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Sample records for active vibrational modes

  1. Enzyme activation and catalysis: characterisation of the vibrational modes of substrate and product in protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Sytina, Olga A; Alexandre, Maxime T; Heyes, Derren J; Hunter, C Neil; Robert, Bruno; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-02-14

    The light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide, a key step in the synthesis of chlorophyll, is catalyzed by the enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) and requires two photons (O. A. Sytina et al., Nature, 2008, 456, 1001-1008). The first photon activates the enzyme-substrate complex, a subsequent second photon initiates the photochemistry by triggering the formation of a catalytic intermediate. These two events are characterized by different spectral changes in the infra-red spectral region. Here, we investigate the vibrational frequencies of the POR-bound and unbound substrate, and product, and thus provide a detailed assignment of the spectral changes in the 1800-1250 cm(-1) region associated with the catalytic conversion of PChlide:NADPH:TyrOH into Chlide:NADP(+):TyrO(-). Fluorescence line narrowed spectra of the POR-bound Pchlide reveal a C=O keto group downshifted by more than 20 cm(-1) to a relatively low vibrational frequency of 1653 cm(-1), as compared to the unbound Pchlide, indicating that binding of the chromophore to the protein occurs via strong hydrogen bond(s). The frequencies of the C=C vibrational modes are consistent with a six-coordinated state of the POR-bound Pchlide, suggesting that there are two coordination interactions between the central Mg atom of the chromophore and protein residues, and/or a water molecule. The frequencies of the C=C vibrational modes of Chlide are consistent with a five-coordinated state, indicating a single interaction between the central Mg atom of the chromophore and a water molecule. Rapid-scan FTIR measurements on the Pchlide:POR:NADPH complex at 4 cm(-1) spectral resolution reveal a new band in the 1670 cm(-1) region. The FTIR spectra of the enzyme activation phase indicate involvement of a nucleotide-binding structural motif, and an increased exposure of the protein to solvent after activation. PMID:21103538

  2. Semi-active damping with negative stiffness for multi-mode cable vibration mitigation: approximate collocated control solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.; Distl, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper derives an approximate collocated control solution for the mitigation of multi-mode cable vibration by semi-active damping with negative stiffness based on the control force characteristics of clipped linear quadratic regulator (LQR). The control parameters are derived from optimal modal viscous damping and corrected in order to guarantee that both the equivalent viscous damping coefficient and the equivalent stiffness coefficient of the semi-active cable damper force are equal to their desired counterparts. The collocated control solution with corrected control parameters is numerically validated by free decay tests of the first four cable modes and combinations of these modes. The results of the single-harmonic tests demonstrate that the novel approach yields 1.86 times more cable damping than optimal modal viscous damping and 1.87 to 2.33 times more damping compared to a passive oil damper whose viscous damper coefficient is optimally tuned to the targeted mode range of the first four modes. The improvement in case of the multi-harmonic vibration tests, i.e. when modes 1 and 3 and modes 2 and 4 are vibrating at the same time, is between 1.55 and 3.81. The results also show that these improvements are obtained almost independent of the cable anti-node amplitude. Thus, the proposed approximate real-time applicable collocated semi-active control solution which can be realized by magnetorheological dampers represents a promising tool for the efficient mitigation of stay cable vibrations.

  3. Active Pneumatic Vibration Control by Using Pressure and Velocity Measurements and Adaptive Fuzzy Sliding-Mode Controller

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Yi; Liang, Jin-Wei; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an intelligent control strategy to overcome nonlinear and time-varying characteristics of a diaphragm-type pneumatic vibration isolator (PVI) system. By combining an adaptive rule with fuzzy and sliding-mode control, the method has online learning ability when it faces the system's nonlinear and time-varying behaviors during an active vibration control process. Since the proposed scheme has a simple structure, it is easy to implement. To validate the proposed scheme, a composite control which adopts both chamber pressure and payload velocity as feedback signal is implemented. During experimental investigations, sinusoidal excitation at resonance and random-like signal are input on a floor base to simulate ground vibration. Performances obtained from the proposed scheme are compared with those obtained from passive system and PID scheme to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed intelligent control. PMID:23820746

  4. A high pressure study of the eigenvectors of the infra-red active vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine.

    PubMed

    Starkey, Carl A; Lee, Scott A; Anderson, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    High-pressure infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine at 298 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as adenosine have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is that it is a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of these vibrational modes. Stretching modes, which are predominantly internal to the molecule, have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Particular attention is paid to modes in the 800-1000 cm(-1) range since modes in that region of the vibrational spectrum are found to be sensitive to the conformation of double-helical DNA. Since the sugar pucker is different for the various conformations of DNA, this fact suggests that these modes involve the motion of atoms in the sugar group. The vibrations of the hydrogen atoms are also of interest to study since the vibrational frequency of hydrogen atoms involved in hydrogen bonds has a negative pressure derivative. Such behavior clearly shows which hydrogen atoms are involved in hydrogen bonding. PMID:26009279

  5. Vibrational modes and damping in the cochlear partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    It has been assumed in models of cochlear mechanics that the primary role of the cochlear active process is to counteract the damping of the basilar membrane, the vibration of which is much larger in a living animal than post mortem. Recent measurements of the relative motion between the reticular lamina and basilar membrane imply that this assumption is incorrect. We propose that damping is distributed throughout the cochlear partition rather than being concentrated in the basilar membrane. In the absence of significant damping, the cochlear partition possesses three modes of vibration, each associated with its own locus of Hopf bifurcations. Hair-cell activity can amplify any of these modes if the system's operating point lies near the corresponding bifurcation. The distribution of damping determines which mode of vibration predominates. For physiological levels of damping, only one mode produces a vibration pattern consistent with experimental measurements of relative motion and basilar-membrane motion.

  6. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid.

  7. Mode-dependent vibrational autoionization in aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Raptis, C. A.; Pratt, S. T.

    2000-09-08

    High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study the branching ratios for vibrational autoionization of Rydberg states of aniline (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}NH{sub 2}) converging to the ground electronic state of the ion. By using two-color double-resonance excitation, it is possible to prepare autoionizing resonances in which two different vibrational modes are excited. Determination of the vibrational state distribution in the product ion provides information on the relative rates of autoionization for the two modes. It is found that some normal modes appear to be especially effective at promoting vibrational autoionization, while others appear to be completely ineffective. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Low-frequency vibrational modes of glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Wang, Guo; Zhang, Yan

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution terahertz absorption and Raman spectra of glutamine in the frequency region 0.2 THz-2.8 THz are obtained by using THz time domain spectroscopy and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy. Based on the experimental and the computational results, the vibration modes corresponding to the terahertz absorption and Raman scatting peaks are assigned and further verified by the theoretical calculations. Spectral investigation of the periodic structure of glutamine based on the sophisticated hybrid density functional B3LYP indicates that the vibrational modes come mainly from the inter-molecular hydrogen bond in this frequency region.

  9. Hydrogen local vibrational modes in compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, M.D.

    1998-12-31

    Local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy of hydrogen and deuterium in GaP, AlSb, ZnSe, and GaN has provided important information about the structures of dopant-hydrogen complexes and their interaction with the host lattice. In GaN:Mg, for example, hydrogen binds to a host nitrogen which is adjacent to the magnesium acceptor. In GaP and ZnSe, it has been demonstrated that the temperature dependent shifts of LVM`s are proportional to the lattice thermal energy, a consequence of the anharmonic coupling of the local mode to acoustical phonons. Large hydrostatic pressures have been applied to semiconductors to probe the vibrational properties of hydrogen-related complexes. In GaAs, the pressure dependent shifts of the {sup 12}C-H and {sup 13}C-H stretch modes have positive curvatures, while the shift of the S-H stretch mode has a negative curvature. This may be related to the fact that in the bond-centered C-H complex, the hydrogen is compressed between the carbon acceptor and one gallium host atom, whereas in the S-H complex, the hydrogen occupies an interstitial position and is not crowded by neighboring atoms. If these trends are general, then hydrostatic pressure may be a powerful tool in determining the position of the hydrogen atom(s) in a complex. In AlSb, pressure was utilized to resolve a mystery as to why the Se-D complex gives rise to one stretch mode peak while the Se-H stretch mode splits into three peaks. This anomalous splitting is explained in terms of a new resonant interaction between the stretch mode and combination modes involving a wag mode harmonic and extended lattice phonons. The interaction gives rise to vibrational modes with both localized and extended components. When the temperature or hydrostatic pressure is varied, the modes exhibit anti-crossing behavior.

  10. Vibration modes and frequencies of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durling, R. J.; Kvaternik, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    SUDAN, Substructuring in Direct Analysis, analyzes natural modes and frequencies of vibration of structural systems. Based on direct method of analysis that employs substructures methodology, program is used with structures that may be represented as equivalent system of beam, springs, and rigid bodies.

  11. Vibrational local modes in DNA polymer.

    PubMed

    Van Zandt, L L; Saxena, V K

    1994-04-01

    Where the translational symmetry of a long polymer chain is interrupted, characteristic vibrations of the molecule are possible in which only those atoms at or relatively near the defect site partake of the motion. This contrasts with the more common vibrational states in which the motion propagates along the chain as a sound wave. Examples of readily producible local defects include broken bonds, missing atoms or groups, and extra links as are found, e.g., in thymine dimers. For each different defect, the spectrum of local mode frequencies is characteristic of its structure. Hence the local modes give direct information about the nature of the defect and can serve as a diagnostic signature of the polymer chain lesion. We have developed and are using algorithms and fortran code to predict the existence and nature of local modes based on their atomic structures. We have studied examples of different defects and found their eigen-frequencies and eigenvectors. For the simplest case of a broken hydrogen bond in a single A-T unit in a long homopolymer dA.dT chain, we display stereo views of the vibrating unit side-by-side with the undisturbed molecule for the three local modes occurring below 300 cm-1 in frequency. PMID:7946063

  12. Design and development of a model free robust controller for active control of dominant flexural modes of vibrations in a smart system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswaran, Arun P.; Ananthakrishnan, B.; Gangadharan, K. V.

    2015-10-01

    Real physical vibrating smart systems exhibit a lot of nonlinearities in their dynamics. Undesirable vibrations, particularly in the regions of first as well as second resonance, play a very important role in deteriorating the stability of the system as well as its operational efficiency. The work presented in the paper focuses on an analytical technique of mathematical modeling of a vibrating piezoelectric laminate cantilever beam which is considered to be the smart system. The natural frequencies of the vibrating smart system are determined from the ANSYS simulation studies and experimentally, it is found that the vibrations induced voltage is maximum at the first followed by the second natural frequencies. Hence, the smart system is modeled analytically through finite element technique using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory for the first two flexural modes of vibrations. To account for the possible nonlinearities, a suitable robust controller is designed based on sliding mode technique. Simulation studies on the developed analytical model indicated a high performance of the designed controller in controlling the vibrations at first and second resonance regions. Also, the designed controller was found to be effective in its operations when the excitation varied over a large range covering the first two natural frequencies. In the final stage, the designed robust controller was successfully prototyped on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform using LabVIEW coupled with Compact Reconfigurable Input Output (cRIO-9022) controller configured in its FPGA interface mode and the resulting robust FPGA controller successfully controlled the occurring system vibrations.

  13. Vibrational modes in the quantum Hall system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Yan, Bin; Daily, Kevin; Greene, Chris H.

    The hyperspherical adiabatic technique is more familiar to atomic and nuclear few-body systems, but can also be applied with high accuracy to the many-body quantum Hall problem. This technique reformulates the Schrödinger equation for N electrons into hyperspherical coordinates, which, after extracting the trivial center of mass, describes the system in terms of a single global size coordinate known as the hyperradius R, and 2 N - 3 remaining internal angular coordinates. The solutions are approximately separable in the hyperradial coordinate, and solutions in the system are found by treating the hyperradius as an adiabatic coordinate. The approximate separability of the wave functions in this coordinate suggests the presence of hyperradial vibrational modes which are not described in conventional theories. The vibrationally excited states share the internal geometry of their quantum Hall ground states, and their excitation frequencies may vary with the number of participating particles or the strength of the confinement. We plan to discuss the features of these vibrational modes and their possible detection in quantum Hall systems. NSF.

  14. On the vibrational modes of C 60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis P.; Gorman, John P.

    1996-03-01

    The vibrational spectrum of C 60 is compared to the spectrum of a classical isotropic elastic spherical shell. We show correlations between the low frequency modes of C 60 and those of the spherical shell. We find the spherical model gives the approximate frequency ordering for the low frequency modes. We estimate a Poisson ratio of σ ≈ 0.30 and a transverse speed of sound of υs ≈ 1800 m/s for the equivalent elastic shell. We also find that ω( M1) /ω( M0) = √ 3/2 for the shell modes M 0 and M 1, independent of elastic constants. We find that this ratio compares favorably with an experimental value of 1.17.

  15. Surface Vibrational Modes on Ni(977)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Abdelkader; Durukanoglu, Sondan; Rahman, Talat S.

    1996-03-01

    Using the Embedded Atom Method for the interatomic interaction potential, and the Real Space Green's function for calculating the Local Vibrational Densities of States, we present a detailed analysis of the surface phonons of Ni(977). We find that, in general, the step row phonons are softened ( shifted toward low frequencies) as compared to the ones corresponding to the terrace atoms in excellent agreement with the recent He scattering measurments. ( L. Niu, D. J. Gaspar and S. J. Sibner, Science, Vol. 268 , 1995, p 847.) We explore the polarization and the frequencies of these step vibrational modes and relate the softening of the frequencies to the changes in the force constants associated with the surface atoms.

  16. Vibrational mode for nitrogen in zinc selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, H.J. )

    1994-03-21

    The first observation of a localized vibrational mode for N in ZnSe by infrared absorption is reported. Nitrogen was introduced into internal reflection plates of polycrystalline ZnSe by ion implantation. Isotopic substitution confirmed assignment of the absorption to N, and the band frequency is consistent with N on Se sites. Coimplantation with deuterium decreased the N band intensity and introduced a band for Zn---D. These deuterium effects which increase upon annealing between 200 and 300 [degree]C are ascribed to a breaking of Zn---N bonds to form Zn---D bonds and a relaxation of N toward threefold coordination.

  17. Acoustic mode vibrational anharmonicity of hexahelometallate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sanjeev Kumar; Goyal, R. P.; Gupta, B. R. K.

    1992-11-01

    The vibrational anharmonicity and Grüneisen parameters of hexahelometallate A 2MX 6 single crystals have been determined theoretically by making use of phonon lattice theory. The potential model employed to calculate these properties consists of long range coulomb, three body interactions, short range overlap repulsion effective upto the nearest neighbour ions and phonon-lattice interactions. These antifluorite structure compounds contain large MX 2-6- ions and as the interionic spacings are much greater than those of the alkaline-earth fluorite structure halides, their elastic constants are correspondingly smaller. The hydrostatic pressure derivatives of the second order elastic constants (SOEC) calculated for K 2SnCl 6, K 2ReCl 6, (NH 4) 2SnCl 6, (NH 4) 2TeCl 6, (NH 4) 2SnBr 6, and (NH 4) 2TeBr 6, are found to be positive and close to the experimental values. The vibrational anharmonicities of the long-wavelength modes are explained in terms of the acoustic mode Grüneisen parameters.

  18. Active damping of spacecraft structural appendage vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An active vibration damper system, for bending in two orthogonal directions and torsion, in each of three mutually perpendicular axes is located at the extremities of the flexible appendages of a space platform. The system components for each axis includes: an accelerometer, filtering and signal processing apparatus, and a DC motor-inertia wheel torquer. The motor torquer, when driven by a voltage proportional to the relative vibration tip velocity, produces a reaction torque for opposing and therefore damping a specific modal velocity of vibration. The relative tip velocity is obtained by integrating the difference between the signal output from the accelerometer located at the end of the appendage with the output of a usually carried accelerometer located on a relatively rigid body portion of the space platform. A selector switch, with sequential stepping logic or highest modal vibration energy logic, steps to another modal tip velocity channel and receives a signal voltage to damp another vibration mode. In this manner, several vibration modes can be damped with a single sensor/actuator pair. When a three axis damper is located on each of the major appendages of the platform, then all of the system vibration modes can be effectively damped.

  19. Hydrogen local vibrational modes in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, M D

    1997-06-01

    Following, a review of experimental techniques, theory, and previous work, the results of local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy on hydrogen-related complexes in several different semiconductors are discussed. Hydrogen is introduced either by annealing in a hydrogen ambient. exposure to a hydrogen plasma, or during growth. The hydrogen passivates donors and acceptors in semiconductors, forming neutral complexes. When deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. the frequency of the LVM decreases by approximately the square root of two. By varying the temperature and pressure of the samples, the microscopic structures of hydrogen-related complexes are determined. For group II acceptor-hydrogen complexes in GaAs, InP, and GaP, hydrogen binds to the host anion in a bond-centered orientation, along the [111] direction, adjacent to the acceptor. The temperature dependent shift of the LVMs are proportional to the lattice thermal energy U(T), a consequence of anharmonic coupling between the LVM and acoustical phonons. In the wide band gap semiconductor ZnSe, epilayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD) and doped with As form As-H complexes. The hydrogen assumes a bond-centered orientation, adjacent to a host Zn. In AlSb, the DX centers Se and Te are passivated by hydrogen. The second, third, and fourth harmonics of the wag modes are observed. Although the Se-D complex has only one stretch mode, the Se-H stretch mode splits into three peaks. The anomalous splitting is explained by a new interaction between the stretch LVM and multi-phonon modes of the lattice. As the temperature or pressure is varied, and anti-crossing is observed between LVM and phonon modes.

  20. Automatic determination of important mode-mode correlations in many-mode vibrational wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Carolin; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-04-01

    We introduce new automatic procedures for parameterizing vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) and vibrational configuration interaction wave functions. Importance measures for individual mode combinations in the wave function are derived based on upper bounds to Hamiltonian matrix elements and/or the size of perturbative corrections derived in the framework of VCC. With a threshold, this enables an automatic, system-adapted way of choosing which mode-mode correlations are explicitly parameterized in the many-mode wave function. The effect of different importance measures and thresholds is investigated for zero-point energies and infrared spectra for formaldehyde and furan. Furthermore, the direct link between important mode-mode correlations and coordinates is illustrated employing water clusters as examples: Using optimized coordinates, a larger number of mode combinations can be neglected in the correlated many-mode vibrational wave function than with normal coordinates for the same accuracy. Moreover, the fraction of important mode-mode correlations compared to the total number of correlations decreases with system size. This underlines the potential gain in efficiency when using optimized coordinates in combination with a flexible scheme for choosing the mode-mode correlations included in the parameterization of the correlated many-mode vibrational wave function. All in all, it is found that the introduced schemes for parameterizing correlated many-mode vibrational wave functions lead to at least as systematic and accurate calculations as those using more standard and straightforward excitation level definitions. This new way of defining approximate calculations offers potential for future calculations on larger systems.

  1. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  2. On variational arguments for vibrational modes near jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Le; DeGiuli, Eric; Wyart, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Amorphous solids tend to present an abundance of soft elastic modes, which diminish their transport properties, generate heterogeneities in their elastic response, and affect non-linear processes like thermal activation of plasticity. This is especially true in packings of particles near their jamming transition, for which effective medium theory and variational arguments can both predict the density of vibrational modes. However, recent numerics support that one hypothesis of the variational argument does not hold. We provide a novel variational argument which overcomes this problem, and correctly predicts the scaling properties of soft modes near the jamming transition. Soft modes are shown to be related to the response to a local strain in more connected networks, and to be characterized by a volume 1/δ z , where δ z is the excess coordination above the Maxwell threshold. These predictions are verified numerically.

  3. Modeling low frequency vibrational modes of large biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Otto; Dykeman, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Mechanical oscillations of proteins in their native state are relevant to understanding the flexibility of the protein assembly, the binding of substrates, the mechanical action involved in enzymatic activity, and the vibrational response to light scattering. Often, only the low frequency modes are of interest and coarse grained methods or other approximations are used due to the large size of the dynamical matrix. We introduce a computational approach, which exploits the methodology from electronic structure Order N methods, to find the vibrational modes below some frequency threshold (analogous to a Fermi-level in electronic structure theory). The approach allows systems to be described in atomistic detail. We use a generalized Born force field to model the interactions. Examples of normal modes for icosahedral viruses (e.g. satellite tobacco necrosis virus), tubular viruses (e.g. M13), and enzymes (e.g. lysozyme, HIV-protease, alpha-lytic protease) will be discussed. This effort is motivated by recent experimental work to produce high amplitude vibrations of viruses from impulsive stimulated Raman scattering.

  4. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  5. Observation of Protein Structural Vibrational Mode Sensitivity to Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Snell, Edward; Markelz, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    We report the first measurements of the dependence of large-scale protein intramolecular vibrational modes on ligand binding. These collective vibrational modes in the terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1) are of great interest due to their predicted relation to protein function. Our technique, Crystals Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM), allows for room temperature, table-top measurements of the optically active intramolecular modes. CATM measurements have revealed surprisingly narrowband features. CATM measurements are performed on single crystals of chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) as well as CEWL bound to tri-N-acetylglucosamine (CEWL-3NAG) inhibitor. We find narrow band resonances that dramatically shift with binding. Quasiharmonic calculations are performed on CEWL and CEWL-3NAG proteins with CHARMM using normal mode analysis. The expected CATM response of the crystals is then calculated by summing over all protein orientations within the unit cell. We will compare the CATM measurements with the calculated results and discuss the changes which arise with protein-ligand binding. This work is supported by NSF grant MRI 2 grant DBI2959989.

  6. Active damping of modal vibrations by force apportioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallauer, W. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Force apportioning, a method of active structural damping based on that used in modal vibration testing of isolating modes by multiple shaker excitation, was analyzed and numerically simulated. A distribution of as few forces as possible on the structure is chosen so as to maximally affect selected vibration modes while minimally exciting all other modes. The accuracy of numerical simulations of active damping, active damping of higher-frequency modes, and studies of imperfection sensitivity are discussed. The computer programs developed are described and possible refinements of the research are examined.

  7. Modular Wideband Active Vibration Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David R.; Zewari, Wahid; Lee, Kenneth Y.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of space experiments with previous missions shows a common theme. Some of the recent experiments are based on the scientific fundamentals of instruments of prior years. However, the main distinguishing characteristic is the embodiment of advances in engineering and manufacturing in order to extract clearer and sharper images and extend the limits of measurement. One area of importance to future missions is providing vibration free observation platforms at acceptable costs. It has been shown by researchers that vibration problems cannot be eliminated by passive isolation techniques alone. Therefore, various organizations have conducted research in the area of combining active and passive vibration control techniques. The essence of this paper is to present progress in what is believed to be a new concept in this arena. It is based on the notion that if one active element in a vibration transmission path can provide a reasonable vibration attenuation, two active elements in series may provide more control options and better results. The paper presents the functions of a modular split shaft linear actuator developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and University of Massachusetts Lowell. It discusses some of the control possibilities facilitated by the device. Some preliminary findings and problems are also discussed.

  8. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  9. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  10. Intrinsic component mode synthesis and plate vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourquin, F.; D'Hennezel, F.

    1992-07-01

    A 'fixed-interface' method of component mode synthesis is presented and employed to compute error bounds for the case of Kirchhoff plates. The fixed-interface method exploits particular 'constraint modes' that are used as eigenfunctions for the Poincare-Steklov operator in the domain decomposition. The technique is applied to the computation of error bounds and coupling modes for several variants of plate problems. The definition and number of the component modes required for accurate mode synthesis does not depend on the selected discretization process. This allows the fixed-interface technique to be used for the effective treatment of large 3D elasticity problems with a large number of unknown interfaces.

  11. The normal modes of lattice vibrations of ice XI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Ying-Bo; Ding, Zheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum of ice XI at thermal wavelengths using the CASTEP code, a first-principles simulation method, is investigated. A dual-track approach is constructed to verify the validity for the computational phonon spectrum: collate the simulated spectrum with inelastic neutron scattering experiments and assign the photon scattering peaks according to the calculated normal vibration frequencies. The 33 optical normal vibrations at the Brillouin center are illustrated definitely from the ab initio outcomes. The depolarizing field effect of the hydrogen bond vibrations at frequencies of 229 cm−1 and 310 cm−1 is found to agree well with the LST relationship. It is a convincing evidence to manifest the LO-TO splitting of hydrogen bonds in ice crystal. We attribute the two hydrogen bond peaks to the depolarization effect and apply this viewpoint to ordinary ice phase, ice Ih, which is difficult to analyse their vibration modes due to proton disorder. PMID:27375199

  12. The normal modes of lattice vibrations of ice XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Ying-Bo; Ding, Zheng-Wen

    2016-07-01

    The vibrational spectrum of ice XI at thermal wavelengths using the CASTEP code, a first-principles simulation method, is investigated. A dual-track approach is constructed to verify the validity for the computational phonon spectrum: collate the simulated spectrum with inelastic neutron scattering experiments and assign the photon scattering peaks according to the calculated normal vibration frequencies. The 33 optical normal vibrations at the Brillouin center are illustrated definitely from the ab initio outcomes. The depolarizing field effect of the hydrogen bond vibrations at frequencies of 229 cm‑1 and 310 cm‑1 is found to agree well with the LST relationship. It is a convincing evidence to manifest the LO-TO splitting of hydrogen bonds in ice crystal. We attribute the two hydrogen bond peaks to the depolarization effect and apply this viewpoint to ordinary ice phase, ice Ih, which is difficult to analyse their vibration modes due to proton disorder.

  13. The normal modes of lattice vibrations of ice XI.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Ying-Bo; Ding, Zheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum of ice XI at thermal wavelengths using the CASTEP code, a first-principles simulation method, is investigated. A dual-track approach is constructed to verify the validity for the computational phonon spectrum: collate the simulated spectrum with inelastic neutron scattering experiments and assign the photon scattering peaks according to the calculated normal vibration frequencies. The 33 optical normal vibrations at the Brillouin center are illustrated definitely from the ab initio outcomes. The depolarizing field effect of the hydrogen bond vibrations at frequencies of 229 cm(-1) and 310 cm(-1) is found to agree well with the LST relationship. It is a convincing evidence to manifest the LO-TO splitting of hydrogen bonds in ice crystal. We attribute the two hydrogen bond peaks to the depolarization effect and apply this viewpoint to ordinary ice phase, ice Ih, which is difficult to analyse their vibration modes due to proton disorder. PMID:27375199

  14. Inhibiting multiple mode vibration in controlled flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James M.; Seering, Warren P.

    1991-01-01

    Prior research has led to the development of input command pre-shapers that can significantly reduce residual vibration. These shapers exhibit marked insensitivity to errors in natural frequency estimates and can be used to minimize vibration at more than one frequency. A method is outlined for the development of multiple mode input shapers. An examination is made of the results of shaper performance tests conducted on linear and non-linear computer models of MACE, an MIT/NASA experimental flexible structure.

  15. Quantitative measurements of vibration amplitude using a contact-mode freestanding triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sihong; Niu, Simiao; Yang, Jin; Lin, Long; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-12-23

    A vibration sensor is usually designed to measure the vibration frequency but disregard the vibration amplitude, which is rather challenging to be quantified due to the requirement of linear response. Here, we show the application of triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) as a self-powered tool for quantitative measurement of vibration amplitude based on an operation mode, the contact-mode freestanding triboelectric nanogenerator (CF-TENG). In this mode, the triboelectrically charged resonator can be agitated to vibrate between two stacked stationary electrodes. Under the working principle with a constant capacitance between two electrodes, the amplitudes of the electric signals are proportional to the vibration amplitude of the resonator (provided that the resonator plate is charged to saturation), which has been illuminated both theoretically and experimentally. Together with its capability in monitoring the vibration frequency, the CF-TENG appears as the triboelectrification-based active sensor that can give full quantitative information about a vibration. In addition, the CF-TENG is also demonstrated as a power source for electronic devices. PMID:25386799

  16. Temperature Dependent Studies of Conformational Vibrational Modes of Biological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelz, A. G.; Pawar, A.

    2001-03-01

    Low frequency vibrational modes of proteins are correlated to conformation and conformational change critical to biochemical activity, however direct measurements of these modes has been impeded by limitations in spectroscopic techniques. We are presently exploring the use of the high sensitivity FIR spectroscopic technique of pulsed terahertz spectroscopy to measure these modes as a function of conformational state. Initial measurements have been preformed using bovine heart cytochrome c and the chromophore of photoactive yellow protein, p-coumaric acid (PCA). We have measured the temperature dependence (77 K - 300 K) of the far infrared absorption (2-100 cm-1) using both solid state and solution samples. Sample preparation techniques to eliminate etalon in the spectra will be discussed. For cytochrome c, a distinct absorption at 10 cm-1 is seen at room temperature that narrows and slightly red shifts as the temperature decreases. For PCA, the FIR absorption remains broad at lower temperatures, with an overall increase in FIR absorption at lower temperatures. We will discuss the implications of these measurements for future studies of conformational dynamics in these proteins.

  17. Gait Patterns of Quadrupeds and Natural Vibration Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Yutaka; Matsumura, Yuichi; Kanda, Shinichi; Kinugasa, Hironao

    Quadruped animals switch gait patterns with speed for energy-effective movement. This is similar to the phenomenon that excited natural vibration modes switch with vibration frequency in a multi-degree-of-freedom system. Therefore, in this paper, it is assumed that quadruped animals move by using the natural vibration of their own musculoskeletal systems. In the simplest rigid-body-link model consisting of one body and four legs, there are natural vibration modes similar to the gait patterns (trot, pace, and gallop) of quadruped animals. However, all the natural frequencies in the model exist near the natural frequency of the free leg and are accordingly different from the walking frequencies of actual quadruped animals. When a scapula and a pelvis are added to the rigid-body-link model on the basis of observations of quadruped motion, the natural frequency of the gallop mode used at high speed increases greatly and approaches the walking frequency. If the body characteristics of a horse are applied to the rigid-body-link model with leg joints, the natural vibration modes of the model are close to the gait patterns of the horse.

  18. Intermolecular Vibrational Modes Speed Up Singlet Fission in Perylenediimide Crystals.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2015-02-01

    We report numerical simulations based on a non-Markovian density matrix propagation scheme of singlet fission (SF) in molecular crystals. Ab initio electronic structure calculations were used to parametrize the exciton and phonon Hamiltonian as well as the interactions between the exciton and the intramolecular and intermolecular vibrational modes. We demonstrate that the interactions of the exciton with intermolecular vibrational modes are highly sensitive to the stacking geometry of the crystal and can, in certain cases, significantly accelerate SF. This result may help in understanding the fast SF experimentally observed in a broad range of molecular crystals and offers a new direction for the engineering of efficient SF sensitizers. PMID:26261948

  19. Low-frequency vibrational modes of riboflavin and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Nishizawa, Jun-ichi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    The low-frequency vibrations of riboflavin and related compounds (alloxazine, lumichrome, lumiflavin as the ring system and D-mannitol as the side-chain system) were observed by far-infrared (terahertz) spectroscopy. Vibrational mode assignments in this spectrally congested range were made using high precision quantum chemical calculations. These resonance frequencies located below 200 cm -1 indicate the existence of motions important for biological reactions. The observed absorption bands in the low-frequency region of riboflavin are assigned to the in-plane and out-of-plane-ring deformations of pyrimidine and isoalloxazine, and to the torsion modes of the ribityl chain.

  20. Active Vibration Dampers For Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascack, Albert F.; Ropchock, John J.; Lakatos, Tomas F.; Montague, Gerald T.; Palazzolo, Alan; Lin, Reng Rong

    1994-01-01

    Active dampers developed to suppress vibrations in rotating machinery. Essentially feedback control systems and reciprocating piezoelectric actuators. Similar active damper containing different actuators described in LEW-14488. Concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations in stationary structures subject to winds and earthquakes. Active damper offers adjustable suppression of vibrations. Small and lightweight and responds faster to transients.

  1. Nuclear Schiff moment and soft vibrational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir; Volya, Alexander; Auerbach, Naftali

    2008-07-15

    The atomic electric dipole moment (EDM) currently searched by a number of experimental groups requires that both parity and time-reversal invariance be violated. According to current theoretical understanding, the EDM is induced by the nuclear Schiff moment. The enhancement of the Schiff moment by the combination of static quadrupole and octupole deformation was predicted earlier. Here we study a further idea of the possible enhancement in the absence of static deformation but in a nuclear system with soft collective vibrations of two types. Both analytical approximation and numerical solution of the simplified problem confirm the presence of the enhancement. We discuss related aspects of nuclear structure which should be studied beyond mean-field and random phase approximations.

  2. NASDA's activities on vibration isolation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The National Space Development Agency's (NASDA) activities in providing various vibration isolation technologies for the Space Station Mission are covered in viewgraph form. Technologies covered include an active vibration isolation system for extra sensitive missions in the low frequency range, a passive damping system consisting of a damping rack for the reduction of resonance amplification, and an isolator for vibration isolation from low frequencies. Information is given in viewgraph form on the active vibration isolation concept, voice coil type electromagnetic suspension, a profile of an active vibration isolation system, a three degree of freedom ground experiment, and acceleration feedback.

  3. Two-mode elliptical-core weighted fiber sensors for vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vengsarkar, Ashish M.; Murphy, Kent A.; Fogg, Brian R.; Miller, William V.; Greene, Jonathan A.; Claus, Richard O.

    1992-01-01

    Two-mode, elliptical-core optical fibers are demonstrated in weighted, distributed and selective vibration-mode-filtering applications. We show how appropriate placement of optical fibers on a vibrating structure can lead to vibration mode filtering. Selective vibration-mode suppression on the order of 10 dB has been obtained using tapered two-mode, circular-core fibers with tapering functions that match the second derivatives of the modes of vibration to be enhanced. We also demonstrate the use of chirped, two-mode gratings in fibers as spatial modal sensors that are equivalents of shaped piezoelectric sensors.

  4. Novel active vibration absorber with magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, T.; Ehrlich, J.; Böse, H.

    2009-02-01

    Disturbing vibrations diminish the performance of technical high precision devices significantly. In search of a suitable solution for reducing these vibrations, a novel concept of active vibration reduction was developed which exploits the special properties of magnetorheological fluids. In order to evaluate the concept of such an active vibration absorber (AVA) a demonstrator was designed and manufactured. This demonstrator generates a force which counteracts the motion of the vibrating body. Since the counterforce is generated by a centrifugal exciter, the AVA provides the capability to compensate vibrations even in two dimensions. To control the strength of the force transmitted to the vibrating body, the exciter is based on a tunable MR coupling. The AVA was integrated in an appropriate testing device to investigate its performance. The recorded results show a significant reduction of the vibration amplitudes by an order of magnitude.

  5. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  6. Pressure dependence of local vibrational modes in InP

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, M. D.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Davidson, B. R.; Newman, R. C.

    2001-03-15

    Using infrared spectroscopy and a diamond-anvil cell, we have observed carbon and carbon-hydrogen local vibrational modes (LVM's) in InP at hydrostatic pressures as high as 5.5 GPa at liquid-helium temperatures. For pressures beyond 4.5 GPa, the carbon-hydrogen mode was not observed, perhaps as a result of a transformation of the complex into a different configuration. The LVM arising from carbon substitutional impurities varies linearly with pressure, whereas the shift of the carbon-hydrogen mode has a positive curvature. Both of these observations are in qualitative agreement with the pressure dependence of LVM's in GaAs. While the substitutional carbon impurities show very similar pressure shifts in the two materials, the linear pressure coefficient of the carbon-hydrogen stretch mode in InP is nearly three times that in GaAs. For all the measured modes, the Gru''neisen parameters increase with pressure.

  7. A violin shell model: vibrational modes and acoustics.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2015-03-01

    A generic physical model for the vibro-acoustic modes of the violin is described treating the body shell as a shallow, thin-walled, guitar-shaped, box structure with doubly arched top and back plates. comsol finite element, shell structure, software is used to identify and understand the vibrational modes of a simply modeled violin. This identifies the relationship between the freely supported plate modes when coupled together by the ribs and the modes of the assembled body shell. Such coupling results in a relatively small number of eigenmodes or component shell modes, of which a single volume-changing breathing mode is shown to be responsible for almost all the sound radiated in the monopole signature mode regime below ∼1 kHz for the violin, whether directly or by excitation of the Helmholtz f-hole resonance. The computations describe the influence on such modes of material properties, arching, plate thickness, elastic anisotropy, f-holes cut into the top plate, the bass-bar, coupling to internal air modes, the rigid neck-fingerboard assembly, and, most importantly, the soundpost. Because the shell modes are largely determined by the symmetry of the guitar-shaped body, the model is applicable to all instruments of the violin family. PMID:25786935

  8. Nonlinear mode coupling and vibrational energy transfer in Yukawa clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear mode coupling and the subsequent vibrational energy transfer that results is an important topic in chemical physics research, ranging from small molecules consisting of several atoms to macromolecules such as those found in proteins and DNA. Nonlinear mode coupling is recognized as the mechanism leading to ergodicity, which is a foundational tenet of statistical mechanics. Over the past two decades, Yukawa systems of particles such as those found in complex plasma, have been shown to be an effective model across a large number of physical systems. In this research, nonlinear mode coupling in Yukawa clusters consisting of 3-10 particles is examined via numerical simulation of the vibrational energy transfer between modes starting from an initial excited state. The relationship between the energy transfer process and the internal resonance between modes having a specified frequency ratio and the temporal evolution of the system to a state of equal energy across all modes, i.e., the state of ergodicity, will be discussed. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Relaxation paths for single modes of vibrations in isolated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoular, R.

    2006-06-01

    A numerical simulation of vibrational excitation of molecules was devised and used to excite computational models of common molecules into a prescribed, pure, normal vibration mode in the ground electronic state, with varying, controllable energy content. The redistribution of this energy (either non-chaotic or irreversible IVR) within the isolated, free molecule is then followed in time with a view to determining the coupling strength between modes. This work was triggered by the need to predict the general characters of the infrared spectra to be expected from molecules in interstellar space, after being excited by photon absorption or reaction with a radical. It is found that IVR from a pure normal mode is very 'restricted' indeed at energy contents of one mode quantum or so. However, as this is increased, or when the excitation is localized, our approach allows us to isolate, describe and quantify a number of interesting phenomena, known to chemists and in nonlinear mechanics, but difficult to demonstrate experimentally: frequency dragging, mode locking or quenching or, still, instability near a potential surface crossing, the first step to generalized chaos as the energy content per mode is increased.

  10. Vibrational modes of ultrathin carbon nanomembrane mechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xianghui E-mail: elke.scheer@uni-konstanz.de; Angelova, Polina; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Waitz, Reimar; Yang, Fan; Lutz, Carolin; Scheer, Elke E-mail: elke.scheer@uni-konstanz.de

    2015-02-09

    We report measurements of vibrational mode shapes of mechanical resonators made from ultrathin carbon nanomembranes (CNMs) with a thickness of approximately 1 nm. CNMs are prepared from electron irradiation induced cross-linking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers and the variation of membrane thickness and/or density can be achieved by varying the precursor molecule. Single- and triple-layer freestanding CNMs were made by transferring them onto Si substrates with square/rectangular orifices. The vibration of the membrane was actuated by applying a sinusoidal voltage to a piezoelectric disk on which the sample was glued. The vibrational mode shapes were visualized with an imaging Mirau interferometer using a stroboscopic light source. Several mode shapes of a square membrane can be readily identified and their dynamic behavior can be well described by linear response theory of a membrane with negligible bending rigidity. By applying Fourier transformations to the time-dependent surface profiles, the dispersion relation of the transverse membrane waves can be obtained and its linear behavior verifies the membrane model. By comparing the dispersion relation to an analytical model, the static stress of the membranes was determined and found to be caused by the fabrication process.

  11. A single vibration mode tubular piezoelectric ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    He, Siyuan; Chiarot, Paul R; Park, Soonho

    2011-05-01

    A novel tubular ultrasonic motor is presented that uses only a single vibration bending mode of a piezoelectric tube to generate rotation. When the piezoelectric tube bends, the diagonal motion of points on selected areas at the ends of the tube generates forces with tangential components along the same circumferential direction, driving the rotors to rotate. Bi-directional motion is achieved by simply switching the direction of bending. Because only one vibration mode is used, the motor requires only one driving signal and no vibration mode coupling is needed, simplifying the design, fabrication, assembly, and operation of the device. Two prototypes [one with cut-in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) teeth and one with added metal teeth] were built and tested using PZT tubes available to the authors. The tubes have an outside diameter of 6.6 mm, inner diameter of 5.0 mm, and length of 25.4 mm. The working frequencies of the two motors are 27.6 and 23.5 kHz. The motors achieved a maximum no-load speed of 400 rpm and a stall torque of 300 μN·m. PMID:21622060

  12. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  13. Active Vibration Control For Lasers And Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Jerome

    1983-12-01

    The Active Control of Space Structures (ACOSS) program of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has identified problems in active vibration control of structural modes in extremely flexible space structures and in precisely pointed optics. The Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories programs are an outgrowth of the ACOSS program. They are aimed at the problems of sensors, actuators, and their dynamic interactions with the structure to be controlled, and at the problem of system identification by one-g laboratory experiments. The VCOSS-1 and VCOSS-2 programs (Vibration Control of Space Structures) address the dynamic interactions of the sensor-actuator-structure; the Benchless Laser program and the Airborne Laser Mirror-Control program address the active control of HEL mirrors; the Experimental Modal Analysis and Component Synthesis and the Large Space Structure Dynamics programs address the problems of system identification and testing. Closer coordination with NASA and DARPA is being sought in support of on-orbit dynamic testing using the Space Shuttle and in the development of a national facility for one-g dynamics testing of large space structures.

  14. Multiple modes in the vibration of cantilevered shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindle, W. L.; Torvik, P. J.

    1987-06-01

    The term multiple modes describes pairs of modes which are similar in shape but occur at different frequencies. This phenomenon has been observed in holographic vibration test results for a turbine blade. Pairs of modes were found, such as two modes which both resembled first torsional modes. In this investigation holographic interferometry was used to verify the earlier results for the turbine blade and to investigate three shell segments simulating blades. The shells ranged in size from moderately to very thick with length to thickness ratios of 16, 8 and 5·6. The blade geometry is characterized by a circumferential angle of 142° and a ratio of length to inner radii arc length near 1·0. In addition, a NASTRAN finite element analysis was performed on these simulated blades. Both mode shapes and frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the results from the experiment. The multiple mode phenomenon was found to be an artifact of the holographic experiment. Pairs of modes were found in the NASTRAN results for the simulated blades in which the out-of-plane displacements (those seen in the hologram) were very similar, but for which the displacements in the plane of the hologram differed significantly. Thus, the two modes which appeared in the experimental results as first torsional modes were seen to include quite different in-plane displacements. The two modes are therefore quite different and do not contradict the normal result, which may be justified from such elementary considerations as a Rayleigh quotient, that similar modes must produce similar frequencies.

  15. Heavy atom vibrational modes and low-energy vibrational autodetachment in nitromethane anions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Michael C.; Weber, J. Mathias; Baraban, Joshua H.; Matthews, Devin A.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-06-21

    We report infrared spectra of nitromethane anion, CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}{sup −}, in the region 700–2150 cm{sup −1}, obtained by Ar predissociation spectroscopy and electron detachment spectroscopy. The data are interpreted in the framework of second-order vibrational perturbation theory based on coupled-cluster electronic structure calculations. The modes in the spectroscopic region studied here are mainly based on vibrations involving the heavier atoms; this work complements earlier studies on nitromethane anion that focused on the CH stretching region of the spectrum. Electron detachment begins at photon energies far below the adiabatic electron affinity due to thermal population of excited vibrational states.

  16. Recent Advances In Structural Vibration And Failure Mode Control In Mainland China: Theory, Experiments And Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2008-07-01

    A number of researchers have been focused on structural vibration control in the past three decades over the world and fruit achievements have been made. This paper introduces the recent advances in structural vibration control including passive, active and semiactive control in mainland China. Additionally, the co-author extends the structural vibration control to failure mode control. The research on the failure mode control is also involved in this paper. For passive control, this paper introduces full scale tests of buckling-restrained braces conducted to investigate the performance of the dampers and the second-editor of the Code of Seismic Design for Buildings. For active control, this paper introduces the HMD system for wind-induced vibration control of the Guangzhou TV tower. For semiactive control, the smart damping devices, algorithms for semi-active control, design methods and applications of semi-active control for structures are introduced in this paper. The failure mode control for bridges is also introduced.

  17. Recent Advances In Structural Vibration And Failure Mode Control In Mainland China: Theory, Experiments And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hui; Ou Jinping

    2008-07-08

    A number of researchers have been focused on structural vibration control in the past three decades over the world and fruit achievements have been made. This paper introduces the recent advances in structural vibration control including passive, active and semiactive control in mainland China. Additionally, the co-author extends the structural vibration control to failure mode control. The research on the failure mode control is also involved in this paper. For passive control, this paper introduces full scale tests of buckling-restrained braces conducted to investigate the performance of the dampers and the second-editor of the Code of Seismic Design for Buildings. For active control, this paper introduces the HMD system for wind-induced vibration control of the Guangzhou TV tower. For semiactive control, the smart damping devices, algorithms for semi-active control, design methods and applications of semi-active control for structures are introduced in this paper. The failure mode control for bridges is also introduced.

  18. Azimuthal asymmetries and vibrational modes in bubble pinch-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Laura E.

    The pressure-driven inertial collapse of a cylindrical void in an inviscid liquid is an integrable, Hamiltonian system that forms a finite-time singularity as the radius of the void collapses to zero. Here it is shown that when the natural cylindrical symmetry of the void is perturbed azimuthally, the perturbation modes neither grow nor decay, but instead cause constant amplitude vibrations about the leading-order symmetric collapse. Though the amplitudes are frozen in time, they grow relative to the mean radius which is collapsing to zero, eventually overtaking the leading-order symmetric implosion. Including weak viscous dissipation destroys the integrability of the underlying symmetric implosion, and the effect on the stability spectrum is that short-wavelength disturbances are now erased as the implosion proceeds. Introducing a weak rotational flow component to the symmetric implosion dynamics causes the vibrating shapes to spin as the mean radius collapses. The above theoretical scenario is compared to a closely related experimental realization of void implosion: the disconnection of an air bubble from an underwater nozzle. There, the thin neck connecting the bubble to the nozzle implodes primarily radially inward and disconnects. Recent experiments were able to induce vibrations of the neck shape by releasing the bubble from a slot-shaped nozzle. The frequency and amplitude of the observed vibrations are consistent with the theoretical prediction once surface tension effects are taken into account.

  19. Low-energy vibrational modes in phenylene oligomers studied by THz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. B.; Herz, L. M.; Khan, A. L. T.; Köhler, A.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.

    2003-08-01

    Low-energy vibrational modes have been investigated in polycrystalline biphenyl, para-terphenyl, para-quaterphenyl and para-sexiphenyl using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). A number of both internal and external infrared-active modes were observed for wavenumbers ranging between 20 and 80 cm -1. The temperature dependence of these modes is consistent with structural phase transitions occurring in the molecular crystal, indicating that THz-TDS is a sensitive probe of the conformation of conjugated molecular systems.

  20. Elastic moduli and vibrational modes in jammed particulate packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Silbert, Leonardo E.

    2016-06-01

    When we elastically impose a homogeneous, affine deformation on amorphous solids, they also undergo an inhomogeneous, nonaffine deformation, which can have a crucial impact on the overall elastic response. To correctly understand the elastic modulus M , it is therefore necessary to take into account not only the affine modulus MA, but also the nonaffine modulus MN that arises from the nonaffine deformation. In the present work, we study the bulk (M =K ) and shear (M =G ) moduli in static jammed particulate packings over a range of packing fractions φ . The affine MA is determined essentially by the static structural arrangement of particles, whereas the nonaffine MN is related to the vibrational eigenmodes. We elucidate the contribution of each vibrational mode to the nonaffine MN through a modal decomposition of the displacement and force fields. In the vicinity of the (un)jamming transition φc, the vibrational density of states g (ω ) shows a plateau in the intermediate-frequency regime above a characteristic frequency ω*. We illustrate that this unusual feature apparent in g (ω ) is reflected in the behavior of MN: As φ →φc , where ω*→0 , those modes for ω <ω* contribute less and less, while contributions from those for ω >ω* approach a constant value which results in MN to approach a critical value MN c, as MN-MN c˜ω* . At φc itself, the bulk modulus attains a finite value Kc=KA c-KN c>0 , such that KN c has a value that remains below KA c. In contrast, for the critical shear modulus Gc, GN c and GA c approach the same value so that the total value becomes exactly zero, Gc=GA c-GN c=0 . We explore what features of the configurational and vibrational properties cause such a distinction between K and G , allowing us to validate analytical expressions for their critical values.

  1. Coupling of Solute Vibrational Modes with a Fabry-Perot Optical Cavity Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkelberger, Adam; Compton, Ryan; Fears, Kenan; Spann, Bryan; Long, James; Simpkins, Blake; Owrutsky, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Electronic transitions of systems confined in optical microcavities can strongly couple to cavity modes, giving rise to new, mixed-character modes. Recent studies have demonstrated similar coherent coupling between the vibrational modes of a thin polymer film and a Fabry-Perot optical cavity mode. This coupling manifests experimentally as a splitting of the transmissive cavity mode into two dispersive branches separated by the vacuum Rabi splitting. Here we present recent experimental results for the coupling of solution-phase compounds with an optical cavity. Solutions of W(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and NCS- contained in cavities show strong coupling between the solute chromophores in the mid-infrared and cavity modes. We show that the methodology established with polymer-filled cavities is generally applicable to liquids but that the fluidity of the sample complicates the cavity construction. Varied cavity thicknesses can give rise to spatial gradients in coupling strength and difficulty in targeting a specific cavity-mode order. We also compare the transmission of the mixed vibrational-cavity modes in cavities constructed from either metallic or dielectric reflectors which impacts the cavity resonance line width. NRC Postdoctoral Fellow.

  2. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  3. Phonon transport at interfaces: Determining the correct modes of vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordiz, Kiarash; Henry, Asegun

    2016-01-01

    For many decades, phonon transport at interfaces has been interpreted in terms of phonons impinging on an interface and subsequently transmitting a certain fraction of their energy into the other material. It has also been largely assumed that when one joins two bulk materials, interfacial phonon transport can be described in terms of the modes that exist in each material separately. However, a new formalism for calculating the modal contributions to thermal interface conductance with full inclusion of anharmonicity has been recently developed, which now offers a means for checking the validity of this assumption. Here, we examine the assumption of using the bulk materials' modes to describe the interfacial transport. The results indicate that when two materials are joined, a new set of vibrational modes are required to correctly describe the transport. As the modes are analyzed, certain classifications emerge and some of the most important modes are localized at the interface and can exhibit large conductance contributions that cannot be explained by the current physical picture based on transmission probability.

  4. Mode competition in streamwise-only vortex induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagney, N.; Balabani, S.

    2013-08-01

    Time-resolved Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been used to study mode competition and transient behaviour in the wake of a cylinder experiencing Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV) in the streamwise direction. The cylinder response regime contained two branches, occurring above and below the onset of synchronisation between the wake and the cylinder motion (lock-in). During the first branch, the wake exhibited both the S-I mode (in which two vortices are shed simultaneously per vibration cycle) and the alternate A-II mode (similar to the well known von Kármán vortex street). An extended PIV data set acquired in this region revealed mode switching between the S-I and A-II modes. A criterion based on Proper-Orthogonal Decomposition was developed to identify which mode was dominant as a function of time. The A-II mode was found to be dominant for over 90% of the instantaneous fields examined, while the S-I mode appeared to be more unstable.Symmetrically shed vortices were found to rearrange downstream into an alternate structure in which the wake was no longer synchronised to the cylinder motion. The dominant frequency of transverse velocity fluctuations was measured throughout the wake in order to study the effects of this breakdown in more detail. For the majority of the wake, the fluctuations occurred at the Strouhal frequency, while in a region in the near wake the fluctuations occurred at the frequency of the cylinder motion. It is thought that during the first response branch vortices are formed at the cylinder response frequency, but tend to quickly rearrange downstream into an alternate structure which is no longer synchronised to the cylinder motion. As a result, the fluctuating drag will be synchronised to the structural motion, and is capable of providing positive energy transfer in the apparent absence of lock-in. Finally, the spatial dependence of the frequency of velocity fluctuations throughout the wake is used to explain some of the conflicting

  5. Vibrational energy flow between modes by dynamic mode coupling in THIATS J-aggregates.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Nakata, Kazuaki; Tokunaga, Eiji; Okamura, Kotaro; Du, Juan; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2013-11-14

    We performed ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of J-aggregates of 3,3'-disulfopropyl-5,5'-dichloro-9-ethyl thiacarbocyanine triethylammonium (THIATS), one of the most typical cyanine dyes, and detected excited molecular vibrations, using a sub-10 fs pulse laser. The time-resolved two-dimensional difference absorption (ΔA) spectra are observed between -314 and 1267 fs. By performing the Fourier transform and spectrogram analysis, vibrational modes in THIATS are observed at 285, 485, 555, 824, and 1633 cm(-1) and there was a modulation of the vibrational frequencies around 1633 cm(-1) which depend on the delay time, respectively. By the analysis of the modulation, energy flow is found to take place from other modes to the 1633 cm(-1) mode through the low frequency mode with ∼50 cm(-1). Also, by fitting the real-time traces of ΔA with the sum of two exponential functions and a constant term, the average lifetimes of three electronically excited states were found to be τ1 = 52 ± 5 fs and τ2 = 540 ± 78 fs. By performing single-exponential fitting around the stationary absorption peak at 1.990 eV, in the negative time range, the electronic dephasing time, T2(ele), is determined to be 18.30 fs. PMID:24111914

  6. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  7. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0–60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  8. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  9. Vibrating surface actuators for active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Frederick T.; Clingman, Dan J.

