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Sample records for active volcanic vents

  1. The roar of Yasur: Handheld audio recorder monitoring of Vanuatu volcanic vent activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Howell, Robert; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.

    2016-08-01

    We describe how near-field audio recording using a pocket digital sound recorder can usefully document volcanic activity, demonstrating the approach at Yasur, Vanuatu in May 2014. Prominent emissions peak at 263 Hz, interpreted as an organ-pipe mode. High-pass filtering was found to usefully discriminate volcano vent noise from wind noise, and autocorrelation of the high pass acoustic power reveals a prominent peak in exhalation intervals of 2.5, 4 and 8 s, with a number of larger explosive events at 200 s intervals. We suggest that this compact and inexpensive audio instrumentation can usefully supplement other field monitoring such as seismic or infrasound. A simple estimate of acoustic power interpreted with a dipole jet noise model yielded vent velocities too low to be compatible with pyroclast emission, suggesting difficulties with this approach at audio frequencies (perhaps due to acoustic absorption by volcanic gases).

  2. Major and trace element distributions around active volcanic vents determined by analyses of grasses: implications for element cycling and bio-monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. S.; Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M.; Day, J. A.; Witt, M. L. I.; Collins, S. J.; Hilton, R. G.

    2010-10-01

    Samples of grass were collected at Masaya Volcano (Nicaragua; Rhynchelytrum repens and Andropogon angustatus) and the Piton de La Fournaise (around the April 2007 eruptive vent, La Réunion; Vetiveria zizanioides) to investigate the controls on major and trace element concentrations in plants around active volcanic vents. Samples were analysed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for a wide range of elements, and atomic absorption spectroscopy for Hg. At Masaya, As, Cu, Mo, Tl and K concentrations in both grass species showed a simple pattern of variability consistent with exposure to the volcanic plume. Similar variability was found in A. angustatus for Al, Co, Cs, Hg and Mg. At the Piton de La Fournaise, the patterns of variability in V. zizanioides were more complex and related to variable exposures to emissions from both the active vent and lava flow. These results suggest that exposure to volcanic emissions is, for many elements, the main control on compositional variability in vegetation growing on active volcanoes. Thus, vegetation may be an important environmental reservoir for elements emitted by volcanoes and should be considered as part of the global biogeochemical cycles.

  3. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): Toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedele, L.; Insinga, D.D.; Calvert, A.T.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei hosts numerous monogenetic vents inferred to be younger than the 15 ka Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Sanidine crystals from the three young Campi Flegrei vents of Fondi di Baia, Bacoli and Nisida were dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. These vents, together with several other young edifices, occur roughly along the inner border of the Campi Flegrei caldera, suggesting that the volcanic conduits are controlled by caldera-bounding faults. Plateau ages of ∼9.6 ka (Fondi di Baia), ∼8.6 ka (Bacoli) and ∼3.9 ka (Nisida) indicate eruptive activity during intervals previously interpreted as quiescent. A critical revision, involving calendar age correction of literature 14C data and available 40Ar/39Ar age data, is presented. A new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, which significantly differs from the previously adopted ones, is proposed. This has important implications for understanding the Campi Flegrei eruptive history and, ultimately, for the evaluation of related volcanic risk and hazard, for which the inferred history of its recent activity is generally taken into account.

  4. Explosive Volcanic Eruptions from Linear Vents on Earth, Venus and Mars: Comparisons with Circular Vent Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Wimert, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    Conditions required to support buoyant convective plumes are investigated for explosive volcanic eruptions from circular and linear vents on Earth, Venus, and Mars. Vent geometry (linear versus circular) plays a significant role in the ability of an explosive eruption to sustain a buoyant plume. On Earth, linear and circular vent eruptions are both capable of driving buoyant plumes to equivalent maximum rise heights, however, linear vent plumes are more sensitive to vent size. For analogous mass eruption rates, linear vent plumes surpass circular vent plumes in entrainment efficiency approximately when L(sub o) > 3r(sub o) owing to the larger entrainment area relative to the control volume. Relative to circular vents, linear vents on Venus favor column collapse and the formation of pyroclastic flows because the range of conditions required to establish and sustain buoyancy is narrow. When buoyancy can be sustained, however, maximum plume heights exceed those from circular vents. For current atmospheric conditions on Mars, linear vent eruptions are capable of injecting volcanic material slightly higher than analogous circular vent eruptions. However, both geometries are more likely to produce pyroclastic fountains, as opposed to convective plumes, owing to the low density atmosphere. Due to the atmospheric density profile and water content on Earth, explosive eruptions enjoy favorable conditions for producing sustained buoyant columns, while pyroclastic flows would be relatively more prevalent on Venus and Mars. These results have implications for the injection and dispersal of particulates into the planetary atmosphere and the ability to interpret the geologic record of planetary volcanism.

  5. Hydrothermal activity on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Tectonically- and volcanically-controlled venting at 4 5°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bennett, S. A.; Connelly, D. P.; Evans, A. J.; Murton, B. J.; Parson, L. M.; Prien, R. D.; Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Jakuba, M.; Shank, T. M.; Yoerger, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-09-01

    We report results from an investigation of the geologic processes controlling hydrothermal activity along the previously-unstudied southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (3-7°S). Our study employed the NOC (UK) deep-tow sidescan sonar instrument, TOBI, in concert with the WHOI (USA) autonomous underwater vehicle, ABE, to collect information concerning hydrothermal plume distributions in the water column co-registered with geologic investigations of the underlying seafloor. Two areas of high-temperature hydrothermal venting were identified. The first was situated in a non-transform discontinuity (NTD) between two adjacent second-order ridge-segments near 4°02'S, distant from any neovolcanic activity. This geologic setting is very similar to that of the ultramafic-hosted and tectonically-controlled Rainbow vent-site on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The second site was located at 4°48'S at the axial-summit centre of a second-order ridge-segment. There, high-temperature venting is hosted in an ˜ 18 km 2 area of young lava flows which in some cases are observed to have flowed over and engulfed pre-existing chemosynthetic vent-fauna. In both appearance and extent, these lava flows are directly reminiscent of those emplaced in Winter 2005-06 at the East Pacific Rise, 9°50'N and reference to global seismic catalogues reveals that a swarm of large (M 4.6-5.6) seismic events was centred on the 5°S segment over a ˜ 24 h period in late June 2002, perhaps indicating the precise timing of this volcanic eruptive episode. Temperature measurements at one of the vents found directly adjacent to the fresh lava flows at 5°S MAR (Turtle Pits) have subsequently revealed vent-fluids that are actively phase separating under conditions very close to the Critical Point for seawater, at ˜ 3000 m depth and 407 °C: the hottest vent-fluids yet reported from anywhere along the global ridge crest.

  6. Cluster Analysis of vents in monogenetic volcanic fields, Lunar Crater Volcanic Field (Nevada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadini, A.; Cortes, J. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Johnson, P. J.; Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.

    2012-12-01

    Monogenetic volcanic fields pose a serious risk to human activities and settlements due to their high occurrence around the world and because of the type of eruptive activity that they exhibit. The need of adequate tools to better undertake volcanic hazard assessment for volcanic fields, especially from a spatial point of view, is of key importance at the time of mitigate such hazard. Among these tools, a better understanding of the spatial distribution of cones and vents and any structural/tectonical relationship are essential to understand the plumbing system of the field and thus help to predict the likelihood location of future eruptions. In this study we have developed a spatial methodology, which is the combination of various methodologies developed for volcanic textures and other clustering goals [1,2], to study the clustering of volcanic vents and their relation with structural features from satellite images. The methodology first involves the statistical identification and removal of spatial outliers using a predictive elliptical area [2] and the generation of randomly distributed points in the same predictive area. A comparison of the Near Neighbor Distance (NND) between the generated data and the data measured in a volcanic field is used to determine whether the vents are clustered or not. If the vents are clustered, a combination of hierarchical clustering and K-means [3] is then used to identify the clusters and their related vents. Results are then further constrained with the study of lineaments and other structural features that can be affected and related with the clusters. The methodology was tested in the Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Nevada (USA) and successfully has helped to identify tectonically controlled lineaments from those that are resultant of geomorphological processes such the drainage control imposed by the cone clusters. Theoretical approaches has been developed before to constrain the plumbing of a volcanic field [4], however these

  7. Fluid dynamics in explosive volcanic vents and craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Darcy

    2011-12-01

    Explosive volcanic jets can transition to buoyant plumes or collapse to form pyroclastic density currents depending on their ability to entrain and heat the ambient air. Recent one-dimensional (1D) analysis shows that fluid acceleration through volcanic vents and craters changes the velocity and pressures within these jets sufficiently enough to be a first order control on plume dimensions and therefore air entrainment and column stability (Koyaguchi et al., 2010). These 1D studies are only applicable to craters and vents with angles of less than about 30° to vertical. Using analytical formulations and numerical simulations, this study describes 2D effects of shallowly dipping vents and craters on volcanic eruptions. The effect of vents on acceleration and expansion of eruptive mixtures of ash and gas is described as a force imparted on the fluid by the vent wall, the wall force ( Fw). This force is a measure of the momentum coupling between an eruption and the solid earth that takes place in the vent. Rapid divergence of supersonic eruptive fluid within shallowly dipping vents occurs via Prandtl-Meyer expansion, which results in different pressure and velocity fields than those predicted by 1D analysis. This expansion decreases Fw and the vertical acceleration experienced by the eruptive fluid in the vent. For jets predicted by 1D analysis to exit the vent at supersonic velocities and at atmospheric pressure, this decrease in Fw will cause an increase in the predicted plume area, decreasing column stability. The complex 2D shape of volcanic vents can change jet structure (presence and location of shock waves) and preclude the development of jets that exit the vent supersonically with no internal standing shock waves (i.e., perfectly expanded or pressure balanced jets). These significant complications in jet structure and increase in plume radius may result in changes to air entrainment, plume stability, and tephra distribution.

  8. Spatial density analysis of volcanic vents in the Concepción volcanic complex, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saballos, J. A.; Kiyosugi, K.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.

    2011-12-01

    We have applied a bivariate Gaussian kernel function to estimate spatial density of volcanic vents associated to the Concepción Volcanic Complex, CVC. Our dataset consists of 36 known vents distributed on an area 11.0 km (N-S) by 11.3 km (E-W), and whose age of formation is unknown. There are 3 known vents on the western side of the CVC, 21 in the central area, and 12 in the eastern side. All these three regions describe preferentially N-S elongate zones. Concepción is the most active composite volcano in Nicaragua and forms the northwestern side of the Ometepe Island with a total population estimated to be ~33,000, and with the vast majority living very near the volcano. Thus there is an immediate need for estimating the probabilistic hazard associated with areas more prone to the formation of new volcanic vents and how they compare to the location of population centers. We computed the spatial density using the sum of the asymptotic mean squared error (SAMSE), and the least-square cross validation (LSCV) algorithms, both available in the freely-distributed R statistical software library. Both algorithms produce grossly similar spatial density, but with significantly different emphasis on the three elongate vent zones. The SAMSE algorithm yields a spatial vent density of 3x10-2 - 4x10-4 event/km2 between the 1st and 99th percentiles, and an elliptical bandwidth of 2.6 km in the N-S direction and 2.2 km in the E-W. The LSCV algorithm produces a spatial vent density of 5x10-2 - 5x10-4 event/km2 between the 1st and 99th percentiles, and a highly eccentric bandwidth with axis of 2.8 km in the N-S direction and 0.8 km in the E-W. The vent spatial density map produced by the SAMSE algorithm embraces all the vents below the 95th percentile with a spatial density > 2x10-3 event/km2, and the shape of the map is quite homogeneous and not particularly sensitive to local geology or tectonic setting. The spatial density produced by the LSCV algorithm shows three parallel

  9. Implementation and evaluation of an inexpensive low-power low-noise infrasound sensor and its use in a dense sensor network around an active volcanic vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcillo, O. E.; Johnson, J. B.; Hart, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The development and evaluation of a low-cost infrasound sensor, the infraNMT, and its use as part of a dense (45-element) sensor network around an active volcanic vent, are described. This sensor is based on a commercial micro-machined piezo-resistive differential pressure transducer that uses a mechanical high-pass filter to reject low-frequency out-band energy. The sensor features low noise, 2.02 mPa rms (0.5-2 Hz), 5.47 mPa RMS (0.1-20 Hz), or 5.62 mPa rms (0.05-20 Hz), flat response between 0.01 Hz to at least 40 Hz, inband sensitivity of 45.13 +/-0.23 μV/Pa, and nominal linear range of -124.5 to +124.5 Pa. The sensor consumes a minimum of 24 mW, and operates with voltages above 8V while drawing 3mA of current. The infraNMT specifications described above were independently verified using the infrasound test chamber at the Sandia National Laboratories' Facility for Acceptance, Calibration, and Testing (SNL-FACT) and following procedures for comparison calibration against traceable reference stands in voltage and pressure. Due to the intended broad frequency response of this sensor the testing chamber was configured in a double reference sensor scheme. A well-characterized MB2000 micro-barometer (with a flat amplitude response between 0.01 and 8 Hz) and microphone (with a flat amplitude response above 8Hz) were used simultaneously in this double reference test configuration. The characteristics of the infraNMT, including small size, low power consumption, high dynamic range, and low cost, favor its use in array or network configurations for near source and/or higher noise environments. This sensor has been used for infrasound array studies associated with various sources, including volcanic and chemical explosions, glacier earthquakes, and thunder. In this study we report on the Summer 2010 deployment of a network of 45 infraNMT sensors at Kilauea volcano to study the infrasound generated by degassing of the active Halema'uma'u vent. For this experiment, the

  10. Spatial Compilation of Holocene Volcanic Vents in the Western Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Siebert, L.

    2015-12-01

    A spatial compilation of all known Holocene volcanic vents in the western conterminous United States has been assembled. This compilation records volcanic vent location (latitude/longitude coordinates), vent type (cinder cone, dome, etc.), geologic map unit description, rock type, age, numeric age and reference (if dated), geographic feature name, mapping source, and, where available, spatial database source. Primary data sources include: USGS geologic maps, USGS Data Series, the Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program (GVP) catalog, and published journal articles. A total of 726 volcanic vents have been identified from 45 volcanoes or volcanic fields spanning ten states. These vents are found along the length of the Cascade arc in the Pacific Northwest, widely around the Basin and Range province, and at the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau into New Mexico. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS) identifies 28 volcanoes and volcanic centers in the western conterminous U.S. that pose moderate, high, or very high threats to surrounding communities based on their recent eruptive histories and their proximity to vulnerable people, property, and infrastructure. This compilation enhances the understanding of volcano hazards that could threaten people and property by providing the context of where Holocene eruptions have occurred and where future eruptions may occur. Locations in this compilation can be spatially compared to located earthquakes, used as generation points for numerical hazard models or hazard zonation buffering, and analyzed for recent trends in regional volcanism and localized eruptive activity.

  11. Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic methanogen isolated from a volcanically active deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lucy C; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, You-Tae; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Park, Cheon-Seok; Holden, James F

    2015-04-01

    A hyperthermophilic methanogen, strain JH146(T), was isolated from 26 °C hydrothermal vent fluid emanating from a crack in basaltic rock at Marker 113 vent, Axial Seamount in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. It was identified as an obligate anaerobe that uses only H2 and CO2 for growth. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain is more than 97% similar to other species of the genus Methanocaldococcus . Therefore, overall genome relatedness index analyses were performed to establish that strain JH146(T) represents a novel species. For each analysis, strain JH146(T) was most similar to Methanocaldococcus sp. FS406-22, which can fix N2 and also comes from Marker 113 vent. However, strain JH146(T) differs from strain FS406-22 in that it cannot fix N2. The average nucleotide identity score for strain JH146(T) was 87%, the genome-to-genome direct comparison score was 33-55% and the species identification score was 93%. For each analysis, strain JH146(T) was below the species delineation cut-off. Full-genome gene synteny analysis showed that strain JH146(T) and strain FS406-22 have 97% genome synteny, but strain JH146(T) was missing the operons necessary for N2 fixation and assimilatory nitrate reduction that are present in strain FS406-22. Based on its whole genome sequence, strain JH146(T) is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Methanocaldococcus for which the name Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens is proposed. The type strain is JH146(T) ( = DSM 27223(T) = KACC 18232(T)).

  12. Quantifying volcanic hazard at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) with uncertainty assessment: 1. Vent opening maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, Andrea; Isaia, Roberto; Neri, Augusto; Vitale, Stefano; Aspinall, Willy P.; Bisson, Marina; Flandoli, Franco; Baxter, Peter J.; Bertagnini, Antonella; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Iannuzzi, Enrico; Pistolesi, Marco; Rosi, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    Campi Flegrei is an active volcanic area situated in the Campanian Plain (Italy) and dominated by a resurgent caldera. The great majority of past eruptions have been explosive, variable in magnitude, intensity, and in their vent locations. In this hazard assessment study we present a probabilistic analysis using a variety of volcanological data sets to map the background spatial probability of vent opening conditional on the occurrence of an event in the foreseeable future. The analysis focuses on the reconstruction of the location of past eruptive vents in the last 15 ka, including the distribution of faults and surface fractures as being representative of areas of crustal weakness. One of our key objectives was to incorporate some of the main sources of epistemic uncertainty about the volcanic system through a structured expert elicitation, thereby quantifying uncertainties for certain important model parameters and allowing outcomes from different expert weighting models to be evaluated. Results indicate that past vent locations are the most informative factors governing the probabilities of vent opening, followed by the locations of faults and then fractures. Our vent opening probability maps highlight the presence of a sizeable region in the central eastern part of the caldera where the likelihood of new vent opening per kilometer squared is about 6 times higher than the baseline value for the whole caldera. While these probability values have substantial uncertainties associated with them, our findings provide a rational basis for hazard mapping of the next eruption at Campi Flegrei caldera.

  13. Evidence of young volcanic vents in the lunar maria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braden, S.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    from broad areas of mare basalt flows. Changes in extrusion rate and temperature commonly occur at vents, which could explain the IMPs' unique morphology. Furthermore, IMPs are often spatially associated with volcanic features such as mare domes (e.g., Cauchy 5), collapse calderas (e.g., Hyginus crater), and large pyroclastic deposits (e.g., Mare Vaporum). Multispectral analysis on a subset of the largest IMPs using combined Clementine UV-VIS data (950/750 nm ratio) and LROC Wide Angle Camera images (320/415 nm ratio) show that the uneven unit is consistent with a mare basalt composition. The multispectral data also suggest the presence of pyroclastic material in the area directly surrounding some of the IMPs, which is consistent with a vent hypothesis. Thus, the morphology, composition, and distribution of IMPs imply that lunar volcanic activity may be much younger than generally recognized. References: [1] Whitaker E. (1972) NASA SP-289. [2] Schultz P. H. (1976) Moon Morphology, 626 pp., Univ. of Texas. [3] Stooke P. J. (2012) LPSC 43, abst 1011. [4] Braden S. E. et al. (2013) LPSC 44, abst. 2843. [5] El-Baz, F. (1973) NASA SP-330. [6] Strain P. L. and El-Baz F. (1980) PLPSC 11, 2437-2446. [7] Schultz P. H. (2006) Nature, 444, 184-186. [8] Staid M. et al. (2011) LPSC 42, abst. 2499. [9] Garry W. B. et al. (2012) JGR, 117, E00H31. [10] Robinson M. S. et al. (2010) LPSC 41, abst. 2592.

