for use in rotary drilling includes a splined tubular telescopic joint and employs plural paralleled stacks of double acting series stacked roller belleville spring washers in an annular pocket between the inner and outer tubular members of the joint. The springs, spline and telescopic bearings are in an oil filled volume sealed from the outside by a pressure seal at the lower end of the damper and a floating seal at the upper end. Electric and magnetic means are provided to check on the condition and quantity of the lubricant.

  13. An inverse model for magnetorheological dampers based on a restructured phenomenological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Li-Jun; Liu, Bo; Chen, Peng; Bai, Xian-Xu

    2016-04-01

    Magnetorheological dampers (MRDs), a semi-active actuator based on MR effect, have great potential in vibration/shock control systems. However, it is difficult to establish its inverse model due to its intrinsic strong nonlinear hysteresis behaviors, and sequentially the precise, fast and effective control could not be realized effectively. This paper presents an inverse model for MRDs based on a restructured phenomenological model with incorporation of the "normalization" concept. The proposed inverse model of MRDs is validated by the simulation of the force tracking. The research results indicate that the inverse model could be applied for the damping force control with consideration of the strong nonlinear hysteresis behaviors of the MRDs.

  14. Active vibration control based on piezoelectric smart composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Le; Lu, Qingqing; Fei, Fan; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-12-01

    An aircraft’s vertical fin may experience dramatic buffet loads in high angle of attack flight conditions, and these buffet loads would cause huge vibration and dynamic stress on the vertical fin structure. To reduce the dynamic vibration of the vertical fin structure, macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators were used in this paper. The drive moment equations and sensing voltage equations of the MFC actuators were developed. Finite element analysis models based on three kinds of models of simplified vertical fin structures with surface-bonded MFC actuators were established in ABAQUS. The equivalent damping ratio of the structure was employed in finite element analysis, in order to measure the effectiveness of vibration control. Further, an open-loop test for the active vibration control system of the vertical fin with MFC actuators was designed and developed. The experimental results validated the effectiveness of the MFC actuators as well as the developed methodology.

  15. Active Blade Vibration Control Being Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines are currently being designed to have increased performance, lower weight and manufacturing costs, and higher reliability. Consequently, turbomachinery components, such as turbine and compressor blades, have designs that are susceptible to new vibration problems and eventual in-service failure due to high-cycle fatigue. To address this problem, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing and testing innovative active blade vibration control concepts. Preliminary results of using an active blade vibration control system, involving a rotor supported by an active magnetic bearing in Glenn's Dynamic Spin Rig, indicate promising results (see the photograph). Active blade vibration control was achieved using feedback of blade strain gauge signals within the magnetic bearing control loop. The vibration amplitude was reduced substantially (see the graphs). Also, vibration amplitude amplification was demonstrated; this could be used to enhance structural mode identification, if desired. These results were for a nonrotating two-bladed disk. Tests for rotating blades are planned. Current and future active blade vibration control research is planned to use a fully magnetically suspended rotor and smart materials. For the fully magnetically suspended rotor work, three magnetic bearings (two radial and one axial) will be used as actuators instead of one magnetic bearing. This will allow additional degrees of freedom to be used for control. For the smart materials work, control effectors located on and off the blade will be considered. Piezoelectric materials will be considered for on-the-blade actuation, and actuator placement on a stator vane, or other nearby structure, will be investigated for off-the-blade actuation. Initial work will focus on determining the feasibility of these methods by performing basic analysis and simple experiments involving feedback control.

  16. Nonlinear modeling of a rotational MR damper via an enhanced Bouc-Wen model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, Mohammad S.; Chatzi, Eleni N.; Dertimanis, Vasilis K.; Weber, Felix

    2015-10-01

    The coupling of magnetorheological (MR) dampers with semi-active control schemes has proven to be an effective and failsafe approach for vibration mitigation of low-damped structures. However, due to the nonlinearities inherently relating to such damping devices, the characterization of the associated nonlinear phenomena is still a challenging task. Herein, an enhanced phenomenological modeling approach is proposed for the description of a rotational-type MR damper, which comprises a modified Bouc-Wen model coupled with an appropriately selected sigmoid function. In a first step, parameter optimization is performed on the basis of individual models in an effort to approximate the experimentally observed response for varying current levels and actuator force characteristics. In a second step, based on the previously identified parameters, a generalized best-fit model is proposed by performing a regression analysis. Finally, model validation is carried out via implementation on different sets of experimental data. The proposed model indeed renders an improved representation of the actually observed nonlinear behavior of the tested rotational MR damper.

  17. Smart hybrid rotary damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. S. Walter; DesRoches, Reginald

    2014-03-01

    This paper develops a smart hybrid rotary damper using a re-centering smart shape memory alloy (SMA) material as well as conventional energy-dissipating metallic plates that are easy to be replaced. The ends of the SMA and steel plates are inserted in the hinge. When the damper rotates, all the plates bend, providing energy dissipating and recentering characteristics. Such smart hybrid rotary dampers can be installed in structures to mitigate structural responses and to re-center automatically. The damaged energy-dissipating plates can be easily replaced promptly after an external excitation, reducing repair time and costs. An OpenSEES model of a smart hybrid rotary was established and calibrated to reproduce the realistic behavior measured from a full-scale experimental test. Furthermore, the seismic performance of a 3-story moment resisting model building with smart hybrid rotary dampers designed for downtown Los Angeles was also evaluated in the OpenSEES structural analysis software. Such a smart moment resisting frame exhibits perfect residual roof displacement, 0.006", extremely smaller than 18.04" for the conventional moment resisting frame subjected to a 2500 year return period ground motion for the downtown LA area (an amplified factor of 1.15 on Kobe earthquake). The smart hybrid rotary dampers are also applied into an eccentric braced steel frame, which combines a moment frame system and a bracing system. The results illustrate that adding smart hybrid rotaries in this braced system not only completely restores the building after an external excitation, but also significantly reduces peak interstory drifts.

  18. A seat suspension with a rotary magnetorheological damper for heavy duty vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S. S.; Ning, D. H.; Yang, J.; Du, H.; Zhang, S. W.; Li, W. H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the development of an innovative seat suspension working with a rotary magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper. Compared with a conventional linear MR damper, the well-designed rotary MR damper possesses several advantages such as usage reduction of magnetorheological fluid, low sealing requirements and lower costs. This research starts with the introduction of the seat suspension structure and the damper design, followed by the property test of the seat suspension using an MTS machine. The field-dependent property, amplitude-dependent performance, and the frequency-dependent performance of the new seat suspension are measured and evaluated. This research puts emphasis on the evaluation of the vibration reduction capability of the rotary MR damper by using both simulation and experimental methods. Fuzzy logic is chosen to control the rotary MR damper in real time and two different input signals are considered as vibration excitations. The experimental results show that the rotary MR damper under fuzzy logic control is effective in reducing the vibrations.

  19. Inertial Sensor Development for Active Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef C

    2003-05-21

    Future Linear Colliders require nanometer stability of the beams at the interaction point. One approach to stabilizing the beams is to use feedback based on inertial sensors (accelerometers / seismometers) to control the positions of the final focus magnets. Commercial seismometers developed for geo-science applications have sufficient noise performance (nanometer noise down to a fraction of a hertz), but due to their large size and magnetic sensitivity are unsuitable for use in a linear collider detector. We report on the development of a high sensitivity, compact, non-magnetic inertial sensor for this application. In addition to its use in linear colliders, the sensor is also expected to have application in vibration measurement and control in synchrotron light sources.

  20. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0–60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  1. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-05

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  2. Space Shuttle Damper System for Ground Wind Load Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, G. D.; Holt, J. R.; Chang, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    An active damper system which was originally developed for a 5.5% Saturn IB/Skylab Ground Winds Model was modified and used for similar purposes in a Space Shuttle model. A second damper system which was originally used in a 3% Saturn V/Dry Workshop model was also modified and made compatible with the Space Shuttle model to serve as a back-up system. Included in this final report are descriptions of the modified damper systems and the associated control and instrumentation.

  3. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control the flexural oscillations of large structures in space is investigated. Flexural oscillations are excited by impulsive loads. The vibratory response can degrade the pointing accuracy of cameras and antennae, and can cause high stresses at structural node points. Piezoelectric actuators have the advantage of exerting localized bending moments. In this way, vibration is controlled without exciting rigid body modes. The actuators are used in collocated sensor/driver pairs to form a feedback control system. The sensor produces a voltage that is proportional to the dynamic stress at the sensor location, and the driver produces a force that is proportional to the voltage applied to it. The analog control system amplifies and phase shifts the sensor signal to produce the voltage signal that is applied to the driver. The feedback control is demonstrated to increase the first mode damping in a cantilever beam by up to 100 percent, depending on the amplifier gain. The damping efficiency of the control system when the piezoelectrics are not optimally positioned at points of high stress in the beam is evaluated.

  4. Active Piezoelectric Vibration Control of Subscale Composite Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Min, James B.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program, researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are investigating new technologies supporting the development of lighter, quieter, and more efficient fans for turbomachinery applications. High performance fan blades designed to achieve such goals will be subjected to higher levels of aerodynamic excitations which could lead to more serious and complex vibration problems. Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing engine blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. To investigate this idea, spin testing was performed on two General Electric Aviation (GE) subscale composite fan blades in the NASA GRC Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. The first bending mode (1B) was targeted for vibration control. Because these subscale blades are very thin, the piezoelectric material was surface-mounted on the blades. Three thin piezoelectric patches were applied to each blade two actuator patches and one small sensor patch. These flexible macro-fiber-composite patches were placed in a location of high resonant strain for the 1B mode. The blades were tested up to 5000 rpm, with patches used as sensors, as excitation for the blade, and as part of open- and closed-loop vibration control. Results show that with a single actuator patch, active vibration control causes the damping ratio to increase from a baseline of 0.3% critical damping to about 1.0% damping at 0 RPM. As the rotor speed approaches 5000 RPM, the actively controlled blade damping ratio decreases to about 0.5% damping. This occurs primarily because of centrifugal blade stiffening, and can be observed by the decrease in the generalized electromechanical coupling with rotor speed.

  5. Suppression of rotary unbalance spin-up vibration using passive and semi-active vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begg, Colin Duncan

    Rotating machine unbalance can be the source of unwanted vibrations in many mechanical systems. One problematic form of unbalance force is generated by machine start-up or shut-down. Start-up/shut-down unbalance induces a harmonic excitation force with a varying frequency that is directly proportional to rotor speed, and an amplitude that is proportional to the square of the frequency. When the frequency of a start-up/shut-down unbalance approaches or passes a system resonant frequency, large amplitude vibrations can occur. These vibrations generate greater than normal system operating forces, which could accelerate cumulative part wear and damage internal components. Such degradation could significantly reduce a mechanical system's life. This thesis presents a passive and a semi-active control method for the suppression of vibrations caused by unbalance spin-up excitation (focusing on the start-up scenario) in a mechanical structure. Both methods employ dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). A passive control method using dual mechanical DVAs has been previously proposed (Bursal, 1995). As a basis for design, Bursal (1995) made a conjecture that shaping the system's frequency response function (FRF) by using DVAs to provide a low, flattened, FRF curve over the excitation spin-up frequency range, would minimize the structural vibration response for an unbalance spin-up event. Although the method has been shown to be effective for a few sets of conditions, the conjecture of using steady-state-based FRF-Shaping to suppress transient responses (spin-up unbalance generates a transient response) has not been substantiated. This thesis validates the dual absorber design conjecture and provides additional information regarding the optimal design of such a system. The parametric studies compare the performances between an optimal design (minimum peak response) and the FRF-Shaping design. It is shown that the performances of the two designs are similar for very slow spin

  6. Activities report of the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research in fluid dynamics and acoustics (noise and vibration control); audiology and human effects (audiotory communication and hearing conservation); structures and machinery (automotive design); and shock analysis is summarized. Underwater acoustics; active noise control; aircraft noise; wind turbine noise; laminar flow fans; helmet design; and the acoustics of flow ducts were studied.

  7. Six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Leonard S.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 1 Jan. - 31 Mar. 1993 on six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application is presented. A performance and cost report is included. Topics covered include: actuator testing; mechanical amplifier design; and neural network control system development and experimental evaluation.

  8. Non-linear performance of a three-bearing rotor incorporating a squeeze-film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R.; Dede, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the non-linear vibration performance of a rigid rotor supported on three bearings, one being surrounded by a squeeze-film damper. This damper relies on the pressure built up in the squeeze film to help counter-act external forces arising from unbalance and other effects. As a result a vibration orbit of a certain magnetude results. Such vibration orbits illustrate features found in other non-linear systems, in particular sub-harmonic resonances and jump phenomena. Comparisons between theoretical prediction and experimental observations of these phenomena are made.

  9. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  10. A semi-active H∞ control strategy with application to the vibration suppression of nonlinear high-rise building under earthquake excitations.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guiyun; Chen, Fuquan; Wu, Yingxiong

    2016-01-01

    Different from previous researches which mostly focused on linear response control of seismically excited high-rise buildings, this study aims to control nonlinear seismic response of high-rise buildings. To this end, a semi-active control strategy, in which H∞ control algorithm is used and magneto-rheological dampers are employed for an actuator, is presented to suppress the nonlinear vibration. In this strategy, a modified Kalman-Bucy observer which is suitable for the proposed semi-active strategy is developed to obtain the state vector from the measured semi-active control force and acceleration feedback, taking into account of the effects of nonlinearity, disturbance and uncertainty of controlled system parameters by the observed nonlinear accelerations. Then, the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy is applied to the ASCE 20-story benchmark building when subjected to earthquake excitation and compared with the other control approaches by some control criteria. It is indicated that the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy provides much better control performances by comparison with the semi-active MPC and Clipped-LQG control approaches, and can reduce nonlinear seismic response and minimize the damage in the buildings. Besides, it enhances the reliability of the control performance when compared with the active control strategy. Thus, the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy is suitable for suppressing the nonlinear vibration of high-rise buildings. PMID:27462501

  11. A semi-active H∞ control strategy with application to the vibration suppression of nonlinear high-rise building under earthquake excitations.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guiyun; Chen, Fuquan; Wu, Yingxiong

    2016-01-01

    Different from previous researches which mostly focused on linear response control of seismically excited high-rise buildings, this study aims to control nonlinear seismic response of high-rise buildings. To this end, a semi-active control strategy, in which H∞ control algorithm is used and magneto-rheological dampers are employed for an actuator, is presented to suppress the nonlinear vibration. In this strategy, a modified Kalman-Bucy observer which is suitable for the proposed semi-active strategy is developed to obtain the state vector from the measured semi-active control force and acceleration feedback, taking into account of the effects of nonlinearity, disturbance and uncertainty of controlled system parameters by the observed nonlinear accelerations. Then, the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy is applied to the ASCE 20-story benchmark building when subjected to earthquake excitation and compared with the other control approaches by some control criteria. It is indicated that the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy provides much better control performances by comparison with the semi-active MPC and Clipped-LQG control approaches, and can reduce nonlinear seismic response and minimize the damage in the buildings. Besides, it enhances the reliability of the control performance when compared with the active control strategy. Thus, the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy is suitable for suppressing the nonlinear vibration of high-rise buildings.

  12. Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System on Parabolic Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenbo; Pletser, Vladimir; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System (MAIS) aims at reducing on-orbit vibrations, providing a better controlled lower gravity environment for microgravity physical science experiments. The MAIS will be launched on Tianzhou-1, the first cargo ship of the China Manned Space Program. The principle of the MAIS is to suspend with electro-magnetic actuators a scientific payload, isolating it from the vibrating stator. The MAIS's vibration isolation capability is frequency-dependent and a decrease of vibration of about 40dB can be attained. The MAIS can accommodate 20kg of scientific payload or sample unit, and provide 30W of power and 1Mbps of data transmission. The MAIS is developed to support microgravity scientific experiments on manned platforms in low earth orbit, in order to meet the scientific requirements for fluid physics, materials science, and fundamental physics investigations, which usually need a very quiet environment, increasing their chances of success and their scientific outcomes. The results of scientific experiments and technology tests obtained with the MAIS will be used to improve future space based research. As the suspension force acting on the payload is very small, the MAIS can only be operative and tested in a weightless environment. The 'Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.' (DLR, German Aerospace Centre) granted a flight opportunity to the MAIS experiment to be tested during its 27th parabolic flight campaign of September 2015 performed on the A310 ZERO-G aircraft managed by the French company Novespace, a subsidiary of the 'Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales' (CNES, French Space Agency). The experiment results confirmed that the 6 degrees of freedom motion control technique was effective, and that the vibration isolation performance fulfilled perfectly the expectations based on theoretical analyses and simulations. This paper will present the design of the MAIS and the experiment results obtained during the

  13. Active local volume displacement cancellation of a vibrating baffled beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahui, Marcellin

    An active noise control apparatus is developed. The device reduces the sound radiated from a vibrating clamped beam. The attenuation of the sound field is obtained through minimization of local volume displacements of the vibrating beam. Two single- input/single-output cancellation devices are used. Each device employs a motion sensor and an acoustic actuator. The actuator is a loudspeaker equipped with a pressure sensor to detect its volume displacement. The motion sensor signal is related to the local volume displacement of the structure which is then reduced by a loudspeaker driven with an equal but opposing volume displacement. The volume displacement sensors are developed and fabricated using Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF). They measure the local volume displacements of the vibrating beam. The pressure sensor is mounted in the loudspeaker enclosure. It provides the feedback signal for the loudspeaker volume displacement control. Previous work showed the successful implementation of this technique for uniformly vibrating radiators. This thesis presents the development of this technique for the reduction of sound radiated from a vibrating beam. First, a numerical local volume displacement cancellation experiment is performed using several loudspeakers, each canceling the volume displacement of a section of the beam. The finite element method is used to calculate the velocity distribution of the vibrating beam. A discretized form of the Rayleigh integral is then used to find the sound pressure and the sound power radiated before and after cancellation. Second, the numerical results are verified by laboratory experiments using a beam divided into two sections. Two motion sensors for the beam and one pressure sensor for each loudspeaker are fabricated and thoroughly checked. The cancellation experiment is then performed on a broadband random noise using two independent Proportional-Derivative (PD) controllers.

  14. Downhole Vibration Monitoring and Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. The key feature of this system is its use of a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) to allow the damping coefficient to be changed extensively, rapidly and reversibly without the use of mechanical valves, but only by the application of a current. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Much of the effort was devoted to the design and testing of the MRF damper, itself. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and a final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006, with the objectives of building precommercial prototypes, testing them in a drilling laboratory and the field; developing and implementing a commercialization plan. All of these have been accomplished. The Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) prototypes have been successfully proven in testing at the TerraTek drilling facility and at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC.) Based on the results of these tests, we have signed a definitive development and distribution agreement with Smith, and commercial deployment is underway. This current version of the DVMCS monitors and controls axial vibrations. Due to time and budget constraints of this program, it was not possible to complete a system that would also deal with lateral and torsional (stick-slip) vibrations as originally planned; however, this effort is continuing without DOE

  15. Neuroreceptor Activation by Vibration-Assisted Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Ross D.; Nichols, David; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hyothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction. PMID:25909758

  16. Neuroreceptor activation by vibration-assisted tunneling.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, Ross D; Nichols, David; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hyothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction. PMID:25909758

  17. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieyeville, Fabien; Ichchou, Mohamed; Scorletti, Gérard; Navarro, David; Du, Wan

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control.

  18. Active vibration control in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The low gravity environment of the space station is suitable for experiments or manufacturing processes which require near zero gravity. An experiment was fabricated to test the validity of the active control process and to verify the flow and control parameters identified in a theoretical model. Zero gravity is approximated in the horizontal plane using a low friction air bearing table. An analog control system was designed to activate calibrated air jets when displacement of the test mass is sensed. The experiment demonstrates that an air jet control system introduces an effective damping factor to control oscillatory response. The amount of damping as well as the flow parameters, such as pressure drop across the valve and flow rate of air, are verified by the analytical model.

  19. Active vibration damping using smart material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baras, John S.; Yan, Zhuang

    1994-01-01

    We consider the modeling and active damping of an elastic beam using distributed actuators and sensors. The piezoelectric ceramic material (PZT) is used to build the actuator. The sensor is made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). These materials are glued on both sides of the beam. For the simple clamped beam, the closed loop controller has been shown to be able to extract energy from the beam. The shape of the actuator and its influence on the closed loop system performance are discussed. It is shown that it is possible to suppress the selected mode by choosing the appropriate actuator layout. It is also shown that by properly installing the sensor and determining the sensor shape we can further extract and manipulate the sensor signal for our control need.

  20. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  1. Active vibration control techniques for flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    Two proposed control system design techniques for active vibration control in flexible space structures are detailed. Control issues relevant only to flexible-body dynamics are addressed, whereas no attempt was made to integrate the flexible and rigid-body spacecraft dynamics. Both of the proposed approaches revealed encouraging results; however, further investigation of the interaction of the flexible and rigid-body dynamics is warranted.

  2. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOEpatents

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Mauger, Joseph; Anderson, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  3. [Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two refereed journal publications and ten talks given at conferences, seminars, and colloquia resulted from research supported by NASA. They are itemized in this report. The two publications were entitled "Reactive Tabu and Search Sensor Selection in Active Structural Acoustic Control Problems" and "Quelling Cabin Noise in Turboprop Aircraft via Active Control." The conference presentations covered various aspects of actuator placement, including location problems, for active sound and vibration control of cylinders, of commuter jets, of propeller driven or turboprop aircraft, and for quelling aircraft cabin or interior noise.

  4. Modelling and control of an adaptive tuned mass damper based on shape memory alloys and eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardengo, M.; Cigada, A.; Guanziroli, F.; Manzoni, S.

    2015-08-01

    Tuned mass dampers have long since been used to attenuate vibrations. The need to make them adaptive in order to function even after changes of the dynamic characteristics of the system to be controlled has led to using many different technologies with the aim of improving adaptation performances. Shape memory alloys have already been proven to have properties suitable for creating adaptive tuned mass dampers for light structures. However, the literature has evidenced a number of issues concerning tuned mass dampers based on shape memory alloys, for instance the limited range of adaptation for the eigenfrequency of the damper. The present paper proposes a new layout for adaptive tuned mass dampers based on shape memory alloys, which allows to overcome many of the limitations and to reach a wide range of adaptation for the eigenfrequency. This layout relies on the use of shape memory alloy wires, so that the change of eigenfrequency is achieved by changing the axial load acting on these wires. The new tuned mass damper is then made fully adaptive by including a device that uses the principle of eddy currents, which allows also to change the damping of the tuned mass damper. Indeed, this new kind of damper is designed to dampen vibrations in systems excited by a random disturbance. The paper illustrates the layout and the model of the whole damper and validates it. This model moreover evidences all the advantages allowed by the new layout proposed. Finally, two different strategies to control the dynamic characteristics of the new adaptive tuned mass damper are presented and compared, both numerically as well as experimentally, so to illustrate strengths and drawbacks of each. The experiments and the simulations show that this new damper is fully capable of functioning when random excitation acts as disturbance on the system to control.

  5. Analysis of high load dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, S. T.; Buono, D. F.; Hibner, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    High load damping requirements for modern jet engines are discussed. The design of damping systems which could satisfy these requirements is also discusseed. In order to evaluate high load damping requirements, engines in three major classes were studied; large transport engines, small general aviation engines, and military engines. Four damper concepts applicable to these engines were evaluated; multi-ring, cartridge, curved beam, and viscous/friction. The most promising damper concept was selected for each engine and performance was assessed relative to conventional dampers and in light of projected damping requirements for advanced jet engines.

  6. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-01-09

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program entails modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. The project continues to advance, but is behind the revised (14-month) schedule. Tasks 1-3 (Modeling, Specification and Design) are all essentially complete. The test bench for the Test and Evaluation (Tasks 4 & 5) has been designed and constructed. The design of the full-scale laboratory prototype and associated test equipment is complete and the components are out for manufacture. Barring any unforeseen difficulties, laboratory testing should be complete by the end of March, as currently scheduled. We anticipate the expenses through March to be approximately equal to those budgeted for Phase I.

  7. A phenomenological dynamic model of a magnetorheological damper using a neuro-fuzzy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali, Mohammadjavad; Amri Mazlan, Saiful; Yasser Abd Fatah, Abdul; Zamzuri, Hairi

    2013-12-01

    A magnetorheological (MR) damper is a promising appliance for semi-active suspension systems, due to its capability of damping undesired movement using an adequate control strategy. This research has been carried out a phenomenological dynamic model of two MR dampers using an adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approach. Two kinds of Lord Corporation MR damper (a long stroke damper and a short stroke damper) were used in experiments, and then modeled using the experimental results. In addition, an investigation of the influence of the membership function selection on predicting the behavior of the MR damper and obtaining a mathematical model was conducted to realize the relationship between input current, displacement, and velocity as the inputs and force as output. The results demonstrate that the proposed models for both short stroke and long stroke MR dampers have successfully predicted the behavior of the MR damper with adequate accuracy, and an equation is presented to precisely describe the behavior of each MR damper.

  8. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-10-31

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the rebuilding of the prototype using the improved valve design described in the Jan-March report1. Most of the components have been received and assembly was nearly complete at the end of the period. Testing started in October and results will be submitted in the next report. The field testing component of this Phase has been rethought. The current plan is to adapt the laboratory prototype for use in a drilling laboratory and run a series of controlled drilling tests with and without the DVMCS. This should give a more quantitative evaluation of its value, which will help us sign a commercialization partner. While this testing is underway, we will order and begin machining parts for full field prototypes to be use in Phase III. A modification application is being submitted in October to reflect these changes.

  9. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-07-27

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the rebuilding of the prototype using the improved valve design described in the last report. Most of the components have been received and assembly has begun. Testing is expected to resume in August. In April, a paper was presented at the American Association of Drilling Engineers National Technical Conference in Houston. The paper was well received, and several oilfield service and supply companies sent inquiries regarding commercial distribution of the system. These are currently being pursued, but none have yet been finalized.

  10. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-01-17

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the testing of the rebuilt laboratory prototype and its conversion into a version that will be operable in the drilling tests at TerraTek Laboratories. In addition, formations for use in these tests were designed and constructed, and a test protocol was developed. The change in scope and no-cost extension of Phase II to January, 2006, described in our last report, were approved. The tests are scheduled to be run during the week of January 23, and should be completed before the end of the month.

  11. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-09-30

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and the final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the previous quarter. Efforts this quarter have focused on the manufacture of the prototype and precommercial parts, field test planning and commercialization. The current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The delivery date for five critical parts from one supplier has slipped to late November, which will preclude deployment for a field test before late December or early January. We are exploring whether we can take the partially made parts and complete them earlier in our own shop.

  12. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-01-28

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. The redesign and upgrade of the laboratory prototype was completed on schedule and it was assembled during the last period. Testing was begin during the first week of October. Initial results indicated that the dynamic range of the damping was less than predicted and that the maximum damping was also less than required. A number of possible explanations for these results were posited, and test equipment was acquired to evaluate the various hypotheses. Testing was just underway at the end of this period.

  13. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-10-29

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Phase II began on June 1, and the first month's effort were reported in the seventh quarterly report on the project.1 The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. The redesign and upgrade of the laboratory prototype was completed on schedule during this period, and assembly was complete at the end of this period. Testing will begin during the first week of October. This aspect of the project is thus approximately six weeks behind schedule. Design of the field prototype is progressing per schedule.

  14. Medium to long term behavior of MR dampers for structural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caterino, N.; Azmoodeh, B. M.; Occhiuzzi, A.

    2014-10-01

    The medium to long term behavior of a prototype magnetorheological (MR) damper for structural control of earthquake induced vibrations is investigated herein. Unlike some applications for which MR devices experience frequent dynamic loads, seismic dampers might not be used for most of their life, staying dormant for a long period until an earthquake hits the hosting structure. This work aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a MR damper after years of inactivity. A MR device has been tested twice, first in 2008 and then in 2013, after five years of absolute inactivity. The comparison between the results of the two tests is made in terms of force-displacement loops. It is shown that, after a 5-year rest, only part of the first stroke of the damper is characterized by an unexpected response of the damper. After half a stroke, the damper quickly returned to behave like in 2008, even if a slight non-reversible decrease of the reacting force has been recorded. The latter is found to be more evident (5-7%) for larger currents, less visible in the case of zero magnetic field. From the point of view of civil engineering, this decay of performance is definitely acceptable, being largely bounded within the limits of the uncertainties typically involved and taken into account in the structural design. Finally, starting from a literature review, the paper discusses the possible causes of the observed changes in the mechanical response of the damper over time.

  15. Investigation on seismic resistance of high-rising buildings installed with viscoelastic-wall dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Wang, Y.; Ren, J.

    2015-04-01

    Viscoelastic dampers are one of popular vibration mitigation devices applied to tall buildings to reduce seismic and wind-induced vibiration. In this paper,a new kind of viscoelastic-wall damper, which could be installed at the shearwall location of high-rising buildings, is proposed to enhance the energy disspation ability. The seismic resistance behaviors of one tall building installed with the viscoelastic-wall dampers are investigated by numerical analysis. The mechanical property testing of the viscoelastic-wall damper is carried to investigate its performance parameter under various exciting frequency and strain amplitude. According to the testing results, a mathematical model of viscoelastic - wall damper is modeled based on Kelvin model. On the basis of a 36-floor frame-shear wall structure and using the finite element software ABAQUS, two finite element models of the high-rising building with and without viscoelastic-wall dampers are set up. Elasto-plastic time-history analysis is used to compare the seismic performance of the two structures subjected to the frequently and rarely earthquakes. It is proved that the seismic response of the structure is mitigated effectively when it is equipped with viscoelastic-wall dampers.

  16. A mechanical energy harvested magnetorheological damper with linear-rotary motion converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ki Sum; Zou, Li; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2016-04-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) dampers are promising to substitute traditional oil dampers because of adaptive properties of MR fluids. During vibration, significant energy is wasted due to the energy dissipation in the damper. Meanwhile, for conventional MR damping systems, extra power supply is needed. In this paper, a new energy harvester is designed in an MR damper that integrates controllable damping and energy harvesting functions into one device. The energy harvesting part of this MR damper has a unique mechanism converting linear motion to rotary motion that would be more stable and cost effective when compared to other mechanical transmissions. A Maxon motor is used as a power generator to convert the mechanical energy into electrical energy to supply power for the MR damping system. Compared to conventional approaches, there are several advantages in such an integrated device, including weight reduction, ease in installation with less maintenance. A mechanical energy harvested MR damper with linear-rotary motion converter and motion rectifier is designed, fabricated, and tested. Experimental studies on controllable damping force and harvested energy are performed with different transmissions. This energy harvesting MR damper would be suitable to vehicle suspensions, civil structures, and smart prostheses.

  17. Development of a long-stroke MR damper for a building with tuned masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemp, René; de la Llera, Juan Carlos; Saldias, Hernaldo; Weber, Felix

    2016-10-01

    This article deals with the development of a long-stroke MR-damper aimed to control, by reacting on a tuned mass (TM), the earthquake performance of an existing 21-story office building located in Santiago, Chile. The ±1 m stroke MR-damper was designed using the nominal response of the building equipped with two 160 ton pendular masses tuned to the fundamental lateral vibration mode of the structure. An extended physical on-off controller, a special current driver, a new real-time structural displacement sensor, and an MR-damper force sensor were all developed for this application. The physical damper and control were experimentally validated using a suite of cyclic and seismic signals. The real-time displacement sensor developed was validated by first using a scaled down building prototype subjected to shaking table tests, and then a real-scale free vibration test on the sensor installed horizontally at the foundation level of a building. It is concluded that the proposed TM and MR-damper solution is technically feasible, and for an equivalent key performance index also defined herein, more economical than a solution based on passive viscous dampers.

  18. Multiple plate hydrostatic viscous damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for damping radial motion of a rotating shaft is described. The damper comprises a series of spaced plates extending in a radial direction. A hydraulic piston is utilized to place a load in these plates. Each annular plate is provided with a suitable hydrostatic bearing geometry on at least one of its faces. This structure provides a high degree of dampening in a rotor case system of turbomachinery in general. The damper is particularly useful in gas turbine engines.