    2002-07-01

    Current research has shown that aircraft can gain significant aerodynamic performance benefits from active flow control (AFC). AFC seeks to control large scale flows by exploiting natural response triggered by small energy inputs. The principal target application is download alleviation of the V-22 Osprey under the DARPA sponsored Boeing Active Flow Control System program. One method of injecting energy into the flow over the V22 wings is to use an active vibrating surface on the passive seal between the wing and flapperon. The active surface is an oscillating cantilevered beam which injects fluid into the flow, similar to a synthetic jet, and interacts with the flow field. Two types of actuators, or flipperons, are explored. The first is a multilayer piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride cantilevered bender. The second is a single crystal piezoelectric (SCP)d31 poled wafer mounted on a cantilevered spring steel substrate. This paper details the development effort including fabrication, mechanical and electrical testing, and modeling for both types of actuators. Both flipperons were mounted on the passive seal between a 1/10th scale V22 wing and flapperon and the aerodynamic performance evaluated in low speed wind tunnel. The SCP flipperon demonstrated significant cruise benefits, with increase of 10 percent lift and 20 percent angle of attack capability. The PVDF flipperon provided a 16 percent drag reduction in the hover mode.

  10. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. PMID:17205741

  11. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  12. Elastic moduli and vibrational modes in jammed particulate packings.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2016-06-01

    When we elastically impose a homogeneous, affine deformation on amorphous solids, they also undergo an inhomogeneous, nonaffine deformation, which can have a crucial impact on the overall elastic response. To correctly understand the elastic modulus M, it is therefore necessary to take into account not only the affine modulus M_{A}, but also the nonaffine modulus M_{N} that arises from the nonaffine deformation. In the present work, we study the bulk (M=K) and shear (M=G) moduli in static jammed particulate packings over a range of packing fractions φ. The affine M_{A} is determined essentially by the static structural arrangement of particles, whereas the nonaffine M_{N} is related to the vibrational eigenmodes. We elucidate the contribution of each vibrational mode to the nonaffine M_{N} through a modal decomposition of the displacement and force fields. In the vicinity of the (un)jamming transition φ_{c}, the vibrational density of states g(ω) shows a plateau in the intermediate-frequency regime above a characteristic frequency ω^{*}. We illustrate that this unusual feature apparent in g(ω) is reflected in the behavior of M_{N}: As φ→φ_{c}, where ω^{*}→0, those modes for ω<ω^{*} contribute less and less, while contributions from those for ω>ω^{*} approach a constant value which results in M_{N} to approach a critical value M_{Nc}, as M_{N}-M_{Nc}∼ω^{*}. At φ_{c} itself, the bulk modulus attains a finite value K_{c}=K_{Ac}-K_{Nc}>0, such that K_{Nc} has a value that remains below K_{Ac}. In contrast, for the critical shear modulus G_{c}, G_{Nc} and G_{Ac} approach the same value so that the total value becomes exactly zero, G_{c}=G_{Ac}-G_{Nc}=0. We explore what features of the configurational and vibrational properties cause such a distinction between K and G, allowing us to validate analytical expressions for their critical values. PMID:27415345

  13. A Novel Vibration Mode Testing Method for Cylindrical Resonators Based on Microphones

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongmeng; Wu, Yulie; Wu, Xuezhong; Xi, Xiang; Wang, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Non-contact testing is an important method for the study of the vibrating characteristic of cylindrical resonators. For the vibratory cylinder gyroscope excited by piezo-electric electrodes, mode testing of the cylindrical resonator is difficult. In this paper, a novel vibration testing method for cylindrical resonators is proposed. This method uses a MEMS microphone, which has the characteristics of small size and accurate directivity, to measure the vibration of the cylindrical resonator. A testing system was established, then the system was used to measure the vibration mode of the resonator. The experimental results show that the orientation resolution of the node of the vibration mode is better than 0.1°. This method also has the advantages of low cost and easy operation. It can be used in vibration testing and provide accurate results, which is important for the study of the vibration mode and thermal stability of vibratory cylindrical gyroscopes. PMID:25602269

  14. Symmetry classification of the degenerate vibrational normal modes of ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, F.; di Lauro, C.; Legay-Sommaire, N.

    1992-11-01

    We determine the G36(EM) (usually called G 36†) symmetry species of all the degenerate vibrational normal modes of ethane unambiguously. We are able to do this as a result of observing the K-dependence of the sign of the energy separation between the torsionally split levels of ν4 + νy combination states, where ν4 is the torsion and νy ⊂ Eg of D3 d, and by observing the lack of any intrinsic torsional splitting or broadening in the νx fundamentals and hot ( ν4 + νx) - ν4 transitions ( νx ⊂ Eu of D3 d). It is found that in C 2H 6 all the Eu normal modes of D3 d correlate with E1 d of G36(EM) (and hence E' of D3 h), and all the Eg normal modes of D3 d correlate with E1 d of G36(EM) (and hence E″ of D3 h). High-resolution Q branches of ν8, ν4 + ν12, and ( ν4 + ν8) - ν4 of C 2H 6 are shown as illustrations.

  15. Instrumental evidence of normal mode rock slope vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burjánek, Jan; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Yugsi Molina, Freddy X.; Fäh, Donat

    2012-02-01

    A unique field experiment was performed to constrain the seismic response of a large, potentially unstable rock slope in the southern Swiss Alps. Small-aperture seismic arrays were deployed to record ambient vibrations both inside and outside of the mapped instability boundary. The recordings were analysed by means of the high-resolution f-k method, site-to-reference spectral ratios and time-frequency dependent polarization analysis. All three methods indicated that the wavefield within the potentially unstable rock mass is dominated by normal mode motion (standing waves) rather than horizontal propagation of seismic waves. Both fundamental frequency and relative amplification could be recovered from ambient noise data. The observed amplification is strongly directional, and the maximum amplification is oriented perpendicular to open tension cracks mapped at the ground surface. Our results highlight site response characteristics relevant for analysis of earthquake-triggered rock slope failures.

  16. Vibrational dynamics of vocal folds using nonlinear normal modes.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Alan P; Kerschen, Gaëtan

    2013-08-01

    Many previous works involving physical models, excised and in vivo larynges have pointed out nonlinear vibration in vocal folds during voice production. Moreover, theoretical studies involving mechanical modeling of these folds have tried to gain a profound understanding of the observed nonlinear phenomena. In this context, the present work uses the nonlinear normal mode theory to investigate the nonlinear modal behavior of 16 subjects using a two-mass mechanical modeling of the vocal folds. The free response of the conservative system at different energy levels is considered to assess the impact of the structural nonlinearity of the vocal fold tissues. The results show very interesting and complex nonlinear phenomena including frequency-energy dependence, subharmonic regimes and, in some cases, modal interactions, entrainment and bifurcations. PMID:23218815

  17. Vibrational mode mediated electron transport in molecular transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamore, Deborah; Lambert, Neill; Nori, Franco

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the steady-state electronic transport through a suspended dimer molecule coupled to leads. When strongly coupled to a vibrational mode, the electron transport is enhanced at the phonon resonant frequency and higher-order resonances. The temperature and bias determines the nature of the phonon-assisted resonances, with clear absorption and emission peaks. The strong coupling also induces a Frank-Condon-like blockade, suppressing the current between the resonances. We compare an analytical polaron transformation method to two exact numerical methods: the Hierarchy equations of motion and an exact diagonalization in the Fock basis. In the steady-state, our two numerical results are an exact match and qualitatively reflect the main features of the polaron treatment. Our results also indicate the possibility of compensating the current decrease due to the thermal environment.

  18. Active Blade Vibration Control Being Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines are currently being designed to have increased performance, lower weight and manufacturing costs, and higher reliability. Consequently, turbomachinery components, such as turbine and compressor blades, have designs that are susceptible to new vibration problems and eventual in-service failure due to high-cycle fatigue. To address this problem, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing and testing innovative active blade vibration control concepts. Preliminary results of using an active blade vibration control system, involving a rotor supported by an active magnetic bearing in Glenn's Dynamic Spin Rig, indicate promising results (see the photograph). Active blade vibration control was achieved using feedback of blade strain gauge signals within the magnetic bearing control loop. The vibration amplitude was reduced substantially (see the graphs). Also, vibration amplitude amplification was demonstrated; this could be used to enhance structural mode identification, if desired. These results were for a nonrotating two-bladed disk. Tests for rotating blades are planned. Current and future active blade vibration control research is planned to use a fully magnetically suspended rotor and smart materials. For the fully magnetically suspended rotor work, three magnetic bearings (two radial and one axial) will be used as actuators instead of one magnetic bearing. This will allow additional degrees of freedom to be used for control. For the smart materials work, control effectors located on and off the blade will be considered. Piezoelectric materials will be considered for on-the-blade actuation, and actuator placement on a stator vane, or other nearby structure, will be investigated for off-the-blade actuation. Initial work will focus on determining the feasibility of these methods by performing basic analysis and simple experiments involving feedback control.

  19. Active Inertial Vibration Isolators And Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren; Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Report describes development of active inertial vibration isolators and dampers in which actuators electromagnet coils moving linearly within permanent magnetic fields in housings, somewhat as though massive, low-frequency voice coils in loudspeakers. Discusses principle of operation, electrical and mechanical considerations in design of actuators, characteristics of accelerometers, and frequency responses of control systems. Describes design and performance of one- and three-degree-of-freedom vibration-suppressing system based on concept.

  20. Active Piezoelectric Vibration Control of Subscale Composite Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Min, James B.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program, researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are investigating new technologies supporting the development of lighter, quieter, and more efficient fans for turbomachinery applications. High performance fan blades designed to achieve such goals will be subjected to higher levels of aerodynamic excitations which could lead to more serious and complex vibration problems. Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing engine blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. To investigate this idea, spin testing was performed on two General Electric Aviation (GE) subscale composite fan blades in the NASA GRC Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. The first bending mode (1B) was targeted for vibration control. Because these subscale blades are very thin, the piezoelectric material was surface-mounted on the blades. Three thin piezoelectric patches were applied to each blade two actuator patches and one small sensor patch. These flexible macro-fiber-composite patches were placed in a location of high resonant strain for the 1B mode. The blades were tested up to 5000 rpm, with patches used as sensors, as excitation for the blade, and as part of open- and closed-loop vibration control. Results show that with a single actuator patch, active vibration control causes the damping ratio to increase from a baseline of 0.3% critical damping to about 1.0% damping at 0 RPM. As the rotor speed approaches 5000 RPM, the actively controlled blade damping ratio decreases to about 0.5% damping. This occurs primarily because of centrifugal blade stiffening, and can be observed by the decrease in the generalized electromechanical coupling with rotor speed.

  1. Experimental and simulation characterisation of flexural vibration modes in unimorph ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, T J R; Ramadas, S N; Dixon, S M

    2016-02-01

    A unimorph flexural transducer design is proposed and tested with regard to mode shapes and frequencies. The transducers consist of a passive metal cap structure, and a thin piezoelectric disc, rigidly bonded to the inside. Extensive finite element (FE) modelling, and experimental 2D, time-resolved displacement measurements were done to characterise the transducers flexural properties, and to compare them to the analytical solutions of thin vibrating plates. Emphasis was put on characterising the passive layer of the unimorph structure, before bonding the piezoelectric element, to understand how the active element affects the behaviour of the flexing plate. A high power Nd:YAG laser was used to actuate the metal plate (non-contact), and the frequency content of the resulting displacement signal was analysed to identify the flexural modes. The non-axisymmetric modes, which are conventionally disregarded because of their unfavourable acoustic properties, were also taken into account. There was excellent agreement between the experimental results and the FE simulation data. There was good agreement with the analytical edge clamped plate model, but with some notable deviations, which have not previously been identified or commented upon. Specifically, the second axisymmetric mode is split into three separate modes, which is not explained by the traditional theory of vibrating plates. PMID:26472055

  2. Resonance-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Ring-Involved Vibrational Modes in the (1)B(2u) Absorption Band of Benzene, Including the Kekule Vibrational Modes ν(9) and ν(10).

    PubMed

    Willitsford, Adam H; Chadwick, C Todd; Kurtz, Stewart; Philbrick, C Russell; Hallen, Hans

    2016-02-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy provides much stronger Raman signal levels than its off-resonant counterpart and adds selectivity by excitation tuning. Raman preresonance of benzene has been well studied. On-resonance studies, especially at phonon-allowed absorptions, have received less attention. In this case, we observe resonance of many of the vibration modes associated motion of the carbons in the ring while tuning over the (1)B2u absorption, including the related ν9 (CC stretch Herzberg notation, ν14 Wilson notation) and ν10 (CH-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν15 Wilson notation) vibrational modes along with the ν2 (CC-stretch or ring-breathing Herzberg notation, ν1 Wilson notation) mode and multiples of the ν18 (CCC-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν6 Wilson notation) vibrational mode. The ring-breathing mode is found to mix with the b2u modes creating higher frequency composites. Through the use of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to tune through the (1)B2u absorption band of liquid benzene, a stiffening (increase in energy) of the vibrational modes is observed as the excitation wavelength nears the (1)B2u absorption peak of the isolated molecule (vapor) phase. The strongest resonance amplitude observed is in the 2 × ν18 (e2g) mode, with nearly twice the intensity of the ring-breathing mode, ν2. Several overtones and combination modes, especially with ν2 (a1g), are also observed to resonate. Raman resonances on phonon-allowed excitations are narrow and permit the measurement of vibrations not Raman-active in the ground state. PMID:26731431

  3. A Dynamic Absorber With Active Vibration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.-J.; Lian, R.-J.

    1994-12-01

    The design and construction of a dynamic absorber incorporating active vibration control is described. The absorber is a two-degrees-of-freedom spring — lumped mass system sliding on a guide pillar, with two internal vibration disturbance sources. Both the main mass and the secondary absorber mass are acted on by DC servo motors, respectively, to suppress the vibration amplitude. The state variable technique is used to model this dynamic system and a decoupling PID control method is used. First, the discrete time state space model is identified by using the commercial software MATLAB. Then the decoupling controller of this multi-input/multi-output system is derived from the identified model. Finally the results of some experiments are presented. The experimental results show that the system is effective in suppressing vibration. Also, the performance of this control strategy for position tracking control is evaluated based on experimental data.

  4. Dielectric elastomers for active vibration control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, S.; Kaal, W.; Melz, T.

    2011-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DE) have proved to have high potential for smart actuator applications in many laboratory setups and also in first commercially available components. Because of their large deformation capability and the inherent fast response to external stimulation they proffer themselves to applications in the field of active vibration control, especially for lightweight structures. These structures typically tend to vibrate with large amplitudes even at low excitation forces. Here, DE actuators seem to be ideal components for setting up control loops to suppress unwanted vibrations. Due to the underlying physical effect DE actuators are generally non-linear elements with an approximately quadratic relationship between in- and output. Consequently, they automatically produce higher-order frequencies. This can cause harmful effects for vibration control on structures with high modal density. Therefore, a linearization technique is required to minimize parasitic effects. This paper shows and quantifies the nonlinearity of a commercial DE actuator and demonstrates the negative effects it can have in technical applications. For this purpose, two linearization methods are developed. Subsequently, the actuator is used to implement active vibration control for two different mechanical systems. In the first case a concentrated mass is driven with the controlled actuator resulting in a tunable oscillator. In the second case a more complex mechanical structure with multiple resonances is used. Different control approaches are applied likewise and their impact on the whole system is demonstrated. Thus, the potential of DE actuators for vibration control applications is highlighted.

  5. Nonresonant and resonant mode-specific intermolecular vibrational energy transfers in electrolyte aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hongtao; Chen, Hailong; Li, Jiebo; Wen, Xiewen; Zheng, Junrong

    2011-10-27

    The donor/acceptor energy mismatch and vibrational coupling strength dependences of interionic vibrational energy transfer kinetics in electrolyte aqueous solutions were investigated with ultrafast multiple-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy. An analytical equation derived from the Fermi's Golden rule that correlates molecular structural parameters and vibrational energy transfer kinetics was found to be able to describe the intermolecular mode specific vibrational energy transfer. Under the assumption of the dipole-dipole approximation, the distance between anions in the aqueous solutions was obtained from the vibrational energy transfer measurements, confirmed with measurements on the corresponding crystalline samples. The result demonstrates that the mode-specific vibrational energy transfer method holds promise as an angstrom molecular ruler. PMID:21916443

  6. Characterizing Anharmonic Vibrational Modes of Quinones with Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cyran, Jenée D; Nite, Jacob M; Krummel, Amber T

    2015-07-23

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy was used to study the vibrational modes of three quinones--benzoquinone, naphthoquinone, and anthraquinone. The vibrations of interest were in the spectral range of 1560-1710 cm(-1), corresponding to the in-plane carbonyl and ring stretching vibrations. Coupling between the vibrational modes is indicated by the cross peaks in the 2D IR spectra. The diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicities range from 4.6 to 17.4 cm(-1) for the quinone series. In addition, there is significant vibrational coupling between the in-plane carbonyl and ring stretching vibrations. The diagonal anharmonicity, off-diagonal anharmonicity, and vibrational coupling constants are reported for benzoquinone, naphthoquinone, and anthraquinone. PMID:25697689

  7. Piezoelectric rotational mixer based on a first bending vibration mode.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoaki

    2013-10-01

    We propose a miniature piezoelectric mixer that can rotate a liquid inside a hole of several millimeters diameter. The mixer has dimensions 14 × 14 × 10 mm with a through-hole (7 mm), and piezoelectric elements bonded to its four identical sides. When the first bending vibration mode of the mixer is excited by ac voltages, rotational flow of liquid is generated by the rotation of an acoustic field (acoustic streaming) in the through-hole. This technology is useful in automating mixing processes such as the mixing by hand of a few drops of blood in medical testing. In this paper, we verify the driving principle experimentally and examine the characteristics of a prototype mixer, including the induced flow velocity, under changes of the amplitude and frequency of the applied voltages. A plastic test tube, used to prevent contamination, is inserted to the through-hole, and the liquid inside the tube is mixed by rotation of the acoustic field. PMID:24081258

  8. Optimization of new magnetorheological fluid mount for vibration control of start/stop engine mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jye Ung; Phu, Do Xuan; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    The technologies related to saving energy/or green vehicles are actively researched. In this tendency, the problem for reducing exhausted gas is in development with various ways. Those efforts are directly related to the operation of engine which emits exhausted gas. The auto start/stop of vehicle engine when a vehicle stop at road is currently as a main stream of vehicle industry resulting in reducing exhausted gas. However, this technology automatically turns on and off engine frequently. This motion induces vehicle engine to transmit vibration of engine which has large displacement, and torsional impact to chassis. These vibrations causing uncomfortable feeling to passengers are transmitted through the steering wheel and the gear knob. In this work, in order to resolve this vibration issue, a new proposed magnetorheological (MR) fluid based engine mount (MR mount in short) is presented. The proposed MR mount is designed to satisfy large damping force in various frequency ranges. It is shown that the proposed mount can have large damping force and large force ratio which is enough to control unwanted vibrations of engine start/stop mode.

  9. Dissociative electron attachment and vibrational excitation of CF{sub 3}Cl: Effect of two vibrational modes revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Tarana, Michal; Houfek, Karel; Horacek, Jiri; Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2011-11-15

    We present a study of dissociative electron attachment and vibrational excitation processes in electron collisions with the CF{sub 3}Cl molecule. The calculations are based on the two-dimensional nuclear dynamics including the C-Cl symmetric stretch coordinate and the CF{sub 3} symmetric deformation (umbrella) coordinate. The complex potential energy surfaces are calculated using the ab initio R-matrix method. The results for dissociative attachment and vibrational excitation of the umbrella mode agree quite well with experiment whereas the cross section for excitation of the C-Cl symmetric stretch vibrations is about a factor-of-three too low in comparison with experimental data.

  10. Nonlinear normal vibration modes in the dynamics of nonlinear elastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhlin, Yu V.; Perepelkin, N. V.; Klimenko, A. A.; Harutyunyan, E.

    2012-08-01

    Nonlinear normal modes (NNMs) are a generalization of the linear normal vibrations. By the Kauderer-Rosenberg concept in the regime of the NNM all position coordinates are single-values functions of some selected position coordinate. By the Shaw-Pierre concept, the NNM is such a regime when all generalized coordinates and velocities are univalent functions of a couple of dominant (active) phase variables. The NNMs approach is used in some applied problems. In particular, the Kauderer-Rosenberg NNMs are analyzed in the dynamics of some pendulum systems. The NNMs of forced vibrations are investigated in a rotor system with an isotropic-elastic shaft. A combination of the Shaw-Pierre NNMs and the Rauscher method is used to construct the forced NNMs and the frequency responses in the rotor dynamics.

  11. Experimental Study of Flexible Plate Vibration Control by Using Two-Loop Sliding Mode Control Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingyu; Lin, Jiahui; Liu, Yuejun; Yang, Kang; Zhou, Lanwei; Chen, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that intelligent control theory has been used in many research fields, novel modeling method (DROMM) is used for flexible rectangular active vibration control, and then the validity of new model is confirmed by comparing finite element model with new model. In this paper, taking advantage of the dynamics of flexible rectangular plate, a two-loop sliding mode (TSM) MIMO approach is introduced for designing multiple-input multiple-output continuous vibration control system, which can overcome uncertainties, disturbances or unstable dynamics. An illustrative example is given in order to show the feasibility of the method. Numerical simulations and experiment confirm the effectiveness of the proposed TSM MIMO controller.

  12. Quantifying Ant Activity Using Vibration Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Oberst, Sebastian; Baro, Enrique Nava; Lai, Joseph C. S.; Evans, Theodore A.

    2014-01-01

    Ant behaviour is of great interest due to their sociality. Ant behaviour is typically observed visually, however there are many circumstances where visual observation is not possible. It may be possible to assess ant behaviour using vibration signals produced by their physical movement. We demonstrate through a series of bioassays with different stimuli that the level of activity of meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus) can be quantified using vibrations, corresponding to observations with video. We found that ants exposed to physical shaking produced the highest average vibration amplitudes followed by ants with stones to drag, then ants with neighbours, illuminated ants and ants in darkness. In addition, we devised a novel method based on wavelet decomposition to separate the vibration signal owing to the initial ant behaviour from the substrate response, which will allow signals recorded from different substrates to be compared directly. Our results indicate the potential to use vibration signals to classify some ant behaviours in situations where visual observation could be difficult. PMID:24658467

  13. Surveillance and diagnostics of the beam mode vibrations of the Ringhals PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, C. M.; Pazsit, I.; Nylen, H.

    2012-07-01

    Surveillance of core barrel vibrations has been performed in the Swedish Ringhals PWRs for several years. This surveillance is focused mainly on the pendular motion of the core barrel, which is known as the beam mode. The monitoring of the beam mode has suggested that its amplitude increases along the cycle and decreases after refuelling. In the last 5 years several measurements have been taken in order to understand this behaviour. Besides, a non-linear fitting procedure has been implemented in order to better distinguish the different components of vibration. By using this fitting procedure, two modes of vibration have been identified in the frequency range of the beam mode. Several results coming from the trend analysis performed during these years indicate that one of the modes is due to the core barrel motion itself and the other is due to the individual flow induced vibrations of the fuel elements. In this work, the latest results of this monitoring are presented. (authors)

  14. Thermal conductance associated with six types of vibration modes in quantum wire modulated with quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Xin-Jun; Chen, Li-Qun; Li, Jian-Bo; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Zhang, Gui; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2014-06-01

    We study the ballistic phonon transport and thermal conductance of six low-lying vibration modes in quantum wire modulated with quantum dot at low temperatures. A comparative analysis is made among the six vibrational modes. The results show that the transmission rates of the six vibrational modes relative to reduced frequency display periodic or quasi-periodic oscillatory behavior. Among the four acoustic modes, the thermal conductance contributed by the torsional mode is the smallest, and the thermal conductances of other acoustic modes have adjacent values. It is also found that the thermal conductance of the optical mode increases from zero monotonously. Moreover, the total thermal conductance in concavity-shaped quantum structure is lower than that in convexity-shaped quantum structure. These thermal conductance values can be adjusted by changing the structural parameters of the quantum dot.

  15. Ultrafast redistribution of vibrational energy after excitation of NH stretching modes in DNA oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozich, V.; Szyc, Ł.; Nibbering, E. T. J.; Werncke, W.; Elsaesser, T.

    2009-04-01

    Vibrational relaxation after spectrally selective excitation within the NH stretching band of adenine-thymine base pairs in DNA oligomers was studied by subpicosecond infrared-pump/anti-Stokes Raman-probe spectroscopy. The decay of the different NH stretching vibrations populates distinct accepting modes in the NH bending range with a rise time of 0.6 ps that is close to the NH stretching decay times. The population of thymine fingerprint modes after excitation of the adenine antisymmetric NH 2 stretching mode points to an ultrafast excitation transfer to the thymine NH stretching vibration before relaxation. The nonequilibrium fingerprint populations decay on a time scale of several picoseconds.

  16. Longitudinal–torsional vibration source consisting of two transducers with different vibration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2016-07-01

    The planar vibration locus is applicable to, for example, ultrasonic welding, ultrasonic machining, and ultrasonic polishing. In a previous study, we obtained the planar locus using an ultrasonic longitudinal–torsional vibration source that contained a vibration converter comprising diagonal slits to drive two frequencies. It was difficult to obtain only longitudinal or torsional vibration when using an ultrasonic complex vibration source with diagonal slits. Therefore, the versatility of the ultrasonic complex vibration source with diagonal slits was low. We have developed an ultrasonic longitudinal–torsional vibration source in which the longitudinal–torsional vibration can be controlled. The requirements for an ultrasonic vibration source were longitudinal–torsional vibration control and that the source has a planar locus. In this paper, we investigate a new type of vibration source that satisfies these requirements. It consists of two transducers, a longitudinal transducer and a torsional transducer, attached to the ends of a uniform rod with a length of one wavelength of the propagating vibration.

  17. Optimal active vibration absorber - Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  18. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  19. Contribution of Multiple Vibration Modes to Chaotic Vibrations of a Post-buckled Beam with an Axial Elastic Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Shinichi; Nagai, Ken-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Takao; Hoshi, Kazuaki

    Analytical results are presented on contribution of multiple modes of vibration to chaotic responses of a post-buckled clamped beam constrained by an axial spring. Introducing the mode shape function proposed by the senior author and applying the Galerkin procedure to the governing equation of the beam, a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations in amultiple-degree-of-freedom system is obtained. Chaotic time responses are integrated numerically. Responses of the beam subjected to periodic lateral acceleration are investigated by comparing with the relevant experimental results. Dominant chaotic responses are generated within the frequency ranges of the subharmonic resonance of 1/2 and 1/3 orders. The maximum Lyapunov exponent of the chaotic response corresponding to the sub-harmonic resonance of 1/2 order is greater than that of the chaos with the sub-harmonic resonance of 1/3 order. The analytical results of the chaotic responses have remarkable agreement with that of the experimental results. The Lyapunov dimension and the Poincaré projection of the chaotic responses predict that more than three modes of vibration contribute to the chaos based on the calculation from the equation of multiple-degree-of-freedom system. The principal component analysis shows that the lowest vibration mode contributes dominantly. Higher modes of vibration contribute to the chaos with small amount of amplitude.

  20. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Lovrincic, Robert; Yu, Xi; Selig, Oleg; Bakker, Huib J.; Rezus, Yves L. A.; Nayak, Pabitra K.; Fonari, Alexandr; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Cahen, David

    2015-08-01

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500-1,700 cm-1 region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron-phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials.

  1. Calculation of vibration mode and its experimental study in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Junwei; Sun, Weishen; Xing, Chunjing

    1992-05-01

    A method for the calculation of vibration mode in rocket motors is presented, and a corresponding program is worked out. Values calculated with this program are consistent with theoretical and experimental results, indicating that the program is soundly based. A new type of vibration excitation apparatus-turbo vibration exciter is also introduced and used for determination of natural frequency of acoustic cavities and of acoustic damping coefficients of motor.

  2. Vibration Mode Observation of Piezoelectric Disk-type Resonator by High Frequency Laser Doppler Vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Esashi, Masayoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    For future mobile phones based on cognitive radio technology, a compact multi-band RF front-end architecture is strongly required and an integrated multi-band RF filter bank is a key component in it. Contour-mode resonators are receiving increased attention for a multi-band filter solution, because its resonant frequency is mainly determined by its size and shape, which are defined by lithography. However, spurious responses including flexural vibration are also excited due to its thin structure. To improve resonator performance and suppress spurious modes, visual observation with a laser probe system is very effective. In this paper, we have prototyped a mechanically-coupled disk-array filter, which consists of a Si disk and 2 disk-type resonators of higher-order wine-glass mode, and observed its vibration modes using a high-frequency laser-Doppler vibrometer (UHF-120, Polytec, Inc.). As a result, it was confirmed that higher order wine-glass mode vibration included a compound displacement, and that its out-of-plane vibration amplitude was much smaller than other flexural spurious modes. The observed vibration modes were compared with FEM (Finite Element Method) simulation results. In addition, it was also confirmed that the fabrication error, e.g. miss-alignment, induced asymmetric vibration.

  3. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  4. Frequency Response of the Sample Vibration Mode in Scanning Probe Acoustic Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ya-Jun; Cheng, Qian; Qian, Meng-Lu

    2010-05-01

    Based on the interaction mechanism between tip and sample in the contact mode of a scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM), an active mass of the sample is introduced in the mass-spring model. The tip motion and frequency response of the sample vibration mode in the SPAM are calculated by the Lagrange equation with dissipation function. For the silicon tip and glass assemblage in the SPAM the frequency response is simulated and it is in agreement with the experimental result. The living myoblast cells on the glass slide are imaged at resonance frequencies of the SPAM system, which are 20kHz, 30kHz and 120kHz. It is shown that good contrast of SPAM images could be obtained when the system is operated at the resonance frequencies of the system in high and low-frequency regions.

  5. Active control of vibration transmission through struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinescu, Ion; Balachandran, Balakumar

    1998-07-01

    In this work, analytical investigations into active control of longitudinal and flexural vibrations transmitted through a cylindrical strut are conducted. A mechanics based model for a strut fitted with a piezoelectric actuator is developed. For harmonic disturbances, a linear dynamic formulation describing the motion of the actuator is integrated with the formulation describing wave transmission through the strut, and the resulting system is studied in the frequency domain. Open-loop studies are conducted with the aid of numerical simulations, and the potential of active control schemes to attenuate the transmitted vibrations over the frequency range of 10 Hz to 6000 Hz is examined. The relevance of the current work to control of helicopter cabin interior noise is also discussed.

  6. Voltage tuning of vibrational mode energies in single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yajing; Doak, Peter; Kronik, Leeor; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Natelson, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Vibrational modes of molecules are fundamental properties determined by intramolecular bonding, atomic masses, and molecular geometry, and often serve as important channels for dissipation in nanoscale processes. Although single-molecule junctions have been used to manipulate electronic structure and related functional properties of molecules, electrical control of vibrational mode energies has remained elusive. Here we use simultaneous transport and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements to demonstrate large, reversible, voltage-driven shifts of vibrational mode energies of C60 molecules in gold junctions. C60 mode energies are found to vary approximately quadratically with bias, but in a manner inconsistent with a simple vibrational Stark effect. Our theoretical model instead suggests that the mode shifts are a signature of bias-driven addition of electronic charge to the molecule. These results imply that voltage-controlled tuning of vibrational modes is a general phenomenon at metal–molecule interfaces and is a means of achieving significant shifts in vibrational energies relative to a pure Stark effect. PMID:24474749

  7. Vibration control of cylindrical shells using active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Manas C.; Chen, Tung-Huei; Baz, Amr M.

    1997-05-01

    The fundamentals of controlling the structural vibration of cylindrical shells treated with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments are presented. The effectiveness of the ACLD treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. The FEM is used to predict the natural frequencies and the modal loss factors of shells which are partially treated with patches of the ACLD treatments. The predictions of the FEM are validated experimentally using stainless steel cylinders which are 20.32 cm in diameter, 30.4 cm in length and 0.05 cm in thickness. The cylinders are treated with ACLD patches of different configurations in order to target single or multi-modes of lobar vibrations. The ACLD patches used are made of DYAD 606 visco-elastic layer which is sandwiched between two layers of PVDF piezo-electric films. Vibration attenuations of 85% are obtained with maximum control voltage of 40 volts. Such attenuations are attributed to the effectiveness of the ACLD treatment in increasing the modal damping ratios by about a factor of four over those of conventional passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatments. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  8. Vibrational Control of Bimolecular Reactions with Methane by Mode, Bond, and Stereo Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kopin

    2016-05-27

    Vibrational motions of a polyatomic molecule are multifold and can be as simple as stretches or bends or as complex as concerted motions of many atoms. Different modes of excitation often possess different capacities in driving a bimolecular chemical reaction, with distinct dynamic outcomes. Reactions with vibrationally excited methane and its isotopologs serve as a benchmark for advancing our fundamental understanding of polyatomic reaction dynamics. Here, some recent progress in this area is briefly reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the key concepts developed from those studies. The interconnections among mode and bond selectivity, Polanyi's rules, and newly introduced vibrational-induced steric phenomena are highlighted. PMID:26980310

  9. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibration of complex structures. Volume 3: Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibrations of beams using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shen, Mo-How

    1987-01-01

    Multiple-mode nonlinear forced vibration of a beam was analyzed by the finite element method. Inplane (longitudinal) displacement and inertia (IDI) are considered in the formulation. By combining the finite element method and nonlinear theory, more realistic models of structural response are obtained more easily and faster.

  10. Minimizing the Excitation of Parasitic Modes of Vibration in Slender Power Ultrasonic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieson, A.; Lucas, M.

    The design of slender power ultrasonic devices can often be challenging due to the excitation of parasitic modes of vibration during operation. The excitation of these modes is known to manifest from behaviors such as modal coupling which if not controlled or designed out of the system can, under operational conditions, lead to poor device performance and device failure. However, a report published by the authors has indicted that the excitation of these modes of vibration could be minimized through device design, specifically careful location of the piezoceramic stack. This paper illustrates that it is possible, through piezoceramic stack position, to minimize modal coupling between a parasitic mode and the tuned longitudinal mode of vibration for slender ultrasonic devices.

  11. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2015-12-15

    The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  12. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  13. Active isolation of vibrations with adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guigou, C.; Fuller, C. R.; Wagstaff, P. R.

    1991-01-01

    Vibration transmission in structures is controlled by means of a technique which employs distributed arrays of piezoelectric transducers bonded to the supporting structure. Distributed PVDF piezoelectric strips are employed as error sensors, and a two-channel feedforward adaptive LMS algorithm is used for minimizing error signals and thereby controlling the structure. A harmonic force input excites a thick plate, and a receiving plate is configured with three pairs of piezoelectric actuators. Modal analyses are performed to determine the resonant frequencies of the system, and a scanning laser vibrometer is used to study the shape of the response of the receiving plate during excitation with and without the control algorithm. Efficient active isolation of the vibrations is achieved with modal suppression, and good control is noted in the on-resonance cases in which increased numbers of PVDF sensors and piezoelectric actuators are employed.

  14. Energy transfer efficiency in the chromophore network strongly coupled to a vibrational mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourokh, Lev G.; Nori, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Using methods from condensed matter and statistical physics, we examine the transport of excitons through the photosynthetic complex from a receiving antenna to a reaction center. Writing the equations of motion for the exciton creation-annihilation operators, we are able to describe the exciton dynamics, even in the regime when the reorganization energy is of the order of the intrasystem couplings. We determine the exciton transfer efficiency in the presence of a quenching field and protein environment. While the majority of the protein vibrational modes are treated as a heat bath, we address the situation when specific modes are strongly coupled to excitons and examine the effects of these modes on the energy transfer efficiency in the steady-state regime. Using the structural parameters of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex, we find that, for vibrational frequencies below 16 meV, the exciton transfer is drastically suppressed. We attribute this effect to the formation of a "mixed exciton-vibrational mode" where the exciton is transferred back and forth between the two pigments with the absorption or emission of vibrational quanta, instead of proceeding to the reaction center. The same effect suppresses the quantum beating at the vibrational frequency of 25 meV. We also show that the efficiency of the energy transfer can be enhanced when the vibrational mode strongly couples to the third pigment only, instead of coupling to the entire system.

  15. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    PubMed

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions. PMID:27004879

  16. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2016-03-01

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  17. Generation of three-mode nonclassical vibrational states of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Ba An; Truong Minh Duc

    2002-12-01

    We propose using eight lasers with appropriate orientations and conditions to generate stable trio coherent states of an ion in a three-dimensional isotropic trap. Seven lasers whose orientations are important should be detuned to the third lower sideband of the ion vibrational motion. The eighth laser whose direction is not important should be in resonance with the ionic transition.

  18. A Pictorial Visualization of Normal Mode Vibrations of the Fullerene (C[subscript 60]) Molecule in Terms of Vibrations of a Hollow Sphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Janette L.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the normal mode vibrations of a molecule is important in the analysis of vibrational spectra. However, the complicated 3D motion of large molecules can be difficult to interpret. We show how images of normal modes of the fullerene molecule C[subscript 60] can be made easier to understand by superimposing them on images of the normal…

  19. Experimental investigation of active machine tool vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, J.; Liang, Chen; Geng, Zheng J.

    1996-05-01

    The successful vibration reduction of machine tools during machining process can improve productivity, increase quality, and reduce tool wear. This paper will present our initial investigation in the application of smart material technologies in machine tool vibration control using magnetostrictive actuators and electrorheological elastomer dampers on an industrial Sheldon horizontal lathe. The dynamics of the machining process are first studied, which reveals the complexity in the machine tool vibration response and the challenge to the active control techniques. The active control experiment shows encouraging results. The use of electrorheological elastomer damping device for active/passive vibration control provides significant vibration reduction in the high frequency range and great improvement in the workpiece surface finishing. The research presented in this paper demonstrates that the combination of active and active/passive vibration control techniques is very promising for successful machine tool vibration control.

  20. On the benefits of localized modes in anharmonic vibrational calculations for small molecules.

    PubMed

    Panek, Paweł T; Jacob, Christoph R

    2016-04-28

    Anharmonic vibrational calculations can already be computationally demanding for relatively small molecules. The main bottlenecks lie in the construction of the potential energy surface and in the size of the excitation space in the vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations. To address these challenges, we use localized-mode coordinates to construct potential energy surfaces and perform vibrational self-consistent field and L-VCI calculations [P. T. Panek and C. R. Jacob, ChemPhysChem 15, 3365 (2014)] for all vibrational modes of two prototypical test cases, the ethene and furan molecules. We find that the mutual coupling between modes is reduced when switching from normal-mode coordinates to localized-mode coordinates. When using such localized-mode coordinates, we observe a faster convergence of the n-mode expansion of the potential energy surface. This makes it possible to neglect higher-order contributions in the n-mode expansion of the potential energy surface or to approximate higher-order contributions in hybrid potential energy surfaces, which reduced the computational effort for the construction of the anharmonic potential energy surface significantly. Moreover, we find that when using localized-mode coordinates, the convergence with respect to the VCI excitation space proceeds more smoothly and that the error at low orders is reduced significantly. This makes it possible to devise low-cost models for obtaining a first approximation of anharmonic corrections. This demonstrates that the use of localized-mode coordinates can be beneficial already in anharmonic vibrational calculations of small molecules and provides a possible avenue for enabling such accurate calculations also for larger molecules. PMID:27131535

  1. On the benefits of localized modes in anharmonic vibrational calculations for small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, Paweł T.; Jacob, Christoph R.

    2016-04-01

    Anharmonic vibrational calculations can already be computationally demanding for relatively small molecules. The main bottlenecks lie in the construction of the potential energy surface and in the size of the excitation space in the vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations. To address these challenges, we use localized-mode coordinates to construct potential energy surfaces and perform vibrational self-consistent field and L-VCI calculations [P. T. Panek and C. R. Jacob, ChemPhysChem 15, 3365 (2014)] for all vibrational modes of two prototypical test cases, the ethene and furan molecules. We find that the mutual coupling between modes is reduced when switching from normal-mode coordinates to localized-mode coordinates. When using such localized-mode coordinates, we observe a faster convergence of the n-mode expansion of the potential energy surface. This makes it possible to neglect higher-order contributions in the n-mode expansion of the potential energy surface or to approximate higher-order contributions in hybrid potential energy surfaces, which reduced the computational effort for the construction of the anharmonic potential energy surface significantly. Moreover, we find that when using localized-mode coordinates, the convergence with respect to the VCI excitation space proceeds more smoothly and that the error at low orders is reduced significantly. This makes it possible to devise low-cost models for obtaining a first approximation of anharmonic corrections. This demonstrates that the use of localized-mode coordinates can be beneficial already in anharmonic vibrational calculations of small molecules and provides a possible avenue for enabling such accurate calculations also for larger molecules.

  2. Vibrational modes of metal nanoshells and bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kirakosyan, Arman S.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2008-01-01

    We theoretically study the spectrum of radial vibrational modes in composite metal nanostructures such as bimetallic core-shell particles and metal nanoshells with dielectric core in an environment. We calculate frequencies and damping rates of fundamental (breathing) modes for these nanostructures along with those of two higher-order modes. For metal nanoshells, we find that the breathing mode frequency is always lower than the one for solid particles of the same size, while the damping is higher and increases with a reduction in the shell thickness. We identify two regimes that can be characterized as weakly damped and overdamped vibrations in the presence of external medium. For bimetallic particles, we find periodic dependence of frequency and damping rate on the shell thickness with period being determined by the mode number. For both types of nanostructures, the frequency of higher modes is nearly independent of the environment, while the damping rate shows a strong sensitivity to the outside medium. PMID:18647039

  3. Localization of natural modes of vibration in bladed disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendiksen, O. O.; Valero, N. A.

    1987-01-01

    A study is presented of the mode localization phenomenon in imperfect blade-disk and blade-shroud-disk assemblies. The results indicate that unshrouded blades mounted on stiff disks are especially susceptible, and even small blade imperfections within manufacturing tolerances are likely to trigger mode localization. Increasing the interblade coupling by adding shrouds or reducing the disk stiffness greatly reduces the localization susceptiblity, although certain modes may still become localized if the shrouds are free to slip.

  4. Hybrid dampers for active vibration control

    SciTech Connect

    Gordaninejad, F.; Ray, A.

    1994-12-31

    In the present investigation feasibility of using hybrid electrorheological (ER) fluid dampers for active vibration control is examined. Small-scale, three-electrode hybrid dampers were designed and built such that they have two separate compartments to contain a viscous oil and an ER fluid. The results were compared to those obtained using a three-electrode ER fluid damper. It was shown that the use of hybrid ER fluid damper can enhance the damping. It was also found that the bang-bang and linear proportional control algorithms have similar effects on the amplitude-time response obtained from hybrid and ER fluid dampers.

  5. Vibration modes and acoustic noise in a 4-phase switched reluctance motor

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, R.S.; Mottier, F.; Miller, T.J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Acoustic noise in the switched reluctance motor is caused primarily by the deformation of the stator lamination stack. Acoustic noise is most severe when the periodic excitation of the SRM phases excites a natural vibration mode of the stack. The natural vibration modes and frequencies of a 4-phase, 8/6 switched reluctance motor are examined. Structural finite element analysis is used to compute the natural modes and frequencies. Impulse tests on the stator stack verify the calculations and show which modes are excited. Heuristic arguments are developed to predict the operating conditions that will excite the natural modes. Measurement of vibration while the machine is under load shows which operating conditions excite the natural modes and verifies the predictions. An approximate formula is derived to predict the frequency of the fundamental vibration mode in terms of lamination dimensions and material properties. The formula is validated by comparison with finite element calculations for several laminations, and hence is shown to be useful in design trade-off studies.

  6. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control the flexural oscillations of large structures in space is investigated. Flexural oscillations are excited by impulsive loads. The vibratory response can degrade the pointing accuracy of cameras and antennae, and can cause high stresses at structural node points. Piezoelectric actuators have the advantage of exerting localized bending moments. In this way, vibration is controlled without exciting rigid body modes. The actuators are used in collocated sensor/driver pairs to form a feedback control system. The sensor produces a voltage that is proportional to the dynamic stress at the sensor location, and the driver produces a force that is proportional to the voltage applied to it. The analog control system amplifies and phase shifts the sensor signal to produce the voltage signal that is applied to the driver. The feedback control is demonstrated to increase the first mode damping in a cantilever beam by up to 100 percent, depending on the amplifier gain. The damping efficiency of the control system when the piezoelectrics are not optimally positioned at points of high stress in the beam is evaluated.

  7. Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1995-01-01

    Active structural acoustic control is a method in which the control inputs (used to reduce interior noise) are applied directly to a vibrating structural acoustic system. The control concept modeled in this work is the application of in-plane force inputs to piezoceramic patches bonded to the wall of a vibrating cylinder. The cylinder is excited by an exterior noise source -- an acoustic monopole -- located near the outside of the cylinder wall. The goal is to determine the force inputs and sites for the piezoelectric actuators so that (1) the interior noise is effectively damped; (2) the level of vibration of the cylinder shell is not increased; and (3) the power requirements needed to drive the actuators are not excessive. We studied external monopole excitations at two frequencies. A cylinder resonance of 100 Hz, where the interior acoustic field is driven in multiple, off-resonance cylinder cavity modes, and a cylinder resonance of 200 Hz are characterized by both near and off-resonance cylinder vibration modes which couple effectively with a single, dominant, low-order acoustic cavity mode at resonance. Previous work has focused almost exclusively on meeting objective (1) and solving a complex least-squares problem to arrive at an optimal force vector for a given set of actuator sites. In addition, it has been noted that when the cavity mode couples with cylinder vibration modes (our 200 Hz case) control spillover may occur in higher order cylinder shell vibrational modes. How to determine the best set of actuator sites to meet objectives (1)-(3) is the main contribution of our research effort. The selection of the best set of actuator sites from a set of potential sites is done via two metaheuristics -- simulated annealing and tabu search. Each of these metaheuristics partitions the set of potential actuator sites into two disjoint sets: those that are selected to control the noise (on) and those that are not (off). Next, each metaheuristic attempts to

  8. "Good Vibrations": A workshop on oscillations and normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Sara; Carpineti, Marina; Giliberti, Marco; Rigon, Enrico; Stellato, Marco; Tamborini, Marina

    2016-05-01

    We describe some theatrical strategies adopted in a two hour workshop in order to show some meaningful experiments and the underlying useful ideas to describe a secondary school path on oscillations, that develops from harmonic motion to normal modes of oscillations, and makes extensive use of video analysis, data logging, slow motions and applet simulations. Theatre is an extremely useful tool to stimulate motivation starting from positive emotions. That is the reason why the theatrical approach to the presentation of physical themes has been explored by the group "Lo spettacolo della Fisica" (http://spettacolo.fisica.unimi.it) of the Physics Department of University of Milano for the last ten years (Carpineti et al., JCOM, 10 (2011) 1; Nuovo Cimento B, 121 (2006) 901) and has been inserted also in the European FP7 Project TEMI (Teaching Enquiry with Mysteries Incorporated, see http://teachingmysteries.eu/en) which involves 13 different partners coming from 11 European countries, among which the Italian (Milan) group. According to the TEMI guidelines, this workshop has a written script based on emotionally engaging activities of presenting mysteries to be solved while participants have been involved in nice experiments following the developed path.

  9. Finite-Temperature Hydrogen Adsorption/Desorption Thermodynamics Driven by Soft Vibration Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sung-Jae; Lee, Eui-Sup; Yoon, Mina; Yong-Hyun, Kim

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that room-temperature hydrogen storage on nanostructured or porous materials requires enhanced dihydrogen adsorption. In this work we reveal that room-temperature hydrogen storage is possible not only by the enhanced adsorption, but also by making use of the vibrational free energy from soft vibration modes. These modes exist for example in the case of metallo-porphyrin-incorporated graphenes (M-PIGs) with out-of-plane ( buckled ) metal centers. There, the in-plane potential surfaces are flat because of multiple-orbital-coupling between hydrogen molecules and the buckled-metal centers. This study investigates the finite-temperature adsorption/desorption thermodynamics of hydrogen molecules adsorbed on M-PIGs by employing first-principles total energy and vibrational spectrum calculations. Our results suggest that the current design strategy for room-temperature hydrogen storage materials should be modified by explicitly taking finite-temperature vibration thermodynamics into account.

  10. A study of the eigenvectors of the low-frequency vibrational modes in crystalline adenosine via high pressure Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Scott A; Pinnick, David A; Anderson, A

    2014-12-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine at 295 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as adenosine will have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is found to be a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes. Stretching modes which are predominantly internal to the molecule have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Particular interest is paid to the low-frequency (≤150 cm(-1)) modes. Based on the pressure dependence of its logarithmic derivative, a mode near 49 cm(-1) is identified as internal mode. The other modes below 400 cm(-1) have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being either (1) modes which are mainly external, meaning that the molecules of the unit cell vibrate against each other in translational or librational motions (or linear combinations thereof), or (2) torsional or bending modes involving a large number of atoms, mainly within a molecule. The modes above 400 cm(-1) all have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being mainly internal modes. PMID:24127792

  11. Density response of a trapped Fermi gas: A crossover from the pair vibration mode to the Goldstone mode

    SciTech Connect

    Korolyuk, A.; Kinnunen, J. J.; Toermae, P.

    2011-09-15

    We consider the density response of a trapped two-component Fermi gas. Combining the Bogoliubov-deGennes method with the random phase approximation allows the study of both collective and single-particle excitations. Calculating the density response across a wide range of interactions, we observe a crossover from a weakly interacting pair vibration mode to a strongly interacting Goldstone mode. The crossover is associated with a depressed collective mode frequency and an increased damping rate, in agreement with density response experiments performed in strongly interacting atomic gases.

  12. Power enhancing by reversing mode sequence in tuned mass-spring unit attached vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Eun; Kim, Yoon Young

    2013-07-01

    We propose a vibration energy harvester consisting of an auxiliary frequency-tuned mass unit and a piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting unit for enhancing output power. The proposed integrated system is so configured that its out-of-phase mode can appear at the lowest eigenfrequency unlike in the conventional system using a tuned unit. Such an arrangement makes the resulting system distinctive: enhanced output power at or near the target operating frequency and very little eigenfrequency separation, not observed in conventional eigenfrequency-tuned vibration energy harvesters. The power enhancement of the proposed system is theoretically examined with and without tip mass normalization or footprint area normalization.

  13. Efficient vibration mode analysis of aircraft with multiple external store configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, M.

    1988-01-01

    A coupling method for efficient vibration mode analysis of aircraft with multiple external store configurations is presented. A set of low-frequency vibration modes, including rigid-body modes, represent the aircraft. Each external store is represented by its vibration modes with clamped boundary conditions, and by its rigid-body inertial properties. The aircraft modes are obtained from a finite-element model loaded by dummy rigid external stores with fictitious masses. The coupling procedure unloads the dummy stores and loads the actual stores instead. The analytical development is presented, the effects of the fictitious mass magnitudes are discussed, and a numerical example is given for a combat aircraft with external wing stores. Comparison with vibration modes obtained by a direct (full-size) eigensolution shows very accurate coupling results. Once the aircraft and stores data bases are constructed, the computer time for analyzing any external store configuration is two to three orders of magnitude less than that of a direct solution.

  14. Electronic Properties of Si-Hx Vibrational Modes at Si Waveguide Interface.

    PubMed

    Bashouti, Muhammad Y; Yousefi, Peyman; Ristein, Jürgen; Christiansen, Silke H

    2015-10-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in suite with Kelvin probe were conjugated to explore the electronic properties of Si-Hx vibrational modes by developing Si waveguide with large dynamic detection range compared with conventional IR. The Si 2p emission and work-function related to the formation and elimination of Si-Hx bonds at Si surfaces are monitored based on the detection of vibrational mode frequencies. A transition between various Si-Hx bonds and thus related vibrational modes is monitored for which effective momentum transfer could be demonstrated. The combination of the aforementioned methods provides for results that permit a model for the kinetics of hydrogen termination of Si surfaces with time and advanced surface characterizing of hybrid-terminated semiconducting solids. PMID:26722904

  15. A nonlinear multi-mode wideband piezoelectric vibration-based energy harvester using compliant orthoplanar spring

    SciTech Connect

    Dhote, Sharvari Zu, Jean; Zhu, Yang

    2015-04-20

    In this paper, a nonlinear wideband multi-mode piezoelectric vibration-based energy harvester (PVEH) is proposed based on a compliant orthoplanar spring (COPS), which has an advantage of providing multiple vibration modes at relatively low frequencies. The PVEH is made of a tri-leg COPS flexible structure, where three fixed-guided beams are capable of generating strong nonlinear oscillations under certain base excitation. A prototype harvester was fabricated and investigated through both finite-element analysis and experiments. The frequency response shows multiple resonance which corresponds to a hardening type of nonlinear resonance. By adding masses at different locations on the COPS structure, the first three vibration modes are brought close to each other, where the three hardening nonlinear resonances provide a wide bandwidth for the PVEH. The proposed PVEH has enhanced performance of the energy harvester in terms of a wide frequency bandwidth and a high-voltage output under base excitations.