  14. Fake ballistics and real explosions: field-scale experiments on the ejection and emplacement of volcanic bombs during vent-clearing explosive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Valentine, G.; Gaudin, D.; Graettinger, A. H.; Lube, G.; Kueppers, U.; Sonder, I.; White, J. D.; Ross, P.; Bowman, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ballistics - bomb-sized pyroclasts that travel from volcanic source to final emplacement position along ballistic trajectories - represent a prime source of volcanic hazard, but their emplacement range, size, and density is useful to inverse model key eruption parameters related to their initial ejection velocity. Models and theory, however, have so far focused on the trajectory of ballistics after leaving the vent, neglecting the complex dynamics of their initial acceleration phase in the vent/conduit. Here, we use field-scale buried explosion experiments to study the ground-to-ground ballistic emplacement of particles through their entire acceleration-deceleration cycle. Twelve blasts were performed at the University at Buffalo Large Scale Experimental Facility with a range of scaled depths (burial depth divided by the cubic root of the energy of the explosive charge) and crater configurations. In all runs, ballistic analogs were placed on the ground surface at variable distance from the vertical projection of the buried charge, resulting in variable ejection angle. The chosen analogs are tennis and ping-pong balls filled with different materials, covering a limited range of sizes and densities. The analogs are tracked in multiple high-speed and high-definition videos, while Particle Image Velocimetry is used to detail ground motion in response to the buried blasts. In addition, after each blast the emplacement position of all analog ballistics was mapped with respect to the blast location. Preliminary results show the acceleration history of ballistics to be quite variable, from very short and relatively simple acceleration coupled with ground motion, to more complex, multi-stage accelerations possibly affected not only by the initial ground motion but also by variable coupling with the gas-particle mixture generated by the blasts. Further analysis of the experimental results is expected to provide new interpretative tools for ballistic deposits and better

  15. Volcanic field elongation, vent distribution and tectonic evolution of continental rift: The Main Ethiopian Rift example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, Francesco; Le Corvec, Nicolas; Isola, Ilaria; Favalli, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    Magmatism and faulting operate in continental rifts and interact at a variety of scales, however their relationship is complex. The African rift, being the best example for both active continental rifting and magmatism, provides the ideal location to study the interplay between the two mechanisms. The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), which connects the Afar depression in the north with the Turkana depression and Kenya Rift to the south, consists of two distinct systems of normal faults and its floor is scattered with volcanic fields formed by tens to several hundreds monogenetic, generally basaltic, small volcanoes and composite volcanoes and small calderas. The distribution of vents defines the overall shape of the volcanic field. Previous work has shown that the distribution of volcanic vents and the shape of a field are linked to its tectonic environment and its magmatic system. In order to distinguish the impact of each mechanism, we analyzed four volcanic fields located at the boundary between the central and northern MER, three of them (Debre Zeyit, Wonji and Kone) grew in the rift valley and one (Akaki) on the western rift shoulder. The elongation and shape of the fields were analyzed based on their vent distribution using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the Vent-to-Vent Distance (VVD), and the two dimensional symmetric Gaussian kernel density estimate methods. We extracted from these methods several parameters characterizing the spatial distribution of points (e.g., eccentricity (e), eigenvector index (evi), angular dispersion (Da)). These parameters allow to define at least three types of shape for volcanic fields: strong elongate (line and ellipse), bimodal/medium elongate (ellipse) and dispersed (circle) shapes. Applied to the natural example, these methods well differentiate each volcanic field. For example, the elongation of the field increases from shoulder to rift axis inversely to the angular dispersion. In addition, the results show that none of

  16. Response of key stress-related genes of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica in the vicinity of submarine volcanic vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauritano, C.; Ruocco, M.; Dattolo, E.; Buia, M. C.; Silva, J.; Santos, R.; Olivé, I.; Costa, M. M.; Procaccini, G.

    2015-03-01

    Submarine volcanic vents are being used as natural laboratories to assess the effects of CO2 on marine organisms and communities, as this gas is the main component of emissions. Seagrasses should positively react to increased dissolved carbon, but in vicinity of volcanic vents there may be toxic substances, that can have indirect effects on seagrasses. Here we analysed the expression of 35 stress-related genes in the Mediterranean keystone seagrass species P. oceanica in the vicinity of submerged volcanic vents located in the Islands of Ischia and Panarea, Italy, and compared them with those from control sites away from the influence of vents. Reverse Transcription-Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to characterize the expression levels of genes. Fifty one per cent of genes analysed showed significant expression changes. Metal detoxification genes were mostly down-regulated in relation to controls both in Ischia and Panarea locations, indicating that P. oceanica does not increase the synthesis of heavy metal detoxification proteins in response to the environmental conditions present at the two vents. The expression levels of genes involved in free radical detoxification indicate that, in contrast with Ischia, P. oceanica at the Panarea vent face stressors that result in the production of reactive oxygen species triggering antioxidant responses. In addition, heat shock proteins were also activated at Panarea and not at Ischia. Overall, our study reveals that P. oceanica is generally under higher stress in the vicinity of the vents at Panarea than at Ischia, possibly resulting from environmental and evolutionary differences existing between the two volcanic sites. This is the first study analysing gene responses in marine plants living near natural CO2 vents and our results call for a careful consideration of factors, other than CO2 and acidification, that can cause stress to seagrasses and other organisms near volcanic vents.

  17. An authoritative global database for active submarine hydrothermal vent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Maffei, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The InterRidge Vents Database is available online as the authoritative reference for locations of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields. Here we describe the revision of the database to an open source content management system and conduct a meta-analysis of the global distribution of known active vent fields. The number of known active vent fields has almost doubled in the past decade (521 as of year 2009), with about half visually confirmed and others inferred active from physical and chemical clues. Although previously known mainly from mid-ocean ridges (MORs), active vent fields at MORs now comprise only half of the total known, with about a quarter each now known at volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers. Discoveries in arc and back-arc settings resulted in an increase in known vent fields within exclusive economic zones, consequently reducing the proportion known in high seas to one third. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. The purpose of the database now extends beyond academic research and education and into marine policy and management, with at least 18% of known vent fields in areas granted or pending applications for mineral prospecting and 8% in marine protected areas.

  18. Using Volcanic Lightning Measurements to Discern Variations in Explosive Volcanic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, S. A.; Thomas, R. J.; McNutt, S. R.; Edens, H. E.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.

    2013-12-01

    VHF observations of volcanic lightning have been made during the recent eruptions of Augustine Volcano (2006, Alaska, USA), Redoubt Volcano (2009, Alaska, USA), and Eyjafjallajökull (2010, Iceland). These show that electrical activity occurs both on small scales at the vent of the volcano, concurrent with an eruptive event and on large scales throughout the eruption column during and subsequent to an eruptive event. The small-scale discharges at the vent of the volcano are often referred to as 'vent discharges' and are on the order of 10-100 meters in length and occur at rates on the order of 1000 per second. The high rate of vent discharges produces a distinct VHF signature that is sometimes referred to as 'continuous RF' radiation. VHF radiation from vent discharges has been observed at sensors placed as far as 100 km from the volcano. VHF and infrasound measurements have shown that vent discharges occur simultaneously with the onset of eruption, making their detection an unambiguous indicator of explosive volcanic activity. The fact that vent discharges are observed concurrent with explosive volcanic activity indicates that volcanic ejecta are charged upon eruption. VHF observations have shown that the intensity of vent discharges varies between eruptive events, suggesting that fluctuations in eruptive processes affect the electrification processes giving rise to vent discharges. These fluctuations may be variations in eruptive vigor or variations in the type of eruption; however, the data obtained so far do not show a clear relationship between eruption parameters and the intensity or occurrence of vent discharges. Further study is needed to clarify the link between vent discharges and eruptive behavior, such as more detailed lightning observations concurrent with tephra measurements and other measures of eruptive strength. Observations of vent discharges, and volcanic lightning observations in general, are a valuable tool for volcano monitoring, providing a

  19. Hydrothermal Activity on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Tectonically- and Volcanically-Hosted High Temperature Venting at 2-7 Degrees S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Parson, L. M.; Murton, B. J.; Bennett, S. A.; Connelly, D. P.; Evans, A. J.; Prien, R. D.; Ramirez-Llodra, E. Z.; Shank, T. M.; Yoerger, D. R.; Jakuba, M.; Bradley, A. M.; Baker, E. T.; Nakamura, K.

    2005-12-01

    We have conducted a systematic investigation for hydrothermal activity along the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 2°30-6°50 S. Our initial approach was to use a combination of multi-beam swath mapping, deep-tow sidescan sonar imaging and water column plume-detection using MAPRs and CTD-rosette system to locate new sites of hydrothermal activity immediately south of the Romanche and Chain Fracture zones. We wanted to test whether these geologic features represent a significant barrier to gene-flow along-axis away from northern MAR vent ecosystems. During the first leg of our research cruise (RRS Charles Darwin cruise CD169, Feb-Mar 2005) we used this approach to identify two hydrothermally active regions, one in a non-transform discontinuity near 4°S and the other in a segment centre characterised by very fresh sheet-flows near 5°S. During Leg 2 we returned to the second of these areas and deployed ABE, WHOI's autonomous underwater vehicle, in a three-phase strategy to prospect for, locate, and image new hydrothermal fields. During Phase 1 two discrete target areas were located ca. 1km apart along strike within the segment centre. During Phase 2 these two areas were each mapped in detail using an SM2000 system while in situ optical back scatter, Eh, temperature, Mn and Fe(II) sensors were used to confirm the interception of buoyant hydrothermal plumes rising from the seafloor. Finally we redeployed ABE (Phase 3) to collect photo-mosaics of each of two new vent-areas whilst simultaneously sampling their buoyant plumes by CTD-rosette for TDMn, Fe and CH4 analyses.

  20. Investigating the role of small vent volcanism during the development of Tharsis Province, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Glaze, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    Clusters of tens to hundreds of small volcanic vents have recently been recognized as a major component of Tharsis Province volcanism. These volcanic fields are formed from distributed-style, possibly monogenetic, volcanism and are composed of low sloped edifices with diameters of tens of kilometers and heights of tens to hundreds of meters. We report a new catalog of these small volcanic vents, now available through the USGS Astrogeology Science Center. This catalog was created with the use of gridded topographic data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and images from the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC). We are now investigating isolated clusters of distributed volcanism in Tharsis with this dataset. We hypothesize that these clusters are formed from significant magmatic events that played a large role in the development of Tharsis. Currently, the catalog contains 1075 unique volcanic vents in the Tharsis Province. With the catalog, potentially isolated volcano clusters are identified with vent density estimation. Vent intensity for clusters is found to be 1 vent per 1000 sq km or less. Crater retention rates for one such cluster, Syria Planum, indicates that these distributed volcanic systems might continue as long as 700 Ma, or that monogenetic volcanic systems overprint older systems. Using a modified basal outlining algorithm with MOLA gridded data, shield volumes are found to be between 1-20 cubic km. Current results show distributed-style volcanism occuring in Tharsis orders of magnitude more dispersed than analogous volcano clusers on Earth, while individual edifices are found to be an order of magnitude larger than volcanoes in Earth clusters. Proof of concept results are reported for three identified clusters: Arsia Mons Caldera, Syria Planum, and Southern Pavonis Mons.

  1. Distribution of late Cenozoic volcanic vents in the Cascade Range: volcanic arc segmentation and regional tectonic considerations ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Weaver, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Spatial, temporal, and compositional distributions of c4000 volcanic vents formed since 16 Ma in Washington, Oregon, N California, and NW Nevada illustrate the evolution of volcanism related to subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate system and extension of the Basin and Range province. Vent data were obtained from published map compilations and include monogenetic and small polygenetic volcanoes in addition to major composite centers. On the basis of the distribution of 2821 vents formed since 5 Ma, the Cascade Range is divided into 5 segments, with vents of the High Lava Plains along the northern margin of the Basin and Range province in Oregon forming a sixth segment. Some aspects of the Cascade Range segmentation can be related to gross structural features of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate.-from Authors

  2. Sustained volcanically-hosted venting at ultraslow ridges: Piccard Hydrothermal Field, Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, James C.; German, Christopher R.

    2013-10-01

    At slow spreading mid-ocean ridges sustained submarine venting and the deposition of large seafloor massive sulfide deposits have previously been ascribed to tectonically-controlled hydrothermal circulation unrelated to young volcanic activity. Here, by contrast, we show that the Piccard Hydrothermal Field (PHF), on the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise, represents a site of sustained fluid flow and sulfide formation hosted in a neovolcanic setting. The lateral extent and apparent longevity associated with the PHF are comparable to some of the largest tectonically-hosted vent sites known along the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge. If such systems recur along all ultraslow ridges, which comprise ˜20% of the ˜55,000 km global ridge crest, potential implications would include (i) a higher probability of locating large, economically valuable, mineral deposits along ultraslow ridges together with (ii) larger fluxes than previously anticipated of chemicals released from high-temperature venting entering the oceans along the Atlantic-Indian Ocean sectors of the deep-ocean thermohaline conveyor.

  3. Differences in recovery between deep-sea hydrothermal vent and vent-proximate communities after a volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollner, Sabine; Govenar, Breea; Arbizu, Pedro Martinez; Mills, Susan; Le Bris, Nadine; Weinbauer, Markus; Shank, Timothy M.; Bright, Monika

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents and the surrounding basalt seafloor are subject to major natural disturbance events such as volcanic eruptions. In the near future, anthropogenic disturbance in the form of deep-sea mining could also significantly affect the faunal communities of hydrothermal vents. In this study, we monitor and compare the recovery of insular, highly productive vent communities and vent-proximate basalt communities following a volcanic eruption that destroyed almost all existing communities at the East Pacific Rise, 9°50‧N in 2006. To study the recovery patterns of the benthic communities, we placed settlement substrates at vent sites and their proximate basalt areas and measured the prokaryotic abundance and compared the meio- and macrofaunal species richness and composition at one, two and four years after the eruption. In addition, we collected samples from the overlying water column with a pelagic pump, at one and two years after the volcanic eruption, to determine the abundance of potential meiofauna colonisers. One year after eruption, mean meio- and macrofaunal abundances were not significantly different from pre-eruption values in vent habitats (meio: 8-1838 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2006; 3-6246 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2001/02; macro: 95-1600 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2006; 205-4577 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2001/02) and on non-vent basalt habitats (meio: 10-1922 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2006; 8-328 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2003/04; macro: 14-3351 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2006; 2-63 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2003/04), but species recovery patterns differed between the two habitat types. In the vent habitat, the initial community recovery was relatively quick but incomplete four years after eruption, which may be due to the good dispersal capabilities of vent endemic macrofauna and vent endemic dirivultid copepods. At vents, 42% of the pre-eruption meio- and 39% of macrofaunal species had returned. In addition, some new species not evident prior to the eruption were found. At the tubeworm site Tica, a total of 26

  4. Retrieving eruptive vent conditions from dynamical properties of unsteady volcanic plume using high-speed imagery and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournigand, Pierre-Yves; Taddeucci, Jacopo; José Peña Fernandez, Juan; Gaudin, Damien; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Del Bello, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    Vent conditions are key parameters controlling volcanic plume dynamics and the ensuing different hazards, such as human health issues, infrastructure damages, and air traffic disruption. Indeed, for a given magma and vent geometry, plume development and stability over time mainly depend on the mass eruption rate, function of the velocity and density of the eruptive mixture at the vent, where direct measurements are impossible. High-speed imaging of eruptive plumes and numerical jet simulations were here non-dimensionally coupled to retrieve eruptive vent conditions starting from measurable plume parameters. High-speed videos of unsteady, momentum-driven volcanic plumes (jets) from Strombolian to Vulcanian activity from three different volcanoes (Sakurajima, Japan, Stromboli, Italy, and Fuego, Guatemala) were recorded in the visible and the thermal spectral ranges by using an Optronis CR600x2 (1280x1024 pixels definition, 500 Hz frame rate) and a FLIR SC655 (640x480 pixels definition, 50 Hz frame rate) cameras. Atmospheric effects correction and pre-processing of the thermal videos were performed to increase measurement accuracy. Pre-processing consists of the extraction of the plume temperature gradient over time, combined with a temperature threshold in order to remove the image background. The velocity and the apparent surface temperature fields of the plumes, and their changes over timescales of tenths of seconds, were then measured by particle image velocimetry and thermal image analysis, respectively, of the pre-processed videos. The parameters thus obtained are representative of the outer plume surface, corresponding to its boundary shear layer at the interface with the atmosphere, and may significantly differ from conditions in the plume interior. To retrieve information on the interior of the plume, and possibly extrapolate it even at the eruptive vent level, video-derived plume parameters were non-dimensionally compared to the results of numerical

  5. Response of key stress-related genes of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica in the vicinity of submarine volcanic vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauritano, C.; Ruocco, M.; Dattolo, E.; Buia, M. C.; Silva, J.; Santos, R.; Olivé, I.; Costa, M. M.; Procaccini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Submarine volcanic vents are being used as natural laboratories to assess the effects of increased ocean acidity and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on marine organisms and communities. However, in the vicinity of volcanic vents other factors in addition to CO2, which is the main gaseous component of the emissions, may directly or indirectly confound the biota responses to high CO2. Here we used for the first time the expression of antioxidant and stress-related genes of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica to assess the stress levels of the species. Our hypothesis is that unknown factors are causing metabolic stress that may confound the putative effects attributed to CO2 enrichment only. We analyzed the expression of 35 antioxidant and stress-related genes of P. oceanica in the vicinity of submerged volcanic vents located in the islands of Ischia and Panarea, Italy, and compared them with those from control sites away from the influence of vents. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to characterize gene expression patterns. Fifty-one percent of genes analyzed showed significant expression changes. Metal detoxification genes were mostly down-regulated in relation to controls at both Ischia and Panarea, indicating that P. oceanica does not increase the synthesis of heavy metal detoxification proteins in response to the environmental conditions present at the two vents. The up-regulation of genes involved in the free radical detoxification response (e.g., CAPX, SODCP and GR) indicates that, in contrast with Ischia, P. oceanica at the Panarea site faces stressors that result in the production of reactive oxygen species, triggering antioxidant responses. In addition, heat shock proteins were also activated at Panarea and not at Ischia. These proteins are activated to adjust stress-accumulated misfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation as a response to some stressors, not necessarily high temperature. This is the first

  6. Distribution of Late Cenozoic volcanic vents in the Cascade range: Volcanic arc segmentation and regional tectonic considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Weaver, Craig S.