  19. Dynamics of the non-ideal autoparametric system with MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sado, Danuta

    2012-11-01

    The nonlinear response of a three degree of freedom autoparametric system with a double pendulum, including the magneto-rheological (MR) damper when the excitation comes from a DC motor which works with limited power supply, has been examined. The non-ideal source of power adds one degree of freedom which makes the system have four degrees of freedom. The influence of damping force in MR damper on the phenomenon of energy transfer has been studied. Near the internal and external resonance region, except periodic vibration also chaotic vibration has been observed.

  20. Optimization of Magneto-Rheological Damper for Maximizing Magnetic Flux Density in the Fluid Flow Gap Through FEA and GA Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Hemanth; Kumar, Hemantha; Gangadharan, Kalluvalappil

    2016-06-01

    A magneto rheological (MR) fluid damper offers cost effective solution for semiactive vibration control in an automobile suspension. The performance of MR damper is significantly depends on the electromagnetic circuit incorporated into it. The force developed by MR fluid damper is highly influenced by the magnetic flux density induced in the fluid flow gap. In the present work, optimization of electromagnetic circuit of an MR damper is discussed in order to maximize the magnetic flux density. The optimization procedure was proposed by genetic algorithm and design of experiments techniques. The result shows that the fluid flow gap size less than 1.12 mm cause significant increase of magnetic flux density.

  1. Evaluation of Seismic Performance and Effectiveness of Multiple Slim-Type Damper System for Seismic Response Control of Building Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David; Sung, Eun Hee; Park, Kwan-Soon; Park, Jaegyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of seismic performance and cost-effectiveness of a multiple slim-type damper system developed for the vibration control of earthquake excited buildings. The multiple slim-type damper (MSD) that consists of several small slim-type dampers and linkage units can control damping capacity easily by changing the number of small dampers. To evaluate the performance of the MSD, dynamic loading tests are performed with three slim-type dampers manufactured at a real scale. Numerical simulations are also carried out by nonlinear time history analysis with a ten-story earthquake excited building structure. The seismic performance and cost-effectiveness of the MSD system are investigated according to the various installation configurations of the MSD system. From the results of numerical simulation and cost-effectiveness evaluation, it is shown that combinations of the MSD systems can effectively improve the seismic performance of earthquake excited building structures. PMID:25301387

  2. Evaluation of seismic performance and effectiveness of multiple slim-type damper system for seismic response control of building structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, David; Sung, Eun Hee; Park, Kwan-Soon; Park, Jaegyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of seismic performance and cost-effectiveness of a multiple slim-type damper system developed for the vibration control of earthquake excited buildings. The multiple slim-type damper (MSD) that consists of several small slim-type dampers and linkage units can control damping capacity easily by changing the number of small dampers. To evaluate the performance of the MSD, dynamic loading tests are performed with three slim-type dampers manufactured at a real scale. Numerical simulations are also carried out by nonlinear time history analysis with a ten-story earthquake excited building structure. The seismic performance and cost-effectiveness of the MSD system are investigated according to the various installation configurations of the MSD system. From the results of numerical simulation and cost-effectiveness evaluation, it is shown that combinations of the MSD systems can effectively improve the seismic performance of earthquake excited building structures.

  3. Rheological properties of bi-dispersed magnetorheological fluids based on plate-like iron particles with application to a small-sized damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Kruti; Xuan Phu, Do; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the rheological properties and an application of bi-dispersed magnetorheological fluid (MRF) based on plate-like iron particles are experimentally investigated. A bi-dispersed MR Fluid is prepared using two different micron-scale sizes of plate-like iron particles. In the absence of a magnetic field, the properties of the fluid are isotropic. Upon the application of a magnetic field, the magnetized particles form a chain aligned in the direction of the field, which promotes the appearance of a yield stress. The reversible transition from solid to liquid is the basic requirement of MR applications. Due to the anisotropy in the shape and formation of a less compact structure in the iron plate-like particles, weak sedimentation and good redispersibility of the proposed MR fluid are created. The physical properties of the proposed MR fluids are evaluated and applied to the design of a small-sized controllable MR vibration damper, which can be used for vibration control of a washing machine. The MR damper is a semi-active device that dissipates energy during vibration motion to increase the stability of the application system. Three different weight fractions of the bi-dispersed MR fluids are prepared, and their rheological properties are presented and discussed. Based on their rheological properties, the figures of merit of the proposed MR fluids are derived. A comparison of these figures of merit gives the nominal behavior of the MR fluids, which are important in the design of the application device. A stability test is also performed to check the settling rate of MR fluids per day. The change in damping force due to the problem of particles settling in the MRF and the field-dependent damping force are measured with the MR damper operated just after filling the MRF and with the MR damper operated after waiting for 48 h after filling. With basic rheological properties and outstanding mechanical properties, it is clearly demonstrated that the proposed MR

  4. Active structural vibration control: Robust to temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vivek; Sharma, Manu; Thakur, Nagesh

    2012-11-01

    d-form augmented piezoelectric constitutive equations which take into account temperature dependence of piezoelectric strain coefficient (d31) and permittivity (∈33), are converted into e-form. Using e-form constitutive equations, a finite element model of a smart two dimensional plate instrumented with piezoelectric patches is derived. Equations of motion are derived using Hamilton's variational principle. Coupled equations of motion are uncoupled using modal analysis. Modal state vectors are estimated using the Kalman observer. The first mode of smart cantilevered plate is actively controlled using negative first modal velocity feedback at various temperatures. Total control effort required to do so is calculated using the electro-mechanical impedance method. The temperature dependence of sensor voltage, control voltage, control effort and Kalman observer equations is shown analytically. Simulation results are presented using MATLAB. Variations in (i) peak sensor voltage, (ii) actual and estimated first modal velocities, (iii) peak control voltage, (iv) total control effort and (v) settling time with respect to temperature are presented. Active vibration control performance is not maintained at temperature away from reference temperature when the temperature dependence of piezoelectric stress coefficient ‘e31' and permittivity ‘∈33' is not included in piezoelectric constitutive equations. Active control of vibrations becomes robust to temperature variations when the temperature dependence of ‘e31' and ‘∈33' is included in piezoelectric constitutive equations.

  5. Experimental and theoretical investigation of passive damping concepts for member forced and free vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Zia; Mykins, David W.

    1987-01-01

    Potential passive damping concepts for use in space structures are identified. The effectiveness of copper brush, wool swab, and silly putty in chamber dampers is investigated through natural vibration tests on a tubular aluminum member. The member ends have zero translation and possess partial rotational restraints. The silly putty in chamber dampers provide the maximum passive damping efficiency. Forced vibration tests are then conducted with one, two, and three damper chambers containing silly putty. Owing to the limitation of the vibrator used, the performance of these dampers could not be evaluated experimentally until the forcing function was disengaged. Nevertheless, their performance is evaluated through a forced dynamic finite element analysis conducted as a part of this investigation. The theoretical results based on experimentally obtained damping ratios indicate that the passive dampers are considerably more effective under member natural vibration than during forced vibration. Also, the maximum damping under forced vibration occurs at or near resonance.

  6. Use of piezoelectric dampers for improving the feel of golf clubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Emanuele; Spangler, Ronald L., Jr.; Pandell, Tracy

    1999-06-01

    Several sports are based upon a tool (club, bat, stick) striking an object (ball, puck) across a field of play. Anytime two structures collide, vibration is created by the impact of the two. The impact of the objects excites the structural modes of the tool, creating a vibration that can be felt by the player, especially if the hit is not at a `sweet spot'. Vibration adversely affects both feel and performance. This paper explains how piezoelectric dampers were developed to reduce vibration and improve the feel of ball-impact sporting goods such as golf clubs. The paper describes how the dynamic characteristics of a golf club were calculated, at first in the free-free condition, and then during its operation conditions (the swing of the club, and the impact with the ball). The dynamic characteristics were used to develop a damper that addressed a specific, or multiple, modes of interest. The damper development and testing are detailed in this paper. Both objective laboratory tests and subjective player tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the piezoelectric dampers. The results of the tests, along with published medical data on the sensitivity of the human body, were used to draw a correlation between human feel and vibration reduction.

  7. Sensor fusion methods for high performance active vibration isolation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, C.; Matichard, F.

    2015-04-01

    Sensor noise often limits the performance of active vibration isolation systems. Inertial sensors used in such systems can be selected through a wide variety of instrument noise and size characteristics. However, the most sensitive instruments are often the biggest and the heaviest. Consequently, high-performance active isolators sometimes embed many tens of kilograms in instrumentation. The weight and size of instrumentation can add unwanted constraint on the design. It tends to lower the structures natural frequencies and reduces the collocation between sensors and actuators. Both effects tend to reduce feedback control performance and stability. This paper discusses sensor fusion techniques that can be used in order to increase the control bandwidth (and/or the stability). For this, the low noise inertial instrument signal dominates the fusion at low frequency to provide vibration isolation. Other types of sensors (relative motion, smaller but noisier inertial, or force sensors) are used at higher frequencies to increase stability. Several sensor fusion configurations are studied. The paper shows the improvement that can be expected for several case studies including a rigid equipment, a flexible equipment, and a flexible equipment mounted on a flexible support structure.

  8. Stability of Intershaft Squeeze Film Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Shafei, A.

    1991-01-01

    Intershaft squeeze film dampers were investigated for damping of dual rotor aircraft jet engines. It was thought that the intershaft damper would enhance the stability of the rotor-bearing system. Unfortunately, it was determined that the intershaft squeeze film damper was unstable above the engine's first critical speed. Here, a stability analysis of rotors incorporating intershaft squeeze film dampers is discussed. A rotor model consisting of two Jeffcott rotors with two intershaft squeeze film dampers was investigated. Examining the system characteristic equation for the conditions at which the roots indicate an ever-growing unstable motion results in the stability conditions. The cause of the instability is identified as the rotation of the oil in the damper clearance. Several proposed configurations of intershaft squeeze film dampers are discussed, and it is shown that the intershaft dampers are stable supercritically only with a configuration in which the oil film does not rotate.

  9. Prototype and test of a novel rotary magnetorheological damper based on helical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianqiang; Dong, Xiaomin; Wang, Wen

    2016-02-01

    To increase the output damping torque of a rotary magnetorheological (MR) damper with limited geometrical space, a novel rotary MR damper based on helical flow is proposed. A new working mode, helical flow mode, is discussed and applied to enlarge the flow path of MR fluids. The helical flow can improve the performance of the rotary damper by enlarging the length of the active region. Based on the idea, a rotary MR damper is designed. The rotary MR damper contains a spiral piston, dual-coil core, a rotating cylinder and a stator cylinder. Based on the Bingham model, the output damping torque of the damper is analytically derived. The finite element method (FEM) is applied to calculate the magnetic field of the active region. The multi-objective optimal design method is adopted to obtain the optimal geometric parameters. A prototype is fabricated based on the optimal results. To validate the proposed rotary MR damper, two types of experiments including the low rotation speed and the high rotation speed are investigated. The results show that the proposed rotary MR damper has high torque density and compact structure. The helical flow mode can increase the output damping torque with limited space.

  10. Integrated passive/active vibration absorber for multi-story buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina J.; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Horta, Lucas G.

    1995-01-01

    Passive isolator, active vibration absorber, and an integrated passive/active (hybrid) control are studied for their effectiveness in reducing structural vibration under seismic excitations. For the passive isolator, a laminated rubber bearing base isolator which has been studied and used extensively by researchers and seismic designers is considered. An active vibration absorber concept, which can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability with minimum knowledge of the controlled system, is used to reduce the passive isolator displacement and to suppress the top floor vibration. A three-story building model is used for the numerical simulation. The performance of an active vibration absorber and a hybrid vibration controller in reducing peak structural responses is compared with the passively isolated structural response and with absence of vibration control systems under the N00W component of El Centro 1940 and N90W component of the Mexico City earthquake excitation records. The results show that the integrated passive/active vibration control system is most effective in suppressing the peak structural acceleration for the El Centro 1940 earthquake when compared with the passive or active vibration absorber alone. The active vibration absorber, however, is the only system that suppresses the peak acceleration of the structure for the Mexico City 1985 earthquake.

  11. The design of an active-adaptive tuned vibration absorber based on magnetorheological elastomer and its vibration attenuation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, G. J.; Gong, X. L.; Kang, C. J.; Xuan, S. H.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents an active-adaptive tuned vibration absorber (AATVA) which is based on magnetorheological elastomer (MRE). A voice coil motor is attached to a conventional MRE adaptive tuned vibration absorber (ATVA) to improve its performance. In this study, two feedback types of the activation force were analyzed and the stability condition was obtained. In order to eliminate the time delay effect during the signal processing, a phase-lead compensator was incorporated. Based on the analysis, an MRE AATVA prototype was designed and its dynamic properties were experimentally investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that its resonant frequency could vary from 11 to 18 Hz and its damping ratio decreased to roughly 0.05 from 0.19 by adding the activation force. Besides, its vibration reduction abilities at the first two resonant frequencies of the experimental platform could reach 5.9 dB and 7.9 dB respectively.

  12. A nonlinear kinematic and dynamic modeling of Macpherson suspension systems with a magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Saikat; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that Macpherson strut suspension systems are widely used in light and medium weight vehicles. The performance of these suspension systems can be enriched by incorporating magneto-rheological (MR) dampers and an appropriate dynamic model is required in order to find out the ride comfort and other performances properly in the sense of practical environment conditions. Therefore, in this work the kinematic and dynamic modeling of Macpherson strut suspension system with MR damper is presented and its responses are evaluated. The governing equations are formulated using the kinematic properties of the suspension system and adopting Lagrange’s equation. In the formulation of the model, both the rotation of the wheel assembly and the lateral stiffness of the tire are considered to represent the nonlinear characteristic of Macpherson type suspension system. The formulated mathematical model is then compared with equivalent conventional quarter car suspension model and the different dynamic responses such as the displacement of the sprung mass are compared to emphasize the effectiveness of the proposed model. Additionally, in this work the important kinematic properties of suspension system such as camber angle, king-pin angle and track width alteration, which cannot be obtained from conventional quarter car suspension model, are evaluated in time and frequency domains. Finally, vibration control responses of the proposed suspension system are presented in time and frequency domains which are achieved from the semi-active sky-hook controller.

  13. 46 CFR 131.899 - Fire dampers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire dampers. 131.899 Section 131.899 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.899 Fire dampers. Each fire damper installed within the boundary...

  14. 46 CFR 131.899 - Fire dampers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire dampers. 131.899 Section 131.899 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.899 Fire dampers. Each fire damper installed within the boundary...

  15. 46 CFR 131.899 - Fire dampers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire dampers. 131.899 Section 131.899 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.899 Fire dampers. Each fire damper installed within the boundary...

  16. 46 CFR 131.899 - Fire dampers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire dampers. 131.899 Section 131.899 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.899 Fire dampers. Each fire damper installed within the boundary...

  17. 46 CFR 131.899 - Fire dampers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire dampers. 131.899 Section 131.899 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.899 Fire dampers. Each fire damper installed within the boundary...

  18. Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1995-01-01

    Active structural acoustic control is a method in which the control inputs (used to reduce interior noise) are applied directly to a vibrating structural acoustic system. The control concept modeled in this work is the application of in-plane force inputs to piezoceramic patches bonded to the wall of a vibrating cylinder. The cylinder is excited by an exterior noise source -- an acoustic monopole -- located near the outside of the cylinder wall. The goal is to determine the force inputs and sites for the piezoelectric actuators so that (1) the interior noise is effectively damped; (2) the level of vibration of the cylinder shell is not increased; and (3) the power requirements needed to drive the actuators are not excessive. We studied external monopole excitations at two frequencies. A cylinder resonance of 100 Hz, where the interior acoustic field is driven in multiple, off-resonance cylinder cavity modes, and a cylinder resonance of 200 Hz are characterized by both near and off-resonance cylinder vibration modes which couple effectively with a single, dominant, low-order acoustic cavity mode at resonance. Previous work has focused almost exclusively on meeting objective (1) and solving a complex least-squares problem to arrive at an optimal force vector for a given set of actuator sites. In addition, it has been noted that when the cavity mode couples with cylinder vibration modes (our 200 Hz case) control spillover may occur in higher order cylinder shell vibrational modes. How to determine the best set of actuator sites to meet objectives (1)-(3) is the main contribution of our research effort. The selection of the best set of actuator sites from a set of potential sites is done via two metaheuristics -- simulated annealing and tabu search. Each of these metaheuristics partitions the set of potential actuator sites into two disjoint sets: those that are selected to control the noise (on) and those that are not (off). Next, each metaheuristic attempts to

  19. H∞ control of railway vehicle suspension with MR damper using scaled roller rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yu-Jeong; You, Won-Hee; Hur, Hyun-Moo; Park, Joon-Hyuk

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a magneto-rheological (MR) damper was applied to the secondary suspension to reduce the vibration of a car body. The control performance of the MR damper was verified by numerical analysis with a 1/5 scale railway vehicle model in accordance with the similarity law. The analysis results were then validated in tests. In particular, the objective of the study was to understand how the control performance affected the dynamic characteristics of a railway vehicle and to systematically analyze the relationship between control performance and dynamic characteristics depending on various running speeds. To achieve this, experimental results for the dynamic characteristics of the scaled MR damper designed for the 1/5 scale railway vehicle model were applied to the railway vehicle model. The H∞ control method was applied to the controller. The means of designing the railway vehicle body vibration controller and the effectiveness of its results were studied.

  20. Passive and active launch vibration studies in the LVIS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, Donald L.; Bartos, Bruce; Goodding, James C.; Wilke, Paul S.; Davis, Torey

    1998-06-01

    A U.S. Air Force-sponsored team consisting of Boeing (formerly McDonnell Douglas), Honeywell Satellite Systems, and CSA Engineering has developed technology to reduce the vibration felt by an isolated payload during launch. Spacecraft designers indicate that a launch vibration isolation system (LVIS) could provide significant cost benefits in payload design, testing, launch, and lifetime. This paper contains developments occurring since those reported previously. Simulations, which included models of a 6,500 pound spacecraft, an isolating payload attach fitting (PAF) to replace an existing PAF, and the Boeing Delta II launch vehicle, were used to generate PAF performance requirements for the desired levels of attenuation. Hardware was designed to meet the requirements. The isolating PAF concept replaces portions of a conventional metallic fitting with hydraulic- pneumatic struts featuring a unique hydraulic cross-link feature that stiffens under rotation to meet rocking restrictions. The pneumatics provide low-stiffness longitudinal support. Two demonstration isolating PAF struts were designed, fabricated and tested to determine their stiffness and damping characteristics and to verify the performance of the hydraulic crosslink concept. Measurements matched analytical predictions closely. An active closed-loop control system was simulated to assess its potential isolation performance. A factor of 100 performance increase over the passive case was achieved with minor weight addition and minimal power consumption.

  1. Suppression of chaotic vibrations in a nonlinear half-car model

    SciTech Connect

    Tusset, Ângelo Marcelo E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Piccirillo, Vinícius E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Janzen, Frederic Conrad E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Lenz, Wagner Barth E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Balthazar, José Manoel; Fonseca Brasil, Reyolando M. L. R. da

    2014-12-10

    The present work investigates the nonlinear response of a half-car model. The disturbances of the road are assumed to be sinusoidal. After constructing the bifurcation diagram, we using the 0-1 test for identify the chaotic motion. The principal objective of this study is to eliminate the chaotic behaviour of the chassis and reduce its vibration, and for this reason a control system for semi-active vehicle suspension with magnetorheological damper is proposed. The control mechanism is designed based on SDRE technique, where the control parameter is the voltage applied to the coil of the damper. Numerical results show that the proposed control method is effective in significantly reducing of the chassis vibration, increasing therefore, passenger comfort.

  2. Suppression of chaotic vibrations in a nonlinear half-car model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tusset, Ángelo Marcelo; Piccirillo, Vinícius; Janzen, Frederic Conrad; Lenz, Wagner Barth; Balthazar, José Manoel; da Fonseca Brasil, Reyolando M. L. R.

    2014-12-01

    The present work investigates the nonlinear response of a half-car model. The disturbances of the road are assumed to be sinusoidal. After constructing the bifurcation diagram, we using the 0-1 test for identify the chaotic motion. The principal objective of this study is to eliminate the chaotic behaviour of the chassis and reduce its vibration, and for this reason a control system for semi-active vehicle suspension with magnetorheological damper is proposed. The control mechanism is designed based on SDRE technique, where the control parameter is the voltage applied to the coil of the damper. Numerical results show that the proposed control method is effective in significantly reducing of the chassis vibration, increasing therefore, passenger comfort.

  3. Active low-frequency vertical vibration isolation system for precision measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kang; Li, Gang; Hu, Hua; Wang, Lijun

    2016-06-01

    Low-frequency vertical vibration isolation systems play important roles in precision measurements to reduce seismic and environmental vibration noise. Several types of active vibration isolation systems have been developed. However, few researches focus on how to optimize the test mass install position in order to improve the vibration transmissibility. An active low-frequency vertical vibration isolation system based on an earlier instrument, the Super Spring, is designed and implemented. The system, which is simple and compact, consists of two stages: a parallelogram-shaped linkage to ensure vertical motion, and a simple spring-mass system. The theoretical analysis of the vibration isolation system is presented, including terms erroneously ignored before. By carefully choosing the mechanical parameters according to the above analysis and using feedback control, the resonance frequency of the system is reduced from 2.3 to 0.03 Hz, a reduction by a factor of more than 75. The vibration isolation system is installed as an inertial reference in an absolute gravimeter, where it improved the scatter of the absolute gravity values by a factor of 5. The experimental results verifies the improved performance of the isolation system, making it particularly suitable for precision experiments. The improved vertical vibration isolation system can be used as a prototype for designing high-performance active vertical isolation systems. An improved theoretical model of this active vibration isolation system with beam-pivot configuration is proposed, providing fundamental guidelines for vibration isolator design and assembling.

  4. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment is performed to study the mechanisms of active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders via vibrational outputs. In the present method of control, a vibrational force input was used as the secondary control input to reduce the radiated acoustic field. For the frequencies considered, the active vibration technique provided good global reduction of interior sound even though only one actuator was used.

  5. Digital control system for space structural dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Digital control systems for space structural dampers, also referred to as inertia or proof-mass dampers are investigated. A damper concept is improved by adding a small taper to the proof-mass, and using a proximeter to determine position. Another damper using a three inch stroke rather than the standard one inch stroke is described. Provisions are made for a relative velocity feedback. In one approach, the digital controller is modified to accept the signal from a linear velocity transducer. In the other, the velocity feedback is included in the digital program. An overall system concept for the use of the dampers is presented.

  6. System design for active vibration control of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, V.; Nagaraja, B. V.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Shree S, Amrutha; Muthaiah, Skanda N.

    2003-10-01

    Instrumentation, electronics, digital signal processing and related software form the basic building blocks of a system for implementation of Active Vibration Control (AVC) for smart aerospace structures. This paper essentially deals with the design, development and implementation of a 4 channel analog input sub-system essentially consisting of charge amplifiers, filters, gain amplifiers & Analog to Digital Converters (ADC), the subsequent Digital Signal Processor (DSP) hardware for implementation of the controller and finally a 4 Channel analog output subsystem consisting of Digital to Analog Converters (DAC), reconstruction filters & high voltage amplifiers. This system essentially interfaces to a structure with piezo-ceramic sensors and actuators for implementation of real time AVC on a smart beam. The paper also highlights some of the new ideas that have been incorporated into the system design.

  7. Active vibration and balance system for closed cycle thermodynamic machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass. A method is also provided.

  8. A wave-based design of semi-active piezoelectric composites for broadband vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Collet, M.; Ichchou, M.; Li, L.; Bareille, O.; Dimitrijevic, Z.

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with the design of periodic piezoelectric structures for broadband vibration control. By shunting identical negative capacitances to the periodically distributed piezoelectric patches, a wide and continuous band gap is created so as to cover the frequency range of interest. This way the modal density of the structure is reduced and the modal shapes are localized at the boundaries. A large proportion of the energy can then be removed or dissipated by a small number of dampers or energy harvesters integrated within the negative capacitance circuits. A design process is proposed to achieve the wide band gap. The overall amount of piezoelectric materials is constrained in order to keep mass of structures low. The wave electromechanical coupling factor is proposed and used as a criterion. This allows to reach the largest width of the band gap by using a stable value of negative capacitance. The control of multiple high-order modes of a cantilever beam is considered as an example. The vibration reduction performance of the designed piezoelectric structures is presented and the influences of band gap resonance, resistor and the boundary condition are discussed. The proposed approach is fully based on wave characteristics and it does not rely on any modal information. It is therefore promising for applications at mid- and high frequencies where the access to the exact modal information is difficult.

  9. Compact Active Vibration Control System for a Flexible Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A diamond-shaped actuator for a flexible panel has an inter-digitated electrode (IDE) and a piezoelectric wafer portion positioned therebetween. The IDE and/or the wafer portion are diamond-shaped. Point sensors are positioned with respect to the actuator and measure vibration. The actuator generates and transmits a cancelling force to the panel in response to an output signal from a controller, which is calculated using a signal describing the vibration. A method for controlling vibration in a flexible panel includes connecting a diamond-shaped actuator to the flexible panel, and then connecting a point sensor to each actuator. Vibration is measured via the point sensor. The controller calculates a proportional output voltage signal from the measured vibration, and transmits the output signal to the actuator to substantially cancel the vibration in proximity to each actuator.

  10. A new magnetorheological damper for seismic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Zhang, Lu; Zhu, Hai-Tao; Li, Zhong-Xian

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes a new MR damper with bidirectional adjusting damping forces to enhance the fail-safe property of the MR damper. The structure of the composite magnetic circuits is improved for the new damper. Four prototype dampers are fabricated and tested by magnetic field tests and dynamic tests. The magnetic field distribution in the damping path and the dynamic properties of the dampers with different input currents are obtained. The Gompertz model is proposed to portray the dynamic behavior of the prototype dampers. The study shows that, due to the improved structure of composite magnetic circuits, the prototype dampers can maintain a medium damping force with zero current input. This behavior may ensure a better fail-safe property and avoid settlement of MR fluid compared with conventional MR dampers. Furthermore, the minimum and maximum output powers of the proposed dampers can be obtained at the states of the negative peak and positive peak of currents inputs, respectively. In addition, the dynamic range of controllable force is wider than that of conventional MR dampers. The analysis further shows that the proposed Gompertz model can precisely portray the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the proposed dampers without complicated function forms.

  11. Response of a quarter car model with optimal magnetorheological damper parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabakar, R. S.; Sujatha, C.; Narayanan, S.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the control of the stationary response of a quarter car model to random road excitation with a Magnetorheological (MR) damper as a semi-active suspension device is considered. The MR damper is a hypothetical analytical damper whose parameters are determined optimally using a multi-objective optimization technique Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA II). The hysteretic behaviour of the MR damper is characterized using Bingham and modified Bouc-Wen models. The multi-objective optimization problem is solved by minimizing the difference between the root mean square (rms) sprung mass acceleration, suspension stroke and the road holding responses of the quarter car model with the MR damper and those of the active suspension system based on linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control with the constraint that the MR damper control force lies between ±5 percent of the LQR control force. It is observed that the MR damper suspension systems with optimal parameters perform an order of magnitude better than the passive suspension and perform as well as active suspensions with limited state feedback and closer to the performance of fully active suspensions.

  12. Study, Development, and Design of Replaceable Shear Yielding Steel Panel Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Katsuhide; Keii, Michio

    2008-07-08

    For middle-high rise buildings, vibration controlled structures to reduce the damage of main frames are recently becoming general in Japan. A steel material damper is low price and excellent in the energy absorption efficiency at a large earthquake. Though the exchange of the dampers are necessary when an excessive accumulation of plasticity deformation occurs, a steel material damping system, which received an excessive accumulation of plasticity deformation after a large earthquake, can recover a seismic-proof performance and property value of the building after the replacement. In the paper, shear yielding steel panel dampers installed in the web of a beam connected with high tension bolt joint is introduced. This damper is made of low-yield point steel, and the advantages of this system are low cost, easy-production and easy-replacement. For this steel panel damper, the finite element method (FEM) analysis using the shell element model adjusted to 1/2 of 6.4 m beam span is executed to make the design most effective. Yielding property of the beam installing this damper, shape of the splice plate and the bolt orientation for the connecting are examined in this analysis. As a result, we found that the plastic strain extends uniformly to the entire damping panel when making the splice plate a trapezoidal shape. The basic performance confirmation examination was also done using the real scale examination model besides the FEM analysis, and the performance of the system was confirmed. In addition, design of a high rise building in which the steel shear-yielding panel dampers and oil dampers were adopted without disturbing an architectural plan is also introduced.

  13. Improved Coulomb-Friction Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    Equal damping provided on forward and reverse strokes. Improved damper has springs and wedge rings symmetrically placed on both ends of piston wedge, so friction force same in both directions of travel. Unlike conventional automotive shock absorbers, they resemble on outside, both versions require no viscous liquid and operate over wide temperature range.

  14. Activities of the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research in fluid dynamics, acoustics, automotive engineering, audiology, noise and vibration effects (on human beings), and structural response to noise and vibration was carried out. Aircraft noise, acoustics of flow duct systems and enclosures, acoustic modeling, sound propagation, and acoustic measurement techniques were studied. Auditory and vestibular functions and electrophysiology were investigated.

  15. Optimum connecting dampers to reduce the seismic responses of parallel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. P.; Ge, D. D.; Huang, X.

    2011-04-01

    Parameters of connecting dampers between two adjacent structures and twin-tower structure with large podium are optimized through theoretical analysis. The connecting visco-elastic damper (VED) is represented by the Kelvin model and the connecting viscous fluid damper (VFD) is represented by the Maxwell model. Two optimization criteria are selected to minimize the vibration energy of the primary structure and to minimize the vibration energy of both structures. Two representative numerical examples of adjacent structures and one three-dimensional finite element model of a twin-tower with podium structure are used to verify the correctness of the theoretical approach. On the one hand, by means of theoretical analysis, the first natural circular frequencies and total mass of the two structures can be taken as parameters in the general formula to get the optimal parameters of the coupling dampers. On the other hand, using the Kanai-Tajimi filtered white-noise ground motion model and several actual earthquake records, the appropriate parameters of two types of linking dampers are obtained through extensive parametric studies. By comparison, it can be found that the results of parametric studies are consistent with the results of theoretical studies for the two types of dampers under the two optimization criteria. The effectiveness of VED and VFD is investigated in terms of the seismic response reduction of the neighboring structures. The numerical results demonstrate that the seismic response and vibration energy of parallel structures are mitigated significantly. The performances of VED and VFD are comparable to one another. The explicit formula of VED and VFD can help engineers in application of coupled structure control strategies.

  16. A hybrid electromagnetic shock absorber for active vehicle suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Babak; Bolandhemmat, Hamidreza; Behrad Khamesee, Mir; Golnaraghi, Farid

    2011-02-01

    The use of electromagnetic dampers (ED) in vehicle active suspension systems has drawn considerable attention in the past few years, attributed to the fact that active suspension systems have shown superior performance in improving ride comfort and road handling of terrain vehicles, compared with their passive and semi-active counterparts. Although demonstrating superb performance, active suspensions still have some shortcomings that must be overcome. They have high energy consumption, weight, and cost and are not fail-safe in case of a power breakdown. The novel hybrid ED, which is proposed in this paper, is a potential solution to the above-mentioned drawbacks of conventional active suspension systems. The proposed hybrid ED is designed to inherit the high-performance characteristics of an active ED with the reliability of a passive damper in a single package. The eddy current damping effect is utilised as a source of the passive damping. First, a prototype ED is designed and fabricated. The prototype ED is then utilised to experimentally establish the design requirements for a real-size active ED. This is accomplished by comparing its vibration isolation performance in a 1-DOF quarter-car test rig with that of a same-class semi-active damper. Then, after a real-size active ED is designed, the concept of hybrid damper is introduced to the damper design to address the drawbacks of the active ED. Finally, the finite-element method is used to accurately model and analyse the designed hybrid damper. It is demonstrated that by introducing the eddy current damping effect to the active part, a passive damping of approximately 1570 Ns/m is achieved. This amount of passive damping guarantees that the damper is fail-safe and reduces the power consumption more than 70%, compared with an active ED in an automotive active suspension system.