  16. Vibrational mode shapes in Caribbean steelpans. I. Tenor and double second.

    PubMed

    Rossing, T D; Hansen, U J; Hampton, D S

    2000-08-01

    Vibrational mode shapes have been studied in several tenor (soprano range) and double-second (alto range) steelpans by three well-known makers. Normal modes are determined from operating deflection shapes recorded by means of electronic TV holography. Vibrational modes of the various note areas are designated by the number of radial and circumferential nodal lines. Tuners generally tune one mode an octave above the fundamental and, if possible, a third mode is tuned either a twelfth or two octaves above the fundamental. Note dimensions follow an approximate scaling law L=Kf(213), and the larger note areas can be roughly modeled as rectangular plates with simply supported edges. Modal shapes in the skirt correspond to standing bending waves propagating around the ring. PMID:10955647

  17. 2-Chloro- and 2-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxaldehydes: Structures, rotamers, fermi resonance and vibration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenagi, Jayashree; Shettar, Anita; Tonannavar, J.

    2011-09-01

    FT-Infrared (4000-400 cm -1) and NIR-FT-Raman (4000-50 cm -1) spectral measurements have been made for 2-chloro- and 2-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxaldehydes. A DFT vibration analysis at B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) level, valence force-fields and vibrational mode calculations have been performed. Aided by very good agreement between observed and computed vibration spectra, a complete assignment of fundamental vibration modes to the observed absorptions and Raman bands has been proposed. Orientations of the aldehydic group have produced two oblate asymmetric rotamers for each molecule, ON- trans and ON- cis: the ON- trans rotamer being more stable than cis by 3.42 kcal mol -1 for 2-chloro-3-pyridinecarboxaldehyde and 3.68 kcal mol -1 for 2-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxaldehyde. High potential energy barrier ca 14 kcal/mol, induced by steric hindrance, restricts rotamers' population to ON- trans only. It is observed that, in the presence of bromine, C-H stretching modes are pronounced; a missing characteristic ring mode in chlorine's presence shows at 1557 cm -1; the characteristic ring mode at 1051 cm -1 is diminished; a mixed mode near 707 cm -1 is enhanced. Further, an observed doublet near 1696-1666 cm -1 in both IR and Raman spectra is explained on the basis of Fermi resonance between aldehydic carbonyl stretching at 1696 cm -1 and a combination mode of ring stretch near 1059 cm -1 and deformation vibration, 625 cm -1. A strong Raman aldehydic torsional mode at 62 cm -1 is interpreted to correspond to the dominant ON- trans over cis rotamers population.

  18. Synthesis of stiffness and mass matrices from experimental vibration modes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    With highly complex structures, it is sometimes desirable to derive a dynamic model of the system from experimental vibration data. This paper presents algorithms for synthesizing the mass and stiffness matrices from experimentally derived modal data in a way which preserves the physical significance of the individual mass and stiffness elements. The synthesizing procedures allow for the incorporation of other mass and stiffness data, whether empirical or based on the analyst's insight. The mass and stiffness matrices are derived for a cantilever beam example and are compared with those obtained using earlier techniques.

  19. Mode shape combination in a two-dimensional vibration energy harvester through mass loading structural modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpes, Nathan; Abdelkefi, Abdessattar; Abdelmoula, Hichem; Kumar, Prashant; Adler, Jan; Priya, Shashank

    2016-07-01

    Mode shapes in the design of mechanical energy harvesters, as a means of performance increase, have been largely overlooked. Currently, the vast majority of energy harvester designs employ some variation of a single-degree-of-freedom cantilever, and the mode shapes of such beams are well known. This is especially true for the first bending mode, which is almost exclusively the chosen vibration mode for energy harvesting. Two-dimensional beam shapes (those which curve, meander, spiral, etc., in a plane) have recently gained research interest, as they offer freedom to modify the vibration characteristics of the harvester beam for achieving higher power density. In this study, the second bending mode shape of the "Elephant" two-dimensional beam shape is examined, and its interaction with the first bending mode is evaluated. A combinatory mode shape created by using mass loading structural modification to lower the second bending modal frequency was found to interact with the first bending mode. This is possible since the first two bending modes do not share common areas of displacement. The combined mode shape is shown to produce the most power of any of the considered mode shapes.

  20. A magnetic damper for first mode vibration reduction in multimass flexible rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasarda, M. E. F.; Allaire, P. E.; Humphris, R. R.; Barrett, L. E.

    1989-01-01

    Many rotating machines such as compressors, turbines and pumps have long thin shafts with resulting vibration problems, and would benefit from additional damping near the center of the shaft. Magnetic dampers have the potential to be employed in these machines because they can operate in the working fluid environment unlike conventional bearings. An experimental test rig is described which was set up with a long thin shaft and several masses to represent a flexible shaft machine. An active magnetic damper was placed in three locations: near the midspan, near one end disk, and close to the bearing. With typical control parameter settings, the midspan location reduced the first mode vibration 82 percent, the disk location reduced it 75 percent and the bearing location attained a 74 percent reduction. Magnetic damper stiffness and damping values used to obtain these reductions were only a few percent of the bearing stiffness and damping values. A theoretical model of both the rotor and the damper was developed and compared to the measured results. The agreement was good.

  1. CO2 laser photoacoustic spectra and vibrational modes of heroin, morphine and narcotine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, R. L.; Thakur, S. N.; Bhar, G. C.

    2002-09-01

    Heroin, morphine and narcotine are very large molecules having 50, 40 and 53 atoms respectively. Moderately high resolution photoacoustic (PA) spectra have been recorded in 9.6 mum and 10.6 mum regions of CO_2 laser. It is very difficult to assign the modes of vibrations for PA bands by comparison with conventional low resolution IR spectra. The ab initio quantum chemical calculations were used for determining the molecular geometries and normal mode frequencies of vibrations of these molecules for assignments of PA spectra.

  2. The protein irreversible denaturation studied by means of the bending vibrational mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Domenico; Corsaro, Carmelo; Vasi, Cirino; Vasi, Sebastiano; Dugo, Giacomo; Mallamace, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    We study by means of the infrared bending vibrational mode the microscopic mechanisms that are at the base of protein irreversible denaturation. In particular, we follow the thermal evolution of the Amide I and II vibrational modes of lysozyme residuals from ambient temperature toward the temperature of irreversible unfolding. Our results indicate that the thermal changes of the coupling, by means of the hydrogen bond, between hydration water molecules and the different chemical groups of the protein are the main microscopic mechanisms underlying the unfolding process.

  3. Vibrational Spectrum of (CO)2 on Cu(100): Quantum Calculations with 18 Coupled Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzegilenko, Fedor; Bowman, Joel M.; Carter, Stuart; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    We report calculations of the vibrational frequencies of CO dimer on Cu(100) using recently developed vibrational self-consistent field code. Eighteen modes are treated explicitly within three modes coupling representation. Nine symmetry distinct doublets are observed and the corresponding frequencies are computed. The thermally broadened spectrum of the CO-stretch fundamental is calculated at various temperatures. Both the temperature and coverage dependence of both the average CO-stretch frequency and the corresponding line-width are consistent with experimentally observed trends. The document contains no classified information International clearance is needed.

  4. Computation of expectation values from vibrational coupled-cluster at the two-mode coupling level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccante, Alberto; Seidler, Peter; Christiansen, Ove

    2011-04-01

    In this work we show how the vibrational coupled-cluster method at the two-mode coupling level can be used to calculate zero-point vibrational averages of properties. A technique is presented, where any expectation value can be calculated using a single set of Lagrangian multipliers computed solving iteratively a single linear set of equations. Sample calculations are presented which show that the resulting algorithm scales only with the third power of the number of modes, therefore making large systems accessible. Moreover, we present applications to water, pyrrole, and para-nitroaniline.

  5. Active vibration control using mechanical and electrical analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Perez, A.; Hassan, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical-electrical analogous circuit models are widely used in electromechanical system design as they represent the function of a coupled electrical and mechanical system using an equivalent electrical system. This research uses electrical circuits to establish a discussion of simple active vibration control principles using two scenarios: an active vibration isolation system and an active dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using a voice coil motor (VCM) actuator. Active control laws such as gain scheduling are intuitively explained using circuit analysis techniques. Active vibration control approaches are typically constraint by electrical power requirements. The electrical analogous is a fast approach for specifying power requirements on the experimental test platform which is based on a vibration shaker that provides the based excitation required for the single Degree- of-Freedom (1DoF) vibration model under study.

  6. Damping Control of Liquid Container by Swing-type Active Vibration Reducer on Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Masafumi; Taniguchi, Takao

    This paper proposes a damping control of sloshing in a cylindrical container with a swing-type active vibration reducer on a wheeled mobile robot (WMR). The WMR runs along a straight path on a horizontal plane. The container is mounted on the active vibration reducer. A laser displacement sensor is used to observe the liquid level in the container. The container can be tilted in the running direction by the active vibration reducer. A sloshing model is obtained from a spherical pendulum-type sloshing model, which approximately expresses (1, 1)-mode sloshing. The sloshing model is used to design a damping control system. The control system of the active vibration reducer is designed with an inverse model of sloshing and an optimal regulator with a Kalman filter. The WMR is driven by an acceleration pattern designed with an input shaping method. The usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated through simulation and experimental results.

  7. 27 kHz Ultrasonic Complex Vibration Source Using (1, 1) Mode Transverse Vibration Disk with Multiple Transducers of 40 mm Diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Ueoka, Tetsugi; Aoyama, Tohru; Karatsu, Ryohei; Kyuzen, Takafumi

    2007-07-01

    The configurations of a small-diameter 27 kHz ultrasonic complex vibration source using a (1,1)-mode transverse vibration disk with four bolt-clamped Langevin-type piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) transducers (BLTs) 40 mm in diameter is developed and studied. The vibration source is driven using two power amplifier systems and a circular vibration locus is obtained at a welding tip. A vibration amplitude of 8.5 μmp-0 (peak-to-zero value) is obtained at a driving voltage of 50 Vrms.

  8. Observation of sound-induced corneal vibrational modes by optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Akca, B. Imran; Chang, Ernest W.; Kling, Sabine; Ramier, Antoine; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Marcos, Susana; Yun, Seok H.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical stability of the cornea is critical for maintaining its normal shape and refractive function. Here, we report an observation of the mechanical resonance modes of the cornea excited by sound waves and detected by using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography. The cornea in bovine eye globes exhibited three resonance modes in a frequency range of 50-400 Hz. The vibration amplitude of the fundamental mode at 80-120 Hz was ~8 µm at a sound pressure level of 100 dB (2 Pa). Vibrography allows the visualization of the radially symmetric profiles of the resonance modes. A dynamic finite-element analysis supports our observation. PMID:26417503

  9. Optical emission and vibrational modes of uniform pentacene monolayers (*)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui; Tassi, Nancy; Blanchet, Graciela; Pinczuk, Aron

    2006-03-01

    Pentacene monolayers are probed by photoluminescence and resonant Raman spectroscopies below 10K. Monolayers grown on polymeric substrate of poly-alpha-methyl-styrene (PAMS) exhibit high uniformity within micron size clusters. These films show sharp exciton luminescence bands, and the energy of the exciton optical emission displays a red-shift as the average film thickness increases. The large resonance enhancements of Raman scattering intensities enable the measurements of low-lying (40- 200cm-1) optical lattice vibrations from these monolayers. These experiments demonstrate that luminescence and resonant Raman scattering from single pentacene monolayers are venues for probing 2D properties, studies of interface effects, and thin film characterization. (*) Supported primarily by the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Initiative of the National Science Foundation under NSF Award No. CHE-0117752 and by the New York State Office of Science, Technology, and Academic Research (NYSTAR), and by a research grant of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  10. Piezoelectric Power Requirements for Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Matthew C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the power consumption of piezoelectric actuators utilized for active vibration control. Analytical developments and experimental tests show that the maximum power required to control a structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is independent of the dynamics between the piezoelectric actuator and the host structure. The results demonstrate that for a perfectly-controlled system, the power consumption is a function of the quantity and type of piezoelectric actuators and the voltage and frequency of the control law output signal. Furthermore, as control effectiveness decreases, the power consumption of the piezoelectric actuators decreases. In addition, experimental results revealed a non-linear behavior in the material properties of piezoelectric actuators. The material non- linearity displayed a significant increase in capacitance with an increase in excitation voltage. Tests show that if the non-linearity of the capacitance was accounted for, a conservative estimate of the power can easily be determined.

  11. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  12. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Lovrincic, Robert; Yu, Xi; Selig, Oleg; Bakker, Huib J.; Rezus, Yves L. A.; Nayak, Pabitra K.; Fonari, Alexandr; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Cahen, David

    2015-01-01

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500–1,700 cm−1 region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron–phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials. PMID:26246039

  13. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Bakulin, Artem A; Lovrincic, Robert; Yu, Xi; Selig, Oleg; Bakker, Huib J; Rezus, Yves L A; Nayak, Pabitra K; Fonari, Alexandr; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Cahen, David

    2015-01-01

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500-1,700 cm(-1) region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron-phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials. PMID:26246039

  14. Quantum dynamics and spectra of vibrational Raman-resonance fluorescence in a two-mode cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Sete, Eyob A.; Liu, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    We study the classically driven two-level system with its center-of-mass motion vibrating in a harmonic trap and coupled to the photons in a two-mode cavity. The first mode is resonant to the driving field and an electronic transition. The second mode is off-resonant, forming a vibrational-assisted Raman transition. Using an exact numerical method, we investigate the quantum dynamics of the light emitted by the atom and the cavity modes. We analyze and compare the corresponding atomic and intracavity photon spectra for a range of the driving laser field and the cavity coupling strengths. The results provide better understanding of the effects of the laser field and atom-cavity coupling strengths on quantum interference effects and photon blockade, particularly the Mollow's triplet and the Autler-Townes splitting in the good and bad cavity limits.

  15. Statistics and Properties of Low-Frequency Vibrational Modes in Structural Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Edan; Düring, Gustavo; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-07-01

    Low-frequency vibrational modes play a central role in determining various basic properties of glasses, yet their statistical and mechanical properties are not fully understood. Using extensive numerical simulations of several model glasses in three dimensions, we show that in systems of linear size L sufficiently smaller than a crossover size LD, the low-frequency tail of the density of states follows D (ω )˜ω4 up to the vicinity of the lowest Goldstone mode frequency. We find that the sample-to-sample statistics of the minimal vibrational frequency in systems of size L modes are spatially quasilocalized and that their localization and associated quartic anharmonicity are largely frequency independent. The effect of preparation protocols on the low-frequency modes is elucidated, and a number of glassy length scales are briefly discussed.

  16. Phonon Transport at Crystalline Si/Ge Interfaces: The Role of Interfacial Modes of Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordiz, Kiarash; Henry, Asegun

    2016-03-01

    We studied the modal contributions to heat conduction at crystalline Si and crystalline Ge interfaces and found that more than 15% of the interface conductance arises from less than 0.1% of the modes in the structure. Using the recently developed interface conductance modal analysis (ICMA) method along with a new complimentary methodology, we mapped the correlations between modes, which revealed that a small group of interfacial modes, which exist between 12–13 THz, exhibit extremely strong correlation with other modes in the system. It is found that these interfacial modes (e.g., modes with large eigen vectors for interfacial atoms) are enabled by the degree of anharmonicity near the interface, which is higher than in the bulk, and therefore allows this small group of modes to couple to all others. The analysis sheds light on the nature of localized vibrations at interfaces and can be enlightening for other investigations of localization.

  17. Phonon Transport at Crystalline Si/Ge Interfaces: The Role of Interfacial Modes of Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Gordiz, Kiarash; Henry, Asegun

    2016-01-01

    We studied the modal contributions to heat conduction at crystalline Si and crystalline Ge interfaces and found that more than 15% of the interface conductance arises from less than 0.1% of the modes in the structure. Using the recently developed interface conductance modal analysis (ICMA) method along with a new complimentary methodology, we mapped the correlations between modes, which revealed that a small group of interfacial modes, which exist between 12–13 THz, exhibit extremely strong correlation with other modes in the system. It is found that these interfacial modes (e.g., modes with large eigen vectors for interfacial atoms) are enabled by the degree of anharmonicity near the interface, which is higher than in the bulk, and therefore allows this small group of modes to couple to all others. The analysis sheds light on the nature of localized vibrations at interfaces and can be enlightening for other investigations of localization. PMID:26979787

  18. Phonon Transport at Crystalline Si/Ge Interfaces: The Role of Interfacial Modes of Vibration.

    PubMed

    Gordiz, Kiarash; Henry, Asegun

    2016-01-01

    We studied the modal contributions to heat conduction at crystalline Si and crystalline Ge interfaces and found that more than 15% of the interface conductance arises from less than 0.1% of the modes in the structure. Using the recently developed interface conductance modal analysis (ICMA) method along with a new complimentary methodology, we mapped the correlations between modes, which revealed that a small group of interfacial modes, which exist between 12-13 THz, exhibit extremely strong correlation with other modes in the system. It is found that these interfacial modes (e.g., modes with large eigen vectors for interfacial atoms) are enabled by the degree of anharmonicity near the interface, which is higher than in the bulk, and therefore allows this small group of modes to couple to all others. The analysis sheds light on the nature of localized vibrations at interfaces and can be enlightening for other investigations of localization. PMID:26979787

  19. Local vibrational modes of Se-H complexes in AlSb

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, M.D.; Hsu, L.; Haller, E.E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Becla, P.

    1996-09-01

    Using infrared spectroscopy the authors have observed local vibrational modes (LVMs) arising from Se-H complexes in AlSb. At liquid-helium temperatures, hydrogenated AlSb:Se samples have three stretch mode peaks at 1,606.3, 1,608.6, and 1,615.7 cm{sup {minus}1}, whereas deuterated samples have only one peak at 1,173.4 cm{sup {minus}1}. The anomalous splitting of the se-H stretch mode may be explained by a resonance between the stretch mode and two multi-phonon modes. As the temperature or pressure is increased, the stretch mode and multi-phonon modes show anti-crossing behavior.

  20. Raman investigation of ro-vibrational modes of interstitial H2 in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, S. G.; Lavrov, E. V.; Weber, J.

    2012-08-01

    A Raman scattering study of ro-vibrational transitions Q(J) of the interstitial H2 in Si is presented. It is shown that the Q(2) mode of para hydrogen is coupled to the TAX phonon of Si. The mode appears in the spectra at temperatures above 200 K. The results presented also suggest that the Q(3) transition of ortho hydrogen is resonantly coupled to the OΓ phonon.

  1. Calculations of lattice vibrational mode lifetimes using Jazz: a Python wrapper for LAMMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Wang, H.; Daw, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    Jazz is a new python wrapper for LAMMPS [1], implemented to calculate the lifetimes of vibrational normal modes based on forces as calculated for any interatomic potential available in that package. The anharmonic character of the normal modes is analyzed via the Monte Carlo-based moments approximation as is described in Gao and Daw [2]. It is distributed as open-source software and can be downloaded from the website http://jazz.sourceforge.net/.

  2. Improved orthogonality check for measured modes. [from ground vibration testing of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method is proposed for performing an orthogonality check for normal modes derived from ground vibration testing. The method utilizes partitioned mass and stiffness matrices for a linear undamped representation of a structure. The normalization of the modes by the proposed method inherently includes the effects of significant displacements which were not measured; and the method may allow the use of fewer measurement points than would be necessary with the conventional method.

  3. Vibrationally highly excited molecules and intramolecular mode coupling through high-overtone spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.S.; Moore, C.B.

    1981-08-01

    High overtone spectra of organic molecules can be interpreted using the local mode model for absorptions by the inequivalent C-H bonds. The spectra can be assigned using either observed C-H bond lengths or isolated fundamental frequencies. The spectra of trihalomethanes indicate that the dominant intramolecular mode coupling for the C-H stretching overtones is Fermi resonance with combination states with one less C-H stretching quantum plus two quanta of the C-H bending vibrations.

  4. Application of range imaging lidar for measurement of mechanical vibration and frequency mode distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua A.; Zhu, Yonghao; He, Yun

    1993-05-01

    This article reports the application of laser range imaging radar in the measurement of mechanical vibration frequency and the mode distribution, and the periodic motion of the mechanical parts such as a piston rod. The principle of the laser range imaging radar is based on the phase shift of the reflected amplitude modulated laser beam. The mechanical vibration frequency up to 20 KHZ and the minimal retrieved amplitude (or the motion displacement) of 0.5 mm have been achieved with the laser modulating frequency of 40 MHZ. With appropriate modulating frequency, this laser range system can measure the mechanical vibration amplitude, or the moving displacement, from 10-1 mm up to 102 mm, or even higher to the order of meters, which will be useful to measure the vibration and the periodic motion of machines and their parts for field test.

  5. Theory and Normal Mode Analysis of Change in Protein Vibrational Dynamics on Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Mortisugu, Kei; Njunda, Brigitte; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-12-01

    The change of protein vibrations on ligand binding is of functional and thermodynamic importance. Here, this process is characterized using a simple analytical 'ball-and-spring' model and all-atom normal-mode analysis (NMA) of the binding of the cancer drug, methotrexate (MTX) to its target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The analytical model predicts that the coupling between protein vibrations and ligand external motion generates entropy-rich, low-frequency vibrations in the complex. This is consistent with the atomistic NMA which reveals vibrational softening in forming the DHFR-MTX complex, a result also in qualitative agreement with neutron-scattering experiments. Energy minimization of the atomistic bound-state (B) structure while gradually decreasing the ligand interaction to zero allows the generation of a hypothetical 'intermediate' (I) state, without the ligand force field but with a structure similar to that of B. In going from I to B, it is found that the vibrational entropies of both the protein and MTX decrease while the complex structure becomes enthalpically stabilized. However, the relatively weak DHFR:MTX interaction energy results in the net entropy gain arising from coupling between the protein and MTX external motion being larger than the loss of vibrational entropy on complex formation. This, together with the I structure being more flexible than the unbound structure, results in the observed vibrational softening on ligand binding.

  6. Intermediate energy electron impact excitation of composite vibrational modes in phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L.; Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Silva, G. B. da; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-05-21

    We report differential cross section results from an experimental investigation into the electron impact excitation of a number of the low-lying composite (unresolved) vibrational modes in phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The measurements were carried out at incident electron energies in the range 15–40 eV and for scattered-electron angles in the range 10–90°. The energy resolution of those measurements was typically ∼80 meV. Calculations, using the GAMESS code, were also undertaken with a B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level model chemistry, in order to enable us to assign vibrational modes to the features observed in our energy loss spectra. To the best of our knowledge, the present cross sections are the first to be reported for vibrational excitation of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH molecule by electron impact.

  7. Prediction of vibration modes and thermal conductivity for amorphous ZnO-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Roy, Anindya; Falk, Michael L.

    2015-03-01

    Amorphous materials, due to their distinct physical and chemical properties, have been widely used in photovoltaics, thermoelectrics and integrated circuits. Because the thermal conductivity is critical to the performance of such devices, the thermal transport in amorphous materials has received considerable attention in the last decade. So far, a number of experimental studies and theoretical models have reported the vibration modes and thermal conductivities for amorphous Si and SiO2. However, the applicability of these vibration mode analyses and thermal conductivity models for other amorphous materials has not been studied. In this work, we employ the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and Allen-Feldman (AF) theory to investigate the vibration modes and thermal conductivity of amorphous ZnO-based materials. ZnO is basis of a promising class of n-type semiconductors for thermoelectric application. Additionally, from this work, the contribution of individual vibrational modes to the thermal conductivity can be characterized. These results are expected to guide the interpretation of thermal transport in amorphous ZnO-based materials and the optimization for their performance with different applications.

  8. A Study of the Temperature Characteristics of Vibration Mode Axes for Vibratory Cylinder Gyroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yulie; Xi, Xiang; Tao, Yi; Wu, Xiaomei; Wu, Xuezhong

    2011-01-01

    The zero bias stability, which is an important performance parameter for vibratory cylinder gyroscopes, is high sensitive to temperature change. It is considered that the varying temperature makes the vibration mode axes unstable, which has significant influence on the zero bias stability. This paper will investigate this problem in detail. First, the relationships between the angular positions of vibration mode axes and the zero bias are analyzed. Secondly, the thermal-modal model of the cylinder resonator with several defects such as mass imbalance, frequency split (FS), and geometry errors are developed by ANSYS. Simulation results show that with the increase of temperature, angular positions of the vibration mode axes obviously change, which leads to a dramatic zero bias drift. Finally, several major influence factors on the angular position stability of vibration mode axes, including frequency split, geometry errors, thermal elastic modulus coefficient (TEMC) and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) are analyzed in detail. Simulation results in this paper will be helpful for deep understanding of the drift principle of zero bias induced by temperature for vibratory cylinder gyroscopes and also be helpful for further temperature compensation or control. PMID:22164038

  9. Instantaneous normal mode analysis of the vibrational relaxation of the amide I mode of alanine dipeptide in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Marwa H.; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Bastida, Adolfo

    2013-05-01

    Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations coupled to instantaneous normal modes (INMs) analysis are used to study the vibrational relaxation of the acetyl and amino-end amide I modes of the alanine dipeptide (AlaD) molecule dissolved in water (D2O). The INMs are assigned in terms of the equilibrium normal modes using the Effective Atomic Min-Cost algorithm as adapted to make use of the outputs of standard MD packages, a method which is well suited for the description of flexible molecules. The relaxation energy curves of both amide I modes show multiexponential decays, in good agreement with the experimental findings. It is found that ˜85%-90% of the energy relaxes through intramolecular vibrational redistribution. The main relaxation pathways are also identified. The rate at which energy is transferred into the solvent is similar for the acetyl-end and amino-end amide I modes. The conformational changes occurring during relaxation are investigated, showing that the populations of the alpha and beta region conformers are altered by energy transfer in such a way that it takes 15 ps for the equilibrium conformational populations to be recovered after the initial excitation of the AlaD molecule.

  10. Vibrational modes of hemoglobin in red blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martel, P; Calmettes, P; Hennion, B

    1991-01-01

    Equine red blood cells were washed in saline heavy water (2H2O) to exchange the hydrogen atoms of the non-hemoglobin components with deuterons. This led to novel neutron scattering measurements of protein vibrations within a cellular system and permitted a comparison with inelastic neutron scattering measurements on purified horse hemoglobin, either dry or wetted with 2H2O. As a function of wavevector transfer Q and the frequency transfer v the neutron response typified by the dynamic structure factor S(Q, v) was found to be similar for extracted and cellular hemoglobin at low and high temperatures. At 77 K, in the cells, a peak in S(Q, v) due to the protein was found near 0.7 THz, approximately half the frequency of a strong peak in the aqueous medium. Measurements at higher temperatures (170 and 230 K) indicated similar small shifts downwards in the peak frequencies of both components. At 260 K the low frequency component became predominantly quasielastic, but a significant inelastic component could still be ascribed to the aqueous scattering. Near 295 K the frequency responses of both components were similar and centered near zero. When scattering due to water is taken into account it appears that the protein neutron response in, or out of, red blood cells is little affected by hydration in the low frequency regime where Van der Waals forces are thought to be effective. PMID:1849028

  11. Low frequency vibrational modes of oxygenated myoglobin, hemoglobins, and modified derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jeyarajah, S; Proniewicz, L M; Bronder, H; Kincaid, J R

    1994-12-01

    The low frequency resonance Raman spectra of the dioxygen adducts of myoglobin, hemoglobin, its isolated subunits, mesoheme-substituted hemoglobin, and several deuteriated heme derivatives are reported. The observed oxygen isotopic shifts are used to assign the iron-oxygen stretching (approximately 570 cm-1) and the heretofore unobserved delta (Fe-O-O) bending (approximately 420 cm-1) modes. Although the delta (Fe-O-O) is not enhanced in the case of oxymyoglobin, it is observed for all the hemoglobin derivatives, its exact frequency being relatively invariable among the derivatives. The lack of sensitivity to H2O/D2O buffer exchange is consistent with our previous interpretation of H2O/D2O-induced shifts of v(O-O) in the resonance Raman spectra of dioxygen adducts of cobalt-substituted heme proteins; namely, that those shifts are associated with alterations in vibrational coupling of v(O-O) with internal modes of proximal histidyl imidazole rather than to steric or electronic effects of H/D exchange at the active site. No evidence is obtained for enhancement of the v(Fe-N) stretching frequency of the linkage between the heme iron and the imidazole group of the proximal histidine. PMID:7983043

  12. Dual-Actuator Active Vibration-Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Kiraly, Louis J.; Montague, Gerald T.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Manchala, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Dual-actuator active vibration-control (DAAVC) system is developmental system of type described in "Active Vibration Dampers for Rotating Machinery" (LEW-15427). System features sensors and actuators positioned and oriented at bearings to measure and counteract vibrations of shaft along either of two axes perpendicular to axis of rotation. Effective in damping vibrations of helicopter-engine test stand, making it safer to operate engine at speeds near and above first resonance of engine/test-stand system. Opens new opportunities for engine designers to draw more power from engine, and concept applicable to other rotating machines.

  13. Influence of inhomogeneous damping distribution on sound radiation properties of complex vibration modes in rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    In order to reduce noise emitted by vibrating structures additional damping treatments such as constraint layer damping or embedded elastomer layers can be used. To save weight and cost, the additional damping is often placed at some critical locations of the structure, what leads to spatially inhomogeneous distribution of damping. This inhomogeneous distribution of structural damping leads to an occurrence of complex vibration modes, which are no longer dominated by pure standing waves, but by a superposition of travelling and standing waves. The existence of complex vibration modes raises the question about their influence on sound radiation. Previous studies on the sound radiation of complex modes of rectangular plates reveal, that, depending on the direction of travelling waves, the radiation efficiency of structural modes can slightly decrease or significantly increase. These observations have been made using a rectangular plate with a simple inhomogeneous damping configuration which includes a single plate boundary with a higher structural damping ratio. In order to answer the question about the influence of other possible damping configurations on the sound radiation properties, this paper addresses the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the resulting complex vibration modes. Numerical simulations are used for the calculation of complex structural modes of different inhomogeneous damping configurations with varying geometrical form and symmetry. The evaluation of self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies reveals that primarily the symmetry properties of the inhomogeneous damping distribution affect the sound radiation characteristics. Especially the asymmetric distributions of inhomogeneous damping show a high influence on the investigated acoustic metrics. The presented study also reveals that the acoustic cross-coupling between structural modes, which is described by the mutual-radiation efficiencies, generally increases with the presence of

  14. Vibrational spectra and DFT calculations of the vibrational modes of Schiff base C18H17N3O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, J. A.; Silva, L. E.; Bento, R. R. F.; Teixeira, A. M. R.; Freire, P. T. C.; Faria, J. L. B.; Ramos, R. J.; Silva, C. B.; Lima, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    The Schiff base 4-{[(1E)-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)methylidene]amino}-1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-1,2-dihydro-3H-pyrazol-3-one (C18H17N3O2) is a synthetic compound with a variety of scientific and technological applications, such as clinic, analytic and pharmacologic. In this work FT-Raman spectrum and FT-infrared spectrum of C18H17N3O2 were investigated at 300 K. Vibrational wavenumber and wave vector have been predicted using Density Functional Theory (B3LYP) calculations with the 6-31 G(d,p) basis set. The description of the normal modes was performed by means of the potential energy distribution. A comparison with experiment allowed us to assign most of the normal modes of the crystal.

  15. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  16. Efficient representation of shape variability using surface-based free-vibration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Kaus, Michael R.; Pekar, Vladimir; Weese, Juergen

    2001-07-01

    The efficient representation of shape and shape variability is a key issue in computerized 3D image processing. One of the common goals is the ability to express as much shape variability as necessary with as few parameters as possible. In this paper we focus on the capture of shape variability on the basis of free surface vibration modes. We do not model the interior of an elastic object, but rather its triangulated surface. As in the case of 3D statistical point-distribution models (PDM) we assume that the shape of an anatomical object can efficiently be approximated by a weighted sum of a mean shape and a number of variation modes. The variation modes are in our case Eigenvectors of a stiffness-matrix. Based on a given surface triangulation we define a physical model by placing mass points at the vertices and coil- and leaf-spring elements at the edge positions of the triangulation. Ordered by wavelength, the resulting free vibration modes can be used to efficiently approximate shape variability in a coarse to fine manner, similar to a Fourier decomposition. As real-object examples from the medical image-processing domain, we applied the method to triangulated surfaces of segmented lumbar vertebra and femor-head from CT data sets. A comparison to corresponding statistical shape models shows, that natural variability of anatomical shape can efficiently be approximated by free surface vibration modes.

  17. Vibrational mode and sound radiation of electrostatic speakers using circular and annular diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Hsi; Chiang, Hsin-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    This study modeled two diaphragms comprising a pair of indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent plates sandwiching a vibrating diaphragm to create circular (30 mm radius) and annular (30 mm outer and 3 mm inner radius) push-pull electrostatic speakers. We then measured the displacement amplitudes and mode shapes produced by the devices. Vibration characteristics were used to predict sound pressure levels (SPLs) using the lumped parameter method (LPM) and distributed parameter method (DPM). The two measurement results obtained using a laser system were compared to the SPLs obtained using traditional acoustic measurement (AM) from 20 Hz to 20 kHz in order to verify our predictions. When using LPM and DPM, the SPL prediction results in the first three symmetric modes were in good agreement with the AM results. Under the assumption of linear operations, the DPM and amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) techniques proved effective in determining the visualization of mode shape (0,1)-(0,3). The use of ITO plates is a practical technique for the prediction of SPL, as well as measurement of mode shapes. The four evaluation methods, i.e. LPM, DPM, ESPI and AM, present a high degree of consistency with regard to vibrational mode and sound radiation characteristics.

  18. /SU(3) symmetry and scissors mode vibrations in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Wu, Cheng-Li; Bhatt, Kumar; Guidry, Mike

    2002-05-01

    We show that a nearly perfect SU(3) symmetry emerges from an extended projected shell model. Starting from a deformed potential we construct separate bases for neutron and proton collective rotational states by exact angular momentum projection. These rotational states are then coupled by diagonalizing a residual pairing plus quadrupole interaction. The states obtained exhibit a one-to-one correspondence with an SU(3) spectrum up to high angular momentum and excitation, and their wave functions have a near-maximal overlap with the SU(3) states. They can also be classified as rotational bands built on spin-1ℏ phonon excitations, which correspond to a geometrical scissors mode and its generalizations. This work is a direct demonstration that numerical angular momentum projection theory extends the Elliott's original idea to heavy nuclear systems.

  19. Sliding Mode Control of ER Seat Suspension Considering Human Vibration Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. M.; Jung, J. Y.; Choi, S. B.; Wereley, N. M.

    This paper presents robust control performances of a semi-active electro-rheological (ER) seat suspension incorporating vibration model of human-body. A cylindrical type of ER seat damper is manufactured for a commercial vehicle seat suspension system and its field-dependent damping force is experimentally evaluated. A human-body model is then derived and integrated with the governing equations of the ER seat suspension system. The integrated seat-driver model featured by a high order degree-of-freedom (DOF) is reduced through a balanced model reduction to design robust controller. By imposing semi-active actuating conditions, a sliding mode controller which is very robust to external disturbances and parameter uncertainties is synthesized and experimentally realized with the state observer. In the experimental configuration, a driver directly sits on the controlled seat. Control results for ride quality considering response of each human body segment are evaluated in both time and frequency domains. In addition, a comparison of the proposed semi-active ER seat suspension to a conventional passive seat suspension system is undertaken.

  20. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide: A F. D. S. incoherent inelastic neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Barthes, M.; Moret, J. ); Eckert, J.; Johnson, S.W.; Swanson, B.I.; Unkefer, C.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The origin of the anomalous infra-red and Raman modes in acetanilide (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}NHCOCH{sub 3}, or ACN), remains a subject of considerable controversy. One family of theoretical models involves Davydov-like solitons nonlinear vibrational coupling, or polaronic'' localized modes. An alternative interpretation of the extra-bands in terms of a Fermi resonance was proposed and recently the existence of slightly non-degenerate hydrogen atom configurations in the H-bond was suggested as an explanation for the anomalies. In this paper we report some new results on the anomalous vibrational modes in ACN that were obtained by inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (INS).

  1. Imaging the surface stress and vibration modes of a microcantilever by laser beam deflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Javier; Pini, Valerio; Kosaka, Prisicila; Martinez, Nicolas F; Ahumada, Oscar; Calleja, Montserrat

    2012-08-10

    There is a need for noninvasive techniques for simultaneous imaging of the stress and vibration mode shapes of nanomechanical systems in the fields of scanning probe microscopy, nanomechanical biological and chemical sensors and the semiconductor industry. Here we show a novel technique that combines a scanning laser, the beam deflection method and digital multifrequency excitation and analysis for simultaneous imaging of the static out-of-plane displacement and the shape of five vibration modes of nanomechanical systems. The out-of-plane resolution is at least 100 pm Hz⁻¹/² and the lateral resolution, which is determined by the laser spot size, is 1-1.5 μm. The capability of the technique is demonstrated by imaging the residual surface stress of a microcantilever together with the shape of the first 22 vibration modes. The vibration behavior is compared with rigorous finite element simulations. The technique is suitable for major improvements in the imaging of liquids, such as higher bandwidth and enhanced spatial resolution. PMID:22797006

  2. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibrations of complex structures. [beams and trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, C.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of the NASTRAN modal synthesis analysis was assessed by comparing it with full structure NASTRAN and nine other modal synthesis results using a nine-bay truss. A NASTRAN component mode transient response analysis was also performed on the free-free truss structure. A finite element method was developed for nonlinear vibration of beam structures subjected to harmonic excitation. Longitudinal deformation and inertia are both included in the formula. Tables show the finite element free vibration results with and without considering the effects of longitudinal deformation and inertia as well as the frequency ratios for a simply supported and a clamped beam subjected to a uniform harmonic force.

  3. Investigations of the Low Frequency Modes of Ferric Cytochrome c Using Vibrational Coherence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond vibrational coherence spectroscopy is used to investigate the low frequency vibrational dynamics of the electron transfer heme protein, cytochrome c (cyt c). The vibrational coherence spectra of ferric cyt c have been measured as a function of excitation wavelength within the Soret band. Vibrational coherence spectra obtained with excitation between 412 and 421 nm display a strong mode at ∼44 cm–1 that has been assigned to have a significant contribution from heme ruffling motion in the electronic ground state. This assignment is based partially on the presence of a large heme ruffling distortion in the normal coordinate structural decomposition (NSD) analysis of the X-ray crystal structures. When the excitation wavelength is moved into the ∼421–435 nm region, the transient absorption increases along with the relative intensity of two modes near ∼55 and 30 cm–1. The intensity of the mode near 44 cm–1 appears to minimize in this region and then recover (but with an opposite phase compared to the blue excitation) when the laser is tuned to 443 nm. These observations are consistent with the superposition of both ground and excited state coherence in the 421–435 nm region due to the excitation of a weak porphyrin-to-iron charge transfer (CT) state, which has a lifetime long enough to observe vibrational coherence. The mode near 55 cm–1 is suggested to arise from ruffling in a transient CT state that has a less ruffled heme due to its iron d6 configuration. PMID:24823442

  4. Space structure vibration modes: How many exist? Which ones are important?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    This report attempts to shed some light on the two issues raised in the title, namely, how many vibration modes does a real structure have, and which of these modes are important? The surprise-free answers to these two questions are, respectively, an infinite number and the first several modes. The author argues that the absurd subspace (all but the first billion modes) is not a strength of continuum modeling, but, in fact, a weakness. Partial differential equations are not real structures, only mathematical models. This note also explains (1) that the PDE model and the finite element model are, in fact, the same model, the latter being a numerical method for dealing with the former, (2) that modes may be selected on dynamical grounds other than frequency alone, and (3) that long slender rods are useful as primitive cases but dangerous to extrapolate from.

  5. Higher-order vibrational mode frequency tuning utilizing fishbone-shaped microelectromechanical systems resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Naoya; Tanigawa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kenichiro

    2013-04-01

    Resonators based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have received considerable attention for their applications for wireless equipment. The requirements for this application include small size, high frequency, wide bandwidth and high portability. However, few MEMS resonators with wide-frequency tuning have been reported. A fishbone-shaped resonator has a resonant frequency with a maximum response that can be changed according to the location and number of several exciting electrodes. Therefore, it can be expected to provide wide-frequency tuning. The resonator has three types of electrostatic forces that can be generated to deform a main beam. We evaluate the vibrational modes caused by each exciting electrodes by comparing simulated results with measured ones. We then successfully demonstrate the frequency tuning of the first to fifth resonant modes by using the algorithm we propose here. The resulting frequency tuning covers 178 to 1746 kHz. In addition, we investigate the suppression of the anchor loss to enhance the Q-factor. An experiment shows that tapered-shaped anchors provide a higher Q-factor than rectangular-shaped anchors. The Q-factor of the resonators supported by suspension beams is also discussed. Because the suspension beams cause complicated vibrational modes for higher frequencies, the enhancement of the Q-factor for high vibrational modes cannot be obtained here. At present, the tapered-anchor resonators are thought to be most suitable for frequency tuning applications.

  6. The application of infrared synchrotron radiation to the study of interfacial vibrational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschmugl, C.J.; Williams, G.P.

    1992-12-31

    Synchrotron radiation provides an extremely bright broad-band source in the infrared which is ideally suited to the study of surface and interface vibrational modes in the range 50--3,000 cm{sup {minus}1}. Thus it covers the important range of molecule-substrate interactions, as well as overlapping with the more easily accessible near-ir region where molecular internal modes are found. Compared to standard broadband infrared sources such as globars, not only is it 1,000 times brighter, but its emittance matches the phase-space of the electrochemical cell leading to full utilization of this brightness advantage. In addition, the source is more stable even than water-cooled globars in vacuum for both short-term and long-term fluctuations. The authors summarize the properties of synchrotron radiation in the infrared, in particular pointing out the distinct differences between this and the x-ray region. They use experimental data in discussing important issues of signal to noise and address the unique problems and advantages of the synchrotron source. Thus they emphasize the important considerations necessary for developing new facilities. This analysis then leads to a discussion of phase-space matching to electrochemical cells, and to other surfaces in vacuum. Finally they show several examples of the application of infrared synchrotron radiation to surface vibrational spectroscopy. The examples are for metal crystal surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and include CO/Cu(100) and (111) and CO/K/Cu(100). The experiments show how the stability of the synchrotron source allows subtle changes in the background to be observed in addition to the discrete vibrational modes. These changes are due to electronic states induced by the adsorbate. In some cases the authors have seen interferences between these and the discrete vibrational modes, leading to a breakdown of the dipole selection rules, and the observation of additional modes.

  7. The application of infrared synchrotron radiation to the study of interfacial vibrational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschmugl, C.J.; Williams, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation provides an extremely bright broad-band source in the infrared which is ideally suited to the study of surface and interface vibrational modes in the range 50--3,000 cm[sup [minus]1]. Thus it covers the important range of molecule-substrate interactions, as well as overlapping with the more easily accessible near-ir region where molecular internal modes are found. Compared to standard broadband infrared sources such as globars, not only is it 1,000 times brighter, but its emittance matches the phase-space of the electrochemical cell leading to full utilization of this brightness advantage. In addition, the source is more stable even than water-cooled globars in vacuum for both short-term and long-term fluctuations. The authors summarize the properties of synchrotron radiation in the infrared, in particular pointing out the distinct differences between this and the x-ray region. They use experimental data in discussing important issues of signal to noise and address the unique problems and advantages of the synchrotron source. Thus they emphasize the important considerations necessary for developing new facilities. This analysis then leads to a discussion of phase-space matching to electrochemical cells, and to other surfaces in vacuum. Finally they show several examples of the application of infrared synchrotron radiation to surface vibrational spectroscopy. The examples are for metal crystal surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and include CO/Cu(100) and (111) and CO/K/Cu(100). The experiments show how the stability of the synchrotron source allows subtle changes in the background to be observed in addition to the discrete vibrational modes. These changes are due to electronic states induced by the adsorbate. In some cases the authors have seen interferences between these and the discrete vibrational modes, leading to a breakdown of the dipole selection rules, and the observation of additional modes.

  8. Interactions between directly- and parametrically-driven vibration modes in a micromechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westra, H. J. R.; Karabacak, D. M.; Brongersma, S. H.; Crego-Calama, M.; van der Zant, H. S. J.; Venstra, W. J.

    2011-10-01

    The interactions between parametrically- and directly-driven vibration modes of a clamped-clamped beam resonator are studied. An integrated piezoelectric transducer is used for direct and parametric excitation. First, the parametric amplification and oscillation of a single mode are analyzed by the power and phase dependence below and above the threshold for parametric oscillation. Then, the motion of a parametrically-driven mode is detected by the induced change in resonance frequency in another mode of the same resonator. The resonance frequency shift is the result of the nonlinear coupling between the modes by the displacement-induced tension in the beam. These nonlinear modal interactions result in the quadratic relation between the resonance frequency of one mode and the amplitude of another mode. The amplitude of a parametrically-oscillating mode depends on the square root of the pump frequency. Combining these dependencies yields a linear relation between the resonance frequency of the directly-driven mode and the frequency of the parametrically-oscillating mode.

  9. Sliding mode attitude control with L 2-gain performance and vibration reduction of flexible spacecraft with actuator dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qinglei

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a dual-stage control system design method for the rotational maneuver control and vibration stabilization of a flexible spacecraft. In this design approach, the sub-systems of attitude control and vibration suppression are designed separately using the low order model. Based on the sliding mode control (SMC) theory, a discontinuous attitude control law in the form of the input voltage of the reaction wheel is derived to control the orientation of the spacecraft, incorporating the L 2-gain performance criterion constraint. The resulting closed-loop system is proven to be uniformly ultimately bounded stability and the effect of the external disturbance on both attitude quaternion and angular velocity can be attenuated to the prescribed level as well. In addition, an adaptive version of the control law is designed for adapting the unknown upper bounds of the lumped disturbance such that the limitation of knowing the bound of the disturbance in advance is released. For actively suppressing the induced vibration, strain rate feedback control method is also investigated by using piezoelectric materials as additional sensors and actuators bonded on the surface of the flexible appendages. Numerical simulations are performed to show that rotational maneuver and vibration suppression are accomplished in spite of the presence of disturbance and uncertainty.

  10. Using input command pre-shaping to suppress multiple mode vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James M.; Seering, Warren P.

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft, space-borne robotic systems, and manufacturing equipment often utilize lightweight materials and configurations that give rise to vibration problems. Prior research has led to the development of input command pre-shapers that can significantly reduce residual vibration. These shapers exhibit marked insensitivity to errors in natural frequency estimates and can be combined to minimize vibration at more than one frequency. This paper presents a method for the development of multiple mode input shapers which are simpler to implement than previous designs and produce smaller system response delays. The new technique involves the solution of a group of simultaneous non-linear impulse constraint equations. The resulting shapers were tested on a model of MACE, an MIT/NASA experimental flexible structure.

  11. Study on the Langevin piezoelectric ceramic ultrasonic transducer of longitudinal-flexural composite vibrational mode.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the Langevin longitudinal-flexural composite mode piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer is studied. This type of transducers consists of slender metal rods and longitudinally polarized piezoelectric ceramic rings. The resonance frequency equations for the longitudinal and flexural vibrations in the transducer are derived. By correcting the length of the metal slender rods, the simultaneous resonance of the longitudinal and flexural vibrations in the transducer is acquired. The experimental results show that the measured resonance frequencies of the transducers are in good agreement with the computed ones, and the measured resonance frequencies of the longitudinal and the flexural vibrations in the composite transducers are also in good agreement with each other. PMID:16289195

  12. Mode-locking of acoustic resonators and its application to vibration cancellation in acoustic heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Spoor, P.S.; Swift, G.W. )

    1999-09-01

    Vibration induced in engine hardware by a working fluid can be very significant in high-power, high-amplitude acoustic heat engines, and is a serious impediment to their practical use. This vibration can cause fatigue and destruction of engine components as well as fuel lines, cooling lines, and sensor wires. The forces involved make anchoring such an engine to an [open quotes]immovable[close quotes] object impractical. Rigidly attaching two such engines together, and acoustically coupling them with a duct of such a length and diameter that the two engines mode-lock in antiphase (thus canceling the longitudinal vibration) appears to be an inexpensive, viable solution. This paper describes in detail experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this idea, and the underlying theory. [copyright] [ital 1999 Acoustical Society of America.] < --[HEB] -->

  13. Design for coupled-mode flutter and non-synchronous vibration in turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stephen Thomas

    This research presents the detailed investigation of coupled-mode flutter and non-synchronous vibration in turbomachinery. Coupled-mode flutter and non-synchronous vibration are two aeromechanical challenges in designing turbomachinery that, when present, can cause engine blade failure. Regarding flutter, current industry design practices calculate the aerodynamic loads on a blade due to a single mode. In response to these design standards, a quasi three-dimensional, reduced-order modeling tool was developed for identifying the aeroelastic conditions that cause multi-mode flutter. This tool predicts the onset of coupled-mode flutter reasonable well for four different configurations, though certain parameters were tuned to agree with experimentation. Additionally, the results of this research indicate that mass ratio, frequency separation, and solidity have an effect on critical rotor speed for flutter. Higher mass-ratio blades require larger rotational velocities before they experience coupled-mode flutter. Similarly, increasing the frequency separation between modes and raising the solidity increases the critical rotor speed. Finally, and most importantly, design guidelines were generated for defining when a multi-mode flutter analysis is required in practical turbomachinery design. Previous work has shown that industry computational fluid dynamics can approximately predict non-synchronous vibration (NSV), but no real understanding of frequency lock-in and blade limit-cycle amplitude exists. Therefore, to understand the causes of NSV, two different reduced-order modeling approaches were used. The first approach uses a van der Pol oscillator to model a non-linear fluid instability. The van der Pol model is then coupled to a structural degree of freedom. This coupled system exhibits the two chief properties seen in experimental and computational non-synchronous vibration. Under various conditions, the fluid instability and the natural structural frequency will lock

  14. Vibration attenuation of aircraft structures utilizing active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, Gregory S.; Whitehouse, Stephen R.; Mackaman, John R.

    1993-09-01

    The need for active vibration control for airborne laser systems was demonstrated during the late 1970s by the Airborne Laser Laboratory. Other possible applications include sonic fatigue alleviation, reduction of buffet induced fatigue, vibration control for embedded antennae, and active aeroelastic control. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of active vibration control technology and its application to aircraft. Classification of classic aircraft vibration problems and currently available solutions are used to provide a framework for the study. Current solutions are classified as being either passive or active and by the methodology (modal modification or addition) used to reduce vibration. Possible applications for this technology in aircraft vibration control are presented within this framework to demonstrate the increased versatility active materials technologies provide the designer. An in- depth study of an active pylon to reduce wing/store vibration is presented as an example. Finally, perceived gaps in the existing technology base are identified and both on-going and future research plans in these areas are discussed.

  15. Active vibration control of a flexible cantilever beam using shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kagawa, Y.

    2010-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of using shape memory alloys (SMAs) as actuators to control the vibration of a flexible cantilever beam. In a tendon mechanism, SMAs are controlled in a push-pull fashion based on H-infinity theory and taking into account the uncertainty in the actuator performance. Using this mechanism, the four vibrational modes (three bending and one torsional) of the cantilever beam can be simultaneously damped. To control bending and torsional vibrational modes of a flexible beam, we install SMAs obliquely in a beam-SMA structure, then measure and theoretically model the properties of an actuator consisting of an SMA and a spring. Using the properties of the actuator, we introduce the state equations based on the dynamic model of the proposed beam-SMA structure and design the active control system according to H-infinity theory. Finally, we experimentally verify the functioning of the system.

  16. An approach based on tool mode control for surface roughness reduction in high-frequency vibration cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostasevicius, V.; Gaidys, R.; Rimkeviciene, J.; Dauksevicius, R.

    2010-11-01

    The presented research work, aimed at deeper understanding of vibrational process during high-frequency vibration cutting, is accomplished by treating cutting tool as an elastic structure which is characterized by several modes of natural vibrations. An approach for surface quality improvement is proposed in this paper by taking into account that quality of machined surface is related to the intensity of tool-tip (cutting edge) vibrations. It is based on the excitation of a particular higher vibration mode of a turning tool, which leads to the reduction of deleterious vibrations in the machine-tool-workpiece system through intensification of internal energy dissipation in the tool material. The combined application of numerical analysis with accurate finite element model as well as different experimental methods during investigation of the vibration turning process allowed to determine that the most favorable is the second flexural vibration mode of the tool in the direction of vertical cutting force component. This mode is excited by means of piezoelectric transducer vibrating in axial tool direction at the corresponding natural frequency, thereby enabling minimization of surface roughness and tool wear.

  17. Numerical-experimental identification of the most effective dynamic operation mode of a vibration drilling tool for improved cutting performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostasevicius, V.; Ubartas, M.; Gaidys, R.; Jurenas, V.; Samper, S.; Dauksevicius, R.

    2012-11-01

    This study is concerned with application of numerical-experimental approach for characterizing dynamic behavior of the developed piezoelectrically excited vibration drilling tool with the aim to identify the most effective conditions of tool vibration mode control for improved cutting efficiency. 3D finite element model of the tool was created on the basis of an elastically fixed pre-twisted cantilever (standard twist drill). The model was experimentally verified and used together with tool vibration measurements in order to reveal rich dynamic behavior of the pre-twisted structure, representing a case of parametric vibrations with axial, torsional and transverse natural vibrations accompanied by the additional dynamic effects arising due to the coupling of axial and torsional deflections ((un)twisting). Numerical results combined with extensive data from interferometric, accelerometric, dynamometric and surface roughness measurements allowed to determine critical excitation frequencies and the corresponding vibration modes, which have the largest influence on the performance metrics of the vibration drilling process. The most favorable tool excitation conditions were established: inducing the axial mode of the vibration tool itself through tailoring of driving frequency enables to minimize magnitudes of surface roughness, cutting force and torque. Research results confirm the importance of the tool mode control in enhancing the effectiveness of vibration cutting tools from the viewpoint of structural dynamics.