    1988-06-01

    Spatial, temporal, and compositional distributions of approximately 4000 volcanic vents formed since 16 Ma in Washington, Oregon, northern California, and northwestern Nevada illustrate the evolution of volcanism related to subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate system and extension of the Basin and Range province. Vent data were obtained from published map compilations and include monogenetic and small polygenetic volcanoes in addition to major composite centers. On the basis of the distribution of 2821 vents formed since 5 Ma, the Cascade Range is divided into five segments, with vents of the High Lava Plains along the northern margin of the Basin and Range province in Oregon forming a sixth segment. Some aspects of the Cascade Range segmentation can be related to gross structural features of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The orientation of the volcanic front of segments one and two changes from NW in northern Washington to NE in southern Washington, paralleling the strike of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. Segments one and two are separated by a 90-km volcanic gap between Mount Rainier and Glacier Peak that is landward of the portion of the subducting plate having the least average dip to a depth of 60 km. A narrow, N-S trending belt of predominantly andesitic vents in Oregon constitutes a third segment, which is landward of the seismically quiet portion of the subduction zone. The narrowness of this segment may indicate steep dip of the subducting plate beneath the Cascade arc in Oregon. Vents are sparse between segment four (containing the Mount Shasta and Medicine Lake centers) and segment five (containing Lassen Peak), where the Juan de Fuca and Gorda North plates are characterized by differing age, amounts of subcrustal seismicity, and probably geometry. From the relation between seismicity at depth of 60 km and the position of the volcanic front of vents formed since 5 Ma, transitions between subducting-plate segments of varying geometry likely occur

  7. Subsurface magma pathways inferred from statistical analysis of volcanic vent distribution and numerical model of magma ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, Aurelie; Connor, Laura; Connor, Chuck; Malservisi, Rocco

    2015-04-01

    One challenge of volcanic hazard assessment in distributed volcanic fields (large number of small-volume basaltic volcanoes along with one or more silicic central volcanoes) is to constrain the location of future activity. Although the extent of the source of melts at depth can be known using geophysical methods or the location of past eruptive vents, the location of preferential pathways and zones of higher magma flux are still unobserved. How does the spatial distribution of eruptive vents at the surface reveal the location of magma sources or focusing? When this distribution is investigated, the location of central polygenetic edifices as well as clusters of monogenetic volcanoes denote zones of high magma flux and recurrence rate, whereas areas of dispersed monogenetic vents represent zones of lower flux. Additionally, central polygenetic edifices, acting as magma filters, prevent dense mafic magmas from reaching the surface close to their central silicic system. Subsequently, the spatial distribution of mafic monogenetic vents may provide clues to the subsurface structure of a volcanic field, such as the location of magma sources, preferential magma pathways, and flux distribution across the field. Gathering such data is of highly importance in improving the assessment of volcanic hazards. We are developing a modeling framework that compares output of statistical models of vent distribution with outputs form numerical models of subsurface magma transport. Geologic data observed at the Earth's surface are used to develop statistical models of spatial intensity (vents per unit area), volume intensity (erupted volume per unit area) and volume-flux intensity (erupted volume per unit time and area). Outputs are in the form of probability density functions assumed to represent volcanic flow output at the surface. These are then compared to outputs from conceptual models of the subsurface processes of magma storage and transport. These models are using Darcy's law

  8. Global relationships between volcanic vents and fractures radial to large impact basins on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneid, Byron D.; Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    The relation of volcanic vents on Mars to impact basins has been previously studied. It has been asserted that the concentric fractures around impact basins extend into the crust and might localize some features, including volcanoes. Herein, the possibility is assessed of radial fractures inferred to be associated with impact basins as an additional control on the location of volcanoes on Mars. Geologic mapping at 1:2 million scale enabled 250 central vents and fissure vents to be identified. Pattern of vent distribution superimposed on a globe show that most are located on three distinct circles. In addition, there are two more possible great circles which may be superimposed onto the Martian globe. These five Martian circles are briefly examined for their geological relationship to volcanoes.

  9. Influence of hydrothermal venting on water column properties in the crater of the Kolumbo submarine volcano, Santorini volcanic field (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulou, Maria E.; Mertzimekis, Theo J.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steven; Mandalakis, Manolis

    2016-02-01

    The Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of the island of Santorini, is part of Santorini's volcanic complex in the south Aegean Sea, Greece. Kolumbo's last eruption was in 1650 AD. However, a unique and active hydrothermal vent field has been revealed in the northern part of its crater floor during an oceanographic survey by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in 2006. In the present study, conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data collected by ROV Hercules during three oceanographic surveys onboard E/V Nautilus in 2010 and 2011 have served to investigate the distribution of physicochemical properties in the water column, as well as their behavior directly over the hydrothermal field. Additional CTD measurements were carried out in volcanic cone 3 (VC3) along the same volcanic chain but located 3 km northeast of Kolumbo where no hydrothermal activity has been detected to date. CTD profiles exhibit pronounced anomalies directly above the active vents on Kolumbo's crater floor. In contrast, VC3 data revealed no such anomalies, essentially resembling open-sea (background) conditions. Steep increases of temperature (e.g., from 16 to 19 °C) and conductivity near the maximum depth (504 m) inside Kolumbo's cone show marked spatiotemporal correlation. Vertical distributions of CTD signatures suggest a strong connection to Kolumbo's morphology, with four distinct zones identified (open sea, turbid flow, invariable state, hydrothermal vent field). Additionally, overlaying the near-seafloor temperature measurements on an X-Y coordinate grid generates a detailed 2D distribution of the hydrothermal vent field and clarifies the influence of fluid discharges in its formation.

  10. The NOAA/PMEL Vents Program - 1983 to 2013: A History of Deep-Sea Volcanic and Hydrothermal Exploration and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, S. R.; Baker, E. T.; Embley, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Inspiration for the Vents program arose from two serendipitous events: the discovery of seafloor spreading-center hydrothermal venting on the Galápagos Rift in 1977, and NOAA's deployment of the first US civilian research multibeam bathymetric sonar on the NOAA Ship Surveyor in 1979. Multibeam mapping in the NE Pacific revealed an unprecedented and revolutionary perspective of the Gorda and Juan de Fuca spreading centers, thus stimulating a successful exploration for volcanic and hydrothermal activity at numerous locations along both. After the 1986 discovery of the first "megaplume,", quickly recognized as the water column manifestation of a deep submarine volcanic eruption, the Vents program embarked on a multi-decadal effort to discover and understand local-, regional-, and, ultimately, global-scale physical, chemical, and biological ocean environmental impacts of submarine volcanism and hydrothermal venting. The Vents program made scores of scientific discoveries, many of which owed their success to the program's equally innovative and productive technological prowess. These discoveries were documented in hundreds of peer-reviewed papers by Vents researchers and their colleagues around the world. An emblematic success was the internationally recognized, first-ever detection, location, and study of an active deep volcanic eruption in 1993. To continue the Vents mission and further enhance its effectiveness in marine science and technology innovation, the program was reorganized in 2014 into two distinct, but closely linked, programs: Earth-Oceans Interactions and Acoustics. Both are currently engaged in expeditions and projects that maintain the Vents tradition of pioneering ocean exploration and research.

  11. Hydrothermal fluids vented at shallow depths at the Aeolian islands: relationships with volcanic and geothermal systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Italiano, Francesco; Caracausi, Antonio; Longo, Manfredi; Maugeri, Roberto; Paonita, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Scuba diving investigations carried out over the last two decades at the Aeolian islands revealed the existence of submarine magmatic and late-magmatic hydrothermalism at all the islands, despite the absence of on-shore activity at some of the islands. The results gained by diving activities provided useful information to evaluate the volcanic and geothermal activity and to manage the volcanic crisis occurred on November 2002 off the island of Panarea. Scuba diving investigations carried out from middle 80's, had shown that despite the absence of on shore volcanic manifestations, submarine hydrothermal activity is recognizable at shallow depth around all the Aeolian islands related either to volcanic and geothermal activity. The sampled gases are CO2-dominated with low amounts of oxygen and reactive gases (H2, CO, CH4 and H2S) with concentrations ranging from a few ppm to some mole percent. Sometimes significant N2 amount are detectable together with high helium contents. Samples having low CO2 content, besides relevant N2 and He amounts, are the consequence of CO2 dissolution in sea-water due to gas-water interactions (GWI) occurred before the sample collection. The high CO2 solubility (878 ml/l, T=20°C, P=1bar) may, in fact, decrease the CO2 content in the venting gases thus increasing the concentrations of the less soluble species (e.g. He 8 ml/l, CO 23 ml/l and CH4 33.8 ml/l) in the gas mixture. Such a process might occur at any level, however, because of the slow water circulation in deep sediments, CO2 is able to saturate the circulating sea-water. The isotopic composition of carbon displays a small range of values while helium isotopes are in the range of 4.1active and extinct Volcanoes, their chemical composition is similar. Contrastingly the isotope composition of helium shows a large heterogeneity with the highest isotopic ratios surprisingly measured at the extinct volcanic islands in the western sector, and much

  12. Newly discovered Holocene volcanic vents, Port Moller and Stepovak Bay quadrangles, Alaska Peninsula: A section in The United States Geological Survey in Alaska: Accomplishments during 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yount, M. Elizabeth; Wilson, Frederic H.; Miller, John W.

    1985-01-01

    Reconnaissance mapping in 1982-83 suggests previously unreported Holocene volcanic activity in the area 14-24 km southwest of Kupreanof Volcano (fig. 45). One young volcanic vent has been observed along the divide between Stepovak Bay and Bear Lake, and the locations of two others are inferred from the position of morphologically young lava flows mapped in valleys draining into Clark Bay, Grub Gulch, and Ramsey Bay. Other morphologically young flows extending northwest from the divide are evident on aerial photographs.

  13. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).

    The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.

    North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page

  14. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-01-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:3946726

  15. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  16. Late Neogene Volcanic Stratigraphy in the Southern Puertecitos Volcanic Province of Baja California: Time Constraints and Vent Source Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carrillo, P.; Martin, A.; Lopez-Martinez, M.; Cañon, E.

    2007-05-01

    during the opening of the Lower Delfin basin has been accommodated to the east. Our data support multiple source vents located offshore the central Puertecitos Volcanic Province. These pyroclastic flows may constitute useful marker horizons in marine seismic lines for reconstructing the timing and amount of extension across conjugate margins in the Lower Delfin basin.

  17. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  18. Molecular response of Sargassum vulgare to acidification at volcanic CO2 vents - insights from de novo transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Castellano, Immacolata; Patti, Francesco Paolo; Delledonne, Massimo; Abdelgawad, Hamada; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Asard, Han; Palumbo, Anna; Buia, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-30

    Ocean acidification is an emerging problem that is expected to impact ocean species to varying degrees. Currently, little is known about its effect on molecular mechanisms induced in fleshy macroalgae. To elucidate genome wide responses to acidification, a comparative transcriptome analysis was carried out between Sargassum vulgare populations growing under acidified conditions at volcanic CO2 vents and a control site. Several transcripts involved in a wide range of cellular and metabolic processes were differentially expressed. No drastic changes were observed in the carbon acquisition processes and RuBisCO level. Moreover, relatively few stress genes, including those for antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins, were affected. Instead, increased expression of transcripts involved in energy metabolism, photosynthetic processes, and ion homeostasis suggested that algae increased energy production to maintain ion-homeostasis and other cellular processes. Also, an increased allocation of carbon to cell wall and carbon storage was observed. A number of genes encoding proteins involved in cellular signaling, information storage and processing, and transposition were differentially expressed between the two conditions. The transcriptional changes of key enzymes were largely confirmed by enzymatic activity measurements. Altogether, the changes induced by acidification indicate an adaptation of growth and development of S. vulgare at the volcanic CO2 vents, suggesting that this fleshy alga exhibits a high plasticity to low pH and can adopt molecular strategies to grow also in future more acidified waters. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The Chthonic Charging of Volcanic Flows: The Generation of Vent Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez Harper, J.; Dufek, J.

    2015-12-01

    While volcanic lightning has been reported for millennia, the physics that generate charge in plumes still require clarification. Lightning observations during the Augustine (2006) and Redoubt (2009) eruptions have revealed a new form of lightning: nearly continuous, vent discharges associated with the explosive phase of the eruption. Vent lightning is often small (10-100 m in length) and disorganized, suggesting the existence of multiple, transient charge centers proximal to the volcanic vent. Thomas et al., 2007 and Behnke et al., 2012 have postulated that this form of lightning is driven by fragmentation charging [James et al., 2008]. However, triboelectrification—frictional charging arising from particle-particle collisions as material is advected up to the vent—should also play an important role. Because tribocharging is modulated by collision rates and energies, it is within the conduit and the gas-thrust regions that this frictional process should be most efficient. Indeed, the work of Cimarelli et al., 2014 has suggested that lightning can be generated at the vent via triboelectric charging alone. Using an energy-based comparison, we investigate the relative efficiencies of fracto- and triboelectric charging. To generate charged particles via a fragmentation process, we employ Prince Rupert's Drops (PRDs), meta-stable, tadpole-shaped structures formed by quenching molten glass in water. While a PDR's head is extremely strong, even the slightest damage to the tail causes explosive disintegration of the drop [Silverman et al., 2012]. A set of PDRs are disrupted in a controlled environment and the charge on the resulting particles is measured using a set of Faraday cups. The energy density associated with the breaking of PRDs is on the order of 105-106 J/m3. Then, to investigate tribocharging at similar energies, we eject spherical particles at high velocities, producing particle-particle collisions in a novel Faraday cube sensor. Our setup allows us to

  20. Welded tuff infilling a volcanic vent at Weolseong, Republic of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedman, Antony John; Park, Ki Hwa; Merriman, Richard James; Kim, Seon Eok

    1987-06-01

    A plug of parataxitically welded tuff, with an elliptical (700 × 400 m) cross section, crops out in Weolseong district, Republic of Korea. It intrudes late Cretaceous granodiorite and extrusive tuffs of the Chisulryoung Volcanic Formation and displays a steeply inclined welding foliation, concordant with the intrusive contacts, and a subvertical stretching lineation. These fabrics are interpreted as resulting from laminar shearing in a boundary layer during deposition of the tuff by agglutination along the walls of a vent which served as a feeder for extrusive ignimbrites.

  1. Multiphase flow above explosion sites in debris-filled volcanic vents: Insights from analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Pierre-Simon; White, James D. L.; Zimanowski, Bernd; Büttner, Ralf

    2008-11-01

    Discrete explosive bursts are known from many volcanic eruptions. In maar-diatreme eruptions, they have occurred in debris-filled volcanic vents when magma interacted with groundwater, implying that material mobilized by such explosions passed through the overlying and enclosing debris to reach the surface. Although other studies have addressed the form and characteristics of craters formed by discrete explosions in unconsolidated material, no details are available regarding the structure of the disturbed debris between the explosion site and the surface. Field studies of diatreme deposits reveal cross-cutting, steep-sided zones of non-bedded volcaniclastic material that have been inferred to result from sedimentation of material transported by "debris jets" driven by explosions. In order to determine the general processes and deposit geometry resulting from discrete, explosive injections of entrained particles through a particulate host, we ran a series of analogue experiments. Specific volumes of compressed (0.5-2.5 MPa) air were released in bursts that drove gas-particle dispersions through a granular host. The air expanded into and entrained coloured particles in a small crucible before moving upward into the host (white particles). Each burst drove into the host an expanding cavity containing air and coloured particles. Total duration of each run, recorded with high-speed video, was approximately 0.5-1 s. The coloured beads sedimented into the transient cavity. This same behaviour was observed even in runs where there was no breaching of the surface, and no coloured beads ejected. A steep-sided body of coloured beads was left that is similar to the cross-cutting pipes observed in deposits filling real volcanic vents, in which cavity collapse can result not only from gas escape through a granular host as in the experiments, but also through condensation of water vapour. A key conclusion from these experiments is that the geometry of cross-cutting volcaniclastic

  2. Volcanic and magmatic evolution of a small trachytic vent complex, north Burro Mesa, Big Bend National Park, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Lisa A.; Shanks, Pat

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic rocks exposed on the northern end of Burro Mesa in Big Bend National Park portray the evolution of an Oligocene central volcanic vent complex that produced two generations of welded block and ash deposits associated with 1) initial dome collapse and 2) subsequent central spine collapse. Peripheral to the vent complex, isolated breccia deposit exposures overlie ignimbrites, tephras, and lavas. These blocks are a few meters to several hundred meters long and 30 m high and consist of monolithic angular and welded trachytic lava clasts in finer-grained matrix. Rheomorphic structures in the breccia deposit show ductile deformation and suggest it formed while above the glass transition temperature.

  3. Using VHF Lightning Observations to Monitor Explosive Volcanic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, S. A.; Thomas, R. J.; McNutt, S. R.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Edens, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    Lightning is an integral part of explosive volcanic eruptions and volcanic lightning measurements are a useful tool for volcano monitoring. VHF measurements of volcanic lightning can be made remotely, at distances of up to 100 km. A strategically placed network of 6 or more VHF ground stations could locate lightning in eruption columns from several regional volcanoes, and a minimum of two stations could be used to monitor a single volcano. Such a network would be particularly useful for detection or confirmation of explosive activity in situations where volcanoes are remotely located, and thus lack visual observations, or are not well instrumented with seismic networks. Furthermore, clouds are fully transparent to VHF signals, making lightning detection possible even when weather obscures visual observations. Recent VHF observations of volcanic lightning at Augustine Volcano (Alaska, USA, 2006), Redoubt Volcano (Alaska, USA, 2009) and Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland, 2010) have shown that two basic types of VHF signals are observed during volcanic eruptions, one of which is unique to volcanic activity. The unique signal, referred to as a 'continual RF' signal, was caused by very high rates of small 'vent discharges' occurring directly above the vent in the eruption column and was unlike any observations of lightning in meteorological thunderstorms. Vent discharges were observed to begin immediately following an explosive eruption. The second type of signal is from conventional lightning discharges, such as upward directed 'near-vent lightning' and isolated 'plume lightning.' Near-vent lightning was observed to begin 1-2 minutes following the onset of an explosive eruption while plume lightning began 4 or more minutes after the onset. At Redoubt the plume lightning occurred at such high rates that it rivaled lightning rates of supercell thunderstorms on the Great Plains of the United States. While both types of lightning signals can be used as indicators that explosive

  4. The Physical and Petrologic Evolution of a Multi-vent Volcanic Field Associated With Yellowstone-Newberry Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueseke, M. E.; Hart, W. K.