  17. Vibrational spectra and antimicrobial activity of selected bivalent cation benzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borawska, M. H.; Koczoń, P.; Piekut, J.; Świsłocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2009-02-01

    Selected bands of FT-IR spectra of Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) benzoates of both solid state and water solution, were assigned to appropriate molecular vibrations. Next evaluation of electronic charge distribution in both carboxylic anion and aromatic ring of studied compounds was performed. Classical plate tests and turbidimetry measurements, monitoring growth of bacteria Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and yeasts Pichia anomala and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during 24 h of incubation, in optimal growth conditions (control) and in medium with addition of studied benzoate (concentration of 0.01% expressed as the concentration of benzoic acid), proved antimicrobial activity of studied compounds against investigated micro-organisms. PLS (partially least square) and PCR (principal component regression) techniques were applied to build a model, correlating spectral data reflecting molecular structure of studied compounds, with degree of influence of those compounds on growth of studied micro-organisms. Statistically significant correlation within cross validation diagnostic of PLS-1 calibration was found, when log 1/T of selected spectral regions of water solution samples were used as input data. The correlation coefficients between predicted with PLS calibration based on created 1, 2 or 3 factor models, and actual values of antimicrobial activity were: 0.70; 0.76, 0.81 for P. anomala, B. subtilis, and E. coli, respectively. Log(PRESS) values of appropriate models were 2.10, 2,39 and 3.23 for P. anomala, B. subtilis, and E. coli, respectively.

  18. Electroviscoelastic materials as active dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.; Kosmatka, John B.

    2002-07-01

    Electroviscoelastic materials (EVEMs) are polymeric materials that exhibit changes in structural properties when a voltage is applied across it. In the current study, an EVEM is developed that produce large changes in stiffness and damping materials with applied voltage. The resulting material exhibits many of the same properties as an electrorheological (ER) material, except the current material is self-supporting and thus can be used to applications where viscoelastic materials are used. The EVEM is composed of three components: 20% (by mass) of poly (p-phenylene) (PPP) particles doped with CuCl2 or FeCl3, 64% of Dow Sylgard 527 silicone gel, and 16% Dow Corning Sylgard 182 silicone elastomer, where the elastomer is added to for stiffening. Experimental harmonic tests using a double-lap shear test and a 0.025 thick specimens between 1 and 150 Hz reveal a factor six increase in stiffening and a factor of three decrease in damping with applied voltage (1500v).

  19. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  20. The effects of sling exercise using vibration on trunk muscle activities of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngin; Kang, Hyungkyu

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of sling exercises with and without vibration on the muscular activity of the internal oblique (IO), rectus abdominis (RA), multifidus (MF), and erector spinae (ES) muscles of healthy adults. [Methods] Eleven healthy university students (11 men) with a mean age of 22.8 years were enrolled in this study. Subjects performed supine and prone bridge exercises with the knees flexed using a sling suspension system with and without vibration. The amplitudes of the EMG activities of selected trunk muscles (internal oblique, rectus abdominis, erector spinae, multifidus) were recorded. Two types of exercise conditions were executed in a random sequence for 5 seconds each. The signals detected from the middle 3 seconds (after discarding the signals of the first and the last one seconds) were used in the analysis. A 3-minute break was given after each exercise to minimize muscle fatigue. [Results] During the supine bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES muscles were significantly higher than those of the supine bridge exercise without vibration. Additionally, during the prone bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES were significantly higher than those of the prone bridge exercise without vibration. [Conclusion] Sling exercises with vibration improved the trunk muscle activities of healthy adults compared to the sling exercises without vibration. The information presented here is important for clinicians who use lumbar stabilization exercises as an evaluation tool or a rehabilitation exercise. PMID:24259778

  1. The effects of sling exercise using vibration on trunk muscle activities of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngin; Kang, Hyungkyu

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of sling exercises with and without vibration on the muscular activity of the internal oblique (IO), rectus abdominis (RA), multifidus (MF), and erector spinae (ES) muscles of healthy adults. [Methods] Eleven healthy university students (11 men) with a mean age of 22.8 years were enrolled in this study. Subjects performed supine and prone bridge exercises with the knees flexed using a sling suspension system with and without vibration. The amplitudes of the EMG activities of selected trunk muscles (internal oblique, rectus abdominis, erector spinae, multifidus) were recorded. Two types of exercise conditions were executed in a random sequence for 5 seconds each. The signals detected from the middle 3 seconds (after discarding the signals of the first and the last one seconds) were used in the analysis. A 3-minute break was given after each exercise to minimize muscle fatigue. [Results] During the supine bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES muscles were significantly higher than those of the supine bridge exercise without vibration. Additionally, during the prone bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES were significantly higher than those of the prone bridge exercise without vibration. [Conclusion] Sling exercises with vibration improved the trunk muscle activities of healthy adults compared to the sling exercises without vibration. The information presented here is important for clinicians who use lumbar stabilization exercises as an evaluation tool or a rehabilitation exercise.

  2. Molecular Vibration-Activity Relationship in the Agonism of Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Hyun Keun

    2013-01-01

    The molecular vibration-activity relationship in the receptor-ligand interaction of adenosine receptors was investigated by structure similarity, molecular vibration, and hierarchical clustering in a dataset of 46 ligands of adenosine receptors. The resulting dendrogram was compared with those of another kind of fingerprint or descriptor. The dendrogram result produced by corralled intensity of molecular vibrational frequency outperformed four other analyses in the current study of adenosine receptor agonism and antagonism. The tree that was produced by clustering analysis of molecular vibration patterns showed its potential for the functional classification of adenosine receptor ligands. PMID:24465242

  3. Note: A three-dimension active vibration isolator for precision atom gravimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Min-Kang; Xiong, Xin; Chen, Le-Le; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2015-04-15

    An ultra-low frequency active vibration isolator, simultaneously suppressing three-dimensional vibration noise, is demonstrated experimentally. The equivalent natural period of the isolator is 100 s and 12 s for the vertical and horizontal direction, respectively. The vibration noise in the vertical direction is about 50 times reduced during 0.2 and 2 Hz, and 5 times reduced in the other two orthogonal directions in the same frequency range. This isolator is designed for atom gravimeters, especially suitable for the gravimeter whose sensitivity is limited by vibration couplings.

  4. Variable stiffness and damping semi-active vibration control technology based on magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shiyu; Deng, Huaxia; Zhang, Jin; Sun, ShuaiShuai; Li, Weihua; Wang, Lei

    2013-10-01

    Vibration is a source to induce uncertainty for the measurement. The traditional passive vibration control method has low efficiency and limited working conditions. The active vibration control method is not practical for its power demanding, complexity and instability. In this paper, a novel semi-active vibration control technology based on magnetorheological (MR) fluid is presented with dual variable stiffness and damping capability. Because of the rheological behavior depending on the magnetic field intensity, MR fluid is used in many damping semi-active vibration control systems. The paper proposed a structure to allow the both overall damping and stiffness variable. The equivalent damping and stiffness of the structure are analyzed and the influences of the parameters on the stiffness and damping changing are further discussed.

  5. Development of a Practical Broadband Active Vibration Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Perey, Daniel F.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop robust, lightweight, and low-power control units that can be used to suppress structural vibration in flexible aerospace structures. In particular, this paper focuses on active damping, which is implemented using compact decentralized control units distributed over the structure. Each control unit consists of a diamond-shaped piezoelectric patch actuator, three miniature accelerometers, and analog electronics. The responses from the accelerometers are added together and then integrated to give a signal proportional to velocity. The signal is then inverted, amplified, and applied to the actuator, which generates a control force that is out of phase with the measured velocity. This paper describes the development of the control system, including a detailed description of the control and power electronics. The paper also presents experimental results acquired on a Plexiglas window blank. Five identical control units installed around the perimeter of the window achieved 10 dB peak reductions and a 2.4 dB integrated reduction of the spatially averaged velocity of the window between 500 and 3000 Hz.

  6. Calculation of Raman optical activity spectra for vibrational analysis.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Shaun T; Zielinski, François; Popelier, Paul L A; Blanch, Ewan W

    2015-05-01

    By looking back on the history of Raman Optical Activity (ROA), the present article shows that the success of this analytical technique was for a long time hindered, paradoxically, by the deep level of detail and wealth of structural information it can provide. Basic principles of the underlying theory are discussed, to illustrate the technique's sensitivity due to its physical origins in the delicate response of molecular vibrations to electromagnetic properties. Following a short review of significant advances in the application of ROA by UK researchers, we dedicate two extensive sections to the technical and theoretical difficulties that were overcome to eventually provide predictive power to computational simulations in terms of ROA spectral calculation. In the last sections, we focus on a new modelling strategy that has been successful in coping with the dramatic impact of solvent effects on ROA analyses. This work emphasises the role of complementarity between experiment and theory for analysing the conformations and dynamics of biomolecules, so providing new perspectives for methodological improvements and molecular modelling development. For the latter, an example of a next-generation force-field for more accurate simulations and analysis of molecular behaviour is presented. By improving the accuracy of computational modelling, the analytical capabilities of ROA spectroscopy will be further developed so generating new insights into the complex behaviour of molecules.

  7. Passive and Active Vibrations Allow Self-Organization in Large-Scale Electromechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Fortuna, Carlo Famoso Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the role of passive and active vibrations for the control of nonlinear large-scale electromechanical systems is investigated. The mathematical model of the system is discussed and detailed experimental results are shown in order to prove that coupling the effects of feedback and vibrations elicited by proper control signals makes possible to regularize imperfect uncertain large-scale systems.

  8. Activities of the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research in fluid dynamics and acoustics, vehicle noise, audiology and human effects, industrial noise, and noise and vibration control is summarized. Aircraft noise, underwater acoustics, damping of fiber reinforced materials and finite element methods are discussed.

  9. Active Control of Panel Vibrations Induced by a Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, active and passive control of sound and vibration in aeroelastic structures have received a great deal of attention due to many potential applications to aerospace and other industries. There exists a great deal of research work done in this area. Recent advances in the control of sound and vibration can be found in the several conference proceedings. In this report we will summarize our research findings supported by the NASA grant NAG-1-1175. The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to study the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. The vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings will be presented in the next three sections. In Section II we shall describe our results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Section III is concerned with active control of the vibration and sound radiation from a nonlinear elastic panel. A detailed description of our work on the parametric vibrational control of nonlinear elastic panel will be presented in Section IV. This paper will be submitted to the Journal

  10. Eddy Current Damper for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starin, Scott; Crosno, Fred

    2002-09-01

    This presentation considers the following topics: the need for cryogenic energy absorption, high speed damper characteristics, gearbox characteristics, composite assembly characteristics, performance tests, simulation models.

  11. A new adaptive hybrid electromagnetic damper: modelling, optimization, and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Ehsan; Ribeiro, Roberto; Behrad Khamesee, Mir; Khajepour, Amir

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a new electromagnetic hybrid damper which provides regenerative adaptive damping force for various applications. Recently, the introduction of electromagnetic technologies to the damping systems has provided researchers with new opportunities for the realization of adaptive semi-active damping systems with the added benefit of energy recovery. In this research, a hybrid electromagnetic damper is proposed. The hybrid damper is configured to operate with viscous and electromagnetic subsystems. The viscous medium provides a bias and fail-safe damping force while the electromagnetic component adds adaptability and the capacity for regeneration to the hybrid design. The electromagnetic component is modeled and analyzed using analytical (lumped equivalent magnetic circuit) and electromagnetic finite element method (FEM) (COMSOL® software package) approaches. By implementing both modeling approaches, an optimization for the geometric aspects of the electromagnetic subsystem is obtained. Based on the proposed electromagnetic hybrid damping concept and the preliminary optimization solution, a prototype is designed and fabricated. A good agreement is observed between the experimental and FEM results for the magnetic field distribution and electromagnetic damping forces. These results validate the accuracy of the modeling approach and the preliminary optimization solution. An analytical model is also presented for viscous damping force, and is compared with experimental results The results show that the damper is able to produce damping coefficients of 1300 and 0-238 N s m-1 through the viscous and electromagnetic components, respectively.

  12. Damping performance of bean bag dampers in zero gravity environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng

    2016-06-01

    Bean bag dampers (BBDs), developed from impact damping technology, have been widely applied in engineering field to attenuate the vibration of a structural system. The damping effect of a BBD on vibration control in ground gravity environments is good, but its performance in zero gravity environments is not clear, and there are few studies on it. Therefore, the damping effect of BBDs in zero gravity environments was investigated based on the discrete element method (DEM) in this paper. Firstly, a three-dimensional DEM model of a BBD was established, and the damping effects of the single degree of freedom (SDOF) systems with BBDs and non-obstructive particle dampers (NOPDs) in zero gravity environments were compared. Moreover, the influences of the diameter of the inner ball, the tightness of BBD, the vibration frequency of SDOF system and the gap between BBD and cavity on the vibration reduction effect of BBD in zero gravity environments were also studied, and the results were compared with the system with BBD in ground gravity environments. There are optimum ranges of the diameter of the inner ball, tightness and gap for BBD, and the effects of these parameters on the damping performances of BBD in gravity and zero gravity environments are similar in evolving trends, and the values are without big differences in the optimum ranges. Thereby the parameter selection in BBD design in zero gravity environments is similar to that in gravity environments. However, the diameter of BBD should be a slightly larger than the size of the cavity when the structures with BBD work in zero gravity environments. The BBD is supposed to be picked tightly when the vibration frequency is high, and the BBD has better to be picked more tightly in zero gravity environments. These results can be used as a guide in the design of BBDs in zero gravity environments.

  13. Dynamics of a spacecraft with large flexible appendage constrained by multi-strut passive damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ying-Hong; Xu, Shi-Jie; Hu, Quan

    2013-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a spacecraft with multi-strut passive damper for large flexible appendage. The damper platform is connected to the spacecraft by a spheric hinge, multiple damping struts and a rigid strut. The damping struts provide damping forces while the rigid strut produces a motion constraint of the multibody system. The exact nonlinear dynamical equations in reducedorder form are firstly derived by using Kane's equation in matrix form. Based on the assumptions of small velocity and small displacement, the nonlinear equations are reduced to a set of linear second-order differential equations in terms of independent generalized displacements with constant stiffness matrix and damping matrix related to the damping strut parameters. Numerical simulation results demonstrate the damping effectiveness of the damper for both the motion of the spacecraft and the vibration of the flexible appendage, and verify the accuracy of the linear equations against the exact nonlinear ones.

  14. Analysis of start-up transient for a powertrain system with a nonlinear clutch damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Laihang; Singh, Rajendra

    2015-10-01

    The transient vibration phenomenon in a vehicle powertrain system during the start-up (or shut-down) process is studied with a focus on the nonlinear characteristics of a multi-staged clutch damper. First, a four-degree-of-freedom torsional model with multiple discontinuous nonlinearities under flywheel motion input is developed, and the powertrain transient event is validated with a vehicle start-up experiment. Second, the role of the nonlinear torsional path on the transient event is investigated in the time and time-frequency domains; interactions between the clutch damper and the transmission transients are estimated by using two metrics. Third, the harmonic balance method is applied to examine the nonlinear characteristics of clutch damper during a slowly varying non-stationary process in a simplified and validated single-degree-of-freedom powertrain system model. Finally, analytical formulas are successfully developed and verified to approximate the nonlinear amplification level for a rapidly varying process.

  15. Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Trunk and Neck Muscle Activity in Consideration of Different Vibration Loads

    PubMed Central

    Perchthaler, Dennis; Hauser, Simon; Heitkamp, Hans-Christian; Hein, Tobias; Grau, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical parameters in terms of different peak-to-peak displacements and knee angles on trunk and neck muscle activity during whole-body vibration (WBV). 28 healthy men and women (age 23 ± 3 years) performed four static squat positions (2 peak-to-peak displacements x 2 knee angles) on a side alternating vibration platform with and without vibration stimulus. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the erector spinae muscle, the rectus abdominis muscle, and of the splenius muscle. EMG levels normalized to maximal voluntary contractions ranged between 3.2 – 27.2 % MVC during WBV. The increase in muscle activity caused by WBV was significant, particularly for the back muscles, which was up to 19.0 % MVC. The impact of the factor ‘condition’ (F-values ranged from 13.4 to 132.0, p ≤ 0.001) and of the factor ‘peak-to-peak displacement’ (F-values ranged from 6.4 to 69.0 and p-values from < 0.001 to 0.01) were statistically significant for each muscle tested. However, the factor ‘knee angle’ only affected the back muscles (F-value 10.3 and 7.3, p ≤ 0.01). The results of this study should give more information for developing effective and safe training protocols for WBV treatment of the upper body. Key points The maximum levels of muscle activity were significantly reached at high amplitudes at a vibration frequency of 30 Hz. WBV leads to a higher muscle activation of the lower back muscles than of the abdominal muscles. Both knee angles of 30° and 45° have similar effects on the vibration load and represent safe positions to prevent any actual harm. Certain combinations of the biomechanical variables have similar effects on the level of muscle activity. PMID:25729303

  16. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  17. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  18. Damper Spring For Omega Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclaughlin, Scott T.; Montgomery, Stuart K.

    1993-01-01

    Damper spring reduces deflections of omega-cross-section seal, reducing probability of failure and extending life of seal. Spring is split ring with U-shaped cross section. Placed inside omega seal and inserted with seal into seal cavity. As omega seal compressed into cavity, spring and seal make contact near convolution of seal, and spring becomes compressed also. During operation, when seal dynamically loaded, spring limits deflection of seal, reducing stress on seal.

  19. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  20. Design and characterization of axial flux permanent magnet energy harvester for vehicle magnetorheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    An axial flux permanent magnet energy harvester (AFPMEH) is proposed and analyzed for a vehicle magneto-rheological (MR) damper. The relationship between the output voltage and the input excitations are analytically developed. Under different constant rotation speeds and sinusoidal excitations, the harvesting energy is numerically computed for different loads of pure resistance and coil in the MR damper. To check the performance of the proposed AFPMEH for the MR damper, the AFPMEH and MR damper are fabricated individually. Experiments are performed to measure the harvesting energy of the AFPMEH and the damping characteristics of the MR damper under different excited conditions. The excited conditions include three constant rotation speeds and sinusoidal inputs. Load inputs of the pure resistance and the coil of the MR damper are considered. The results show that the time history of the generated voltage of the AFPMEH in experiment is agreed well with that of the AFPMEH in simulation. Under constant rotation speeds, the root mean square (rms) of loaded voltage will increase with the increment of load, whereas the rms of power will be affected by the amplitude of load. The MR damper powered by the AFPMEH can almost obtain the similar damping characteristics of that external power supply. Under sinusoidal inputs, the rms of loaded voltage will increase with the increment of external loads, whereas the rms of power will be almost kept as a constant. The damping range of the MR damper can also be enlarged over 30% comparing to off-state damping force. A quarter car model with an MR damper powered by the AFPMEH is developed to investigate the control performance. The on-off skyhook control is adopted to tune the input current of the MR damper. The vibration performance of the MR suspension is investigated under different roads and vehicle speeds. The numerical results show that the MR suspension with the AFPMEH under on-off skyhook control can achieve better ride comfort

  1. Vibration Control in Turbomachinery Using Active Magnetic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah D.

    1996-01-01

    The effective use of active magnetic bearings for vibration control in turbomachinery depends on an understanding of the forces available from a magnetic bearing actuator. The purpose of this project was to characterize the forces as functions shaft position. Both numerical and experimental studies were done to determine the characteristics of the forces exerted on a stationary shaft by a magnetic bearing actuator. The numerical studies were based on finite element computations and included both linear and nonlinear magnetization functions. Measurements of the force versus position of a nonrotating shaft were made using two separate measurement rigs, one based on strain gage measurement of forces, the other based on deflections of a calibrated beam. The general trends of the measured principal forces agree with the predictions of the theory while the magnitudes of forces are somewhat smaller than those predicted. Other aspects of theory are not confirmed by the measurements. The measured forces in the normal direction are larger than those predicted by theory when the rotor has a normal eccentricity. Over the ranges of position examined, the data indicate an approximately linear relationship between the normal eccentricity of the shaft and the ratio of normal to principal force. The constant of proportionality seems to be larger at lower currents, but for all cases examined its value is between 0.14 and 0.17. The nonlinear theory predicts the existence of normal forces, but has not predicted such a large constant of proportionality for the ratio. The type of coupling illustrated by these measurements would not tend to cause whirl, because the coupling coefficients have the same sign, unlike the case of a fluid film bearing, where the normal stiffness coefficients often have opposite signs. They might, however, tend to cause other self-excited behavior. This possibility must be considered when designing magnetic bearings for flexible rotor applications, such as gas

  2. Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-03-31

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and the Phase II final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006. Efforts the current quarter have continued to focus on the manufacture of the prototype and precommercial parts, field test planning and commercialization. The continued extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components significantly delayed the deployment of the prototype and precommercial units. All parts have now been received for two units, and all but one for the third. Mechanical assembly of the first two systems is complete and the electronics installation and laboratory testing will be finished in April. We have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with a major US oilfield equipment supplier, which calls for their assisting with our field tests, in cash and in kind. We are close to signing a definitive agreement which includes the purchase of the three precommercial units. We had also signed a CRADA with the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC), and scheduled a test at their site, The RMOTC drilling schedule continues to slip, and the test cannot begin until the first week of May. Based on these factors, we have requested a no-cost extension to July 31, 2007.

  3. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006. The month of January was devoted to the final preparations for, and conducting of testing of the DVMCS at TerraTek laboratories in Salt Lake City. This testing was concluded on January 27, 2006. Much of the effort in this period was then devoted to the analysis of the data and the preparation of the Phase II final report. The report was issued after the close of the period. Work on Phase III of the project began during this quarter. It has consisted of making some modifications in the prototype design to make it more suitable for field testing an more practical for commercial use. This work is continuing. The redesign effort, coupled with the current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The precommercial prototypes are being developed in parallel, so the project should be completed per the current schedule.

  4. Damping force control of a vehicle MR damper using a Preisach hysteretic compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Min-Sang; Choi, Seung-Bok; Han, Young-Min

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents damping force control performances of a magnetorheological (MR) damper via a new control strategy considering hysteretic behavior of the field-dependent damping force. In order to achieve this goal, a commercial MR damper, Delphi Magneride™ which is applicable to a high-class passenger vehicle is adopted and its field-dependent damping force is experimentally evaluated. The MR damper has two types of damping force hysteretic behavior. The first is velocity-dependent hysteresis and the other is field-dependent hysteresis. Since the magnetic field is directly connected with control input, the field-dependent hysteresis largely affects the control performances of the MR damper system. To consider the field-dependent hysteretic behavior of the MR damper, a Preisach hysteresis model is established and its first-order descending (FOD) curves are experimentally identified. Subsequently, a feedforward hysteretic compensator associated with the biviscous model and inverse Bingham model is formulated to achieve the desired damping force. The control algorithm is experimentally implemented and damping force controllability for sinusoidal and arbitrary trajectories is evaluated in terms of accuracy and input magnitude. In addition, vibration control performances of the MR suspension system are experimentally evaluated with a quarter-vehicle test facility.

  5. Development and performance evaluation of an MR squeeze-mode damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiński, Bogdan; Gołdasz, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the authors present results of a magnetorheological (MR) damper prototype development and performance evaluation study. The damper is a device functioning in the so-called squeeze-mode of MR fluid flow regime of operation. By principle, in a squeeze-mode damper the control (working) gap height varies according to the prescribed displacement or force input profile. Such hardware has been claimed to be well suited to small-amplitude vibration damping applications. However, it is still in its infancy. Its potential seems appealing yet unclear. Accordingly, the authors reveal performance figures of the damper complemented by numerical finite-element simulations of the electro-magnetic circuit of the device. The numerical results are presented in the form of maps of averaged magnetic flux density versus coil current and gap height as well as magnetic flux, inductance, and cogging force calculations, respectively. The simulated data are followed by experimental evaluation of the damper performance incorporating plots of force versus piston displacement (velocity) across a prescribed range of excitation inputs. Moreover, some insight into transient (unsteady) characteristics of the device is provided through testing results involving transient currents.

  6. Electromechanical simulation and test of rotating systems with magnetic bearing or piezoelectric actuator active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Tang, Punan; Kim, Chaesil; Manchala, Daniel; Barrett, Tim; Kascak, Albert F.; Brown, Gerald; Montague, Gerald; Dirusso, Eliseo; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    This paper contains a summary of the experience of the authors in the field of electromechanical modeling for rotating machinery - active vibration control. Piezoelectric and magnetic bearing actuator based control are discussed.

  7. Damping Control of Liquid Container by Swing-type Active Vibration Reducer on Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Masafumi; Taniguchi, Takao

    This paper proposes a damping control of sloshing in a cylindrical container with a swing-type active vibration reducer on a wheeled mobile robot (WMR). The WMR runs along a straight path on a horizontal plane. The container is mounted on the active vibration reducer. A laser displacement sensor is used to observe the liquid level in the container. The container can be tilted in the running direction by the active vibration reducer. A sloshing model is obtained from a spherical pendulum-type sloshing model, which approximately expresses (1, 1)-mode sloshing. The sloshing model is used to design a damping control system. The control system of the active vibration reducer is designed with an inverse model of sloshing and an optimal regulator with a Kalman filter. The WMR is driven by an acceleration pattern designed with an input shaping method. The usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated through simulation and experimental results.

  8. Stability Analysis of a High-Speed Seal Test Rotor With Marginal and Extended Squeeze-Film Dampers: Theoretical and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Gunter, Edgar J.

    2007-01-01

    A case study of a high-speed seal test rotor shows how rotor dynamic analysis can be used to diagnose the source of high vibrations and evaluate a proposed remedy. Experimental results are compared with the synchronous and non-synchronous whirl response analysis of a double overhung, high-speed seal test rotor with ball bearings supported in 5.84- and 12.7-mm-long, un-centered squeeze-film oil dampers. Test performance with the original damper of length 5.84 mm was marginal. Non-synchronous whirling occurred at the overhung seal test disk and there was a high amplitude synchronous response near the drive spline above 32,000 rpm. Nonlinear synchronous unbalance and time transient whirl studies were conducted on the seal test rotor with the original and extended damper lengths. With the original damper design, the nonlinear synchronous response showed that unbalance could cause damper lockup at 33,000 rpm. Alford cross-coupling forces were also included at the overhung seal test disk for the whirl analysis. Sub-synchronous whirling at the seal test disk was observed in the nonlinear time transient analysis. With the extended damper length of 12.7 mm, the sub-synchronous motion was eliminated and the rotor unbalance response was acceptable to 45,000 rpm with moderate rotor unbalance. Seal test rotor orbits and vibration levels with the extended squeeze film dampers showed smooth operation to 40,444 rpm.

  9. Active control of panel vibrations induced by a boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to consider the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. Although the sound radiation has not been included, the vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings are presented in three sections. In section two we describe results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Sections three and four are concerned with some analytical and numerical results in the optimal control of the linear and nonlinear panel vibrations, respectively, excited by the flow pressure fluctuations. Finally, in section five, we draw some conclusions from research findings.

  10. Transverse instability digital damper for the Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.; /Fermilab

    2006-02-01

    Transverse beam instability of a coasting beam with a digital damper is examined. Threshold of instability is calculated in specific cases with Landau damping taken into account. The results are applied to the Fermilab Recycler Ring. Some improvement of existing RR damper is proposed.

  11. Improved syncom-type fluid damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J.

    1974-01-01

    Two efficient types of fluid nutation dampers that are simple, reliable, and inexpensive have been developed. In use, either damper may be mounted on a spinning body, parallel to the spin axis of the body and radially displaced from it, to eliminate nutation.

  12. Damper mechanism for nuclear reactor control elements

    DOEpatents

    Taft, William Elwood

    1976-01-01

    A damper mechanism which provides a nuclear reactor control element decelerating function at the end of the scram stroke. The total damping function is produced by the combination of two assemblies, which operate in sequence. First, a tapered dashram assembly decelerates the control element to a lower velocity, after which a spring hydraulic damper assembly takes over to complete the final damping.

  13. Vibration Control via Stiffness Switching of Magnetostrictive Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magnetostrictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magnetostrictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magnetostrictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magnetomechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.25; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magnetostrictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magnetostrictive shunt damping.

  14. An active control system for helicopter vibration reduction by higher harmonic pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.; Farrar, F. A.; Miao, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study defining the basic configuration of an active control system to reduce helicopter vibrations is presented. Theoretical results for a nonlinear four-bladed single rotor helicopter simulation are discussed, showing that vibration reductions on the order of 80-90% for airspeeds up to 150 kn can be expected when using a higher harmonic pitch in an active feedback control system. The rotor performance penalty associated with this level of vibration reduction is about 1-3% and the increase in rotor blade stresses is considered to be low. The location of sensor accelerometers proved to be significant for vibration reductions, and it is noted that the RTSA controller is tolerant of sensor signal noise.

  15. Passive damping concepts for free and forced member and grillage vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Zia; Najjar, Bassam

    1988-01-01

    The performance of potential passive damping concepts is investigted for a long tubular aluminum alloy member, and a two-bar grillage structure. The members are restrained partially at the ends and are of the type being considered by NASA for possible use in the construction of a future space station. Four different passive damping concepts are studied and include nylon brush, wool swab, copper brush, and silly putty in chamber dampers. Both free and forced vibration tests are conducted. It is found that the silly putty in chamber damper concept provides considerably greater passive damping as compared to that of the other three concepts. For the grillage natural vibration, a five wool swab damper configuration provides greater damping than the five silly putty dampers in chamber configuration. Due to the constrained motion imposed by the vibrator used in the tests, the effectiveness of the passive dampers could not be adequately evaluated for the individual member. However, it is found that for the grillage under forced vibration, the five silly putty dampers in chamber damper configuration provides very effective passive damping although only at and around the resonant frequency. At resonance, these dampers provide a 51 percent reduction in the dynamic magnification factor for this case.

  16. A novel triple-actuating mechanism of an active air mount for vibration control of precision manufacturing machines: experimental work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung-Tae; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Choi, Seung-Bok; Moon, Seok-Jun; Song, Won-Gil

    2014-07-01

    With the goal of vibration control and isolation in a clean room, we propose a new type of air mount which consists of pneumatic, electromagnetic (EM), and magnetorheological (MR) actuators. The air mount is installed below a semiconductor manufacturing machine to reduce the adverse effects caused by unwanted vibration. The proposed mechanism integrates the forces in a parallel connection of the three actuators. The MR part is designed to operate in an air spring in which the EM part is installed. The control logic is developed with a classical method and a switching mode to avoid operational mismatch among the forces developed. Based on extended microprocessors, a portable, embedded controller is installed to execute both nonlinear logic and digital communication with the peripherals. The pneumatic forces constantly support the heavy weight of an upper structure and maintain the level of the air mount. The MR damper handles the transient response, while the EM controller reduces the resonance response, which is switched mutually with a threshold. Vibration is detected by laser displacement sensors which have submicron resolution. The impact test results of three tons load weight demonstrate practical feasibility by showing that the proposed triple-actuating mechanism can reduce the transient response as well as the resonance in the air mount, resulting in accurate motion of the semiconductor manufacturing machine.

  17. The Influence of Vibration on Muscle Activation and Rate of Force Development during Maximal Isometric Contractions.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Brendan; Warman, Geoff; Purton, Jason; Doyle, Tim L A; Dugan, Eric

    2004-03-01

    At present there appears to be a need for research conducted on the effects of vibration on the contractile ability of skeletal muscle tissue. The aim of this study was to address this issue by examining the effects of a superimposed muscle/tendon vibration at 50.42±1.16 Hz (acceleration 13.24 ± 0.18ms(-2): displacement ≈5mm) on muscular activation and maximal isometric contraction. Sixteen participants with a mean age, body mass, and height of 22 ± 4.4 years, 73.2 ± 11.7 kg and 173.1 ± 9.7 cms, respectively, were recruited for this study. Electromyography and accelerometry from the rectus femoris, and maximal isometric force data characteristics were collected from the dominant limb under conditions of vibration, and no-vibration. A superimposed 50 Hz vibration was used during the contraction phase for the maximal isometric leg extension for the condition of vibration. A one-way ANOVA revealed no significant (p > 0.05) differences between the vibration and no-vibration conditions for peak normalized EMGRMS (84.74% Vs 88.1%) values. An ANOVA revealed significant (p > 0.05) differences between the peak fundamental frequencies of the FFT between the conditions vibration (27.1 ± 12.2 Hz) and no-vibration (9.8 ± 3.5 Hz). Peak isometric force, peak rate of force development, rate of force development at times 0.05, 0.01, 0.1, 0.5 seconds, and rate of force development at 50, 75, and 90% of peak force were not significantly different. The results of this study suggest that the application of vibration stimulation at 50 Hz during the contraction does not contribute to muscle activation, or enhance force production for maximal isometric contractions. Key PointsThe application of a vibratory stimulation to the human body increases the normal acceleration resulting in an increase in force and a change in performanceThis study was to address this issue by examining the effects of a direct superimposed muscle/tendon vibration at 50 Hz on isometric strength

  18. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  19. Digital control system for space structural dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    A recently developed concept for a damper was improved by adding a small taper to the proof-mass, and using a proximeter to determine position. Also, an experimental damper was built using a three-inch stroke in place of the standard one-inch stroke. The analog controller initially used was replaced by an independent digital controller slaved to a TRS-80 Model I computer, which also serves as a highly effective, low-cost development system. An overall system concept for the use of proof-mass dampers is presented.