  18. Flow-Induced Multiple-Mode Vibrations of Gates with Submerged Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billeter, P.; Staubli, T.

    2000-04-01

    An experimental investigation of flow-induced vibrations of gates with multiple degrees of freedom is presented. An underflown vertical gate plate with submerged discharge was allowed to oscillate both in the cross-flow (z -) and in the streamwise (x -) direction. The two purposes of the investigation were to further the insight into the hydrodynamic coupling mechanisms of the two vibration modes and to determine the interaction of the unsteady lift and drag forces. Self-excited vibration tests were run with reduced velocities Vrzand Vrxfrom 0.8 to 14, covering a range in which the instability-induced excitation (IIE) due to impinging-leading-edge vortices (ILEV) as well as the transition to galloping (MIE) occurred. The ratio of the natural frequencies of the two vibration modes fx 0/fz 0, the gate opening ratio s/d, and the submergence of the gate plate were varied. Depending on the ranges of reduced velocities and frequency ratios, a complex interaction of two different kinds of instability-induced excitation was detected. Furthermore, it was found that streamwise IIE-excitation and cross-flow galloping coexist. To assess the relevant fluid dynamic amplification and attenuation mechanisms, simultaneous body response and flow velocity measurements were carried out.

  19. Terahertz beats of vibrational modes in methanol and ethanol selectively excited by tr-CARS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Wang, HuiLi; Fan, RongWei; Chen, DeYing; Xia, YuanQin; Yu, Xin; Wang, JiaLing; Jiang, YuGang

    2012-12-01

    A recently developed time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (tr-CARS) technique allows the measurement of vibrational coherences with high frequency differences with the ambient environment. The method is based on the short spatial extension of femtosecond pulses with a broadband tunable nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) and an internal time delay between the probe and pump/Stokes pulse pair in the CARS process. The different beat frequencies between Raman modes can be selectively detected as oscillations in the tr-CARS transient signal with the broadband tunable NOPA. In this work, we aim at the Raman C—H stretching vibrations from 2800 cm-1 to 3000 cm-1, within which the different vibrational modes in both ethanol and methanol are selectively excited and simultaneously detected. The high time resolution of the experimental set-up allows one to monitor the vibrational coherence dynamics and to observe the quantum beat phenomena on a terahertz scale. This investigation indicates that the femtosecond tr-CARS technique is a powerful tool for the real-time monitoring and detection of molecular and biological agents, including airborne contaminants such as bacterial spores, viruses and their toxins.

  20. Nuclear inelastic scattering of heme proteins: from iron ligand vibrations to low energy protein modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeser, Beate; Janoschka, Adam; Wolny, Juliusz A.; Filipov, Igor; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Walker, F. Ann; Schünemann, Volker

    2012-03-01

    The binding of the signal molecule nitric oxide (NO) to the NO transporter protein Nitrophorin 2 (NP2) from the bloodsucking insect Rhodnius prolixus has been characterized by Mössbauer spectroscopy as well as nuclear forward scattering (NFS) and nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS). A striking feature of the vibrational spectrum obtained from NP2-NO is a vibration at 594 cm - 1. This mode is assigned to a Fe-NO stretching mode via simulation of the NIS data by density functional theory (DFT) coupled with molecular mechanics (MM) methods. At frequencies below 100 cm - 1 collective motions like heme doming occur which could explain spectroscopic features observed by NIS at these low energies.

  1. Vibrational modes of viruses and virus-based nano-assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandin, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    Viruses have been proposed as biological templates for fabricating identical nanostructures. Various metallic and semiconductor nanowires and nanotubes were fabricated using cylindrical viruses such as tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and M13 bacteriophage. The knowledge of the phonon (vibrational) modes of the viruses used for nano-templating is important for monitoring the chemical assembly process and understanding carrier transport properties in resulting nanostructures. In this paper we present results of our investigation of the low-frequency phonon spectra of TMV and M13 viruses immersed in air and water [1]. It is demonstrated that the vibrational modes of inorganic nanowires and nanotubes undergo strong modifications when the organic virus is present inside the nanotube. [1] V.A. Fonoberov and A.A. Balandin, Phys. Stat. Solidi B 241, R67 (2004); A.A. Balandin and V.A. Fonoberov, J. Biomed. Nanotechnol. 1, in press (2005); see also at http://ndl.ee.ucr.edu

  2. Chemical reactions of water molecules on Ru(0001) induced by selective excitation of vibrational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Mugarza, Aitor; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-05-07

    Tunneling electrons in a scanning tunneling microscope were used to excite specific vibrational quantum states of adsorbed water and hydroxyl molecules on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface. The excited molecules relaxed by transfer of energy to lower energy modes, resulting in diffusion, dissociation, desorption, and surface-tip transfer processes. Diffusion of H{sub 2}O molecules could be induced by excitation of the O-H stretch vibration mode at 445 meV. Isolated molecules required excitation of one single quantum while molecules bonded to a C atom required at least two quanta. Dissociation of single H{sub 2}O molecules into H and OH required electron energies of 1 eV or higher while dissociation of OH required at least 2 eV electrons. In contrast, water molecules forming part of a cluster could be dissociated with electron energies of 0.5 eV.

  3. Ultrasonic trapping of small particles by sharp edges vibrating in a flexural mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Junhui; Yang, Jianbo; Xu, Jun

    2004-12-01

    Ultrasonic trapping of small particles by sharp edges vibrating in a flexural mode is reported. Two rectangular metal plates with a sharp edge are mechanically excited to vibrate in a flexural mode by the piezoelectric rings which are pressed between them by a bolt structure. Small particles such as mint seeds and flying color seeds can be attracted to the sharp edges of the plates. Relationship between input power applied to the piezoelectric rings and the number of trapped particles is experimentally investigated for mint seeds and flying color seeds in water and air. The result shows that for a given type of particle, there exists an input power at which the number of trapped particles is a maximum. Mechanism analysis shows that nodes or antinodes of acoustic pressure of the sound field near the sharp edges are responsible for the trapping.

  4. Optimization procedure to control the coupling of vibration modes in flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.

    1987-01-01

    As spacecraft structural concepts increase in size and flexibility, the vibration frequencies become more closely-spaced. The identification and control of such closely-spaced frequencies present a significant challenge. To validate system identification and control methods prior to actual flight, simpler space structures will be flown. To challenge the above technologies, it will be necessary to design these structures with closely-spaced or coupled vibration modes. Thus, there exists a need to develop a systematic method to design a structure which has closely-spaced vibration frequencies. This paper describes an optimization procedure which is used to design a large flexible structure to have closely-spaced vibration frequencies. The procedure uses a general-purpose finite element analysis program for the vibration and sensitivity analyses and a general-purpose optimization program. Results are presented from two studies. The first study uses a detailed model of a large flexible structure to design a structure with one pair of closely-spaced frequencies. The second study uses a simple equivalent beam model of a large flexible structure to obtain a design with two pairs of closely-spaced frequencies.

  5. Electric field generated by longitudinal axial microtubule vibration modes with high spatial resolution microtubule model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifra, M.; Havelka, D.; Deriu, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Microtubules are electrically polar structures fulfilling prerequisites for generation of oscillatory electric field in the kHz to GHz region. Energy supply for excitation of elasto-electrical vibrations in microtubules may be provided from GTP-hydrolysis; motor protein-microtubule interactions; and energy efflux from mitochondria. It recently was determined from anisotropic elastic network modeling of entire microtubules that the frequencies of microtubule longitudinal axial eigenmodes lie in the region of tens of GHz for the physiologically common microtubule lengths. We calculated electric field generated by axial longitudinal vibration modes of microtubule, which model is based on subnanometer precision of charge distribution. Due to elastoelectric nature of the vibrations, the vibration wavelength is million-fold shorter than that of the electromagnetic field in free space and the electric field around the microtubule manifests rich spatial structure with multiple minima. The dielectrophoretic force exerted by electric field on the surrounding molecules will influence the kinetics of reactions via change in the probability of the transport of charge and mass particles. The electric field generated by vibrations of electrically polar cellular structures is expected to play a role in biological self-organization.

  6. Active vibration damping using smart material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baras, John S.; Yan, Zhuang

    1994-01-01

    We consider the modeling and active damping of an elastic beam using distributed actuators and sensors. The piezoelectric ceramic material (PZT) is used to build the actuator. The sensor is made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). These materials are glued on both sides of the beam. For the simple clamped beam, the closed loop controller has been shown to be able to extract energy from the beam. The shape of the actuator and its influence on the closed loop system performance are discussed. It is shown that it is possible to suppress the selected mode by choosing the appropriate actuator layout. It is also shown that by properly installing the sensor and determining the sensor shape we can further extract and manipulate the sensor signal for our control need.

  7. Development of active vibration isolation system for precision machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Z.; Lin, W. J.; Yang, G. L.

    2009-12-01

    It is a common understanding by manufacturers of precision machines that vibrations are a potentially disastrous threat to precision and throughput. To satisfy the quest for more stable processes and tighter critical dimension control in the microelectronics manufacturing industry, active vibration control becomes increasingly important for high-precision equipment developers. This paper introduced the development of an active vibration isolation system for precision machines. Innovative mechatronic approaches are investigated that can effectively suppress both environmental and payload-generated vibration. In this system, accelerometers are used as the feedback sensor, voice coil motors are used to generate the counter force, and a TI DSP controller is used to couple sensor measurements to actuator forces via specially designed control algorithms in real-time to counteract the vibration disturbances. Experimental results by using the developed AVI prototype showed promising performance on vibration attenuation. It demonstrated a reduction of the settling time from 2s to 0.1s under impulsive disturbances; and a vibration attenuation level of more than 20dB for harmonic disturbances. The technology can be used to suppress vibration for a wide range of precision machines to achieve fast settling time and higher accuracy.

  8. Development of active vibration isolation system for precision machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Z.; Lin, W. J.; Yang, G. L.

    2010-03-01

    It is a common understanding by manufacturers of precision machines that vibrations are a potentially disastrous threat to precision and throughput. To satisfy the quest for more stable processes and tighter critical dimension control in the microelectronics manufacturing industry, active vibration control becomes increasingly important for high-precision equipment developers. This paper introduced the development of an active vibration isolation system for precision machines. Innovative mechatronic approaches are investigated that can effectively suppress both environmental and payload-generated vibration. In this system, accelerometers are used as the feedback sensor, voice coil motors are used to generate the counter force, and a TI DSP controller is used to couple sensor measurements to actuator forces via specially designed control algorithms in real-time to counteract the vibration disturbances. Experimental results by using the developed AVI prototype showed promising performance on vibration attenuation. It demonstrated a reduction of the settling time from 2s to 0.1s under impulsive disturbances; and a vibration attenuation level of more than 20dB for harmonic disturbances. The technology can be used to suppress vibration for a wide range of precision machines to achieve fast settling time and higher accuracy.

  9. Vibrational modes in the Pmc21 structure of ZnGeN2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Mark; Bhandari, Churna; Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    2016-05-01

    Vibrational normal modes at the Brillouin zone center and related Raman and infrared spectra are calculated from first-principles density functional perturbation theory for the until now hypothetical Pmc21 structure of ZnGeN2 and are compared with those in the known Pnb21 structure. Although there are great similarities in phonon spectra, we show that the distinctions are specific enough to experimentally distinguish the two crystal structures.

  10. Combined implementation of holographic and speckle interferometry for comparative local stress analysis at different vibration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Sergey A.; Pisarev, Vladimir S.; Dzuba, Alexander S.; Grigoriev, Vladimir D.

    1998-09-01

    New capability of combined application of time-averaged holographic interferometry and defocused speckle photography, allowing us a comparative analysis of local stresses corresponding to different vibration modes, is considered. The main aspects of the technique developed are illustrated by using as an example bending oscillations of thin square plate with a large central circular hole. Experimental results are compared with corresponding numerical data obtained by means of the MSC/NASTRAN software.

  11. Influence of vibration modes on control system stabilization for space shuttle type vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the feasibility of using conventional autopilot techniques to stabilize the vibration modes at the liftoff flight condition for two space shuttle configurations. One configuration is called the dual flyback vehicle in which both the orbiter and booster vehicles have wings and complete flyback capability. The other configuration is called the solid motor vehicle win which the orbiter only has flyback. The results of the linear stability analyses for each of the vehicles are summarized.

  12. Electron-Vibration Coupling in Molecular Materials: Assignment of Vibronic Modes from Photoelectron Momentum Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, M.; Grimm, M.; Metzger, C.; Dauth, M.; Tusche, C.; Kirschner, J.; Kümmel, S.; Schöll, A.; Reinert, F.

    2016-04-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is one of the most fundamental effects in condensed matter physics. We here demonstrate that photoelectron momentum mapping can reveal and visualize the coupling between specific vibrational modes and electronic excitations. When imaging molecular orbitals with high energy resolution, the intensity patterns of photoelectrons of the vibronic sidebands of molecular states show characteristic changes due to the distortion of the molecular frame in the vibronically excited state. By comparison to simulations, an assignment of specific vibronic modes is possible, thus providing unique information on the coupling between electronic and vibronic excitation.

  13. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide: a F.D.S. incoherent inelastic neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Mariette; Eckert, Juergen; Johnson, Susanna W.; Moret, Jacques; Swanson, Basil I.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    The origin of the anomalous infra-red and Raman modes in acetanilide (C6H5NHCOCH3, or ACN)(1) , remains a subject of considerable controversy. One family of theoretical models involves Davydov-like solitons (2) nonlinear vibrational coupling (3), or "polaronic" localized modes (4)(5). An alternative interpretation of the extra-bands in terms of a Fermi resonance was proposed (6) and recently the existence of slightly non-degenerate hydrogen atom configurations (7) in the H-bond was suggested as an explanation for the anomalies.

  14. Electron-Vibration Coupling in Molecular Materials: Assignment of Vibronic Modes from Photoelectron Momentum Mapping.

    PubMed

    Graus, M; Grimm, M; Metzger, C; Dauth, M; Tusche, C; Kirschner, J; Kümmel, S; Schöll, A; Reinert, F

    2016-04-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is one of the most fundamental effects in condensed matter physics. We here demonstrate that photoelectron momentum mapping can reveal and visualize the coupling between specific vibrational modes and electronic excitations. When imaging molecular orbitals with high energy resolution, the intensity patterns of photoelectrons of the vibronic sidebands of molecular states show characteristic changes due to the distortion of the molecular frame in the vibronically excited state. By comparison to simulations, an assignment of specific vibronic modes is possible, thus providing unique information on the coupling between electronic and vibronic excitation. PMID:27104726

  15. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Libo; Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Tongdong; Ding, Jianjun; Liu, Xixiang; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-01-01

    Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m3 to 900 kg/m3 and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail. PMID:27275823

  16. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Libo; Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Tongdong; Ding, Jianjun; Liu, Xixiang; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-01-01

    Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m³ to 900 kg/m³ and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail. PMID:27275823

  17. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics and collective vibrational modes of liquid water in an inhomogeneous electric field.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Adam D; Drusová, Sandra; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C

    2016-06-28

    In this experiment liquid water is subject to an inhomogeneous electric field (∇(2)Ea≈ 10(10) V m(2)) using a high voltage (20 kV) point-plane electrode system. Using interferometry it was found that the application of a strong electric field gradient to water generates local changes in the refractive index of the liquid, polarizes the surface and creates a downward moving electro-convective jet. A maximum temperature difference of 1 °C is measured in the immediate vicinity of the point electrode. Raman spectroscopy performed on water reveals an enhancement of the vibrational collective modes (3250 cm(-1)) as well as an increase in the local mode (3490 cm(-1)) energy. This bimodal enhancement indicates that the spectral changes are not due to temperature changes. The intense field gradient thus establishes an excited subpopulation of vibrational oscillators far from thermal equilibrium. Delocalization of the collective vibrational mode spatially expands this excited population beyond the microscale. Hindered rotational freedom due to electric field pinning of molecular dipoles retards the heat flow and generates a chemical potential gradient. These changes are responsible for the observed changes in the refractive index and temperature. It is demonstrated that polar liquids can thus support local non-equilibrium thermodynamic transient states critical to biochemical and environmental processes. PMID:27253197

  18. Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibrations of beams using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Decha-Umphai, Kamolphan

    1987-01-01

    Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibration of a beam is analyzed by the finite element method. The geometric nonlinearity is investigated. Inplane displacement and inertia (IDI) are also considered in the formulation. Harmonic force matrix is derived and explained. Nonlinear free vibration can be simply treated as a special case of the general forced vibration by setting the harmonic force matrix equal to zero. The effect of the higher modes is more pronouced for the clamped supported beam than the simply supported one. Beams without IDI yield more effect of the higher modes than the one with IDI. The effects of IDI are to reduce nonlinearity. For beams with end supports restrained from axial movement (immovable cases), only the hardening type nonlinearity is observed. However, beams of small slenderness ratio (L/R = 20) with movable end supports, the softening type nonlinearity is found. The concentrated force case yields a more severe response than the uniformly distributed force case. Finite element results are in good agreement with the solution of simple elliptic response, harmonic balance method, and Runge-Kutte method and experiment.

  19. Low-frequency interlayer vibration modes in two-dimensional layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jianting; Dong, Shan; Zhang, Anmin; Zhang, Qingming

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials have been attracted tremendous research interest because of their novel photoelectric properties. If a single atomic layer instead of individual atoms is taken as a rigid motion object, two unique interlayer vibrations, i.e. compression/breathing and shear motions, at ultra-low frequencies can be expected and actually have been observed in many layered materials. The vibrations stem from the interlayer van der Waals interaction and can be well described by a conventional linear-chain model in most cases. The vibration frequencies strongly depend on layer thickness, which enables an accurate determination of layer numbers. A quick and nondestructive determination of flake thickness is particularly important for the materials, since the physical properties can be dramatically changed in the cases of several atomic layers. As a measure of interlayer coupling, the low-frequency modes are also sensitive to the stacking methods of atomic layers and the overlapping of different kinds of 2D materials. This allows the modes to play a key role in the applications like van der Waals heterojunctions. In this paper, we will give a brief review on the experimental observations and theoretical understanding of the interlayer modes in several typical 2D systems, as well as their actual and potential applications.

  20. Exploring the relationship between vibrational mode locality and coupling using constrained optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Andrew; Smereka, Peter; Zimmerman, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of alternate coordinate systems as a means to improve the efficiency and accuracy of anharmonic vibrational structure analysis has seen renewed interest in recent years. While normal modes (which diagonalize the mass-weighted Hessian matrix) are a typical choice, the delocalized nature of this basis makes it less optimal when anharmonicity is in play. When a set of modes is not designed to treat anharmonicity, anharmonic effects will contribute to inter-mode coupling in an uncontrolled fashion. These effects can be mitigated by introducing locality, but this comes at its own cost of potentially large second-order coupling terms. Herein, a method is described which partially localizes vibrations to connect the fully delocalized and fully localized limits. This allows a balance between the treatment of harmonic and anharmonic coupling, which minimizes the error that arises from neglected coupling terms. Partially localized modes are investigated for a range of model systems including a tetramer of hydrogen fluoride, water dimer, ethene, diphenylethane, and stilbene. Generally, partial localization reaches ˜75% of maximal locality while introducing less than ˜30% of the harmonic coupling of the fully localized system. Furthermore, partial localization produces mode pairs that are spatially separated and thus weakly coupled to one another. It is likely that this property can be exploited in the creation of model Hamiltonians that omit the coupling parameters of the distant (and therefore uncoupled) pairs.

  1. Exploring the relationship between vibrational mode locality and coupling using constrained optimization.

    PubMed

    Molina, Andrew; Smereka, Peter; Zimmerman, Paul M

    2016-03-28

    The use of alternate coordinate systems as a means to improve the efficiency and accuracy of anharmonic vibrational structure analysis has seen renewed interest in recent years. While normal modes (which diagonalize the mass-weighted Hessian matrix) are a typical choice, the delocalized nature of this basis makes it less optimal when anharmonicity is in play. When a set of modes is not designed to treat anharmonicity, anharmonic effects will contribute to inter-mode coupling in an uncontrolled fashion. These effects can be mitigated by introducing locality, but this comes at its own cost of potentially large second-order coupling terms. Herein, a method is described which partially localizes vibrations to connect the fully delocalized and fully localized limits. This allows a balance between the treatment of harmonic and anharmonic coupling, which minimizes the error that arises from neglected coupling terms. Partially localized modes are investigated for a range of model systems including a tetramer of hydrogen fluoride, water dimer, ethene, diphenylethane, and stilbene. Generally, partial localization reaches ∼75% of maximal locality while introducing less than ∼30% of the harmonic coupling of the fully localized system. Furthermore, partial localization produces mode pairs that are spatially separated and thus weakly coupled to one another. It is likely that this property can be exploited in the creation of model Hamiltonians that omit the coupling parameters of the distant (and therefore uncoupled) pairs. PMID:27036431

  2. Selective nonresonant excitation of vibrational modes in suspended graphene via vibron-plasmon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Axel M.; Gorelik, Leonid Y.

    2015-12-01

    We theoretically study a doped graphene ribbon suspended over a trench and subject to an ac-electrical field polarized perpendicularly to the graphene plane. In such a system, the external ac-field is coupled to the relatively slow mechanical vibrations via plasmonic oscillations in the isolated graphene sheet. We show that the electrical field generates an effective pumping of the mechanical modes. It is demonstrated that in the case of underdamped plasma oscillation, a peculiar kind of geometrical resonance of the mechanical and plasma oscillations appear. The efficiency of pumping significantly increases when the wavenumber of the mechanical mode is in close agreement with the wavenumber of the plasma waves. The intensity of the pumping increases with the wavenumber of the mode. This phenomenon allows selective actuation of different mechanical modes, although the driving field is homogeneous.

  3. Elastic Moduli and Damping of Vibrational Modes of Aluminum/Silicon Carbide Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning

    1996-01-01

    Elastic and shear moduli were determined for two aluminum matrix composites containing 20 and 40 volume percent discontinuous silicon carbide, respectively, using transverse, longitudinal, and torsional vibrational modes of specimens prepared as thin beams. These moduli are consistent with those determined from stress-strain measurements. The damping factors for these modes were also determined. Thermal properties are used to show that part of the damping of transverse modes is caused by the transverse thermal currents discussed by C. Zener (thermo-elastic damping); this damping is frequency-dependent with a maximum damping factor of approximately 0.002. The remaining damping is frequency-independent, and has roughly similar values in transverse, longitudinal, and torsional modes: approximately 0.0001.

  4. Exploring the distinction between experimental resonant modes and theoretical eigenmodes: from vibrating plates to laser cavities.

    PubMed

    Tuan, P H; Wen, C P; Yu, Y T; Liang, H C; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2014-02-01

    Experimentally resonant modes are commonly presumed to correspond to eigenmodes in the same bounded domain. However, the one-to-one correspondence between theoretical eigenmodes and experimental observations is never reached. Theoretically, eigenmodes in numerous classical and quantum systems are the solutions of the homogeneous Helmholtz equation, whereas resonant modes should be solved from the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation. In the present paper we employ the eigenmode expansion method to derive the wave functions for manifesting the distinction between eigenmodes and resonant modes. The derived wave functions are successfully used to reconstruct a variety of experimental results including Chladni figures generated from the vibrating plate, resonant patterns excited from microwave cavities, and lasing modes emitted from the vertical cavity. PMID:25353549

  5. Passive and Active Vibration Control With Piezoelectric Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vigier, Yves; Agbossou, Amen; Richard, Claude

    2002-07-01

    The possibility of dissipating mechanical energy with piezoelectric fiber composites (PFC) is investigated. The techniques for manufacturing an active beam with integrated (PFC) are presented and applied to a cantilevered beam experiment. We evaluated experimentally the performances of the active beam in passive energy dissipation. Three vibration cases were analysed: electrodes of the PFCs are (i) in open circuit, (ii) short circuit and (iii) shunted with electrical impedance designed to dissipate the electrical energy, which has been converted from the beam mechanical energy by the PFCs. Then we presented numerical models to analyze the vibration of active beams connect to electrical impedance. The proposed models point out with an accurate order of magnitude the change in vibration amplitude of the analysed beam. Hence we validate experimentally and numerically the concept of vibration control with PFCs and point out some new contributions of PFCs in active or passive damping. (authors)

  6. A Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. This paper provides a tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements as well as a comparison of the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation. This paper also surveys the flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: Suppression of Transient Accelerations By Levitation (STABLE); the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Mount (MIM); and the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS).

  7. Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration-sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. A tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem, including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements, as well as a comparison or the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation is provided. The flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: suppression of transient accelerations by levitation, the microgravity vibration isolation mount, and the active rack isolation system are surveyed.

  8. Piezoelectric pushers for active vibration control of rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Kascak, Albert F.

    1988-01-01

    The active control of rotordynamic vibrations and stability by magnetic bearings and electromagnetic shakers have been discussed extensively in the literature. These devices, though effective, are usually large in volume and add significant weight to the stator. The use of piezoelectric pushers may provide similar degrees of effectiveness in light, compact packages. Tests are currently being conducted with piezoelectric pusher-based active vibration control. Results from tests performed on NASA test rigs as preliminary verification of the related theory are presented.

  9. Performance of active vibration control technology: the ACTEX flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, T. W.; Manning, R. A.; Qassim, K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and results of two intelligent structures space-flight experiments, each of which could affect architecture designs of future spacecraft. The first, the advanced controls technology experiment I (ACTEX I), is a variable stiffness tripod structure riding as a secondary payload on a classified spacecraft. It has been operating well past its expected life since becoming operational in 1996. Over 60 on-orbit experiments have been run on the ACTEX I flight experiment. These experiments form the basis for in-space controller design problems and for concluding lifetime/reliability data on the active control components. Transfer functions taken during the life of ACTEX I have shown consistent predictability and stability in structural behavior, including consistency with those measurements taken on the ground prior to a three year storage period and the launch event. ACTEX I can change its modal characteristics by employing its dynamic change mechanism that varies preloads in portions of its structure. Active control experiments have demonstrated maximum vibration reductions of 29 dB and 16 dB in the first two variable modes of the system, while operating over a remarkable on-orbit temperature range of -80 °C to 129 °C. The second experiment, ACTEX II, was successfully designed, ground-tested, and integrated on an experimental Department of Defense satellite prior to its loss during a launch vehicle failure in 1995. ACTEX II also had variable modal behavior by virtue of a two-axis gimbal and added challenges of structural flexibility by being a large deployable appendage. Although the loss of ACTEX II did not provide space environment experience, ground testing resulted in space qualifying the hardware and demonstrated 21 dB, 14 dB, and 8 dB reductions in amplitude of the first three primary structural modes. ACTEX II could use either active and/or passive techniques to affect vibration suppression. Both experiments trailblazed

  10. Analytical Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies for the Green Fluorescent Protein Computed with ONIOM: Chromophore Mode Character and Its Response to Environment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lee M; Lasoroski, Aurélie; Champion, Paul M; Sage, J Timothy; Frisch, Michael J; van Thor, Jasper J; Bearpark, Michael J

    2014-02-11

    A systematic comparison of different environmental effects on the vibrational modes of the 4-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone (HBDI) chromophore using the ONIOM method allows us to model how the molecule's spectroscopic transitions are modified in the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). ONIOM(QM:MM) reduces the expense of normal mode calculations when computing the majority of second derivatives only at the MM level. New developments described here for the efficient solution of the CPHF equations, including contributions from electrostatic interactions with environment charges, mean that QM model systems of ∼100 atoms can be embedded within a much larger MM environment of ∼5000 atoms. The resulting vibrational normal modes, their associated frequencies, and dipole derivative vectors have been used to interpret experimental difference spectra (GFPI2-GFPA), chromophore vibrational Stark shifts, and changes in the difference between electronic and vibrational transition dipoles (mode angles) in the protein environment. PMID:26580050

  11. Statistics and Properties of Low-Frequency Vibrational Modes in Structural Glasses.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Edan; Düring, Gustavo; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-07-15

    Low-frequency vibrational modes play a central role in determining various basic properties of glasses, yet their statistical and mechanical properties are not fully understood. Using extensive numerical simulations of several model glasses in three dimensions, we show that in systems of linear size L sufficiently smaller than a crossover size L_{D}, the low-frequency tail of the density of states follows D(ω)∼ω^{4} up to the vicinity of the lowest Goldstone mode frequency. We find that the sample-to-sample statistics of the minimal vibrational frequency in systems of size Lmodes are spatially quasilocalized and that their localization and associated quartic anharmonicity are largely frequency independent. The effect of preparation protocols on the low-frequency modes is elucidated, and a number of glassy length scales are briefly discussed. PMID:27472122

  12. An efficient vibration energy harvester with a multi-mode dynamic magnifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wanlu; Reddy Penamalli, Gopinath; Zuo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    A novel piezoelectric energy harvester with a multi-mode dynamic magnifier, which is capable of significantly increasing the bandwidth and the energy harvested from the ambient vibration, is proposed and investigated in this paper. The design comprises a multi-mode intermediate beam with a tip mass, called a ‘dynamic magnifier’, and an ‘energy harvesting beam’ with a tip mass. The piezoelectric film is adhered to the harvesting beam to harvest the vibration energy. By properly designing the parameters, such as the length, width and thickness of the two beams and the weight of the two tip masses, we can magnify the motion virtually in all the resonance frequencies of the energy harvesting beam, in a similar way as designing a new beam-type tuned mass damper (TMD) to damp the resonance frequencies of all the modes of the primary beam. Theoretical analysis, finite element simulation, and the experiment study are carried out. The results show that voltage produced by the harvesting beam is amplified for efficient energy harvesting over a broader frequency range, while the peaks of the first three modes of the primary beam can be effectively mitigated simultaneously. The experiment demonstrates 25.5 times more energy harvesting capacity than the conventional cantilever type harvester in the frequency range 3-300 Hz, and 100-1000 times more energy around all the first three resonances of the harvesting beam.

  13. Mechanisms of the Space Active Vibration Isolation (SAVI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Frank

    1992-01-01

    The Space Active Vibration Isolation (SAVI) is a concept for vibration isolation of one body from another with simultaneous precise control in 6 Degrees Of Freedom (DOF). SAVI achieves this using a combination of electromechanical linear actuators and magnetic actuators. Other mechanisms of interest include a structure for simulating the body being pointed, an apparatus to simulate the body that is the vibration source, and mechanisms to off-load the weight of each of these two bodies from the experiment to approximate a zero-g condition. A SAVI was built and tested to demonstrate these capabilities.

  14. Modeling vibrational dephasing and energy relaxation of intramolecular anharmonic modes for multidimensional infrared spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Akihito; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2006-08-28

    Starting from a system-bath Hamiltonian in a molecular coordinate representation, we examine an applicability of a stochastic multilevel model for vibrational dephasing and energy relaxation in multidimensional infrared spectroscopy. We consider an intramolecular anharmonic mode nonlinearly coupled to a colored noise bath at finite temperature. The system-bath interaction is assumed linear plus square in the system coordinate, but linear in the bath coordinates. The square-linear system-bath interaction leads to dephasing due to the frequency fluctuation of system vibration, while the linear-linear interaction contributes to energy relaxation and a part of dephasing arises from anharmonicity. To clarify the role and origin of vibrational dephasing and energy relaxation in the stochastic model, the system part is then transformed into an energy eigenstate representation without using the rotating wave approximation. Two-dimensional (2D) infrared spectra are then calculated by solving a low-temperature corrected quantum Fokker-Planck (LTC-QFP) equation for a colored noise bath and by the stochastic theory. In motional narrowing regime, the spectra from the stochastic model are quite different from those from the LTC-QFP. In spectral diffusion regime, however, the 2D line shapes from the stochastic model resemble those from the LTC-QFP besides the blueshifts caused by the dissipation from the colored noise bath. The preconditions for validity of the stochastic theory for molecular vibrational motion are also discussed. PMID:16965023

  15. Mode-specific intermolecular vibrational energy transfer. I. Phenyl selenocyanate and deuterated chloroform mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Hongtao; Li, Jiebo; Wen, Xiewen; Zheng, Junrong

    2010-05-01

    Vibrational energy transfer from the first excited state (2252 cm-1) of the C-D stretch of deuterated chloroform (DCCl3) to the 0-1 transition (2155 cm-1) of the CN stretch of phenyl selenocyanate (C6H5SeCN) in their 1:1 liquid mixture was observed with a pump/probe two-color two dimensional infrared spectroscopic technique. The mode-specific energy transfer can occur mainly because of the long vibrational lifetime of the CN stretch first excited state (˜300 ps) and the relatively strong hydrogen-bond between the C-D and CN (calculated H-bond formation energy in gas phase ˜-5.4 kcal/mol). The mode-specific energy transfer is relatively low efficient (only ˜2%), which is mainly because of the relatively short vibrational lifetime (˜9 ps) of the C-D stretch first excited state and the big donor/acceptor energy mismatch (97 cm-1) and the slow transfer kinetics (1/kCD→CN=330 ps).

  16. Approximate natural vibration analysis of rectangular plates with openings using assumed mode method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Dae Seung; Vladimir, Nikola; Choi, Tae MuK

    2013-09-01

    Natural vibration analysis of plates with openings of different shape represents an important issue in naval architecture and ocean engineering applications. In this paper, a procedure for vibration analysis of plates with openings and arbitrary edge constraints is presented. It is based on the assumed mode method, where natural frequencies and modes are determined by solving an eigenvalue problem of a multi-degree-of-freedom system matrix equation derived by using Lagrange's equations of motion. The presented solution represents an extension of a procedure for natural vibration analysis of rectangular plates without openings, which has been recently presented in the literature. The effect of an opening is taken into account in an intuitive way, i.e. by subtracting its energy from the total plate energy without opening. Illustrative numerical examples include dynamic analysis of rectangular plates with rectangular, elliptic, circular as well as oval openings with various plate thicknesses and different combinations of boundary conditions. The results are compared with those obtained by the finite element method (FEM) as well as those available in the relevant literature, and very good agreement is achieved.

  17. Low participation ratio vibrational modes in a limit-periodic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcoux, Catherine; Socolar, Joshua E. S.

    Motivated by the demonstration that patterned colloidal particles may form a limit-periodic phase, we study the nature of vibrational modes in a toy model based on the Taylor-Socolar tiling. We consider a triangular lattice of identical point masses with nearest neighbors connected by springs of two different strengths, where the pattern of spring constants reflects the limit-periodic structure of the tiling. Using calculations of the phonon spectra for crystalline approximants to the limit-periodic structure, we identify several hierarchies of modes shared by the full limit-periodic system that have arbitrarily low participation ratios. We present a heuristic explanation of the existence of such modes, which are robust in the presence of vacancies and small amounts of disorder in the spring constants. Supported by the NSF Research Triangle MRSEC (DMR-1121107).

  18. A procedure obtaining stiffnesses and masses of a structure from vibration modes and substructure static test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edighoffer, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    A component mode desynthesis procedure is developed for determining the unknown vibration characteristics of a structural component (i.e., a launch vehicle) given the vibration characteristics of a structural system composed of that component combined with a known one (i.e., a payload). At least one component static test has to be performed. These data are used in conjunction with the system measured frequencies and mode shapes to obtain the vibration characteristics of each component. The flight dynamics of an empty launch vehicle can be determined from measurements made on a vehicle/payload combination in conjunction with a static test on the payload.

  19. The cancellation of repetitive noise and vibration by active nethods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghtesadi, Kh.; Chaplin, G. B. B.

    The active attenuation of diesel engine noise is discussed as well as the active control of vibration. The system used is found to work best with repetitive sources of noise. Applications of active noise attentuation include noise inside helicopters and propellor aircraft, auxilliary generators and large compressors, and noise on emergency vehicles such as fire engines and snow cats.

  20. Elements of active vibration control for rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    The success or failure of active vibration control is determined by the availability of suitable actuators, modeling of the entire system including all active elements, positioning of the actuators and sensors, and implementation of problem-adapted control concepts. All of these topics are outlined and their special problems are discussed in detail. Special attention is given to efficient modeling of systems, especially for considering the active elements. Finally, design methods for and the application of active vibration control on rotating machinery are demonstrated by several real applications.

  1. A novel signal compression method based on optimal ensemble empirical mode decomposition for bearing vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Tse, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Today, remote machine condition monitoring is popular due to the continuous advancement in wireless communication. Bearing is the most frequently and easily failed component in many rotating machines. To accurately identify the type of bearing fault, large amounts of vibration data need to be collected. However, the volume of transmitted data cannot be too high because the bandwidth of wireless communication is limited. To solve this problem, the data are usually compressed before transmitting to a remote maintenance center. This paper proposes a novel signal compression method that can substantially reduce the amount of data that need to be transmitted without sacrificing the accuracy of fault identification. The proposed signal compression method is based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), which is an effective method for adaptively decomposing the vibration signal into different bands of signal components, termed intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). An optimization method was designed to automatically select appropriate EEMD parameters for the analyzed signal, and in particular to select the appropriate level of the added white noise in the EEMD method. An index termed the relative root-mean-square error was used to evaluate the decomposition performances under different noise levels to find the optimal level. After applying the optimal EEMD method to a vibration signal, the IMF relating to the bearing fault can be extracted from the original vibration signal. Compressing this signal component obtains a much smaller proportion of data samples to be retained for transmission and further reconstruction. The proposed compression method were also compared with the popular wavelet compression method. Experimental results demonstrate that the optimization of EEMD parameters can automatically find appropriate EEMD parameters for the analyzed signals, and the IMF-based compression method provides a higher compression ratio, while retaining the bearing defect

  2. Detection of degradation in polyester implants by analysing mode shapes of structure vibration.

    PubMed

    Samami, Hassan; Pan, Jingzhe

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on using vibration analysis to detect degradation in degrading polyesters. A numerical model of a degrading plate sample is considered. The plate is assumed to degrade following the typical behaviour of amorphous copolymers of polylactide and polyglycolide. Due to the well-known autocatalytic effect in the degradation of these polyesters, the inner core of the plate degrades faster than outer surface region, forming layers of materials with varying Young׳s modulus. Firstly the change in molecular weight and corresponding change in Young׳s modulus at different times are calculated using the mathematical models developed in our previous work. Secondly the first four mode shapes of transverse vibration of the plate are calculated using the finite element method. Finally the curvature of the mode shapes are calculated and related to the spatial distribution of the polymer degradation. It is shown that the curvature of the mode shapes can be used to detect the onset and distribution of polymer degradation. The level of measurement accuracy required in an experiment is presented to guide practical applications of the method. At the end of this paper a demonstration case of coronary stent is presented showing how the method can be used to detect degradation in an implant of sophisticated structure. PMID:27235780

  3. Stick-slip failure in granular experiments: the role of low-frequency vibrational modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzinski, T., III; Daniels, K.

    2014-12-01

    The intermittent nature of strain at geological faults is a consequence of the loss of rigidity of the gouge. Due to the granular nature of the gouge, we take insight from granular physics in order to characterize the role of gouge in the generation of seismic events. In static granular packings, the loss of rigidity has been observed to be associated with an excess in low-frequency vibrational modes. The same holds true in both molecular and colloidal glasses, suggesting that excess low-frequency vibrational modes are a general feature in the failure of disordered solids. Therefore, we seek a relationship between these low-frequency modes and spatiotemporal patterns of failure by studying an experimental analog to a geological fault. Specifically, we measure the acoustic emissions from jammed, quasi-2D granular packings under shear. We use a split-bottom annular shear geometry, driven with a linear-ramp torque in order to generate stick-slip behavior, and observe intervals of both periodic and aperiodic slip. We investigate how low-frequency emissions are associated with both local and global slip events of various magnitudes and directions. Twelve piezoelectric acoustic receivers, an imaging system, and high-resolution stress/strain sensors enable direct comparison of acoustic properties as the system approaches failure. The use of photoelastic grains enables local measurement of changes to the internal stresses.

  4. Active vibration control of basic structures using macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-03-01

    In the modern naval battle, as the anti-detection technique developing fleetly, enhancing submarine's hidden ability is becoming more and more important. However, in view of the worse control effect at low-frequency and weak adjustability to external influence, conventional passive vibration control can't satisfy the modern naval rigorous demands. Fortunately, active vibration control technology not only monitors the structure's real-time vibration, but also has more remarkable control effects and superior suitability. At the present time, it has a primary application in the vibration damping of ship engineering. In addition, due to functional materials rapidly developing, with the coming of piezoelectric composite materials, the advanced active control techniques have more applicability, lager damp amplitude and wider applied field, which basing on the piezoelectric-effect and inverse- piezoelectric-effect of piezoelectric materials. Especially, in the end of nineties, NASA had successfully manufactured the excellent macro fiber composite (MFC), which assembles actuating and sensing abilities. Comparing with the conventional piezoelectric ceramic materials, it provides the required durability, excellent flexibility, higher electromechanical coupling factors and stronger longitudinal actuating force by using interdigital electrodes. On the basis of the application of cantilever beam' active vibration control by using MFC actuators, this paper started with the mechanical characteristics of its actuating and sensing equations, and then investigated its piezoelectric feedback scale factor when equipped on the honeycomb aluminous panel. Finally, in order to validate the theoretical analysis method, the vibration control experiment of cantilever beam and honeycomb aluminous panel are built and tested with different activating force. The experimental results verify that MFC used in submarine structures' active vibration control are feasible and effective.

  5. Active vibration control based on piezoelectric smart composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Le; Lu, Qingqing; Fei, Fan; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-12-01

    An aircraft’s vertical fin may experience dramatic buffet loads in high angle of attack flight conditions, and these buffet loads would cause huge vibration and dynamic stress on the vertical fin structure. To reduce the dynamic vibration of the vertical fin structure, macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators were used in this paper. The drive moment equations and sensing voltage equations of the MFC actuators were developed. Finite element analysis models based on three kinds of models of simplified vertical fin structures with surface-bonded MFC actuators were established in ABAQUS. The equivalent damping ratio of the structure was employed in finite element analysis, in order to measure the effectiveness of vibration control. Further, an open-loop test for the active vibration control system of the vertical fin with MFC actuators was designed and developed. The experimental results validated the effectiveness of the MFC actuators as well as the developed methodology.

  6. Docking Prediction of a Water Soluble Porphyrin and Tubulin Assisted with Resonance Raman and Vibrational Mode Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMicken, Brady; Brancaleon, Lorenzo; Thomas, Robert; Parker, James

    2015-03-01

    The ability to modify protein conformation by controlling its partial unfolding may have practical applications such as diminishing its function or blocking its activity. One method used to induce partial unfolding of a protein involves the use of a photosensitizer non-covalently bound to a protein that triggers photochemical reactions upon irradiation leading to protein conformational changes. We are investigating the photoinduced conformational changes of tubulin mediated by a bound water-soluble porphyrin that acts as a photosensitizer. Analysis of how tubulin conformational changes affect its function including polymeric assembly forming microtubules is of interest to uncover the mechanism responsible for the structural change. Our approach to better understand the conformational change, we first plan to discover the binding location between the porphyrin and protein. Use of vibrational mode analysis using density functional theory and resonance Raman experiments targeting the porphyrin molecule will be used to correlate Raman peaks with vibrational modes. The relative intensities of the porphyrin bound to tubulin can be used to calculate the equilibrium geometry observed from Raman spectra. These data will provide the relative distortion of the porphyrin when bound to tubulin, which will subsequently be used in docking simulations to find the most likely binding configuration.

  7. Active and passive vibration suppression for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The relative benefits of passive and active vibration suppression for large space structures (LSS) are discussed. The intent is to sketch the true ranges of applicability of these approaches using previously published technical results. It was found that the distinction between active and passive vibration suppression approaches is not as sharp as might be thought at first. The relative simplicity, reliability, and cost effectiveness touted for passive measures are vitiated by 'hidden costs' bound up with detailed engineering implementation issues and inherent performance limitations. At the same time, reliability and robustness issues are often cited against active control. It is argued that a continuum of vibration suppression measures offering mutually supporting capabilities is needed. The challenge is to properly orchestrate a spectrum of methods to reap the synergistic benefits of combined advanced materials, passive damping, and active control.

  8. Active control of cantilever-beam vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbyn, M. Roman

    2002-11-01

    A bang-bang control system previously developed for the stabilization of a rigid platform [ISA Trans. 21, 55-59 (1982)] has been adapted to the problem of reducing flexural vibrations of a beam. The electromechanical system develops an appropriate control signal for the actuator from samples of the disturbance by analog and digital signal processing using integrated circuits. The effectiveness of this approach is predicated upon the sampling rate being much higher than the maximum vibration frequency to be silenced. It is also robust with respect to the waveform of the disturbance. Noise reductions of 10-20 dB have been achieved, depending on the bandwidth of the noise. The cantilever, chosen because of its mechanical and theoretical simplicity, provides a good foundation for the study of more complex structures, like airfoils and nonrigid platforms. In both experimental and analytical investigations the emphasis has been on the optimization of control parameters, particularly with regard to the application of the cancellation signal. Reduction in size and cost of the control unit is possible by incorporating the latest technological advances in electronic and electromechanical devices, such as FPGA boards and MEMS components.

  9. Large amplitude free vibrations of Timoshenko beams at higher modes using coupled displacement field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Bhaskar, K.; Meera Saheb, K.

    2015-12-01

    A simple but accurate continuum solution for the shear flexible beam problem using the energy method involves in assuming suitable single term admissible functions for the lateral displacement and total rotation. This leads to two non-linear temporal differential equations in terms of the lateral displacement and the total rotation and are difficult, if not impossible, to solve to obtain the large amplitude fundamental frequencies of beams as a function of the amplitude and slenderness ratios of the vibrating beam. This situation can be avoided if one uses the concept of coupled displacement field where in the fields for lateral displacement and the total rotation are coupled through the static equilibrium equation. In this paper the lateral displacement field is assumed and the field for the total rotation is evaluated through the coupling equation. This approach leads to only one undetermined coefficient which can easily be used in the principle of conservation of total energy of the vibrating beam at a given time, neglecting damping. Finally, through a number of algebraic manipulations, one gets a nonlinear equation of Duffing type which can be solved using any standard method. To demonstrate the simplicity of the method discussed above the problem of large amplitude free vibrations of a uniform shear flexible hinged beam at higher modes with ends immovable to move axially has been solved. The numerical results obtained from the present formulation are in very good agreement with those obtained through finite element and other continuum methods for the fundamental mode, thus demonstrating the efficacy of the proposed method. Also some interesting observations are made with variation of frequency Vs amplitude at different modes.

  10. Effects of compression on the vibrational modes of marginally jammed solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyart, Matthieu; Silbert, Leonardo E.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Witten, Thomas A.

    2005-11-01

    Glasses have a large excess of low-frequency vibrational modes in comparison with most crystalline solids. We show that such a feature is a necessary consequence of the weak connectivity of the solid, and that the frequency of modes in excess is very sensitive to the pressure. We analyze, in particular, two systems whose density D(ω) of vibrational modes of angular frequency ω display scaling behaviors with the packing fraction: (i) simulations of jammed packings of particles interacting through finite-range, purely repulsive potentials, comprised of weakly compressed spheres at zero temperature and (ii) a system with the same network of contacts, but where the force between any particles in contact (and therefore the total pressure) is set to zero. We account in the two cases for the observed (a) convergence of D(ω) toward a nonzero constant as ω→0 , (b) appearance of a low-frequency cutoff ω* , and (c) power-law increase of ω* with compression. Differences between these two systems occur at a lower frequency. The density of states of the modified system displays an abrupt plateau that appears at ω* , below which we expect the system to behave as a normal, continuous, elastic body. In the unmodified system, the pressure lowers the frequency of the modes in excess. The requirement of stability despite the destabilizing effect of pressure yields a lower bound on the number of extra contact per particle δz:δz⩾p1/2 , which generalizes the Maxwell criterion for rigidity when pressure is present. This scaling behavior is observed in the simulations. We finally discuss how the cooling procedure can affect the microscopic structure and the density of normal modes.

  11. Active control of bending vibrations in thick bars using PZT stack actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Parker, G.; Barney, P.; Rodeman, R.

    1995-07-01

    An experimental investigation into active control of bending vibrations in thick bar and plate-like structural elements is described. This work is motivated by vibration problems in machine tools and photolithography machines that require greater control authority than available from conventional surface mounted PZT patches or PVDF films. Focus of this experiment is a cantilevered circular steel bar in which PZT stacks are mounted in cutouts near the bar root. Axially aligned and offset from the neutral axis, these actuators control the bending vibrations by generating moments in the bar through their compressive loads. A Positive Feedback control law is used to significantly augment the damping in the first bending mode. Implications of the experimental results for machine tool stability enhancement are discussed.

  12. Calculation of low-frequency vibrational modes of biologically important isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Inke; Rainsford, Tamath J.; Fischer, Bernd M.; Abbott, Derek

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we compare the value of different molecular modeling techniques for the prediction of vibrational modes, especially in the mid- and far-infrared region. There is a wide range of different levels of theory available for molecular modelling - the choice depending on the kind of system to be investigated. For our calculations we use different theoretical approaches such as Hartree-Fock and Density functional theory. We also compare the performances of two available electronic structure programs-Gamess-US and Gaussian03. As examples, we use two different retinoids - all-trans retinal and all-trans retinoic acid - derivatives of Vitamin A.

  13. Lowest Energy Vibrational Modes of Nine Naphthalene Derivatives; Experiment and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Pirali, O.; Laquais, Y.; Falvo, C.; Parneix, P.; Brechignac, Ph.

    2013-06-01

    FIR gas phase absorption spectra of nine naphthalene derivatives (azulene, quinoline, isoquinoline, biphenyl, diphenylmethane, bibenzyl, 2-, 3-, and 4-phenyltoluene) have been recorded at medium resolution (0.5 wn) using a Fourier transform Bruker IFS125 interferometer located on the AILES beamline of SOLEIL synchrotron. Assignments of these weak vibrational bands were performed using density-functional theory calculations carried out at the harmonic and anharmonic levels (B97-1/6-311G(d,p)). Molecular structure dependence of the FIR spectra is discussed based on the comparative study of several selected FIR modes.

  14. Lowest energy vibrational modes of some naphthalene derivatives: Azulene, quinoline, isoquinoline - Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Pirali, O.; Loquais, Y.; Falvo, C.; Bréchignac, Ph.

    2013-02-01

    Far infrared (FIR) gas phase absorption spectra of azulene, quinoline and isoquinoline have been recorded using a Fourier transform Bruker IFS125 interferometer at medium resolution (0.5 cm-1). Assignments of these weak vibrational bands were performed using density-functional theory calculations carried out at the harmonic and anharmonic levels. Agreement between observed and calculated band positions is better than 5% for azulene and 1% for quinoline and isoquinoline. The relative band intensities are also correctly predicted. Molecular structure dependence of the FIR spectra is discussed based on the comparative study of three selected FIR modes.

  15. Identification of the local vibrational modes of small nitrogen clusters in dilute GaAsN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, A.; Barker, S. J.; Jones, R.; Williams, R. S.; Ashwin, M. J.; Newman, R. C.; Stavrinou, P. N.; Parry, G.; Jones, T. S.; Öberg, S.; Briddon, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Ultra-high-resolution infra-red local vibrational mode (IR LVM) spectroscopy measurements together with density-functional calculations have been used to identify the signatures of close substitutional nitrogen ( NAs) pairs in GaAs1-xNx alloys with concentrations of x<0.025. We show that the presence of sub-peaks close to the NAs absorption band can be attributed to nitrogen pairs up to fourth neighbor position. Additionally, we suggest that the nitrogen pairs which give rise to the deepest levels below the conduction band edge are the first to be removed upon annealing.

  16. Vibrational modes and changing molecular conformation of perfluororubrene in thin films and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, F.; Scholz, R.; Gerlach, A.; Schreiber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of perfluororubrene (PF-RUB) in thin films on silicon wafers with a native oxide layer as well as on silicon wafers covered with a self-assembled monolayer and in dichloromethane solution. In comparison with computed Raman and IR spectra, we can assign the molecular modes and identify two molecular conformations with twisted and planar tetracene backbones of the molecule. Moreover, we employ Raman imaging techniques to study the morphology and distribution of the molecular conformation in PF-RUB thin films.

  17. Signatures of different vibrational modes in strong-field fragmentation of diiodomethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaderiya, B.; Malakar, Y.; Kanaka Raju, P.; Pearson, W. L.; Ziaee, F.; Jensen, K.; Rajput, J.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Roles, D.; Rudenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    The diiodomethane molecule (CH2 I2) has served as a model system for time-domain studies of large-scale bending vibrations and concerted elimination of I2+.Here we present the results of a time-resolved 3D Coulomb explosion imaging experiment on diiodomethane that maps ultrafast dynamics of both, bound and dissociating nuclear wave packets driven by a strong laser field. Measuring yields, kinetic energies and emission angles of coincident ionic fragments as a function of time delay between two 25 fs, 800 nm pump and probe pulses, we track the propagation of different dissociation pathways and visualize vibrational motion of the molecule. Analyzing channel-selective Fourier spectra, we observe signatures of both, bending and stretching vibrations of diiodomethane, and reveal correlation between bending motion (the I-C-I ``scissors'' mode) and different fragmentation pathways, including I2+elimination. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. DOE. K. R. P. and W. L. P. supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049, K.J. supported by the NSF-REU Grant No. PHYS-1461251.