    2004-12-01

    The Santa Rosa-Calico volcanic field (SC) of northern Nevada is perhaps the most chemically and physically diverse of all volcanic fields associated with mid-Miocene northwestern USA volcanism. SC volcanism occurred from 16.5 to 14 Ma and was characterized by the eruption of a complete compositional spectrum from basalt through high-Si rhyolite. Locally derived tholeiitic lava flows and shallow intrusive bodies are chemically and isotopically identical to the Steens Basalt (87/86Sri=<0.7040), the Oregon Plateau-wide mid-Miocene flood basalt. Andesite-dacite lava flows are exposed as at least four geographically and chemically distinct packages representing products of multiple, discrete magmatic systems. The most voluminous of these is calc-alkaline and characterized by abundant granitoid and mafic xenoliths/xenocrysts and radiogenic Sr isotopic ratios. Subalkaline silicic lava flows, domes, and shallow intrusive bodies define three diffuse north-south trending zones. Textural, chemical, and isotopic variability within the silicic units is linked to their spatial and temporal distribution, again necessitating the existence of multiple magmatic systems. The youngest locally derived silicic units are ash flows exposed in the central portion of the SC that erupted in actively forming sedimentary basins at ˜15.4 Ma. Underlying the 400-1500m thick package of SC volcanic rocks are temporally ( ˜103 and ˜85 Ma), chemically, and isotopically (87/86Sr at 16 Ma= 0.7045 to 0.7058 and 0.7061 to >0.7070) heterogeneous granitoid plutons and a package of ˜20-23 Ma calc-alkaline, arc-related intermediate lava flows. The observed disequilibrium textures, xenoliths, and chemical/isotopic diversity suggests that upwelling Steens magma interacted with local crust, siliceous crustal melts, and the mafic plutonic roots of early Miocene arc volcanism in multiple magmatic systems characterized by heterogeneous open system processes. The formation of these systems is tectonically

  5. Carbon fluxes from hydrothermal vents off Milos, Aegean Volcanic Arc, and the influence of venting on the surrounding ecosystem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dando, Paul; Aliani, Stefano; Bianchi, Nike; Kennedy, Hilary; Linke, Peter; Morri, Carla

    2014-05-01

    The island of Milos, in the Aegean Sea, has extensive hydrothermal fields to the east and southeast of the island with additional venting areas near the entrance to and within the central caldera. A calculation of the total area of the vent fields, based on ship and aerial surveys, suggested that the hydrothermal fields occupy 70 km2, twice the area previously estimated. The vents ranged in water depth from the intertidal to 300 m. As a result of the low depths there was abundant free gas release: in places water boiled on the seabed. The stream of gas bubbles rising through the sandy seabed drove a shallow re-circulation of bottom seawater. The majority of the water released with the gas, with a mean pH of 5.5, was re-circulated bottom water that had become acidified in contact with CO2 gas and was often diluted by admixture with the vapour phase from the deeper fluids. The major component of the free gas, 80%, was CO2, with an estimated total flux of 1.5-7.5 x 1012 g a-1. The methane flux, by comparison, was of the order of 1010 g a.-1 Using methane as a tracer it was shown that the major gas export from the vents was below the thermocline towards the southwest, in agreement with the prevailing currents. Areas of hydrothermal brine seepage occurred between the gas vents and occasional brine pools were observed in seabed depressions. Under relatively calm conditions, many of the brine seeps were covered by thick minero-bacterial mats consisting of silica and sulphur and surrounded by mats of diatoms and cyanobacteria. The minerals were not deposited in the absence of bacteria. Storms disrupted the mats, leading to an export of material to the surrounding area. Stable isotope data from sediments and sediment trap material suggested that exported POM was processed by zooplankton. The combined effects of the geothermal heating of the seabed, the large gas flux, variation in the venting and the effect of the brine seeps had a dramatic effect on the surrounding

  6. The study of active submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents in the Southernmost Part of Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Tsai, C.; Lee, C.

    2004-12-01

    The study area is located in the Southernmost Part of Okinawa Trough (SPOT), which is a back-arc basin formed by extension of Eurasian plate. Previous research indicated two extensional stages in SPOT area. Many normal-fault structures were come into existence during both extensional processes. The SPOT is presently in an activity tectonic episode. Therefore, the area becomes a frequent earthquake and abundant magmatism. The purpose of this study is to discuss which relationship between tectonics, submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents in SPOT area. The investigations are continued from 1998 to 2004, we have found at least twelve active hydrothermal vents in study area. Compare the locations hydrothermal vents with fault systems, we find both of them have highly correlated. We can distinguish them into two shapes, pyramidal shape and non-pyramidal shape. According to plumes height, we are able to divide these vents into two groups near east longitude 122.5° . East of this longitude, the hydrothermal plumes are more powerful and west of it are the weaker. This is closely related to the present extensional axis (N80° E) of the southern part of the Okinawa Trough. This can be explained the reason of why the more powerful vents coming out of the east group. The east group is associated with the present back-arc spreading system. West of 122.5° , the spreading system are in a primary stage. The andesitic volcanic island, the Turtle Island, is a result of N60° E extensional tectonism with a lot of faults. Besides the pyramidal shape, this can be proved indirectly. The vents located in the west side were occurred from previous extensional faults and are weaker than the eastern. Therefore, we suggest that if last the extension keeps going on, the hydrothermal vents located at the west side of the longitude 122.5° will be intensified.

  7. Open-Vent Degassing of CO2 from Typical Andesitic Volcanoes in the Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robidoux, P.; Aiuppa, A.; Rotolo, S.; Giudice, G.; Moretti, R.; Conde, V.; Galle, B.; Tamburello, G.

    2014-12-01

    The collection of H2O-CO2-SO2 volcanic gas datasets at open-vent basaltic volcanoes has increased since the introduction of electrochemical/NDIR (Multi-GAS) instruments in the field. An open problem remains to understand the degassing regime of volcanoes of intermediate compositions, which is complicated by wide range of eruption styles. We propose here to initiate the study of the degassing regime of Telica and San Cristobal (Nicaragua), two constantly monitored volcanoes in the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA). We calculated the CO2 flux sustained by summit plume degassing at Telica and San Cristobal as the product of the CO2/SO2 ratio of Multi-GAS technique with parallel SO2 flux measurements, made by using scanning UV-DOAS instruments in 2013. At Telica, the CO2 flux was evaluated at 166±76 t/d and at San Cristobal we measured 520±260 t/d. Degassing activity at Telica volcano consists in surface gas discharges dominated by H2O (70-98 mol%; mean of 92 mol%), and by CO2 (1-23 mol%; mean of 6 mol%) and SO2 (0.5-7.4 mol%; mean of 2.9 mol%). San Cristobal gas is dominated by H2O (85-97 mol%; mean of 92 mol%), and by CO2 (2-12 mol%; mean of 6 mol%) and SO2 (3-5 mol%; mean of 3.8 mol%). These values are typical of volcanic arc regions and the volcanoes were in a stage of quiescent degassing without excess of CO2 output relatively to the other major gases. By interpreting our recent gas measurements in tandem with preliminary melt inclusion records of pre-eruptive dissolved volatile abundances, we hope to build a conceptual degassing model taking into account the active degassing regimes during past volcanic eruptions. Finally, we hope to refine the CO2 budget estimates along the CAVA.

  8. Structure of the Volcanic Vent Distribution of the Cascades Arc from a New Database of Holocene and Pleistocene Volcanism, with Focus on Pre-Caldera Monogenetic Volcanism at Mount Mazana, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, L.; Karlstrom, L.; Ramsey, D. W.; Wright, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of volcanoes in the Cascades Arc, USA,reflects modulation of time-varying mantle melt influx by crustal magmatic plumbing and tectonic forces. The relative contribution of spatio-temporal source variations versus crustal focusing in generating the observed distribution of vents is poorly constrained. To identify patterns in preserved eruptive products and validate models for crustal magma transport we have assembled the most complete database of Cascades volcanism to date. Our database contains >2900 volcanic vent locations from the Holocene and Pleistocene, and includes vent types, ages, and major element geochemistry of eruptive products from the Holocene and Pleistocene. Bulk geochemistry is obtained from USGS Professional Papers and the American Volcanic and Intrusive Rock Database (NAVDAT). We also include arc-wide heat flow data, modeled ambient noise crustal seismic tomography and crust thickness interpolated to each vent. We perform spectral clustering on vent locations to define volcanic centers for the Holocene and Pleistocene. Centers found through Spectral Clustering reproduce the major loci of volcanism in the Cascades, and show time-varying structure in the number, type and distribution eruptions. There is significant North-South variation in vent type and distribution that correlates with variations in heat flow, bulk silica content and average crustal shear velocity. Although precise eruption ages for the complete dataset are not yet available, Mount Mazama, OR, has a well-resolved time/composition/volume/location history of eruptions <400 ka that allow for further analysis. The spatial distribution of Mazamaeruptive units does not follow a Poisson distribution when well resolved in time, but rather clusters around an evolved center that exhibits progressively more evolved eruptive products in time. Monogenetic eruptions preceding the 7.8 ka Crater Lake eruption define a spatial and temporal pattern that is

  9. Morphology and Distribution of Volcanic Vents in the Orientale Basin from Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James; Pieters, C.; Staid, M.; Mustard, J.; Taylor, L.; McCord, T.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R.; Petro, N.; Clark, R.; Nettles, J.; Whitten, J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in the geological and thermal evolution of the Moon is the nature and history of mantle melting and its relationship to the formation and evolution of lunar multi-ringed basins. Mare volcanic deposits provide evidence for the nature, magnitude and composition of mantle melting as a function of space and time [1]. Many argue that mantle partial melts are derived from depths well below the influence of multiringed basin impact events [1], while others postulate that the formation of these basins can cause mantle perturbations that are more directly linked to the generation ascent and eruption of mare basalts [2,3]. In any case, longer-term basin evolution will considerably influence the state and orientation of stress in the lithosphere, and the location of mare volcanic vents in basins as a function of time [4]. Thus, the location, nature and ages of volcanic vents and deposits in relation to multi-ringed impact basins provides evidence for the role that these basins played in the generation of volcanism or in the influence of the basins on surface volcanic eruption and deposit concentration. Unfortunately, most lunar multi-ringed impact basins have been eroded by impacts or filled with lunar mare deposits [5-8], with estimates of the thickness of mare fill extending up to more than six km in the central part of some basins [9-11]. The interior of most basins (e.g., Crisium, Serenitatis, Imbrium, Humorum) are almost completely covered and obscured. Although much is known about the lava filling of multi-ringed basins, and particularly the most recent deposits [5-8], little is known about initial stages of mare volcanism and its relationship to the impact event. One multi-ringed basin, Orientale, offers substantial clues to the relationships of basin interiors and mare basalt volcanism.

  10. Tectonic/volcanic segmentation and controls on hydrothermal venting along Earth's fastest seafloor spreading system, EPR 27°-32°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, Richard; Baker, Edward; Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne; Massoth, Gary; Kleinrock, Martin; Martinez, Fernando; Naar, David; Pardee, Debra; Lupton, John; Feely, Richard; Gharib, Jim; Resing, Joe; Rodrigo, Cristian; Sansone, Francis; Walker, Sharon

    2004-12-01

    We have collected 12 kHz SeaBeam bathymetry and 120 kHz DSL-120 side-scan sonar and bathymetry data to determine the tectonic and volcanic segmentation along the fastest spreading (˜150 km/Myr) part of the global mid-ocean ridge system, the southern East Pacific Rise between the Easter and Juan Fernandez microplates. This area is presently reorganizing by large-scale dueling rift propagation and possible protomicroplate tectonics. Fracture patterns observed in the side-scan data define structural segmentation scales along these ridge segments. These sometimes, but not always, correlate with linear volcanic systems defining segmentation in the SeaBeam data. Some of the subsegments behave cohesively, with in-phase tectonic activity, while fundamental discontinuities occur between other subsegments. We also collected hydrothermal plume data using sensors mounted on the DSL-120 instrument package, as well as CTDO tow-yos, to determine detailed structural and volcanic controls on the hydrothermal vent pattern observed along 600 km of the Pacific-Nazca axis. Here we report the first rigorous correlation between coregistered hydrothermal plume and high-resolution marine geophysical data on similar scales and over multisegment distances. Major plume concentrations were usually found where axial inflation was relatively high and fracture density was relatively low. These correlations suggest that hydrothermal venting is most active where the apparent magmatic budget is greatest, resulting in recent eruptions that have paved over the neovolcanic zone. Areas of voluminous acoustically dark young lava flows produced from recent fissure eruptions correlate with many of the major hydrothermal vent areas. Increased crustal permeability, as gauged by increased fracture density, does not enhance hydrothermal venting in this area. Axial summit troughs and graben are rare, probably because of frequent volcanic resurfacing in this superfast spreading environment, and are not good

  11. Discovery of Nascent Vents and Recent Colonization Associated with(Re)activated Hydrothermal Vent Fields by the GALREX 2011 Expedition on the Galápagos Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shank, T. M.; Holden, J. F.; Herrera, S.; Munro, C.; Muric, T.; Lin, J.; Stuart, L.

    2011-12-01

    GALREX 2011 was a NOAA OER telepresence cruise that explored the diverse habitats and geologic settings of the deep Galápagos region. The expedition made12 Little Hercules ROV dives in July 2011.Abundant corals and a strong depth zonation of species (including deepwater coral communities) were found near 500 m depth on Paramount Seamount, likely influenced by past low sea level states, wave-cut terrace processes, and the historical presence of shallow reef structures. At fresh lava flows with associated (flocculent) hydrothermal venting near 88° W, now known as Uka Pacha and Pegasus Vent Fields, rocks were coated with white microbial mat and lacked sessile fauna, with few mobile fauna (e.g., bythograeid crabs, alvinocarid shrimp, polynoid worms, zoarcid fish, and dirivultid copepods). This suggests a recent creation of hydrothermal habitats through volcanic eruptions and/or diking events, which may have taken place over a 15 km span separating the two vent fields. The Rosebud vent field at 86°W was not observed and may have been covered with lava since last visited in 2005. A hydrothermal vent field near 86°W was discovered that is one of the largest vent fields known on the Rift (120m by 40m). Low-temperature vent habitats were colonized by low numbers of tubeworms including Riftia, Oasisia, and a potential Tevnia species (the latter not previously observed on the Galapagos Rift). Patches of tubeworms were observed with individuals less than 2cm in length, and the relatively few large Riftia had tube lengths near 70cm long. Large numbers of small (< 3cm long) bathymodiolin mussels lined cracks and crevices throughout the active part of the field. Live clams, at least four species of gastropod limpets, three species of polynoid polychaetes, juvenile and adult alvinocarid shrimp, actinostolid anemones, and white microbial communities were observed on the underside and vertical surfaces of basalt rock surfaces. There were at least 13 species of vent-endemic fauna

  12. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 2--morphological and mineralogical features.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic emissions were studied at Mount Etna (Italy) by using moss-bags technique. Mosses were exposed around the volcano at different distances from the active vents to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions in the atmosphere. Morphology and mineralogy of volcanic particulate intercepted by mosses were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Particles emitted during passive degassing activity from the two active vents, Bocca Nuova and North East Crater (BNC and NEC), were identified as silicates, sulfates and halide compounds. In addition to volcanic particles, we found evidences also of geogenic, anthropogenic and marine spray input. The study has shown the robustness of this active biomonitoring technique to collect particles, very useful in active volcanic areas characterized by continuous degassing and often not easily accessible to apply conventional sampling techniques.

  13. Active Volcanism on Io as Seen by Galileo SSI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Geissler, P.; Simonelli, D.P.; Carr, M.H.; Johnson, T.V.; Klaasen, K.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Senske, D.A.; Belton, M.J.S.; Schubert, G.

    1998-01-01

    Active volcanism on Io has been monitored during the nominal Galileo satellite tour from mid 1996 through late 1997. The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment was able to observe many manifestations of this active volcanism, including (1) changes in the color and albedo of the surface, (2) active airborne plumes, and (3) glowing vents seen in eclipse. About 30 large-scale (tens of kilometers) surface changes are obvious from comparison of the SSI images to those acquired by Voyager in 1979. These include new pyroclastic deposits of several colors, bright and dark flows, and caldera-floor materials. There have also been significant surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission itself, such as a new 400-km-diameter dark pyroclastic deposit around Pillan Patera. While these surface changes are impressive, the number of large-scale changes observed in the four months between the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys in 1979 suggested that over 17 years the cumulative changes would have been much more impressive. There are two reasons why this was not actually the case. First, it appears that the most widespread plume deposits are ephemeral and seem to disappear within a few years. Second, it appears that a large fraction of the volcanic activity is confined to repeated resurfacing of dark calderas and flow fields that cover only a few percent of Io's surface. The plume monitoring has revealed 10 active plumes, comparable to the 9 plumes observed by Voyager. One of these plumes was visible only in the first orbit and three became active in the later orbits. Only the Prometheus plume has been consistently active and easy to detect. Observations of the Pele plume have been particularly intriguing since it was detected only once by SSI, despite repeated attempts, but has been detected several times by the Hubble Space Telescope at 255 nm. Pele's plume is much taller (460 km) than during Voyager 1 (300 km) and much fainter at visible wavelengths. Prometheus-type plumes (50

  14. The Extremes of Volcanic Activity: Earth and Jupiter's Moon Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowes, L. L.; Lopes, R.

    2004-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the solar system's most volcanically active body, and the only place that magmatic volcanic eruptions have been observed beyond Earth. One of the first images of Io obtained by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1979 shows a plume above one of its volcanoes. The NASA Voyager and Galileo spacecraft imaged many explosive eruptions of plumes and deposits - which travel hundreds of kilometers (farther than on the Earth or the Moon). Very hot lavas that are erupting from volcanic vents on Io may be similar to lavas that erupted on Earth billions of years ago. Understanding the physical processes driving volcanic eruptions is important for the understanding of terrestrial volcanoes, not only because of their potential hazards, but also as geologic resources, biologic environments, and for their role in shaping the surface of Earth and other planets. Volcanic eruptions are perhaps the most dramatic events on Earth, and are of intrinsic interest to students, youth, and adults. Topics involving volcanoes are a part of the national science education benchmarks for understanding the Earth's composition and structure for grades 6-8 (the process of creating landforms) and grades 9-12 (the effects of movement of crustal plates). Natural events on Earth coupled with exciting discoveries in space can serve to heighten the awareness of these phenomena and provide learning opportunities for real world applications of science. Educational applications for youth to compare volcanic activity on Io and Earth have been done through NASA-sponsored field trip workshops to places such as Yellowstone National Park (allowing educators to experience environments similar to those on other worlds), targeted classroom and hands-on activities, special interest books, and other resources. A sampling of such activities will be presented, and discussion invited on other related developmentally appropriate resources and activities.