  20. Selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes in a concise manner three selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems. The three topics are as follows: (1) the active control of helicopter air-resonance using an LQG/LTR approach; (2) simulation of higher harmonic control (HHC) applied to a four bladed hingeless helicopter rotor in forward flight; and (3) vibration suppression in forward flight on a hingeless helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap, which is mounted on the blade. Only a few selected illustrative results are presented. The results obtained clearly indicate that the partial span, actively controlled flap has considerable potential for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors.

  1. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  2. Proportional-plus-integral semiactive control using magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, N.; Ikhouane, F.; Rodellar, J.

    2011-05-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) dampers are a promising alternative to structural active actuators as they provide adjustable damping over a wide range of frequencies without large power requirements. However, the complex dynamics that characterizes these devices makes it difficult to formulate control laws based on the MR damper model. Instead, many semiactive control strategies proposed in the literature have been based on the idea of "clipping" the voltage signal so that the MR damper force "tracks" a desired active control force which is computed on-line. With this idea many algorithms have been proposed using, among others, techniques such as optimal control, H∞ control, sliding mode control, backstepping and QFT. This work presents a semiactive control strategy based on the same idea of "clipping" the voltage signal but using a simpler PI design. The proportional and integral gains of the controller are calculated so that the controller guarantees stability, minimization of the closed loop response and robustness against modeling errors. Effectiveness of the control strategy is compared to some others techniques and passive cases as well. Simulation results shows that this simple strategy can effectively improve the structural responses and achieve performance index comparable to that of more complex algorithms.

  3. Investigation of a model vertical motion liquid damper: comparing numerical simulation and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Chris; Tabatabai, Habib; Buechel, Craig

    2005-05-01

    Tuned Liquid Dampers (TLD) are used to limit horizontal vibrations in structures, and offer practical alternatives to Tuned Mass Dampers (TMD). However, to our knowledge, liquid damping systems have not been developed to reduce vertical vibrations. In this work, we develop a model for a Vertical Motion Liquid Damper (VMLD), idealized as a discrete, two degree of freedom system. One degree of freedom represents the 'target' structure that is to be damped, and the other represents the approximate, one-dimensional motion of a liquid in a U-shaped tube. Internal losses due to the fluid oscillation serve to limit and control motions of the target structure. The U-shaped tube has a flexible joint such that one vertical portion and the horizontal portion of the tube remain fixed, and the remaining vertical portion of the tube is affixed to the vibrating structure, allowing the liquid to become excited. The equations of motion are derived using Lagrange's Equations, and are integrated using Runge-Kutta algorithms that are available in Matlab. An experimental model was built in the laboratory, consisting of a mass attached to the end of a cantilevered beam (corresponding to the target structure), and a U-tube made from PVC pipe. The various damping and stiffness parameters of the system were calibrated independently based on experimental data. Measured data from the experimental model show reasonable agreement with numerical simulations.

  4. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  5. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  6. Recent advancements in passive and active vibration control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiland, K. P.

    1992-02-01

    The control of environmental vibration is a prime consideration in designing sensitive electro- optical equipment. Pneumatic isolation systems with low natural frequencies are commonly used to shield the payload from random seismic vibration. In order to further optimize the isolation characteristics, it is desirable to decrease natural frequencies in all translational axes to well below 0.5 Hz, while at the same time achieving maximum damping at resonance. The limitations of conventional systems, however, are such that the lowest natural frequency achievable is 1 Hz. Typical resonance amplification is measured at approximately 10 to 20 dB. The use of low-frequency pneumatic isolators in precision machinery with built-in XY-stages (i.e., microlithography, submicron inspection systems (highlights an additional problem. Low natural frequencies are equivalent to low spring stiffnesses. Inertial forces applied to mass- spring systems with low spring stiffnesses results in large dynamic deflections. This kind of motion has an impact on the stability and settling time of XY-stages mounted on the mass spring system. The positioning controller of the XY-stage must overcome these disturbances which are induced by the reacting mass-spring system. The softer the isolation system, the large the dynamic deflection of the mass-spring system will be. It would be ideal to have a system that would act like a perfectly soft suspension system for all floor induced motion, while simultaneously creating an infinitely stiff system for all payload-induced forces. This can only be accomplished by using servo-control mechanisms with feedback and feed forward capabilities. This technology is introduced and analyzed in the body of this paper.

  7. Influence of vibration on mechanical power and electromyogram activity in human arm flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Bosco, C; Cardinale, M; Tsarpela, O

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of vibration on the mechanical properties of arm flexors. A group of 12 international level boxers, all members of the Italian national team, voluntarily participated in the experiment: all were engaged in regular boxing training. At the beginning of the study they were tested whilst performing forearm flexion with an extra load equal to 5% of the subjects' body mass. Following this. one arm was given the experimental treatment (E; mechanical vibration) and the other was the control (no treatment). The E treatment consisted of five repetitions lasting 1-min each of mechanical vibration applied during arm flexion in isometric conditions with 1 min rest between them. Further tests were performed 5 min immediately after the treatment on both limbs. The results showed statistically significant enhancement of the average power in the arm treated with vibrations. The root mean square electromyogram (EMGrms) had not changed following the treatment but, when divided by mechanical power, (P) as an index of neural efficiency, it showed statistically significant increases. It was concluded that mechanical vibrations enhanced muscle P and decreased the related EMG/P relationship in elite athletes. Moreover, the analysis of EMGrms recorded before the treatment and during the treatment itself showed an enormous increase in neural activity during vibration up to more than twice the baseline values. This would indicate that this type of treatment is able to stimulate the neuromuscular system more than other treatments used to improve neuromuscular properties.

  8. Application of a load-bearing passive and active vibration isolation system in hydraulic drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Oliver; Haase, Thomas; Pohl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Hydraulic drives are widely used in many engineering applications due to their high power to weight ratio. The high power output of the hydraulic drives produces high static and dynamic reaction forces and moments which must be carried by the mounts and the surrounding structure. A drawback of hydraulic drives based on rotating pistons consists in multi-tonal disturbances which propagate through the mounts and the load bearing structure and produce structure borne sound at the surrounding structures and cavities. One possible approach to overcome this drawback is to use an optimised mounting, which combines vibration isolation in the main disturbance direction with the capability to carry the reaction forces and moments. This paper presents an experimental study, which addresses the vibration isolation performance of an optimised mounting. A dummy hydraulic drive is attached to a generic surrounding structure with optimised mounting and excited by multiple shakers. In order to improve the performance of the passive vibration isolation system, piezoelectric transducers are applied on the mounting and integrated into a feed-forward control loop. It is shown that the optimised mounting of the hydraulic drive decreases the vibration transmission to the surrounding structure by 8 dB. The presented study also reveals that the use of the active control system leads to a further decrease of vibration transmission of up to 14 dB and also allows an improvement of the vibration isolation in an additional degree of freedom and higher harmonic frequencies.

  9. Fermilab Recycler damper requirements and design

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.; Hu, M.; Tupikov, V.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The design of transverse dampers for the Fermilab Recycler storage ring is described. An observed instability and analysis of subsequent measurements where used to identify the requirements. The digital approach being implemented is presented.

  10. Squeeze-film dampers for turbomachinery stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, L. J.; Hahn, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for investigating the stability and damping present in centrally preloaded radially symmetric multi-mass flexible rotor bearing systems is presented. In general, one needs to find the eigenvalues of the linearized perturbation equations, though zero frequency stability maps may be found by solving as many simultaneous non-linear equations as there are dampers; and in the case of a single damper, such maps may be found directly, regardless of the number of degrees of freedom. The technique is illustrated for a simple symmetric four degree of freedom flexible rotor with an unpressurized damper. This example shows that whereas zero frequency stability maps are likely to prove to be a simple way to delineate multiple solution possibilities, they do not provide full stability information. Further, particularly for low bearing parameters, the introduction of an unpressurized squeeze film damper may promote instability in an otherwise stable system.

  11. Dampers for Natural Draft Heaters: Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, James D.; Biermayer, Peter; King, Derek

    2008-10-27

    Energy required for water heating accounts for approximately 40percent of national residential natural gas consumption in California. With water heating contributing such a substantial portion of natural gas consumption, it is important to pay attention to water heater efficiencies. This paper reports on an investigation of a patented, buoyancy-operated flue damper. It is an add-on design to a standard atmospherically vented natural-draft gas-fired storage water heater. The flue damper was expected to reduce off-cycle standby losses, which would lead to improvements in the efficiency of the water heater. The test results showed that the Energy Factor of the baseline water heater was 0.576. The recovery efficiency was 0.768. The standby heat loss coefficient was 10.619 (BTU/hr-oF). After the damper was installed, the test results show an Energy Factor for the baseline water heater of 0.605. The recovery efficiency was 0.786. The standby heat loss coefficient was 9.135 (BTU/hr-oF). The recovery efficiency increased 2.3percent and the standby heat loss coefficient decreased 14percent. When the burner was on, the baseline water heater caused 28.0 CFM of air to flow from the room. During standby, the flow was 12.4 CFM. The addition of the damper reduced the flow when the burner was on to 23.5 CFM. During standby, flow with the damper was reduced to 11.1 CFM. The flue damper reduced off-cycle standby losses, and improved the efficiency of the water heater. The flue damper also improved the recovery efficiency of the water heater by restricting on-cycle air flows through the flue.With or without the flue damper, off-cycle air flow upthe stack is nearly half the air flow rate as when the burner is firing.

  12. Investigation of squeeze-film dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R.; Dogan, M.

    1982-01-01

    Squeeze film dampers are a means of curing instabilities in rotating shaft assemblies. Their efficiency depends very much on the condition of the oil, which in turn depends on inlet and outlet arrangements, on damper geometry and on the flexibility of the rotor and surrounding structure. Rig investigations in which structural flexibility is included experimentally are discussed. Comparisons are made between measured and predicted results.

  13. Active vibration control of a free-free beam by using a tendon mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Junji; Ueda, Hiroki

    This paper is concerned with an active vibration control of a free-free beam. The beam is reduced to a finite-degree-of-freedom system by the modal analysis, in which the mode function is derived from the transfer matrix method. A control force is produced by a pair of tendons and a DC servo motor attached to the beam. The state of the beam is presumed by the minimum order state observer and the control force is determined by the digital optimum regulator theory. It is found that the active tendon control method is effective to suppress the vibration of the free-free beam.

  14. Over-driven control for large-scale MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, A. J.; Dyke, S. J.; Phillips, B. M.

    2013-04-01

    As semi-active electro-mechanical control devices increase in scale for use in real-world civil engineering applications, their dynamics become increasingly complicated. Control designs that are able to take these characteristics into account will be more effective in achieving good performance. Large-scale magnetorheological (MR) dampers exhibit a significant time lag in their force-response to voltage inputs, reducing the efficacy of typical controllers designed for smaller scale devices where the lag is negligible. A new control algorithm is presented for large-scale MR devices that uses over-driving and back-driving of the commands to overcome the challenges associated with the dynamics of these large-scale MR dampers. An illustrative numerical example is considered to demonstrate the controller performance. Via simulations of the structure using several seismic ground motions, the merits of the proposed control strategy to achieve reductions in various response parameters are examined and compared against several accepted control algorithms. Experimental evidence is provided to validate the improved capabilities of the proposed controller in achieving the desired control force levels. Through real-time hybrid simulation (RTHS), the proposed controllers are also examined and experimentally evaluated in terms of their efficacy and robust performance. The results demonstrate that the proposed control strategy has superior performance over typical control algorithms when paired with a large-scale MR damper, and is robust for structural control applications.

  15. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING AND CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2003-04-01

    The project continues to advance approximately per the revised (14-month) schedule. Tasks 1-3 (Modeling, Specification and Design) are all essentially complete. Work has begun on designing the test equipment for the Test and Evaluation (Tasks 4 & 5.) One of the intents of this project is to not only dampen vibration above the damper, but to also dampen vibrations below the damper. This is accomplished by smoothing out the discontinuities as the bit drills ahead. The model has the capability to simulate the drilling looking at the depth of cut along the discontinuities. It can also look at the amount of time that the bit is in contact with the formation. It is found that under some conditions the vibrations increased the discontinuities due to resonant conditions. In the ideal situation, the damper reduces the discontinuities and smooths out the drilling. APS looked at a wide range of spring stiffness and damping properties to determine the optimum damper. Spring rates of 10,000 lb/in to 60,000 lbs/in were analyzed. The best compromise is at 30,000 lb/in for the 6 3/4 inch tool. Low spring rates would require large displacements for the damper, while stiff springs do not provide enough motion for the damper. Several damping concepts were analyzed: (1) The first thought was to have a damper providing high damping in the upward direction and low damping in the downward direction. It was found that this increased the vibration by wallowing out the troughs of the discontinuities leading to increased displacements at the bit. (2) Another method investigated was having increased damping at high acceleration levels and less damping at lower acceleration levels. This gave improved results. (3) Constant damping so far provides the damping situation. With the proper damping level the damper can smooth out the discontinuities and provide smooth drilling. However, the damping values are different for different drilling conditions. Different WOB and ROP require different damping

  16. Active control of payload fairing noise using distributed active vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Arnaud; Johnson, Marty E.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2003-04-01

    High sound pressure inside a launch vehicle fairing during lift-off can damage the payload. Interior levels of up to 140 dB between 60 and 250 Hz are mostly due to exhaust plume noise combined with the limited transmission loss of lightweight composite fairings and little acoustic damping in the fairing volume. Past work using passive and hybrid passive/reactive noise control devices has shown that their limitations are mostly due to packaging volume and weight penalty. The objective of this work is to design a lightweight, compact, and low electrical power active noise control system to reduce the fairing interior sound level. Hybrid active/passive actuators such as Smart Foam (Couche and Fuller, Proceedings of Active 1999, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, pp. 609-620) and Distributed Active Vibration Absorbers (Marcotte, Fuller, and Johnson, Proceedings of Active 2002, ISVR, Southampton, England, pp. 535-546) are optimized for fairing noise control. The latter have been used to increase the transmission loss of the fairing. Active noise control test results on a sub-scale, sandwich composite fairing are presented. The global interior acoustic response due to airborne exterior excitation is minimized using an adaptive multiple-input, multiple-output feedforward controller. [Work supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate (AFRL).

  17. Rectification of SEMG as a tool to demonstrate synchronous motor unit activity during vibration.

    PubMed

    Sebik, Oguz; Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Türker, Kemal S

    2013-04-01

    The use of surface electromyography (SEMG) in vibration studies is problematic since motion artifacts occupy the same frequency band with the SEMG signal containing information on synchronous motor unit activity. We hypothesize that using a harsher, 80-500 Hz band-pass filter and using rectification can help eliminate motion artifacts and provide a way to observe synchronous motor unit activity that is phase locked to vibration using SEMG recordings only. Multi Motor Unit (MMU) action potentials using intramuscular electrodes along with SEMG were recorded from the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) of six healthy male volunteers. Data were collected during whole body vibration, using vibration frequencies of 30 Hz, 35 Hz, 40 Hz or 50 Hz. A computer simulation was used to investigate the efficacy of filtering under different scenarios: with or without artifacts and/or motor unit synchronization. Our findings indicate that motor unit synchronization took place during WBV as verified by MMU recordings. A harsh filtering regimen along with rectification proved successful in demonstrating motor unit synchronization in SEMG recordings. Our findings were further supported by the results from the computer simulation, which indicated that filtering and rectification was efficient in discriminating motion artifacts from motor unit synchronization. We suggest that the proposed signal processing technique may provide a new methodology to evaluate the effects of vibration treatments using only SEMG. This is a major advantage, as this non-intrusive method is able to overcome movement artifacts and also indicate the synchronization of underlying motor units.

  18. IIR filtering based adaptive active vibration control methodology with online secondary path modeling using PZT actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boz, Utku; Basdogan, Ipek

    2015-12-01

    Structural vibrations is a major cause for noise problems, discomfort and mechanical failures in aerospace, automotive and marine systems, which are mainly composed of plate-like structures. In order to reduce structural vibrations on these structures, active vibration control (AVC) is an effective approach. Adaptive filtering methodologies are preferred in AVC due to their ability to adjust themselves for varying dynamics of the structure during the operation. The filtered-X LMS (FXLMS) algorithm is a simple adaptive filtering algorithm widely implemented in active control applications. Proper implementation of FXLMS requires availability of a reference signal to mimic the disturbance and model of the dynamics between the control actuator and the error sensor, namely the secondary path. However, the controller output could interfere with the reference signal and the secondary path dynamics may change during the operation. This interference problem can be resolved by using an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter which considers feedback of the one or more previous control signals to the controller output and the changing secondary path dynamics can be updated using an online modeling technique. In this paper, IIR filtering based filtered-U LMS (FULMS) controller is combined with online secondary path modeling algorithm to suppress the vibrations of a plate-like structure. The results are validated through numerical and experimental studies. The results show that the FULMS with online secondary path modeling approach has more vibration rejection capabilities with higher convergence rate than the FXLMS counterpart.

  19. Investigation on active vibration isolation of a Stewart platform with piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaoxin; Xie, Xiling; Chen, Yanhao; Zhang, Zhiyi

    2016-11-01

    A Stewart platform with piezoelectric actuators is presented for micro-vibration isolation. The Jacobi matrix of the Stewart platform, which reveals the relationship between the position/pointing of the payload and the extensions of the six struts, is derived by kinematic analysis. The dynamic model of the Stewart platform is established by the FRF (frequency response function) synthesis method. In the active control loop, the direct feedback of integrated forces is combined with the FxLMS based adaptive feedback to dampen vibration of inherent modes and suppress transmission of periodic vibrations. Numerical simulations were conducted to prove vibration isolation performance of the Stewart platform under random and periodical disturbances, respectively. In the experiment, the output consistencies of the six piezoelectric actuators were measured at first and the theoretical Jacobi matrix as well as the feedback gain of each piezoelectric actuator was subsequently modified according to the measured consistencies. The direct feedback loop was adjusted to achieve sufficient active damping and the FxLMS based adaptive feedback control was adopted to suppress vibration transmission in the six struts. Experimental results have demonstrated that the Stewart platform can achieve 30 dB attenuation of periodical disturbances and 10-20 dB attenuation of random disturbances in the frequency range of 5-200 Hz.

  20. Muscular forearm activation in hand-grip tasks with superimposition of mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, L; Tirabasso, A; Lunghi, A; Di Giovanni, R; Sacco, F; Marchetti, E

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the muscular activation of the forearm, with or without vibration stimuli at different frequencies while performing a grip tasks of 45s at various level of exerted force. In 16 individuals, 9 females and 7 males, the surface electromyogram (EMG) of extensor carpi radialis longus and the flexor carpi ulnari muscles were assessed. At a short latency from onset EMG, RMS and the level of MU synchronization were assessed to evaluate the muscular adaptations. Whilst a trend of decay of EMG Median frequency (MDFd) was employed as an index of muscular fatigue. Muscular tasks consists of the grip of an instrumented handle at a force level of 20%, 30%, 40%, 60% of the maximum voluntary force. Vibration was supplied by a shaker to the hand in mono-frequential waves at 20, 30, 33 and 40Hz. In relation to EMG, RMS and MU synchronization, the muscular activation does not seem to change with the superimposition of the mechanical vibrations, on the contrary a lower MDFd was observed at 33Hz than in absence of vibration. This suggests an early muscular fatigue induced by vibration due to the fact that 33Hz is a resonance frequency for the hand-arm system.

  1. Active control of vibration using a neural network.

    PubMed

    Snyder, S D; Tanaka, N

    1995-01-01

    Feedforward control of sound and vibration using a neural network-based control system is considered, with the aim being to derive an architecture/algorithm combination which is capable of supplanting the commonly used finite impulse response filter/filtered-x least mean square (LMS) linear arrangement for certain nonlinear problems. An adaptive algorithm is derived which enables stable adaptation of the neural controller for this purpose, while providing the capacity to maintain causality within the control scheme. The algorithm is shown to be simply a generalization of the linear filtered-x LMS algorithm. Experiments are undertaken which demonstrate the utility of the proposed arrangement, showing that it performs as well as a linear control system for a linear control problem and better for a nonlinear control problem. The experiments also lead to the conclusion that more work is required to improve the predictability and consistency of the performance before the neural network controller becomes a practical alternative to the current linear feedforward systems.

  2. Variable force, eddy-current or magnetic damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An object of the invention is to provide variable damping for resonant vibrations which may occur at different rotational speeds in the range of rpms in which a rotating machine is operated. A variable force damper in accordance with the invention includes a rotating mass carried on a shaft which is supported by a bearing in a resilient cage. The cage is attached to a support plate whose rim extends into an annular groove in a housing. Variable damping is effected by tabs of electrically conducting nonmagnetic material which extend radially from the cage. The tabs at an index position lie between the pole face of respective C shaped magnets. The magnets are attached by cantilever spring members to the housing.

  3. Regular physical activity reduces the effects of Achilles tendon vibration on postural control for older women.

    PubMed

    Maitre, J; Serres, I; Lhuisset, L; Bois, J; Gasnier, Y; Paillard, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to determine in what extent physical activity influences postural control when visual, vestibular, and/or proprioceptive systems are disrupted. Two groups of healthy older women: an active group (74.0 ± 3.8 years) who practiced physical activities and a sedentary group (74.7 ± 6.3 years) who did not, underwent 12 postural conditions consisted in altering information emanating from sensory systems by means of sensory manipulations (i.e., eyes closed, cervical collar, tendon vibration, electromyostimulation, galvanic vestibular stimulation, foam surface). The center of foot pressure velocity was recorded on a force platform. Results indicate that the sensory manipulations altered postural control. The sedentary group was more disturbed than the active group by the use of tendon vibration. There was no clear difference between the two groups in the other conditions. This study suggests that the practice of physical activities is beneficial as a means of limiting the effects of tendon vibration on postural control through a better use of the not manipulated sensory systems and/or a more efficient reweighting to proprioceptive information from regions unaffected by the tendon vibration.

  4. Analytical study on damping performances of magnetorheological grease damper based on disk squeeze mode and experimental test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Danxia; Liao, Changrong; Liu, Qiong; Luo, Jing

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a small displacement-type magnetorheological grease (MRG) damper based on disk squeeze mode is proposed. The squeeze flow differential equation is obtained. The Navier slip condition is considered on the surfaces and the boundary compatible condition is established. The radial velocity profiles and the radial pressure distributions are derived respectively, and the mathematical stress expression is calculated. To verify rationality of analytical method, the MRG damper is designed and fabricated according to the technical requirements of an engine vibration isolation system. The experimental damping force from MTS870 Electrohydraulic Servo with sine wave excitation shows that the proposed analytical method is feasible and provides the reference value for designing MRG damper based on disk squeeze mode.

  5. Experimental investigation on the dissipative and elastic characteristics of a yaw colloidal damper destined to carbody suspension of a bullet train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, B.; Tomioka, T.

    2016-09-01

    Yaw damper represents a major source of excitation for flexural vibration of the railway carbody. In order to reduce transmissibility of such undesired excitation, yaw damper should allow for large force transmission at low working frequencies, but should behave as vibration isolator at high working frequencies. Unfortunately, the yaw oil damper (OD), which is nowadays in service, has poor intrinsic elastic capabilities and provides damping forces varying as a power function versus the piston speed. Since colloidal damper (CD) has intrinsic elastic capabilities and larger damping forces at lower excitation frequencies, it occurs as an attractive alternative solution to traditional yaw dampers. In this work, a yaw CD destined to carbody suspension of a bullet train was designed and manufactured; then, its dynamic characteristics, produced by both the frictional and colloidal effects, were evaluated from the experimental results, obtained during horizontal vibration tests, performed on a ball-screw shaker. Compared to the corresponding classical yaw OD, the trial yaw CD allowed for: weight reduction of 31.6%; large damping force, dissipated energy and spring constant at long piston stroke under low excitation frequency; low damping force, dissipated energy and spring constant at short piston stroke under high excitation frequency. Elastic properties were justified by introducing a model for the spring constant that included the effect of pore size distribution.

  6. The Influence of Whole-Body Vibration on Creatine Kinase Activity and Jumping Performance in Young Basketball Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fachina, Rafael; da Silva, Antônio; Falcão, William; Montagner, Paulo; Borin, João; Minozzo, Fábio; Falcão, Diego; Vancini, Rodrigo; Poston, Brach; de Lira, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify creatine kinase (CK) activity changes across time following an acute bout of whole-body vibration (WBV) and determine the association between changes in CK activity and jumping performance. Method: Twenty-six elite young basketball players were assigned to 3 groups: 36-Hz and 46-Hz vibration groups (G36 and G46, respectively)…

  7. Measuring of object vibration using sinusoidal-modulation laser-diode active interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yong; Cao, Qinfeng; Lu, Su

    1996-09-01

    Using the character that the emitting optical frequency of the laser diode is controlled by the injected current, the ability of eliminating environmental disturbance of the sinusoidal modulation laser diode active interferometer will be raised by more than one hundred times through putting the disturbed interference signal produced by the environment into the interferometer. When vibrating frequency of objects is different from that of the sinusoidol modulation, 'beat- frequency' will be produced in the interfere signal, which can be analyzed to get the vibrating frequency of objects. This paper described the operation principle and theoretical delusion of the 'beat-frequency' method.

  8. Exploring vibration control strategies for a footbridge with time-varying modal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Jose M.; Díaz, Ivan M.; Pereira, Emiliano; García-Palacios, Jaime H.; Wang, Xidong

    2016-09-01

    This paper explores different vibration control strategies for the cancellation of human-induced vibration of a structure with time-varying modal parameters. The motivation of this study is an urban stress-ribbon footbridge (Pedro Gomez Bosque, Valladolid, Spain) that, after a whole-year monitoring, it has been obtained that the natural frequency of a vibration mode at approximately 1.8 Hz (within the normal range of walking) changes up to 20%, mainly due to temperature variations. Thus, this paper takes the annual modal parameter estimates (aprox. 14000 estimations) of this mode and designs three control strategies: a) a tuned mass damper (TMD) tuned to the aforementioned mode using its most-repeated modal properties, b) a semi-active TMD with an on-off control law for the TMD damping, and c) an active mass damper designed using the well-known velocity feedback control strategy with a saturation nonlinearity. Illustrative results have been reported from this preliminary study.

  9. Inverse eigenvalue problems in vibration absorption: Passive modification and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.; Ram, Yitshak M.

    2006-01-01

    The abiding problem of vibration absorption has occupied engineering scientists for over a century and there remain abundant examples of the need for vibration suppression in many industries. For example, in the automotive industry the resolution of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) problems is of extreme importance to customer satisfaction. In rotorcraft it is vital to avoid resonance close to the blade passing speed and its harmonics. An objective of the greatest importance, and extremely difficult to achieve, is the isolation of the pilot's seat in a helicopter. It is presently impossible to achieve the objectives of vibration absorption in these industries at the design stage because of limitations inherent in finite element models. Therefore, it is necessary to develop techniques whereby the dynamic of the system (possibly a car or a helicopter) can be adjusted after it has been built. There are two main approaches: structural modification by passive elements and active control. The state of art of the mathematical theory of vibration absorption is presented and illustrated for the benefit of the reader with numerous simple examples.

  10. Active vibration control of a photolithography planten for increased resolution and throughput

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Barney, P.

    1996-02-01

    An experimental investigation into active control of bending vibrations in thick plate-like structural elements is described. This work is motivated by vibration problems encountered in manufacturing processes that require greater control authority than is available from conventional surface mounted PZT patches or PVDF films. The focus of this experiment is a surrogate photolithography platen in which PZT stacks are mounted in cutouts on the platen top surface. These actuators provide significant vibration control authority by generating moments in the platen through their compressive loads. A Positive Position Feedback control law is used to significantly augment the damping in the first two bending modes. The implications of the experimental results for photolithography machines are discussed.

  11. Active control of bending vibrations in thick bars using PZT stack actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Parker, G.; Barney, P.; Rodeman, R.

    1995-07-01

    An experimental investigation into active control of bending vibrations in thick bar and plate-like structural elements is described. This work is motivated by vibration problems in machine tools and photolithography machines that require greater control authority than available from conventional surface mounted PZT patches or PVDF films. Focus of this experiment is a cantilevered circular steel bar in which PZT stacks are mounted in cutouts near the bar root. Axially aligned and offset from the neutral axis, these actuators control the bending vibrations by generating moments in the bar through their compressive loads. A Positive Feedback control law is used to significantly augment the damping in the first bending mode. Implications of the experimental results for machine tool stability enhancement are discussed.

  12. Application of an active controller for reducing small-amplitude vertical vibration in a vehicle seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-Da; Chen, Rong-Jun

    2004-07-01

    This report describes the principle and application of active vibration control (AVC) for reducing undesired small-amplitude vertical vibration in the driver's seat of a vehicle. Three different control algorithms are implemented and compared in the experimental investigation. Apart from adaptive control and robust control, a hybrid control algorithm consisting of a combination of an adaptive controller with a filtered-x least mean squares (FXLMS) algorithm and a feedback structure with a robust synthesis theory for obtaining fast convergence and robust performance are proposed. A frequency domain technique is used for achieving the control plant identification and controller design. All of the proposed AVC controllers are implemented in a digital signal processor (DSP) platform, using a finite impulse response (FIR) filter for real-time control. A characteristic analysis and experimental comparison of three control algorithms for reducing the small amplitude vertical vibration in a vehicle seat are also presented in this paper.

  13. Whole-body vibration increases upper and lower body muscle activity in older adults: potential use of vibration accessories.

    PubMed

    Marín, Pedro J; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Santin-Medeiros, Fernanda; Vicente-Rodriguez, German; Casajús, Jose A; Hazell, Tom J; Garatachea, Nuria

    2012-06-01

    The current study examined the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on upper and lower body muscle activity during static muscle contractions (squat and bicep curls). The use of WBV accessories such as hand straps attached to the platform and a soft surface mat were also evaluated. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was measured for the medial gastrocnemius (MG), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps brachii (BB) muscles in fourteen healthy older adults (74.8±4.5 years; mean±SD) with a WBV stimulus at an acceleration of 40 m s(-2) (30 Hz High, 2.5 mm or 46 Hz Low, 1.1 mm). WBV increased lower body (VL and MG) sEMG vs baseline (no WBV) though this was decreased with the use of the soft mat. The addition of the bicep curl with hand straps had no effect on lower body sEMG. WBV also increased BB sEMG vs baseline which was further increased when using the hand straps. There was no upper body effect of the soft mat. This study demonstrates WBV increases both lower and upper body muscle activity in healthy older adults. Moreover, WBV accessories such as hand straps attached to the platform or a soft surface mat may be used to alter exercise intensity.

  14. A novel self-powered MR damper: theoretical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinchun, Guan; Yonghu, Huang; Yi, Ru; Hui, Li; Jinping, Ou

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel magnetorheological (MR) damper with a self-powered capability, which is proposed to have energy harvesting and MR damping technologies integrated into a single device. Vibration energy harvesting mechanisms were adopted, based on ball-screw mechanisms and a rotary permanent magnet dc generator, to convert the external vibration energy into electrical energy to power the MR damping unit. The configuration and operating principles of the proposed self-powered MR damper were presented. Considering the core loss effect on the magnetic field, a theoretical analysis of the proposed MR damper was carried out and a mechanical model was developed. Finally, a prototype with a capacity of 10 kN was fabricated and experimentally investigated in both the direct-supply mode and the supply-with-rectifier mode. The results indicated that the proposed configuration is feasible and that both modes can realize good self-adaptability of the MR damping force. However, the direct-supply mode has a sag effect in the force-displacement curve and provides a lower energy-dissipating capacity than the direct-supply mode does under the same conditions.