  18. Transient currents of a single molecular junction with a vibrational mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guo-Hui; Xiong, Bo; Dong, Bing

    2016-02-01

    By using a propagation scheme for current matrices and an auxiliary mode expansion method, we investigate the transient dynamics of a single molecular junction coupled with a vibrational mode. Our approach is based on the spinless Anderson-Holstein model and the dressed tunnelling approximation for the electronic self-energy in the polaronic regime. The time-dependent currents after a sudden switching on the tunnelling to leads, an abrupt upward step bias pulse and a step potential on the quantum dot are calculated. We show that the strong electron-phonon interaction greatly influences the nonlinear response properties of the system, and gives rise to interesting characteristics on the time traces of transient currents.

  19. Vibrational relaxation of bulk modes perturbed by electronic state of dilute impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ta-Chau; Chou, Shiow-Hwa; Li, Hung-Wen; Lin, Sheng-Hsien

    1993-08-01

    Vibrational dephasing of the 1385 cm-1 vibron of host molecules (naphthalene) perturbed by electronically excited guest molecules (pentacene) was studied by the time-resolved coherent Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CSRS) in the temperature region of 6-26 K. The decay time was faster when the excitation frequency was tuned from the off-resonance to the resonance of the electronic transition of pentacene. For the resonance case, longer decay times were observed at higher temperatures (˜26 K) than at low temperatures (˜6 K). Two possible mechanisms were considered for the inverse temperature behavior. The shorter decay time in the impurity perturbed domains may be attributed to the increase of a coupling strength on the decay channel from 1385 cm-1 mode to 1365 cm-1 mode by stimulating phonon emission.

  20. Vibration of a thickness-twist mode piezoelectric resonator with asymmetric, nonuniform electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiashi; Chen, Ziguang; Hu, Yuantai

    2008-04-01

    We studied the effect of electrodes with varying thicknesses on thickness-twist modes in a piezoelectric plate resonator of crystals of 6mm symmetry. The focus is on the effects of asymmetric electrodes, which do not seem to have been examined before. A theoretical analysis is performed using the theory of linear piezoelectricity. A trigonometric series solution is obtained that is relatively rare from the equations of piezoelectricity. Numerical calculations are made based on the series solution. Results show that asymmetric, nonuniform electrodes have a strong effect on vibration mode shapes. This effect offers the possibility of using nonuniform electrodes in design to achieve various goals. The quantitative results in this paper are useful for the purpose. PMID:18467228

  1. Adaptive control of an active seat for occupant vibration reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zengkang; Hillis, Andrew J.; Darling, Jocelyn

    2015-08-01

    The harmful effects on human performance and health caused by unwanted vibration from vehicle seats are of increasing concern. This paper presents an active seat system to reduce the vibration level transmitted to the seat pan and the occupants' body under low frequency periodic excitation. Firstly, the detail of the mechanical structure is given and the active seat dynamics without external load are characterized by vibration transmissibility and frequency responses under different excitation forces. Owing the nonlinear and time-varying behaviour of the proposed system, a Filtered-x least-mean-square (FXLMS) adaptive control algorithm with on-line Fast-block LMS (FBLMS) identification process is employed to manage the system operation for high vibration cancellation performance. The effectiveness of the active seat system is assessed through real-time experimental tests using different excitation profiles. The system identification results show that an accurate estimation of the secondary path is achieved by using the FBLMS on-line technique. Substantial reduction is found for cancelling periodic vibration containing single and multiple frequencies. Additionally, the robustness and stability of the control system are validated through transient switching frequency tests.

  2. Active control of panel vibrations induced by boundary-layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1991-01-01

    Some problems in active control of panel vibration excited by a boundary layer flow over a flat plate are studied. In the first phase of the study, the optimal control problem of vibrating elastic panel induced by a fluid dynamical loading was studied. For a simply supported rectangular plate, the vibration control problem can be analyzed by a modal analysis. The control objective is to minimize the total cost functional, which is the sum of a vibrational energy and the control cost. By means of the modal expansion, the dynamical equation for the plate and the cost functional are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations and the cost functions for the modes. For the linear elastic plate, the modes become uncoupled. The control of each modal amplitude reduces to the so-called linear regulator problem in control theory. Such problems can then be solved by the method of adjoint state. The optimality system of equations was solved numerically by a shooting method. The results are summarized.

  3. Modes of vibration of air-driven free reeds in transient and steady state oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, Ammon; Vines, Justin; Cottingham, James P.

    2003-10-01

    Most treatments of free reed oscillation approximate the reed vibration as a sinusoidal oscillation of a cantilever beam in the fundamental transverse mode, although some evidence of the presence of the second transverse mode has been reported. [Cottingham et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 940 (1999)]. Some new measurements of the oscillation of a free reed from an American reed organ mounted on a laboratory wind chest show that the second beam mode is present even at low amplitudes of oscillation, and is often observable in the transient period before the oscillation reaches full amplitude. Some evidence of higher frequency modes has also been observed. In addition to steady state oscillation, reed motion during two types of attack transients has been studied. In one case, with full playing pressure in the wind chest and air flowing through the reed, the reed is restrained in its unblown equilibrium position and suddenly released. In another configuration, the reed is provided with a pallet valve mechanism, and reed oscillation is initiated by a sudden rush of air when the valve is opened. [Work supported by the NSF from REU Grant No. 0139096.

  4. Mode transitions in vortex-induced vibrations of a flexible pipe near plane boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaochao; Wang, Yongxue; Wang, Guoyu; Jiang, Meirong; Sun, Ying

    2013-09-01

    A pipe model with a mass ratio (mass/displaced mass) of 4.30 was tested to investigate the vortex-induced vibrations of submarine pipeline spans near the seabed. The pipe model was designed as a bending stiffness-dominated beam. The gap ratios (gap to diameter ratio) at the pipe ends were 4.0, 6.0, and 8.0. The flow velocity was systematically varied in the 0-16.71 nondimensional velocity range based on the first natural frequency. The mode transition between the first and the second mode as the flow velocity increases was investigated. At various transition flow velocities, the research indicates that the peak frequencies with respect to displacement are not identical along the pipe, nor the frequencies associated with the peak of the amplitude spectra for the first four modes as well. The mode transition is associated with a continuous change in the amplitude, but there's a jump in frequency, and a gradual process along the pipe length.

  5. Analysis of Vibration and Noise of Construction Machinery Based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition and Spectral Correlation Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuebiao; Zhou, Yiqi; Yu, Gang; Lu, Dan

    In order to analyze the effect of engine vibration on cab noise of construction machinery in multi-frequency bands, a new method based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and spectral correlation analysis is proposed. Firstly, the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of vibration and noise signals were obtained by EEMD method, and then the IMFs which have the same frequency bands were selected. Secondly, we calculated the spectral correlation coefficients between the selected IMFs, getting the main frequency bands in which engine vibration has significant impact on cab noise. Thirdly, the dominated frequencies were picked out and analyzed by spectral analysis method. The study result shows that the main frequency bands and dominated frequencies in which engine vibration have serious impact on cab noise can be identified effectively by the proposed method, which provides effective guidance to noise reduction of construction machinery.

  6. Wake modes of a cylinder undergoing free streamwise vortex-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagney, N.; Balabani, S.

    2013-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the response of a circular cylinder experiencing vortex-induced vibrations (VIVs) in the streamwise direction and the resulting wake field were performed for a range of reduced velocities using time-resolved Particle-Image Velocimetry in the Reynolds number range 450-3700. The dominant vortex shedding mode was identified using phase-averaged vorticity fields. The cylinder response amplitude was characterised by two response branches, separated by a low amplitude region at resonance, as has been previously reported in the literature. During the first response branch the wake exhibited not only the symmetric S-I mode, but also the alternate A-II mode at slightly higher reduced velocities. For both modes, the vortices were observed to be shed at the cylinder response frequency, but rearranged downstream into a more stable structure in which the velocity fluctuations were no longer synchronised to the cylinder motion. A special case of the A-II mode, referred to as the SA mode, was found to dominate in the second response branch and the low amplitude region, while the far wake and the cylinder motion were synchronised (lock-in). A change in the timing of the vortex shedding with respect to the cylinder motion was observed between the low amplitude region and the second response branch. This is likely to correspond to a change in the fluid forcing and levels of excitation, and may explain the variation in the cylinder amplitude observed in this region. Lock-in and the second response branch were found to coincide with a contraction of the wake and an increase in strength of the shed vortices. This work reveals the inherent differences between the extensively studied case of transverse-only VIV and the streamwise-only case, which is crucial if the wealth of information available on transverse VIV is to be extended to the more practical two degree-of-freedom case.

  7. Spectroscopic and theoretical study of the charge transfer interaction effect on the vibrational modes and nonlinear optical properties in L-asparaginium nitrate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elleuch, Nabil; Abid, Younes; Feki, Habib

    2016-09-01

    Single crystals of L-asparaginium nitrate (LAsnN) were grown by slow evaporation technique. To confirm the crystalline nature of the obtained compound, samples were the subject of an XRPD. The density functional theory (DFT) computations were carried out at B3LYP/6-31G (d) level to reach the optimized geometry, the vibrational spectra and the NLO properties. The excellent agreement between simulated and observed vibrational spectra led to a reliable vibrational assignment. To demonstrate the various charge transfer interactions that stabilize the compound and led to the high nonlinear optical activity, NBO analysis was performed. Also, owing to the hydrogen bond formation, a lowering in the HOMO-LUMO energy gap is noticed. Moreover, as a result of the charge transfer interactions, the symmetry of the nitrate ions was lost and some forbidden modes were excited.

  8. Activities report of the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research in fluid dynamics and acoustics (noise and vibration control); audiology and human effects (audiotory communication and hearing conservation); structures and machinery (automotive design); and shock analysis is summarized. Underwater acoustics; active noise control; aircraft noise; wind turbine noise; laminar flow fans; helmet design; and the acoustics of flow ducts were studied.

  9. Six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Leonard S.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 1 Jan. - 31 Mar. 1993 on six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application is presented. A performance and cost report is included. Topics covered include: actuator testing; mechanical amplifier design; and neural network control system development and experimental evaluation.

  10. Effectiveness of a passive-active vibration isolation system with actuator constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lingling; Sun, Wei; Song, Kongjie; Hansen, Colin H.

    2014-05-01

    In the prediction of active vibration isolation performance, control force requirements were ignored in previous work. This may limit the realization of theoretically predicted isolation performance if control force of large magnitude cannot be supplied by actuators. The behavior of a feed-forward active isolation system subjected to actuator output constraints is investigated. Distributed parameter models are developed to analyze the system response, and to produce a transfer matrix for the design of an integrated passive-active isolation system. Cost functions comprising a combination of the vibration transmission energy and the sum of the squared control forces are proposed. The example system considered is a rigid body connected to a simply supported plate via two passive-active isolation mounts. Vertical and transverse forces as well as a rotational moment are applied at the rigid body, and resonances excited in elastic mounts and the supporting plate are analyzed. The overall isolation performance is evaluated by numerical simulation. The simulation results are then compared with those obtained using unconstrained control strategies. In addition, the effects of waves in elastic mounts are analyzed. It is shown that the control strategies which rely on unconstrained actuator outputs may give substantial power transmission reductions over a wide frequency range, but also require large control force amplitudes to control excited vibration modes of the system. Expected power transmission reductions for modified control strategies that incorporate constrained actuator outputs are considerably less than typical reductions with unconstrained actuator outputs. In the frequency range in which rigid body modes are present, the control strategies can only achieve 5-10 dB power transmission reduction, when control forces are constrained to be the same order of the magnitude as the primary vertical force. The resonances of the elastic mounts result in a notable increase

  11. Improving the vibration suppression capabilities of a magneto-rheological damper using hybrid active and semi-active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Irfan; Wagg, David; Sims, Neil D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid active and semi-active control method for vibration suppression in flexible structures. The method uses a combination of a semi-active device and an active control actuator situated elsewhere in the structure to suppress vibrations. The key novelty is to use the hybrid controller to enable the magneto-rheological damper to achieve a performance as close to a fully active device as possible. This is achieved by ensuring that the active actuator can assist the magneto-rheological damper in the regions where energy is required. In addition, the hybrid active and semi-active controller is designed to minimize the switching of the semi-active controller. The control framework used is the immersion and invariance control technique in combination with sliding mode control. A two degree-of-freedom system with lightly damped resonances is used as an example system. Both numerical and experimental results are generated for this system, and then compared as part of a validation study. The experimental system uses hardware-in-the-loop to simulate the effect of both the degrees-of-freedom. The results show that the concept is viable both numerically and experimentally, and improved vibration suppression results can be obtained for the magneto-rheological damper that approach the performance of an active device.

  12. Vibrational relaxation of the bending mode of shock-heated CO2 by laser-absorption measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, D. J.; Bershader, D.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the vibrational relaxation characteristics of shock-heated CO2 using a tuned CO2 laser absorption technique. Absorption-coefficient histories were obtained for a single rotational state in each of the -10 0- and -02 0- levels over the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K, and for 21 rotational states of the -10 0- level at 1000 K. These histories have been combined with translational-rotational temperature histories based on interferometer measurements to calculate vibrational relaxation times for the bending mode. The results verify the mutual equilibrium of the bending and symmetric-stretch modes due to Fermi resonance. The bending mode relaxation times are approximately 10% shorter than predicted from interferometer results using the ratio of specific heats. Furthermore, relaxation times based on measurements of different rotational states at 1000 K show a variation with quantum number J, indicating a possible rotational nonequilibrium during the vibration relaxation process.

  13. Ab initio study on the electronic structure and vibration modes of alkali and alkaline-earth amides and alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumuraya, Takao; Shishidou, Tatsuya; Oguchi, Tamio

    2009-05-01

    We study the electronic structure and vibrational modes of several amides M(NH2)n and alanates M(AlH4)n (M = K, Na, Li, Ca and Mg), focusing on the role of cation states. Calculated breathing stretching vibration modes for these compounds are compared with measured infrared and Raman spectra. In the amides, we find a significant tendency such that the breathing mode frequencies and the structural parameters of NH2 vary in accordance with the ionization energy of cation. The tendency may be explained by the strength in hybridization between cation orbitals and molecular orbitals of (NH2)-. The microscopic mechanism of correlations between the vibration frequencies and structural parameters is elucidated in relation to the electronic structure. A possible similar tendency in the alanates is also discussed.

  14. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.; Dirusso, E.; Fleming, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 microns down to approximately 25 microns (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  15. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  16. Powerful Low-Frequency Vibrators for Active Seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A.S.; Chichinin, I.S.; Korneev, V.A.

    2003-12-01

    In the past two decades, active seismology studies in Russia have made use of powerful (40- and 100-ton) low-frequency vibrators. These sources create a force amplitude of up to 100 tons and function in the 1.5 3, 3 6, and 5 10 Hz frequency bands. The mobile versions of the vibrator have a force amplitude of 40 tons and a 6 12 Hz frequency band. Recording distances for the 100-ton vibrator are as large as 350 km, enabling the refracted waves to penetrate down to 50 km depths. Vibrator operation sessions are highly repeatable, having distinct summer or winter spectral patterns. A long profile of seismic records allows estimation of fault zone depths using changes in recorded spectra. Other applications include deep seismic profiling, seismic hazard mapping, structural testing, stress-induced anisotropy studies, seismic station calibration, and large-structure integrity testing. The theoretical description of the low-frequency vibrator is given in the appendices, which contain numerical examples.

  17. Effects of phase and coupling between the vibrational modes on selective excitation in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Vishesha; Malinovsky, Vladimir S.; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2010-06-15

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has been a major tool of investigation of biological structures as it contains the vibrational signature of molecules. A quantum control method based on chirped pulse adiabatic passage was recently proposed for selective excitation of a predetermined vibrational mode in CARS microscopy [Malinovskaya and Malinovsky, Opt. Lett. 32, 707 (2007)]. The method utilizes the chirp sign variation at the peak pulse amplitude and gives a robust adiabatic excitation of the desired vibrational mode. Using this method, we investigate the impact of coupling between vibrational modes in molecules on controllability of excitation of the CARS signal. We analyze two models of two coupled two-level systems (TLSs) having slightly different transitional frequencies. The first model, featuring degenerate ground states of the TLSs, gives robust adiabatic excitation and maximum coherence in the resonant TLS for positive value of the chirp. In the second model, implying nondegenerate ground states in the TLSs, a population distribution is observed in both TLSs, resulting in a lack of selectivity of excitation and low coherence. It is shown that the relative phase and coupling between the TLSs play an important role in optimizing coherence in the desired vibrational mode and suppressing unwanted transitions in CARS microscopy.

  18. Broadband energy harvesting by exploiting nonlinear oscillations around the second vibration mode of a rectangular piezoelectric bistable laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Dai, Fuhong; Du, Shanyi

    2015-04-01

    Recently bistable composite laminates have been investigated for broadband energy harvesting, by taking advantage of their nonlinear oscillations around the first vibration mode. However, it has been reported that the excitation acceleration needed for the desired large amplitude limit cycle oscillation is too high, if the first vibration mode is elevated to relative higher frequencies (60 Hz e.g.). This study investigates the feasibility of exploiting the nonlinear oscillations around the second vibration mode of a rectangular piezoelectric bistable laminate (RPBL), for broadband vibration energy harvesting at relative higher frequencies, but with relative low excitation acceleration. The proposed RPBL has three oscillation patterns around the second vibration mode, including single-well oscillation, chaotic intermittency oscillation and limit cycle oscillation. The broadband characteristics and the considerable energy conversion efficiency of the RPBL are demonstrated in experiments. The static nonlinearity and the dynamic responses of the RPBL are investigated by finite element method. Finite element analysis (FEA) reveals that the enhanced dynamic responses of the RPBL are due to its softening bending stiffness and the local snap through phenomenon. The FEA results coincide reasonably well with experimental results.

  19. Active vibration control of periodic disturbances using a DEAP damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarban, Rahimullah; Jones, Richard W.; Mace, Brian; Rustighi, Emiliano

    2010-04-01

    A potential problem that could possibly restrict the application of dielectric electro-active polymer (DEAP) actuators for active vibration damping is highlighted in this contribution. If a periodic electric field is applied to a DEAP actuator to counteract a periodic vibratory disturbance, a very common vibration attenuation problem, then the mechanical output will be the square of the periodic input. This will result in an actuator output with several harmonics. Therefore from a vibration damping perspective not only does the first harmonic of the periodic disturbance need to be considered but also additional harmonics, introduced by the actuator itself. Feedforward active damping of periodic vibratory disturbances using a tubular DEAP actuator is addressed in this contribution. Initially the addition of a d.c. bias offset to the periodic voltage signal applied to the actuator is investigated to try and reduce the effect of the higher harmonics. The use of a linearizing gain schedule is then also examined. Using a comparatively large d.c. bias voltage offset has a linearizing affect on the voltage-strain characteristics of the tubular actuator thereby reducing the influence of the higher harmonics on the resulting vibration damping characteristics. The disadvantage of this approach is that the operating range, in terms of the actuator stroke that can be achieved, is decreased. The use of a linearizing gain schedule also reduces the influence of the higher harmonics but provides less of a constraint on the operating range of the actuator.

  20. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of amino acids and nucleotide bases for target bacterial vibrational mode identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Argue, Leanne; Hyre, Aaron; Jacobson, Michele; Christesen, Steven D.

    2006-05-01

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies of bacteria have reported a wide range of vibrational mode assignments associated with biological material. We present Raman and SER spectra of the amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamine, cysteine, alanine, proline, methionine, asparagine, threonine, valine, glycine, serine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid and the nucleic acid bases adenosine, guanosine, thymidine, and uridine to better characterize biological vibrational mode assignments for bacterial target identification. We also report spectra of the bacteria Bacillus globigii, Pantoea agglomerans, and Yersinia rhodei along with band assignments determined from the reference spectra obtained.

  1. Substrate independence of THz vibrational modes of polycrystalline thin films of molecular solids in waveguide THz-TDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsha, S. Sree; Melinger, Joseph. S.; Qadri, S. B.; Grischkowsky, D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the metal substrate on the measurement of high resolution THz vibrational modes of molecular solids with the waveguide THz-TDS technique is investigated. The sample film of salicylic acid is studied using waveguide THz-TDS on three different metal substrates and two-surface passivated substrates. The independence of the observed THz vibrational modes to the metal substrate is demonstrated. Independently, surface passivation is presented as a viable experimental addition to the waveguide THz-TDS technique to aid the characterization of samples with known reactivity to metal surfaces.

  2. Buck-boost converter for simultaneous semi-active vibration control and energy harvesting for electromagnetic regenerative shock absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Chongxiao; Kim, Junyoung; Yu, Liangyao; Zuo, Lei

    2014-04-01

    Regenerative semi-active suspensions can capture the previously dissipated vibration energy and convert it to usable electrical energy for powering on-board electronic devices, while achieve both the better ride comfort and improved road handling performance at the same time when certain control is applied. To achieve this objective, the power electronics interface circuit connecting the energy harvester and the electrical loads, which can perform simultaneous vibration control and energy harvesting function is in need. This paper utilized a buck-boost converter for simultaneous semi-active vibration control and energy harvesting with electromagnetic regenerative shock absorber, which utilizes a rotational generator to converter the vibration energy to electricity. It has been found that when the circuit works in discontinuous current mode (DCM), the ratio between the input voltage and current is only related to the duty cycle of the switch pulse width modulation signal. Using this property, the buck-boost converter can be used to perform semi-active vibration control by controlling the load connected between the terminals of the generator in the electromagnetic shock absorber. While performing the vibration control, the circuit always draw current from the shock absorber and the suspension remain dissipative, and the shock absorber takes no additional energy to perform the vibration control. The working principle and dynamics of the circuit has been analyzed and simulations were performed to validate the concept.

  3. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  4. Measurement of Liquid Viscosity and Density Using Single Piezoelectric Resonator with Two Vibration Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarada, Jun; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi; Yamamoto, Ken

    2012-07-01

    We report the results of an experiment on measuring the viscosities and densities of several liquids using a single piezoelectric sensor, since only the numerical results obtained by finite element analysis were reported in our previous paper. The novelty of the sensor is that the viscosity and density can be inferred simply by measuring resonance frequencies in liquid for the vibration in the tangential and normal directions with respect to the contact surface between the sensor and the liquid, while the method suggested as reference requires measurements of resonance frequency and damping of a single vibration mode. By comparing the viscosities and densities measured by the proposed and conventional methods using food oil, the densities were found to correspond to the values measured using a weight meter with an error within 1% and the viscosity was evaluated to be higher than that measured using a viscometer with an error within 10%. The results suggest the possibility of measuring liquid density and viscosity by the proposed method.

  5. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming

    2013-11-01

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  6. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming

    2013-11-28

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  7. Water and lysozyme: Some results from the bending and stretching vibrational modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Cirino; Cicero, Nicola; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic or glass transition in biomolecules is important to their functioning. Also essential is the transition between the protein native state and the unfolding process. To better understand these transitions, we use Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to study the vibrational bending and stretching modes of hydrated lysozymes across a wide temperature range. We find that these transitions are triggered by the strong hydrogen bond coupling between the protein and hydration water. More precisely, we demonstrate that in both cases the water properties dominate the evolution of the system. We find that two characteristic temperatures are relevant: in the supercooled regime of confined water, the fragile-to-strong dynamic transition occurs at T L , and in the stable liquid phase, T* ≈ 315 ± 5 K characterizes the behavior of both isothermal compressibility K T ( T, P) and the coefficient of thermal expansion a P ( T, P).

  8. Vibration of cantilever piezolaminated beam with extension and shear mode piezo actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Wankhade, Rajan L.

    2015-04-01

    Vibration of piezolaminated beams with extension and shear mode piezo actuators subjected to electromechanical loading is studied. A finite element eight node isoparametric element is adopted in the formulation with higher order shear deformation theory. Constitutive law for piezoelectric is considered. In case of the extension actuation mechanism, top and bottom layers of beam are of PZT-5A piezoelectric material and the central core is of Aluminum. Whereas, in case of shear actuation mechanism, top and bottom layers are of Aluminum and the central core is provided with a small patch of PZT-5A piezoelectric material and the rest of the core is a rigid foam material. Frequencies obtained by using present methodology are presented for both extension as well as shear actuation mechanism of piezoelectric material

  9. Quantification of the low temperature infrared vibrational modes from interstitial oxygen in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gryse, O.; Clauws, P.

    2000-04-01

    Accurate conversion factors are obtained to determine the concentration of interstitial oxygen in silicon from the low temperature local vibrational mode absorption at 1136, 1128 and 1205 cm-1 for different resolutions and apodization functions. The absorption spectra at 6 K were fitted with fit functions in order to extract the amplitudes of interest in an accurate and reproducible manner. The ratio of the amplitude at room temperature to the low temperature amplitude then gives the conversion factors for 6 K. Based on a phonon model [H. Yamada-Kaneta Materials Science Forum, edited by G. Davies and M. H. Hazare (Trans Tech, Aveiro, 1997), 258-263, p. 355] and on occupation statistics the use of the conversion factors is extended to temperatures as high as 100 K, taking into account the broadening of the absorption peaks and the variation in the occupation of the different excited states.

  10. Low-Temperature Heat Capacity and Localized Vibrational Modes in Natural and Synthetic Tetrahedrites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; May, Andrew F; Delaire, Olivier A; McGuire, Michael A; Lu, Xu; Li, Cheng-Yun; Case, Eldon D; Morelli, Donold

    2014-01-01

    The heat capacity of natural (Cu12-x (Fe, Zn, Ag)x(Sb, As)4S13) and synthetic (Cu12-xZnxSb4S13 with x=0, 1, 2) tetrahedrite compounds was measured between 2K and 380K. It was found that the temperature dependence of the heat capacity can be described using a Debye term and three Einstein oscillators with characteristic temperatures that correspond to energies of ~1.0 meV, ~2.8 meV and ~8.4 meV. The existence of localized vibration modes, which are assigned to the displacements of the trigonally coordinated Cu atoms in the structure, is discussed in the context of anharmonicity and its effect on the low lattice thermal conductivity exhibited by these compounds.

  11. Local vibrational modes competitions in Mn-doped ZnO epitaxial films with tunable ferromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qiang; Fu, Maoxiang; Liu, Guolei Zhang, Huaijin; Yan, Shishen; Chen, Yanxue; Mei, Liangmo; Jiao, Jun

    2014-06-28

    We reported spectroscopic investigations of high quality Mn-doped ZnO (ZnMnO) films grown by oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Raman scattering spectra revealed two local vibrational modes (LVMs) associated with Mn dopants at 523 and 712 cm{sup −1}. The LVMs and magnetic properties of ZnMnO films can be synchronously modulated by post annealing processing or by introducing tiny Co. The relative intensity of two LVMs clearly shows competitions arising from uncompensated acceptor and donor defects competition for ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic films. The experimental results indicated that LVM at 523 cm{sup −1} is attributed to Mn—(Zinc-vacancy) complexes, while LVM at 712 cm{sup −1} is attributed to Mn—(Oxygen-vacancy) complexes.

  12. Terahertz spectroscopy and solid-state density functional theory calculation of anthracene: Effect of dispersion force on the vibrational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Tominaga, Keisuke E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp; Hayashi, Michitoshi E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp Wang, Houng-Wei; Kambara, Ohki; Sasaki, Tetsuo; Nishizawa, Jun-ichi E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp

    2014-05-07

    The phonon modes of molecular crystals in the terahertz frequency region often feature delicately coupled inter- and intra-molecular vibrations. Recent advances in density functional theory such as DFT-D{sup *} have enabled accurate frequency calculation. However, the nature of normal modes has not been quantitatively discussed against experimental criteria such as isotope shift (IS) and correlation field splitting (CFS). Here, we report an analytical mode-decoupling method that allows for the decomposition of a normal mode of interest into intermolecular translation, libration, and intramolecular vibrational motions. We show an application of this method using the crystalline anthracene system as an example. The relationship between the experimentally obtained IS and the IS obtained by PBE-D{sup *} simulation indicates that two distinctive regions exist. Region I is associated with a pure intermolecular translation, whereas region II features coupled intramolecular vibrations that are further coupled by a weak intermolecular translation. We find that the PBE-D{sup *} data show excellent agreement with the experimental data in terms of IS and CFS in region II; however, PBE-D{sup *} produces significant deviations in IS in region I where strong coupling between inter- and intra-molecular vibrations contributes to normal modes. The result of this analysis is expected to facilitate future improvement of DFT-D{sup *}.

  13. Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System on Parabolic Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenbo; Pletser, Vladimir; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System (MAIS) aims at reducing on-orbit vibrations, providing a better controlled lower gravity environment for microgravity physical science experiments. The MAIS will be launched on Tianzhou-1, the first cargo ship of the China Manned Space Program. The principle of the MAIS is to suspend with electro-magnetic actuators a scientific payload, isolating it from the vibrating stator. The MAIS's vibration isolation capability is frequency-dependent and a decrease of vibration of about 40dB can be attained. The MAIS can accommodate 20kg of scientific payload or sample unit, and provide 30W of power and 1Mbps of data transmission. The MAIS is developed to support microgravity scientific experiments on manned platforms in low earth orbit, in order to meet the scientific requirements for fluid physics, materials science, and fundamental physics investigations, which usually need a very quiet environment, increasing their chances of success and their scientific outcomes. The results of scientific experiments and technology tests obtained with the MAIS will be used to improve future space based research. As the suspension force acting on the payload is very small, the MAIS can only be operative and tested in a weightless environment. The 'Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.' (DLR, German Aerospace Centre) granted a flight opportunity to the MAIS experiment to be tested during its 27th parabolic flight campaign of September 2015 performed on the A310 ZERO-G aircraft managed by the French company Novespace, a subsidiary of the 'Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales' (CNES, French Space Agency). The experiment results confirmed that the 6 degrees of freedom motion control technique was effective, and that the vibration isolation performance fulfilled perfectly the expectations based on theoretical analyses and simulations. This paper will present the design of the MAIS and the experiment results obtained during the

  14. Adaptive active control of periodic vibration using maglev actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fengyan; Sun, Hongling; Li, Xiaodong

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, active control of periodic vibration is implemented using maglev actuators which exhibit inherent nonlinear behaviors. A multi-channel feedforward control algorithm is proposed to solve these nonlinear problems, in which maglev actuators are treated as single-input-single-output systems with unknown time-varying nonlinearities. A radial basis function network is used by the algorithm as its controller, whose parameters are adapted only with the model of the linear system in the secondary path. Compared with the strategies in the conventional magnetic-levitation system control as well as nonlinear active noise/vibration control, the proposed algorithm has the advantage that the nonlinear modeling procedure of maglev actuators and the usage of displacement sensors could be both avoided. Numerical simulations and real-time experiments are carried out based on a multiple-degree-of-freedom vibration isolation system. The results show that the proposed algorithm not only could efficiently compensate for the actuators' time-varying nonlinearities, but also has the ability to greatly attenuate the energy of periodic vibration.

  15. Neuroreceptor Activation by Vibration-Assisted Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Ross D.; Nichols, David; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hyothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction. PMID:25909758

  16. Neuroreceptor activation by vibration-assisted tunneling.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, Ross D; Nichols, David; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hyothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction. PMID:25909758

  17. Quantum-Chemical Calculation and Visualization of the Vibrational Modes of Graphene in Different Points of the Brillouin Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedieva, Tetiana; Gubanov, Victor; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Pidhirnyi, Denys

    2015-07-01

    Different notations of graphene irreducible representations and optical modes could be found in the literature. The goals of this paper are to identify the correspondence between available notations, to calculate the optical modes of graphene in different points of the Brillouin zone, and to compare them with experimental data obtained by Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. The mechanism of the resonance enhancement of vibration modes of the molecules adsorbed on graphene in CARS experiments is proposed. The possibility of appearance of the discrete breathing modes is discussed.

  18. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieyeville, Fabien; Ichchou, Mohamed; Scorletti, Gérard; Navarro, David; Du, Wan

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control.

  19. Actively mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.E.; Morton, P.A.; Mar, A.; Corzine, S.W.

    1989-06-01

    Measurements of actively mode-locked semiconductor lasers are described and compared to calculations of the mode-locking process using three coupled traveling wave rate equations for the electron and photon densities. The dependence of pulse width on the modulation current and frequency are described. A limitation to minimum achievable pulse widths in mode-locked semiconductor lasers is shown to be dynamic detuning due to gain saturation. Techniques to achieve subpicosecond pulses are described, together with ways to reduce multiple pulse outputs. The amplitude and phase noise of linear and ring cavity semiconductor lasers were measured and found to be tens of dB smaller than YAG and argon lasers and limited by the noise from the microwave oscillator. High-frequency phase noise is only measurable in detuned cavities, and is below -110 dBc (1 Hz) in optimally tuned cavities. The prospects for novel ways to achieve even shorter pulses are discussed.

  20. Modeling Stretching Modes of Common Organic Molecules with the Quantum Mechanical Harmonic Oscillator: An Undergraduate Vibrational Spectroscopy Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnis, J. Mark; Thompson, Matthew G. K.

    2004-01-01

    An introductory undergraduate physical organic chemistry exercise that introduces the harmonic oscillator's use in vibrational spectroscopy is developed. The analysis and modeling exercise begins with the students calculating the stretching modes of common organic molecules with the help of the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator (QMHO) model.

  1. A flex-compressive-mode piezoelectric transducer for mechanical vibration/strain energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaotian; Guo, Mingsen; Dong, Shuxiang

    2011-04-01

    A piezoelectric transducer for harvesting energy from ambient mechanical vibrations/strains under pressure condition was developed. The proposed transducer was made of two ring-type piezoelectric stacks, one pair of bow-shaped elastic plates, and one shaft that pre-compresses them. This transducer works in flex-compressive (F-C) mode, which is different from a conventional flex-tensional (F-T) one, to transfer a transversely applied force F into an amplified longitudinal force N pressing against the two piezo-stacks via the two bowshaped elastic plates, generating a large electric voltage output via piezoelectric effect. Our experimental results show that without an electric load, an F-C mode piezo-transducer could generate a maximum electric voltage output of up to 110 Vpp, and with an electric load of 40 κΩ, it a maximum power output of 14.6 mW under an acceleration excitation of 1 g peak-peak at the resonance frequency of 87 Hz. PMID:21507747

  2. Evolution of microstructure and residual stress under various vibration modes in 304 stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Wang, Peng-Shuen; Wang, Jia-Siang; Wu, Weite

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous vibration welding of 304 stainless steel was carried out with an eccentric circulating vibrator and a magnetic telescopic vibrator at subresonant (362 Hz and 59.3 Hz) and resonant (376 Hz and 60.9 Hz) frequencies. The experimental results indicate that the temperature gradient can be increased, accelerating nucleation and causing grain refinement during this process. During simultaneous vibration welding primary δ -ferrite can be refined and the morphologies of retained δ-ferrite become discontinuous so that δ-ferrite contents decrease. The smallest content of δ-ferrite (5.5%) occurred using the eccentric circulating vibrator. The diffraction intensities decreased and the FWHM widened with both vibration and no vibration. A residual stress can obviously be increased, producing an excellent effect on stress relief at a resonant frequency. The stress relief effect with an eccentric circulating vibrator was better than that obtained using a magnetic telescopic vibrator. PMID:24605068

  3. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  4. Piezoelectric pushers for active vibration control of rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, A. B.; Kascak, A. F.; Lin, R. R.; Montague, J.; Alexander, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    The active control of rotordynamic vibrations and stability by magnetic bearings and electromagnetic shakers was discussed extensively in the literature. These devices, though effective, are usually large in volume and add significant weight to the stator. The use of piezoelectric pushers may provide similar degrees of effectiveness in light, compact packages. Analyses are contained which extend quadratic regulator, pole placement and derivative feedback control methods to the prescribed displacement character of piezoelectric pushers. The structural stiffness of the pusher is also included in the theory. Tests are currently being conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center with piezoelectric pusher-based active vibration control. Results performed on the NASA test rig as preliminary verification of the related theory are presented.

  5. Bilinear Robust Control for Vertical Vibration in Railway Vehicle with Semi-Active Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehara, Ryuichi; Otsuki, Masatsugu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    It is well known that the vibration control problem for automobiles and railway vehicles with semi-active suspensions is classified as a control problem in a bilinear system. Bullet trains and railway vehicles have lighter body in order to improve acceleration; these vibrations in the body are easily induced by various disturbances due to rigid and elastic dynamics. Currently, passive dampers such as air suspensions and axle springs are installed on railway vehicle trucks as countermeasures for such vibrations. This study presents an effective controller, based on the H∞ theory, for vibration suppression in railway vehicles and describes a method of synthesizing this robust controller by considering unstructured and structured uncertainties that are applicable to a bilinear system. The performance of the proposed controller and its robustness toward uncertainties are examined by numerical calculations that simulate a railway vehicle subjected to disturbances due to vertical uneven railway tracks, the variations in its mass due to boarding passengers, and the modeling errors caused by non-controlled modes. This enables a comparison of the proposed control method with the conventional one in terms of the robustness toward parameter variation. Thus, this result shows the high robustness and usefulness of the proposed controller.

  6. ACTIVE VIBRATION SUPPRESSION R+D FOR THE NEXT LINEARCOLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, Leif S.

    2002-08-20

    The nanometer scale beam sizes at the interaction point in linear colliders limit the allowable motion of the final focus magnets. We have constructed a prototype system to investigate the use of active vibration damping to control magnet motion. Inertial sensors are used to measure the position of a test mass, and a DSP based system provides feedback using electrostatic pushers. Simulation and experimental results for the control of a mechanically simple system are presented.

  7. Active Vibration Suppression R and D for the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef C

    2001-12-17

    The nanometer scale beam sizes at the interaction point in linear colliders limit the allowable motion of the final focus magnets. We have constructed a prototype system to investigate the use of active vibration damping to control magnet motion. Inertial sensors are used to measure the position of a test mass, and a DSP based system provides feedback using electrostatic pushers. Simulation and experimental results for the control of a mechanically simple system are presented.

  8. Active vibration control techniques for flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    Two proposed control system design techniques for active vibration control in flexible space structures are detailed. Control issues relevant only to flexible-body dynamics are addressed, whereas no attempt was made to integrate the flexible and rigid-body spacecraft dynamics. Both of the proposed approaches revealed encouraging results; however, further investigation of the interaction of the flexible and rigid-body dynamics is warranted.

  9. Probing the Raman-active acoustic vibrations of nanoparticles with extraordinary spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Skyler; Gelfand, Ryan M.; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots, viruses, DNA and all other nanoparticles have acoustic vibrations that can act as ‘fingerprints’ to identify their shape, size and mechanical properties, yet high-resolution Raman spectroscopy in this low-energy range has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy to measure the Raman-active vibrations of single isolated nanoparticles in the 0.1-10 cm-1 range with ˜0.05 cm-1 resolution, to resolve peak splitting from material anisotropy and to probe the low-frequency modes of biomolecules. EAR employs a nanoaperture laser tweezer that can select particles of interest and manipulate them once identified. We therefore believe that this nanotechnology will enable expanded capabilities for the study of nanoparticles in the materials and life sciences.

  10. Vibrational lifetimes of cyanide ion in aqueous solution from molecular dynamics simulations: intermolecular vs intramolecular accepting modes.

    PubMed

    Talapatra, Surma; Geva, Eitan

    2014-07-01

    The lifetimes of the first vibrational state of (12)C(14)N(-) and (13)C(15)N(-) dissolved in H2O or D2O were calculated. The calculations were based on the Landau-Teller formula that puts the vibrational lifetimes in terms of the autocorrelation function of the force exerted on the C-N stretch by the remaining degrees of freedom. The force autocorrelation functions were calculated from classical molecular dynamics simulations of the four cyanide/water isotopomer combinations ((12)C(14)N(-)/H2O, (12)C(14)N(-)/D2O, (13)C(15)N(-)/H2O, (13)C(15)N(-)/D2O). The cyanide ion was described by a polarizable force field, and the water was described by either the rigid SPC/E model or the flexible SPC/Fw model, in order to compare two different types of accepting modes, namely, (1) intermolecular (translational and rotational) solvent accepting modes (rigid SPC/E water) and (2) intramolecular (vibrational) solvent accepting modes (flexible SPC/Fw water). Since quantum effects are expected to increase in size with increasing frequency mismatch between relaxing and accepting modes, different quantum correction factors were employed depending on the identity of the accepting modes, more specifically, the harmonic/Schofield quantum correction factor in the case of intermolecular accepting modes and the standard quantum correction factor in the case of intramolecular accepting modes. The lifetimes with either the rigid SPC/E or flexible SPC/Fw water models were found to be in good quantitative agreement with the experimentally measured values for all isotopomer combinations. Our results suggest that taking into account quantum effects on the vibrational energy relaxation of cyanide in aqueous solution can make the intermolecular pathway at least as likely as the intramolecular pathway. PMID:24927159

  11. [Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two refereed journal publications and ten talks given at conferences, seminars, and colloquia resulted from research supported by NASA. They are itemized in this report. The two publications were entitled "Reactive Tabu and Search Sensor Selection in Active Structural Acoustic Control Problems" and "Quelling Cabin Noise in Turboprop Aircraft via Active Control." The conference presentations covered various aspects of actuator placement, including location problems, for active sound and vibration control of cylinders, of commuter jets, of propeller driven or turboprop aircraft, and for quelling aircraft cabin or interior noise.

  12. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Ab initio calculation of the local vibrational modes of the interstitial boron interstitial oxygen defect in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, A.; Jones, R.; Coutinho, J.; Briddon, P. R.

    2005-05-01

    The first stage in the anneal of interstitial boron below room temperature in Czochralski-grown Si (Cz-Si) is the formation of the interstitial boron-oxygen (BiOi) defect. First principles modelling show that this defect has a structure similar to the interstitial carbon-oxygen complex. However, whereas the latter defect has been characterized by local vibrational mode infra-red spectroscopy, there is no information on the local vibrational modes of BiOi even though the defect is known to be a dominant interstitial boron defect in irradiated Cz-Si. Here, we carry out density functional calculations to determine its vibrational modes and respective isotope shifts, concluding that it possesses six local vibrational modes. As in the case of CiOi, we find an oxygen-related vibrational mode with frequency far below the 1136 cm-1 of the oxygen interstitial, characteristic of the three-fold coordinated oxygen.

  13. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOEpatents

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Mauger, Joseph; Anderson, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  14. Anharmonicity and local mode effects in the vibrational spectra of Ni(CO)4 and Co(CO)3NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, I. M.

    Previously published data on the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the carbonyl stretching modes of Ni(CO)4 and Co(CO)3NO are reinterpreted using the recent model of Mills and Robiette, including Darling-Dennison resonances and local mode effects. The harmonic wavenumber θm and anharmonicity constant xm associated with the carbonyl and nitrosyl stretching modes are derived, and the 13C and 18O isotopic shifts are discussed in relation to the harmonic and anharmonic force field.

  15. A study of the eigenvectors of low frequency vibrational modes in crystalline cytidine via high pressure infrared absorption and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, Carl; Woods, Kristina; Lee, Scott

    High-pressure infrared absorption experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline cytidine at 295 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: 1/ωdω/dP . Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as cytidine have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit (``internal'' modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other (``external'' modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes, making high pressure experiments a very useful probe for such studies. Internal stretching modes have low logarithmic derivatives while external as well as internal torsional and bending modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Modes at about 503, 757, 795, 3093 and 3351 cm-1 are found to have negative logarithmic pressure derivatives, indicating a weakening of the effective force constants associated with those modes. The two modes above 3000 cm-1 are hydrogen-bond-stretching modes. The identity of all of these modes will be determined via molecular dynamical simuations.

  16. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Qiao, Pizhong; Sethi, Vineet; Prasad, A.

    2002-06-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results of active vibration control of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. PZT (Lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface-bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensator, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000 percent with a positive position feedback control.

  17. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Qiao, P.; Sethi, V.; Prasad, A.

    2004-08-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results on active vibration control of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. The PZT (lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensation, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000% with positive position feedback control.

  18. Coupled Torsional and Bending Vibrations of Actively Controlled Drillstrings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YIGIT, A. S.; CHRISTOFOROU, A. P.

    2000-06-01

    The dynamics of actively controlled drillstrings is studied. The equations of motion are derived using a lumped parameter model in which the coupling between torsional and bending vibrations is considered. The model also includes the dynamics of the rotary drive system which contains the rotary table, the gearbox and an armature controlled DC motor. The interactions between the drillstring and the borehole which are considered, include the impacts of collars with the borehole wall as well as bit rotation-dependent weight and torque on bit (WOB and TOB). Simulation results obtained by numerically solving the equations of motion are in close qualitative agreement with field and laboratory observations regarding stick-slip oscillations. A linear quadratic regulator (LQR) controller is designed based on a linearized model and is shown to be effective in eliminating this type of oscillations. It is also shown that for some operational parameters the control action may excite large bending vibrations due to coupling with the torsional motion.

  19. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibration of complex structures. Volume 2: Single-mode large deflection vibrations of beams and plates using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1987-01-01

    A finite element method is presented for the large amplitude vibrations of complex structures that can be modelled with beam and rectangular plate elements subjected to harmonic excitation. Both inplane deformation and inertia are considered in the formulation. Derivation of the harmonic force and nonlinear stiffness matrices for a beam and a rectangular plate element are presented. Solution procedures and convergence characteristics of the finite element method are described. Nonlinear response to uniform and concentrated harmonic loadings and improved nonlinear free vibration results are presented for beams and rectangular plates of various boundary conditions.

  20. Relationship between crack defects in magnetic tiles and variation frequencies of high-order vibration mode based on modal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lin; Yang, Suijun; Wang, Xueying; Hou, Dexin

    2010-08-01

    Conventional sonic testing method has such limitations as monotony of signal characteristic quantity, regular shape requirement of measured workpiece, limited ability to identify only one type of defect, etc. This paper establishes the mathematical model of modal vector of free vibration object of arbitrary order, analyzes the effects of vibration modes on the various types of crack default with magnetic tiles commonly used in industry as study object, then gives the relationship between the frequencies of high-order vibration mode and the location, length, depth of the same type crack defects and that between the frequencies of high-order vibration mode and 4 kinds of defects common in magnetic tiles including axial short crack through the top of the arc, tangential short crack through the bottom of the arc, tangential crack in the intrados and axial crack in the intrados, and finally 3 types of magnetic tiles were tested to verify its effectiveness. The results are very helpful in automatic detection of internal defects in workpieces.

  1. Desorption of Hydrogen from Si(111) by Resonant Excitation of the Si-H Vibrational Stretch Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiheng; Feldman, Leonard C.; Tolk, Norman; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cohen, Philip I

    2006-01-01

    Past efforts to achieve selective bond scission by vibrational excitation have been thwarted by energy thermalization. Here we report resonant photodesorption of hydrogen from a Si(111) surface using tunable infrared radiation. The wavelength dependence of the desorption yield peaks at 0.26 electron volt: the energy of the Si-H vibrational stretch mode. The desorption yield is quadratic in the infrared intensity. A strong H/D isotope effect rules out thermal desorption mechanisms, and electronic effects are not applicable in this low-energy regime. A molecular mechanism accounting for the desorption event remains elusive.

  2. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking. PMID:26367642

  3. Active vibration and noise alleviation in rotorcraft using microflaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padthe, Ashwani Kumar

    This work presents a comprehensive analysis of active Gurney flaps, or microflaps, for on blade control of noise and vibration in rotorcraft. The initial portion of the work considered the two-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of three different oscillating microflap configurations using a compressible computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver. Among these the configuration most suitable for rotorcraft applications was chosen. An unsteady reduced order aerodynamic model (ROM) was developed for the microflap using the Rational Function Approximation approach and CFD based oscillatory aerodynamic load data. The resulting ROM is a state-space, time-domain model that accounts for unsteadiness, compressibility and time-varying freestream effects. The ROM was validated against direct CFD calculations for a wide range of flow conditions showing excellent agreement. Subsequently, the ROM was then incorporated into a comprehensive rotorcraft simulation code featuring a free-wake model, an acoustic prediction tool, and fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. The higher harmonic control (HHC) algorithm was used to simulate closed-loop active control with a 1.5% chord microflap on a hingeless rotor configuration resembling the MBB BO-105. Three span-wise configurations, single, dual, and a five-microflap configuration were considered. Results indicate that the microflap can achieve reductions ranging from 3-6 dB in the blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Vibration reduction ranging from 70-90% was also demonstrated at both low-speed and high-speed flight conditions. It was also found that reduction in BVI noise results in an increase in vibrations and vice versa, a trend also noted in previous active control studies employing HHC and conventional partial span trailing-edge flaps. Next, simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of 2-3 dB in the advancing and retreating side noise combined with a 55% reduction in the

  4. Oxygen isotope effect on the vibrational modes of La1-xCaxMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, J. C.; Chrzanowski, J.; Franck, J. P.

    1999-04-01

    Raman-scattering experiments have been carried out on polycrystalline samples of La0.65Ca0.35Mn 16O3 and isotope-exchanged La0.65Ca0.35Mn 18O3 as a function of temperature. The most interesting feature in the spectra is a vibrational mode that occurs at a nominal frequency of ω0~230 cm-1, which is assigned to an out-of-phase rotational mode that involves motion of the O(1) atoms. The frequency of this phonon depends strongly on the Ca concentration and has been correlated with the strength of the Jahn-Teller lattice distortion as measured by the tolerance factor. As the temperature is lowered through the critical temperature, the phonon frequency ω0 increases rather abruptly and continues to harden as the temperature is lowered further. In contrast, the linewidth Γ0 decreases abruptly when the sample passes through the transition from the paramagnetic insulating phase to the more metallic ferromagnetic phase. The observed temperature dependences of the frequency and linewidth are well described by a model that incorporates a double-exchange mechanism in the presence of an electron-phonon interaction. The agreement between experiment and theory suggests that the temperature dependence of the phonon is determined primarily by the spin alignment associated with the double-exchange mechanism. The results for both ω0 and Γ0 imply that there are no significant structural modifications associated with the transition to the ferromagnetic phase. Finally, the linewidth Γ0 in the isotope-exchanged sample (18O) is smaller than in the 16O sample, an observation that is consistent with the smaller electron-phonon-coupling constant in the 18O compound.

  5. Inferential monitoring of chlorinated solvents through Raman spectroscopic observation of the vibrational modes of water.

    PubMed

    Sinfield, Joseph V; Monwuba, Chike

    2016-02-01

    Recent improvements in diode laser, fiber optic, and data acquisition technology have rejuvenated interest in field applications of Raman spectroscopy in a wide range of settings. One such application involves the observation of chlorinated solvents to facilitate the practice of "monitored natural attenuation." In this context, this manuscript focuses on means to improve the sensitivity of in-situ Raman analysis of chlorinated solvents. In particular, the work explores the performance limits of a Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy (TRRS) system employed to observe chlorinated solvents in aqueous samples via laboratory tests conducted on both liquid standards of trichloroethylene (TCE) and simulated biodegraded field samples. Quantitative assessment of TCE in solution is carried out through both direct observation of TCE Raman functional groups (381 cm(-1) (δ skeletal), 840 cm(-1) (νCCl) and 1242 cm(-1) (δCH)) and indirect observation of the broad OH stretching (2700-3800 cm(-1)) Raman modes of water. Results from tests on simple solutions show that the TRRS system can detect TCE at aqueous concentrations as low as 70 ppm by directly monitoring the 381 cm(-1) TCE line, whereas observation of the OH stretching line of water (3393 cm(-1)) provides an indirect indication of TCE presence with nearly a 9× improvement in detection level. This unique and counterintuitive mechanism to detect the presence of chlorinated compounds in solution takes advantage of the influence of chlorine on the vibrational modes of water. This influence, which is believed to be attributed to the formation of hydrogen bonds and their resultant interactions with the solvation shell, may serve as a more sensitive and robust indication of the presence of aggregate chlorinated solvent contamination in aqueous systems. Tests performed on simulated biodegraded field samples demonstrate that the indirect detection mechanism is apparent even in complex samples representative of typical field

  6. Modeling the antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrational modes of aqueous carboxylate anions.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Catherine C R; Franks, George V; da Silva, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The infrared spectra of six aqueous carboxylate anions have been calculated at the M05-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory with the SMD solvent model, and validated against experimental data from the literature over the region of 1700 cm(-1) to 1250 cm(-1); this region corresponds to the stretching modes of the carboxylate group, and is often interrogated when probing bonding of carboxylates to other species and surfaces. The anions studied here were formate, acetate, oxalate, succinate, glutarate and citrate. For the lowest energy conformer of each anion, the carboxylate moiety antisymmetric stretching peak was predicted with a mean signed error of only 4 cm(-1) using the SMD solvent model, while the symmetric peak was slightly overestimated. Performing calculations in vacuum and scaling was found to generally over-predict the antisymmetric vibrational frequencies and under predict the symmetric peak. Different conformers of the same anion were found to have only slightly different spectra in the studied region and the inclusion of explicit water molecules was not found to significantly change the calculated spectra when the implicit solvent model is used. Overall, the use of density functional theory in conjunction with an implicit solvent model was found to result in infra-red spectra that are the best reproduction of the features found experimentally for the aqueous carboxylate ions in the important 1700 cm(-1) to 1250 cm(-1) region. The development of validated model chemistries for simulating the stretching modes of aqueous carboxylate ions will be valuable for future studies that investigate how carboxylate anions complex with multivalent metal cations and related species in solution. PMID:25048288

  7. Nonlinear vibration analysis of the high-efficiency compressive-mode piezoelectric energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengbao; Zu, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Power source is critical to achieve independent and autonomous operations of electronic mobile devices. The vibration-based energy harvesting is extensively studied recently, and recognized as a promising technology to realize inexhaustible power supply for small-scale electronics. Among various approaches, the piezoelectric energy harvesting has gained the most attention due to its high conversion efficiency and simple configurations. However, most of piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs) to date are based on bending-beam structures and can only generate limited power with a narrow working bandwidth. The insufficient electric output has greatly impeded their practical applications. In this paper, we present an innovative lead zirconate titanate (PZT) energy harvester, named high-efficiency compressive-mode piezoelectric energy harvester (HC-PEH), to enhance the performance of energy harvesters. A theoretical model was developed analytically, and solved numerically to study the nonlinear characteristics of the HC-PEH. The results estimated by the developed model agree well with the experimental data from the fabricated prototype. The HC-PEH shows strong nonlinear responses, favorable working bandwidth and superior power output. Under a weak excitation of 0.3 g (g = 9.8 m/s2), a maximum power output 30 mW is generated at 22 Hz, which is about ten times better than current energy harvesters. The HC-PEH demonstrates the capability of generating enough power for most of wireless sensors.