  15. Microgravity change as a precursor to volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, Hazel

    1994-07-01

    In recent decades, systematic microgravity studies over some 20 active volcanoes in Central America, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Papua New Guinea and the USA have provided valuable data on sub-surface mass redistribution associated with volcanic activity. Concurrent data on ground deformation are essential to the unambiguous interpretation of gravity changes. In some instances, gravity and elevation vary along the free-air or Bouguer gradients, implying that there has been no sub-surface mass or density change, respectively. Where there are residual gravity changes after correction for elevation changes, magma movements in sub-surface chambers, feeder systems, vents and fissures (dykes) or water table variations are proposed. Although detailed interpretations depend on local circumstances and the calculations depend on source geometry, in general, the smallest residual gravity changes are associated with eruptions from volatile-poor basaltic vents and at extensional rift zones, whereas the highest residual values occur at explosive, subduction-related stratocones built from volatile-rich andesitic magma. The most intriguing, yet difficult, data to interpret derive from large-volume, infrequently erupting volcanic systems where caldera unrest is now becoming well documented and the ultimate hazards are most severe. Mass increases during inflation followed by limited mass loss during subsequent deflation typify these structures.

  16. Intra-vent peperites related to the phreatomagmatic 71 Gulch Volcano, western Snake River Plain volcanic field, Idaho (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Károly; White, Craig M.

    2009-05-01

    The western Snake River Plain volcanic field in SW Idaho contains up to 400 basaltic vents and centers that produced lava shields, pahoehoe lava fields, scoria cones, and a great variety of phreatomagmatic volcanoes between late Miocene and middle Pleistocene time. Tephra deposits produced by phreatomagmatic eruptions are particularly well exposed in the walls of the Snake River canyon, where thick accumulations of pyroclastic rocks indicate widespread phreatomagmatic eruptive events throughout most of the volcanic history of the region. Previously, many of the phreatomagmatic deposits were considered to be the products of subaqueous eruptions that took place on the floor of one or more large freshwater intra-continental lakes. Recent field based observations confirm the presence of widespread phreatomagmatic pyroclastic rocks; however, some that had been interpreted as being subaqueous exhibit textural features that are more consistent with subaerial depositional environments. Intrusive and extrusive magmatic bodies with features associated with peperite formation have also been identified. Most of these peperites can be attributed to magma-sediment mixing in intra-crater/conduit or vent settings, and therefore they can only be used as widespread paleoenvironmental indicators with limitations to demonstrate magma and surface water (e.g. lake) non-explosive interaction. One of the studied sites ("71 Gulch Volcano") was previously used to indicate the presence of a shallow lake. At this site there is clear field evidence that peperitic feeder dykes contacted muddy, sandy siliciclastic sediments forming globular peperite. The peperitic feeder dykes transition to pillowed, ponded lava up section. The ponded lavas are partially surrounded by a ~ 5-m-thick unit composed of gently dipping, dune bedded, volcanic glass shard-rich, unsorted, tuff and lapilli tuff containing abundant impact sags caused by volcanic lithics. We suggest that the 3D architecture of the erosional

  17. Mafic monogenetic vents at the Descabezado Grande volcanic field (35.5°S-70.8°W): the northernmost evidence of regional primitive volcanism in the Southern Volcanic Zone of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Pablo A.; Rabbia, Osvaldo M.; Hernández, Laura B.; Ruprecht, Philipp

    2016-06-01

    In the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), the broad distribution of mafic compositions along the recent volcanic arc occurs mainly south of 37°S, above a comparatively thin continental crust (≤~35 km) and mostly associated with the dextral strike-slip regime of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ). North of 36°S, mafic compositions are scarce. This would be in part related to the effect resulting from protracted periods of trapping of less evolved ascending magmas beneath a thick Meso-Cenozoic volcano-sedimentary cover that lead to more evolved compositions in volcanic rocks erupted at the surface. Here, we present whole-rock and olivine mineral chemistry data for mafic rocks from four monogenetic vents developed above a SVZ segment of thick crust (~45 km) in the Descabezado Grande volcanic field (~35.5°S). Whole-rock chemistry (MgO > 8 wt%) and compositional variations in olivine (92 ≥ Fo ≥ 88 and Ni up to ~3650 ppm) indicate that some of the basaltic products erupted through these vents (e.g., Los Hornitos monogenetic cones) represent primitive arc magmas reaching high crustal levels. The combined use of satellite images, regional data analysis and field observations allow to recognize at least 38 mafic monogenetic volcanoes dispersed over an area of about 5000 km2 between 35.5° and 36.5°S. A link between ancient structures inherited from pre-Andean tectonics and the emplacement and distribution of this mafic volcanism is suggested as a first-order structural control that may explain the widespread occurrence of mafic volcanism in this Andean arc segment with thick crust.

  18. Hydrothermal Activity and Volcanism on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. M.; Scientific Party, M.

    2005-12-01

    In April 2005 four recently discovered different hydrothermal fields on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) south of the Equator were studied and sampled using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) during cruise METEOR 64/1. Three of these hydrothermally active fields (called Turtle Pits, Red Lion, and Wideawake) occur at about 3000 m water depth in the centre of a MAR segment at 4° 48'S which appears to be volcanically very active. The youngest lava flow partly covers the low-temperature, diffuse flow Wideawake mussel field and is thus probably only a few years old. The high-temperature Turtle Pits hydrothermal field with four active vent structures lies some 300 m west of the diffuse vent field and is characterized by boiling fluids with temperatures close to 400° C. The mineral assemblage recovered from inactive hydrothermal mounds includes massive magnetite+hematite+sulfate and differs from that of the presently active vents and indicates more oxidizing conditions during the earlier activity. The vent fluids at Turtle Pits contain relatively high contents of hydrogen which may have formed during iron oxidation processes when basaltic magmas crystallized. The high fluid temperatures, the change to more reducing conditions, and the relatively high hydrogen contents in the fluids are most likely due to the ascent of magmas from the mantle that fed the very recent eruption. The high-temperature Red Lion hydrothermal field lies some 2 km north of the Turtle Pits field and consists of at least four active black smokers surrounded by several inactive sulfide mounds. The composition of the Red Lion fluids differs significantly from the Turtle Pits fluids, possibly owing largely to a difference in the temperature of the two systems. The fourth hydrothermally active field on the southern MAR, the Liliput field, was discovered near 9° 33'S in a water depth of 1500 m and consists of several low-temperature vents. A shallow hydrothermal plume in the water column

  19. Discovery of a black smoker vent field and vent fauna at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Rolf B; Rapp, Hans Tore; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Lilley, Marvin D; Barriga, Fernando J A S; Baumberger, Tamara; Flesland, Kristin; Fonseca, Rita; Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Jorgensen, Steffen L

    2010-11-23

    The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) represents one of the most slow-spreading ridge systems on Earth. Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting, as well as the provenance of vent fauna at this northern and insular termination of the global ridge system, have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the first discovery of a black smoker vent field at the AMOR. The field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) and is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting and long-lived hydrothermal systems exist at ultraslow-spreading ridges, despite their strongly reduced volcanic activity. The vent field hosts a distinct vent fauna that differs from the fauna to the south along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The novel vent fauna seems to have developed by local specialization and by migration of fauna from cold seeps and the Pacific.

  20. Discovery of a black smoker vent field and vent fauna at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Rolf B.; Rapp, Hans Tore; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Barriga, Fernando J. A. S.; Baumberger, Tamara; Flesland, Kristin; Fonseca, Rita; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Jorgensen, Steffen L.

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) represents one of the most slow-spreading ridge systems on Earth. Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting, as well as the provenance of vent fauna at this northern and insular termination of the global ridge system, have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the first discovery of a black smoker vent field at the AMOR. The field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) and is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting and long-lived hydrothermal systems exist at ultraslow-spreading ridges, despite their strongly reduced volcanic activity. The vent field hosts a distinct vent fauna that differs from the fauna to the south along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The novel vent fauna seems to have developed by local specialization and by migration of fauna from cold seeps and the Pacific. PMID:21119639

  1. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions on the deep sea floor have traditionally been assumed to be non-explosive as the high-pressure environment should greatly inhibit steam-driven explosions. Nevertheless, occasional evidence both from (generally slow-) spreading axes and intraplate seamounts has hinted at explosive activity at large water depths. Here we present evidence from a submarine field of volcanic cones and pit craters called Charles Darwin Volcanic Field located at about 3600 m depth on the lower southwestern slope of the Cape Verdean Island of Santo Antão. We examined two of these submarine volcanic edifices (Tambor and Kolá), each featuring a pit crater of 1 km diameter, using photogrammetric reconstructions derived from ROV-based imaging followed by 3D quantification using a novel remote sensing workflow, aided by sampling. The measured and calculated parameters of physical volcanology derived from the 3D model allow us, for the first time, to make quantitative statements about volcanic processes on the deep seafloor similar to those generated from land-based field observations. Tambor cone, which is 2500 m wide and 250 m high, consists of dense, probably monogenetic medium to coarse-grained volcaniclastic and pyroclastic rocks that are highly fragmented, probably as a result of thermal and viscous granulation upon contact with seawater during several consecutive cycles of activity. Tangential joints in the outcrops indicate subsidence of the crater floor after primary emplacement. Kolá crater, which is 1000 m wide and 160 m deep, appears to have been excavated in the surrounding seafloor and shows stepwise sagging features interpreted as ring fractures on the inner flanks. Lithologically, it is made up of a complicated succession of highly fragmented deposits, including spheroidal juvenile lapilli, likely formed by spray granulation. It resembles a maar-type deposit found on land. The eruption apparently entrained blocks of MORB-type gabbroic country rocks with

  2. Volcanic eruptions and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The historical record of large volcanic eruptions from 1500 to 1980 is subjected to detailed time series analysis. In two weak but probably statistically significant periodicities of about 11 and 80 yr, the frequency of volcanic eruptions increases (decreases) slightly around the times of solar minimum (maximum). Time series analysis of the volcanogenic acidities in a deep ice core from Greenland reveals several very long periods ranging from about 80 to about 350 yr which are similar to the very slow solar cycles previously detected in auroral and C-14 records. Solar flares may cause changes in atmospheric circulation patterns that abruptly alter the earth's spin. The resulting jolt probably triggers small earthquakes which affect volcanism.

  3. Active Volcanic Eruptions on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Six views of the volcanic plume named Prometheus, as seen against Io's disk and near the bright limb (edge) of the satellite by the SSI camera on the Galileo spacecraft during its second (G2) orbit of Jupiter. North is to the top of each frame. To the south-southeast of Prometheus is another bright spot that appears to be an active plume erupting from a feature named Culann Patera. Prometheus was active 17 years ago during both Voyager flybys, but no activity was detected by Voyager at Culann. Both of these plumes were seen to glow in the dark in an eclipse image acquired by the imaging camera during Galileo's first (G1) orbit, and hot spots at these locations were detected by Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer.

    The plumes are thought to be driven by heating sulfur dioxide in Io's subsurface into an expanding fluid or 'geyser'. The long-lived nature of these eruptions requires that a substantial supply of sulfur dioxide must be available in Io's subsurface, similar to groundwater. Sulfur dioxide gas condenses into small particles of 'snow' in the expanding plume, and the small particles scatter light and appear bright at short wavelengths. The images shown here were acquired through the shortest-wavelength filter (violet) of the Galileo camera. Prometheus is about 300 km wide and 75 km high and Culann is about 150 km wide and less than 50 km high. The images were acquired on September 4, 1996 at a range of 2,000,000 km (20 km/pixel resolution). Prometheus is named after the Greek fire god and Culann is named after the Celtic smith god.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the

  4. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans.

  5. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  6. Rapid response of a hydrologic system to volcanic activity: Masaya volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, S.C.P.; Connor, C.B.; Sanford, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrologic systems change in response to volcanic activity, and in turn may be sensitive indicators of volcanic activity. Here we investigate the coupled nature of magmatic and hydrologic systems using continuous multichannel time series of soil temperature collected on the flanks of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, one of the most active volcanoes in Central America. The soil temperatures were measured in a low-temperature fumarole field located 3.5 km down the flanks of the volcano. Analysis of these time series reveals that they respond extremely rapidly, on a time scale of minutes, to changes in volcanic activity also manifested at the summit vent. These rapid temperature changes are caused by increased flow of water vapor through flank fumaroles during volcanism. The soil temperature response, ~5 °C, is repetitive and complex, with as many as 13 pulses during a single volcanic episode. Analysis of the frequency spectrum of these temperature time series shows that these anomalies are characterized by broad frequency content during volcanic activity. They are thus easily distinguished from seasonal trends, diurnal variations, or individual rainfall events, which triggered rapid transient increases in temperature during 5% of events. We suggest that the mechanism responsible for the distinctive temperature signals is rapid change in pore pressure in response to magmatism, a response that can be enhanced by meteoric water infiltration. Monitoring of distal fumaroles can therefore provide insight into coupled volcanic-hydrologic-meteorologic systems, and has potential as an inexpensive monitoring tool.

  7. Three thousand years of flank and central vent eruptions of the San Salvador volcanic complex (El Salvador) and their effects on El Cambio archeological site: a review based on tephrostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrés, D.; Delgado Granados, H.; Hernández, W.; Pullinger, C.; Chávez, H.; Castillo Taracena, C. R.; Cañas-Dinarte, C.

    2011-09-01

    The volcanic events of the last 3,000 years at San Salvador volcanic complex are reviewed using detailed stratigraphic records exposed in new excavations between 2005 and 2007, at El Cambio archeological site (Zapotitán Valley, El Salvador), and in other outcrops on the northern and northwestern sectors of the complex. The sequences that overlie Tierra Blanca Joven (cal. 429 ± 107 ad), from the Ilopango caldera, comprise the Loma Caldera (cal. 590 ± 90 ad) and El Playón (1658-1671) deposits and the San Andrés Tuff (cal. 1031 ± 29 ad), related to El Boquerón Volcano. The surge deposits within the El Playón, San Andrés Tuff and overlying Talpetate II sequences indicate the significance of phreatomagmatic phases in both central vent and flank eruptions during the last 1,600 years. Newly identified volcanic deposits underlying Tierra Blanca Joven at El Cambio extend the stratigraphic record of the area to 3,000 years bp. Paleosols interstratified with those deposits contain cultural artifacts which could be associated with the Middle Preclassic period (900-400 bc). If correct, human occupation of the site during the Preclassic period was more intense than previously known and volcanic eruptions must have affected prehistoric settlements. The archeological findings provide information on how prehistoric populations dealt with volcanic hazards, thousands of years ago in the eastern Zapotitán Valley, where several housing projects are currently being developed. The new stratigraphic and volcanological data can be used as a basis for local and regional hazard assessment related to future secondary vent activity in the San Salvador Volcanic Complex.

  8. Near-vent measurements of volcanic gases and aerosols with multiple small unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, D. C.; Diaz, J. A.; Bland, G.; Fladeland, M. M.; Schumann, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic phenomena occurring on the earth's surface and in the atmosphere are almost always distributed over a volume or area that changes progressively over time (e.g., explosive eruption plumes, lava flows, floods, toxic materials releases, wildfires). 'Snapshot' views of such phenomena traditionally capture a small part of the area or volume of the event in successive time slices. Such time series are fundamentally limited in providing accurate boundary conditions for models of such processes, or even to create descriptions or observations at spatial scales relevant to the characteristic dimensions of the process. High spatial resolution (e.g., ~1-3m/pixel) imaging views of such spatially extended phenomena that capture the entire extent of the event are not usually possible with a single low altitude aircraft, for instance. Synoptic satellite and high altitude airborne views are often at spatial resolutions that an order of magnitude coarser. Airborne in situ sampling faces a similar problem in that point measurements are acquired along a flight line in a time-series. Source conditions changing at timescales shorter than an airborne sortie interval (typical for most dynamic phenomena) render such flight line observations incomplete. The ability to capture hi-spatial resolution, synchronous, full volume or area data over dynamically evolving (possibly hazardous) features (e.g., volcanic plumes, air pollution layers, oil slicks, wildfires) requires a distributed 2D or 3D mesh of observation platforms. Small (e.g., <25kg) unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are an emerging technology that can provide distributed formations or networks of observation platforms that can be dynamically reconfigured to encompass areas or volumes of interest for imaging or other kinds of in situ observations (e.g., SO2 or CO2 sampling of volcanic gas emissions). Such data are crucial for the calibration and validation of remotely sensed concentration retrievals (e.g., from multi

  9. Post-drilling hydrothermal vent and associated biological activities seen through artificial hydrothermal vents in the Iheya North field, Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, K.; Kawagucci, S.; Miyazaki, J.; Watsuji, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Yamamoto, H.; Nozaki, T.; Kashiwabara, T.; Shibuya, T.

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, IODP Expedition 331 was conducted in the Iheya North Field, the Okinawa Trough and drilled several sites in hydrothermally active subseafloor. In addition, during the IODP Expedition 331, four new hydrothermal vents were created. These post-drilling artificial hydrothermal vents provide excellent opportunities to investigate the physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the previously unexplored subseafloor hydrothermal fluid reservoirs, and to monitor and estimate how the anthropogenic drilling behaviors affect the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem. We were very much interested in the difference of hydrothermal fluid chemistry between the natural hydrothermal vents and the artificial hydrothermal vents. The IODP porewater chemistry of the cores pointed to the density-driven stratification of the phase-separated hydrothermal fluids and the natural vent fluids were likely derived only from the shallower vapor-enriched phases. However, the artificial hydrothermal vents had deeper fluid sources in the subseafloor hydrothermal fluid reservoirs composed of vapor-lost (Cl-enriched) phases. The fluids from the artificial hydrothermal vents were sampled by ROV at 5, 12 and 18 months after the IODP expedition. The artificial hydrothermal vent fluids were slightly enriched with Cl as compared to the natural hydrothermal vent fluids. Thus, the artificial hydrothermal vents successfully entrained the previously unexplored subseafloor hydrothermal fluids. The newly created hydrothermal vents also hosted the very quickly grown, enormous chimney structures, of which mineral compositions were highly variable among the vents. However, the quickly grown C0016B and C0016D vent chimneys were found to be typical Kuroko ore even though the chimney growth rates in the artificial vents were extremely faster than those in the natural vents. In addition, the IODP drilling operation not only created new hydrothermal vents by deep drilling but also induced the

  10. Characterization of volcanic activity using observations of infrasound, volcanic emissions, and thermal imagery at Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, T.; Fee, D.; Prata, F.