  15. A reduced energy supply strategy in active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichchou, M. N.; Loukil, T.; Bareille, O.; Chamberland, G.; Qiu, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a control strategy is presented and numerically tested. This strategy aims to achieve the potential performance of fully active systems with a reduced energy supply. These energy needs are expected to be comparable to the power demands of semi-active systems, while system performance is intended to be comparable to that of a fully active configuration. The underlying strategy is called 'global semi-active control'. This control approach results from an energy investigation based on management of the optimal control process. Energy management encompasses storage and convenient restitution. The proposed strategy monitors a given active law without any external energy supply by considering purely dissipative and energy-demanding phases. Such a control law is offered here along with an analysis of its properties. A suboptimal form, well adapted for practical implementation steps, is also given. Moreover, a number of numerical experiments are proposed in order to validate test findings.

  16. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  17. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.; Dirusso, E.; Fleming, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 microns down to approximately 25 microns (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  18. Harmonic-resonator-based triboelectric nanogenerator as a sustainable power source and a self-powered active vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Zhu, Guang; Yang, Weiqing; Jing, Qingshen; Bai, Peng; Yang, Ya; Hou, Te-Chien; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-11-13

    A harmonic-resonator-based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is presented as a sustainable power source and an active vibration sensor. It can effectively respond to vibration frequencies ranging from 2 to 200 Hz with a considerably wide working bandwidth of 13.4 Hz. This work not only presents a new principle in the field of vibration energy harvesting but also greatly expands the applicability of TENGs.

  19. Experimental study on using electromagnetic devices on bridge stay cables for simultaneous energy harvesting and vibration damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wenai; Zhu, Songye; Zhu, Hongping

    2016-06-01

    Flexible bridge stay cables are often vulnerable to problematic vibrations under dynamic excitations. However, from an energy perspective, such excessive vibrations denote a green and sustainable energy source to some electronic devices (such as semi-active dampers or wireless sensors) installed on the same cables. This paper presents an experimental study on a novel dual-function system called electromagnetic damper cum energy harvester (EMDEH). The proposed EMDEH, consisting of an electromagnetic device connected to an energy-harvesting circuit (EHC), simultaneously harvests cable vibration energy and provides sufficient damping to the cables. A fixed-duty-cycle buck-boost converter is employed as the EHC, which emulates a resistive load and provides approximately optimal damping and optimal energy harvesting efficiency when operating in discontinuous conduction mode. A 5.85 m long scaled stay cable installed with a prototype EMDEH is tested in the laboratory under a series of harmonic and random excitations. The EMDEH can achieve a control performance comparable to passive viscous dampers. An average electrical power of 31.6 and 21.51 mW is harvested under harmonic and random vibrations, respectively, corresponding to the efficiency of 16.9% and 13.8%, respectively. Moreover, this experimental study proves that optimal damping and energy harvesting can be achieved simultaneously, which answers a pending question regarding such a dual-objective optimization problem. Self-powered semi-active control systems or wireless sensor networks may be developed for bridge stay cables in the future based on the proposed concept in this study.

  20. Experimental study on using electromagnetic devices on bridge stay cables for simultaneous energy harvesting and vibration damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wenai; Zhu, Songye; Zhu, Hongping

    2016-06-01

    Flexible bridge stay cables are often vulnerable to problematic vibrations under dynamic excitations. However, from an energy perspective, such excessive vibrations denote a green and sustainable energy source to some electronic devices (such as semi-active dampers or wireless sensors) installed on the same cables. This paper presents an experimental study on a novel dual-function system called electromagnetic damper cum energy harvester (EMDEH). The proposed EMDEH, consisting of an electromagnetic device connected to an energy-harvesting circuit (EHC), simultaneously harvests cable vibration energy and provides sufficient damping to the cables. A fixed-duty-cycle buck–boost converter is employed as the EHC, which emulates a resistive load and provides approximately optimal damping and optimal energy harvesting efficiency when operating in discontinuous conduction mode. A 5.85 m long scaled stay cable installed with a prototype EMDEH is tested in the laboratory under a series of harmonic and random excitations. The EMDEH can achieve a control performance comparable to passive viscous dampers. An average electrical power of 31.6 and 21.51 mW is harvested under harmonic and random vibrations, respectively, corresponding to the efficiency of 16.9% and 13.8%, respectively. Moreover, this experimental study proves that optimal damping and energy harvesting can be achieved simultaneously, which answers a pending question regarding such a dual-objective optimization problem. Self-powered semi-active control systems or wireless sensor networks may be developed for bridge stay cables in the future based on the proposed concept in this study.

  1. The spectral analysis of an aero-engine assembly incorporating a squeeze-film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R.; Dede, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aero-engine structures have very low inherent damping and so artificial damping is often introduced by pumping oil into annular gaps between the casings and the outer races of some or all of the rolling-element bearings supporting the rotors. The thin oil films so formed are called squeeze film dampers and they can be beneficial in reducing rotor vibration due to unbalance and keeping to reasonable limits the forces transmitted to the engine casing. However, squeeze-film dampers are notoriously non-linear and as a result can introduce into the assembly such phenomena as subharmonic oscillations, jumps and combination frequencies. The purpose of the research is to investigate such phenomena both theoretically and experimentally on a test facility reproducing the essential features of a medium-size aero engine. The forerunner of this work was published. It was concerned with the examination of a squeeze-film damper in series with housing flexibility when supporting a rotor. The structure represented to a limited extent the essentials of the projected Rolls Royce RB401 engine. That research demonstrated the ability to calculate the oil-film forces arising from the squeeze film from known motions of the bearing components and showed that the dynamics of a shaft fitted with a squeeze film bearing can be predicted reasonably accurately. An aero-engine will normally have at least two shafts and so in addition to the excitation forces which are synchronous with the rotation of one shaft, there will also be forces at other frequencies from other shafts operating on the squeeze-film damper. Theoretical and experimental work to consider severe loading of squeeze-film dampers and to include these additional effects are examined.

  2. Activities report of the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research concerning fluid dynamics and acoustics; audiology and human effects; structures and machinery; and signal processing and control is summarized. Aircraft noise; underwater acoustics; silencers; biomechanics; noise measurement; hearing; structural dynamics; laser technology; automotive engineering; and active control are discussed.

  3. Minimization of the mean square velocity response of dynamic structures using an active-passive dynamic vibration absorber.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O; Cheng, L

    2012-07-01

    An optimal design of a hybrid vibration absorber (HVA) with a displacement and a velocity feedback for minimizing the velocity response of the structure based on the H(2) optimization criterion is proposed. The objective of the optimal design is to reduce the total vibration energy of the vibrating structure under wideband excitation, i.e., the total area under the velocity response spectrum is minimized in this criterion. One of the inherent limitations of the traditional passive vibration absorber is that its vibration suppression is low if the mass ratio between the absorber mass and the mass of the primary structure is low. The active element of the proposed HVA helps further reduce the vibration of the controlled structure, and it can provide very good vibration absorption performance even at a low mass ratio. Both the passive and active elements are optimized together for the minimization of the mean square velocity of the primary system as well as the active force required in the HVA. The proposed HVA was tested on single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) and continuous vibrating structures and compared to the traditional passive vibration absorber.

  4. Reduction of interior sound fields in flexible cylinders by active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of interior sound reduction through active control of a thin flexible shell's vibrational response are presently evaluated in view of an analytical model. The noise source is a single exterior acoustic monopole. The active control model is evaluated for harmonic excitation; the results obtained indicate spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 20 dB over the source plane, for acoustic resonant conditions inside the cavity.

  5. Preliminary results on passive eddy current damper technology for SSME turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Some preliminary results have been obtained for the dynamic response of a rotor operating over a speed range of 800 to 10,000 rpm. Amplitude frequency plots show the lateral vibratory response of an unbalanced rotor with and without external damping. The mode of damping is by means of eddy currents generated with 4 c shaped permanent magnets installed at the lower bearing of a vertically oriented rotor. The lower ball bearing and its damper assembly are totally immersed in liquid nitrogen at a temperature of -197 deg C (-320 deg F). These preliminary results for a referenced or base line passive eddy current damper assembly show that the amplitude of synchronous vibration is reduced at the resonant frequency. Measured damping coefficients were calculated to phi = .086; this compares with a theoretically calculated value of phi = .079.

  6. Active control of sound radiation from a vibrating rectangular panel by sound sources and vibration inputs - An experimental comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Hansen, C. H.; Snyder, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Active control of sound radiation from a rectangular panel by two different methods has been experimentally studied and compared. In the first method a single control force applied directly to the structure is used with a single error microphone located in the radiated acoustic field. Global attenuation of radiated sound was observed to occur by two main mechanisms. For 'on-resonance' excitation, the control force had the effect of increasing the total panel input impedance presented to the nosie source, thus reducing all radiated sound. For 'off-resonance' excitation, the control force tends not significantly to modify the panel total response amplitude but rather to restructure the relative phases of the modes leading to a more complex vibration pattern and a decrease in radiation efficiency. For acoustic control, the second method, the number of acoustic sources required for global reduction was seen to increase with panel modal order. The mechanism in this case was that the acoustic sources tended to create an inverse pressure distribution at the panel surface and thus 'unload' the panel by reducing the panel radiation impedance. In general, control by structural inputs appears more effective than control by acoustic sources for structurally radiated noise.

  7. Dynamic behavior of the mercury damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crout, P. D.; Newkirk, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of the mercury nutation damper is investigated. Particular attention is paid to the eccentric annular mercury configuration, which is the final continuous ring phase that occurs in the operation of all mercury dampers. In this phase, damping is poorest, and the system is closely linear. During the investigation, the hydrodynamic problem is treated as three dimensional, and extensive use is made of a variational principle of least-viscous frictional power loss. A variational principle of least-constraint is also used to advantage. Formulas for calculating the behavior of the mercury damper are obtained. Some confirmatory experiments were performed with transparent ring channels on a laboratory gyroscope. Selected movie frames taken during wobble damping are shown along with the results of film measurements.

  8. An integrated approach for friction damper design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, T. M.; Griffin, J. H.; Hoosac, T. M.; Kielb, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure is outlined for determining the optimal design of friction dampers for high speed turbomachinery blading. The procedure includes: an integration of bench test results with finite element analysis and a single mode blade model to ensure accuracy of the analytical model and improve reliability of the friction damper design; an extension of the single mode blade model to predict the engine behavior of friction dampers; and a new way of viewing analytical and experimental results to determine optimal design parameters when the levels of excitation and damping in the system are unknown. Analysis and experiments are performed on a test disk in order to demonstrate and verify the accuracy of the design procedure.

  9. Integrated fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms for multi-objective control of structures using MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Gang; Zhou, Lily L.

    2006-09-01

    This study presents a design strategy based on genetic algorithms (GA) for semi-active fuzzy control of structures that have magnetorheological (MR) dampers installed to prevent damage from severe dynamic loads such as earthquakes. The control objective is to minimize both the maximum displacement and acceleration responses of the structure. Interactive relationships between structural responses and input voltages of MR dampers are established by using a fuzzy controller. GA is employed as an adaptive method for design of the fuzzy controller, which is here known as a genetic adaptive fuzzy (GAF) controller. The multi-objectives are first converted to a fitness function that is used in standard genetic operations, i.e. selection, crossover, and mutation. The proposed approach generates an effective and reliable fuzzy logic control system by powerful searching and self-learning adaptive capabilities of GA. Numerical simulations for single and multiple damper cases are given to show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed intelligent control strategy.

  10. Improvements for rotary viscous dampers used in spacecraft deployment mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Alphonso; Powers, Charles; Lyons, Ron

    1998-01-01

    During component level thermal-vacuum deployment testing of eight rotary viscous dampers for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, all the dampers failed to provide damping during a region of the deployment. Radiographic examination showed that air in the damping fluid caused the undamped motion when the dampers were operated in a vacuum environment. Improvements in the procedure used to fill the dampers with damping fluid, the installation of a Viton vacuum seal in the damper cover, and improved screening techniques eliminated the problem.

  11. Observation of the Fe—CN and Fe—CO Vibrations in the Active Site of [NiFe] Hydrogenase by Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy**

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Saeed; Wang, Hongxin; Mitra, Devrani; Ogata, Hideaki; Manor, Brian C.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Byrne, Deborah; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Jenney, Francis E.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Alp, Ercan; Zhao, Jiyong; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering of 57Fe labeled [NiFe] hydrogenase is shown to give information on different states of the enzyme. It was thus possible to detect and assign Fe–CO and Fe–CN bending and stretching vibrations of the active site outside the spectral range of the Fe–S cluster normal modes. PMID:23136119

  12. Optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of gas turbine blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Marx, N.; Gentili, S.; Schwingshackl, C. W.; Di Mare, L.; Cerri, G.; Dini, D.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the gas turbine blade vibrations can give rise to catastrophic failures and a reduction of the blades life because of fatigue related phenomena[1]-[3] . In last two decades, the adoption of piezoelectric elements, has received considerable attention by many researcher for its potential applicability to different areas of mechanical, aerospace, aeronautical and civil engineering. Recently, a number of studies of blades vibration control via piezoelectric plates and patches have been reported[4]-[6] . It was reported that the use of piezoelectric elements can be very effective in actively controlling vibrations. In one of their previous contributions[7] , the authors of the present manuscript studied a model to control the blade vibrations by piezoelectric elements and validated their results using a multi-physics finite elements package (COMSOL) and results from the literature. An optimal placement method of piezoelectric plate has been developed and applied to different loading scenarios for realistic configurations encountered in gas turbine blades. It has been demonstrated that the optimal placement depends on the spectrum of the load, so that segmented piezoelectric patches have been considered and, for different loads, an optimal combination of sequential and/or parallel actuation and control of the segments has been studied. In this paper, an experimental investigation carried out by the authors using a simplified beam configuration is reported and discussed. The test results obtained by the investigators are then compared with the numerical predictions [7] .

  13. Layout optimization methodology of piezoelectric transducers in energy-recycling semi-active vibration control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezawa, Akihiro; Makihara, Kanjuro; Kogiso, Nozomu; Kitamura, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    An optimization methodology is proposed for the piezoelectric transducer (PZT) layout of an energy-recycling semi-active vibration control (ERSAVC) system for a space structure composed of trusses. Based on numerical optimization techniques, we intend to generate optimal location of PZTs under the constraint for the total length of PZTs. The design variables are set as the length of the PZT on each truss based on the concept of the ground structure approach. The transient problems of the mechanical and electrical vibrations based on the ERSAVC theory are considered as the equations of state. The objective is to minimize the integration of the square of all displacement over the whole analysis time domain. The sensitivity of the objective function is derived based on the adjoint variable method. Based on these formulations, an optimization algorithm is constructed using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and the method of moving asymptotes. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the validity and utility of the proposed methodology. Using the proposed methodology, the optimal location of PZTs for the vibration suppression for multi-modal vibration is studied, which can be benchmark results of further study in the context of ERSAVC systems.

  14. Refinement and evaluation of helicopter real-time self-adaptive active vibration controller algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    A Real-Time Self-Adaptive (RTSA) active vibration controller was used as the framework in developing a computer program for a generic controller that can be used to alleviate helicopter vibration. Based upon on-line identification of system parameters, the generic controller minimizes vibration in the fuselage by closed-loop implementation of higher harmonic control in the main rotor system. The new generic controller incorporates a set of improved algorithms that gives the capability to readily define many different configurations by selecting one of three different controller types (deterministic, cautious, and dual), one of two linear system models (local and global), and one or more of several methods of applying limits on control inputs (external and/or internal limits on higher harmonic pitch amplitude and rate). A helicopter rotor simulation analysis was used to evaluate the algorithms associated with the alternative controller types as applied to the four-bladed H-34 rotor mounted on the NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus (RTA) which represents the fuselage. After proper tuning all three controllers provide more effective vibration reduction and converge more quickly and smoothly with smaller control inputs than the initial RTSA controller (deterministic with external pitch-rate limiting). It is demonstrated that internal limiting of the control inputs a significantly improves the overall performance of the deterministic controller.

  15. Vibration and damping characteristics of cylindrical shells with active constrained layer damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Yi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the application of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments is extended to the vibration control of cylindrical shells. The governing equation of motion of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments is derived on the basis of the constitutive equations of elastic, piezoelectric and visco-elastic materials and an energy approach. The damping of a visco-elastic layer is modeled by the complex modulus formula. A finite element model is developed to describe and predict the vibration characteristics of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments. A closed-loop control system based on proportional and derivative feedback of the sensor voltage generated by the piezo-sensor of the ACLD patches is established. The dynamic behaviors of cylindrical shells with ACLD treatments such as natural frequencies, loss factors and responses in the frequency domain are further investigated. The effects of several key parameters such as control gains, location and coverage of ACLD treatments on vibration suppression of cylindrical shells are also discussed. The numerical results indicate the validity of the finite element model and the control strategy approach. The potential of ACLD treatments in controlling vibration and sound radiation of cylindrical shells used as major critical structures such as cabins of aircraft, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles is thus demonstrated.

  16. Active Vibration Control for Helicopter Interior Noise Reduction Using Power Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J.; Chevva, K.; Sun, F.; Blanc, A.; Kim, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work performed by United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) under Contract NNL11AA06C. The objective of this program is to develop technology to reduce helicopter interior noise resulting from multiple gear meshing frequencies. A novel active vibration control approach called Minimum Actuation Power (MAP) is developed. MAP is an optimal control strategy that minimizes the total input power into a structure by monitoring and varying the input power of controlling sources. MAP control was implemented without explicit knowledge of the phasing and magnitude of the excitation sources by driving the real part of the input power from the controlling sources to zero. It is shown that this occurs when the total mechanical input power from the excitation and controlling sources is a minimum. MAP theory is developed for multiple excitation sources with arbitrary relative phasing for single or multiple discrete frequencies and controlled by a single or multiple controlling sources. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of MAP for structural vibration reduction of a realistic rotorcraft interior structure. MAP control resulted in significant average global vibration reduction of a single frequency and multiple frequency excitations with one controlling actuator. Simulations also demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the observed vibration reductions on interior radiated noise.

  17. Experimental studies on active vibration control of a smart composite beam using a PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Miroslav M.; Simonović, Aleksandar M.; Zorić, Nemanja D.; Lukić, Nebojša S.; Stupar, Slobodan N.; Ilić, Slobodan S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents experimental verification of the active vibration control of a smart cantilever composite beam using a PID controller. In order to prevent negative occurrences in the derivative and integral terms in a PID controller, first-order low-pass filters are implemented in the derivative action and in the feedback of the integral action. The proposed application setup consists of a composite cantilever beam with a fiber-reinforced piezoelectric actuator and strain gage sensors. The beam is modeled using a finite element method based on third-order shear deformation theory. The experiment considers vibration control under periodic excitation and an initial static deflection. A control algorithm was implemented on a PIC32MX440F256H microcontroller. Experimental results corresponding to the proposed PID controller are compared with corresponding results using proportional (P) control, proportional-integral (PI) control and proportional-derivative (PD) control. Experimental results indicate that the proposed PID controller provides 8.93% more damping compared to a PD controller, 14.41% more damping compared to a PI controller and 19.04% more damping compared to a P controller in the case of vibration under periodic excitation. In the case of free vibration control, the proposed PID controller shows better performance (settling time 1.2 s) compared to the PD controller (settling time 1.5 s) and PI controller (settling time 2.5 s).

  18. Modelling and study of active vibration control for off-road vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junwei; Chen, Sizhong

    2014-05-01

    In view of special working characteristics and structure, engineering machineries do not have conventional suspension system typically. Consequently, operators have to endure severe vibrations which are detrimental both to their health and to the productivity of the loader. Based on displacement control, a kind of active damping method is developed for a skid-steer loader. In this paper, the whole hydraulic system for active damping method is modelled which include swash plate dynamics model, proportional valve model, piston accumulator model, pilot-operated check valve model, relief valve model, pump loss model, and cylinder model. A new road excitation model is developed for the skid-steer loader specially. The response of chassis vibration acceleration to road excitation is verified through simulation. The simulation result of passive accumulator damping is compared with measurements and the comparison shows that they are close. Based on this, parallel PID controller and track PID controller with acceleration feedback are brought into the simulation model, and the simulation results are compared with passive accumulator damping. It shows that the active damping methods with PID controllers are better in reducing chassis vibration acceleration and pitch movement. In the end, the test work for active damping method is proposed for the future work.

  19. Design and optimization of voice coil actuator for six degree of freedom active vibration isolation system using Halbach magnet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MyeongHyeon; Kim, Hyunchang; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling, optimization, and validation of an active vibration isolation system using a voice coil motor. The active vibration isolating method was constructed with a passive isolator and an active isolator. A spring was used for passive isolating; an actuator was used for active isolating. The proposed active vibration isolation system (AVIS) can isolate disturbances for many kinds of instruments. Until now, developed AVIS were able to isolate a six degree-of-freedom disturbance effectively. This paper proposes the realization of such a six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system that can work as a bench top device for precision measuring machines such as atomic force microscope, scanning probe microscope, etc.

  20. Design and optimization of voice coil actuator for six degree of freedom active vibration isolation system using Halbach magnet array.

    PubMed

    Kim, MyeongHyeon; Kim, Hyunchang; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling, optimization, and validation of an active vibration isolation system using a voice coil motor. The active vibration isolating method was constructed with a passive isolator and an active isolator. A spring was used for passive isolating; an actuator was used for active isolating. The proposed active vibration isolation system (AVIS) can isolate disturbances for many kinds of instruments. Until now, developed AVIS were able to isolate a six degree-of-freedom disturbance effectively. This paper proposes the realization of such a six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system that can work as a bench top device for precision measuring machines such as atomic force microscope, scanning probe microscope, etc.

  1. Direct voltage control of magnetorheological damper for vehicle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Haiping; Lam, James; Cheung, K. C.; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Nong

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents a study on the direct voltage control of a magnetorheological (MR) damper for application in vehicle suspensions. As MR damper dynamics is highly nonlinear, the direct control system design for an MR damper is difficult. Representing an MR damper by a Takagi-Sugeno (TS) fuzzy model enables the linear control theory to be directly applied to design the MR damper controller. In this paper, first the MR damper dynamics is represented by a TS fuzzy model, and then an H∞ controller that considers the suspension performance requirements and the constraint on the input voltage for the MR damper is designed. Furthermore, considering the case that not all the state variables are measurable in practice, the design of an H∞ observer with immeasurable premise variables and the design of a robust controller are proposed, respectively. Numerical simulations are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  2. Active vibration control of an inertial actuator subject to broadband excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camperi, S.; Ghanchi-Tehrani, M.; Zilletti, M.; Elliott, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    Active vibration control has been widely used in many engineering applications in order to minimise vibrations in structures, when subjected to broadband random disturbances. Feedback control in the form of velocity feedback is considered in this paper, which generates a damping force proportional to the velocity. The control gain is tuned in such a way to minimise the kinetic energy of the system. In this paper, an inertial actuator excited by a random voltage is considered and an active control is implemented. The dynamic equations of the system are derived and the response is obtained with and without control. The stability of the system is analysed using the Nyquist plot. The response of the actuator is obtained from time domain simulations using Matlab. The effect of the control gains are also investigated on the responses. Energy analysis shows how the energy in the system decreases by increasing the feedback gain up to a stability limit.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Premkumar, S.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2015-06-24

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material.

  4. Semi-active variable stiffness vibration control of vehicle seat suspension using an MR elastomer isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Haiping; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Nong

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a study on continuously variable stiffness control of vehicle seat suspension using a magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) isolator. A concept design for an MRE isolator is proposed in the paper and its behavior is experimentally evaluated. An integrated seat suspension model, which includes a quarter-car suspension and a seat suspension with a driver body model, is used to design a sub-optimal H_{\\infty } controller for an active isolator. The desired control force generated by this active isolator is then emulated by the MRE isolator through its continuously variable stiffness property when the actuating condition is met. The vibration control effect of the MRE isolator is evaluated in terms of driver body acceleration responses under both bump and random road conditions. The results show that the proposed control strategy achieves better vibration reduction performance than conventional on-off control.

  5. Origin invariance in vibrational resonance Raman optical activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, Luciano N. Cappelli, Chiara; Egidi, Franco; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-05-07

    A theoretical investigation on the origin dependence of the vibronic polarizabilities, isotropic and anisotropic rotational invariants, and scattering cross sections in Resonance Raman Optical Activity (RROA) spectroscopy is presented. Expressions showing the origin dependence of these polarizabilities were written in the resonance regime using the Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) approximations for the electronic transition moments. Differently from the far-from-resonance scattering regime, where the origin dependent terms cancel out when the rotational invariants are calculated, RROA spectrum can exhibit some origin dependence even for eigenfunctions of the electronic Hamiltonian. At the FC level, the RROA spectrum is completely origin invariant if the polarizabilities are calculated using a single excited state or for a set of degenerate states. Otherwise, some origin effects can be observed in the spectrum. At the HT level, RROA spectrum is origin dependent even when the polarizabilities are evaluated from a single excited state but the origin effect is expected to be small in this case. Numerical calculations performed for (S)-methyloxirane, (2R,3R)-dimethyloxirane, and (R)-4-F-2-azetidinone at both FC and HT levels using the velocity representation of the electric dipole and quadrupole transition moments confirm the predictions of the theory and show the extent of origin effects and the effectiveness of suggested ways to remove them.

  6. Electromagnetic and structural coupled finite element analysis of active control in an anti-vibration device

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamoto, Eiji; Chen, Q.M.; Takeuchi, Hitoshi; Brauer, J.R.

    1997-03-01

    An active control model of an anti-vibration device is analyzed using a coupled electromagnetic and structural finite element technique. The model consists of two parallel conducting wires moving in a uniform magnetic field. Displacement and velocity of the wires are detected and transformed into voltages. Those voltages are fed back to each wire to control the motion by Lorentz force. Calculated response of the motion is shown to agree with the theory of the equivalent mechanical model.

  7. Active vibration control of adaptive flexible structures using piezoelectric smart sensors and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, S.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The active control of vibrations and radiated noise from structures is studied. The emphasis is the use of a minimum number of discrete piezoelectric wafer type sensors and actuators and optimal control algorithms. One of the major objectives is to effect control without substantially changing the structural dynamics of the original system. Canonical structures such as a cantilever beam and an all-clamped square plate, as well as practical structures such as fuel tanks, are investigated. For the suppression of a single mode as well as for multi-mode structural motions, velocity feedback and coupled model steady-state quadratic optimal control methods are applied using both analog and digital control systems with the various types of PZT (Lead-Zirconate-Titanate) transducers. The advantages of circular disc type PZT wafers are explained and a uni-disc type co-located sensor and actuator system has been proposed. For more efficient filtering of the structural mode signal, a smart filtering idea was developed considering the mode shape and poling direction of the sensor. To cover the signals from a partially distributed sensor and actuator to a point displacement and forcing signal, efficient conversion methods are developed. From the experimental and theoretical studies on the optimum selection of actuator positions, a coupled mode optimal control simulations is executed. A variety of adaptive structural vibration control experiments are performed verifying the potential of PZT transducers as sensors and actuators. Single mode and multimode control of structural vibration and radiated noise has been achieved. Using at the most 1-4 small disc or ring-shaped actuators, the original vibration levels have been reduced by 12-25 dB. Successful vibration control of the automobile fuel tank indicates that the ideas in this thesis can be applied to practical structures such as passenger compartments of ground and airborne vehicles.

  8. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  9. Active vibration control on a quarter-car for cancellation of road noise disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgacem, Walid; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a methodology is presented for the cancellation of road noise, from the analysis of vibration transmission paths for an automotive suspension to the design of an active control system using inertial actuators on a suspension to reduce the vibrations transmitted to the chassis. First, experiments were conducted on a Chevrolet Epica LS automobile on a concrete test track to measure accelerations induced on the suspension by the road. These measurements were combined with experimental Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) measured on a quarter-car test bench to reconstruct an equivalent three dimensional force applied on the wheel hub. Second, FRFs measured on the test bench between the three-dimensional driving force and forces at each suspension/chassis linkage were used to characterize the different transmission paths of vibration energy to the chassis. Third, an experimental model of the suspension was constructed to simulate the configuration of the active control system, using the primary (disturbance) FRFs and secondary (control) FRFs also measured on the test bench. This model was used to optimize the configuration of the control actuators and to evaluate the required forces. Finally, a prototype of an active suspension was implemented and measurements were performed in order to assess the performance of the control approach. A 4.6 dB attenuation on transmitted forces was obtained in the 50-250 Hz range.

  10. A magnetorheological damper with an integrated self-powered displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dai-Hua; Bai, Xian-Xu

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, aiming at self-powering the integrated relative displacement sensor (IRDS) and the corresponding electronic system of an integrated relative displacement self-sensing magnetorheological (MR) damper (IRDSMRD) based semi-active system, the principle of an MR damper with an integrated self-powered displacement sensor is proposed and realized. The prototype of the MR damper with an integrated self-powered displacement sensor is designed and fabricated. In this MR damper, a coil evenly wound on the piston simultaneously acts as the exciting coil for the MR fluid and the IRDS, while a coil evenly wound on the cylinder simultaneously acts as the induction coil (i.e., pick-up coil) for the IRDS and the pick-up coil for the energy harvesting device. On one hand, both the MR fluid and the IRDS are simultaneously magnetized by a mixed signal, in which the carrier signal for the IRDS and the current for the MR fluid with different frequencies are superposed by a superposition circuit. That is, the exciting coil is frequency division multiplexed. On the other hand, when the exciting coil of the MR damper is energized by the carrier signal for the IRDS and the current for the MR fluid, the induced voltage in the pick-up coil not only can be harvested by the energy harvesting circuit to power the IRDS and the corresponding electronic system of the IRDSMRD, but also can be demodulated to obtain the relative displacement of the piston relative to the cylinder. That is, the induction coil for the IRDS and the pick-up coil for the energy harvesting device are functionally multiplexed. The characteristics of the fabricated MR damper with an integrated self-powered displacement sensor, including the energy harvested by the pick-up coil, the relative displacement sensed by the IRDS, and the controllable damping force, are modeled, analyzed, and tested. The feasibility and capability of the proposed principle are validated theoretically and experimentally.

  11. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lienhard, Karin; Cabasson, Aline; Meste, Olivier; Colson, Serge S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG) spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV) exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental) and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05), and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05). This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity. Key points The spikes observed in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity The motion artifacts are more pronounced in the first spike than the following spikes in the sEMG spectrum Reflex activity during WBV exercises is enhanced with an additional load of approximately 50% of the body mass PMID:25729290

  12. Resonance modeling and control via magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letelier, Mario F.; Siginer, Dennis A.; Stockle, Juan S.

    2016-08-01

    A method to model and minimize resonant structural oscillations using magnetorheological dampers is presented. The response of the magnetorheological fluid flowing in a circular tube under a pressure gradient to the applied variable magnetic field is tailored to determine the optimum stress field in the fluid to mitigate resonance effects.

  13. BVI induced vibration and noise alleviation by active and passive approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li

    This dissertation describes the development of a comprehensive aeroelastic/aeroacoustic simulation capability for the modeling of vibration and noise in rotorcraft induced by blade-vortex interaction (BVI). Subsequently this capability is applied to study vibration and noise reduction, using active and passive control approaches. The active approach employed is the actively controlled partial span trailing edge flaps (ACF), implemented in single and dual, servo and plain flap configurations. The passive approach is based on varying the sweep and anhedral on the tip of the rotor. Two different modern helicopters are chosen as the baseline for the implementation of ACF approach, one resembling a four-bladed MBB BO-105 hingeless rotor and the other similar to a five-bladed MD-900 bearingless rotor. The structural model is based on a finite element approach capable of simulating composite helicopter blades with swept tips, and representing multiple load paths at the blade root which is a characteristic of bearingless rotors. An unsteady compressible aerodynamic model based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach is combined with a free wake analysis which has been enhanced by improving the wake analysis resolution and modeling a dual vortex structure. These enhancements are important for capturing BVI effects. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades has been developed, which is required by the acoustic analysis. A modified version of helicopter noise code WOPWOP with provisions for blade flexibility has been combined with the aeroelastic analysis to predict the BVI noise. Several variants of the higher harmonic control (HHC) algorithm have been applied for the active noise control, as well as the simultaneous vibration and noise control. Active control of BVI noise is accomplished using feedback from an onboard microphone. The simulation has been extensively validated against experimental data and

  14. Vibration control via stiffness switching of magnetostrictive transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a computational study is presented of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magneto-strictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magneto-strictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magneto-strictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magneto-mechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.13; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magneto-strictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magneto-strictive shunt damping. For the cases considered, optimal resistive shunt damping performed considerably better than both voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching.