  8. Stable and Vibrational Octupole Modes in Mo, Xe, Ba, La, Ce and Nd

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, P.M.; Hamilton, J.H.; Hwang, J.K.; Jones, E.F.; Peker, L.K.; Ramayya, A.V.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zhu, S.J.

    1998-05-18

    Evidence is presented for stable octupole deformation in neutron-rich nuclei, bounded by Z = 54-58 and N = 85-92. To either side of this region negative parity bands built on more vibrational type octupole modes are observed in {sup 140}Ba and {sup 152,154}Nd. The largest stable octupole deformation ({beta}{sub s} {approximately} 0.1) is found in {sup 144}Ba{sub as}. The theoretically predicted quenching ({beta}{sub s} {approximately} 0) of stable octupole deformation at higher spins is found in {sup 140}Ba. There is good agreement between theory and experiment for the strongly varying electric dipole moments as a function of mass for {sup 142-141}Ba. In odd-A {sup 142}Ba and odd-Z {sup 140}La, we observe parity doublets, two pairs of positive and negative parity bands with opposite spins. In {sup 145}La a strong coupled ground band with symmetric shape coexists with the asymmetric octupole shape which stabilizes above about spin 19/2. In {sup 145,147}La a strong reduction in E2 strength around 25/2 from band crossing is observed. The isotope {sup 109}Mo was identified and a new region of stable uctpole deformation is identified in {sup 107,108}Mo centered around N = 64-66 as earlier predicted. This is the first case of stable uctpole deformation involving only one pair of orbitals.

  9. Spatially resolved localized vibrational mode spectroscopy of carbon in liquid encapsulated Czochralski grown gallium arsenide wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Waifan.

    1988-04-01

    Substitutional carbon on an arsenic lattice site is the shallowest and one of the most dominant acceptors in semi-insulating Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs. However, the role of this acceptor in determining the well known W'' shape spatial variation of neutral EL2 concentration along the diameter of a LEC wafer is not known. In this thesis, we attempt to clarify the issue of the carbon acceptor's effect on this W'' shaped variation by measuring spatial profiles of this acceptor along the radius of three different as-grown LEC GaAs wafers. With localized vibrational mode absorption spectroscopy, we find that the profile of the carbon acceptor is relatively constant along the radius of each wafer. Average values of concentration are 8 {times} 10E15 cm{sup -3}, 1.1 {times} 10E15 cm{sup -3}, and 2.2 {times} 10E15 cm{sup -3}, respectively. In addition, these carbon acceptor LVM measurements indicate that a residual donor with concentration comparable to carbon exists in these wafers and it is a good candidate for the observed neutral EL2 concentration variation. 22 refs., 39 figs.

  10. Low-temperature heat capacity and localized vibrational modes in natural and synthetic tetrahedrites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, E. May, A. F.; Delaire, O.; McGuire, M. A.; Lu, X.; Liu, Cheng-Yun; Case, E. D.; Morelli, D. T.

    2014-05-21

    The heat capacity of natural (Cu{sub 12−x} (Fe, Zn, Ag){sub x}(Sb, As){sub 4}S{sub 13}) and synthetic (Cu{sub 12−x}Zn{sub x}Sb{sub 4}S{sub 13} with x = 0, 1, 2) tetrahedrite compounds was measured between 2 K and 380 K. It was found that the temperature dependence of the heat capacity can be described using a Debye term and three Einstein oscillators with characteristic temperatures that correspond to energies of ∼1.0 meV, ∼2.8 meV, and ∼8.4 meV. The existence of localized vibrational modes, which are assigned to the displacements of the trigonally coordinated Cu atoms in the structure, is discussed in the context of anharmonicity and its effect on the low lattice thermal conductivity exhibited by these compounds.

  11. A design procedure for active control of beam vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, S. L.; Jarocki, G.

    1983-01-01

    The transverse vibrations of beams is discussed and a methodology for the design of an active damping device is given. The Bernoulli-Euler equation is used to derive a transcendental transfer function, which relates a torque applied at one end of the beam to the rotational position and velocity at that point. The active damping device consists of a wire, a linear actuator and a short torque arm attached to one end of the beam. The action of the actuator varies a tension in the wire and creates a torque which opposes the rotation of the beam and thus damps vibration. A design procedure for such an active damper is given. This procedure shows the relationships and trade-offs between the actuator stroke, power required, stress levels in the wire and beam and the geometry of the beam and wire. It is shown that by consideration of the frequency response at the beam natural frequencies, the aforementioned relationships can be greatly simplified. Similarly, a simple way of estimating the effective damping ratios and eigenvalue locations of actively controlled beams is presented.

  12. Group Theoretical Analysis of Vibrational Modes, Rovibronic Levels and Nuclear Spin Statistics of extended aromatic C48N12 Azafullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K

    2004-03-17

    We have presented a group theoretical analysis of the vibrational modes and rovibronic levels of a novel extended aromatic C{sub 48}N{sub 12} azafullerene. The nuclear spin multiplets and statistical weights of {sup 14}N spin-1 bosons, vibrational and rotational analysis and computed vibrational spectra are provided. We have also predicted the properties of the {sup 3}A{sub u}, {sup 3}E{sub g}, and {sup 3}E{sub u} excited states of C{sub 48}N{sub 12} that lie 1.9 eV above the {sup 1}A{sub g} ground state, and that the {sup 3}E{sub g} and {sup 3}E{sub u} states would undergo Jahn-Teller distortion into chiral structures with no symmetry and an achiral structure with C{sub i} symmetry.

  13. Active vibration reduction by optimally placed sensors and actuators with application to stiffened plates by beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    This study concerns new investigation of active vibration reduction of a stiffened plate bonded with discrete sensor/actuator pairs located optimally using genetic algorithms based on a developed finite element modeling. An isotropic plate element stiffened by a number of beam elements on its edges and having a piezoelectric sensor and actuator pair bonded to its surfaces is modeled using the finite element method and Hamilton’s principle, taking into account the effects of piezoelectric mass, stiffness and electromechanical coupling. The modeling is based on the first order shear deformation theory taking into account the effects of bending, membrane and shear deformation for the plate, the stiffening beam and the piezoelectric patches. A Matlab finite element program has been built for the stiffened plate model and verified with ANSYS and also experimentally. Optimal placement of ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs and optimal feedback gain for active vibration reduction are investigated for a plate stiffened by two beams arranged in the form of a cross. The genetic algorithm was set up for optimization of sensor/actuator placement and feedback gain based on the minimization of the optimal linear quadratic index as an objective function to suppress the first six modes of vibration. Comparison study is presented for active vibration reduction of a square cantilever plate stiffened by crossed beams with two sensor/actuator configurations: firstly, ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs are located in optimal positions; secondly, a piezoelectric layer of single sensor/actuator pair covering the whole of the stiffened plate as a SISO system.

  14. Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational force inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders is analytically and experimentally studied. The primary (noise) field in the cylinder model is generated by the coupled dynamic response of the shell under loading by a single exterior acoustic source. Control of the interior sound field is achieved by applying vibrational force inputs directly to the shell wall. Action of the point controllers serve to increase the input impedance of select structural modes of the shell which are well-coupled to the interior acoustic cavity, thus substantially reducing sound transmission into the cavity. Spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 30 dB are demonstrated for acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity. Twin controller configurations are presented which demonstrate the ability to independently control orthogonal modes of the interior acoustic space. Benefits and drawbacks of this new methodology for noise control are discussed and clearly demonstrated.

  15. Multi-mode traffic-induced vibrations in composite ladder-deck bridges under heavy moving vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camara, A.; Ruiz-Teran, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    Composite (steel-concrete) ladder-decks represent one of the most common solutions in road bridges nowadays. In these structures the Serviceability Limit State (SLS) of vibrations is traditionally ignored or roughly addressed by means of simple static deflection-based approaches, inherently assuming that the vibrations are controlled by the fundamental longitudinal mode. This work demonstrates that a wide range of high-order vibrational modes, involving the transverse flexure of the slab between longitudinal girders, govern the accelerations recorded in the deck and inside the vehicles. In addition, a new methodology for analysing the Vehicle-Bridge Interaction is proposed, including the approaching platforms, the transition slabs, and the bridge joints. The results suggest that the riding comfort for vehicle users is specially affected by direct effects on the wheels, like the road roughness and possible construction misalignments at the bridge joints, as well as low-frequency vibrations coming from the deck in short or slender bridges. The filtering effects resulting from the average of the response in time and in space when calculating the root mean square acceleration are also explored, and new design parameters are provided. In addition, several structural features (such as the depth and spacing of the longitudinal and transverse steel beams, the thickness of the concrete slab, and the stiffness of the cantilever cross beams at the diaphragm sections) have been studied, and a set of new design criteria has been established. It has been demonstrated that the transverse flexibility of the deck (specially influenced by the support conditions and the slab thickness) is critically important for the users' (pedestrians and vehicle passengers) comfort, as it controls the aforementioned high-order vibrational modes which govern the dynamic response.

  16. Active sensor/actuator assemblies for vibration damping, compensation, measurement, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryaboy, Vyacheslav M.; Kasturi, Prakash S.

    2010-04-01

    The vibration control module known as IQ damper had been developed as part of active vibration damping system for optical tables and other precision vibration isolated platforms. The present work describes steps to expand the application of these units to other tasks, namely, (1) dynamic testing of structures and (2) compensation of forced vibration in local areas. The sensor-actuator assembly, including signal conditioning circuits, is designed as a compact dynamically symmetric module with mechanical interface to an optical table. The test data show that the vibration control modules can be used to measure dynamic compliance characteristics of optical tables with precision comparable to that of dedicated vibration measurement systems. Stable concerted work of active vibration control modules compensating forced harmonic vibration is demonstrated experimentally.

  17. Segmentation of a Vibro-Shock Cantilever-Type Piezoelectric Energy Harvester Operating in Higher Transverse Vibration Modes

    PubMed Central

    Zizys, Darius; Gaidys, Rimvydas; Dauksevicius, Rolanas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Daniulaitis, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    The piezoelectric transduction mechanism is a common vibration-to-electric energy harvesting approach. Piezoelectric energy harvesters are typically mounted on a vibrating host structure, whereby alternating voltage output is generated by a dynamic strain field. A design target in this case is to match the natural frequency of the harvester to the ambient excitation frequency for the device to operate in resonance mode, thus significantly increasing vibration amplitudes and, as a result, energy output. Other fundamental vibration modes have strain nodes, where the dynamic strain field changes sign in the direction of the cantilever length. The paper reports on a dimensionless numerical transient analysis of a cantilever of a constant cross-section and an optimally-shaped cantilever with the objective to accurately predict the position of a strain node. Total effective strain produced by both cantilevers segmented at the strain node is calculated via transient analysis and compared to the strain output produced by the cantilevers segmented at strain nodes obtained from modal analysis, demonstrating a 7% increase in energy output. Theoretical results were experimentally verified by using open-circuit voltage values measured for the cantilevers segmented at optimal and suboptimal segmentation lines. PMID:26703623

  18. Application of Nonstationary Sliding Mode Control to Suppression of Transverse Vibration of Elevator Rope Using Input Device with Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuki, Masatsugu; Ushijima, Yumiko; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Toshiaki

    Transverse vibrations of ropes spanning a high-speed elevator are induced by resonance when a building sways because of an earthquake or wind force. Hence, an effective solution is demanded. In this study, we undertake to suppress the vibration of an elevator rope by using an input device placed in the vicinity of the upper boundary of the rope. This input device has gaps between an actuator and the rope to prevent the progression of their abrasion. A nonstationary control method is effective for the control of a time-varying system with which an elevator rope and a crane wire are categorized. In addition, a sliding mode controller is robust toward nonlinearity at the position where input is introduced. Thus, in this paper, we present a method of vibration control for the elevator rope, which is based on the nonstationary sliding mode control method using the input device with gaps. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed controller are examined by numerical calculation that simulates input saturation, stroke limitation, gap-width expansion, and varying parameters, in the presence of model errors of the elevator rope. The results indicate effective vibration suppression and high robustness in the above cases except for the case of varying parameters.

  19. Direct assignment of molecular vibrations via normal mode analysis of the neutron dynamic pair distribution function technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fry-Petit, A. M. E-mail: afry@fullerton.edu; Sheckelton, J. P.; McQueen, T. M. E-mail: afry@fullerton.edu; Rebola, A. F.; Fennie, C. J.; Mourigal, M.; Valentine, M.; Drichko, N.

    2015-09-28

    For over a century, vibrational spectroscopy has enhanced the study of materials. Yet, assignment of particular molecular motions to vibrational excitations has relied on indirect methods. Here, we demonstrate that applying group theoretical methods to the dynamic pair distribution function analysis of neutron scattering data provides direct access to the individual atomic displacements responsible for these excitations. Applied to the molecule-based frustrated magnet with a potential magnetic valence-bond state, LiZn{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 8}, this approach allows direct assignment of the constrained rotational mode of Mo{sub 3}O{sub 13} clusters and internal modes of MoO{sub 6} polyhedra. We anticipate that coupling this well known data analysis technique with dynamic pair distribution function analysis will have broad application in connecting structural dynamics to physical properties in a wide range of molecular and solid state systems.

  20. Direct assignment of molecular vibrations via normal mode analysis of the neutron dynamic pair distribution function technique.

    PubMed

    Fry-Petit, A M; Rebola, A F; Mourigal, M; Valentine, M; Drichko, N; Sheckelton, J P; Fennie, C J; McQueen, T M

    2015-09-28

    For over a century, vibrational spectroscopy has enhanced the study of materials. Yet, assignment of particular molecular motions to vibrational excitations has relied on indirect methods. Here, we demonstrate that applying group theoretical methods to the dynamic pair distribution function analysis of neutron scattering data provides direct access to the individual atomic displacements responsible for these excitations. Applied to the molecule-based frustrated magnet with a potential magnetic valence-bond state, LiZn2Mo3O8, this approach allows direct assignment of the constrained rotational mode of Mo3O13 clusters and internal modes of MoO6 polyhedra. We anticipate that coupling this well known data analysis technique with dynamic pair distribution function analysis will have broad application in connecting structural dynamics to physical properties in a wide range of molecular and solid state systems. PMID:26429001

  1. Evolution of Microstructure and Residual Stress under Various Vibration Modes in 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng-Shuen; Wang, Jia-Siang

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous vibration welding of 304 stainless steel was carried out with an eccentric circulating vibrator and a magnetic telescopic vibrator at subresonant (362 Hz and 59.3 Hz) and resonant (376 Hz and 60.9 Hz) frequencies. The experimental results indicate that the temperature gradient can be increased, accelerating nucleation and causing grain refinement during this process. During simultaneous vibration welding primary δ-ferrite can be refined and the morphologies of retained δ-ferrite become discontinuous so that δ-ferrite contents decrease. The smallest content of δ-ferrite (5.5%) occurred using the eccentric circulating vibrator. The diffraction intensities decreased and the FWHM widened with both vibration and no vibration. A residual stress can obviously be increased, producing an excellent effect on stress relief at a resonant frequency. The stress relief effect with an eccentric circulating vibrator was better than that obtained using a magnetic telescopic vibrator. PMID:24605068

  2. Mode- and bond-selected reactions of vibrationally excited methane and monodeuterated methane with chlorine atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sangwoon

    Direct infrared absorption prepares CH4 in two nearly isoenergetic vibrationally excited states, the symmetric stretch-bend combination (nu 1 + nu4) and the antisymmetric stretch-bend combination (nu3 + nu4), for a study of the effect of stretching vibrations of CH4 on the reaction, CH4 + Cl( 2P3/2) → CH3 + HCl. Comparison of intensities in the action spectra with those in the simulated absorption spectra shows that vibrational excitation of methane to the nu1 + nu4 state promotes the reaction more efficiently than excitation to the nu3 + nu4 state by a factor of 1.9 +/- 0.5. The reduced symmetry of CH3D allows us to explore the relative reactivity of the fundamental symmetric and the antisymmetric C-H stretches. We excite three vibrational eigenstates of CH3D near 3000 cm -1 that contain different amounts of symmetric C-H stretch (nu 1), antisymmetric C-H stretch (nu4), and two quanta of bend (2nu5). Analyzing the action spectra with the simulation and the composition of the eigenstates reveals that the nu1 vibration is 6 +/- 1 times more reactive than the nu4 vibration. Ab initio calculations of the vibrational eigenfunctions along the reaction coordinate show that as the Cl atom approaches, the nu1 vibration of CH3D is transformed into localized vibrational excitation in the C-H bond pointing toward the Cl atom, promoting the reaction, and the nu 4 vibrational energy flows into the distal C-H bonds that remain unaffected during the reaction, consistent with our experimental results. Selective vibrational excitation permits control of the outcome of a reaction with two competing channels. Vibrational excitation of the first overtone of C-D stretch (2nu2) of CH3D at ˜4300 cm-1 exclusively increases the probability of breaking the C-D bond, yielding CH3 but no CH2D. By contrast, excitation of the nu1 vibration, the nu4 vibration, or the combination vibration of C-H stretch and CH3 umbrella bend (nu4 + nu3) preferentially promotes the H-atom abstraction to

  3. Lattice vibration modes in type-II superlattice InAs/GaSb with no-common-atom interface and overlapping vibration spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Henan; Yue, Naili; Zhang, Yong; Qiao, Pengfei; Zuo, Daniel; Kesler, Ben; Chuang, Shun Lien; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Justice, James D.; Dupuis, Russell

    2015-06-01

    Heterostructures like InAs /GaSb superlattices (SLs) are distinctly different from well-studied ones like GaAs /AlAs SLs in terms of band alignment, common interface atom, and phonon spectrum overlapping of the constituents, which manifests as stark differences in their electronic and vibrational properties. This paper reports a comprehensive examination of all four types of phonon modes (confined, quasiconfined, extended, and interface) that have long been predicted for the InAs /GaSb SL, with the observation and interpretation of a set of phonon modes by performing cleaved edge μ -Raman study with polarization analysis. Furthermore, we show a signature of symmetry reduction from D2 d for GaAs /AlAs SL to C2 v for InAs/GaSb SL revealed as a phonon-polariton effect.

  4. Active control of sound radiation from a vibrating rectangular panel by sound sources and vibration inputs - An experimental comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Hansen, C. H.; Snyder, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Active control of sound radiation from a rectangular panel by two different methods has been experimentally studied and compared. In the first method a single control force applied directly to the structure is used with a single error microphone located in the radiated acoustic field. Global attenuation of radiated sound was observed to occur by two main mechanisms. For 'on-resonance' excitation, the control force had the effect of increasing the total panel input impedance presented to the nosie source, thus reducing all radiated sound. For 'off-resonance' excitation, the control force tends not significantly to modify the panel total response amplitude but rather to restructure the relative phases of the modes leading to a more complex vibration pattern and a decrease in radiation efficiency. For acoustic control, the second method, the number of acoustic sources required for global reduction was seen to increase with panel modal order. The mechanism in this case was that the acoustic sources tended to create an inverse pressure distribution at the panel surface and thus 'unload' the panel by reducing the panel radiation impedance. In general, control by structural inputs appears more effective than control by acoustic sources for structurally radiated noise.

  5. Adaptive active vibration control to improve the fatigue life of a carbon-epoxy smart structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Cazzulani, Gabriele; Cinquemani, Simone; Resta, Ferruccio; Torti, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Active vibration controls are helpful in improving fatigue life of structures through limitation of absolute displacements. However, control algorithms are usually designed without explicitly taking into account the fatigue phenomenon. In this paper, an adaptive vibration controller is proposed to increase the fatigue life of a smart structure made of composite material and actuated with piezoelectric patches. The main innovation with respect to the most common solutions is that the control laws are directly linked to a damage driving force, which is correlated to a fatigue damage model for the specific material. The control logic is different depending on the damage state of the structure. If no significant damage affects the structure, the controller decreases the crack nucleation probability by limiting the driving forces in the overall structure. On the contrary, if initiated cracks are present, their further propagation is prevented by controlling the damage driving forces in the already damaged areas. The structural diagnostics is performed through a vibration-based health monitoring technique, while periodical adaptation of the controller is adopted to consider damage-induced changes on the structure state-space model and to give emphasis to the most excited modes. The control algorithm has been numerically validated on the finite element model of a cantilever plate.

  6. Photothermal excitation and laser Doppler velocimetry of higher cantilever vibration modes for dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Shuhei; Kobayashi, Dai; Sakurada, Takeo; Nakazawa, Tomonori; Hoshi, Yasuo; Kawakatsu, Hideki

    2008-12-15

    The authors present an optically based method combining photothermal excitation and laser Doppler velocimetry of higher cantilever vibration modes for dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid. The frequency spectrum of a silicon cantilever measured in water over frequencies ranging up to 10 MHz shows that the method allows us to excite and detect higher modes, from fundamental to fifth flexural, without enhancing spurious resonances. By reducing the tip oscillation amplitude using higher modes, the average tip-sample force gradient due to chemical bonds is effectively increased to achieve high-spatial-resolution imaging in liquid. The method's performance is demonstrated by atomic resolution imaging of a mica surface in water obtained using the second flexural mode with a small tip amplitude of 99 pm; individual atoms on the surface with small height differences of up to 60 pm are clearly resolved.

  7. Vibration energy harvesting from a nonlinear standing beam-mass system using a two-mode approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajimi, S. A. M.; Friswell, M. I.

    2015-04-01

    For a nonlinear beam-mass system used to harvest vibratory energy, the two-mode approximation of the response is computed and compared to the single-mode approximation of the response. To this end, the discretized equations of generalized coordinates are developed and studied using a computational method. By obtaining phase-portraits and time-histories of the displacement and voltage, it is shown that the strong nonlinearity of the system affects the system dynamics considerably. By comparing the results of single- and two-mode approximations, it is shown that the number of mode shapes affects the dynamics of the response. Varying the tip-mass results in different structural configurations namely linear, pre-buckled nonlinear, and post-buckled nonlinear configurations. The nonlinear dynamics of the system response are investigated for vibrations about static equilibrium points arising from the buckling of the beam. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the harvested power is affected by the system configuration.

  8. Advanced tip design for liquid phase vibration mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yuji; Shigeno, Masatsugu; Shirakawabe, Yoshiharu; Inoue, Akira; Kim, Woo-Sik; Kim, Seung Jin; Chang, Sang-Mok; Kim, Jong Min

    2008-03-24

    We have fabricated polymer tips for atomic force microscopy in order to elucidate the effects of tip length and shape on cantilever vibration damping in liquids. The vibration damping is investigated by measuring the vibration amplitude of cantilevers as a function of tip-sample distance. The cantilever with a short tip provides a higher damping effect over long tip-sample distances. When the vibration amplitude was rescaled to show the effect of the cantilever width on oscillation damping, the vibration amplitude of cantilevers with various tip lengths was similarly obtained in a long distance range over 50 microm. This similarity is explained by an acoustic damping model in which an acoustic wave is generated by the cantilever. Finally, the results indicate a cantilever with a sufficiently long tip compared to the cantilever width can dramatically reduce the long-range damping effect in a liquid environment. PMID:18328326

  9. Integrated passive/active vibration absorber for multi-story buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina J.; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Horta, Lucas G.

    1995-01-01

    Passive isolator, active vibration absorber, and an integrated passive/active (hybrid) control are studied for their effectiveness in reducing structural vibration under seismic excitations. For the passive isolator, a laminated rubber bearing base isolator which has been studied and used extensively by researchers and seismic designers is considered. An active vibration absorber concept, which can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability with minimum knowledge of the controlled system, is used to reduce the passive isolator displacement and to suppress the top floor vibration. A three-story building model is used for the numerical simulation. The performance of an active vibration absorber and a hybrid vibration controller in reducing peak structural responses is compared with the passively isolated structural response and with absence of vibration control systems under the N00W component of El Centro 1940 and N90W component of the Mexico City earthquake excitation records. The results show that the integrated passive/active vibration control system is most effective in suppressing the peak structural acceleration for the El Centro 1940 earthquake when compared with the passive or active vibration absorber alone. The active vibration absorber, however, is the only system that suppresses the peak acceleration of the structure for the Mexico City 1985 earthquake.

  10. Design of the Active Elevon Rotor for Low Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, Mark V.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter fuselages vibrate more than desired, and traditional solutions have limited effectiveness and can impose an appreciable weight penalty. Alternative methods of combating high vibration, including Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) via harmonic swashplate motion and Individual Blade Control (IBC) via active pitch links, have been studied for several decades. HHC via an on-blade control surface was tested in 1977 on a full scale rotor using a secondary active swashplate and a mechanical control system. Recent smart material advances have prompted new research into the use of on-blade control concepts. Recent analytical studies have indicated that the use of on-blade control surfaces produces vibration reduction comparable to swashplate-based HHC but for less power. Furthermore, smart materials (such as piezoceramics) have been shown to provide sufficient control authority for preliminary rotor experiments. These experiments were initially performed at small scale for reduced tip speeds. More recent experiments have been conducted at or near full tip speeds, and a full-scale active rotor is under development by Boeing with Eurocopter et al. pursuing a similarly advanced full-scale implementation. The US Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate has undertaken a new research program called the Active Elevon Rotor (AER) Focus Demo. This program includes the design, fabrication, and wind. tunnel testing of a four-bladed, 12.96 ft diameter rotor with one or two on-blade elevons per blade. The rotor, which will be Mach scaled, will use 2-5/rev elevon motion for closed-loop control and :will be tested in late 2001. The primary goal of the AER Focus Demo is the reduction of vibratory hub loads by 80% and the reduction of vibratory blade structural loads. A secondary goal is the reduction of rotor power. The third priority is the measurement and possible reduction of Blade Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. The present study is focused on elevon effectiveness, that is, the elevon

  11. Hybrid PD and effective multi-mode positive position feedback control for slewing and vibration suppression of a smart flexible manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Jun-qiang; Wei, Yan-ding; Yang, Yi-ling; Xie, Feng-ran

    2015-03-01

    A hybrid control strategy for slewing and vibration suppression of a smart flexible manipulator is presented in this paper. It consists of a proportional derivative controller to realize motion control, and an effective multi-mode positive position feedback (EMPPF) controller to suppress the multi-mode vibration. Rather than treat each mode equally as the standard multi-mode PPF, the essence of the EMPPF is that control forces of different modes are applied according to the mode parameters of the respective modes, so the vibration modes with less vibration energy receive fewer control forces. Stability conditions for the close loop system are established through stability analysis. Optimal parameters of the EMPPF controller are obtained using the method of root locus analysis. The performance of the proposed strategy is demonstrated by simulation and experiments. Experimental results show that the first two vibration modes of the manipulator are effectively suppressed. The setting time of the setup descends approximately 55%, reaching 3.12 s from 5.67 s.

  12. The design of an active-adaptive tuned vibration absorber based on magnetorheological elastomer and its vibration attenuation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, G. J.; Gong, X. L.; Kang, C. J.; Xuan, S. H.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents an active-adaptive tuned vibration absorber (AATVA) which is based on magnetorheological elastomer (MRE). A voice coil motor is attached to a conventional MRE adaptive tuned vibration absorber (ATVA) to improve its performance. In this study, two feedback types of the activation force were analyzed and the stability condition was obtained. In order to eliminate the time delay effect during the signal processing, a phase-lead compensator was incorporated. Based on the analysis, an MRE AATVA prototype was designed and its dynamic properties were experimentally investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that its resonant frequency could vary from 11 to 18 Hz and its damping ratio decreased to roughly 0.05 from 0.19 by adding the activation force. Besides, its vibration reduction abilities at the first two resonant frequencies of the experimental platform could reach 5.9 dB and 7.9 dB respectively.

  13. Vibrational spectra, structure and antioxidant activity of gossypol imine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilkevych, N. S.; Schroeder, G.; Rybachenko, V. I.; Chotiy, K. Y.; Makarova, R. A.

    2012-02-01

    The structures and tautomeric equilibria of natural polyphenol gossypol and four its imine derivatives were studied by FT-IR-, NMR-spectroscopy and quantum chemistry methods. It was shown that gossypol Schiff bases exist in solution as enamine-enamine tautomer and hydrazones as imine-imine tautomer. Infrared absorption spectra of studied compounds were simulated using the PM3 method. The fundamental vibrational frequencies were evaluated using various scale factors which yield a good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. Free radical scavenging activity of gossypol and its imine derivatives was evaluated using DPPH method. Antioxidant activity of studied compounds was characterized. Gossypol hydrazones were shown to be more efficient, while Schiff base to be less efficient as antioxidants in comparison with gossypol itself.

  14. Energy-Recycling Semi-Active Vibration Suppression Experiment of a Truss with Piezoelectric Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makihara, K.

    2002-01-01

    inherent performance in damping is enhanced. Several semi-active vibration suppression approaches have been proposed based on variable-stiffness members, variable-friction devices, or variable-viscosity dampers, and the performance of each of these systems has been studied. The semi-active approach exploits passive energy-dissipation mechanisms, and supplies the system with no additional energy. Semi-active vibration suppression thus ensures that the system is always stable. This is its advantage. However, its performance in vibration suppression is usually inferior to active vibration suppression. have proposed collection of the energy taken from a vibrating system in suppressing its vibration. Using the collected energy to more quickly suppress the vibration is an attractive possibility. Additional energy is still not supplied to the system, and the vibration energy is finally dissipated. Therefore, this is a kind of semi-active approach, and retains the quality of that the system with it is always stable. method of energy-recycling semi-active vibration suppression is described and its performance is demonstrated by an experiment. A five bay truss beam with a piezoelectric transducer was used, and a simple electric circuit with switches was connected to the transducers. Then the switches were controlled by a processor so that the vibration was quickly suppressed by exploiting the collected electric energy. The results of the experiment demonstrated that the performance in vibration suppression of energy-recycling semi-active vibration suppression with actual hardware is much better than that of a traditional semi-active control. The effects of some non-ideal characteristics of real hardware on the performance in vibration suppression are also investigated.

  15. Active Flap Control of the SMART Rotor for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Steven R.; Anand, R. Vaidyanathan; Straub, Friedrich K.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Active control methodologies were applied to a full-scale active flap rotor obtained during a joint Boeing/ DARPA/NASA/Army test in the Air Force National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40- by 80-foot anechoic wind tunnel. The active flap rotor is a full-scale MD 900 helicopter main rotor with each of its five blades modified to include an on-blade piezoelectric actuator-driven flap with a span of 18% of radius, 25% of chord, and located at 83% radius. Vibration control demonstrated the potential of active flaps for effective control of vibratory loads, especially normal force loads. Active control of normal force vibratory loads using active flaps and a continuous-time higher harmonic control algorithm was very effective, reducing harmonic (1-5P) normal force vibratory loads by 95% in both cruise and approach conditions. Control of vibratory roll and pitch moments was also demonstrated, although moment control was less effective than normal force control. Finally, active control was used to precisely control blade flap position for correlation with pretest predictions of rotor aeroacoustics. Flap displacements were commanded to follow specific harmonic profiles of 2 deg or more in amplitude, and the flap deflection errors obtained were less than 0.2 deg r.m.s.

  16. The influence of vibration type, frequency, body position and additional load on the neuromuscular activity during whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Gollhofer, Albert; Kramer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of different whole body vibration (WBV) determinants on the electromyographic (EMG) activity during WBV in order to identify those training conditions that cause highest neuromuscular responses and therefore provide optimal training conditions. In a randomized cross-over study, the EMG activity of six leg muscles was analyzed in 18 subjects with respect to the following determinants: (1) vibration type (side-alternating vibration (SV) vs. synchronous vibration (SyV), (2) frequency (5-10-15-20-25-30 Hz), (3) knee flexion angle (10°-30°-60°), (4) stance condition (forefoot vs. normal stance) and (5) load variation (no extra load vs. additional load equal to one-third of the body weight). The results are: (1) neuromuscular activity during SV was enhanced compared to SyV (P < 0.05); (2) a progressive increase in frequency caused a progressive increase in EMG activity (P < 0.05); (3) the EMG activity was highest for the knee extensors when the knee joint was 60° flexed (P < 0.05); (4) for the plantar flexors in the forefoot stance condition (P < 0.05); and (5) additional load caused an increase in neuromuscular activation (P < 0.05). In conclusion, large variations of the EMG activation could be observed across conditions. However, with an appropriate adjustment of specific WBV determinants, high EMG activations and therefore high activation intensities could be achieved in the selected muscles. The combination of high vibration frequencies with additional load on an SV platform led to highest EMG activities. Regarding the body position, a knee flexion of 60° and forefoot stance appear to be beneficial for the knee extensors and the plantar flexors, respectively. PMID:22538279

  17. Active vibration control of a sandwich plate by non-collocated positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Giovanni; Amabili, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The active vibration control of a free rectangular sandwich plate by using the Positive Position Feedback (PPF) algorithm was experimentally investigated in a previous study. Four normal modes were controlled by four nearly collocated couples of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The experimental results of the control showed some limitation, especially in the Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO) configuration. This was attributed to the specific type of sensors and their conditioning, as well as to the phase shifts present in the vibration at different points of the structure. An alternative approach is here undertaken by abandoning the configuration of quasi-perfect collocation between sensor and actuator. The positioning of the piezoelectric patches is still led by the strain energy value distribution on the plate; each couple of sensor and actuator is now placed on the same face of the plate but in two distinct positions, opposed and symmetrical with respect to the geometric center of the plate. Single-Input Single-Output (SISO) PPF is tested and the transfer function parameters of the controller are tuned according to the measured values of modal damping. Then the participation matrices necessary for the MIMO control algorithm are determined by means of a completely experimental procedure. PPF is able to mitigate the vibration of the first four natural modes, in spite of the rigid body motions due to the free boundary conditions. The amplitude reduction achieved with the non-collocated configuration is much larger than the one obtained with the nearby collocated one. The phase lags were addressed in the MIMO algorithm by correction phase delays, further increasing the performance of the controller.

  18. Development and applications of two computational procedures for determining the vibration modes of structural systems. [aircraft structures - aerospaceplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Two computational procedures for analyzing complex structural systems for their natural modes and frequencies of vibration are presented. Both procedures are based on a substructures methodology and both employ the finite-element stiffness method to model the constituent substructures. The first procedure is a direct method based on solving the eigenvalue problem associated with a finite-element representation of the complete structure. The second procedure is a component-mode synthesis scheme in which the vibration modes of the complete structure are synthesized from modes of substructures into which the structure is divided. The analytical basis of the methods contains a combination of features which enhance the generality of the procedures. The computational procedures exhibit a unique utilitarian character with respect to the versatility, computational convenience, and ease of computer implementation. The computational procedures were implemented in two special-purpose computer programs. The results of the application of these programs to several structural configurations are shown and comparisons are made with experiment.

  19. Adsorption of linear alkanes on Cu(111): Temperature and chain-length dependence of the softened vibrational mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosser, Kari A.; Kang, Joo H.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Wöll, Christof

    2007-05-01

    The vibrational spectra of linear alkanes, with lengths ranging from n-propane to n-octane, were examined on a copper surface by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy. The appearance and frequency of the "soft mode," a feature routinely seen in studies of saturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on metals, were examined and compared between the different adsorbates. The frequency of the mode was found to be dependent on both the number of methylene units of each alkane as well as specific aspects of the order of the monolayer phase. Studies of monolayer coverages at different temperatures provide insights into the nature of the two-dimensional (2D) melting transitions of these adlayer structures, ones that can be inferred from observed shifts in the soft vibrational modes appearing in the C-H stretching region of the infrared spectrum. These studies support recently reported hypotheses as to the origins of such soft modes: the metal-hydrogen interactions that mediate them and the dynamics that underlay their pronounced temperature dependencies. The present data strongly support a model for the 2D to one-dimensional order-order phase transition arising via a continuous rather than discrete first-order process.

  20. Active Creation of Instrinsically Localized Vibrations in Uranium Using X-Ray and Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, M; Alatas, A; Trouw, F; Hults, W; Leu, B; Lynn, J; Chen, Y

    2007-08-23

    In real materials, nonlinear forces cause the frequencies of vibrating atoms to depend on amplitude. As a consequence, a large-amplitude fluctuation on the scale of the atom spacing can develop a frequency that does not resonate with the normal modes, causing energy to become trapped in an intrinsically localized mode (ILM)--also called 'discrete breather' or 'lattice soliton'. As temperature is increased, entropy is expected to stabilize increased concentrations of these random hotspots. This mechanism, which spontaneously concentrates energy, has been observed in analogous systems on a larger scale, but direct sightings at the atomic scale have proved difficult. Two challenges have hampered progress: (1) the need to separate ILMs from modes associated with crystal imperfections, and (2) complications that arise at high temperatures, including feature broadening and multiphonon processes. Here we solve both of these problems by actively creating ILMs at low temperatures in {alpha}-uranium using high-energy inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering. The ILM creation excitation occurs at energies ten times higher than conventional lattice excitations, cleanly separating it from modes associated with crystal imperfections. The discovery of this excitation not only proves the existence of ILMs in uranium but also opens up a new route for finding ILMs in other materials and, in the process, a new area for spectroscopy.

  1. Synchronization analysis and control of three eccentric rotors in a vibrating system using adaptive sliding mode control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxi; Zhang, Xueliang; Chen, Xiaozhe; Wen, Bangchun; Wang, Bo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, self- and controlled synchronizations of three eccentric rotors (ERs) in line driven by induction motors rotating in the same direction in a vibrating system are investigated. The vibrating system is a typical underactuated mechanical-electromagnetic coupling system. The analysis and control of the vibrating system convert to the synchronization motion problem of three ERs. Firstly, the self-synchronization motion of three ERs is analyzed according to self-synchronization theory. The criterions of synchronization and stability of self-synchronous state are obtained by using a modified average perturbation method. The significant synchronization motion of three ERs with zero phase differences cannot be implemented according to self-synchronization theory through analysis and simulations. To implement the synchronization motion of three ERs with zero phase differences, an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) algorithm based on a modified master-slave control strategy is employed to design the controllers. The stability of the controllers is verified by using Lyapunov theorem. The performances of the controlled synchronization system are presented by simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of controllers. Finally, the effects of reference speed and non-zero phase differences on the controlled system are discussed to show the strong robustness of the proposed controllers. Additionally, the dynamic responses of the vibrating system in different synchronous states are analyzed.

  2. Evidence for highly anharmonic low-frequency vibrational modes in bulk amorphous Pd40Cu40P20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarik, D. J.; Schwarz, R. B.

    2009-09-01

    We have measured the elastic constants of amorphous Pd40Cu40P20 (isotropic, two independent elastic constants), single crystal Pd40Cu40P20 (tetragonal, six elastic constants), and single crystal Pd50Cu50 (fcc, three elastic constants) over the range 3.9vibrations. The temperature dependence of the shear modulus of amorphous Pd40Cu40P20 includes an additional contribution, ΔCE(T) , which becomes dominant for T<20K : C(T)=C(0)-BT2+ΔCLat(T)+ΔCE(T) . The ΔCE(T) contribution can be explained by the presence of a small number of low-frequency, highly anharmonic vibrational modes, which we characterize as Einstein oscillators with temperature θE≈12K and Grüneisen parameter γEC'≫2 . Theory and computer modeling suggest that these modes involve the collective vibration of stringlike arrays of atoms.

  3. Excess of low frequency vibrational modes and glass transition: A molecular dynamics study for soft spheres at constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Ruiz, Hugo M.; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2009-10-01

    Using molecular dynamics at constant pressure, the relationship between the excess of low frequency vibrational modes (known as the boson peak) and the glass transition is investigated for a truncated Lennard-Jones potential. It is observed that the quadratic mean displacement is enhanced by such modes, as predicted using a harmonic Hamiltonian for metastable states. As a result, glasses loose mechanical stability at lower temperatures than the corresponding crystal, since the Lindemann criteria are observed, as is also deduced from density functional theory. Finally, we found that the average force and elastic constant are reduced in the glass due to such excess of modes. The ratio between average elastic constants can be approximated using the 2/3 rule between melting and glass transition temperatures.

  4. Reduction of nonspecific protein adsorption on cantilever biosensors caused by transverse resonant mode vibration.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Blake N; Mutharasan, Raj

    2014-03-01

    We examine if vibration of millimeter-sized cantilever sensors can release nonspecifically adsorbed proteins. Integrated electrochemical and mass-change measurement as well as fluorescence assays showed transverse surface vibration released nonspecifically bound proteins in samples prepared at 0.2-3.6 mg bovine serum albumin (BSA) per mL. Extent of release was directly related to magnitude of excitation voltage (Vex) applied to the self-actuating lead zirconate titanate (PZT) cantilever over three log units (0, 10 mV, 100 mV, and 1 V). Vibration-induced release was not instantaneous, but had an apparent first-order rate constant (kapp) which ranged from 0.02-0.1 min(-1). Results suggest significant serum albumin protein release could be achieved using excitation voltages of 1 V in millimeter-sized cantilever sensors. Complementary experiments with thiolated DNA, which binds to surface gold 〈111〉 sites with ∼ four times higher binding energy than BSA, showed negligible release under the same vibration magnitude. The results of the study suggest a direct correlation between surface-adsorbate binding energy and the effectiveness of vibration-induced release. We suggest that the release mechanism includes contributions from surface strain energy, body force, and acoustic streaming-associated hydrodynamic effects. The primary contribution of this study suggests that surface vibration of cantilever sensors may be useful in reducing nonspecific adsorption, especially for biosensing of analytes present in a complex background. PMID:24416758

  5. Active low-frequency vertical vibration isolation system for precision measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kang; Li, Gang; Hu, Hua; Wang, Lijun

    2016-06-01

    Low-frequency vertical vibration isolation systems play important roles in precision measurements to reduce seismic and environmental vibration noise. Several types of active vibration isolation systems have been developed. However, few researches focus on how to optimize the test mass install position in order to improve the vibration transmissibility. An active low-frequency vertical vibration isolation system based on an earlier instrument, the Super Spring, is designed and implemented. The system, which is simple and compact, consists of two stages: a parallelogram-shaped linkage to ensure vertical motion, and a simple spring-mass system. The theoretical analysis of the vibration isolation system is presented, including terms erroneously ignored before. By carefully choosing the mechanical parameters according to the above analysis and using feedback control, the resonance frequency of the system is reduced from 2.3 to 0.03 Hz, a reduction by a factor of more than 75. The vibration isolation system is installed as an inertial reference in an absolute gravimeter, where it improved the scatter of the absolute gravity values by a factor of 5. The experimental results verifies the improved performance of the isolation system, making it particularly suitable for precision experiments. The improved vertical vibration isolation system can be used as a prototype for designing high-performance active vertical isolation systems. An improved theoretical model of this active vibration isolation system with beam-pivot configuration is proposed, providing fundamental guidelines for vibration isolator design and assembling.

  6. Voice Coil Actuator for Active Vibration Isolation in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, E.; Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Maddaleno, F.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Many microgravity experiments require very low levels of acceleration which cannot be achieved on the International Space Station due to the residual vibration. A vibration isolation system is then usually devised between the experiment and the space station to obtain the desired accelerations at the experiment level. The very low frequency threshold required by the isolation specifications makes passive solutions for the isolation difficult to implement. This is mainly due to the practical impossibility of achieving high values of compliance of the elastic suspension. Furthermore, the unavoidable connections of uncertain characteristics between the experiment and the space station makes the problem even more difficult to be addressed. Disturbance reduction can be performed by means of active vibration isolation, based on magnetic suspension technology acting both at rack and at scientific experiment levels. The stiffness and damping of the active suspension can be tuned by the control loop to minimise the acceleration of the payload. The mechatronic design of an active magnetic suspension for vibration isolation in microgravity has been performed by resorting to the so-called voice-coil configuration, after a preliminary trade-off analysis of the available magnetic actuators and materials. The optimisation of the actuator layout was developed with respect to the design airgap and force density (N/kg of actuator) and force resolution requirements, by demonstrating that the configuration based on Lorentz magnetic force is more suitable for the above application in terms of stability, bi- directionality of the actuation, cross coupling effects and linearity of the force. The aim of the design was the maximisation of the actuation force/mass ratio. The FEM analysis of the voice coil allowed to investigate the flux leakage and the cross coupling effects between the actuation forces along the three principal directions of the active device. A procedure for the numerical

  7. Tuning of active vibration controllers for ACTEX by genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    1999-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal tuning of digitally programmable analog controllers on the ACTEX-1 smart structures flight experiment. The programmable controllers for each channel include a third order Strain Rate Feedback (SRF) controller, a fifth order SRF controller, a second order Positive Position Feedback (PPF) controller, and a fourth order PPF controller. Optimal manual tuning of several control parameters can be a difficult task even though the closed-loop control characteristics of each controller are well known. Hence, the automatic tuning of individual control parameters using Genetic Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The optimal control parameters of each control law are obtained by imposing a constraint on the closed-loop frequency response functions using the ACTEX mathematical model. The tuned control parameters are then uploaded to the ACTEX electronic control electronics and experiments on the active vibration control are carried out in space. The experimental results on ACTEX will be presented.

  8. Active vibration and balance system for closed cycle thermodynamic machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass. A method is also provided.

  9. Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy of - CH Activation Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2013-06-01

    Despite the rather simple composition of alkanes the strength of their C-C and C-H bonds has made controlled, selective reaction of these compounds an unrealized goal of synthetic chemistry. The field was pioneered by Shilov and coworkers in 1969 when they observed the exchange of H and D in methane that was bubbled into an acidic solution of K_2PtCl_4. The Shilov reaction has since been extended to induce oxidation of methane selectively to methanol and has become the standard bearer of CH activation despite its limitations. The mechanism for the reaction, while inferred from kinetics studies, is still largely uncharacterized. Here, we present our work towards applying cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) to capture the intermediate species of this reaction with a focus on the σ-CH adduct formed between methane and Pt(II) complexes that is believed to be crucial to the selectivity and rate of this reaction.

  10. System design for active vibration control of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, V.; Nagaraja, B. V.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Shree S, Amrutha; Muthaiah, Skanda N.

    2003-10-01

    Instrumentation, electronics, digital signal processing and related software form the basic building blocks of a system for implementation of Active Vibration Control (AVC) for smart aerospace structures. This paper essentially deals with the design, development and implementation of a 4 channel analog input sub-system essentially consisting of charge amplifiers, filters, gain amplifiers & Analog to Digital Converters (ADC), the subsequent Digital Signal Processor (DSP) hardware for implementation of the controller and finally a 4 Channel analog output subsystem consisting of Digital to Analog Converters (DAC), reconstruction filters & high voltage amplifiers. This system essentially interfaces to a structure with piezo-ceramic sensors and actuators for implementation of real time AVC on a smart beam. The paper also highlights some of the new ideas that have been incorporated into the system design.

  11. CrN electronic structure and vibrational modes: An optical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Gall, D.

    2010-07-01

    The optical properties of paramagnetic CrN over the wavelength range 250nm-30μm were determined from transmission and reflection spectra of 44-11000-nm -thick epitaxial CrN(001) layers that were grown on MgO(001) by ultrahigh vacuum magnetron sputtering at 700°C and were found to be pure cubic single crystals by x-ray diffraction ω-2θ , ω , and φ scan analyses. The imaginary part of the dielectric function exhibits a steep onset at ℏω=0.64eV as well as peaks at ℏω=1.5 and 2.9 eV due to direct interband transitions and indicates a depletion in the density of states at the Fermi level with an upper limit for free carriers of 3×1019cm-3 . This is attributed to local magnetic moments that cause splitting of the t2g bands and the formation of an indirect band gap of 0.19±0.46eV , as estimated by comparing the optical transition energies with reported direct gap energies from calculations with different magnetic ordering and Coulomb interaction terms. The dielectric function shows a strong resonance at ℏω0=48.7±0.2meV , and values of ɛdc=53±5 and ɛ∞=22±2 below and above the resonance, respectively, providing values for transverse and longitudinal optical phonon frequencies at the zone center of 11.7 THz and 18.2 THz (corresponding to ℏω=48.7±0.2 and 75.6±6.8meV ), respectively, and a Born effective charge of 4.4±0.9 . The vibrational frequencies are confirmed by Raman spectroscopy peaks at 800, 1170, and 1330cm-1 which are attributed to 2TO(X), 2LO(X), and 2LO(L) modes and correspond to single-phonon energies of 49.6 meV, 72.5 meV, and 82.5 meV, respectively. They are quantitatively comparable to those reported for ScN, a semiconductor with the same crystal structure as cubic CrN. In conclusion, both electronic interband transitions and optical phonon frequencies suggest that CrN is a Mott-Hubbard-type insulator with a small to negligible indirect band gap.

  12. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment is performed to study the mechanisms of active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders via vibrational outputs. In the present method of control, a vibrational force input was used as the secondary control input to reduce the radiated acoustic field. For the frequencies considered, the active vibration technique provided good global reduction of interior sound even though only one actuator was used.

  13. Reduction of structural weight, costs and complexity of a control system in the active vibration reduction of flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper concerns the active vibration reduction of a flexible structure with discrete piezoelectric sensors and actuators in collocated pairs bonded to its surface. In this study, a new fitness and objective function is proposed to determine the optimal number of actuators, based on variations in the average closed loop dB gain margin reduction for all of the optimal piezoelectric pairs and on the modes that are required to be attenuated using the optimal linear quadratic control scheme. The aim of this study is to find the minimum number of optimally located sensor/actuator pairs, which can achieve the same vibration reduction as a greater number, in order to reduce the cost, complexity and power requirement of the control system. This optimization was done using a genetic algorithm. The technique may be applied to any lightly damped structure, and is demonstrated here by attenuating the first six vibration modes of a flat cantilever plate. It is shown that two sensor/actuator pairs, located and controlled optimally, give almost the same vibration reduction as ten pairs. These results are validated by comparing the open and closed loop time responses and actuator feedback voltages for various numbers of piezoelectric pairs using the ANSYS finite element package and a proportional differential control scheme.

  14. Ultrasensitive detection of mode splitting in active optical microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lina; Oezdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhu Jiangang; Yang Lan

    2010-11-15

    Scattering-induced mode splitting in active microcavities is demonstrated. Below the lasing threshold, quality factor enhancement by optical gain allows resolving, in the wavelength-scanning transmission spectrum, of resonance dips of the split modes which otherwise would not be detected in a passive resonator. In the lasing regime, mode splitting manifests itself as two lasing modes with extremely narrow linewidths. Mixing these lasing modes in a detector leads to a heterodyne beat signal whose frequency corresponds to the mode-splitting amount. Lasing regime not only allows ultra-high sensitivity for mode-splitting measurements but also provides an easily accessible scheme by eliminating the need for wavelength scanning around resonant modes. Mode splitting in active microcavities has an immediate impact in enhancing the sensitivity of subwavelength scatterer detection and in studying light-matter interactions in a strong-coupling regime.

  15. Compact Active Vibration Control System for a Flexible Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A diamond-shaped actuator for a flexible panel has an inter-digitated electrode (IDE) and a piezoelectric wafer portion positioned therebetween. The IDE and/or the wafer portion are diamond-shaped. Point sensors are positioned with respect to the actuator and measure vibration. The actuator generates and transmits a cancelling force to the panel in response to an output signal from a controller, which is calculated using a signal describing the vibration. A method for controlling vibration in a flexible panel includes connecting a diamond-shaped actuator to the flexible panel, and then connecting a point sensor to each actuator. Vibration is measured via the point sensor. The controller calculates a proportional output voltage signal from the measured vibration, and transmits the output signal to the actuator to substantially cancel the vibration in proximity to each actuator.

  16. Vibrational mode Fourier Transform Spectroscopy with a diamond anvil cell: Modes of the Si DX center and S related centers in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, J.A.; Haller, E.E. |; Heyman, J.N.; Jeanloz, R.; Beeman, J.W.; Guitron, J.G.; Bourret, E.D.; Walukiewicz, W.W.

    1992-12-31

    The authors report the first use of the diamond anvil cell to observe the local modes of impurities in GaAs under large hydrostatic pressure by Fourier Transform Spectroscopy. These observations were accomplished by constructing a monolithic assembly which has a light concentrating cone in front of the diamond anvil cell and a Ge:Be photoconductor detector designed to operate at low photon fluxes mounted directly behind the cell. This technique has been used to discover a local vibrational mode of the DX center in GaAs:Si and, in combination with Hall effect and resistivity analysis, to infer that the charge state of this defect is negative. This new spectroscopic tool has also been used to identify new LVMs in heavily doped GaAs:S which are due to sulfur related centers.