    2012-04-01

    Karymsky Volcano is one of the most active and dynamic volcanoes in Kamchatka, with activity ranging from vigorous degassing, frequent ash emissions, and apparent vent sealing, all punctuated by daily to weekly explosive magmatic eruptions. Recent studies have highlighted the strengths in using complementary infrasound measurements and remote volcanic emission measurements to characterize volcanic activity, with the potential to discriminate emission-type, approximate ash-cloud height, and estimate SO2 emission mass. Here we use coincident measurements of infrasound, SO2, ash, and thermal radiation collected over a ten day period at Karymsky Volcano in August 2011 to characterize the observed activity and elucidate vent processes. The ultimate goal of this project is to enable different types of volcanic activity to be identified using only infrasound data, which would significantly improve our ability to continuously monitor remote volcanoes. Four types of activity were observed. Type 1 activity is characterized by discrete ash emissions occurring every 1 - 5 minutes that either jet or roil out of the vent, by plumes from 500 - 1500 m (above vent) altitudes, and by impulsive infrasonic onsets. Type 2 activity is characterized by periodic pulses of gas emission, little or no ash, low altitude (100 - 200 m) plumes, and strong audible jetting or roaring. Type 3 activity is characterized by sustained emissions of ash and gas, with multiple pulses lasting from ~1 - 3 minutes, and by plumes from 300 - 1500 m. Type 4 activity is characterized by periods of relatively long duration (~30 minutes to >1 hour) quiescence, no visible plume and weak SO2 emissions at or near the detection limit, followed by an explosive, magmatic eruption, producing ash-rich plumes to >2000 m, and centimeter to meter (or greater) sized pyroclastic bombs that roll down the flanks of the edifice. Eruption onset is accompanied by high-amplitude infrasound and occasionally visible shock

  11. A quaternary monogenetic volcanic field in the Xalapa region, eastern Trans-Mexican volcanic belt: Geology, distribution and morphology of the volcanic vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, S. R.; Morales-Barrera, W.; Layer, P.; González-Mercado, E.

    2010-11-01

    The most abundant volcanic manifestations along the east-west trending Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) are the scoria cones. These have been grouped by other authors in extended monogenetic volcanic fields such as Michoacán-Guanajuato, Chichinautzin, Apan and Los Tuxtlas. Here we present geological and morphological data of a relatively unknown group of monogenetic volcanoes located on the east flank of the Cofre de Perote volcano (CP), around the city of Xalapa in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Within an area of about 2400 km 2, the "Xalapa Monogenetic Volcanic Field" (XMVF) contains over 50 late Quaternary volcanoes. Most of them are scoria cones, but small shield volcanoes and tuff rings also occur. The lava flows produced by these volcanoes are constrained by an abrupt topography and cover a great percentage of the surface on the eastern and northeastern flanks of CP, between 3000 and 500 m a.s.l. The representative rocks of the different volcanic centers include olivine basalt, basaltic andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase, pyroxene and minor olivine, and andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene. SiO 2 and Al 2O 3 contents of the rocks vary between 45 and 62 wt% and 15 to 18 wt%, respectively. Most of the basaltic rocks have MgO contents between 4.2 and 9 wt%, Ni and Cr concentrations between 23 and 180 and 10 to 380 ppm, respectively, with a typical calc-alkaline behavior. Trace elements suggest two types of magmas; the most abundant are characterized by an enrichment of LILE and LREE with negative anomalies of Nb and Ti, which denote a calc-alkaline affinity. Others are LILE depleted and show high concentrations of MgO, Cr, and Ni, which is typical of primary calc-alkaline magmas. The mean scoria cone morphological values are: cone height (Hco) = 90.8 m, cone diameter (Wco) = 686.38 m, crater diameter (Wcr) = 208.49 m and 0.12 km 3 for the cone volume. We dated twelve different scoria cones using the 40Ar/ 39Ar method; for the other

  12. Turning Off Entrainment: The Role of Particle Size Distributions and Vent GeometryIn The Collapse of Volcanic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessop, D.; Jellinek, M.; Roche, O.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic jets can undergo gravitational collapse to produce pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), or loft material several tens of kilometres and spread out as an ash cloud. The key ingredient that determines which of these two phenomena will occur is the turbulent entrainment of atmospheric air, which adds buoyancy to the jet. Classical models of eruption columns assume that the rate of entrainment is fixed and ~10% of the upflow rate of the jet. In particular, the efficiency of entrainment is assumed to be independent of the vent shape as well as the physical properties of the pyroclastic mixture. However, we show that the presence of particles of certain particle-size distributions (PSDs) in the jet can have a significant effect on the entrainment rate owing to their buoyancy and inertia. As a consequence, the conditions for collapse as previously identified must be revisited. In particular, there is a possibility for an eruption to produce both a buoyant column and a collapsing fountain. Using scaled analogue experiments, we test the likelyhood of collapse and the production of pyroclastic flows according to the source geometry and particle-size distributions.

  13. First hydroacoustic evidence of marine, active fluid vents in the Naples Bay continental shelf (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Salvatore; Genovese, Simona; Sacchi, Marco; Barra, Marco; Rumolo, Paola; Tamburrino, Stella; Mazzola, Salvatore; Basilone, Gualtiero; Placenti, Francesco; Aronica, Salvatore; Bonanno, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of a multidisciplinary research aimed at the detection and mapping of Active Fluid Vents (AFVs) at the seafloor of the Naples Bay, Italy. This segment of the Campania continental margin is characterised by severe Quaternary extension and intense volcanism at Ischia and Procida islands, the Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complexes. High resolution hydroacoustic profilers were used to identify and localize fluid emission from the seafloor. ROV direct observation showed that each emission centre is generally composed by the coalescence of several emitting points. CTD probes showed that there are no significant gradients in temperature profiles. The results of this study include the detection and mapping of 54 fluid emission points all located in the - 71/- 158 m depth range, and spatially distributed into four main clusters. Three of the described clusters are located along the margin of a complex, toe-shaped seafloor morphology southwest of the Somma-Vesuvius, representing the shallow expression of partly buried, coalesced depositional features (namely, two flank collapses and one pyroclastic flow) associated with the Late Pleistocene activity of the volcano. The fourth AFV cluster was detected at the morphological - high, located about 8 km south of Naples (Banco della Montagna), represented by a field of volcaniclastic diapirs composed of massive pumiceous deposits originated from the Campi Flegrei intruding rising through the latest Quaternary-Holocene marine deposits. Our study suggests that the occurrence of AFV in this area could be genetically linked to the interaction between volcanic related seafloor morphologies and the main, NE striking faults present in the area, i.e. the Magnaghi-Sebeto line and the Vesuvian fault.

  14. Linking gene expression to productivity to unravel long- and short-term responses of seagrasses exposed to CO2 in volcanic vents

    PubMed Central

    Olivé, Irene; Silva, João; Lauritano, Chiara; Costa, Monya M.; Ruocco, Miriam; Procaccini, Gabriele; Santos, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Ocean acidification is a major threat for marine life but seagrasses are expected to benefit from high CO2. In situ (long-term) and transplanted (short-term) plant incubations of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa were performed near and away the influence of volcanic CO2 vents at Vulcano Island to test the hypothesis of beneficial effects of CO2 on plant productivity. We relate, for the first time, the expression of photosynthetic, antioxidant and metal detoxification-related genes to net plant productivity (NPP). Results revealed a consistent pattern between gene expression and productivity indicating water origin as the main source of variability. However, the hypothesised beneficial effect of high CO2 around vents was not supported. We observed a consistent long- and short-term pattern of gene down-regulation and 2.5-fold NPP decrease in plants incubated in water from the vents and a generalized up-regulation and NPP increase in plants from the vent site incubated with water from the Reference site. Contrastingly, NPP of specimens experimentally exposed to a CO2 range significantly correlated with CO2 availability. The down-regulation of metal-related genes in C. nodosa leaves exposed to water from the venting site suggests that other factors than heavy metals, may be at play at Vulcano confounding the CO2 effects. PMID:28205566

  15. Linking gene expression to productivity to unravel long- and short-term responses of seagrasses exposed to CO2 in volcanic vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivé, Irene; Silva, João; Lauritano, Chiara; Costa, Monya M.; Ruocco, Miriam; Procaccini, Gabriele; Santos, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Ocean acidification is a major threat for marine life but seagrasses are expected to benefit from high CO2. In situ (long-term) and transplanted (short-term) plant incubations of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa were performed near and away the influence of volcanic CO2 vents at Vulcano Island to test the hypothesis of beneficial effects of CO2 on plant productivity. We relate, for the first time, the expression of photosynthetic, antioxidant and metal detoxification-related genes to net plant productivity (NPP). Results revealed a consistent pattern between gene expression and productivity indicating water origin as the main source of variability. However, the hypothesised beneficial effect of high CO2 around vents was not supported. We observed a consistent long- and short-term pattern of gene down-regulation and 2.5-fold NPP decrease in plants incubated in water from the vents and a generalized up-regulation and NPP increase in plants from the vent site incubated with water from the Reference site. Contrastingly, NPP of specimens experimentally exposed to a CO2 range significantly correlated with CO2 availability. The down-regulation of metal-related genes in C. nodosa leaves exposed to water from the venting site suggests that other factors than heavy metals, may be at play at Vulcano confounding the CO2 effects.

  16. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  17. Impact of Volcanic Activity on AMC Channel Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    IMPACT OF VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Matthew D... VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences...AFIT-ENS-GRP-14-J-11 IMPACT OF VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS Matthew D. Meshanko, BS, MA Major, USAF

  18. Evidence of sub-vent biosphere: enzymatic activities in 308 °C deep-sea hydrothermal systems at Suiyo seamount, Izu Bonin Arc, Western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Edazawa, Yae; Kobayashi, Kensei; Urabe, Tetsuro; Marumo, Katsumi

    2005-01-01

    A high-temperature deep-sea hydrothermal system related to dacitic arc-volcanism was drilled using a tethered, submarine rock-drill system as a part of the Archaean Park Project. The benthic multi-coring system (BMS) employed allowed for direct sampling of microorganisms, rocks and fluids beneath hydrothermal vents. The samples examined in this study were from sites APSK 05 and APSK 07 on the Suiyo Seamount of the Izu-Bonin Arc in the Pacific Ocean. Based on the vertical distribution of samples derived from this vigorous sub-vent environment, a model of deep-sea subterranean chemistry and biology was determined detailing optimal microbial activities. Deep-sea hydrothermal sub-vent core samples of dacitic arc-volcanism obtained at the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Western Pacific Ocean were analyzed for acid and alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activities. Useful biomarkers of acid phosphatase (ACP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzymatic activities were positively correlated against each other and was greatest at the partial middle core sequences; ACP and ALP activities determined were as high as 5.10 and 6.80 nmol/min/g rock, respectively. Biochemical indicators of ACP and ALP were consistent with the origin of biogenic amino acids occupied in the sub-vent region and microbial cell number in the fluid. The significant enzymatic activities demonstrated in this study provides crucial evidence that sub-vent regions represent part of the previously unknown extreme-environment biosphere, extending the known subterranean habitable spaces of, for example, extremophilic microbes. This boring trial was first example of discharging high temperature hydrothermal activities at the frontal arc volcanoes.

  19. Monogenetic volcanic hazards and assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, C.; Connor, L. J.; Richardson, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many of the Earth's major cities are build on the products of monogenetic volcanic eruptions and within geologically active basaltic volcanic fields. These cities include Mexico City (Mexico), Auckland (New Zealand), Melbourne (Australia), and Portland (USA) to name a few. Volcanic hazards in these areas are complex, and involve the potential formation of new volcanic vents and associated hazards, such as lava flows, tephra fallout, and ballistic hazards. Hazard assessment is complicated by the low recurrence rate of volcanism in most volcanic fields. We have developed a two-stage process for probabilistic modeling monogenetic volcanic hazards. The first step is an estimation of the possible locations of future eruptive vents based on kernel density estimation and recurrence rate of volcanism using Monte Carlo simulation and accounting for uncertainties in age determinations. The second step is convolution of this spatial density / recurrence rate model with hazard codes for modeling lava inundation, tephra fallout, and ballistic impacts. A methodology is presented using this two-stage approach to estimate lava flow hazard in several monogenetic volcanic fields, including at a nuclear power plant site near the Shamiram Plateau, a Quaternary volcanic field in Armenia. The location of possible future vents is determined by estimating spatial density from a distribution of 18 mapped vents using a 2-D elliptical Gaussian kernel function. The SAMSE method, a modified asymptotic mean squared error approach, uses the distribution of known eruptive vents to optimally determine a smoothing bandwidth for the Gaussian kernel function. The result is a probability map of vent density. A large random sample (N=10000) of vent locations is drawn from this probability map. For each randomly sampled vent location, a lava flow inundation model is executed. Lava flow input parameters (volume and average thickness) are determined from distributions fit to field observations of the low

  20. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  1. Vent 7504 of the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), Arizona: Sample Geochemistry and Implications for Cone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needham, D. H.; Eppler, D. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Whitson, P. A.; Janoiko, B. A.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Vent 7504 is a complex structure in the SFVF that has 3 unit classes: a central cone with exposed dikes and cinder-covered rheomorphic facies; a SE/NW-trending ridge north of the cone with cinder-covered rheomorphic facies; and three discrete lava flows that emanate to the N from the ridge and to the SW and NW from the cone. Field observations suggest the ridge was the northern crest of an initial, larger cone. The NW portion of this cone was most likely disrupted during a catastrophic breach of lava that had accumulated within the cone; this third of three lava flows carried rafted packages of the rheomorphic cone facies to the NW, forming the linear N ridge. The final phase of pyroclastic activity was concentrated in the SW portion of the original cone, covering the top of the cone with cinders and forming the more traditional conic-shaped construct observed today. This study describes the geochemistry of 9 samples collected from the mapped units (2 from the cone, 1 from the N ridge, 1 from the N lava flow, 2 from the SW lava flow, and 3 from the NW lava flow) to further constrain the formation of Vent 7504. Geochemical analyses including back-scatter electron scanning electron microscopy and laboratory X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy were conducted on the 9 collected samples to measure bulk rock and olivine phenocryst compositions. Major element concentrations in the bulk rock and olivine compositions are strongly clustered in all samples, indicating they likely originated from a single magmatic source. Bulk rock SiO2 (~47.5 wt%) and alkali (Na2O + K2O, ~2.7 wt% + 0.71 wt%) concentrations are consistent with a basaltic classification for these samples. Trends in major elements relative to MgO are observed for the olivine phenocrysts: SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O, and TiO2 remain constant relative to MgO, but strong linear trends are observed in MnO, FeO, and NiO relative to MgO. These linear trends are expected given the potential for bivalent cation exchanges in the

  2. Ferrous iron- and ammonium-rich diffuse vents support habitat-specific communities in a shallow hydrothermal field off the Basiluzzo Islet (Aeolian Volcanic Archipelago).

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, G; Romeo, T; La Cono, V; La Spada, G; Smedile, F; Esposito, V; Sabatino, G; Di Bella, M; Canese, S; Scotti, G; Bo, M; Giuliano, L; Jones, D; Golyshin, P N; Yakimov, M M; Andaloro, F

    2017-04-06

    Ammonium- and Fe(II)-rich fluid flows, known from deep-sea hydrothermal systems, have been extensively studied in the last decades and are considered as sites with high microbial diversity and activity. Their shallow-submarine counterparts, despite their easier accessibility, have so far been under-investigated, and as a consequence, much less is known about microbial communities inhabiting these ecosystems. A field of shallow expulsion of hydrothermal fluids has been discovered at depths of 170-400 meters off the base of the Basiluzzo Islet (Aeolian Volcanic Archipelago, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea). This area consists predominantly of both actively diffusing and inactive 1-3 meters-high structures in the form of vertical pinnacles, steeples and mounds covered by a thick orange to brown crust deposits hosting rich benthic fauna. Integrated morphological, mineralogical, and geochemical analyses revealed that, above all, these crusts are formed by ferrihydrite-type Fe(3+) oxyhydroxides. Two cruises in 2013 allowed us to monitor and sampled this novel ecosystem, certainly interesting in terms of shallow-water iron-rich site. The main objective of this work was to characterize the composition of extant communities of iron microbial mats in relation to the environmental setting and the observed patterns of macrofaunal colonization. We demonstrated that iron-rich deposits contain complex and stratified microbial communities with a high proportion of prokaryotes akin to ammonium- and iron-oxidizing chemoautotrophs, belonging to Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospira, and Zetaproteobacteria. Colonizers of iron-rich mounds, while composed of the common macrobenthic grazers, predators, filter-feeders, and tube-dwellers with no representatives of vent endemic fauna, differed from the surrounding populations. Thus, it is very likely that reduced electron donors (Fe(2+) and NH4(+) ) are important energy sources in supporting primary production in microbial mats, which form a habitat

  3. Active Volcanism on Io: Global Distribution and Variations in Activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes-Gautier, R.; McEwen, A.S.; Smythe, W.B.; Geissler, P.E.; Kamp, L.; Davies, A.G.; Spencer, J.R.; Keszthelyi, L.; Carlson, R.; Leader, F.E.; Mehlman, R.; Soderblom, L.

    1999-01-01

    Io's volcanic activity has been monitored by instruments aboard the Galileo spacecraft since June 28, 1996. We present results from observations by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) for the first 10 orbits of Galileo, correlate them with results from the Solid State Imaging System (SSI) and from groundbased observations, and compare them to what was known about Io's volcanic activity from observations made during the two Voyager flybys in 1979. A total of 61 active volcanic centers have been identified from Voyager, groundbased, and Galileo observations. Of these, 41 are hot spots detected by NIMS and/or SSI. Another 25 locations were identified as possible active volcanic centers, mostly on the basis of observed surface changes. Hot spots are correlated with surface colors, particularly dark and red deposits, and generally anti-correlated with white, SO2-rich areas. Surface features corresponding to the hot spots, mostly calderas or flows, were identified from Galileo and Voyager images. Hot spot temperatures obtained from both NIMS and SSI are consistent with silicate volcanism, which appears to be widespread on Io. Two types of hot spot activity are present: persistent-type activity, lasting from months to years, and sporadic events, which may represent either short-lived activity or low-level activity that occasionally flares up. Sporadic events are not often detected, but may make an important contribution to Io's heat flow and resurfacing. The distribution of active volcanic centers on the surface does not show any clear correlation with latitude, longitude, Voyager-derived global topography, or heat flow patterns predicted by the asthenosphere and deep mantle tidal dissipation models. However, persistent hot spots and active plumes are concentrated toward lower latitudes, and this distribution favors the asthenosphere rather than the deep mantle tidal dissipation model. ?? 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Volcanic and Hydrothermal Activity of the North Su Volcano: New Insights from Repeated Bathymetric Surveys and ROV Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thal, J.; Bach, W.; Tivey, M.; Yoerger, D.