  15. Vibration Control via Stiffness Switching of Magnetostrictive Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a computational study is presented of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magnetostrictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magnetostrictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magnetostrictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magneto-mechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.13; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magnetostrictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magnetostrictive shunt damping. For the cases considered, optimal resistive shunt damping performed considerably better than both voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching.

  16. Shunted Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Analysis Including Centrifugal Loading Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue problems which require damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. One method is the use of piezoelectric materials as passive or active dampers. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery rotor blades research, an effort has been made to investigate the effectiveness of a shunted piezoelectric for the turbomachinery rotor blades vibration control, specifically for a condition with centrifugal rotation. While ample research has been performed on the use of a piezoelectric material with electric circuits to attempt to control the structural vibration damping, very little study has been done regarding rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. Specifically, the objectives of this study are: (a) to create and analyze finite element models for harmonic forced response vibration analysis coupled with shunted piezoelectric circuits for engine blade operational conditions, (b) to validate the experimental test approaches with numerical results and vice versa, and (c) to establish a numerical modeling capability for vibration control using shunted piezoelectric circuits under rotation. Study has focused on a resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches on plate specimens. Tests and analyses were performed for both non-spinning and spinning conditions. The finite element (FE) shunted piezoelectric circuit damping simulations were performed using the ANSYS Multiphysics code for the resistive and inductive circuit piezoelectric simulations of both conditions. The FE results showed a good correlation with experimental test results. Tests and analyses of shunted piezoelectric damping control, demonstrating with plate specimens, show a great potential to reduce blade vibrations under centrifugal loading.

  17. Decentralized harmonic active vibration control of a flexible plate using piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Matthieu; Micheau, Philippe; Berry, Alain

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated decentralized active control of periodic panel vibration using multiple pairs combining PZT actuators and PVDF sensors distributed on the panel. By contrast with centralized MIMO controllers used to actively control the vibrations or the sound radiation of extended structures, decentralized control using independent local control loops only requires identification of the diagonal terms in the plant matrix. However, it is difficult to a priori predict the global stability of such decentralized control. In this study, the general situation of noncollocated actuator-sensor pairs was considered. Frequency domain gradient and Newton-Raphson adaptation of decentralized control were analyzed, both in terms of performance and stability conditions. The stability conditions are especially derived in terms of the adaptation coefficient and a control effort weighting coefficient. Simulations and experimental results are presented in the case of a simply supported panel with four PZT-PVDF pairs distributed on it. Decentralized vibration control is shown to be highly dependent on the frequency, but can be as effective as a fully centralized control even when the plant matrix is not diagonal-dominant or is not strictly positive real (not dissipative).

  18. The Development of an Intelligent Hybrid Active-passive Vibration Isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Changgeng; Ma, Jianguo; Rustighi, Emiliano

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid active-passive vibration isolator made up of electromagnetic actuator and air spring in parallel can be used to effectively isolate the broadband and line spectrum vibration of mechanical equipment simultaneously. However, due to its reliability and safety problems caused by the impact, its application in ships is limited. In this paper, an impact- resistant structure and an air gap self-sensing method of the passive-active hybrid vibration isolator are proposed and developed on the base of modelling, simulation and analysis. A thin magnetic rubber is filled into the air gap of electromagnetic actuator, which can avoid rigid collision between the armature and the permanent magnet under the action of impact. A suspension armature structure including pre-compression spring is suggested, which can automatically compensate the deformation caused by impact and protect the coil and permanent magnet from impact damage. An air gap self-sensing method is developed through detecting the voltage between the input and output terminals of actuator, which is verified by experiments.

  19. Probing the Raman-active acoustic vibrations of nanoparticles with extraordinary spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Skyler; Gelfand, Ryan M.; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots, viruses, DNA and all other nanoparticles have acoustic vibrations that can act as ‘fingerprints’ to identify their shape, size and mechanical properties, yet high-resolution Raman spectroscopy in this low-energy range has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy to measure the Raman-active vibrations of single isolated nanoparticles in the 0.1-10 cm-1 range with ˜0.05 cm-1 resolution, to resolve peak splitting from material anisotropy and to probe the low-frequency modes of biomolecules. EAR employs a nanoaperture laser tweezer that can select particles of interest and manipulate them once identified. We therefore believe that this nanotechnology will enable expanded capabilities for the study of nanoparticles in the materials and life sciences.

  20. Active vibration control of flexible cantilever plates using piezoelectric materials and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Inman, Daniel J.

    2016-02-01

    The study presented in this paper introduces a new intelligent methodology to mitigate the vibration response of flexible cantilever plates. The use of the piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs for active control of plates is discussed. An intelligent neural network based controller is designed to control the optimal voltage applied on the piezoelectric patches. The control technique utilizes a neurocontroller along with a Kalman Filter to compute the appropriate actuator command. The neurocontroller is trained based on an algorithm that incorporates a set of emulator neural networks which are also trained to predict the future response of the cantilever plate. Then, the neurocontroller is evaluated by comparing the uncontrolled and controlled responses under several types of dynamic excitations. It is observed that the neurocontroller reduced the vibration response of the flexible cantilever plate significantly; the results demonstrated the success and robustness of the neurocontroller independent of the type and distribution of the excitation force.

  1. Temperature-activated layer-breathing vibrations in few-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Lui, Chun Hung; Ye, Zhipeng; Keiser, Courtney; Xiao, Xun; He, Rui

    2014-08-13

    We investigated the low-frequency Raman spectra of freestanding few-layer graphene (FLG) at varying temperatures (400-900 K) controlled by laser heating. At high temperature, we observed the fundamental Raman mode for the lowest-frequency branch of rigid-plane layer-breathing mode (LBM) vibration. The mode frequency redshifts dramatically from 81 cm(-1) for bilayer to 23 cm(-1) for 8-layer. The thickness dependence is well described by a simple model of coupled oscillators. Notably, the LBM Raman response is unobservable at room temperature, and it is turned on at higher temperature (>600 K) with a steep increase of Raman intensity. The observation suggests that the LBM vibration is strongly suppressed by molecules adsorbed on the graphene surface but is activated as desorption occurs at high temperature.

  2. Analytical design and evaluation of an active control system for helicopter vibration reduction and gust response alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.; Zwicke, P. E.; Gold, P.; Miao, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to define the basic configuration of an active control system for helicopter vibration and gust response alleviation. The study culminated in a control system design which has two separate systems: narrow band loop for vibration reduction and wider band loop for gust response alleviation. The narrow band vibration loop utilizes the standard swashplate control configuration to input controller for the vibration loop is based on adaptive optimal control theory and is designed to adapt to any flight condition including maneuvers and transients. The prime characteristics of the vibration control system is its real time capability. The gust alleviation control system studied consists of optimal sampled data feedback gains together with an optimal one-step-ahead prediction. The prediction permits the estimation of the gust disturbance which can then be used to minimize the gust effects on the helicopter.

  3. Hybrid magnetorheological fluid elastomeric lag dampers for helicopter stability augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei; Wereley, Norman M.

    2008-08-01

    A laboratory demonstration of a hybrid magnetorheological fluid-elastomeric (MRFE) damper is investigated for adjustable or programmable lag mode damping in helicopters, so that damping requirements can be varied as a function of different flight conditions. The laboratory demonstration of this hybrid MRFE lag damper consists of a double lap shear elastomeric damper in parallel with two magnetorheological (MR) flow mode dampers. This is compared to a damper where only elastomeric materials are implemented, i.e., a double lap shear specimen. The relationship between the output force and the quasi-steady harmonic displacement input to a flow mode MR damper is exploited, where the output force can be adjusted as a function of applied magnetic field. Equivalent viscous damping is used to compare the damping characteristics of the hybrid damper to a conventional elastomeric damper under steady-state sinusoidal displacement excitation. To demonstrate feasibility, a hybrid MRFE damper test setup is designed, and single frequency (lag frequency or rotor in-plane bending frequency) and dual frequency (lag frequency and rotor frequency) tests are conducted under different magnetic fields. The hybrid MRFE damper exhibits amplitude-dependent damping behavior. However, with application of a magnetic field, the damping level is controlled to a specific damping level objective as a function of displacement amplitude. Similarly, under dual frequency conditions, damping degradation at the lag frequency, because of lag motion at the rotor frequency, can also be recovered by increasing magnetic field. A time-domain analysis is developed to study the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the hybrid MRFE damper. Using rate-dependent elasto-slides, the amplitude-dependent behavior of the hybrid MRFE damper is accurately reconstructed using both constant and current-dependent (i.e. controllable) parameters. The analysis is physically motivated and can be applied to the elastomer and MR fluid

  4. Elimination of spades in wheeled military vehicles using MR-fluid dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinloo, Ashkan H.; Vahdati, Nader; Yap, Fook Fah

    2011-03-01

    Tracked military vehicles were the choice of fighting vehicles due to their heavy fire power, better armor package distribution, better traction, and ability to fire on the move without spades. Many armies are converting to all wheeled vehicles, but one of the drawbacks is the inability to fire on the move without spades. A 2D heave pitch vehicle model for HMMWV has been developed. Simulation results indicate that by the use of MR-fluid dampers with the skyhook controls, it is possible to remove the spades, control chassis vibration, and prevent vehicle lift off during mortar firing, without bursting the tires.

  5. Active Vibration Control of an S809 Wind Turbine Blade Using Synthetic Jet Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Victor; Boucher, Matthew; Ostman, Rebecca; Amitay, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Active flow control via synthetic jet actuators was implemented to improve the aeroelastic performance of a small scale S809 airfoil wind turbine blade model in a wind tunnel. Blade vibration performance was explored for a range of steady post-stall angles of attack, as well as various unsteady pitching motions for a chord based Reynolds number range of 1.29x10^5 to 3.69x10^5. Blade tip deflection was measured using a pair of calibrated strain gauges mounted at the root of the model. Using flow control, significant vibration reduction was observed for some steady post-stall angles of attack, while for dynamic pitching motions, vibration reduction was more pronounced (for a given angle of attack) on the pitch up motion compared to the pitch down motion of the blade cycle. This effect was attributed to the phenomenon known as dynamic stall, where the shedding of a leading edge vortex during the pitch up motion contributes to elevated values of lift (compared to static angles of attack) and lower values of lift when the blade is pitched down. This effect was also quantified through the use of Particle Image Velocimetry.

  6. Evaluating Attenuation of Vibration Response using Particle Impact Damping for a Range of Equipment Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Parsons, David; Smith, Andrew; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert; Craigmyle, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Particle dampers provide a mechanism for diverting energy away from resonant structural vibrations. This experimental study provides data from a series of acoustically excited tests to determine the effectiveness of these dampers for equipment mounted to a curved orthogrid panel for a launch vehicle application. Vibration attenuation trends are examined for variations in particle damper fill level, component mass, and excitation energy. A significant response reduction at the component level was achieved, suggesting that comparatively small, strategically placed, particle damper devices might be advantageously used in launch vehicle design. These test results were compared to baseline acoustic response tests without particle damping devices, over a range of isolation and damping parameters. Instrumentation consisting of accelerometers, microphones, and still photography data will be collected to correlate with the analytical results.

  7. Vibration, acceleration, gravitation, and movement: activity controlled rate adaptive pacing during treadmill exercise testing and daily life activities.

    PubMed

    Candinas, R; Jakob, M; Buckingham, T A; Mattmann, H; Amann, F W

    1997-07-01

    Activity-based sensors for rate adaptive pacing have been available for several years and now include several different types: vibration; acceleration; gravitation; and movement. However, a systematic comparison evaluating the relative advantages and disadvantages of these various sensors has received little study. The purpose of the present study was to compare these sensor subtypes using treadmill testing and an outdoor test circuit, which simulated daily life activities and included both uphill and downhill walking. Pacemakers were strapped on the chest of healthy volunteers and connected to one channel of an ambulatory recording device, which also recorded the subject's intrinsic heart rate. The pacemakers were programmed using an initial treadmill test to standardize the rate responsive parameters for each device. Nine different pacemaker models were studied including 3 vibration-based (Elite, Synchrony, Metros), 4 acceleration-based (Relay, Excel, Ergos, Trilogy), 1 gravitational-based (Swing), and 1 movement-based (Sensorithm) device. All devices demonstrated a prompt rate response with casual walking on flat ground. The vibration-, gravitational-, and movement-based pacemakers showed a pronounced rate decline during more strenuous work, e.g., walking uphill. This phenomenon was absent in the accelerometer-based units. In particular, the vibration- and movement-based units showed a higher rate with walking downhill compared to uphill. An optimally tuned rate behavior on the treadmill usually did not provide an optimal rate behavior during daily activities and there was a tendency to overstimulation during low workload. The development of the two newest sensors (gravitational and movement) did not result in an improved performance of rate response behavior. Overall, the accelerometer-based pacemakers simulated or paralleled sinus rate behavior the most closely.

  8. Function Test of an Automatic Locking and Unlocking System for Passive Damper by using Parabolic Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, M.; Yoshihara, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Watanabe, K.; Sekiya, T.

    2002-01-01

    existence of residual acceleration has been reported.The acceleration is called "g-jitter".In a lot of experiments carried out in space, the adverse influence of the g-jitter on their results has been found out.To understand the effect of g-jitter on fluid phenomena, we are making preparation to orbital experiment as a post-JUSTSAP. In the experiment, the information to understand the influence of the g-jitter on diffusion phenomena will be obtained by comparing diffusion process in two containers. One container is isolated from the g-jitter using a passive damper and the other is not. To avoid the strong accelerations during launch giving damage to the passive damper, an automatic locking and unlocking system for the passive damper must be applied to the experimental apparatus. To increase flight opportunity of the experiment, the apparatus is designed as a small, light, self-controlled and self-powered system.In order to test the function of the apparatus, we have carried out parabolic flight experiments as preparations for the orbital experiment. mol/l), ethanol (0.7%) and NaCl (0.02 mol/l) is set on the upper base plate, which has the passive damper and the locking-unlocking system.The other container is directly set on the lower base plate.The passive damper comprises of flexible membranes and thin-metal plate and connecting rods. The damping is performed under micro-gravity condition by utilizing the non-linear elasticity of flexible membranes. The CPU unit on the upper base plate has 8 channels of A/D converter to measure 3-dimensional vibrations and 8 relays to control all experimental procedures, that is, locking, unlocking, heating, recording and so on. The power unit provides electricity to the CPU unit, the locking-unlocking system and heaters. A digital camera records diffusion of color in both cells simultaneously. color between pH8.3 and pH10. airplane vibrations were directly translated to the experimental container.During a parabolic flight, a

  9. Study on coupled shock absorber system using four electromagnetic dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumori, Y.; Hayashi, R.; Okano, H.; Suda, Y.; Nakano, K.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the electromagnetic damper, which is composed of an electric motor, a ball screw, and a nut, was proposed. The electromagnetic damper has high responsiveness, controllability, and energy saving performance. It has been reported that it improved ride comfort and drivability. In addition, the authors have proposed a coupling method of two electromagnetic dampers. The method enables the characteristics of bouncing and rolling or pitching motion of a vehicle to be tuned independently. In this study, the authors increase the number of coupling of electromagnetic dampers from two to four, and propose a method to couple four electromagnetic dampers. The proposed method enables the characteristics of bouncing, rolling and pitching motion of a vehicle to be tuned independently. Basic experiments using proposed circuit and motors and numerical simulations of an automobile equipped with the proposed coupling electromagnetic damper are carried out. The results indicate the proposed method is effective.

  10. Characterization and design of tuned liquid dampers with floating roof considering arbitrary tank cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, R. O.; Taflanidis, A. A.; Lopez-Garcia, D.

    2016-04-01

    A recently proposed new type of liquid mass damper, called Tuned Liquid Damper with Floating Roof (TLD-FR), is the focus of this paper. The TLD-FR consists of a traditional TLD (tank filled with liquid) with the addition of a floating roof. The sloshing of the liquid within the tank counteracts the motion of the primary structure it is placed on, offering the desired energy dissipation in the vibration of the latter, while the roof prevents wave breaking phenomena and introduces an essentially linear response. This creates a dynamic behavior that resembles other types of linear Tuned Mass dampers (TMDs). This investigation extends previous work of the authors to consider TLDs-FR with arbitrary tank cross-sections, whereas it additionally offers new insights on a variety of topics. In particular, the relationship between the tank geometry and the resultant vibratory characteristics is examined in detail, including the impact of the roof on these characteristics. An efficient mapping between these two is also developed, utilizing Kriging metamodeling concepts, to support the TLD-FR design. It is demonstrated that the overall behavior can be modeled through introduction of only four variables: the liquid mass, the frequency and damping ratio of the fundamental sloshing mode of the TLD-FR, and the efficiency index, which is related to the portion of the total mass that participates in this mode. Comparisons between TLDs-FR and other types of mass dampers are established through the use of the latter index. A design example is presented considering the dynamic response of a structure under stationary excitation. It is illustrated in this example that for complex tank cross-sectional geometries there exists a manifold of tank configurations leading to the same primary vibratory characteristics and therefore same efficiency of the TLD-FR. Considerations about excessive displacements of the roof can be then incorporated to indicate preference towards some of these

  11. Magnetic force driven six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system using a phase compensated velocity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongdae; Park, Kyihwan; Kim, Sangyoo

    2009-04-15

    A six-axis active vibration isolation system (AVIS) is developed using voice coil actuators. Point contact configuration is employed to have an easy assembly of eight voice coil actuators to an upper and a base plates. The velocity sensor, using an electromagnetic principle that is commonly used in the vibration control, is investigated since its phase lead characteristic causes an instability problem for a low frequency vibration. The performances of the AVIS are investigated in the frequency domain and finally validated by comparing with the passive isolation system using the atomic force microscope images.

  12. Magnetic force driven six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system using a phase compensated velocity sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongdae; Kim, Sangyoo; Park, Kyihwan

    2009-04-01

    A six-axis active vibration isolation system (AVIS) is developed using voice coil actuators. Point contact configuration is employed to have an easy assembly of eight voice coil actuators to an upper and a base plates. The velocity sensor, using an electromagnetic principle that is commonly used in the vibration control, is investigated since its phase lead characteristic causes an instability problem for a low frequency vibration. The performances of the AVIS are investigated in the frequency domain and finally validated by comparing with the passive isolation system using the atomic force microscope images.

  13. Semi Active Control of Civil Structures, Analytical and Numerical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerboua, M.; Benguediab, M.; Megnounif, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Kaoulala, F.

    Structural control for civil structures was born out of a need to provide safer and more efficient designs with the reality of limited resources. The purpose of structural control is to absorb and to reflect the energy introduced by dynamic loads such as winds, waves, earthquakes, and traffic. Today, the protection of civil structures from severe dynamic loading is typically achieved by allowing the structures to be damaged. Semi-active control devices, also called "smart" control devices, assume the positive aspects of both the passive and active control devices. A semi-active control strategy is similar to the active control strategy. Only here, the control actuator does not directly apply force to the structure, but instead it is used to control the properties of a passive energy device, a controllable passive damper. Semi-active control strategies can be used in many of the same civil applications as passive and active control. One method of operating smart cable dampers is in a purely passive capacity, supplying the dampers with constant optimal voltage. The advantages to this strategy are the relative simplicity of implementing the control strategy as compared to a smart or active control strategy and that the dampers are more easily optimally tuned in- place, eliminating the need to have passive dampers with unique optimal damping coefficients. This research investigated semi-active control of civil structures for natural hazard mitigation. The research has two components, the seismic protection of buildings and the mitigation of wind-induced vibration in structures. An ideal semi-active motion equation of a composite beam that consists of a cantilever beam bonded with a PZT patch using Hamilton's principle and Galerkin's method was treated. A series R-L and a parallel R-L shunt circuits are coupled into the motion equation respectively by means of the constitutive relation of piezoelectric material and Kirchhoff's law to control the beam vibration. A

  14. BNL 56 MHz HOM Damper Prototype Fabrication at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, Naeem A.; Daly, Edward F.; Clemens, William A.; McIntyre, Gary T.; Wu, Qiong; Seberg, Scott; Bellavia, Steve

    2015-09-01

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider's (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  15. BNL 56 MHz HOM damper prototype fabrication at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, N.; McIntyre, G.; Daly, E. F.; Clemens, W.; Wu, Q.; Seberg, S.; Bellavia, S.

    2015-05-03

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider’s (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  16. Active vibration absorber for the CSI evolutionary model - Design and experimental results. [Controls Structures Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstrations to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility has been developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The paper discusses the design of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. Experimental results in the presence of these factors are presented and discussed. The robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated.

  17. How does high-frequency sound or vibration activate vestibular receptors?

    PubMed

    Curthoys, I S; Grant, J W

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism by which vestibular neural phase locking occurs and how it relates to classical otolith mechanics is unclear. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that sound and vibration both cause fluid pressure waves in the inner ear and that it is these pressure waves which displace the hair bundles on vestibular receptor hair cells and result in activation of type I receptor hair cells and phase locking of the action potentials in the irregular vestibular afferents, which synapse on type I receptors. This idea has been suggested since the early neural recordings and recent results give it greater credibility.

  18. A framework for advanced methods of control of human-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Paul

    2012-04-01

    The vibration serviceability of civil engineering structures under human dynamic excitation is becoming ever more critical with the design and redevelopment of structures with reduced mass, stiffness and damping. A large number of problems have been reported in floors, footbridges, sports stadia, staircases and other structures. Unfortunately, the range of options available to fix such problems are very limited and are primarily limited to structural modification or the implementation of passive vibration control measures, such as tuned mass dampers. This paper presents the initial development of a new framework for advanced methods of control of humaninduced vibrations in civil engineering structures. This framework includes both existing passive methods of vibration control and more advanced active, semi-active and hybrid control techniques, which may be further developed as practical solutions for these problems. Through the use of this framework, rational decisions as to the most appropriate technologies for particular human vibration problems may be made and pursued further. This framework is also intended to be used in the design of new civil engineering structures, where advanced control technologies may be used both to increase the achievable slenderness and to reduce the amount of construction materials used and hence their embodied energy. This will be an ever more important consideration with the current drive for structures with reduced environmental impact.

  19. The partially filled viscous ring damper.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfriend, K. T.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of a spinning satellite with a partially filled viscous ring damper is investigated. It is shown that there are two distinct modes of motion, the nutation-synchronous mode and spin-synchronous mode. From an approximate solution of the equations of motion a time constant is obtained for each mode. From a consideration of the fluid dynamics several methods are developed for determining the damping constant.

  20. Design and analysis of supporting structure with smart struts for active vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeongil; Washington, Gregory N.; Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    This research investigates a supporting structure with smart struts under a vibratory load. In the case of most rotorcraft, structure-borne noise and vibration transmitted from the gearbox contains multiple spectral elements and higher frequencies, which include gear mesh frequencies and their side bands. In order to manage this issue, significant research have been devoted to active smart struts which have tunable stiffness such that a higher level of attenuation is possible. However, present techniques on active control are restricted mostly to the control of single or multiple sinusoids and thus these are not applicable to manage modulated and multi-spectral signals. Therefore, enhanced control algorithms are required in order to achieve simultaneous attenuation of gear mesh frequencies and their side bands. Proposed algorithms employing two nonlinear methods and one model-based technique are examined in this study. Their performance is verified by comparing with conventional algorithms. Moreover, these algorithms are implemented to exhibit whether they are feasible to narrowband or broadband control through experiments with a single smart strut. Novel methodologies are expected to be applied to several active vibration and noise control practices such as vehicles and other engineering structures.

  1. A tubular dielectric elastomer actuator: Fabrication, characterization and active vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarban, R.; Jones, R. W.; Mace, B. R.; Rustighi, E.

    2011-11-01

    This contribution reviews the fabrication, characterization and active vibration isolation performance of a core-free rolled tubular dielectric elastomer (DE) actuator, which has been designed and developed by Danfoss PolyPower A/S. PolyPower DE material, PolyPower TM, is produced in thin sheets of 80 μm thickness with corrugated metallic electrodes on both sides. Tubular actuators are manufactured by rolling the DE sheets in a cylindrical shape. The electromechanical characteristics of such actuators are modeled based on equilibrium pressure equation. The model is validated with experimental measurements from 3 actuators. The dynamic characteristics of three tubular actuators fabricated from the same batch of manufactured DE material are presented and compared to: (a) provide insight into the ability of the fabrication process to produce actuators with similar characteristics and (b) highlight the dominant dynamic characteristics of the core-free tubular actuator. It has been observed that all actuators have similar dynamic characteristics in a frequency range up to 1 kHz. A tubular actuator is then used to provide active vibration isolation (AVI) of a 250 g mass subject to shaker generated 'ground vibration'. An adaptive feedforward control approach is used to achieve this. The tubular actuator is shown to provide excellent isolation against harmonic vibratory disturbances with attenuation of the resulting 5 and 10 Hz harmonics being 66 and 23 dB, respectively. AVI against a narrow band vibratory disturbance with frequency content 2-8 Hz, produced an attenuation of 20 dB across the frequency band.

  2. Active member vibration control experiment in a KC-135 reduced gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C. R.; Lurie, B. J.; Chen, G.-S.; Swanson, A. D.

    1991-01-01

    An active member vibration control experiment in a KC-135 reduced gravity environment was carried out by the Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Two active members, consisting of piezoelectric actuators, displacement sensors, and load cells, were incorporated into a 12-meter, 104 kg box-type test structure. The active member control design involved the use of bridge (compound) feedback concept, in which the collocated force and velocity signals are feedback locally. An impact-type test was designed to accommodate the extremely short duration of the reduced gravity testing window in each parabolic flight. The moving block analysis technique was used to estimate the modal frequencies and dampings from the free-decay responses. A broadband damping performance was demonstrated up to the ninth mode of 40 Hz. The best damping performance achieved in the flight test was about 5 percent in the fourth mode of the test structure.

  3. Vibration control of a nonlinear quarter-car active suspension system by reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucak, İ. Ö.; Öz, H. R.

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the investigation of performance of a nonlinear quarter-car active suspension system with a stochastic real-valued reinforcement learning control strategy. As an example, a model of a quarter car with a nonlinear suspension spring subjected to excitation from a road profile is considered. The excitation is realised by the roughness of the road. The quarter-car model to be considered here can be approximately described as a nonlinear two degrees of freedom system. The experimental results indicate that the proposed active suspension system suppresses the vibrations greatly. A simulation of a nonlinear quarter-car active suspension system is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and examine the performance of the learning control algorithm.

  4. Active vibration suppression of lightweight railway vehicle body by combined use of piezoelectric actuators and linear actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Takayoshi; Hiraizumi, Kazuyuki; Nagai, Masao

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, railway vehicle are becoming lighter because this corresponds not only to the improvement of the running speed but also to the reduction of running cost and environmental noise, especially for ultra-high-speed vehicle such as new Shinkansen and MAGLEV vehicle. However, this causes the deterioration of riding comfort. Bending vibration control method using piezoelectric actuators were proposed and good control performances were obtained through simulations and experiments. In this paper, active vibration control by combined use of piezoelectric actuators and linear actuators is investigated. Elastic vibrations are suppressed by piezoelectric actuators and rigid-body vibrations are reduced by linear actuators. Simulation studies and experiments using scale model were conducted and the effectiveness of the proposed control was confirmed.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopic, structural and nonlinear optical activity studies on 6-aminonicotinamide: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Rekha, T. N.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 6-aminonicotinamide (ANA) using potential energy surface scan method and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The theoretical vibrational frequencies were calculated for the optimized geometry using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. The Mulliken atomic charge values were calculated. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intermolecular charge transfer studies and the related molecular properties were calculated. The ultraviolet-visible spectrum was simulated for both in the gas phase and liquid phase (ethanol) and the л to л* electronic transition was predicted. The nonlinear optical (NLO) activity was studied by means of the first order hyperpolarizability value, which was 8.61 times greater than the urea and the natural bond orbital analysis was also performed to confirm the NLO activity of the molecule. Hence, the ANA molecule is a promising candidate for the NLO materials.

  6. Topology optimization of magnetorheological fluid layers in sandwich plates for semi-active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates topology optimization of the magnetorheological (MR) fluid layer in a sandwich plate for improving the semi-active vibration control performance. Therein, a uniform magnetic field is applied across the MR fluid layer to provide a semi-active damping control effect. In the optimization model, the pseudo-densities describing the MR fluid material distribution are taken as design variables, and an artificial magneto-rheological fluid model (AMRF) with penalization is proposed to suppress intermediate density values. For reducing the vibration level under harmonic excitations, the dynamic compliance under a specific excitation frequency, or the frequency-aggregated dynamic compliance in a given frequency band, is taken as the objective function to be minimized. In this context, the adjoint-variable sensitivity analysis scheme is derived. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical examples, in which the structural dynamic performance can be remarkably improved through optimization. The influences of several key factors on the optimal designs are also explored. It is shown that the AMRF model is effective in yielding clear boundaries in the final optimal solutions without use of additional regularization techniques.

  7. Use of inerter devices for weight reduction of tuned mass-dampers for seismic protection of multi-story building: the Tuned Mass-Damper-Interter (TMDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaralis, Agathoklis; Marian, Laurentiu

    2016-04-01

    This paper explores the practical benefits of the recently proposed by the authors tuned mass-damper-inerter (TMDI) visà- vis the classical tuned mass-damper (TMD) for the passive vibration control of seismically excited linearly building structures assumed to respond linearly. Special attention is focused on showcasing that the TMDI requires considerably reduced attached mass/weight to achieve the same vibration suppression level as the classical TMD by exploiting the mass amplification effect of the ideal inerter device. The latter allows for increasing the inertial property of the TMDI without a significant increase to its physical weight. To this end, novel numerical results pertaining to a seismically excited 3-storey frame building equipped with optimally designed TMDIs for various values of attached mass and inertance (i.e., constant of proportionality of the inerter resisting force in mass units) are furnished. The seismic action is modelled by a non-stationary stochastic process compatible with the elastic acceleration response spectrum of the European seismic code (Eurocode 8), while the TMDIs are tuned to minimize the mean square top floor displacement. It is shown that the TMDI achieves the same level of performance as an unconventional "large mass" TMD for seismic protection (i.e., more than 10% of attached mass of the total building mass), by incorporating attached masses similar to the ones used for controlling wind-induced vibrations via TMDs (i.e., 1%-5% of the total building mass). Moreover, numerical data from response history analyses for a suite of Eurocode 8 compatible recorded ground motions further demonstrate that optimally tuned TMDIs for top floor displacement minimization achieve considerable reductions in terms of top floor acceleration and attached mass displacement (stroke) compared to the classical TMD with the same attached mass.

  8. Innovative modeling of Tuned Liquid Column Damper motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, A.; Lo Iacono, F.; Navarra, G.; Pirrotta, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper a new model for the liquid motion within a Tuned Liquid Column Damper (TLCD) device is developed, based on the mathematical tool of fractional calculus. Although the increasing use of these devices for structural vibration control, it is shown that existing model does not always lead to accurate prediction of the liquid motion. A better model is then needed for accurate simulation of the behavior of TLCD systems. As regards, it has been demonstrated how correctly including the first linear liquid sloshing mode, through the equivalent mechanical analogy well established in literature, produces numerical results that highly match the corresponding experimental ones. Since the apparent effect of sloshing is the deviation of the natural frequency from the theoretical one, the authors propose a fractional differential equation of motion. The latter choice is supported by the fact that the introduction a fractional derivative of order α alters simultaneously both the resonant frequency and the degree of damping of the system. It will be shown, through an extensive experimental analysis, how the proposed model accurately describes liquid surface displacements.

  9. Simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction in rotorcraft using actively-controlled flaps and including performance considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, Daniel A.