  17. Vibrational Coherence Spectroscopy of the Heme Domain in the CO-Sensing Transcriptional Activator CooA

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Venugopal; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Youn, Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Femtosecond vibrational coherence spectroscopy was used to investigate the low frequency vibrational dynamics of the heme in the carbon monoxide oxidation activator protein (CooA) from the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans (Ch-CooA). Low frequency vibrational modes are important because they are excited by the ambient thermal bath (kBT = 200 cm-1) and participate in thermally activated barrier crossing events. However, such modes are nearly impossible to detect in the aqueous phase using traditional spectroscopic methods. Here we present the low frequency coherence spectra of the ferric, ferrous, and CO-bound forms of Ch-CooA in order to compare the protein-induced heme distortions in its active and inactive states. Distortions take place predominantly along the coordinates of low-frequency modes because of their weak force constants and such distortions are reflected in the intensity of the vibrational coherence signals. A strong mode near ~90 cm-1 in the ferrous form of Ch-CooA is suggested to contain a large component of heme ruffling, consistent with the imidazole bound ferrous heme crystal structure, which shows a significant protein-induced heme distortion along this coordinate. A mode observed at ~228 cm-1 in the six-coordinate ferrous state is proposed to be the ν(Fe-His) stretching vibration. The observation of the Fe-His mode indicates that photolysis of the N-terminal α-amino axial ligand takes place. This is followed by a rapid (~8.5 ps) transient absorption recovery, analogous to methionine rebinding in photolyzed ferrous cytochrome c. We have also studied CO photolysis in CooA, which revealed very strong photoproduct state coherent oscillations. The observation of heme-CO photoproduct oscillations is unusual because most other heme systems have CO rebinding kinetics that are too slow to make the measurement possible. The low frequency coherence spectrum of the CO-bound form of Ch-CooA shows a strong vibration at ~230

  18. Semi-active friction tendons for vibration control of space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Hernán; Curadelli, Oscar; Ambrosini, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Semi-active vibration control systems are becoming popular because they offer both the reliability of passive systems and the versatility of active control without high power demands. In this work, a new semi-active control system is proposed and studied numerically. The system consists of variable-friction dampers linked to the structure through cables. Auxiliary soft springs in parallel with these friction dampers allow them to return to their initial pre-tensioned state. Using cables makes the system suitable for deployable, flexible and lightweight structures, such as space structures (spacecraft). A control system with three control laws applied to a single-degree-of-freedom structure is studied. Two of these laws are derived by using Lyapunov theory, whereas the third one is developed heuristically. In order to assess the performance of the control system, a parametric study is carried out through numerical simulations. An application of the proposed method to multi-degree-of-freedom structures is also presented and demonstrated through a numerical example. The system in semi-active mode is more effective than in passive mode and its effectiveness is less sensitive to loss of pre-tension.

  19. The effects of large vibration amplitudes on the fundamental mode shape of a fully clamped, symmetrically laminated, rectangular plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamar, R.; White, R. G.; Bennouna, M. M. K.

    It is shown that the theoretical model presented by Benamar et al. for nonlinear vibration of thin flat structures can be extended to laminated plates, allowing the calculation of the amplitude-dependent fundamental mode shape and the corresponding natural frequencies. The high dependence of the contribution coefficients and the natural frequency of displacement amplitude, demonstrated here for a CFRP plate, shows how the assumption of linearity can be inaccurate for laminated plates. The higher nonlinearity obtained for composite plates both theoretically and experimentally appears to be a consequence of higher in-plane stiffnesses, inducing a higher contribution of the axial strain energy to the total strain energy at large displacement amplitudes.

  20. Thickness-Shear Vibration Mode Characteristics of SrBi4Ti4O15-Based Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hitoshi; Hirose, Masakazu; Tsukada, Takeo; Watanabe, Yasuo; Nomura, Takeshi

    2000-09-01

    Dielectric and piezoelectric properties have been investigated in bismuth layer-structure compounds SrBi4Ti4O15 (SBT) and BaBi4Ti4O15 (BBT)-based solid solutions. Lanthanum-substituted and manganese-added SBT and BBT form solid solutions for all levels of Ba substitution. The Curie temperature and coercive field strength decrease monotonously with the amount of Ba substitution. The mechanical quality factor, Qm, of the thickness-shear vibration mode also decreases. The value of elastic compliance increases with the amount of Ba substitution, but conversely its temperature dependency decreases.

  1. Active vibration absorber for CSI evolutionary model: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstration to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility was developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The design is discussed of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. The primary performance objective considered is damping augmentation of the first nine structural modes. Comparison of experimental and predicted closed loop damping is presented, including test and simulation time histories for open and closed loop cases. Although the simulation and test results are not in full agreement, robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated. The basic advantage of this second order controller design is that the stability of the controller is model independent.

  2. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. I - Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of sound radiation from vibrating plates by oscillating forces applied directly to the structure is analytically studied. The model consists of a plane acoustic wave incident on a clamped elastic circular thin plate. Control is achieved by point forces, and quadratic optimization is used to calculate the optimal control gains necessary to minimize a cost function proportional to the radiated acoustic power (the transmitted field). The results show that global attenuation of broadband radiated sound levels for low to mid-range frequencies can be achieved with one or two control forces, irrespective of whether the system is on or off resonance. The efficiency of the control strategy is demonstrated to be related to the nature of the coupling between the plate modes of response and the radiated field.

  3. Active control for vibration suppression in a flexible beam using a modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. E.; Lindner, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the use of a modal-domain (MD) fiber-optic sensor as an active control system component for vibration suppression, whose output is proportional to the integral of the axial strain along the optical fiber. When an MD sensor is attached to, or embedded in, a flexible structure, it senses the strain in the structure along its gage length. On the basis of the present integration of the sensor model into a flexible-structure model, it becomes possible to design a control system with a dynamic compensator which adds damping to the low-order modes of the flexible structure. This modeling procedure has been experimentally validated.

  4. Activities of the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research in fluid dynamics, acoustics, automotive engineering, audiology, noise and vibration effects (on human beings), and structural response to noise and vibration was carried out. Aircraft noise, acoustics of flow duct systems and enclosures, acoustic modeling, sound propagation, and acoustic measurement techniques were studied. Auditory and vestibular functions and electrophysiology were investigated.

  5. Implementation of local feedback controllers for vibration supression of a truss using active struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, Robert; Lim, Tae W.; Bosse, Albert; Fisher, Shalom

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of local feedback controllers for active vibration suppression of a laboratory truss referred to as the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) space truss. The NRL space truss is a 3.7 meter, 12-bay aluminum laboratory truss used as a testbed to explore smart structures technologies for future Navy spacecraft missions. To conduct real-time control and data acquisition for the implementation of controllers, a digital signal processor based system is used. Two piezoceramic active struts are employed in this experimental study. Each strut is instrumented with a force transducer and a displacement sensor. Modal strain energy computed using a refined finite element model was used to select the optimum locations of the two actuators to ensure controllability of the first two structural modes. Two local feedback controllers were designed and implemented, an integral force feedback and an integral plus double-integral force feedback. The controllers were designed independently for each active strut using classical control design techniques applied to an identified model of the system dynamics. System identification results and controller design procedure are described along with closed loop test results. The test results show up to a factor of 1/110 attenuation of the truss tip motion due to sinusoidal resonant input disturbances and up to 100 times increase in damping of the lower frequency modes of the truss.

  6. Reprint of : Dynamics of coupled vibration modes in a quantum non-linear mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadze, G.; Dukalski, M.; Blanter, Ya. M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the behaviour of two non-linearly coupled flexural modes of a doubly clamped suspended beam (nanomechanical resonator). One of the modes is externally driven. We demonstrate that classically, the behavior of the non-driven mode is reminiscent of that of a parametrically driven linear oscillator: it exhibits a threshold behavior, with the amplitude of this mode below the threshold being exactly zero. Quantum-mechanically, we were able to access the dynamics of this mode below the classical parametric threshold. We show that whereas the mean displacement of this mode is still zero, the mean squared displacement is finite and at the threshold corresponds to the occupation number of 1/2. This finite displacement of the non-driven mode can serve as an experimentally verifiable quantum signature of quantum motion.

  7. Apoprotein isolation and activation, and vibrational structure of the Helicobacter mustelae iron urease

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eric L.; Proshlyakov, Denis A.; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    The micro-aerophilic pathogen Helicobacter mustelae synthesizes an oxygen-labile, iron-containing urease (UreA2B2) in addition to its standard nickel-containing enzyme (UreAB). An apoprotein form of the iron urease was prepared from ureA2B2-expressing recombinant Escherichia coli cells that were grown in minimal medium. Temperature-dependent circular dichroism measurements of holoprotein and apoprotein demonstrate an enhancement of thermal stability associated with the UreA2B2 metallocenter. In parallel to the situation reported for nickel activation of the standard urease apoprotein, incubation of UreA2B2 apoprotein with ferrous ions and bicarbonate generated urease activity in a portion of the nascent active sites. In addition, ferrous ions were shown to be capable of reductively activating the oxidized metallocenter. Resonance Raman spectra of the inactive, aerobically-purified UreA2B2 holoprotein exhibit vibrations at 495 cm−1 and 784 cm−1, consistent with νs and νas modes of an Fe(III)-O-Fe(III) center; these modes undergo downshifts upon binding of urea and were unaffected by changes in pH. The low-frequency mode also exhibits an isotopic shift from 497 to 476 cm−1 upon 16O/18O bulk water isotope substitution. Expression of subunits of the conventional nickel-containing Klebsiella aerogenes urease in cells grown in rich medium without nickel resulted in iron incorporation into a portion of the protein. The inactive iron-loaded species exhibited a UV-visible spectrum similar to oxidized UreA2B2 and was capable of being reductively activated under anoxic conditions. Results from these studies more clearly define the formation and unique properties of the iron urease metallocenter. PMID:22196017

  8. Vibrational spectra and antimicrobial activity of selected bivalent cation benzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borawska, M. H.; Koczoń, P.; Piekut, J.; Świsłocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2009-02-01

    Selected bands of FT-IR spectra of Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) benzoates of both solid state and water solution, were assigned to appropriate molecular vibrations. Next evaluation of electronic charge distribution in both carboxylic anion and aromatic ring of studied compounds was performed. Classical plate tests and turbidimetry measurements, monitoring growth of bacteria Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and yeasts Pichia anomala and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during 24 h of incubation, in optimal growth conditions (control) and in medium with addition of studied benzoate (concentration of 0.01% expressed as the concentration of benzoic acid), proved antimicrobial activity of studied compounds against investigated micro-organisms. PLS (partially least square) and PCR (principal component regression) techniques were applied to build a model, correlating spectral data reflecting molecular structure of studied compounds, with degree of influence of those compounds on growth of studied micro-organisms. Statistically significant correlation within cross validation diagnostic of PLS-1 calibration was found, when log 1/T of selected spectral regions of water solution samples were used as input data. The correlation coefficients between predicted with PLS calibration based on created 1, 2 or 3 factor models, and actual values of antimicrobial activity were: 0.70; 0.76, 0.81 for P. anomala, B. subtilis, and E. coli, respectively. Log(PRESS) values of appropriate models were 2.10, 2,39 and 3.23 for P. anomala, B. subtilis, and E. coli, respectively.

  9. A Simple Reduction Process for the Normal Vibrational Modes Occurring in Linear Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerny, William

    2005-01-01

    The students in molecular spectroscopy courses are often required to determine the permitted normal vibrations for linear molecules that belong to particular groups. The reducible group representations generated by the use of Cartesian coordinates can be reduced by the use of a simple algebraic process applied to the group representations. The…

  10. First-principles Study on the Vibration Modes and Electronic Structure of Alkali and Alkaline-earth Amides and Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumuraya, Takao; Shishidou, Tatsuya; Oguchi, Tamio

    2009-03-01

    Light alkaline and alkaline-earth metal hydrides such as amides M(NH2)n and alanates M(AlH4)n (M=K, Na, Li, Ca, and Mg) have attracted a growing interest as reversible hydrogen storage materials recently because of their innately high hydrogen contents. [1, 2] We study the electronic structure of the amides and alanates with different cations, focusing on the role of cation states from first-principles calculations based on the all-electron FLAPW method. Calculated breathing stretch vibration modes for these compounds are compared with measured infrared and Raman spectra. In the amides, we find a significant tendency such that the breathing stretch vibration frequencies and the structural parameters of NH2 vary in accordance with the ionization energy of cation, which may be explained by the strength in hybridization between cation orbitals and molecular orbitals of (NH2)^-. We elucidate the microscopic mechanism of correlations between the breathing stretch vibration frequencies of N-H and structural parameters by analyzing the calculated electronic structure from a view point of the molecular-orbitals. A similar tendency in the alanates is also discussed. [1] P. Chen, Z. Xiong, J. Luo, J. Lin and K.L. Tan, Nature 420, 302 (2002). [2] B. Bogdanovi and M. Schwickardi, J. Alloys Compd. 253-254, 1 (1997).

  11. Effect of geometrical and environmental parameters on vibration of multi-layered piezoelectric microcantilever in amplitude mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, M. H.; Razazzadeh, S.; Korayem, A. H.; Ghaderi, R.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the vibration motions of multi-layered piezoelectric microcantilevers (MCs) are analyzed in which these MCs are able to perform both actuating and sensing of tip deflection simultaneously. With respect to the presence of piezoelectric layers, these MCs modeled in several structures such as two layers and two segments. The governing equations of motion for these MCs are obtained using Hamilton's principle. It should be noted that the microcantilever (MC) is modeled as a continuous beam based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. Then, the obtained differential equation is solved by finite element method and the time response is obtained using Newmark method. In simulation of the vibrating behavior of MCs in contact mode, the flexible beam model includes attractive, adhesive and repulsive forces, as well as the interaction of the capillary fluid layers. In order to study vibrating motion of MC, the effect of air moisture and the tip-sample equilibrium distance as environmental parameters on the amplitude and current output are investigated, and also, a sensitivity analyses are conducted on the amplitude and current output of sensor in terms of the geometrical parameters of the MC layers and the results are analyzed.

  12. Testing techniques and comparisons between theory and test for vibration modes of ring stiffened truncated-cone shells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Vibration tests were carried out on truncated-cone shells with widely spaced ring stiffeners. The models were excited by an air shaker for LF modes and by small electrodynamic shakers for HF modes. The Novozhilov thin shell theory according to which a ring is an assembly of an arbitrary number of segments, each being a short truncated-cone shell of uniform thickness, is used in the analysis of the results. A mobile, noncontacting, displacement-sensitive sensor system developed by the author was used in the tests. Tests results are given for a free-free 60-deg cone and for a clamped-free 60-deg cone. The tests are characterized as having considerable value for the classification of prevalent multimode responses in shells of this type.

  13. Assignment of the Internal Vibrational Modes of C70 by Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectroscopy and Periodic-DFT

    PubMed Central

    Refson, Keith; Parker, Stewart F

    2015-01-01

    The fullerene C70 may be considered as the shortest possible nanotube capped by a hemisphere of C60 at each end. Vibrational spectroscopy is a key tool in characterising fullerenes, and C70 has been studied several times and spectral assignments proposed. Unfortunately, many of the modes are either forbidden or have very low infrared or Raman intensity, even if allowed. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy is not subject to selection rules, and all the modes are allowed. We have obtained a new INS spectrum from a large sample recorded at the highest resolution available. An advantage of INS spectroscopy is that it is straightforward to calculate the spectral intensity from a model. We demonstrate that all previous assignments are incorrect in at least some respects and propose a new assignment based on periodic density functional theory (DFT) that successfully reproduces the INS, infrared, and Raman spectra. PMID:26491642

  14. Assignment of the Internal Vibrational Modes of C70 by Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectroscopy and Periodic-DFT.

    PubMed

    Refson, Keith; Parker, Stewart F

    2015-10-01

    The fullerene C70 may be considered as the shortest possible nanotube capped by a hemisphere of C60 at each end. Vibrational spectroscopy is a key tool in characterising fullerenes, and C70 has been studied several times and spectral assignments proposed. Unfortunately, many of the modes are either forbidden or have very low infrared or Raman intensity, even if allowed. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy is not subject to selection rules, and all the modes are allowed. We have obtained a new INS spectrum from a large sample recorded at the highest resolution available. An advantage of INS spectroscopy is that it is straightforward to calculate the spectral intensity from a model. We demonstrate that all previous assignments are incorrect in at least some respects and propose a new assignment based on periodic density functional theory (DFT) that successfully reproduces the INS, infrared, and Raman spectra. PMID:26491642

  15. An optimal approach to active damping of nonlinear vibrations in composite plates using piezoelectric patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviz, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper a nonlinear approach to studying the vibration characteristic of laminated composite plate with surface-bonded piezoelectric layer/patch is formulated, based on the Green Lagrange type of strain-displacements relations, by incorporating higher-order terms arising from nonlinear relations of kinematics into mathematical formulations. The equations of motion are obtained through the energy method, based on Lagrange equations and by using higher-order shear deformation theories with von Karman-type nonlinearities, so that transverse shear strains vanish at the top and bottom surfaces of the plate. An isoparametric finite element model is provided to model the nonlinear dynamics of the smart plate with piezoelectric layer/ patch. Different boundary conditions are investigated. Optimal locations of piezoelectric patches are found using a genetic algorithm to maximize spatial controllability/observability and considering the effect of residual modes to reduce spillover effect. Active attenuation of vibration of laminated composite plate is achieved through an optimal control law with inequality constraint, which is related to the maximum and minimum values of allowable voltage in the piezoelectric elements. To keep the voltages of actuator pairs in an allowable limit, the Pontryagin’s minimum principle is implemented in a system with multi-inequality constraint of control inputs. The results are compared with similar ones, proving the accuracy of the model especially for the structures undergoing large deformations. The convergence is studied and nonlinear frequencies are obtained for different thickness ratios. The structural coupling between plate and piezoelectric actuators is analyzed. Some examples with new features are presented, indicating that the piezo-patches significantly improve the damping characteristics of the plate for suppressing the geometrically nonlinear transient vibrations.

  16. Active vibration reduction of a flexible structure bonded with optimised piezoelectric pairs using half and quarter chromosomes in genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    The optimal placement of sensors and actuators in active vibration control is limited by the number of candidates in the search space. The search space of a small structure discretized to one hundred elements for optimising the location of ten actuators gives 1.73 × 1013 possible solutions, one of which is the global optimum. In this work, a new quarter and half chromosome technique based on symmetry is developed, by which the search space for optimisation of sensor/actuator locations in active vibration control of flexible structures may be greatly reduced. The technique is applied to the optimisation for eight and ten actuators located on a 500×500mm square plate, in which the search space is reduced by up to 99.99%. This technique helps for updating genetic algorithm program by updating natural frequencies and mode shapes in each generation to find the global optimal solution in a greatly reduced number of generations. An isotropic plate with piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs bonded to its surface was investigated using the finite element method and Hamilton's principle based on first order shear deformation theory. The placement and feedback gain of ten and eight sensor/actuator pairs was optimised for a cantilever and clamped-clamped plate to attenuate the first six modes of vibration, using minimization of linear quadratic index as an objective function.

  17. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-21

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into "coffee" rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials. PMID:26690965

  18. Note: A three-dimension active vibration isolator for precision atom gravimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Min-Kang; Xiong, Xin; Chen, Le-Le; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2015-04-15

    An ultra-low frequency active vibration isolator, simultaneously suppressing three-dimensional vibration noise, is demonstrated experimentally. The equivalent natural period of the isolator is 100 s and 12 s for the vertical and horizontal direction, respectively. The vibration noise in the vertical direction is about 50 times reduced during 0.2 and 2 Hz, and 5 times reduced in the other two orthogonal directions in the same frequency range. This isolator is designed for atom gravimeters, especially suitable for the gravimeter whose sensitivity is limited by vibration couplings.

  19. Molecular vibration-activity relationship in the agonism of adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Oh, S June

    2013-12-01

    The molecular vibration-activity relationship in the receptor-ligand interaction of adenosine receptors was investigated by structure similarity, molecular vibration, and hierarchical clustering in a dataset of 46 ligands of adenosine receptors. The resulting dendrogram was compared with those of another kind of fingerprint or descriptor. The dendrogram result produced by corralled intensity of molecular vibrational frequency outperformed four other analyses in the current study of adenosine receptor agonism and antagonism. The tree that was produced by clustering analysis of molecular vibration patterns showed its potential for the functional classification of adenosine receptor ligands. PMID:24465242

  20. Molecular Vibration-Activity Relationship in the Agonism of Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Hyun Keun

    2013-01-01

    The molecular vibration-activity relationship in the receptor-ligand interaction of adenosine receptors was investigated by structure similarity, molecular vibration, and hierarchical clustering in a dataset of 46 ligands of adenosine receptors. The resulting dendrogram was compared with those of another kind of fingerprint or descriptor. The dendrogram result produced by corralled intensity of molecular vibrational frequency outperformed four other analyses in the current study of adenosine receptor agonism and antagonism. The tree that was produced by clustering analysis of molecular vibration patterns showed its potential for the functional classification of adenosine receptor ligands. PMID:24465242

  1. Active vibration control for high speed train bogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, Alexander; Storm, Stefan; Röder, Arno; Maier, Rudolf; Frank, Paul-Gerhard

    2005-02-01

    This report deals with the design of an active vibration control (AVC) system integrated into the primary suspension of the bogie of a German high-speed train (ICE). As a design case a prototype bogie (WU92) for the ICE2 was taken. This paper comprises all parts and stages of the development of an AVC system. First, a transfer path analysis was performed in order to identify the main paths of propagation and to determine the boundary conditions at the actuator contact points. A detailed FE-analysis performed on the basis of an already existing FE-model serves as a support to investigate the actuator performance and evaluate several actuator concepts. However, the evaluation of a multifold of varying configurations of actuator, error sensor and monitor sensor positions is obviously not possible in the experiment, but is in the simulation. Based on the simulations and the experiments the control system is implemented on a digital signal processor (DSP) system. The structure borne noise level was determined during running tests at the ICE3 and measurements at the WU92 installed in the test rig. The design of the actuator system includes the layout of the specific system as well as the selection of the piezoelectric elements. A specifically developed amplifier drives the actuators. Finally the system is integrated into one axle of the WU92 and tested during roller-rig measurements.

  2. Development of a Practical Broadband Active Vibration Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Perey, Daniel F.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop robust, lightweight, and low-power control units that can be used to suppress structural vibration in flexible aerospace structures. In particular, this paper focuses on active damping, which is implemented using compact decentralized control units distributed over the structure. Each control unit consists of a diamond-shaped piezoelectric patch actuator, three miniature accelerometers, and analog electronics. The responses from the accelerometers are added together and then integrated to give a signal proportional to velocity. The signal is then inverted, amplified, and applied to the actuator, which generates a control force that is out of phase with the measured velocity. This paper describes the development of the control system, including a detailed description of the control and power electronics. The paper also presents experimental results acquired on a Plexiglas window blank. Five identical control units installed around the perimeter of the window achieved 10 dB peak reductions and a 2.4 dB integrated reduction of the spatially averaged velocity of the window between 500 and 3000 Hz.

  3. Variable stiffness and damping semi-active vibration control technology based on magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shiyu; Deng, Huaxia; Zhang, Jin; Sun, ShuaiShuai; Li, Weihua; Wang, Lei

    2013-10-01

    Vibration is a source to induce uncertainty for the measurement. The traditional passive vibration control method has low efficiency and limited working conditions. The active vibration control method is not practical for its power demanding, complexity and instability. In this paper, a novel semi-active vibration control technology based on magnetorheological (MR) fluid is presented with dual variable stiffness and damping capability. Because of the rheological behavior depending on the magnetic field intensity, MR fluid is used in many damping semi-active vibration control systems. The paper proposed a structure to allow the both overall damping and stiffness variable. The equivalent damping and stiffness of the structure are analyzed and the influences of the parameters on the stiffness and damping changing are further discussed.

  4. Activities of the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research in fluid dynamics and acoustics, vehicle noise, audiology and human effects, industrial noise, and noise and vibration control is summarized. Aircraft noise, underwater acoustics, damping of fiber reinforced materials and finite element methods are discussed.

  5. Passive and Active Vibrations Allow Self-Organization in Large-Scale Electromechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Fortuna, Carlo Famoso Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the role of passive and active vibrations for the control of nonlinear large-scale electromechanical systems is investigated. The mathematical model of the system is discussed and detailed experimental results are shown in order to prove that coupling the effects of feedback and vibrations elicited by proper control signals makes possible to regularize imperfect uncertain large-scale systems.

  6. Dynamic characteristics of heat exchanger tubes vibrating in a tube support plate inactive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    Tubes in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including nuclear plant steam generators, derive their support from longitudinally positioned tube support plates (TSPs). Typically there is a clearance between the tube and TSP hole. Depending on design and fabrication tolerances, the tube may or may not contract all of the TSPs. Noncontact results in an inactive TSP which can lead to detrimental flow induced tube vibrations under certain conditions dependent on the resulting tube-TSP interaction dynamics and the fluid excitation forces. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tube-TSP interaction dynamics. Results of an experimental study of damping and natural frequency as functions of tube-TSP diametral clearance and TSP thickness are reported. Calculated values of damping ratio and frequency of a tube vibrating within an inactive TSP are also presented together with a comparison of calculated and experimental quantities.

  7. Dynamic characteristics of heat exchanger tubes vibrating in a tube support plate inactive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Tubes in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including nuclear plant steam generators, derive their support from longitudinally positioned tube support plates (TSPs). Typically there is a clearance between the tube and TSP hole. Depending on design and fabrication tolerances, the tube may or may not contact all of the TSPs. Noncontact results in an inactive TSP which can lead to detrimental flow induced tube vibrations under certain conditions dependent on the resulting tube-TSP interaction dynamics and the fluid excitation forces. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tube-TSP interaction dynamics. Results of an experimental study of damping and natural frequency as functions of tube-TSP diametral clearance and TSP thickness are reported. Calculated values of damping ratio and frequency of a tube vibrating within an inactive TSP are also presented together with a comparison of calculated and experimetnal quantities.

  8. Dissociation pathways of a single dimethyl disulfide on Cu(111): Reaction induced by simultaneous excitation of two vibrational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Motobayashi, Kenta; Kim, Yousoo; Arafune, Ryuichi; Ohara, Michiaki; Ueba, Hiromu; Kawai, Maki

    2014-05-21

    We present a novel reaction mechanism for a single adsorbed molecule that proceeds via simultaneous excitation of two different vibrational modes excited by inelastic tunneling electrons from a scanning tunneling microscope. Specifically, we analyze the dissociation of a single dimethyl disulfide (DMDS, (CH{sub 3}S){sub 2}) molecule on Cu(111) by using a versatile theoretical method, which permits us to simulate reaction rates as a function of sample bias voltage. The reaction is induced by the excitation of C-H stretch and S-S stretch modes by a two-electron process at low positive bias voltages. However, at increased voltages, the dissociation becomes a single-electron process that excites a combination mode of these stretches, where excitation of the C-H stretch is the energy source and excitation of the S-S stretch mode enhances the anharmonic coupling rate. A much smaller dissociation yield (few orders of magnitude) at negative bias voltages is understood in terms of the projected density of states of a single DMDS on Cu(111), which reflects resonant excitation through the molecular orbitals.

  9. Vibrational modes in excited Rydberg states of acetone: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Aparna; Singh, Param Jeet

    2016-04-01

    Computational studies of electronically excited states of the acetone molecule [(CH3)2CO] and its fully deuterated isotopologue [(CD3)2CO] are performed using the time dependent density functional (TDDFT) methodology. In addition to vertical excitation energies for singlet and triplet states, equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies of the n=3 Rydberg states (3s, 3p and 3d) are obtained. This is the first report of geometry optimization and frequency calculations for the 3px, 3pz, 3dyz, 3dxy, 3dxz, 3dx2-y2 and 3dz2 Rydberg states. Results of the geometry optimization indicate that the molecule retains approximate C2V geometry in most of these excited Rydberg states, with the most significant structural change seen in the CCO bond angle which is found to be reduced from the ground state value. Detailed comparison of the computationally predicted vibrational wavenumbers with experimental studies helps to confirm several of the earlier vibronic assignments while leading to revised/new assignments for some of the bands. The important role of hot bands in analysis of the room temperature photoabsorption spectra of acetone is corroborated by this study. While the vibrational frequencies in excited Rydberg states are overall found to be close to those of the ionic ground state, geometry optimization and vibrational frequency computation for each excited state proves to be very useful to arrive at a consistent set of vibronic assignments. Isotopic substitution helps in consolidating and confirming assignments. An offshoot of this study is the interpretation of the band at ~8.47 eV as the π-3s Rydberg transition converging to the second ionization potential.

  10. Fourier Transform Vibrational Circular Dichroism Of Carbonyl Stretching Modes In N-urethanyl-a-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernovitz, Anita C.; Freedman, Teresa B.; Nafie, Laurence A.

    1985-12-01

    The vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of the N-t-BOC and N-CBZ-derivatives of alanine, proline, phenylalanine and valine in 0.2M CHC13 solutions all exhibit a characteristic, strong bisignate couplet in the carbonyl stretching region. The VCD couplet is interpreted in terms of the coupled oscillation of the urethane and acid carbonyl groups in an intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded structure.

  11. Study of vibrational modes in protonic conductor LaAlO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Anupam Deep; Sinha, M. M.

    2015-08-28

    In this work, we are presenting the results of our theoretical investigation on the vibrational properties of LaAlO{sub 3} in its cubic phase by using lattice dynamical simulation method based on de Launey angular force (DAF) constant model to understand the role of phonon in this system. The calculated zone centre frequencies agree well with available existing results. The phonon dispersion curves of LaAlO{sub 3} in cubic phase are also drawn.

  12. Breathing mode vibrations and elastic properties of single-crystal and penta-twinned gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yong; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Zhen

    2016-08-10

    The acoustic vibrations of individual single-crystal and penta-twinned gold nanorods with widths from ∼7 to ∼26 nm are studied using atomic-level simulations and finite element calculations. It is demonstrated that the continuum model in the limit of an infinite rod length could be used to describe the breathing periods of nanorods with an aspect ratio as small as ∼2.5, in combination with bulk material elastic constants. The elastic moduli of gold nanorods are determined via their atomistically simulated extensional periods and the dispersion relation based on long-wavelength approximation. The twinned nanorods become stiffer as the width is reduced, which is in contrast to the size dependence of the modulus in single-crystal nanorods. Further finite element calculations for the breathing periods of nanorods are performed using isotropic elastic constants of bulk gold. We find that the breathing vibrations of the penta-twinned nanorods are more affected by the crystal structure effect than those of single-crystal nanorods, because a smaller range of crystal directions perpendicular to the long axis is involved in the breathing vibrations of twinned nanorods. PMID:27476532

  13. Active Control of Panel Vibrations Induced by a Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, active and passive control of sound and vibration in aeroelastic structures have received a great deal of attention due to many potential applications to aerospace and other industries. There exists a great deal of research work done in this area. Recent advances in the control of sound and vibration can be found in the several conference proceedings. In this report we will summarize our research findings supported by the NASA grant NAG-1-1175. The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to study the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. The vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings will be presented in the next three sections. In Section II we shall describe our results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Section III is concerned with active control of the vibration and sound radiation from a nonlinear elastic panel. A detailed description of our work on the parametric vibrational control of nonlinear elastic panel will be presented in Section IV. This paper will be submitted to the Journal

  14. Synthesis, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical and structure-activity relation studies of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, V; Devi, L; Subbalakshmi, R; Rani, T; Mohan, S

    2014-09-15

    The stable geometry of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone is optimised by DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(∗∗) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the optimised geometry have been determined. The effects of substituents (hydroxyl, methoxy and acetyl groups) on the benzene ring vibrational frequencies are analysed. The vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone have been precisely assigned and analysed and the theoretical results are compared with the experimental vibrations. 1H and 13C NMR isotropic chemical shifts are calculated and assignments made are compared with the experimental values. The energies of important MO's, the total electron density and electrostatic potential of the compound are determined. Various reactivity and selectivity descriptors such as chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity, nucleophilicity and the appropriate local quantities are calculated. PMID:24792193

  15. Synthesis, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical and structure-activity relation studies of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Devi, L.; Subbalakshmi, R.; Rani, T.; Mohan, S.

    2014-09-01

    The stable geometry of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone is optimised by DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G∗∗ and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the optimised geometry have been determined. The effects of substituents (hydroxyl, methoxy and acetyl groups) on the benzene ring vibrational frequencies are analysed. The vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone have been precisely assigned and analysed and the theoretical results are compared with the experimental vibrations. 1H and 13C NMR isotropic chemical shifts are calculated and assignments made are compared with the experimental values. The energies of important MO’s, the total electron density and electrostatic potential of the compound are determined. Various reactivity and selectivity descriptors such as chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity, nucleophilicity and the appropriate local quantities are calculated.

  16. Fundamental Vibration Frequency and Damping Estimation: A Comparison Using the Random Decrement Method, the Empirical Mode Decomposition, and the HV Spectral Ratio Method for Local Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Upegui Botero, F. M.; Pulliam, J.; Willemann, R. J.; Pasyanos, M.; Schmitz, M.; Rojas Mercedes, N.; Louie, J. N.; Moschetti, M. P.; Martinez-Cruzado, J. A.; Suárez, L.; Huerfano Moreno, V.; Polanco, E.

    2013-12-01

    Site characterization in civil engineering demands to know at least two of the dynamic properties of soil systems, which are: (i) dominant vibration frequency, and (ii) damping. As part of an effort to develop understanding of the principles of earthquake hazard analysis, particularly site characterization techniques using non invasive/non destructive seismic methods, a workshop (Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute: New Frontiers in Geophysical Research: Bringing New Tools and Techniques to Bear on Earthquake Hazard Analysis and Mitigation) was conducted during july 15-25, 2013 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic by the alliance of Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute (PASI) and Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), jointly supported by Department of Energy (DOE) and National Science Foundation (NSF). Preliminary results of the site characterization in terms of fundamental vibration frequency and damping are here presented from data collected during the workshop. Three different methods were used in such estimations and later compared in order to identify the stability of estimations as well as the advantage or disadvantage among these methodologies. The used methods were the: (i) Random Decrement Method (RDM), to estimate fundamental vibration frequency and damping simultaneously; (ii) Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), to estimate the vibration modes, and (iii) Horizontal to Vertical Spectra ratio (HVSR), to estimate the fundamental vibration frequency. In all cases ambient vibration and induced vibration were used.

  17. Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Trunk and Neck Muscle Activity in Consideration of Different Vibration Loads

    PubMed Central

    Perchthaler, Dennis; Hauser, Simon; Heitkamp, Hans-Christian; Hein, Tobias; Grau, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical parameters in terms of different peak-to-peak displacements and knee angles on trunk and neck muscle activity during whole-body vibration (WBV). 28 healthy men and women (age 23 ± 3 years) performed four static squat positions (2 peak-to-peak displacements x 2 knee angles) on a side alternating vibration platform with and without vibration stimulus. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the erector spinae muscle, the rectus abdominis muscle, and of the splenius muscle. EMG levels normalized to maximal voluntary contractions ranged between 3.2 – 27.2 % MVC during WBV. The increase in muscle activity caused by WBV was significant, particularly for the back muscles, which was up to 19.0 % MVC. The impact of the factor ‘condition’ (F-values ranged from 13.4 to 132.0, p ≤ 0.001) and of the factor ‘peak-to-peak displacement’ (F-values ranged from 6.4 to 69.0 and p-values from < 0.001 to 0.01) were statistically significant for each muscle tested. However, the factor ‘knee angle’ only affected the back muscles (F-value 10.3 and 7.3, p ≤ 0.01). The results of this study should give more information for developing effective and safe training protocols for WBV treatment of the upper body. Key points The maximum levels of muscle activity were significantly reached at high amplitudes at a vibration frequency of 30 Hz. WBV leads to a higher muscle activation of the lower back muscles than of the abdominal muscles. Both knee angles of 30° and 45° have similar effects on the vibration load and represent safe positions to prevent any actual harm. Certain combinations of the biomechanical variables have similar effects on the level of muscle activity. PMID:25729303

  18. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  19. Coherent exciton dynamics in a dissipative environment maintained by an off-resonant vibrational mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, E. K.; Irish, E. K.; Lovett, B. W.

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between an open quantum system and its environment can lead to both coherent and incoherent behavior. We explore the extent to which strong coupling to a single bosonic mode can alter the coherence properties of a two-level system in a structured environment. This mode is treated exactly, with the rest of the environment comprising a Markovian bath of bosonic modes. The strength of the coupling between the two-level system and the single mode is varied for a variety of forms for the bath spectral density in order to assess whether the coherent dynamics of the two-level system are modified. We find a clear renormalization of the site population oscillation frequency that causes an altered interaction with the bath. This leads to enhanced or reduced coherent behavior of the two-level system, depending on the form of the spectral density function. We present an intuitive interpretation, based on an analytical model, to explain the behavior.

  20. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide as studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Mariette; Eckert, Juegen; Johnson, Susanna W.; Moret, Jacques; Swanson, Basil I.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    1992-10-01

    A study of the anomalous modes in acetanilide and five deuterated derivatives by incoherent inelastic neutron scattering is reported. These data show that the dynamics of the amide and methyl groups influence each other. In addition, the anomalous temperature behaviour of the NH out-of-plane bending mode is confirmed. These observations suggest that the self-trapping mechanism in ACN may be more complex than hitherto assumed.

  1. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  2. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  3. Vibration Control in Turbomachinery Using Active Magnetic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah D.

    1996-01-01

    The effective use of active magnetic bearings for vibration control in turbomachinery depends on an understanding of the forces available from a magnetic bearing actuator. The purpose of this project was to characterize the forces as functions shaft position. Both numerical and experimental studies were done to determine the characteristics of the forces exerted on a stationary shaft by a magnetic bearing actuator. The numerical studies were based on finite element computations and included both linear and nonlinear magnetization functions. Measurements of the force versus position of a nonrotating shaft were made using two separate measurement rigs, one based on strain gage measurement of forces, the other based on deflections of a calibrated beam. The general trends of the measured principal forces agree with the predictions of the theory while the magnitudes of forces are somewhat smaller than those predicted. Other aspects of theory are not confirmed by the measurements. The measured forces in the normal direction are larger than those predicted by theory when the rotor has a normal eccentricity. Over the ranges of position examined, the data indicate an approximately linear relationship between the normal eccentricity of the shaft and the ratio of normal to principal force. The constant of proportionality seems to be larger at lower currents, but for all cases examined its value is between 0.14 and 0.17. The nonlinear theory predicts the existence of normal forces, but has not predicted such a large constant of proportionality for the ratio. The type of coupling illustrated by these measurements would not tend to cause whirl, because the coupling coefficients have the same sign, unlike the case of a fluid film bearing, where the normal stiffness coefficients often have opposite signs. They might, however, tend to cause other self-excited behavior. This possibility must be considered when designing magnetic bearings for flexible rotor applications, such as gas

  4. Active Vibration Control for Suspension by Considering Its Stroke Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Nobuo

    When large external forces come from the road, a suspension stroke reaches its limitation and riding comfort may decrease. To overcome this problem, we propose a new control method for an active suspension that can avoid reaching the stroke limitation. A sliding mode controller is designed by considering the rigidity variation of a spring. Also, in order to estimate the internal state of the suspension, a variable structural system (VSS) observer is designed without the information of nonlinear force occurring in the rigidity variation when the suspension reaches the stroke limitation. By carrying out simulation and experiment of a quarter-car model, it is verified that the performance of the controller is superior to that of the method, which switches to a passive damper near the stroke limitation from a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) in a small stroke range.

  5. Quantitative Understanding of van der Waals Interactions by Analyzing the Adsorption Structure and Low-Frequency Vibrational Modes of Single Benzene Molecules on Silver.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dingwang; Han, Zhumin; Czap, Gregory; Chiang, Chi-Lun; Xu, Chen; Ho, W; Wu, Ruqian

    2016-06-16

    The combination of a sub-Kelvin scanning tunneling microscope and density functional calculations incorporating van der Waals (vdW) corrections has been used successfully to probe the adsorption structure and low-frequency vibrational modes of single benzene molecules on Ag(110). The inclusion of optimized vdW functionals and improved C6-based vdW dispersion schemes in density functional theory is crucial for obtaining the correct adsorption structure and low-energy vibrational modes. These results demonstrate the emerging capability to quantitatively probe the van der Waals interactions between a physisorbed molecule and an inert substrate. PMID:27232051

  6. Assignment of terahertz vibrational modes of L-glutamine using density functional theory within generalized-gradient approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Tian-Yao; Yan, Fang; Shen, Jiang

    2015-07-01

    The crystal structure of L-glutamine is stabilized by a three-dimensional network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. We utilize plane-wave density functional theory lattice-dynamics calculations within the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), PBE for solids (PBEsol), PBE with Wu-Cohen exchange (WC), and dispersion-corrected PBE, to investigate the effect of these intermolecular contacts on the absorption spectra of glutamine in the terahertz frequency range. Among these calculations, the solid-state simulated results obtained using the WC method exhibit a good agreement with the measured absorption spectra, and the absorption features are assigned with the help of WC. This indicates that the vibrational modes of glutamine were related to the combination of intramolecular and intermolecular motions, the intramolecular modes were dominated by rocking or torsion involving functional groups; the intermolecular modes mainly result from the translational motions of individual molecules, and the rocking of the hydrogen-bonded functional groups. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61302007 and 60977065), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. FRF-SD-12-016A), and the Engineering Research Center of Industrial Spectrum Imaging of Beijing, China.

  7. Detection of vibrational bending mode ν8 and overtone bands of the propargyl radical, HCCCH2 X̃ 2B1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Sander, Stanley P; Chaimowitz, Adam; Ellison, G Barney; Stanton, John F

    2010-11-18

    Infrared (IR) absorption spectra of matrix-isolated HCCCH(2) have been measured. Propargyl radicals were generated in a supersonic pyrolysis nozzle, using a method similar to that described in a previous study (Jochnowitz, E. B.; Zhang, X.; Nimlos, M. R.; Varner, M. E.; Stanton, J. F.; Ellison, G. B. J. Phys. Chem. A 2005, 109, 3812-3821). Besides the nine vibrational modes observed in the previous study, this investigation detected the HCCCH(2) X̃ (2)B(1) out-of-plane bending mode (ν(8)) at 378.0 (±1.9) cm(-1) in a cryogenic argon matrix. This is the first experimental observation of ν(8) for the propargyl radical. In addition, seven overtone and combination bands have also been detected and assigned. Ab initio coupled-cluster anharmonic force field calculations were used to guide the analysis. Furthermore, ν(12), the HCCCH(2) in-plane bending mode, has been assigned to 333 (±10) cm(-1) based on the detection of its overtone (2ν(12), 667.7 ± 1.0 cm(-1)) and a possible combination band (ν(10) + ν(12), 1339.0 ± 0.8 cm(-1)). This is the first experimental estimation of ν(12) for the propargyl radical. PMID:20973539

  8. Observation of Localized Vibrational Modes of Graphene Nanodomes by Inelastic Atom Scattering.

    PubMed

    Maccariello, D; Al Taleb, A; Calleja, F; Vázquez de Parga, A L; Perna, P; Camarero, J; Gnecco, E; Farías, D; Miranda, R

    2016-01-13

    Inelastic helium atom scattering (HAS) is suitable to determine low-energy (few meV) vibrations spatially localized on structures in the nanometer range. This is illustrated for the nanodomes that appear often on graphene (Gr) epitaxially grown on single crystal metal surfaces. The nature of the inelastic losses observed in Gr/Ru(0001) and Gr/Cu/Ru(0001) has been clarified by intercalation of Cu below the Gr monolayer, which decouples the Gr layer from the Ru substrate and changes substantially the out-of-plane, flexural phonon dispersion of epitaxial Gr, while maintaining the nanodomes and their localized vibrations. He diffraction proves that the Cu-intercalated Gr layer is well ordered structurally, while scanning tunneling microscopy reveals the persistence of the (slightly modified) periodic array of Gr nanodomes. A simple model explains the order of magnitude of the energy losses associated with the Gr nanodomes and their size dependence. The dispersionless, low-energy phonon branches may radically alter the transport of heat in intercalated Gr. PMID:26630565

  9. Changing Stiffnesses Of Truss Members For Vibration Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.

    1994-01-01

    Extension of active-member method of vibration testing of trusses and similar structures proposed to obtain additional data for refinement of finite-element mathematical models of vibrational properties of structures. Active truss members not only used in vibration tests to excite and measure vibrations of structures, but also made to have different effective stiffnesses in some tests, enabling excitation of different vibrational modes yielding additional data. Aspects of active-member method of vibration testing described previously in articles in NASA Tech Briefs including "Two Techniques for Suppressing Vibrations in Structures" (NPO-17889), "Active Suppression of Vibrations in a Truss" (NPO-18305), and "Active Members Excite and Measure Vibrations in Trusses" (NPO-18353).

  10. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with a backward-forward trajectories sampling for multidimensional infrared spectroscopy of molecular vibrational modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Taisuke; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2008-02-01

    A full molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach to calculate multidimensional third-order infrared (IR) signals of molecular vibrational modes is proposed. Third-order IR spectroscopy involves three-time intervals between three excitation and one probe pulses. The nonequilibrium MD (NEMD) simulation allows us to calculate molecular dipoles from nonequilibrium MD trajectories for different pulse configurations and sequences. While the conventional NEMD approach utilizes MD trajectories started from the initial equilibrium state, our approach does from the intermediate state of the third-order optical process, which leads to the doorway-window decomposition of nonlinear response functions. The decomposition is made before the second pump excitation for a two-dimensional case of IR photon echo measurement, while it is made after the second pump excitation for a three-dimensional case of three-pulse IR photon echo measurement. We show that the three-dimensional IR signals are efficiently calculated by using the MD trajectories backward and forward in time for the doorway and window functions, respectively. We examined the capability of the present approach by evaluating the signals of two- and three-dimensional IR vibrational spectroscopies for liquid hydrogen fluoride. The calculated signals might be explained by anharmonic Brownian model with the linear-linear and square-linear system-bath couplings which was used to discuss the inhomogeneous broadening and dephasing mechanism of vibrational motions. The predicted intermolecular librational spectra clearly reveal the unusually narrow inhomogeneous linewidth due to the one-dimensional character of HF molecule and the strong hydrogen bond network.

  11. Travel Mode and Physical Activity at Sydney University

    PubMed Central

    Rissel, Chris; Mulley, Corinne; Ding, Ding

    2013-01-01

    How staff and students travel to university can impact their physical activity level. An online survey of physical activity and travel behaviour was conducted in early November 2012 to inform planning of physical activity and active travel promotion programs at the University of Sydney, Australia as part of the “Sit Less, Move More” sub-committee of the Healthy University Initiative, and as baseline data for evaluation. There were 3,737 useable responses, 60% of which were from students. Four out of five respondents travelled to the University on the day of interest (Tuesday, November 30, 2012). The most frequently used travel modes were train (32%), car as driver (22%), bus (17%), walking (17%) and cycling (6%). Staff were twice as likely to drive as students, and also slightly more likely to use active transport, defined as walking and cycling (26% versus 22%). Overall, 41% of respondents were sufficiently active (defined by meeting physical activity recommendations of 150 min per week). Participants were more likely to meet physical activity recommendations if they travelled actively to the University. With a high proportion of respondents using active travel modes or public transport already, increasing the physical activity levels and increasing the use of sustainable travel modes would mean a mode shift from public transport to walking and cycling for students is needed and a mode shift from driving to public transport or active travel for University staff. Strategies to achieve this are discussed. PMID:23939390

  12. Electromechanical simulation and test of rotating systems with magnetic bearing or piezoelectric actuator active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Tang, Punan; Kim, Chaesil; Manchala, Daniel; Barrett, Tim; Kascak, Albert F.; Brown, Gerald; Montague, Gerald; Dirusso, Eliseo; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    This paper contains a summary of the experience of the authors in the field of electromechanical modeling for rotating machinery - active vibration control. Piezoelectric and magnetic bearing actuator based control are discussed.

  13. Effect of vertical active vibration isolation on tracking performance and on ride qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimasi, F. P.; Allen, R. E.; Calcaterra, P. C.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation to determine the effect on pilot performance and comfort of an active vibration isolation system for a commercial transport pilot seat is reported. The test setup consisted of: a hydraulic shaker which produced random vertical vibration inputs; the active vibration isolation system; the pilot seat; the pilot control wheel and column; the side-arm controller; and a two-axis compensatory tracking task. The effects of various degrees of pilot isolation on short-term (two-minute) tracking performance and comfort were determined.

  14. Atomistic simulations of ammonium-based protic ionic liquids: steric effects on structure, low frequency vibrational modes and electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Sunda, Anurag Prakash; Mondal, Anirban; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2015-02-14

    Protic ionic liquids (PILs) are of great interest as electrolytes in various energy applications. Molecular dynamics simulations of trialkylammonium (with varying alkyl group such as methyl, ethyl, and n-propyl) triflate PILs are performed to characterize the influence of the alkyl group on the acidic site (N-H) of the ammonium cation. Spatial distribution function of anions over this site on the cation reveals significant influence of the length of alkyl tail on intermolecular structure. Vibrational density of states and normal modes are calculated for bulk liquids to probe atomic displacements in the far infrared region. The observed N-H···O hydrogen bond stretching vibration in 155-165 cm(-1) frequency region agrees well with experiments. Trends in electrical conductivity calculated using Nernst-Einstein and Green-Kubo relation are in qualitative agreement with experiments. The self-diffusion coefficient and the electrical conductivity is highest for N,N-dimethyl-N-ethylammonium triflate ([N112][TfO]) and is lowest for N,N-di-n-propyl-N-methylammonium triflate ([N133][TfO]) IL. PMID:25585541

  15. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into ``coffee'' rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into ``coffee'' rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly

  16. Lattice vibrations and phase-transition soft mode in near stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, H. R.; Sun, S. Q.; Cheng, X. F.; Dong, S. M.; Xu, H. Y.; Gao, L.; Cui, D. L.

    2005-08-01

    At room temperature, Raman-scattering investigations of near stoichiometric lithium niobate (S-LN) crystals theoretically and experimentally reveal an effect of the lattice vacant positions on the Raman spectra. At high temperature, Raman peaks of the mode ν5 vary sensitively and intensely with the increase of the temperature. A condensed soft optical-phonon mode originates from the triply degenerate symmetric in-plane O-Nb-O bending. The paraelectric-ferroelectric structural transition occurs at about 1170°C. The composition homogeneity and optical uniformity of the S-LN crystals are demonstrated to be excellent compared with those of the congruent lithium niobate.

  17. Epsilon-near-zero mode for active optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Vassant, S; Archambault, A; Marquier, F; Pardo, F; Gennser, U; Cavanna, A; Pelouard, J L; Greffet, J J

    2012-12-01

    The electromagnetic modes of a GaAs quantum well between two AlGaAs barriers are studied. At the longitudinal optical phonon frequency, the system supports a phonon polariton mode confined in the thickness of the quantum well that we call epsilon-near-zero mode. This epsilon-near-zero mode can be resonantly excited through a grating resulting in a very large absorption localized in the single quantum well. We show that the reflectivity can be modulated by applying a voltage. This paves the way to a new class of active optoelectronic devices working in the midinfrared and far infrared at ambient temperature. PMID:23368264

  18. Vibrational lifetimes of hydrated phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, Tayebeh; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Mashaghi, Alireza; Sahimi, Muhammad; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations have been carried out to compute, at human-body temperature, the vibrational modes and lifetimes of pure and hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids. The projected atomic vibrations calculated from the spectral energy density are used to compute the vibrational modes and the lifetimes. All the normal modes of the pure and hydrated DPPC and their frequencies are identified. The computed lifetimes incorporate the full anharmonicity of the atomic interactions. The vibrational modes of the water molecules close to the head group of DPPC are active (possess large projected spectrum amplitudes) in the frequency range 0.5-55 THz, with a peak at 2.80 THz in the energy spectrum. The computed lifetimes for the high-frequency modes agree well with the recent data measured at room temperature where high-order phonon scattering is not negligible. The computed lifetimes of the low-frequency modes can be tested using the current experimental capabilities. Moreover, the approach may be applied to other lipids and biomolecules, in order to predict their vibrational dispersion relations, and to study the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer.

  19. Active Vibration Reduction of Titanium Alloy Fan Blades (FAN1) Using Piezoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Kauffman, Jeffrey; Duffy, Kirsten; Provenza, Andrew; Morrison, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this paper, a digital resonant control technique emulating passive shunt circuits is used to demonstrate vibration reduction of FAN1 Ti real fan blade at the several target modes. Single-mode control and multi-mode control using one piezoelectric material are demonstrated. Also a conceptual study of how to implement this digital control system into the rotating fan blade is discussed.

  20. H infinity controller design to a rigid-flexible satellite with two vibration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, A. G.; de Souza, L. C. G.

    2015-10-01

    The satellite attitude control system (ACS) design becomes more complex when the satellite structure has components like, flexible solar panels, antennas and mechanical manipulators. These flexible structures can interact with the satellite rigid parts during translational and/or rotational manoeuvre damaging the ACS pointing accuracy. Although, a well-designed controller can suppress such disturbances quickly, the controller error pointing may be limited by the minimum time necessary to suppress such disturbances thus affecting the satellite attitude acquisition. This paper deals with the rigid-flexible satellite ACS design using the H infinity method. The rigid-flexible satellite is represented by a beam connected to a central rigid hub at one end and free at the other one. The equations of motions are obtained considering small flexible deformations and the Euler-Bernoulli hypothesis. The results of the simulations have shown that the H-infinity controller was able to control the rigid motion and suppress the vibrations.