    2013-12-01

    Bathymetric data from cruises in 2002, 2006, and 2011 were combined and compared to determine the evolution of volcanic activity, seafloor structures, erosional features and to identify and document the distribution of hydrothermal vents on North Su volcano, SuSu Knolls, eastern Manus Basin (Papua New Guinea). Geologic mapping based on ROV observations from 2006 (WHOI Jason-2) and 2011 (MARUM Quest-4000) combined with repeated bathymetric surveys from 2002 and 2011 are used to identify morphologic features on the slopes of North Su and to track temporal changes. ROV MARUM Quest-4000 bathymetry was used to develop a 10 m grid of the top of North Su to precisely depict recent changes. In 2006, the south slope of North Su was steeply sloped and featured numerous white smoker vents discharging acid sulfate waters. These vents were covered by several tens of meters of sand- to gravel-sized volcanic material in 2011. The growth of this new cone changed the bathymetry of the south flank of North Su up to ~50 m and emplaced ~0.014 km3 of clastic volcanic material. This material is primarily comprised of fractured altered dacite and massive fresh dacite as well as crystals of opx, cpx, olivine and plagioclase. There is no evidence for pyroclastic fragmentation, so we hypothesize that the fragmentation is likely related to hydrothermal explosions. Hydrothermal activity varies over a short (~50 m) lateral distance from 'flashing' black smokers to acidic white smoker vents. Within 2 weeks of observation time in 2011, the white smoker vents varied markedly in activity suggesting a highly episodic hydrothermal system. Based on ROV video recordings, we identified steeply sloping (up to 30°) slopes exposing pillars and walls of hydrothermal cemented volcaniclastic material representing former fluid upflow zones. These features show that hydrothermal activity has increased slope stability as hydrothermal cementation has prevented slope collapse. Additionally, in some places

  5. An analysis of flaring and venting activity in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew R; Coderre, Adam R

    2011-02-01

    Alberta, Canada, is an important global producer of petroleum resources. In association with this production, large amounts of gas (1.14 billion m3 in 2008) are flared or vented. Although the amount of flaring and venting has been measurably reduced since 2002, data from 2005 reveal sharp increases in venting, which have important implications in terms of resource conservation and greenhouse gas emissions (which exceeded 8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2008). With use of extensive monthly production data for 18,203 active batteries spanning the years 2002-2008 obtained in close cooperation with the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board, a detailed analysis has been completed to examine activity patterns of flaring and venting and reasons behind these trends in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry. In any given year, approximately 6000 batteries reported flaring and/or venting, but the distribution of volumes flared and vented at individual sites was highly skewed, such that small numbers of sites handled large fractions of the total gas flaring and venting in the Province. Examination of month-to-month volume variability at individual sites, cast in terms of a nominal turndown ratio that would be required for a compressor to capture that gas and direct it into a pipeline, further revealed that volumes at a majority of sites were reasonably stable and there was no evidence that larger or more stable sites had been preferentially reduced, leaving potential barriers to future mitigation. Through linking of geospatial data with production data coupled with additional statistical analysis, the 31.2% increase in venting volumes since 2005 was revealed to be predominantly associated with increased production of heavier oils and bitumen in the Lloydminster region of the Province. Overall, the data suggest that quite significant reductions in flaring and venting could be realized by seeking mitigation solutions for only the largest batteries in

  6. Risk-Free Volcano Observations Using an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter: seismic observations near the active vent of Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.; Koyama, T.; Yasuda, A.; Watanabe, A.; Takeo, M.; Honda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kanda, W.; Iguchi, M.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2010-12-01

    Observations in the vicinity of summit area of active volcanoes are important not only for understanding physical processes in the volcanic conduit but also for eruption prediction and volcanic hazards mitigation. It is, however, challenging to install observation sensors near active vents because of the danger of sudden eruptions. We need safe and efficient ways of installing sensors near the summit of active volcanoes. We have been developing an volcano observation system based on an unmanned autonomous vehicle (UAV) for risk-free volcano observations. Our UAV is an unmanned autonomous helicopter manufactured by Yamaha-Motor Co., Ltd. The UAV is 3.6m long and weighs 84kg with maximum payload of 10kg. The UAV can aviate autonomously along a previously programmed path within a meter accuracy using real-time kinematics differential GPS equipment. The maximum flight time and distance from the operator are 90 minutes and 5km, respectively. We have developed various types of volcano observation techniques adequate for the UAV, such as aeromagnetic survey, taking infrared and visible images from onboard high-resolution cameras, volcanic ash sampling in the vicinity of active vents. Recently, we have developed an earthquake observation module (EOM), which is exclusively designed for the UAV installation in the vicinity of active volcanic vent. In order to meet the various requirements for UAV installation, the EOM is very compact, light-weight (5-6kg), and is solar-powered. It is equipped with GPS for timing, a communication device using cellular-phone network, and triaxial accelerometers. Our first application of the EOM installation using the UAV is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan, Sakurajima volcano. Since 2006, explosive eruptions have been continuing at the reopened Showa crater at the eastern flank near the summit of Sakurajima. Entering the area within 2 km from the active craters is prohibited, and thus there were no observation station in the vicinity

  7. A spaceborne inventory of volcanic activity in Antarctica and southern oceans, 2000-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Smellie, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Of the more than twenty historically active volcanoes in Antarctica and the sub-Antarctic region only two, to our knowledge, host any ground-based monitoring instruments. Moreover, because of their remoteness, most of the volcanoes are seldom visited, thus relegating the monitoring of volcanism in this region almost entirely to satellites. In this study, high temporal resolution satellite data from the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology's MODVOLC system using MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) are complemented with high spatial resolution data (ASTER, or Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, and similar sensors) to document volcanic activity throughout the region during the period 2000–10. Five volcanoes were observed in eruption (Mount Erebus, Mount Belinda, Mount Michael, Heard Island and McDonald Island), which were predominantly low-level and effusive in nature. Mount Belinda produced tephra, building a cinder cone in addition to an extensive lava field. Five volcanoes exhibited detectable thermal, and presumed fumarolic, activity (Deception, Zavodovski, Candlemas, Bristol, and Bellingshausen islands). A minor eruption reported at Marion Island was not detected in our survey due to its small size. This study also discovered a new active vent on Mount Michael, tracked dramatic vent enlargement on Heard Island, and provides an improved picture of the morphology of some of the volcanoes.

  8. Volcanic Activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A. G.; McEwen, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    Tvashtar Catena (63 N, 120 W) is one of the most interesting features on Io. This chain of large paterae (caldera-like depressions) has exhibited highly variable volcanic activity in a series of observations. Tvashtar is the type example of a style of volcanism seen only at high latitudes, with short-lived Pele-type plumes and short-lived by intense thermal events. Evidence for a hot spot at Tvashtar was first detected in an eclipse observation in April 1997 (orbit G7) by the Solid State Imager (SSI) on the Galileo Spacecraft. Tvashtar was originally targeted for observation at higher resolution in the close flyby in November 1999 (I25) because of its interesting large-scale topography. There are relatively few but generally larger paterae at high latitudes on Io. I25 images revealed a 25 km long, 1-2 km high lava curtain via a pattern of saturation and bleeding in the CCD image, which requires very high temperatures.

  9. Integrating Multiple Space Ground Sensors to Track Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Jones, Samuel; Kjartansson, Einar; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Vogfjord, Kristin; Guomundsson, Magnus; Thordarson, Thor; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic activity can occur with little or no warning. Increasing numbers of space borne assets can enable coordinated measurements of volcanic events to enhance both scientific study and hazard response. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a worldwide volcano monitoring system. We utilize a number of alert systems including the MODVOLC, GOESVOLC, US Air Force Weather Advisory, and Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) alert systems. Additionally we use in-situ data from ground instrumentation at a number of volcanic sites, including Iceland.

  10. Volcanic activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milazzo, M.P.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A.G.; Turtle, E.P.; Geissler, P.; Klaasen, K.P.; Rathbun, J.A.; McEwen, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Galileo's Solid State Imager (SSI) observed Tvashtar Catena four times between November 1999 and October 2001, providing a unique look at a distinctive high latitude volcanic complex on Io. The first observation (orbit I25, November 1999) resolved, for the first time, an active extraterrestrial fissure eruption; the brightness temperature was at least 1300 K. The second observation (orbit I27, February 2000) showed a large (??? 500 km 2) region with many, small, hot, regions of active lava. The third observation was taken in conjunction with Cassini imaging in December 2000 and showed a Pele-like, annular plume deposit. The Cassini images revealed an ???400 km high Pele-type plume above Tvashtar Catena. The final Galileo SSI observation of Tvashtar (orbit I32, October 2001), revealed that obvious (to SSI) activity had ceased, although data from Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) indicated that there was still significant thermal emission from the Tvashtar region. In this paper, we primarily analyze the style of eruption during orbit I27 (February 2000). Comparison with a lava flow cooling model indicates that the behavior of the Tvashtar eruption during I27 does not match that of simple advancing lava flows. Instead, it may be an active lava lake or a complex set of lava flows with episodic, overlapping eruptions. The highest reliable color temperature is ???1300 K. Although higher temperatures cannot be ruled out, they do not need to be invoked to fit the observed data. The total power output from the active lavas in February 2000 was at least 1011 W. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  12. Evidence of volcanic and glacial activity in Chryse and Acidalia Planitiae, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Alonso, Sara; Mellon, Michael T.; Banks, Maria E.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.; HiRISE Team

    2011-04-01

    Chryse and Acidalia Planitiae show numerous examples of enigmatic landforms previously interpreted to have been influenced by a water/ice-rich geologic history. These landforms include giant polygons bounded by kilometer-scale arcuate troughs, bright pitted mounds, and mesa-like features. To investigate the significance of the last we have analyzed in detail the region between 60°N, 290°E and 10°N, 360°E utilizing HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) images as well as regional-scale data for context. The mesas may be analogous to terrestrial tuyas (emergent sub-ice volcanoes), although definitive proof has not been identified. We also report on a blocky unit and associated landforms (drumlins, eskers, inverted valleys, kettle holes) consistent with ice-emplaced volcanic or volcano-sedimentary flows. The spatial association between tuya-like mesas, ice-emplaced flows, and further possible evidence of volcanism (deflated flow fronts, volcanic vents, columnar jointing, rootless cones), and an extensive fluid-rich substratum (giant polygons, bright mounds, rampart craters), allows for the possibility of glaciovolcanic activity in the region. Landforms indicative of glacial activity on Chryse/Acidalia suggest a paleoclimatic environment remarkably different from today's. Climate changes on Mars (driven by orbital/obliquity changes) or giant outflow channel activity could have resulted in ice-sheet-related landforms far from the current polar caps.

  13. Evidence of volcanic and glacial activity in Chryse and Acidalia Planitiae, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez-Alonso, Sara; Mellon, Michael T.; Banks, Maria E.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-01-01

    Chryse and Acidalia Planitiae show numerous examples of enigmatic landforms previously interpreted to have been influenced by a water/ice-rich geologic history. These landforms include giant polygons bounded by kilometer-scale arcuate troughs, bright pitted mounds, and mesa-like features. To investigate the significance of the last we have analyzed in detail the region between 60°N, 290°E and 10°N, 360°E utilizing HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) images as well as regional-scale data for context. The mesas may be analogous to terrestrial tuyas (emergent sub-ice volcanoes), although definitive proof has not been identified. We also report on a blocky unit and associated landforms (drumlins, eskers, inverted valleys, kettle holes) consistent with ice-emplaced volcanic or volcano-sedimentary flows. The spatial association between tuya-like mesas, ice-emplaced flows, and further possible evidence of volcanism (deflated flow fronts, volcanic vents, columnar jointing, rootless cones), and an extensive fluid-rich substratum (giant polygons, bright mounds, rampart craters), allows for the possibility of glaciovolcanic activity in the region.Landforms indicative of glacial activity on Chryse/Acidalia suggest a paleoclimatic environment remarkably different from today's. Climate changes on Mars (driven by orbital/obliquity changes) or giant outflow channel activity could have resulted in ice-sheet-related landforms far from the current polar caps.

  14. Effects of temperature, particle features and vent geometry on volcanic jet dynamics, a shock-tube investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, Valeria; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The lowermost part of an eruptive plume commonly shows characteristics of an underexpanded jet. The dynamics of this gas-thrust region are likely to be a direct consequence of intrinsic (magma properties, overpressure) and extrinsic (vent geometry, weather) eruption conditions. Additionally, they affect the subsequent evolution of the eruptive column and have, therefore, important hazard assessment implications for both near- and far-field. Direct observation of eruptive events is possible, but often insufficient for complete characterization. Important complementary data can be achieved using controlled and calibrated laboratory experiments. Loose natural particles were ejected from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25° and 500°C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), density (basaltic and phonolitic), gas-particle ratio and vent geometry (nozzle, cylindrical, funnel with a flaring of 15° and 30°, respectively). For each experiment, we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle, the presence of electric discharges and the production of fines and analysed their dynamic evolution. Data shows velocity of up to 296 m/s and deceleration patterns following nonlinear paths. Gas spreading angles range between 21° and 41° while the particle spreading angles between 3° and 32°. Electric discharges, in the form of lightning, are observed, quantified and described. Moreover, a variation in the production of fines is recognized during the course of single experiments. This experimental investigation, which mechanistically mimics the process of pyroclast ejection, is shown to be capable of constraining the effects of input parameters and conduit/vent geometry on pyroclastic plumes. Therefore, the results should greatly enhance the ability of numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  15. Deep Explosive Volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and Seismological Constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontbriand, Claire Willis

    Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85°E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-1 ). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the axial valley are covered by numerous, small-volume lava flows, including a few flows fresh enough to have potentially erupted during the 1999 seismic swarm at the site. The morphology and distribution of volcaniclastic deposits observed on the seafloor at depths of ˜3800 m, greater than the critical point for steam generation, are consistent with having formed by explosive discharge of magma and C02 from source vents. Microearthquakes recorded on a 200 m aperture seismometer network deployed on the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse active mound, a seafloor massive sulfide on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26°N, are used to image subsurface processes at the hydrothermal system. Over nine-months, 32,078 local microearthquakes (ML = -1) with single-phase arrivals cluster on the southwest flank of the deposit at depths <125 m. Microearthquakes characteristics are consistent with reaction-driven cracking driven by anhydrite deposition in the shallow secondary circulation system. Exit fluid temperatures recorded at diffuse vents on the mound during the microearthquake study are used to explore linkages between seismicity and venting. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  16. Recent volcanic activity on Venus - Evidence from radiothermal emissivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. A.; Wood, J. A.

    1993-03-01

    Radiothermal emissivity measurements are analyzed in order to study large volcanic constructs on Venus and to correlate details of the reflectivity/emissivity patterns with geological landforms and stratigraphy visible in corresponding SAR images. There appears to be a correlation between locations on Venus where high emissivity at high altitudes and low emissivity at low altitudes are observed. These phenomena are attributed here to relatively recent volcanic activity: the former to summit eruptions that have not had time to weather to the low-emissivity state, the latter to continuing emission of volcanic gases from neighboring small plains volcanoes. The pattern of reflectivity and emissivity on Maat Mons is examined in the light of these findings. It is concluded that Maat Mons has undergone the most recent episode of volcanic activity of all the volcanoes studied here.

  17. Recent volcanic activity on Venus - Evidence from radiothermal emissivity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Cordula A.; Wood, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Radiothermal emissivity measurements are analyzed in order to study large volcanic constructs on Venus and to correlate details of the reflectivity/emissivity patterns with geological landforms and stratigraphy visible in corresponding SAR images. There appears to be a correlation between locations on Venus where high emissivity at high altitudes and low emissivity at low altitudes are observed. These phenomena are attributed here to relatively recent volcanic activity: the former to summit eruptions that have not had time to weather to the low-emissivity state, the latter to continuing emission of volcanic gases from neighboring small plains volcanoes. The pattern of reflectivity and emissivity on Maat Mons is examined in the light of these findings. It is concluded that Maat Mons has undergone the most recent episode of volcanic activity of all the volcanoes studied here.

  18. Changes in microbial communities in coastal sediments along natural CO2 gradients at a volcanic vent in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Raulf, Felix F; Fabricius, Katharina; Uthicke, Sven; de Beer, Dirk; Abed, Raeid M M; Ramette, Alban

    2015-10-01

    Natural CO2 venting systems can mimic conditions that resemble intermediate to high pCO2 levels as predicted for our future oceans. They represent ideal sites to investigate potential long-term effects of ocean acidification on marine life. To test whether microbes are affected by prolonged exposure to pCO2 levels, we examined the composition and diversity of microbial communities in oxic sandy sediments along a natural CO2 gradient. Increasing pCO2 was accompanied by higher bacterial richness and by a strong increase in rare members in both bacterial and archaeal communities. Microbial communities from sites with CO2 concentrations close to today's conditions had different structures than those of sites with elevated CO2 levels. We also observed increasing sequence abundance of several organic matter degrading types of Flavobacteriaceae and Rhodobacteraceae, which paralleled concurrent shifts in benthic cover and enhanced primary productivity. With increasing pCO2 , sequences related to bacterial nitrifying organisms such as Nitrosococcus and Nitrospirales decreased, and sequences affiliated to the archaeal ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota Nitrosopumilus maritimus increased. Our study suggests that microbial community structure and diversity, and likely key ecosystem functions, may be altered in coastal sediments by long-term CO2 exposure to levels predicted for the end of the century.

  19. Crustal deformation and volcanic earthquakes associated with the recent volcanic activity of Iwojima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, H.; Fujita, E.; Tanada, T.