    This work presents the development and application of an active control approach for reduction of both vibration and noise induced by helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI). Control is implemented through single or dual actively controlled flaps (ACFs) on each blade. Low-speed helicopter flight is prone to severe BVI, resulting in elevated vibration and noise levels. Existing research has suggested that when some form of active control is used to reduce vibration, noise will increase and vice versa. The present research achieves simultaneous reduction of noise and vibration, and also investigates the physical sources of the observed reduction. The initial portion of this work focused on developing a tool for simulating helicopter noise and vibrations in the BVI flight regime. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades was developed and combined with an enhanced free-wake model and an acoustic prediction tool with provisions for blade flexibility. These elements were incorporated within an aeroelastic analysis featuring fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. Subsequently, control algorithms were developed that were effective for reducing noise and vibration even in the nonlinear BVI flight regime; saturation limits were incorporated constraining flap deflections to specified limits. The resulting simulation was also validated with a wide range of experimental data, achieving excellent correlation. Finally, a number of active control studies were performed. Multi-component vibration reductions of 40--80% could be achieved, while incurring a small noise penalty. Noise was reduced using an onboard feedback microphone; reductions of 4--10 dB on the advancing side were observed on a plane beneath the rotor when using dual flaps. Finally, simultaneous noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of about 5 dB in noise on the advancing side combined with a 60% reduction in vibration was

  10. An optimal approach to active damping of nonlinear vibrations in composite plates using piezoelectric patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviz, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper a nonlinear approach to studying the vibration characteristic of laminated composite plate with surface-bonded piezoelectric layer/patch is formulated, based on the Green Lagrange type of strain-displacements relations, by incorporating higher-order terms arising from nonlinear relations of kinematics into mathematical formulations. The equations of motion are obtained through the energy method, based on Lagrange equations and by using higher-order shear deformation theories with von Karman-type nonlinearities, so that transverse shear strains vanish at the top and bottom surfaces of the plate. An isoparametric finite element model is provided to model the nonlinear dynamics of the smart plate with piezoelectric layer/ patch. Different boundary conditions are investigated. Optimal locations of piezoelectric patches are found using a genetic algorithm to maximize spatial controllability/observability and considering the effect of residual modes to reduce spillover effect. Active attenuation of vibration of laminated composite plate is achieved through an optimal control law with inequality constraint, which is related to the maximum and minimum values of allowable voltage in the piezoelectric elements. To keep the voltages of actuator pairs in an allowable limit, the Pontryagin’s minimum principle is implemented in a system with multi-inequality constraint of control inputs. The results are compared with similar ones, proving the accuracy of the model especially for the structures undergoing large deformations. The convergence is studied and nonlinear frequencies are obtained for different thickness ratios. The structural coupling between plate and piezoelectric actuators is analyzed. Some examples with new features are presented, indicating that the piezo-patches significantly improve the damping characteristics of the plate for suppressing the geometrically nonlinear transient vibrations.

  11. Recent Advances In Structural Vibration And Failure Mode Control In Mainland China: Theory, Experiments And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hui; Ou Jinping

    2008-07-08

    A number of researchers have been focused on structural vibration control in the past three decades over the world and fruit achievements have been made. This paper introduces the recent advances in structural vibration control including passive, active and semiactive control in mainland China. Additionally, the co-author extends the structural vibration control to failure mode control. The research on the failure mode control is also involved in this paper. For passive control, this paper introduces full scale tests of buckling-restrained braces conducted to investigate the performance of the dampers and the second-editor of the Code of Seismic Design for Buildings. For active control, this paper introduces the HMD system for wind-induced vibration control of the Guangzhou TV tower. For semiactive control, the smart damping devices, algorithms for semi-active control, design methods and applications of semi-active control for structures are introduced in this paper. The failure mode control for bridges is also introduced.

  12. Comparison between experimental and analytical results for seesaw energy dissipation systems using fluid viscous dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jae-Do; Tagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of experimental and numerical investigations of a seesaw energy dissipation system (SEDS) using fluid viscous dampers (FVDs). To confirm the characteristics of the FVDs used in the tests, harmonic dynamic loading tests were conducted in advance of the free vibration tests and the shaking table tests. Shaking table tests were conducted to demonstrate the damping capacity of the SEDS under random excitations such as seismic waves, and the results showed SEDSs have sufficient damping capacity for reducing the seismic response of frames. Free vibration tests were conducted to confirm the reliability of simplified analysis. Time history response analyses were also conducted and the results are in close agreement with shaking table test results.

  13. Synthesis of vibration control and health monitoring of building structures under unknown excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jia; Huang, Qin; Xu, You-Lin

    2014-10-01

    The vibration control and health monitoring of building structures have been actively investigated in recent years but often treated separately according to the primary objective pursued. In this study, a time-domain integrated vibration control and health monitoring approach is proposed based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) for identifying the physical parameters of the controlled building structures without the knowledge of the external excitation. The physical parameters and state vectors of the building structure are then estimated and used for the determination of the control force for the purpose of the vibration attenuation. The interaction between the health monitoring and vibration control is revealed and assessed. The feasibility and reliability of the proposed approach is numerically demonstrated via a five-story shear building structure equipped with magneto-rheological (MR) dampers. Two types of excitations are considered: (1) the EI-Centro ground excitation underneath of the building and (2) a swept-frequency excitation applied on the top floor of the building. Results show that the structural parameters as well as the unknown dynamic loadings could be identified accurately; and, at the same time, the structural vibration is significantly reduced in the building structure.

  14. Effect of whole body vibration frequency on neuromuscular activity in ACL-deficient and healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Giombini, A; Menotti, F; Piccinini, A; Fagnani, F; Di Cagno, A; Macaluso, A; Pigozzi, F

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been shown to enhance muscle activity via reflex pathways, thus having the potential to contrast muscle weakness in individuals with rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The present study aimed to compare the magnitude of neuromuscular activation during WBV over a frequency spectrum from 20 to 45 Hz between ACL-deficient and healthy individuals. Fifteen males aged 28±4 with ACL rupture and 15 age-matched healthy males were recruited. Root mean square (RMS) of the surface electromyogram from the vastus lateralis in both limbs was computed during WBV in a static half-squat position at 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 Hz, and normalized to the RMS while maintaining the half-squat position without vibration. The RMS of the vastus lateralis in the ACL-deficient limb was significantly greater than in the contralateral limb at 25, 30, 35 and 40 Hz (P<0.05) and in both limbs of the healthy participants (dominant limb at 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 Hz, P<0.05; non dominant limb at 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 Hz, P<0.05). The greater neuromuscular activity in the injured limb compared to the uninjured limb of the ACL-deficient patients and to both limbs of the healthy participants during WBV might be due to either augmented excitatory or reduced inhibitory neural inflow to motoneurons of the vastus lateralis through the reflex pathways activated by vibratory stimuli. The study provides optimal WBV frequencies which might be used as reference values for ACL-deficient patients. PMID:26424928

  15. Active vibration control testing of the SPICES program: final demonstration article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, James P.; Jacobs, Jack H.

    1996-05-01

    The Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures (SPICES) Program is a partnership program sponsored by the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The mission of the program is to develop cost effective material processing and synthesis technologies to enable new products employing active vibration suppression and control devices to be brought to market. The two year program came to fruition in 1995 through the fabrication of the final smart components and testing of an active plate combined with two trapezoidal rails, forming an active mount. Testing of the SPICES combined active mount took place at McDonnell Douglas facilities in St. Louis, MO, in October-December 1995. Approximately 15 dB reduction in overall response of a motor mounted on the active structure was achieved. Further details and results of the SPICES combined active mount demonstration testing are outlined. Results of numerous damping and control strategies that were developed and employed in the testing are presented, as well as aspects of the design and fabrication of the SPICES active mount components.

  16. [EFFECTS OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION TRAINING ON BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL FITNESS IN RECREATIONALLY ACTIVE YOUNG ADULTS].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pardo, Esmeraldo; Martínez-Ruiz, Enrique; Alcaraz, Pedro E; Rubio-Arias, Jacobo A

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, it has been suggested that whole- body vibration training (WBV) may increase neuromuscular performance and consequently affect the muscular improvement as either acute response to vibration or chronic adaptation training. Vibrating platforms generate frequencies from 5-45 Hz and vertical oscillations of 1-11 mm peak to peak, affecting more or less intensity acceleration changing by combining frequency and amplitude. Vibration training, in a session as various offers different results in regard to changes in body composition and in increasing the vertical jump, sprint, and the different manifestations of force development. These promising results await further research to establish parameters (duration, frequency and amplitude) with vibration stimulation in young active subjects. This literature review provides an update on the scientific evidence on the body vibrations in order to answer the question whether WBV, meaning the exercise by increasing the gravitational load collection, is a treatment option if the aim is to improve neuromuscular function, flexibility, balance, agility, coordination and body composition.

  17. [EFFECTS OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION TRAINING ON BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL FITNESS IN RECREATIONALLY ACTIVE YOUNG ADULTS].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pardo, Esmeraldo; Martínez-Ruiz, Enrique; Alcaraz, Pedro E; Rubio-Arias, Jacobo A

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, it has been suggested that whole- body vibration training (WBV) may increase neuromuscular performance and consequently affect the muscular improvement as either acute response to vibration or chronic adaptation training. Vibrating platforms generate frequencies from 5-45 Hz and vertical oscillations of 1-11 mm peak to peak, affecting more or less intensity acceleration changing by combining frequency and amplitude. Vibration training, in a session as various offers different results in regard to changes in body composition and in increasing the vertical jump, sprint, and the different manifestations of force development. These promising results await further research to establish parameters (duration, frequency and amplitude) with vibration stimulation in young active subjects. This literature review provides an update on the scientific evidence on the body vibrations in order to answer the question whether WBV, meaning the exercise by increasing the gravitational load collection, is a treatment option if the aim is to improve neuromuscular function, flexibility, balance, agility, coordination and body composition. PMID:26545648

  18. Design of dry-friction dampers for turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancona, W.; Dowell, E. H.

    1983-01-01

    A study is conducted of turbine blade forced response, where the blade has been modeled as a cantilever beam with a generally dry friction damper attached, and where the minimization of blade root strain as the excitation frequency is varied over a given range is the criterion for the evaluation of the effectiveness of the dry friction damper. Attempts are made to determine the location of the damper configuration best satisfying the design criterion, together with the best damping force (assuming that the damper location has been fixed). Results suggest that there need not be an optimal value for the damping force, or an optimal location for the dry friction damper, although there is a range of values which should be avoided.

  19. Testing and certification of fire and smoke dampers

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, J.S. )

    1992-11-01

    The fatalities, injuries and damage associated with fire can increase dramatically if smoke and flame are allowed to spread uncontrolled by way of a building's ventilation system. As a result, the fire protection community and many others have invested considerable energy and resources to restrict the spread of fire and smoke through air duct systems. Fire dampers are used to protect openings in heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) duct system passing through fire resistive walls, partitions or floors. Leakage rated dampers (or smoke dampers) are used to restrict or control the movement of smoke through opening in smoke barriers (either vertical or horizontal) or in engineered smoke control systems. In cooperation with the damper, HVAC and other related industries, Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL) certifies a variety of products and equipment for use in HVAC duct systems. This article describes the tests that fire and leakage rated dampers must pass to be certified.

  20. A prosthetic knee using magnetorhelogical fluid damper for above-knee amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    A prosthetic knee for above-knee (AK) amputees is categorized into two types; namely a passive and an active type. The passive prosthetic knee is generally made by elastic materials such as carbon fiber reinforced composite material, titanium and etc. The passive prosthetic knee easy to walk. But, it has disadvantages such that a knee joint motion is not similar to ordinary people. On the other hand, the active prosthetic knee can control the knee joint angle effectively because of mechanical actuator and microprocessor. The actuator should generate large damping force to support the weight of human body. But, generating the large torque using small actuator is difficult. To solve this problem, a semi-active type prosthetic knee has been researched. This paper proposes a semi-active prosthetic knee using a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper for AK amputees. The proposed semi-active type prosthetic knee consists of the flow mode MR damper, hinge and prosthetic knee body. In order to support weight of human body, the required energy of MR damper is smaller than actuator of active prosthetic leg. And it can control the knee joint angle by inducing the magnetic field during the stance phase.

  1. Exact H2 optimal tuning and experimental verification of energy-harvesting series electromagnetic tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yilun; Zuo, Lei; Lin, Chi-Chang; Parker, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Energy-harvesting series electromagnetic tuned mass dampers (EMTMDs) have been recently proposed for dual-functional energy harvesting and robust vibration control by integrating the tuned mass damper (TMD) and electromagnetic shunted resonant damping. In this paper, we derive ready-to-use analytical tuning laws for the energy-harvesting series EMTMD system when the primary structure is subjected to force or ground excitations, like wind loads or earthquakes. Both vibration mitigation and energy harvesting performances are optimized using H2 criteria to minimize root-mean-square values of the deformation of the primary structure, or maximize the average harvestable power. These analytical tuning laws can easily guide the design of series EMTMDs under various ambient loadings. Later, extensive numerical analysis is presented to show the effectiveness of the series EMTMDs. The numerical analysis shows that the series EMTMD is superior to mitigate the vibration of the primary structure nearly across the whole frequency spectrum, as compared to that of classic TMDs. Simultaneously, the series EMTMD can better harvest the energy due to broader bandwidth effect. Beyond simulations, this paper also experimentally verifies the effectiveness of the energy-harvesting series electromagnetic TMDs in both vibration mitigation and energy harvesting.

  2. Modeling of piezoelectric smart structures for active vibration and noise control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinathan, Senthil V.

    Active vibration control and active structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors and actuators have recently emerged as a practical and promising technology. Efficient and accurate modeling of these structures bonded to or embedded with actuators and sensors is needed for efficient design of smart structures. This dissertation addresses the modeling of these structures and the associated control system design technique. Modeling of structures with both laminated and discrete type of actuators and sensors are addressed. For piezoelectric laminates the governing equations of motion are derived using First Order Shear Deformation Theory (FSDT) and for the first time the dynamic response fields inside the laminate are obtained and compared with full elasticity solutions. This comparison brought out the effect of assumptions made with respect to the electric and mechanical fields using FSDT and Classical Laminate Theory (CLT) in previous work. It is expected that this analysis and the interior field estimations would help designers to understand the shortcomings of FSDT in modeling piezoelectric laminates, and help them to adopt this theory properly for use in FE or other numerical models. For discrete patch actuators/sensors, the governing dynamic equation of motion for a plate is derived. The solution to this equation is obtained using a Fourier series method and the effect of passive stiffness and mass on the natural frequency is studied. The studies showed that ignoring the mass and the passive stiffness' of actuators/sensors leads to large errors in estimating the vibration characteristics of the smart plate. A Rayleigh-Ritz (RR) approach is then presented for studying the active vibration and transmitted noise control of a smart plate with discrete piezoelectric patches. Classical laminated plate theory is used to model the composite plate and electro elastic theory is used model the piezoelectric patches. The dynamic equations of motion for the coupled

  3. Active Seismic Monitoring Using High-Power Moveable 40-TONS Vibration Sources in Altay-Sayn Region of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, V. M.; Seleznev, V. S.; Emanov, A. F.; Kashun, V. N.; Elagin, S. A.; Romanenko, I.; Shenmayer, A. E.; Serezhnikov, N.

    2013-05-01

    determined variations in velocities of longitudinal and transverse waves. Both from 100-tons and 40-tons vibration sources there are distinctly determined annual and semiannual variations, and also variations of 120 and 90 days. There is determined correlations of revealed variations of P- and S-wave velocities with drowning of the upper part of the Earth`s crust because of season changes of water volumes in the biggest Novosibirsk water reservoir. There were carried out experiments on aperture widening of operating vibroseismic observations in seismic active zones of the South of Altay. All these results prove possibility of using moveable collapsible 40-tons vibration sources for active monitoring of seismic dangerous zones, nuclear power plants, nuclear waste storage etc.

  4. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. II - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, V. L.; Fuller, C. R.; Silcox, R. J.; Brown, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Actively controlled harmonic force inputs were applied experimentally to reduce the sound transmitted through an elastic circular plate. The control implementation used a time domain least mean square adaptive algorithm with two error sensors. The control forces were applied directly to the plate by point force vibration inputs, while the error information and performance were measured in the radiated acoustic field by microphones. Test cases were also performed in which the error sensors were accelerometers mounted on the plate. When accelerometers were used as error sensors, the controller performance was degraded; leading to the conclusion that minimizing plate motion does not necessarily lead to an associated decrease in radiated sound levels. In contrast, the results show excellent attenuation of the transmitted sound field when microphone error sensors were used. This result was consistent over a range of frequencies. In addition, the experimental results are compared to previously derived analytical results and the effect of using a point or global minimization scheme is discussed.

  5. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. I - Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of sound radiation from vibrating plates by oscillating forces applied directly to the structure is analytically studied. The model consists of a plane acoustic wave incident on a clamped elastic circular thin plate. Control is achieved by point forces, and quadratic optimization is used to calculate the optimal control gains necessary to minimize a cost function proportional to the radiated acoustic power (the transmitted field). The results show that global attenuation of broadband radiated sound levels for low to mid-range frequencies can be achieved with one or two control forces, irrespective of whether the system is on or off resonance. The efficiency of the control strategy is demonstrated to be related to the nature of the coupling between the plate modes of response and the radiated field.

  6. Active control for vibration suppression in a flexible beam using a modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. E.; Lindner, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the use of a modal-domain (MD) fiber-optic sensor as an active control system component for vibration suppression, whose output is proportional to the integral of the axial strain along the optical fiber. When an MD sensor is attached to, or embedded in, a flexible structure, it senses the strain in the structure along its gage length. On the basis of the present integration of the sensor model into a flexible-structure model, it becomes possible to design a control system with a dynamic compensator which adds damping to the low-order modes of the flexible structure. This modeling procedure has been experimentally validated.

  7. Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational force inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders is analytically and experimentally studied. The primary (noise) field in the cylinder model is generated by the coupled dynamic response of the shell under loading by a single exterior acoustic source. Control of the interior sound field is achieved by applying vibrational force inputs directly to the shell wall. Action of the point controllers serve to increase the input impedance of select structural modes of the shell which are well-coupled to the interior acoustic cavity, thus substantially reducing sound transmission into the cavity. Spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 30 dB are demonstrated for acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity. Twin controller configurations are presented which demonstrate the ability to independently control orthogonal modes of the interior acoustic space. Benefits and drawbacks of this new methodology for noise control are discussed and clearly demonstrated.

  8. Suppression of two-dimensional vortex-induced vibration with active velocity feedback controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Srinil, N.

    2016-09-01

    Vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) establish key design parameters for offshore and subsea structures subject to current flows. Understanding and predicting VIV phenomena have been improved in recent years. Further, there is a need to determine how to effectively and economically mitigate VIV effects. In this study, linear and nonlinear velocity feedback controllers are applied to actively suppress the combined cross-flow and in-line VIV of an elastically-mounted rigid circular cylinder. The strongly coupled fluid-structure interactions are numerically modelled and investigated using a calibrated reduced-order wake oscillator derived from the vortex strength concept. The importance of structural geometrical nonlinearities is studied which highlights the model ability in matching experimental results. The effectiveness of linear vs nonlinear controllers are analysed with regard to the control direction, gain and power. Parametric studies are carried out which allow us to choose the linear vs nonlinear control, depending on the target controlled amplitudes and associated power requirements.

  9. Active vibration absorber for CSI evolutionary model: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstration to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility was developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The design is discussed of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. The primary performance objective considered is damping augmentation of the first nine structural modes. Comparison of experimental and predicted closed loop damping is presented, including test and simulation time histories for open and closed loop cases. Although the simulation and test results are not in full agreement, robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated. The basic advantage of this second order controller design is that the stability of the controller is model independent.

  10. Active vibration control for nonlinear vehicle suspension with actuator delay via I/O feedback linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jing; Jiang, Zuo; Li, Ya-Li; Li, Wu-Xin

    2014-10-01

    The problem of nonlinear vibration control for active vehicle suspension systems with actuator delay is considered. Through feedback linearization, the open-loop nonlinearity is eliminated by the feedback nonlinear term. Based on the finite spectrum assignment, the quarter-car suspension system with actuator delay is converted into an equivalent delay-free one. The nonlinear control includes a linear feedback term, a feedforward compensator, and a control memory term, which can be derived from a Riccati equation and a Sylvester equation, so that the effects produced by the road disturbances and the actuator delay are compensated, respectively. A predictor is designed to implement the predictive state in the designed control. Moreover, a reduced-order observer is constructed to solve its physical unrealisability problem. The stability proofs for the zero dynamics and the closed-loop system are provided. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness and the simplicity of the designed control.

  11. Determining the optimal number and position of damping viscose (MR) in seismic vibration control of buildings to use genetic algorithms (fuzzy engineering application)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami, Farzad; Karimi, Esmail

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, study optimization performance of damping semi-active viscose MR in order to reduce the seismic vibrations of a building with 12 floors. For this purpose, we used genetic algorithms to obtain optimal number and optimal situation in 15 major earthquakes with different frequency content through which final status damping are determined. Investigating the influence of this type of damper on the construct dynamic response, the construct equation has been written regarding dampers .Then, the aforesaid equation has been transmitted to the situational setting ,the optimum quantity of each damper in the form of time function has been computed using optimization algorithm genetic and, the construct response has been determined. The results show that different positions of optimal in the structure height can have different effects on different responses. In a way that aligned damping in the upper parts of structures although much reduced Roof floor shift but are less than the rate of decline in shear force base. It also aligned damping in the bottom parts of structures are less than the rate of decline in base shear force roof and floor shift. Therefore, by determining optimized position of optimal by genetic algorithms that can simultaneously optimize the rate of reduction in the structure response.

  12. Fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms for intelligent control of structures using MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Gang; Zhou, Lily L.

    2004-07-01

    Fuzzy logic control (FLC) and genetic algorithms (GA) are integrated into a new approach for the semi-active control of structures installed with MR dampers against severe dynamic loadings such as earthquakes. The interactive relationship between the structural response and the input voltage of MR dampers is established by using a fuzzy controller rather than the traditional way by introducing an ideal active control force. GA is employed as an adaptive method for optimization of parameters and for selection of fuzzy rules of the fuzzy control system, respectively. The maximum structural displacement is selected and used as the objective function to be minimized. The objective function is then converted to a fitness function to form the basis of genetic operations, i.e. selection, crossover, and mutation. The proposed integrated architecture is expected to generate an effective and reliable fuzzy control system by GA"s powerful searching and self-learning adaptive capability.

  13. Semiactive field-controllable magneto-rheological fluid dampers for mountain bicycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breese, Darrell G.; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of field- controllable, semi-active magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) shock absorbers for a mountain bicycle. Recent trends in the bicycle industry show a movement towards semi-active suspension systems. Two new MRF dampers are designed and tested with the intent of being used on the front and rear suspension of a modern mountain bicycle. The MRF shock absorbers are designed to emulate the performance of the original equipment manufacturer shock absorbers in passive mode. Application of an input electric current to the MRF shock absorber causes a dramatic increase in the damping capacity. Procedures and results are presented for the design and experimental characterization of these MRF dampers.

  14. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an actively controlled partial span trailing edge flap located on the blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes an analytical study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap located on the blade. The vibration reduction produced by the actively controlled flap (ACF) is compared with that obtained using individual blade control (IBC), in which the entire blade is oscillated in pitch. For both cases a deterministic feedback controller is implemented to reduce the 4/rev hub loads. For all cases considered, the ACF produced vibration reduction comparable with that obtained using IBC, but consumed only 10-30% of the power required to implement IBC. A careful parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of blade torsional stiffness, spanwise location of the control flap, and hinge moment correction on the vibration reduction characteristics of the ACF. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach to vibration reduction. It should be emphasized than the ACF, used together with a conventional swashplate, is completely decoupled from the primary flight control system and thus it has no influence on the airworthiness of the helicopter. This attribute is potentially a significant advantage when compared to IBC.

  15. Suppression of mechanical vibrations in a building-like structure using a passive/active autoparametric absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Silva-Navarro, G.

    2014-03-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out on a system consisting of a primary structure coupled with a passive/active autoparametric vibration absorber. The primary structure consists of a building-like mechanical structure, it has three rigid floors connected by flexible columns made from aluminium strips, while the absorber consists of a cantilever beam with a PZT patch actuator actively controlled through an acquisition card. The whole system, which is a coupled non-linear oscillator, is subjected to sinusoidal excitation obtained from an electromechanical shaker in the neighborhood of internal resonances. The natural frequency of the absorber is tuned to be one-half of any of the natural frequencies of the main system. With the addition of a PZT actuator, the autoparametric vibration absorber is made active, thus enabling the possibility to control the effective stiffness associated to the passive absorber and, as a consequence, the implementation of an active vibration control scheme able to preserve, as possible, the autoparametric interaction as well as to compensate varying excitation frequencies. This active vibration absorber employs feedback information from an accelerometer on the primary structure, an accelerometer on the tip of the beam absorber and a strain gage on the base of the beam, feedforward information from the excitation force and on-line computations from the nonlinear approximate frequency response, parameterized in terms of a proportional gain provided by a voltage input to the PZT actuator, thus providing a mechanism to asymptotically track an optimal, robust and stable attenuation solution on the primary system.

  16. Distinct Skeletal Muscle Gene Regulation from Active Contraction, Passive Vibration, and Whole Body Heat Stress in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael A.; Kimball, Amy L.; McHenry, Colleen L.; Suneja, Manish; Yen, Chu-Ling; Sharma, Arpit; Shields, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exercise regulates several important metabolic genes in humans. We know little about the effects of environmental stress (heat) and mechanical stress (vibration) on skeletal muscle. Passive mechanical stress or systemic heat stress are often used in combination with many active exercise programs. We designed a method to deliver a vibration stress and systemic heat stress to compare the effects with active skeletal muscle contraction. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine whether active mechanical stress (muscle contraction), passive mechanical stress (vibration), or systemic whole body heat stress regulates key gene signatures associated with muscle metabolism, hypertrophy/atrophy, and inflammation/repair. Methods: Eleven subjects, six able-bodied and five with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) participated in the study. The six able-bodied subjects sat in a heat stress chamber for 30 minutes. Five subjects with SCI received a single dose of limb-segment vibration or a dose of repetitive electrically induced muscle contractions. Three hours after the completion of each stress, we performed a muscle biopsy (vastus lateralis or soleus) to analyze mRNA gene expression. Results: We discovered repetitive active muscle contractions up regulated metabolic transcription factors NR4A3 (12.45 fold), PGC-1α (5.46 fold), and ABRA (5.98 fold); and repressed MSTN (0.56 fold). Heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05); while vibration induced FOXK2 (2.36 fold change; p < 0.05). Vibration similarly caused a down regulation of MSTN (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05), but to a lesser extent than active muscle contraction. Vibration induced FOXK2 (p < 0.05) while heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold) and ANKRD1 genes (0.51 fold; p < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings support a distinct gene regulation in response to heat stress, vibration, and muscle contractions. Understanding these responses may assist in developing regenerative

  17. Lower Arm Muscle Activation during Indirect-Localized Vibration: The Influence of Skill Levels When Applying Different Acceleration Loads

    PubMed Central

    Padulo, Johnny; Di Giminiani, Riccardo; Dello Iacono, Antonio; Zagatto, Alessandro M.; Migliaccio, Gian M.; Grgantov, Zoran; Ardigò, Luca P.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the electromyographic response to synchronous indirect-localized vibration interventions in international and national table tennis players. Twenty-six male table tennis players, in a standing position, underwent firstly an upper arms maximal voluntary contraction and thereafter two different 30-s vibration interventions in random order: high acceleration load (peak acceleration = 12.8 g, frequency = 40 Hz; peak-to-peak displacement = 4.0 mm), and low acceleration load (peak acceleration = 7.2 g, frequency = 30 Hz, peak-to-peak displacement = 4.0 mm). Surface electromyography root mean square from brachioradialis, extensor digitorum, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor digitorum superficialis recorded during the two vibration interventions was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction recording. Normalized surface electromyography root mean square was higher in international table tennis players with respect to national ones in all the interactions between muscles and vibration conditions (P < 0.05), with the exception of flexor carpi radialis (at low acceleration load, P > 0.05). The difference in normalized surface electromyography root mean square between international table tennis players and national ones increased in all the muscles with high acceleration load (P < 0.05), with the exception of flexor digitorum superficialis (P > 0.05). The muscle activation during indirect-localized vibration seems to be both skill level and muscle dependent. These results can optimize the training intervention in table tennis players when applying indirect-localized vibration to lower arm muscles. Future investigations should discriminate between middle- and long-term adaptations in response to specific vibration loads. PMID:27378948

  18. Simplified design method for shear-valve magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Zhang, Lu; Zhu, Haitao; Li, Zhongxian

    2014-12-01

    Based on the Bingham parallel-plate model, a simplified design method of shear-valve magnetorheological (MR) dampers is proposed considering the magnetic circuit optimization. Correspondingly, a new MR damper with a full-length effective damping path is proposed. The prototype dampers are also fabricated and studied numerically and experimentally. According to the test results, the Bingham parallel-plate model is further modified to obtain a damping force prediction model of the proposed MR dampers. This prediction model considers the magnetic saturation phenomenon. The study indicates that the proposed simplified design method is simple, effective and reliable. The maximum damping force of the proposed MR dampers with a full-length effective damping path is at least twice as large as those of conventional MR dampers. The dynamic range of damping force increases by at least 70%. The proposed damping force prediction model considers the magnetic saturation phenomenon and it can realize the actual characteristic of MR fluids. The model is able to predict the actual damping force of MR dampers precisely.

  19. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, S.C.

    1982-10-21

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  20. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Samuel C.

    1984-01-01

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180.degree. intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  1. Characteristic analysis of the lower limb muscular strength training system applied with MR dampers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Piao, Young Jun; Kim, Kyung; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    A new training system that can adjust training intensity and indicate the center pressure of a subject was proposed by applying controlled electric current to the Magneto-Rheological damper. The experimental studying on the muscular activities were performed in lower extremities during maintaining and moving exercises, which were processed on an unstable platform with Magneto rheological dampers and recorded in a monitor. The electromyography (EMG) signals of the eight muscles in lower extremities were recorded and analyzed in certain time and frequency domain. Muscles researched in this paper were rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), vastuslateralis (VL), vastusmedialis (VM), gastrocnemius (Ga), tibialis anterior (TA), and soleus (So). Differences of muscular activities during four moving exercises were studied in our experimental results. The rate of the increment of the muscular activities was affected by the condition of the unstable platform with MR dampers, which suggested the difference of moving exercises could selectively train each muscle with varying intensities. Furthermore, these findings also proposed that this training system can improve the ability of postural balance.

  2. Twisted intramolecular charge transfer and its contribution to the NLO activity of Diglycine Picrate: a vibrational spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Alen, S; Sajan, D; Umadevi, T; Němec, Ivan; Baburaj, M S; Bena Jothy, V; Selin Joy, B H

    2015-01-25

    Single crystals of Diglycine Picrate (DGLP) were grown by slow evaporation technique and the vibrational spectral analysis is carried out using FT Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy, supported by Density Functional Theoretical (DFT) computations to derive equilibrium geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and first hyperpolarizability. The vibrational spectra confirm the existence of NH3(+) in DGLP. The influence of Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) caused by the strong ionic ground state hydrogen bonding between charged species making DGLP crystal to have the non-centrosymmetric structure has been discussed. The Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis confirms the occurrence of strong intermolecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bond. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap and the first order hyperpolarizability were calculated and it supports the nonlinear optical activity of the Diglycine Picrate crystal.

  3. Active Pneumatic Vibration Control by Using Pressure and Velocity Measurements and Adaptive Fuzzy Sliding-Mode Controller

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Yi; Liang, Jin-Wei; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an intelligent control strategy to overcome nonlinear and time-varying characteristics of a diaphragm-type pneumatic vibration isolator (PVI) system. By combining an adaptive rule with fuzzy and sliding-mode control, the method has online learning ability when it faces the system's nonlinear and time-varying behaviors during an active vibration control process. Since the proposed scheme has a simple structure, it is easy to implement. To validate the proposed scheme, a composite control which adopts both chamber pressure and payload velocity as feedback signal is implemented. During experimental investigations, sinusoidal excitation at resonance and random-like signal are input on a floor base to simulate ground vibration. Performances obtained from the proposed scheme are compared with those obtained from passive system and PID scheme to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed intelligent control. PMID:23820746

  4. Implementation of local feedback controllers for vibration supression of a truss using active struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, Robert; Lim, Tae W.; Bosse, Albert; Fisher, Shalom

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of local feedback controllers for active vibration suppression of a laboratory truss referred to as the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) space truss. The NRL space truss is a 3.7 meter, 12-bay aluminum laboratory truss used as a testbed to explore smart structures technologies for future Navy spacecraft missions. To conduct real-time control and data acquisition for the implementation of controllers, a digital signal processor based system is used. Two piezoceramic active struts are employed in this experimental study. Each strut is instrumented with a force transducer and a displacement sensor. Modal strain energy computed using a refined finite element model was used to select the optimum locations of the two actuators to ensure controllability of the first two structural modes. Two local feedback controllers were designed and implemented, an integral force feedback and an integral plus double-integral force feedback. The controllers were designed independently for each active strut using classical control design techniques applied to an identified model of the system dynamics. System identification results and controller design procedure are described along with closed loop test results. The test results show up to a factor of 1/110 attenuation of the truss tip motion due to sinusoidal resonant input disturbances and up to 100 times increase in damping of the lower frequency modes of the truss.