  1. Inertia-Wheel Vibration-Damping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromechanical system would damp vibrations in large, flexible structure. In active vibration-damping system motors and reaction wheels at tips of appendages apply reaction torques in response to signals from accelerometers. Velocity signal for vibrations about one axis processes into control signal to oppose each of n vibrational modes. Various modes suppressed one at a time. Intended primarily for use in spacecraft that has large, flexible solar panels and science-instrument truss assembly, embodies principle of control interesting in its own right and adaptable to terrestrial structures, vehicles, and instrument platforms.

  2. A programmable broadband low frequency active vibration isolation system for atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Biao; Zhou, Lin; Xiong, Zongyuan; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2014-09-01

    Vibration isolation at low frequency is important for some precision measurement experiments that use atom interferometry. To decrease the vibrational noise caused by the reflecting mirror of Raman beams in atom interferometry, we designed and demonstrated a compact stable active low frequency vibration isolation system. In this system, a digital control subsystem is used to process and feedback the vibration measured by a seismometer. A voice coil actuator is used to control and cancel the motion of a commercial passive vibration isolation platform. With the help of field programmable gate array-based control subsystem, the vibration isolation system performed flexibly and accurately. When the feedback is on, the intrinsic resonance frequency of the system will change from 0.8 Hz to about 0.015 Hz. The vertical vibration (0.01-10 Hz) measured by the in-loop seismometer is reduced by an additional factor of up to 500 on the basis of a passive vibration isolation platform, and we have proved the performance by adding an additional seismometer as well as applying it in the atom interferometry experiment. PMID:25273709

  3. Active control of panel vibrations induced by a boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to consider the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. Although the sound radiation has not been included, the vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings are presented in three sections. In section two we describe results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Sections three and four are concerned with some analytical and numerical results in the optimal control of the linear and nonlinear panel vibrations, respectively, excited by the flow pressure fluctuations. Finally, in section five, we draw some conclusions from research findings.

  4. Transmission of whole-body vibration and its effect on muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Tankisheva, Ekaterina; Jonkers, Ilse; Boonen, Steven; Delecluse, Christophe; van Lenthe, G Harry; Druyts, Hans L J; Spaepen, Pieter; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2013-09-01

    The aim of current study was to measure the transmission of whole-body vibration through the entire body and to relate this to body posture and induced muscular activation. Eight clinically healthy subjects performed 3 static body postures-high squat (135°), deep squat (110°), and erect stance, whereas vibration transmission was assessed over a wide range of accelerations (from 0.33 to 7.98 g) and frequencies (from 30 to 50 Hz). To assess the vibration transmission, 9 triaxial accelerometers were attached from the ankle up to the head and the root mean square of acceleration signal of each site-specific body point was calculated. Additionally, muscle activity from 7 lower limb muscles was recorded. The results showed a significant attenuation of the platform accelerations transmitted from the feet to the head. Compared with erect stance, knee bent posture significantly diminished vibration transmission at the hip, spine, and the head (p < 0.05). Vibration transmission to the spine was significantly lower in deep vs. high squat (p < 0.05), suggesting that further knee bending may reduce the risk of overloading the spine. Vibration increased the muscle activity in most leg and hip muscles during both squat postures, although, on average, no clear dose-response relationship between the acceleration and/or frequency and muscle response was found. The muscular activation of vastus medialis and rectus femoris showed clear negative correlation to the vibration transmission at the sternum. The specific vibration parameters used in the present study can be considered as safe and suitable for a training program. Moreover, the present results contribute to optimize the most advantageous whole-body vibration protocol and to determine the beneficial effects on muscle and bone. PMID:23222086

  5. Optimal placement and active vibration control for piezoelectric smart flexible cantilever plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Xian-min; Wu, Hong-xin; Zhang, Hong-hua

    2007-04-01

    Some flexible appendages of spacecraft are cantilever plate structures, such as sun plate and satellite antenna. Thus, vibration problem will be caused by parameter uncertainties and environmental disturbances. In this paper, piezoelectric ceramics patches are used as sensors and actuators to suppress the vibration of the smart flexible clamped plate. Firstly, modal equations and piezoelectric control equations of cantilever plate are derived. Secondly, an optimal placement method for the locations of piezoelectric actuators and sensors is developed based on the degree of observability and controllability indices for cantilever plate. The bending and torsional modes are decoupled by the proposed method using bandwidth Butterworth filter. Thirdly, an efficient control method by combining positive position feedback and proportional-derivative control is proposed for vibration reduction. The analytical results for modal frequencies, transient responses and control responses are carried out. Finally, an experimental setup of piezoelectric smart plate is designed and built up. The modal frequencies and damping ratios of the plate setup are obtained by identification method. Also, the experimental studies on vibration control of the cantilever plate including bending modes and torsional modes are conducted. The analytical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented control method is feasible, and the optimal placement method is effective.

  6. Long-wavelength lattice vibrations of Ag3In5Se9 and Ag3In5Te9 single crystals — An inversion of LO- and TO-mode frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanly, Nizami Mamed

    2016-06-01

    Infrared (IR) reflectivities are registered in the frequency range of 50-2000 cm‑1 for Ag3In5Se9 and Ag3In5Te9 single crystals grown by Bridgman method. Three infrared-active modes are detected in spectra. The optical parameters, real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function, the function of energy losses, refractive index, absorption index and absorption coefficient were calculated from reflectivity experiments. The frequencies of transverse and longitudinal optical modes (TO and LO modes) and oscillator strength were also determined. The bands detected in infrared spectra were tentatively attributed to various vibration types (valence and valence-deformation). The inversion of LO- and TO-mode frequencies of the sandwiched pair was observed for studied crystals.

  7. Vibration modes of a two-dimensional Wigner lattice coupled to ripplons on a liquid-helium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguiluz, A. G.; Maradudin, A. A.; Elliott, R. J.

    1981-07-01

    We present a theory of the vibration modes of a two-dimensional Wigner lattice coupled to ripplons on a liquid-helium surface based on the use of thermodynamic Green's functions. Starting from the phonon-ripplon Hamiltonian proposed by Fisher, Halperin, and Platzman, the effects of the electron-ripplon interaction (and hence the effects of the temperature and pressing electric field) on the frequencies of the coupled phonon-ripplon modes are obtained from the poles of the Green's function for the phonons of the Wigner lattice. The nature of these poles is determined by the phonon self-energy, which clearly displays the resonant coupling between the phonons and the ripplons. Our theory gives a first-principles derivation of the weights of the ripplon-induced resonances. We present approximate analytical results for the frequencies of the coupled modes. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiments of Grimes and Adams and the theory of Fisher et al. However, we do not find justification for the quantitative agreement with experiment that has been reported by Fisher et al. This discrepancy has to do with the fact that we show that the aforementioned weights are not given in terms of an effective Debye-Waller factor for the 2D Wigner lattice, but rather in terms of an exponential whose argument originates from the difference in electron displacement correlation functions given by .u-->(l1t1)q-->.u-->(l2t2)>-<(q-->.u-->)2>. This being the case, the normal modes of the phonon-ripplon Hamiltonian have frequencies whose values are somewhat smaller than the frequencies of the resonances measured by Grimes and Adams.

  8. Subpicosecond solitons in an actively mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. J.; Haus, H. A.; Ippen, E. P.

    1996-11-01

    Experimental results are presented for a study of the stability regime of an actively mode-locked polarization-maintaining fiber ring laser used as a memory. Observations indicate that the pulse widths in the memory can be reduced (by soliton effects) by a factor of approximately 4.4 below the pulse widths predicted by standard active mode-locking theory. Stability regions for the solitons are mapped and compared with theoretical predictions.

  9. Vibration suppression in flexible structures via the sliding-mode control approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drakunov, S.; Oezguener, Uemit

    1994-01-01

    Sliding mode control became very popular recently because it makes the closed loop system highly insensitive to external disturbances and parameter variations. Sliding algorithms for flexible structures have been used previously, but these were based on finite-dimensional models. An extension of this approach for differential-difference systems is obtained. That makes if possible to apply sliding-mode control algorithms to the variety of nondispersive flexible structures which can be described as differential-difference systems. The main idea of using this technique for dispersive structures is to reduce the order of the controlled part of the system by applying an integral transformation. We can say that transformation 'absorbs' the dispersive properties of the flexible structure as the controlled part becomes dispersive.

  10. Mixed Quantum-Classical Simulations of Transient Absorption Pump-Probe Signals for a Photo-Induced Electron Transfer Reaction Coupled to an Inner-Sphere Vibrational Mode.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Franz; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-05-19

    In a previous study (Martinez, F.; Hanna, G. Chem. Phys. Lett. 2013, 573, 77-83), we demonstrated the ability of two approximate solutions of the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) for qualitatively capturing the electronic dynamics in the pump-probe transient absorption (TA) signal of a model of a condensed phase photoinduced electron transfer reaction whose ground and excited donor states have the same equilibrium geometry. However, the question remained as to the ability of these solutions to treat the more complex situation in which the electronic states are coupled to a low-frequency inner-sphere harmonic vibrational mode (representing an intramolecular mode of the donor-acceptor complex) that shifts their equilibrium geometries with respect to each other and thereby gives rise to signatures of vibrational dynamics in the TA signal. Thus, in this study, we investigated this situation by treating the vibrational mode both quantum mechanically and classically within the context of the approximate Poisson bracket mapping equation (PBME) and forward-backward trajectory solutions (FBTS) of the QCLE. Depending on the definition of the quantum subsystem, both PBME and FBTS are capable of qualitatively capturing several of the main features in the exact TA signal and quantitatively capturing the characteristic time scale of the vibrational dynamics, despite the moderately strong subsystem-bath coupling in this model. Particularly, we found that treating the vibrational mode quantum mechanically using either PBME or FBTS better captures the signatures of the vibrational dynamics, while treating it classically using FBTS better captures the decay in the signal. These findings underscore the utility of the PBME and FBTS approaches for efficiently modeling and interpreting TA signals. PMID:26766568

  11. Oversampling in virtual visual sensors as a means to recover higher modes of vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariati, Ali; Schumacher, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Vibration-based structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques require modal information from the monitored structure in order to estimate the location and severity of damage. Natural frequencies also provide useful information to calibrate finite element models. There are several types of physical sensors that can measure the response over a range of frequencies. For most of those sensors however, accessibility, limitation of measurement points, wiring, and high system cost represent major challenges. Recent optical sensing approaches offer advantages such as easy access to visible areas, distributed sensing capabilities, and comparatively inexpensive data recording while having no wiring issues. In this research we propose a novel methodology to measure natural frequencies of structures using digital video cameras based on virtual visual sensors (VVS). In our initial study where we worked with commercially available inexpensive digital video cameras we found that for multiple degrees of freedom systems it is difficult to detect all of the natural frequencies simultaneously due to low quantization resolution. In this study we show how oversampling enabled by the use of high-end high-frame-rate video cameras enable recovering all of the three natural frequencies from a three story lab-scale structure.

  12. An active control system for helicopter vibration reduction by higher harmonic pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.; Farrar, F. A.; Miao, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study defining the basic configuration of an active control system to reduce helicopter vibrations is presented. Theoretical results for a nonlinear four-bladed single rotor helicopter simulation are discussed, showing that vibration reductions on the order of 80-90% for airspeeds up to 150 kn can be expected when using a higher harmonic pitch in an active feedback control system. The rotor performance penalty associated with this level of vibration reduction is about 1-3% and the increase in rotor blade stresses is considered to be low. The location of sensor accelerometers proved to be significant for vibration reductions, and it is noted that the RTSA controller is tolerant of sensor signal noise.

  13. Active vibration attenuating seat suspension for an armored helicopter crew seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztein, Pablo Javier

    An Active Vibration Attenuating Seat Suspension (AVASS) for an MH-60S helicopter crew seat is designed to protect the occupants from harmful whole-body vibration (WBV). Magnetorheological (MR) suspension units are designed, fabricated and installed in a helicopter crew seat. These MR isolators are built to work in series with existing Variable Load Energy Absorbers (VLEAs), have minimal increase in weight, and maintain crashworthiness for the seat system. Refinements are discussed, based on testing, to minimize friction observed in the system. These refinements include the addition of roller bearings to replace friction bearings in the existing seat. Additionally, semi-active control of the MR dampers is achieved using special purpose built custom electronics integrated into the seat system. Experimental testing shows that an MH-60S retrofitted with AVASS provides up to 70.65% more vibration attenuation than the existing seat configuration as well as up to 81.1% reduction in vibration from the floor.

  14. Optimal placement of sensors and actuators for active vibration reduction of a flexible structure using a genetic algorithm based on modified Hinfinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, J. M.; Daraji, A. H.

    2012-08-01

    This paper is concerned with active vibration reduction of a square isotropic plate, mounted rigidly along one edge to form a cantilever. Optimal placement of ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs is investigated using a genetic algorithm to suppress the first six modes of vibration. A new objective function is developed based on modified Hinfinity to locate the sensor/actuator pairs. The plate, with piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs bonded to its surfaces, is modelled using the finite element method and Hamilton's principle based on first order shear deformation theory including bending, membrane, and shear deformation effects. The effects of piezoelectric mass, stiffness and electromechanical coupling are taken into account. The first six natural frequencies are validated by comparison with the finite element ANSYS package using two dimensional SHELL63 and three dimensional SOLID45 elements and also experimentally. Vibration reduction for the cantilever plate with piezoelectric patches bonded in the optimal location was investigated to attenuate the first six modes of vibration using a linear optimal control scheme. The new fitness function has reduced the computational cost and given greater vibration reduction than other previously published results.

  15. A Randomized Trial on the Effect of Bone Tissue on Vibration-induced Muscle Strength Gain and Vibration-induced Reflex Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cidem, Muharrem; Karacan, İlhan; Diraçoğlu, Demirhan; Yıldız, Aysel; Küçük, Suat Hayri; Uludağ, Murat; Gün, Kerem; Özkaya, Murat; Karamehmetoğlu, Şafak Sahir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whole-body vibration (WBV) induces reflex muscle activity and leads to increased muscle strength. However, little is known about the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of whole-body vibration on muscular performance. Tonic vibration reflex is the most commonly cited mechanism to explain the effects of whole-body vibration on muscular performance, although there is no conclusive evidence that tonic vibration reflex occurs. The bone myoregulation reflex is another neurological mechanism used to explain the effects of vibration on muscular performance. Bone myoregulation reflex is defined as a reflex mechanism in which osteocytes exposed to cyclic mechanical loading induce muscle activity. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess whether bone tissue affected vibration-induced reflex muscle activity and vibration-induced muscle strength gain. Study Design: A prospective, randomised, controlled, double-blind, parallel-group clinical trial. Methods: Thirty-four participants were randomised into two groups. High-magnitude whole-body vibration was applied in the exercise group, whereas low-magnitude whole-body vibration exercises were applied in the control group throughout 20 sessions. Hip bone mineral density, isokinetic muscle strength, and plasma sclerostin levels were measured. The surface electromyography data were processed to obtain the Root Mean Squares, which were normalised by maximal voluntarily contraction. Results: In the exercise group, muscle strength increased in the right and left knee flexors (23.9%, p=0.004 and 27.5%, p<0.0001, respectively). However, no significant change was observed in the knee extensor muscle strength. There was no significant change in the knee muscle strength in the control group. The vibration-induced corrected Root Mean Squares of the semitendinosus muscle was decreased by 2.8 times (p=0.005) in the exercise group, whereas there was no change in the control group. Sclerostin index was decreased by 15

  16. Study of vibrational modes and specific heat of wurtzite phase of BN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Daljit; Sinha, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    In these days of nanotechnology the materials like BN is of utmost importance as in hexagonal phase it is among hardest materials. The phonon mode study of the materials is most important factor to find structural and thermodynamcal properties. To study the phonons de launey angular force (DAF) constant model is best suited as it involves many particle interactions. Therefore in this presentation we have studied the lattice dynamical properties and specific heat of BN in wurtzite phase using DAF model. The obtained results are in excellent agreement with existing results.

  17. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  18. Tuning natural modes of vibration by prestress in the design of a harmonic gong.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Neil; Adams, Ryan; Burvill, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Prestresses are purposefully added to an object to improve its performance, such as tuning a guitar string by adding tension. This paper reports how the normal modes of a sheet metal component can be tuned through the prestresses generated by cold-forging small dimples. Finite element analysis showed that the frequencies of specific mode shapes were differentially affected by the location of residual stress fields due to dimple formation in relation to modal stress fields. The frequencies of overtones were most sensitive to the depth of the dimples located near the maxima of modal stresses. Using this approach a series of musical gongs were designed with up to the first five overtones tuned to within 5% of the harmonic series. The balance of harmonic and inharmonic overtones in these gongs that are well resolved by the human cochlea may constitute a set of recognizable musical timbres with sufficient harmonicity to produce an unambiguous pitch for most listeners. Since many other mechanical properties of sheet metal components are affected by residual stresses this manufacturing technique may have broader application in design engineering. PMID:22280715

  19. Laboratory Spectra of CO2 Vibrational Modes in Planetary Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Douglas; Mastrapa, Rachel M.; Sandford, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory spectra have shown that CO2 is a powerful diagnostic tool for analyzing infrared data from remote observations, as it has been detected on icy moons in the outer Solar System as well as dust grain surfaces in the interstellar medium (ISM). IR absorption band profiles of CO2 within ice mixtures containing H2O and CH3OH change with respect to temperature and mixture ratios. In this particular study, the CO2 asymmetric stretching mode near 4.3 m (2350 cm (exp-1)), overtone mode near 1.97 m (5080 cm (exp-1)), and the combination bands near 2.7 m (3700 cm (exp-1)), 2.8 m (3600 cm (exp-1)), and 2.02 m (4960 cm (exp -1)), are systematically observed in different mixtures with H2O and CH3OH in temperature ranges from 15K to 150 K. Additionally, some high-temperature deposits (T greater than 50 K) of H2O, CH3OH, and CO2 ice mixtures were performed. These data may then be used to interpret infrared observational data obtained from icy surfaces in the outer Solar System and beyond.

  20. Vibrational modes of hydraulic fractures: Inference of fracture geometry from resonant frequencies and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, Bradley P.; Dunham, Eric M.

    2015-02-01

    Oscillatory seismic signals arising from resonant vibrations of hydraulic fractures are observed in many geologic systems, including volcanoes, glaciers and ice sheets, and hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. To better quantify the physical dimensions of fluid-filled cracks and properties of the fluids within them, we study wave motion along a thin hydraulic fracture waveguide. We present a linearized analysis, valid at wavelengths greater than the fracture aperture, that accounts for quasi-static elastic deformation of the fracture walls, as well as fluid viscosity, inertia, and compressibility. In the long-wavelength limit, anomalously dispersed guided waves known as crack or Krauklis waves propagate with restoring force from fracture wall elasticity. At shorter wavelengths, the waves become sound waves within the fluid channel. Wave attenuation in our model is due to fluid viscosity, rather than seismic radiation from crack tips or fracture wall roughness. We characterize viscous damping at both low frequencies, where the flow is always fully developed, and at high frequencies, where the flow has a nearly constant velocity profile away from viscous boundary layers near the fracture walls. Most observable seismic signals from resonating fractures likely arise in the boundary layer crack wave limit, where fluid-solid coupling is pronounced and attenuation is minimal. We present a method to estimate the aperture and length of a resonating hydraulic fracture using both the seismically observed quality factor and characteristic frequency. Finally, we develop scaling relations between seismic moment and characteristic frequency that might be useful when interpreting the statistics of hydraulic fracture events.

  1. Suppression of the Work-Piece Vibrations in Milling Using Active Clamp System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parus, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Okulik, T.

    The machining is always accompanied by vibration. In certain cases the level of vibration is very high and may cause shortening of the tool life, poor quality of machined surface. Operational speed and machined surface depend on dynamic stability of three components of the machine tool-cutting system: the cutting tool, the machine tool structure, the work-piece and the clamping system. To assure stable machining, parameters of the cutting process have to be tuned and frequently the machining productivity is decreased. For this reasons different types of systems are developed for suppressing the work-piece vibration. In some cases an additional modification of the work-piece is allowed and mounting the vibration absorber is possible. The paper describes a modification of the work-piece dynamic properties using active clamp system. In comparison to the vibration absorbers this solution has a great advantageous - adaptation of the work-piece is not necessary. In the paper the simulation results of different variants of milling process with work-piece mounted using the active clamp are presented. Piezo actuators are used in order to assure active influence on the work-piece. The aim of the state space feedback control system is to minimize the amplitude of the vibration during machining process.

  2. Structure and vibrational modes of AgI-doped AsSe glasses: Raman scattering and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostadinova, O.; Chrissanthopoulos, A.; Petkova, T.; Petkov, P.; Yannopoulos, S.N.

    2011-02-15

    We report an investigation of the structure and vibrational modes of (AgI){sub x} (AsSe){sub 100-x}, bulk glasses using Raman spectroscopy and first principles calculations. The short- and medium-range structural order of the glasses was elucidated by analyzing the reduced Raman spectra, recorded at off-resonance conditions. Three distinct local environments were revealed for the AsSe glass including stoichiometric-like and As-rich network sub-structures, and cage-like molecules (As{sub 4}Se{sub n}, n=3, 4) decoupled from the network. To facilitate the interpretation of the Raman spectra ab initio calculations are employed to study the geometric and vibrational properties of As{sub 4}Se{sub n} molecular units that are parts of the glass structure. The incorporation of AgI causes appreciable structural changes into the glass structure. AgI is responsible for the population reduction of molecular units and for the degradation of the As-rich network-like sub-structure via the introduction of As-I terminal bonds. Ab initio calculations of mixed chalcohalide pyramids AsSe{sub m}I{sub 3-m} provided useful information augmenting the interpretation of the Raman spectra. -- Graphical abstract: Raman scattering and ab initio calculations are employed to study the structure of AgI-AsSe superionic glasses. The role of mixed chalcohalide pyramidal units as illustrated in the figure is elucidated. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Doping binary As-Se glasses with AgI cause dramatic changes in glass structure. {yields} Raman scattering and ab initio calculations determine changes in short- and medium-range order. {yields} Three local environments exist in AsSe glass including a network sub-structure and cage-like molecules. {yields} Mixed chalcohalide pyramids AsSe{sub m}I{sub 3-m} dominate the AgI-doped glass structure.

  3. Active Suppression of the Transonic Flutter Using Sliding Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degaki, Takanori; Suzuki, Shinji

    This paper describes two-dimensional active flutter suppression to cope with the transonic dip using the sliding mode control. The airfoil model has plunge and pitch degrees of freedom with leading and trailing edge control surfaces. The aerodynamic forces acting on the airfoil, lift and pitching moment, are calculated by solving Euler's equations using computational fluid dynamics. At a specific altitude, flutter occurs between Mach number of 0.7 and 0.88, which corresponds to the transonic dip. The sliding mode control makes the airfoil to be stable all through the Mach number including the transonic dip. The sliding mode controller gives wider flutter margin than a linear quadratic regulator. These characteristics indicate that the sliding mode control is useful for active flutter suppression in the transonic flight.

  4. Piezoelectric actuator models for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Lefebvre, Sylvie

    1993-01-01

    Analytical models for piezoelectric actuators, adapted from flat plate concepts, are developed for noise and vibration control applications associated with vibrating circular cylinders. The loadings applied to the cylinder by the piezoelectric actuators for the bending and in-plane force models are approximated by line moment and line force distributions, respectively, acting on the perimeter of the actuator patch area. Coupling between the cylinder and interior acoustic cavity is examined by studying the modal spectra, particularly for the low-order cylinder modes that couple efficiently with the cavity at low frequencies. Within the scope of this study, the in-plane force model produced a more favorable distribution of low-order modes, necessary for efficient interior noise control, than did the bending model.

  5. Calculation of exact vibration modes for plane grillages by the dynamic stiffness method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallauer, W. L., Jr.; Liu, R. Y. L.

    1982-01-01

    A dynamic stiffness method is developed for the calculation of the exact modal parameters for plane grillages which consist of straight and uniform beams with coincident elastic and inertial axes. Elementary bending-torsion beam theory is utilized, and bending translation is restricted to one direction. The exact bending-torsion dynamic stiffness matrix is obtained for a straight and uniform beam element with coincident elastic and inertial axes. The element stiffness matrices are assembled using the standard procedure of the static stiffness method to form the dynamic stiffness matrix of the complete grillage. The exact natural frequencies, mode shapes, and generalized masses of the grillage are then calculated by solving a nonlinear eigenvalue problem based on the dynamic stiffness matrix. The exact modal solutions for an example grillage are calculated and compared with the approximate solutions obtained by using the finite element method.

  6. Vibrational analysis of water adsorbed on Pd(100): sensitivity of the isotope shifts of bending modes to the bonding site. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, K.G.; Banse, B.A.; Hemminger, J.C.

    1986-02-15

    A harmonic picture of the vibrations of water adsorbed on Pd(100) is presented. The shift of the water-bending mode (against the surface plane) upon deuteration is well described by this purely harmonic picture. Normal-mode calculations in which the Pd(100) substrate is described by a finite cluster of 66 atoms were used to study the sensitivity of the isotope shift of the bending-mode frequency to the bonding site. The on-top and two-fold bridge sites are consistent with experimental results whereas the four-fold hollow site is not.

  7. Semi-active control of helicopter vibration using controllable stiffness and damping devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    Semi-active concepts for helicopter vibration reduction are developed and evaluated in this dissertation. Semi-active devices, controllable stiffness devices or controllable orifice dampers, are introduced; (i) in the blade root region (rotor-based concept) and (ii) between the rotor and the fuselage as semi-active isolators (in the non-rotating frame). Corresponding semi-active controllers for helicopter vibration reduction are also developed. The effectiveness of the rotor-based semi-active vibration reduction concept (using stiffness and damping variation) is demonstrated for a 4-bladed hingeless rotor helicopter in moderate- to high-speed forward flight. A sensitivity study shows that the stiffness variation of root element can reduce hub vibrations when proper amplitude and phase are used. Furthermore, the optimal semi-active control scheme can determine the combination of stiffness variations that produce significant vibration reduction in all components of vibratory hub loads simultaneously. It is demonstrated that desired cyclic variations in properties of the blade root region can be practically achieved using discrete controllable stiffness devices and controllable dampers, especially in the flap and lag directions. These discrete controllable devices can produce 35--50% reduction in a composite vibration index representing all components of vibratory hub loads. No detrimental increases are observed in the lower harmonics of blade loads and blade response (which contribute to the dynamic stresses) and controllable device internal loads, when the optimal stiffness and damping variations are introduced. The effectiveness of optimal stiffness and damping variations in reducing hub vibration is retained over a range of cruise speeds and for variations in fundamental rotor properties. The effectiveness of the semi-active isolator is demonstrated for a simplified single degree of freedom system representing the semi-active isolation system. The rotor

  8. Selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes in a concise manner three selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems. The three topics are as follows: (1) the active control of helicopter air-resonance using an LQG/LTR approach; (2) simulation of higher harmonic control (HHC) applied to a four bladed hingeless helicopter rotor in forward flight; and (3) vibration suppression in forward flight on a hingeless helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap, which is mounted on the blade. Only a few selected illustrative results are presented. The results obtained clearly indicate that the partial span, actively controlled flap has considerable potential for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors.

  9. Vibration control of a ship engine system using high-load magnetorheological mounts associated with a new indirect fuzzy sliding mode controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phu, Do Xuan; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a new high-load magnetorheological (MR) fluid mount system is devised and applied to control vibration in a ship engine. In the investigation of vibration-control performance, a new modified indirect fuzzy sliding mode controller is formulated and realized. The design of the proposed MR mount is based on the flow mode of MR fluid, and it includes two separated coils for generating a magnetic field. An optimization process is carried out to achieve maximal damping force under certain design constraints, such as the allowable height of the mount. As an actuating smart fluid, a new plate-like iron-particle-based MR fluid is used, instead of the conventional spherical iron-particle-based MR fluid. After evaluating the field-dependent yield stress of the MR fluid, the field-dependent damping force required to control unwanted vibration in the ship engine is determined. Subsequently, an appropriate-sized MR mount is manufactured and its damping characteristics are evaluated. After confirming the sufficient damping force level of the manufactured MR mount, a medium-sized ship engine mount system consisting of eight MR mounts is established, and its dynamic governing equations are derived. A new modified indirect fuzzy sliding mode controller is then formulated and applied to the engine mount system. The displacement and velocity responses show that the unwanted vibrations of the ship engine system can be effectively controlled in both the axial and radial directions by applying the proposed control methodology.

  10. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  11. Sizing of active piezoelectric struts for vibration suppression on a space-based interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirlin, S. W.; Laskin, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The present paper concerns itself with the active suppression of mechanical vibrations on a representative future spaceborne optical interferometer. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a set of piezoelectric struts into the truss structure of the interferometer and the use of these active struts to modify the damping and stiffness characteristics of the truss. It is shown that vibration propagation can be significantly reduced through the use of very simple control laws. It is further shown that the force and stroke requirements for the active struts for this application are rather modest and fall well within the capabilities already demonstrated by prototype hardware in ground testing.

  12. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  13. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  14. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  15. Influence of curvature strain and Van der Waals force on the inter-layer vibration mode of WS2 nanotubes: A confocal micro-Raman spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Hu; Zheng, Chang Cheng; Ning, Ji Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) nanostructures including nanotubes and monolayers have attracted great interests in materials science, chemistry to condensed matter physics. We present an interesting study of the vibration modes in multi-walled tungsten sulfide (WS2) nanotubes prepared via sulfurizing tungsten oxide (WO3) nanowires which are investigated by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. The inter-layer vibration mode of WS2 nanotubes, A1g, is found to be sensitive to the diameter and curvature strain, while the in-plane vibration mode, E(1)2g, is not. A1g mode frequency shows a redshift by 2.5 cm(-1) for the multi-layered nanotubes with small outer-diameters, which is an outcome of the competition between the Van der Waals force stiffening and the curvature strain softening. We also show that the Raman peak intensity ratio is significantly different between the 1-2 wall layered nanotubes and monolayer flat sheets. PMID:27620879

  16. Influence of vibration on mechanical power and electromyogram activity in human arm flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Bosco, C; Cardinale, M; Tsarpela, O

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of vibration on the mechanical properties of arm flexors. A group of 12 international level boxers, all members of the Italian national team, voluntarily participated in the experiment: all were engaged in regular boxing training. At the beginning of the study they were tested whilst performing forearm flexion with an extra load equal to 5% of the subjects' body mass. Following this. one arm was given the experimental treatment (E; mechanical vibration) and the other was the control (no treatment). The E treatment consisted of five repetitions lasting 1-min each of mechanical vibration applied during arm flexion in isometric conditions with 1 min rest between them. Further tests were performed 5 min immediately after the treatment on both limbs. The results showed statistically significant enhancement of the average power in the arm treated with vibrations. The root mean square electromyogram (EMGrms) had not changed following the treatment but, when divided by mechanical power, (P) as an index of neural efficiency, it showed statistically significant increases. It was concluded that mechanical vibrations enhanced muscle P and decreased the related EMG/P relationship in elite athletes. Moreover, the analysis of EMGrms recorded before the treatment and during the treatment itself showed an enormous increase in neural activity during vibration up to more than twice the baseline values. This would indicate that this type of treatment is able to stimulate the neuromuscular system more than other treatments used to improve neuromuscular properties. PMID:10090628

  17. Maximizing semi-active vibration isolation utilizing a magnetorheological damper with an inner bypass configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Wereley, Norman M.; Hu, Wei

    2015-05-01

    A single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) semi-active vibration control system based on a magnetorheological (MR) damper with an inner bypass is investigated in this paper. The MR damper employing a pair of concentric tubes, between which the key structure, i.e., the inner bypass, is formed and MR fluids are energized, is designed to provide large dynamic range (i.e., ratio of field-on damping force to field-off damping force) and damping force range. The damping force performance of the MR damper is modeled using phenomenological model and verified by the experimental tests. In order to assess its feasibility and capability in vibration control systems, the mathematical model of a SDOF semi-active vibration control system based on the MR damper and skyhook control strategy is established. Using an MTS 244 hydraulic vibration exciter system and a dSPACE DS1103 real-time simulation system, experimental study for the SDOF semi-active vibration control system is also conducted. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements.

  18. Maximizing semi-active vibration isolation utilizing a magnetorheological damper with an inner bypass configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Wereley, Norman M.; Hu, Wei

    2015-05-07

    A single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) semi-active vibration control system based on a magnetorheological (MR) damper with an inner bypass is investigated in this paper. The MR damper employing a pair of concentric tubes, between which the key structure, i.e., the inner bypass, is formed and MR fluids are energized, is designed to provide large dynamic range (i.e., ratio of field-on damping force to field-off damping force) and damping force range. The damping force performance of the MR damper is modeled using phenomenological model and verified by the experimental tests. In order to assess its feasibility and capability in vibration control systems, the mathematical model of a SDOF semi-active vibration control system based on the MR damper and skyhook control strategy is established. Using an MTS 244 hydraulic vibration exciter system and a dSPACE DS1103 real-time simulation system, experimental study for the SDOF semi-active vibration control system is also conducted. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements.

  19. Active twist control methodology for vibration reduction of a helicopter with dissimilar rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Prashant M.; Jung, Sung Nam

    2009-03-01

    In this work, an active vibration reduction of hingeless composite rotor blades with dissimilarity is investigated using the active twist concept and the optimal control theory. The induced shear strain on the actuation mechanism by the piezoelectric constant d15 from the PZN-8% PT-based single-crystal material is used to achieve more active twisting to suppress the extra vibrations. The optimal control algorithm is based on the minimization of an objective function comprised of quadratic functions of vibratory hub loads and voltage control harmonics. The blade-to-blade dissimilarity is modeled using the stiffness degradation of composite blades. The optimal controller is applied to various possible dissimilarities arising from different damage patterns of composite blades. The governing equations of motion are derived using Hamilton's principle. The effects of composite materials and smart actuators are incorporated into the comprehensive aeroelastic analysis system. Numerical results showing the impact of addressing the blade dissimilarities on hub vibrations and voltage inputs required to suppress the vibrations are demonstrated. It is observed that all vibratory shear forces are reduced considerably and the major harmonics of moments are reduced significantly. However, the controller needs further improvement to suppress 1/rev moment loads. A mechanism to achieve vibration reduction for the dissimilar rotor system has also been identified.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  1. Study of structure-activity relationship of enantiomeric, protonated and deprotonated forms of warfarin via vibrational spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Alok; Srivastava, Sunil Kumar; Swati, D.

    2013-09-01

    The structure-activity relationship of the anticoagulant drug warfarin were studied by studying two enantiomeric forms (S-form and R-form) of warfarin and its protonated as well as deprotonated structures in aqueous media using density functional theory (DFT). Theoretically computed Raman and IR spectra of all the computed structures were compared and their specific vibrational spectroscopic signatures were discussed. The percentage contributions of individual normal modes of warfarin, which provides direct evidence of the different molecular activity due to change in relative atomic position of atoms in molecule, were investigated through potential energy distribution (PED). The optimized energy and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) maps show that the S-form of the drug molecules warfarin is energetically more stable than R-form and provides higher docking opportunity for the molecular binding with the receptors in the bio-systems.

  2. Active control of payload fairing noise using distributed active vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Arnaud; Johnson, Marty E.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2003-04-01

    High sound pressure inside a launch vehicle fairing during lift-off can damage the payload. Interior levels of up to 140 dB between 60 and 250 Hz are mostly due to exhaust plume noise combined with the limited transmission loss of lightweight composite fairings and little acoustic damping in the fairing volume. Past work using passive and hybrid passive/reactive noise control devices has shown that their limitations are mostly due to packaging volume and weight penalty. The objective of this work is to design a lightweight, compact, and low electrical power active noise control system to reduce the fairing interior sound level. Hybrid active/passive actuators such as Smart Foam (Couche and Fuller, Proceedings of Active 1999, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, pp. 609-620) and Distributed Active Vibration Absorbers (Marcotte, Fuller, and Johnson, Proceedings of Active 2002, ISVR, Southampton, England, pp. 535-546) are optimized for fairing noise control. The latter have been used to increase the transmission loss of the fairing. Active noise control test results on a sub-scale, sandwich composite fairing are presented. The global interior acoustic response due to airborne exterior excitation is minimized using an adaptive multiple-input, multiple-output feedforward controller. [Work supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate (AFRL).

  3. Active vibration control of a three-stage tensegrity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wai Leung; Arbelaez, Diego; Bossens, Frederic; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This experimental study demonstrates the efficiency of simple control strategies to damp a 3-stage tensegrity tower structure. The tower is mounted on a moving support which is excited with a limited bandwidth random signal (filtered white noise) by a shaker. Our goal is to minimize the tansmissibility between base acceleration and top plate acceleration using piezoelectric displacement actuators and force sensors collocated at the bottom stage of vertical strings. Two types of controllers have been designed, namely, it local integral force feedback control and acceleration feedback control. It can be shown that both controllers can effectively damp the first 2 bending modes by about 20 dB, and the acceleration feedback controller performs even better as it can also reduce the amplitude of the next 2 bending modes by about 5-10 dB.

  4. Good vibrations, bad vibrations: Oscillatory brain activity in the attentional blink

    PubMed Central

    Janson, Jolanda; Kranczioch, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is a deficit in reporting the second (T2) of two targets (T1, T2) when presented in close temporal succession and within a stream of distractor stimuli. The AB has received a great deal of attention in the past two decades because it allows to study the mechanisms that influence the rate and depth of information processing in various setups and therefore provides an elegant way to study correlates of conscious perception in supra-threshold stimuli. Recently evidence has accumulated suggesting that oscillatory signals play a significant role in temporally coordinating information between brain areas. This review focuses on studies looking into oscillatory brain activity in the AB. The results of these studies indicate that the AB is related to modulations in oscillatory brain activity in the theta, alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands. These modulations are sometimes restricted to a circumscribed brain area but more frequently include several brain regions. They occur before targets are presented as well as after the presentation of the targets. We will argue that the complexity of the findings supports the idea that the AB is not the result of a processing impairment in one particular process or brain area, but the consequence of a dynamic interplay between several processes and/or parts of a neural network. PMID:22253672

  5. [Intravesical active prostate bleeding diagnosed in B-mode ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Kirchgesner, T; Danse, E; Tombal, B

    2013-09-01

    Hematuria is one of the most frequent minor complications after prostatic biopsy. We would like to report the case of a 68-year-old patient with massive hematuria after prostatic biopsy and intravesical active prostate bleeding diagnosed in B-mode ultrasonography. PMID:24034804

  6. Engaging in activities involving information technology: dimensions, modes, and flow.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Henry; Sharafi, Parvaneh; Hedman, Leif R

    2004-01-01

    An engagement mode involves a subject (e.g., a user of information technology, or IT) who is engaged in an activity with an object in a certain manner (the mode). The purpose of this study is to develop a general model of engagement modes that may be used for understanding how IT-related activities are shaped by properties of the user and the IT object. A questionnaire involving items on IT engagement and the experience of flow was administered to 300 participants. The results supported an engagement mode (EM) model involving 5 different engagement modes (enjoying/acceptance, ambition/curiosity, avoidance/hesitation, frustration/ anxiety, and efficiency/productivity) characterized on 3 dimensions (evaluation of object, locus of control between subject and object, and intrinsic or extrinsic focus of motivation). The flow experience follows from a balance between enjoying/ acceptance and efficiency/productivity propelled by ambition/curiosity. The EM model could provide a platform for considering how IT users, IT applications, and IT environments should work together to yield both enjoyment and efficiency. Actual or potential applications of this research include designing IT training programs on different levels of specificity. PMID:15359681

  7. Rectification of SEMG as a tool to demonstrate synchronous motor unit activity during vibration.

    PubMed

    Sebik, Oguz; Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Türker, Kemal S

    2013-04-01

    The use of surface electromyography (SEMG) in vibration studies is problematic since motion artifacts occupy the same frequency band with the SEMG signal containing information on synchronous motor unit activity. We hypothesize that using a harsher, 80-500 Hz band-pass filter and using rectification can help eliminate motion artifacts and provide a way to observe synchronous motor unit activity that is phase locked to vibration using SEMG recordings only. Multi Motor Unit (MMU) action potentials using intramuscular electrodes along with SEMG were recorded from the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) of six healthy male volunteers. Data were collected during whole body vibration, using vibration frequencies of 30 Hz, 35 Hz, 40 Hz or 50 Hz. A computer simulation was used to investigate the efficacy of filtering under different scenarios: with or without artifacts and/or motor unit synchronization. Our findings indicate that motor unit synchronization took place during WBV as verified by MMU recordings. A harsh filtering regimen along with rectification proved successful in demonstrating motor unit synchronization in SEMG recordings. Our findings were further supported by the results from the computer simulation, which indicated that filtering and rectification was efficient in discriminating motion artifacts from motor unit synchronization. We suggest that the proposed signal processing technique may provide a new methodology to evaluate the effects of vibration treatments using only SEMG. This is a major advantage, as this non-intrusive method is able to overcome movement artifacts and also indicate the synchronization of underlying motor units. PMID:23098913

  8. Semi-active control of torsional vibrations using an MR fluid brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Keith A.; Ye, Shaochun

    2004-07-01

    Control of torsional vibrations in an automotive crankshaft is a classical vibration control problem. The most common solution is to mount a crankshaft damper at one end of the crankshaft. Typical crankshaft dampers are composed of parallel stiffness and damping elements connecting a rotational inertia to the crankshaft. Appropriate design of the damper elements may result in substantial crankshaft vibration. Conventional couplings include elastomeric spring-damper elements and purely viscous fluid couplings. While those approaches result in satisfactory reduction of crankshaft vibration, it may be that a semi-active approach can achieve improved performance. To that end, an investigation of a semi-active crankshaft damper using magneto-rheological (MR) fluid has been initiated. A torsional MR fluid brake was obtained and applied to a scale model of a crankshaft for a common eight-cylinder engine. Experiments were performed with the MR brake as a fixed-friction device. In addition, a simple stick-slip control algorithm was developed such that the MR brake became an on-line variable friction device. While a good deal of work remains to be performed in future efforts, the preliminary experimental results have demonstrated that a torsional damper composed of an MR fluid brake has potential application in the field of torsional vibration control.

  9. IIR filtering based adaptive active vibration control methodology with online secondary path modeling using PZT actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boz, Utku; Basdogan, Ipek

    2015-12-01

    Structural vibrations is a major cause for noise problems, discomfort and mechanical failures in aerospace, automotive and marine systems, which are mainly composed of plate-like structures. In order to reduce structural vibrations on these structures, active vibration control (AVC) is an effective approach. Adaptive filtering methodologies are preferred in AVC due to their ability to adjust themselves for varying dynamics of the structure during the operation. The filtered-X LMS (FXLMS) algorithm is a simple adaptive filtering algorithm widely implemented in active control applications. Proper implementation of FXLMS requires availability of a reference signal to mimic the disturbance and model of the dynamics between the control actuator and the error sensor, namely the secondary path. However, the controller output could interfere with the reference signal and the secondary path dynamics may change during the operation. This interference problem can be resolved by using an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter which considers feedback of the one or more previous control signals to the controller output and the changing secondary path dynamics can be updated using an online modeling technique. In this paper, IIR filtering based filtered-U LMS (FULMS) controller is combined with online secondary path modeling algorithm to suppress the vibrations of a plate-like structure. The results are validated through numerical and experimental studies. The results show that the FULMS with online secondary path modeling approach has more vibration rejection capabilities with higher convergence rate than the FXLMS counterpart.

  10. The Raman and vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-containing complexes and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maxton, P.M.; Schaeffer, M.W.; Ohline, S.M.; Kim, W.; Venturo, V.A.; Felker, P.M. )

    1994-11-15

    Theoretical and experimental results pertaining to the excitation of intermolecular vibrations in the Raman and vibronic spectra of aromatic-containing, weakly bound complexes and clusters are reported. The theoretical analysis of intermolecular Raman activity is based on the assumption that the polarizability tensor of a weakly bound species is given by the sum of the polarizability tensors of its constituent monomers. The analysis shows that the van der Waals bending fundamentals in aromatic--rare gas complexes may be expected to be strongly Raman active. More generally, it predicts strong Raman activity for intermolecular vibrations that involve the libration or internal rotation of monomer moieties having appreciable permanent polarizability anisotropies. The vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-rare gas complexes is analyzed under the assumption that every vibronic band gains its strength from an aromatic-localized transition. It is found that intermolecular vibrational excitations can accompany aromatic-localized vibronic excitations by the usual Franck--Condon mechanism or by a mechanism dependent on the librational amplitude of the aromatic moiety during the course of the pertinent intermolecular vibration. The latter mechanism can impart appreciable intensity to bands that are forbidden by rigid-molecule symmetry selection rules. The applicability of such rules is therefore called into question. Finally, experimental spectra of intermolecular transitions, obtained by mass-selective, ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies, are reported for benzene--X (X=Ar, --Ar[sub 2], N[sub 2], HCl, CO[sub 2], and --fluorene), fluorobenzene--Ar and --Kr, aniline--Ar, and fluorene--Ar and --Ar[sub 2]. The results support the conclusions of the theoretical analyses and provide further evidence for the value of Raman methods in characterizing intermolecular vibrational level structures.

  11. Ab Initio and Improved Empirical Potentials for the Calculation of the Anharmonic Vibrational States and Intramolecular Mode Coupling of N-Methylacetamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregurick, Susan K.; Chaban, Galina M.; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochou (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The second-order Moller-Plesset ab initio electronic structure method is used to compute points for the anharmonic mode-coupled potential energy surface of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in the trans(sub ct) configuration, including all degrees of freedom. The vibrational states and the spectroscopy are directly computed from this potential surface using the Correlation Corrected Vibrational Self-Consistent Field (CC-VSCF) method. The results are compared with CC-VSCF calculations using both the standard and improved empirical Amber-like force fields and available low temperature experimental matrix data. Analysis of our calculated spectroscopic results show that: (1) The excellent agreement between the ab initio CC-VSCF calculated frequencies and the experimental data suggest that the computed anharmonic potentials for N-methylacetamide are of a very high quality; (2) For most transitions, the vibrational frequencies obtained from the ab initio CC-VSCF method are superior to those obtained using the empirical CC-VSCF methods, when compared with experimental data. However, the improved empirical force field yields better agreement with the experimental frequencies as compared with a standard AMBER-type force field; (3) The empirical force field in particular overestimates anharmonic couplings for the amide-2 mode, the methyl asymmetric bending modes, the out-of-plane methyl bending modes, and the methyl distortions; (4) Disagreement between the ab initio and empirical anharmonic couplings is greater than the disagreement between the frequencies, and thus the anharmonic part of the empirical potential seems to be less accurate than the harmonic contribution;and (5) Both the empirical and ab initio CC-VSCF calculations predict a negligible anharmonic coupling between the amide-1 and other internal modes. The implication of this is that the intramolecular energy flow between the amide-1 and the other internal modes may be smaller than anticipated. These results may have

  12. Regular physical activity reduces the effects of Achilles tendon vibration on postural control for older women.

    PubMed

    Maitre, J; Serres, I; Lhuisset, L; Bois, J; Gasnier, Y; Paillard, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to determine in what extent physical activity influences postural control when visual, vestibular, and/or proprioceptive systems are disrupted. Two groups of healthy older women: an active group (74.0 ± 3.8 years) who practiced physical activities and a sedentary group (74.7 ± 6.3 years) who did not, underwent 12 postural conditions consisted in altering information emanating from sensory systems by means of sensory manipulations (i.e., eyes closed, cervical collar, tendon vibration, electromyostimulation, galvanic vestibular stimulation, foam surface). The center of foot pressure velocity was recorded on a force platform. Results indicate that the sensory manipulations altered postural control. The sedentary group was more disturbed than the active group by the use of tendon vibration. There was no clear difference between the two groups in the other conditions. This study suggests that the practice of physical activities is beneficial as a means of limiting the effects of tendon vibration on postural control through a better use of the not manipulated sensory systems and/or a more efficient reweighting to proprioceptive information from regions unaffected by the tendon vibration. PMID:24853711

  13. Vibration isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on vibration isolation are presented. Techniques to control and isolate centrifuge disturbances were identified. Topics covered include: disturbance sources in the microgravity environment; microgravity assessment criteria; life sciences centrifuge; flight support equipment for launch; active vibration isolation system; active balancing system; and fuzzy logic control.

  14. Vibrational Spectroscopy of the CCl[subscript 4] v[subscript 1] Mode: Theoretical Prediction of Isotopic Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, James D.; Wetterer, Anna M.; Cochran, Rea M.; Valente, Edward J.; Mayer, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique, yet it is often missing from the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory curriculum. Tetrachloromethane (CCl[subscript 4]) is the ideal molecule for an introductory vibrational spectroscopy experiment and the symmetric stretch vibration contains fine structure due to isotopic variations…

  15. Fundamental study of lower limb muscle activity using an angled whole body vibration exercise instrument.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Kang, Seung Rok; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    This research was performed to assess the effects of angled whole body vibration on muscle activity of the lower limbs, by examining adults in their twenties during squat exercises, taking into account two variables of exercise intensity (vibration frequency and gradient). Twenty healthy males in their twenties with previous experience of more than 6 month's weight training and no past medical history were included in this study. The experiment was performed by participating in squat exercises which consisted of 3 sets (1 set = 5 seconds x 3 repetitions of exercise), and the muscle activities of the Rectus Femoris, Vastus Lateralis, Vastus Medialis were measured with variation in the gradients of 0°, 10°, and 20°, and vibration frequencies of 20, 30, and 40 Hz. At 30 and 40 Hz, the vastus lateralis showed the highest change in muscle activity, while activity of the vastus medialis also increased significantly. Analysis of muscle activity according to the gradient showed a significant increase of the vastus lateralis at 20°, while the highest muscle activity at 20° was observed for the vastus medialis. In comparison of the change in lower limb muscle activity according to simultaneous stimulation, at a gradient of 10°, high activity was shown in muscle, while at 20°, high muscle activities were produced at 40 Hz in the vastus lateralis, 40 Hz in the rectus femoris, and both 30 and 40 Hz in the vastus medialis. PMID:25226944

  16. The Influence of Whole-Body Vibration on Creatine Kinase Activity and Jumping Performance in Young Basketball Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fachina, Rafael; da Silva, Antônio; Falcão, William; Montagner, Paulo; Borin, João; Minozzo, Fábio; Falcão, Diego; Vancini, Rodrigo; Poston, Brach; de Lira, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify creatine kinase (CK) activity changes across time following an acute bout of whole-body vibration (WBV) and determine the association between changes in CK activity and jumping performance. Method: Twenty-six elite young basketball players were assigned to 3 groups: 36-Hz and 46-Hz vibration groups (G36 and G46, respectively)…

  17. A finite element method for active vibration control of uncertain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. L.; Rongong, J. A.; Sims, N. D.

    2012-10-01

    This work introduces a fuzzy design method using the finite element procedure to simulate and analyze active vibration control of structures subjected to uncertain parameters. The purpose of this work is to provide a tool for studying the influence of uncertainty propagation on both stability and performance of a vibration control system, whilst avoiding the need for computationally expensive probabilistic methods or complex robust control techniques. The proposed procedure applies a general and efficient strategy for computing fuzzy results to a sequence of finite element calculations. Finally, the applicability of the methodology is illustrated through some realistic case studies related to structural control where spillover instability may arise.

  18. Measuring of object vibration using sinusoidal-modulation laser-diode active interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yong; Cao, Qinfeng; Lu, Su

    1996-09-01

    Using the character that the emitting optical frequency of the laser diode is controlled by the injected current, the ability of eliminating environmental disturbance of the sinusoidal modulation laser diode active interferometer will be raised by more than one hundred times through putting the disturbed interference signal produced by the environment into the interferometer. When vibrating frequency of objects is different from that of the sinusoidol modulation, 'beat- frequency' will be produced in the interfere signal, which can be analyzed to get the vibrating frequency of objects. This paper described the operation principle and theoretical delusion of the 'beat-frequency' method.

  19. An active optimal control strategy of rotor vibrations using external forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, W.; Castelazo, I.; Nelson, H. D.

    1989-01-01

    An active control strategy for lateral rotor vibrations using external forces is proposed. An extended state observer is used to reconstruct the full states and the unbalance distribution. An optimal controller which accommodates persistent unbalance excitation is derived with feedback of estimated states and unbalances. Numerical simulations were conducted for two separate four degree of freedom rotor systems. These simulations indicated that the proposed strategy can achieve almost complete vibration cancellation. This was shown to be true even when the number of external control forces was less than the system order so long as coordinate coupling was present. Both steady state and transient response at a constant speed are presented.

  20. Reduction of Floor Shock Vibration by Active Momentum Exchange Impact Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Lovely; Yamada, Keisuke; Hara, Susumu; Utsuno, Hideo; Matsuhisa, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes an active control type of momentum exchange impact damper (AMEID) and its application to reducing shock vibration of the floor. The floor is modeled as a one-degree-of-freedom system. The active component of AMEID is realized by using a linear motor. The controller design of AMEID is based on the LQR optimal control theory. The simulation results show that the performance of AMEID is not affected by the mass ratio. In addition, the performance of AMEID is compared with the conventional passive momentum exchange impact damper (PMEID), the active mass damper (AMD) and the conventional active control method in reducing the floor shock vibration. It is shown that the shock reduction performance obtained by AMEID is larger than that obtained by PMEID. The power consumption and the stroke of the actuator for AMEID are lower than those of AMD. Furthermore, the transmitted force obtained by AMEID is smaller than that of the conventional active control.