  5. Active pneumatic vibration isolation system using negative stiffness structures for a vehicle seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danh, Le Thanh; Ahn, Kyoung Kwan

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, an active pneumatic vibration isolation system using negative stiffness structures (NSS) for a vehicle seat in low excitation frequencies is proposed, which is named as an active system with NSS. Here, the negative stiffness structures (NSS) are used to minimize the vibratory attraction of a vehicle seat. Owing to the time-varying and nonlinear behavior of the proposed system, it is not easy to build an accurate dynamic for model-based controller design. Thus, an adaptive intelligent backstepping controller (AIBC) is designed to manage the system operation for high-isolation effectiveness. In addition, an auxiliary control effort is also introduced to eliminate the effect of the unpredictable perturbations. Moreover, a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) model is utilized to estimate the optimal gain of the auxiliary control effort. Final control input and the adaptive law for updating coefficients of the approximate series can be obtained step by step using a suitable Lyapunov function. Afterward, the isolation performance of the proposed system is assessed experimentally. In addition, the effectiveness of the designed controller for the proposed system is also compared with that of the traditional backstepping controller (BC). The experimental results show that the isolation effectiveness of the proposed system is better than that of the active system without NSS. Furthermore, the undesirable chattering phenomenon in control effort is quite reduced by the estimation mechanism. Finally, some concluding remarks are given at the end of the paper.

  6. Response of ventilation dampers to large airflow pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, W.S.; Smith, P.R.

    1985-04-01

    The results of an experiment program to evaluate the response of ventilation system dampers to simulated tornado transients are reported. Relevant data, such as damper response time, flow rate and pressure drop, and flow/pressure vs blade angle, were obtained, and the response of one tornado protective damper to simulated tornado transients was evaluated. Empirical relationships that will allow the data to be integrated into flow dynamics codes were developed. These flow dynamics codes can be used by safety analysts to predict the response of nuclear facility ventilation systems to tornado depressurization. 3 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. A damper for ground wind-induced launch vehicle oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodle, J. G.; Hackley, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    Prelaunch oscillatory bending deflections of the Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle are restrained by a damper mechanism mounted on the end of a horizontal boom supported from the umbilical tower. A single vertical pin on the vehicle engages the mechanism, and the damper is connected to the vehicle until liftoff. As the attach pin rises with the vehicle, a retractable arm mechanism provides initial clearance. An explosive release mechanism allows the boom to swing clear of the vehicle like a pendulum, while a snubber mechanism decelerates the free swinging boom and damper mechanism to a safe stop.

  8. Contribution of tuned liquid column gas dampers to the performance of offshore wind turbines under wind, wave, and seismic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargi, Khosrow; Dezvareh, Reza; Mousavi, Seyed Amin

    2016-09-01

    The main intention of the present study is to reduce wind, wave, and seismic induced vibrations of jackettype offshore wind turbines (JOWTs) through a newly developed vibration absorber, called tuned liquid column gas damper (TLCGD). Using a Simulink-based model, an analytical model is developed to simulate global behavior of JOWTs under different dynamic excitations. The study is followed by a parametric study to explore efficiency of the TLCGD in terms of nacelle acceleration reduction under wind, wave, and earthquake loads. Study results indicate that optimum frequency of the TLCGD is rather insensitive to excitation type. In addition, while the gain in vibration control from TLCGDs with higher mass ratios is generally more pronounced, heavy TLCGDs are more sensitive to their tuned frequency such that ill-regulated TLCGD with high mass ratio can lead to destructive results. It is revealed that a well regulated TLCGD has noticeable contribution to the dynamic response of the JOWT under any excitation.

  9. Performance and robustness of hybrid model predictive control for controllable dampers in building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erik A.; Elhaddad, Wael M.; Wojtkiewicz, Steven F.

    2016-04-01

    A variety of strategies have been developed over the past few decades to determine controllable damping device forces to mitigate the response of structures and mechanical systems to natural hazards and other excitations. These "smart" damping devices produce forces through passive means but have properties that can be controlled in real time, based on sensor measurements of response across the structure, to dramatically reduce structural motion by exploiting more than the local "information" that is available to purely passive devices. A common strategy is to design optimal damping forces using active control approaches and then try to reproduce those forces with the smart damper. However, these design forces, for some structures and performance objectives, may achieve high performance by selectively adding energy, which cannot be replicated by a controllable damping device, causing the smart damper performance to fall far short of what an active system would provide. The authors have recently demonstrated that a model predictive control strategy using hybrid system models, which utilize both continuous and binary states (the latter to capture the switching behavior between dissipative and non-dissipative forces), can provide reductions in structural response on the order of 50% relative to the conventional clipped-optimal design strategy. This paper explores the robustness of this newly proposed control strategy through evaluating controllable damper performance when the structure model differs from the nominal one used to design the damping strategy. Results from the application to a two-degree-of-freedom structure model confirms the robustness of the proposed strategy.

  10. The reduction of rotorcraft power and vibration using optimally controlled active gurney flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Eui Sung

    The main topic of the present study is the application of active control scheme for the reduction of rotorcraft main rotor power reduction and vibratory load. When the helicopter is operated near its flight boundary, the required power and vibratory loads rapidly increases which impose a limit on the helicopter operation. Various methods were proposed and studied in order to achieve performance improvement under such operating condition. The effect of active control scheme was examined for its impact on the performance improvement and vibration reduction in the present study. Numerical simulations are based on the UH-60A Blackhawk helicopter with an active Gurney flap spanning from 70%R to 80%R of the main rotor. For obtaining the aeroelastic response of the rotor blade, finite element method was used to represent elastic blade. The aerodynamic loads acting on the blade are provided by CFD based 2D lookup table. Prescribed wake model was used to resolve the induced inflow over the rotor disk. The unsteady aerodynamic behavior due to the higher harmonic actuation of active Gurney flap was resolved by the time-domain unsteady aerodynamic model. The first part of preliminary study covers parametric study using Gurney flap. Starting with simple rigid blade representation of the rotor blade, the effect of 1/rev Gurney flap actuation was examined on three different gross weights. The effect of active Gurney flap width, the chordwise location of active Gurney flap, the effect of unsteady aerodynamic model, and the effect of 2/rev actuation frequency were examined. The second part of preliminary study was conducted with the elastic blade model to include the effect of torsion dynamics. Performance improvement using active Gurney flap was examined for maximizing thrust capability at two flight speeds. 1/rev Gurney flap actuation increased the gross weight capability up to 1,000 lbs. Also, 1/rev actuation of Gurney flap increased maximum altitude limit of baseline rotor by 1

  11. Active vibration-suppression systems applied to twin-tail buffeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Mark A.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Zimcik, David G.; Spangler, Ronald L., Jr.

    1998-06-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that plagues high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails. Unsteady cortices emanate form wing/fuselage leading edge extensions when these aircraft maneuver at high angles of attack. These aircraft are designed such that the vortices shed while maneuvering at high angels of attack and improve the lift-to-drag ratio of the aircraft. With proper placement and sizing of the vertical tails, this improvement may be maintained without adverse effects to the tails. However, there are tail locations and angels of attack where these vortices burst and immerse the vertical tails in their wake inducing severe structural vibrations. The resulting buffet loads and severe vertical tail response because an airframe life and maintenance concern as life cycle costs increased. Several passive methods have been investigated to reduce the buffeting of these vertical tails with limited success. As demonstrated through analyses, wind-tunnel investigations, and full-scale ground tests, active control system offer a promising solution to alleviate buffet induced strain and increase the fatigue life of vertical tails. A collaborative research project including the US, Canada, and Australia is in place to demonstrate active buffet load alleviation systems on military aircraft. The present paper provides details on this collaborative project and other research efforts to reduce the buffeting response of vertical tails in fighter aircraft.

  12. Experimental research on vibration reduction of high-rise petrochemical equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, W.; He, L. D.; Chang, J.; Han, W. F.; Wang, L. X.

    2012-05-01

    The wind-induced vibration of high-rise petrochemical equipment would do great harm to equipment operation and cause fatigue damage easily. Thus it is necessary to install some control device to reduce the vibration actively. Existing reinforcement methods include enlarging structural section, welding wind girder, adding braced frame system, fixing taut cable, etc. But each has some shortcomings. Therefore, the tuned mass damper (TMD), rarely used in high-rise petrochemical equipment, is studied by experiment to minimize wind-induced vibration, ensure safety operation and prolong service life. In the experiment, high-rise petrochemical equipment is properly simplified in order to verify the feasibility of the TMD. Parameters of the TMD are mainly researched, which include mass ratio and damping ratio. During the process, different mass ratios and damping ratios have been taken into account to understand the characteristics of the TMD under different conditions. By experiment, the changing tendencies of the natural frequency, damping ratio and top maximum displacement have been given after the simulator is implemented with the TMD. Experimental results show that the TMD is feasible for the wind-induced vibration control of high-rise petrochemical equipment, and that top maximum displacement of the simulator reduces by about 45% in the experimental condition. The experimental research has provided valuable preferences for practical application of the TMD in petrochemical field.

  13. HOM damping with coaxial dampers in the storage ring cavities of the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1994-08-01

    Coaxial dampers with E-probe and H-loop couplers are used to damp higher-order modes (HOM) in a 352-MHz single cell cavity for the storage ring of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Measurements have been made with three different types of dampers such as E-probe dampers, small H-loop dampers, and H-loop dampers with {lambda}/4 short stub. Two dampers are used in each type. The dampers without fundamental frequency rejection filters are positioned to have a minimum deQing at the fundamental frequency: the E-probe dampers are used at the equatorial plane of the cavity, and the small H-loop dampers are used in the end wall of the cavity. The fundamental mode decoupling can be done by positioning the loop plane in the direction of the H-field of the mode.

  14. Verification of Effect of Damper Windings on the Transient Condition of Synchronous Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, Junya; Taoka, Hisao; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Iwamoto, Shigeru; Daikoku, Akihiro

    This paper describes the results of experimental investigation on the effects of damper winding of a 4-pole synchronous generator at the synchronous generator transient. It is known in the simulation that the damper winding acts effectively at the synchronous generator transient condition. However, experimental proof has not been performed yet. Then, experiments on damper effects were conducted in this paper using a laboratory-scale power system. The damper winding of tested generator consists of 5 damper bars each pole and the number of working damper bars can be changed manually. Damper currents at each bar were measured by a Rogowski coil. FFT analysis was applied to both damper currents and armature currents under different operating conditions. Relationships between damper currents in the rotor and armature currents in the stator were made clearer than before.

  15. 66. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE COOLING BUILDING, LOOKING AM DAMPERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE COOLING BUILDING, LOOKING AM DAMPERS, HIGH TEMPERATURE AND LOW TEMPERATURE COOLERS. APRIL 11, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  16. 6. HOT AIR PORTION OF DAMPERS. Hot Springs National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. HOT AIR PORTION OF DAMPERS. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Lamar Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  17. 1. PLENUM WALL, SHOWING BALL AND STRING DAMPER CONTROLS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PLENUM WALL, SHOWING BALL AND STRING DAMPER CONTROLS. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Lamar Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  18. Non-resonant vibration conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreemann, D.; Manoli, Y.; Folkmer, B.; Mintenbeck, D.

    2006-09-01

    The development of distributed wireless sensor systems for automotive, medical or industrial monitoring applications is one of the aims for MEMS technology. For applications where environmental vibrations are present, the harvesting of this kinetic energy is an opportunity to power remote sensor nodes. For the conversion, typically resonant spring-mass-damper systems are considered. In this paper, a novel non-resonant conversion mechanism is presented. Depending on the geometry of the harvester and the vibration, this conversion mechanism shows a few advantages: low frequencies can be converted, higher or lower modes of vibration will be converted instantaneously, the transducer has 2 DOF for energy conversion and the generation of energy is not limited to a small frequency band. Based on a vibration amplitude of 100 µm, the behavior of a fine-mechanical generator and a MEMS generator has been simulated. The results of the fine-mechanical generator were verified by measurements of a prototype with 1.5 cm3 volume. So far the transducer is capable of producing 0.4-3 mW for vibration frequencies ranging from 30 to 80 Hz.

  19. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  20. Integrated tuned vibration absorbers: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, Paolo; Zilletti, Michele

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a simulation study on two integrated tuned vibration absorbers (TVAs) designed to control the global flexural vibration of lightly damped thin structures subject to broad frequency band disturbances. The first one consists of a single axial switching TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on variable axial spring and damper elements so that the characteristic damping and natural frequency of the absorber can be switched iteratively to control the resonant response of three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The second one consists of a single three-axes TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on axial and rotational springs and dampers, which are arranged in such a way that the suspended mass is characterized by uncoupled heave and pitch-rolling vibrations. In this case the three damping and natural frequency parameters of the absorber are tuned separately to control three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The simulation study shows that the proposed single-unit absorbers produce, respectively, 5.3 and 8.7 dB reductions of the global flexural vibration of a rectangular plate between 20 and 120 Hz.

  1. Application of a Broadband Active Vibration Control System to a Helicopter Trim Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Schiller, Noah H.; Simon, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses testing of a broadband active vibration control concept on an interior trim panel in a helicopter cabin mockup located at ONERA's Centre de Toulouse. The control system consisted of twelve diamond-shaped piezoelectric actuators distributed around a 1.2m x 1.2m trim panel. Accelerometers were mounted at the four vertices of each diamond. The aspect ratio of the diamond was based on the dielectric constants of the piezoelectric material in order to create an actuator-sensor pair that was collocated over a broad frequency range. This allowed robust control to be implemented using simple, low power analog electronics. Initial testing on a thick acrylic window demonstrated the capability of the controller, but actuator performance was less satisfactory when mounted on a composite sandwich trim panel. This may have been due to the orthotropic nature of the trim panel, or due to its much higher stiffness relative to the acrylic window. Insights gained from a finite element study of the actuator-sensor-structural system are discussed.

  2. Active vibration control of a full scale aircraft wing using a reconfigurable controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Shashikala; Renjith Kumar, T. G.; Raja, S.; Dwarakanathan, D.; Subramani, H.; Karthikeyan, C.

    2016-01-01

    This work highlights the design of a Reconfigurable Active Vibration Control (AVC) System for aircraft structures using adaptive techniques. The AVC system with a multichannel capability is realized using Filtered-X Least Mean Square algorithm (FxLMS) on Xilinx Virtex-4 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in Very High Speed Integrated Circuits Hardware Description Language, (VHDL). The HDL design is made based on Finite State Machine (FSM) model with Floating point Intellectual Property (IP) cores for arithmetic operations. The use of FPGA facilitates to modify the system parameters even during runtime depending on the changes in user's requirements. The locations of the control actuators are optimized based on dynamic modal strain approach using genetic algorithm (GA). The developed system has been successfully deployed for the AVC testing of the full-scale wing of an all composite two seater transport aircraft. Several closed loop configurations like single channel and multi-channel control have been tested. The experimental results from the studies presented here are very encouraging. They demonstrate the usefulness of the system's reconfigurability for real time applications.

  3. Vibrational optical activity of chiral carbon nanoclusters treated by a generalized π-electron method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Péter R.; Surján, Péter R.; Szabados, Ágnes

    2014-01-01

    Cross sections of inelastic light scattering accompanied by vibronic excitation in large conjugated carbon structures is assessed at the π-electron level. Intensities of Raman and vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) spectra of fullerenes are computed, relying on a single electron per atom. When considering only first neighbor terms in the Hamiltonian (a tight-binding (TB) type or Hückel-model), Raman intensities are captured remarkably well, based on comparison with frequency-dependent linear response of the self-consistent field (SCF) method. Resorting to π-electron levels when computing spectral intensities brings a beneficial reduction in computational cost as compared to linear response SCF. At difference with total intensities, the first neighbor TB model is found inadequate for giving the left and right circularly polarized components of the scattered light, especially when the molecular surface is highly curved. To step beyond first neighbor approximation, an effective π-electron Hamiltonian, including interaction of all sites is derived from the all-electron Fockian, in the spirit of the Bloch-equation. Chiroptical cross-sections computed by this novel π-electron method improve upon first-neighbor TB considerably, with no increase in computational cost. Computed VROA spectra of chiral fullerenes, such as C76 and C28, are reported for the first time, both by conventional linear response SCF and effective π-electron models.

  4. NIST torsion oscillator viscometer response: Performance on the LeRC active vibration isolation platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1992-01-01

    Critical point viscosity measurements are limited to their reduced temperature approach to T(sub c) in an Earth bound system, because of density gradients imposed by gravity. Therefore, these classes of experiments have been proposed as good candidates for 'microgravity' science experiments where this limitation is not present. The nature of these viscosity measurements dictate hardware that is sensitive to low frequency excitations. Because of the vibratory acceleration sensitivity of a torsion oscillator viscometer, used to acquire such measurements, a vibration isolation sensitivity test was performed on candidate 'microgravity' hardware to study the possibility of meeting the stringent oscillatory sensitivity requirements of a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) torsion oscillator viscometer. A prototype six degree of freedom active magnetic isolation system, developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, was used as the isolation system. The ambient acceleration levels of the platform were reduced to the noise floor levels of its control sensors, about one microgravity in the 0.1 to 10 Hz bandwidth.

  5. Distributed friction damping of travelling wave vibration in rods.

    PubMed

    Tangpong, Xiangqing W; Wickert, Jonathan A; Akay, Adnan

    2008-03-13

    A ring damper can be affixed to a rotating base structure such as a gear, an automotive brake rotor or a gas turbine's labyrinth air seal. Depending on the frequency range, wavenumber and level of preload, vibration of the base structure can be effectively and passively attenuated by friction that develops along the interface between it and the damper. The assembly is modelled as two rods that couple in longitudinal vibration through spatially distributed hysteretic friction, with each rod having periodic boundary conditions in a manner analogous to an unwrapped ring and disc. As is representative of rotating machinery applications, the system is driven by a travelling wave disturbance, and for that form of excitation, the base structure's and the damper's responses are determined without the need for computationally intensive simulation. The damper's performance can be optimized with respect to normal preload, and its effectiveness is insensitive to variations in preload or the excitation's magnitude when its natural frequency is substantially lower than the base structure's in the absence of contact. PMID:17947203

  6. Distributed friction damping of travelling wave vibration in rods.

    PubMed

    Tangpong, Xiangqing W; Wickert, Jonathan A; Akay, Adnan

    2008-03-13

    A ring damper can be affixed to a rotating base structure such as a gear, an automotive brake rotor or a gas turbine's labyrinth air seal. Depending on the frequency range, wavenumber and level of preload, vibration of the base structure can be effectively and passively attenuated by friction that develops along the interface between it and the damper. The assembly is modelled as two rods that couple in longitudinal vibration through spatially distributed hysteretic friction, with each rod having periodic boundary conditions in a manner analogous to an unwrapped ring and disc. As is representative of rotating machinery applications, the system is driven by a travelling wave disturbance, and for that form of excitation, the base structure's and the damper's responses are determined without the need for computationally intensive simulation. The damper's performance can be optimized with respect to normal preload, and its effectiveness is insensitive to variations in preload or the excitation's magnitude when its natural frequency is substantially lower than the base structure's in the absence of contact.

  7. Vibrational Study of Melatonin and its Radioprotective Activity towards Hydroxyl Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Kaur, Sarvpreet; Saini, G. S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Vibrational study of Melatonin (N-acetyl 5-methoxytrypatamin) was done using FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. DFT calculations were employed to the structural analysis of melatonin and to the end products. The theoretical calculations confirmed the different observed vibrational modes. The optimized structure energy calculations of the different end products confirmed the most probable site of the hydroxyl radical attack is the hydrogen attached to nitrogen present in the indole ring.

  8. Blading System and Method For Controlling Structural Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A new blading system for controlling the structural vibrations in axial-flow compressors, turbines, or fans, as in aircraft engines and like turbomachines including a stator disc and a rotor disc is presented. The rotor disc defines several radial hubs that retain the rotor blading systems. Each blading system includes a blade formed of an airfoil, and a root attachment which is dimensioned to fit within, and to engage a corresponding hub. Viscoelastic dampers are selectively applied to the outer surfaces of the root attachment on which compressive or shear forces are likely to develop, intermediate the root attachment and the hub, for compression therebetween upon rotation of the rotor disc, in order to dampen structural vibrations. One advantage presented by the viscoelastic dampers lies in its simplicity, efficiency, cost effectiveness, and its ability to be retrofitted into existing turbomachines with minor surface treatment of the root attachments. Furthermore, since the dampers are not exposed to the inflowing airstream, they do not affect the aerodynamic performance of the turbomachine. Another feature of the damping system is that it provides a significant source of damping to minimize destructive structural vibrations, thereby increasing the durability of the turbomachine, and reducing acoustic noise accompanying high amplitude vibrations.

  9. Use of piezoelectric devices to control snowboard vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Emanuele; Spangler, Ronald L., Jr.; Andrus, Cameron

    1998-07-01

    This paper explains how piezoelectric devices can be used to control vibrations in a snowboard. Furthermore the details of the approach, testing, design and analysis of a piezoelectric damper applied to a production snowboard are described here. The approach consisted of determining the principal modes of vibration of a snowboard during its operation (on-slope). This information was used to develop a finite element model of the structure. The finite element model was used to find the areas of higher strain energy where a piezoelectric device could be applied and be effective in reducing undesired vibrations. Several prototype piezoelectric dampers were built, applied to snowboards and tested on snow. The proper amount of damping was selected by the test riders, so that a configuration could be selected for production of the 1998 K2 Electra snowboard. The piezoelectric damper selected reduced the snowboard vibration by 75% at the mode to which it was tuned, allowing for a smoother ride and a more precise control of the snowboard in any kind of snow condition.

  10. Semiactive vibration control of nonlinear structures through adaptive backstepping techniques with H ∞ performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapateiro, Mauricio; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Luo, Ningsu

    2011-05-01

    This article presents a new approach to the vibration mitigation problem in structures subject to seismic motions. These kinds of structures are characterised by the uncertainties of the parameters that describe their dynamics, such as stiffness and damping coefficients. Moreover, the dampers used to mitigate the vibrations caused by earthquakes are usually nonlinear devices with frictional or hysteretic dynamics. We propose an adaptive backstepping controller to account for the uncertainties and the nonlinearities. The controller is formulated in such a way that it satisfies an H ∞ performance. It is designed for a 10-storey building whose base is isolated with a frictional damper (passive device) and a magnetorheological damper (semiactive device). Controller performance is analysed through numerical simulations.

  11. Non-bonded interactions and its contribution to the NLO activity of Glycine Sodium Nitrate A vibrational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, T.; Hubert Joe, I.; Reghunadhan Nair, C. P.; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2008-04-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis of the novel nonlinear optical (NLO) material, Glycine Sodium Nitrate (GSN) is carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy, supported by Density Functional Theoretical (DFT) computations to derive equilibrium geometry, vibrational wave numbers and first hyperpolarizability. The reasonable NLO efficiency, predicted for the first time in this novel compound, has been confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder SHG experiments. The influence of Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) caused by the strong ionic ground state hydrogen bonding between charged species making GSN crystal to have the non-centrosymmetric structure has been discussed. The shortening of C sbnd H bond lengths, blue-shifting of the stretching frequencies and intensity variation indicating the existence of 'blue-shift or improper' C sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonding. The intense low wavenumber H-bond Raman vibrations due to electron-phonon coupling and non-bonded interactions in making the molecule NLO active have been analyzed based on the vibrational spectral features. The Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis confirms the occurrence of a strong intra- and intermolecular N sbnd H⋯O and C sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  12. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  13. Structural, vibrational spectroscopic and nonlinear optical activity studies on 2-hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-06-01

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 2-Hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine molecule using potential energy surface scan and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The vibrational frequencies and Mulliken atomic charge distribution were calculated for the optimized geometry of the molecule using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intramolecular charge transfer studies and the calculation of ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity index and softness values of the title molecule were carried out. The nonlinear optical activity of the molecule was studied by means of first order hyperpolarizability, which was computed as 7.64 times greater than urea. The natural bond orbital analysis was performed to confirm the nonlinear optical activity of the molecule.

  14. Structural, vibrational spectroscopic and nonlinear optical activity studies on 2-hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine: A DFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2015-06-24

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 2-Hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine molecule using potential energy surface scan and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The vibrational frequencies and Mulliken atomic charge distribution were calculated for the optimized geometry of the molecule using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intramolecular charge transfer studies and the calculation of ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity index and softness values of the title molecule were carried out. The nonlinear optical activity of the molecule was studied by means of first order hyperpolarizability, which was computed as 7.64 times greater than urea. The natural bond orbital analysis was performed to confirm the nonlinear optical activity of the molecule.

  15. NASA Common Research Model Test Envelope Extension With Active Sting Damping at NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Balakrishna, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Common Research Model (CRM) high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnel testing program was established to generate an experimental database for applied Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation studies. During transonic wind tunnel tests, the CRM encounters large sting vibrations when the angle of attack approaches the second pitching moment break, which can sometimes become divergent. CRM transonic test data analysis suggests that sting divergent oscillations are related to negative net sting damping episodes associated with flow separation instability. The National Transonic Facility (NTF) has been addressing remedies to extend polar testing up to and beyond the second pitching moment break point of the test articles using an active piezoceramic damper system for both ambient and cryogenic temperatures. This paper reviews CRM test results to gain understanding of sting dynamics with a simple model describing the mechanics of a sting-model system and presents the performance of the damper under cryogenic conditions.

  16. Rheology behavior and optimal damping effect of granular particles in a non-obstructive particle damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Fang, Jianglong

    2016-03-01

    To explore the optimal damping mechanism of non-obstructive particle dampers (NOPDs), research on the relationship between the damping performance of NOPDs and the motion mode of damping particles in NOPDs was carried out based on the rheological properties of vibrated granular particles. Firstly, the damping performance of NOPDs under different excitation intensity and gap clearance was investigated via cantilever system experiments, and an approximate evaluation of the effective mass and effective damping of NOPDs was performed by fitting the experimental data to an equivalent single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with no damping particles. Then the phase diagrams which could show the motion mode of damping particles under different excitation intensity and gap clearance were obtained via a series of vibration table tests. Moreover, the dissipation characteristic of damping particles was explored by the discrete element method (DEM). The study results indicate that when NOPDs play the optimal damping effect the granular Leidenfrost effect whereby the entire particle bed in NOPDs is levitated above the vibrating base by a layer of highly energetic particles is observed. Finally, the damping characteristics of NOPDs was explained by collisions and frictions between particle-particle and particle-wall based on the rheology behavior of damping particles and a new dissipation mechanism was first proposed for the optimal damping performance of NOPDs.

  17. Bone conducted vibration selectively activates irregular primary otolithic vestibular neurons in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Curthoys, Ian S; Kim, Juno; McPhedran, Samara K; Camp, Aaron J

    2006-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine whether bone-conducted vibration (BCV) is equally effective in activating both semicircular canal and otolith afferents in the guinea pig or whether there is preferential activation of one of these classes of vestibular afferents. To answer this question a large number (346) of single primary vestibular neurons were recorded extracellularly in anesthetized guinea pigs and were identified by their location in the vestibular nerve and classed as regular or irregular on the basis of the variability of their spontaneous discharge. If a neuron responded to angular acceleration it was classed as a semicircular canal neuron, if it responded to maintained roll or pitch tilts it was classified as an otolith neuron. Each neuron was then tested by BCV stimuli-either clicks, continuous pure tones (200-1,500 Hz) or short tone bursts (500 Hz lasting 7 ms)-delivered by a B-71 clinical bone-conduction oscillator cemented to the guinea pig's skull. All stimulus intensities were referred to that animal's own auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold to BCV clicks, and the maximum intensity used was within the animal's physiological range and was usually around 70 dB above BCV threshold. In addition two sensitive single axis linear accelerometers cemented to the skull gave absolute values of the stimulus acceleration in the rostro-caudal direction. The criterion for a neuron being classed as activated was an audible, stimulus-locked increase in firing rate (a 10% change was easily detectable) in response to the BCV stimulus. At the stimulus levels used in this study, semicircular canal neurons, both regular and irregular, were insensitive to BCV stimuli and very few responded: only nine of 189 semicircular canal neurons tested (4.7%) showed a detectable increase in firing in response to BCV stimuli up to the maximum 2 V peak-to-peak level we delivered to the B-71 oscillator (which produced a peak-to-peak skull acceleration of around

  18. Bone conducted vibration activates the vestibulo-ocular reflex in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Vulovic, Vedran; Curthoys, Ian S

    2011-08-10

    The aim of the study was: (a) to test whether short duration (6 ms) 500 Hz bone-conducted vibration (BCV) of the skull in alert head free guinea pigs would elicit eye movements; (b) to test whether these eye movements were vestibular in origin; and (c) to determine whether they corresponded to human eye movements to such stimuli. In this way we sought to establish the guinea pig as an acceptable model for testing the mechanism of the effect BCV on the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Consistent short-latency stimulus-locked responses to BCV were observed. The magnitude of eye displacement was directly related to stimulus intensity as recorded by accelerometers cemented onto the animal's skull. The strongest and most consistent response component was intorsion of both eyes. In lateral-eyed animals intorsion is produced by the combined contraction of the inferior rectus and superior oblique muscles. In humans the same pair of muscles acts to cause depression of the eye. To test whether the movements were vestibular we selectively ablated the vestibular endorgans: 3 of the 8 animals underwent a bilateral intratympanic injection of gentamicin, an ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic, to ablate their vestibular receptors. After ablation there was an overall reduction in the magnitude of eye displacement, as well as a reduction in the effectiveness of the BCV stimulus to elicit eye movements. The animals' hearing, as measured by the threshold for auditory brainstem responses, remained unchanged after gentamicin, confirming that the cochlea was not affected. The reduced magnitude of responses after vestibular receptor ablation demonstrates that the eye-movement responses to BCV are probably caused by the stimulation of vestibular receptors, which in turn activate the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

  19. Dynamic responses and vibration control of the transmission tower-line system: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Guo, Wei-hua; Li, Peng-yun; Xie, Wen-ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an overview on the dynamic analysis and control of the transmission tower-line system in the past forty years. The challenges and future developing trends in the dynamic analysis and mitigation of the transmission tower-line system under dynamic excitations are also put forward. It also reviews the analytical models and approaches of the transmission tower, transmission lines, and transmission tower-line systems, respectively, which contain the theoretical model, finite element (FE) model and the equivalent model; shows the advances in wind responses of the transmission tower-line system, which contains the dynamic effects under common wind loading, tornado, downburst, and typhoon; and discusses the dynamic responses under earthquake and ice loads, respectively. The vibration control of the transmission tower-line system is also reviewed, which includes the magnetorheological dampers, friction dampers, tuned mass dampers, and pounding tuned mass dampers. PMID:25105161

  20. Dynamic Responses and Vibration Control of the Transmission Tower-Line System: A State-of-the-Art Review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Guo, Wei-hua; Li, Peng-yun; Xie, Wen-ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an overview on the dynamic analysis and control of the transmission tower-line system in the past forty years. The challenges and future developing trends in the dynamic analysis and mitigation of the transmission tower-line system under dynamic excitations are also put forward. It also reviews the analytical models and approaches of the transmission tower, transmission lines, and transmission tower-line systems, respectively, which contain the theoretical model, finite element (FE) model and the equivalent model; shows the advances in wind responses of the transmission tower-line system, which contains the dynamic effects under common wind loading, tornado, downburst, and typhoon; and discusses the dynamic responses under earthquake and ice loads, respectively. The vibration control of the transmission tower-line system is also reviewed, which includes the magnetorheological dampers, friction dampers, tuned mass dampers, and pounding tuned mass dampers. PMID:25105161