    2013-12-01

    Iwojima is an active volcanic island located within a 10 km wide submarine caldera about 1250 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan. The seismometer and GPS network of National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) in Iwojima has observed a repeating island wide uplift more than 1 m associated with large number of volcanic earthquakes every several years. During 2006-2012, we observed more than 20000 volcanic earthquakes and an uplift of about 3 m, and precursory volcanic earthquakes and rapid crustal deformation just before the small submarine eruption near the northern coast of Iwojima in April 2012. In a restless volcano such as Iwojima, it is important issue to distinguish whether rapid crustal deformation and intense earthquake activity lead to an eruption or not. According to a long period geodetic observation by Ukawa et al. (2006), the crustal deformation of Iwojima can be classify into 2 phases. The first is an island wide large uplift centering on Motoyama area (the eastern part of the island, the center of the caldera), and the second is contraction and subsidence at local area centering on Motoyama and uplift around that area. They are interpreted by superposition of crustal deformations by a shallow contraction source and a deep seated inflation source beneath Motoyama. The earthquake activity of Iwojima highly correlates with the island wide large uplift, suggesting the earthquakes are almost controlled by a magma accumulation into a deep seated magma chamber. In contrast to the activity, the precursory activity of the eruption in 2012 is deviated from the correlation. The rapid crustal deformation just before and after the eruption in 2012 can be interpreted by rapid inflation and deflation of a shallow sill source about 1km deep, respectively, suggesting that it was caused by a shallow hydrothermal activity. The result shows that we can probably distinguish an abnormal activity related with a volcanic eruption when we observe

  20. Origin of temporal compositional trends in monogenetic vent eruptions: Insights from the crystal cargo in the Papoose Canyon sequence, Big Pine Volcanic Field, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruohan; Lassiter, John C.; Ramirez, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    Many monogenetic vents display systematic temporal-compositional variations over the course of eruption. Previous studies have proposed that these trends may reflect variable degrees of crustal assimilation, or melting and mixing of heterogeneous mantle source(s). Discrimination between these two endmember hypotheses is critical for understanding the plumbing systems of monogenetic volcanoes, which pose a significant volcanic hazard in many areas. In this study, we examine the Papoose Canyon (PC) monogenetic vent in the Big Pine Volcanic Field (BPVF), which had been well characterized for temporal-compositional variations in erupted basalts. We present new major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotopic data from the PC "crystal cargo" (phenocrysts and xenoliths). Comparison of "crystal cargo" and host basalt provides new constraints on the history of magma storage, fractionation, and crustal contamination that are obscured in the bulk basalts due to pre- and syn-eruptive magma mixing processes. The abundances of phenocrysts and ultramafic xenoliths in the PC sequence decrease up-section. Olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts span a wide range of Mg# (77-89). The majority of phenocrysts are more evolved than olivine or clinopyroxene in equilibrium with their host basalts (Mg# = 68- 71, equilibrium Fo ≈ 85- 89). In addition, the ultramafic xenoliths display cumulate textures. Olivine and clinopyroxene from ultramafic xenoliths have Mg# (73-87) similar to the phenocrysts, and lower than typical mantle peridotites. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions of the xenoliths are similar to early PC basalts. Finally, many clinopyroxene phenocrysts and clinopyroxene in xenoliths have trace element abundances in equilibrium with melts that are more enriched than the erupted basalts. These features suggest that the phenocrysts and xenoliths derive from melt that is more fractionated and enriched than erupted PC basalts. Pressure constraints suggest phenocrysts and ultramafic

  1. Cinnabar, arsenian pyrite and thallium-enrichment in active shallow submarine hydrothermal vents at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kati, Marianna; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Magganas, Andreas; Baltatzis, Emmanouil; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    We herein report the discovery of active cinnabar-depositing hydrothermal vents in a submarine setting at Paleochori Bay, within the offshore southeastern extension of the Milos Island Geothermal Field, South Aegean Active Volcanic Arc. Active, low temperature (up to 115 °C) hydrothermal venting through volcaniclastic material has led to a varied assemblage of sulfide and alteration mineral phases in an area of approximately 1 km2. Our samples recovered from Paleochori Bay are hydrothermal edifices composed of volcaniclastic detrital material cemented by pyrite, or pure sulfide (mainly massive pyrite) mounts. Besides pyrite and minor marcasite, the hydrothermal minerals include cinnabar, amorphous silica, hydrous ferric oxides, carbonates (aragonite and calcite), alunite-jarosite solid solution and Sr-rich barite. Among others, growth textures, sieve-textured pyrite associated with barite, alunite-jarosite solid solution and hydrous ferric oxides rims colloform-banded pyrite layers. Overgrowths of arsenian pyrite layers (up to 3.2 wt. % As and/or up to 1.1 wt. % Mn) onto As-free pyrite indicate fluctuation in As content of the hydrothermal fluid. Mercury, in the form of cinnabar, occurs in up to 5 μm grains within arsenian pyrite layers, usually forming distinct cinnabar-enriched micro-layers. Hydrothermal Sr-rich barite (barite-celestine solid solution), pseudocubic alunite-jarosite solid solution and Mn- and Sr-enriched carbonates occur in various amounts and closely associated with pyrite and/or hydrous ferric oxides. Thallium-bearing sulfides and/or sulfosalts were not detected during our study; however, hydrous ferric oxides show thallium content of up to 0.5 wt. % Tl. The following scenarios may have played a role in pyrite precipitation at Paleochori: (a) H2S originally dissolved in the deep fluid but separated upon boiling could have reacted with oxygenated seawater under production of sulphuric acid, thus causing leaching and dissolution of primary iron

  2. Volcanic and Tectonic Setting of Hydrothermal Activity on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 4° - 11°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchert, B.; Devey, C. W.; German, C. R.; Haase, K. M.; Koschinsky, A.; Lackschewitz, K.; Yoerger, D. R.

    2006-12-01

    The recurrence rate of volcanism at mid-ocean ridges should drop with spreading rate. Although the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, with a spreading full rate of ~3.6 cm/yr, might therefore be expected to show only sporadic magmatic activity, we present information on recently-discovered volcanically, tectonically and hydrothermally active areas south of the equator (at 4°48'S and 9°33'S, see also German et al. 2005; Haase et al. 2005 EOS Trans. AGU 86 (52) Fall Meet. Suppl. Abstr. OS21C-04 & -05). Around the 4°48'S area the median valley floor forms a ~10 km wide, hour-glass shaped, plateau with water depths of around 3000 m. Four closely-spaced vent fields (the high-temperature sites Turtle Pits, Red Lion and Comfortless Cove and the diffuse low-temperature Wideawake site) occur along a flat (total relief 50 m), volcanically and tectonically active 2 km section of this plateau (see German et al. 2005, Haase et al. 2005 op. cit. also Koschinsky et al. this meeting). The Turtle Pits site lies within a small depression associated with a fracture marked by aligned collapse pits. This central depression is surrounded by laminated sheet flows to the north and northwest, whereas jumbled flows are more prevalent to the east. Comfortless Cove is also associated with young volcanics and shows strong tectonic influence on vent location. Red Lion in contrast shows no clear tectonic control - it is characterised by four active chimneys which sit directly on a pillow lava floor. The 9°33'S area is situated on 11 km-thick crust (Bruguier et al. 2003 JGR 108 2093) at 1490 m water depth and is marked by fresh pillow lavas, sheet flows, lava lakes and collapse structures. Low- temperature, diffuse hydrothermal activity is abundant in the area (Haase et al. 2005; Koschinsky et al. 2006 op. cit.) as are larger extinct hydrothermal mounds suggesting more vigourous hydrothermalism in the past. All sites are located east of a large NNW trending escarpment flanking horst and graben

  3. The Physics of a Volcanic System: What is the Actual Role Played by Tectonic Setting in Controlling Volcanic Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2005-12-01

    Modern text-books commonly explain volcanic activity as a direct consequence of plate tectonics, overlooking the different scales characteristic of both types of processes. By acknowledging such differences, however, it is possible to envisage a model of a volcanic system that is based in the same principles of hydrostatics established by Blaise Pascal over 300 yrs ago. Such principles allow us to estimate the local conditions required for the occurrence of volcanism at a given location highlighting the importance of the rock strength and the density difference between melt and its surroundings. This model shows that the minimum thickness of the zone of partial melting in the mantle (or seismically defined Low Velocity Zone) that is required to feed volcanic activity might range from 5 to over 100 km, but also that under certain circumstances a rock strength < 200 MPa may suffice to keep magma trapped at depth whereas in other cases a strength > 600 MPa will not suffice to stop magma ascent resulting in volcanic activity at the surface. Consequently, the model of volcanism developed here explains why is that a given LVZ may lead to volcanic activity in some places whereas a completely identical LVZ may not result in volcanic activity in a different location. Consequently, this model provides a general framework that allows us to better understand the actual role played by tectonic setting in controlling volcanism at a planetary scale.

  4. Exploring for Volcanic and Hydrothermal Activity Above Off-axis Melt Lenses near the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Lee, A. J.; Rubin, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Two Alvin dives (AL 4771 and 4774) transected the seafloor directly above the two largest Off-Axis Melt Lenses (O-AML) east of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) axis at 9 39'N and 9 54'N. In 2008, a 3D high-resolution seismic reflection survey (MGL-0812) discovered O-AMLs 3-7 km from the EPR at 2-3 km below the seafloor. Several other O-AML in the crust have been subsequently detected in several locations up to 20 km from the spreading axis at fast and intermediate spreading ridges; understanding their impacts is increasingly important. During the dives, no currently active hydrothermal venting or fresh lava was seen, suggesting that these features do not constantly power off-axis geological activity. However, the seafloor appears much younger at small volcanic seamounts in the 9 39'N than at the 9 54'N site. At 9 39'N, we used Alvin to explore the off-axis volcanic mound complex, reaching the summit of the three largest mounds. Although no evidence for on-going hydrothermal or volcanic activity was detected, the seafloor wore a thin sediment layer of ~10cm and thin Mn-coatings on 9 rock samples, suggesting volcanism more recently than would be expected based on the spreading-rate age of the crust. At 9 54'N, the Alvin trackline started south of a prominent abyssal hill, which has an unusual D-shape over 1 km wide in the center, crossed the abyssal hill, visited two local hummocks on top, and then attempted to find volcanic activity on the near slope of EPR axis by going as far west was possible during the dive. Heavy sediment everywhere on the abyssal hill, to the depth of push cores (~30 cm) and probably much deeper in many areas and 4 rock samples from the abyssal hill were quite weathered with little glass intact, suggest that this site is unaffected by the underlying O-AML. Upslope toward the EPR west of the abyssal hill, 4 rocks collected appear somewhat younger, and sediment became thinner. In addition, 3 CTD tow-yos over each O-AML found no evidence of active

  5. Exploring for Volcanic and Hydrothermal Activity Above Off-axis Melt Lenses near the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, A. J.; Torres, M. A.; Nealson, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Two Alvin dives (AL 4771 and 4774) transected the seafloor directly above the two largest Off-Axis Melt Lenses (O-AML) east of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) axis at 9 39'N and 9 54'N. In 2008, a 3D high-resolution seismic reflection survey (MGL-0812) discovered O-AMLs 3-7 km from the EPR at 2-3 km below the seafloor. Several other O-AML in the crust have been subsequently detected in several locations up to 20 km from the spreading axis at fast and intermediate spreading ridges; understanding their impacts is increasingly important. During the dives, no currently active hydrothermal venting or fresh lava was seen, suggesting that these features do not constantly power off-axis geological activity. However, the seafloor appears much younger at small volcanic seamounts in the 9 39'N than at the 9 54'N site. At 9 39'N, we used Alvin to explore the off-axis volcanic mound complex, reaching the summit of the three largest mounds. Although no evidence for on-going hydrothermal or volcanic activity was detected, the seafloor wore a thin sediment layer of ~10cm and thin Mn-coatings on 9 rock samples, suggesting volcanism more recently than would be expected based on the spreading-rate age of the crust. At 9 54'N, the Alvin trackline started south of a prominent abyssal hill, which has an unusual D-shape over 1 km wide in the center, crossed the abyssal hill, visited two local hummocks on top, and then attempted to find volcanic activity on the near slope of EPR axis by going as far west was possible during the dive. Heavy sediment everywhere on the abyssal hill, to the depth of push cores (~30 cm) and probably much deeper in many areas and 4 rock samples from the abyssal hill were quite weathered with little glass intact, suggest that this site is unaffected by the underlying O-AML. Upslope toward the EPR west of the abyssal hill, 4 rocks collected appear somewhat younger, and sediment became thinner. In addition, 3 CTD tow-yos over each O-AML found no evidence of active

  6. The recent seismo-volcanic activity at Deception Island volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Almendros, Javier; Carmona, Enrique; Martínez-Arévalo, Carmen; Abril, Miguel

    2003-06-01

    This paper reviews the recent seismic studies carried out at Deception Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, which was monitored by the Argentinean and Spanish Antarctic Programs since 1986. Several types of seismic network have been deployed temporarily during each Antarctic summer. These networks have consisted of a variety of instruments, including radio-telemetered stations, autonomous digital seismic stations, broadband seismometers, and seismic arrays. We have identified two main types of seismic signals generated by the volcano, namely pure seismo-volcanic signals, such as volcanic tremor and long-period (LP) events, and volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes. Their temporal distributions are far from homogeneous. Volcanic tremors and LP events usually occur in seismic swarms lasting from a few hours to some days. The number of LP events in these swarms is highly variable, from a background level of less than 30/day to a peak activity of about 100 events/h. The occurrence of VT earthquakes is even more irregular. Most VT earthquakes at Deception Island have been recorded during two intense seismic crises, in 1992 and 1999, respectively. Some of these VT earthquakes were large enough to be felt by researchers working on the island. Analyses of both types of seismic events have allowed us to derive source locations, establish seismic source models, analyze seismic attenuation, calculate the energy and stress drop of the seismic sources, and relate the occurrence of seismicity to the volcanic activity. Pure seismo-volcanic signals are modelled as the consequence of hydrothermal interactions between a shallow aquifer and deeper hot materials, resulting in the resonance of fluid-filled fractures. VT earthquakes constitute the brittle response to changes in the distribution of stress in the volcanic edifice. The two VT seismic series are probably related to uplift episodes due to deep injections of magma that did not reach the surface. This evidence, however

  7. Application Of Recent (2008-2013) Lunar Probe Instrumentation To The Exploration For Precambrian Protolife In Volcanic Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Jack

    2009-12-01

    Selected recent and future lunar probes have instruments suitable for the exploration of Precambrian protolife. Fumaroles contain the ingredients for protolife. With available energy including flow charging and charge separation, amino acids and related compounds could evolve into ATP. Fischer-Tropsch reactions in hydrothermal clay could create lipid micelles as reaction chambers. Fumarolic polyphosphates and tungsten catalysts could contribute to precambrian protolife evolution . The floors of Alphonsus and Lavoisier M exhibit dark mounds which could be buried fumaroles at fracture intersections. Chang'e-1 could define regolith thickness at these mounds with microwave radiometry. The MoonLITE penetrometer could likely identify hydrothermal products in these mounds using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Regarding polar craters which may host volcanic ices, intermittent illumination of selected crater floors warmed to 220 K may create a transient tenuous atmosphere of COS, H2S, CO2, CO, HCl and CH4 which could be analyzed by near infrared spectrometry (NIMS) of SELENE or Chandrayaan-1. Prior to the 2009 impact of a polar crater by LCROSS (of the LRO mission), the Soviet LEND mission may detect water using epithermal neutrons. The impact plume proposed in the LCROSS mission at a polar crater could be analyzed by NIMS for fumarolic fluids similar the the NIMS analyses of Callisto and Ganymede moons of Jupiter. The possible identification of cyanogen in the LCROSS impact plume would support the CN2 spectrogram at Aristarchus by Kozyrev in 1969. In the Aristarchus region, lunar dawn during periods of maximum orbital flexing may accentuate release of Rn, Ar and protolife gases. These gases could possibly by identified by the Chang'e-1 gamma/x ray spectrometer, NIMS and the neutral mass spectrometer of the LADEE mission. Microwave spectrometry and radar on the LEO mission as well as LROC (LRO mission) could also be directed at verified lunar transient sites.

  8. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    A search for space and time regularities in volcanic and seismic events for the purpose of forecast method development seems to be of current concern, both scientifically and practically. The seismic and volcanic processes take place in the Earth's field of gravity which in turn is closely related to gravitational fields of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets of the Solar System. It is mostly gravity and tidal forces that exercise control over the Earth's configuration and relief. Dynamic gravitational interaction between the Earth and other celestial bodies makes itself evident in tidal phenomena and other effects in the geospheres (including the Earth's crust). Dynamics of the tidal and attractive forces is responsible for periodical changes in gravity force, both in value and direction [Darwin, 1965], in the rate of rotation and orbital speed; that implies related changes in the endogenic activity of the Earth. The Earth's rotation in the alternating gravitational field accounts to a considerable extent for regular pattern of crustal deformations and dislocations; it is among principal factors that control the Earth's form and structure, distribution of oceans and continents and, probably, continental drift [Peive, 1969; Khain, 1973; Kosygin, 1983]. The energy of gravitational interaction is transmitted through the tidal energy to planetary spheres and feeds various processes there, including volcanic and seismic ones. To determine degree, character and special features of tidal force contribution to the volcanic and seismic processes is of primary importance for understanding of genetic and dynamic aspects of volcanism and seismicity. Both volcanic and seismic processes are involved in evolution of celestial bodies; they are operative on the planets of the Earth group and many satellites [Essays…, 1981; Lukashov, 1996]. From this standpoint, studies of those processes are essential with a view to development of scenarios of the Earth's evolution as a celestial

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Marine Bacterial Symbionts Retrieved from Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Eythorsdottir, Arnheidur; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Einarsson, Hjorleifur

    2016-06-01

    Marine sponges and other sessile macro-organisms were collected at a shallow water hydrothermal site in Eyjafjörður, Iceland. Bacteria were isolated from the organisms using selective media for actinomycetes, and the isolates were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 111 isolates revealed antimicrobial activity displaying different antimicrobial patterns which indicates production of various compounds. Known test strains were grown in the presence of ethyl acetate extracts from one selected isolate, and a clear growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus was observed down to 0.1 % extract concentration in the medium. Identification of isolates shows different species of Actinobacteria with Streptomyces sp. playing the largest role, but also members of Bacilli, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Sponges have an excellent record regarding production of bioactive compounds, often involving microbial symbionts. At the hydrothermal vents, however, the majority of active isolates originated from other invertebrates such as sea anemones or algae. The results indicate that antimicrobial assays involving isolates in full growth can detect activity not visible by other methods. The macro-organisms inhabiting the Eyjafjörður hydrothermal vent area host diverse microbial species in the phylum Actinobacteria with antimicrobial activity, and the compounds responsible for the activity will be subject to further research.

  10. Potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the last 10,000 yr. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health, safety, and economy of the State's citizens as well as that of neighboring states. The nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property is described in this bulletin.

  11. Electrical Charging of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Wilson, L.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.; Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Martin, R. S.

    2008-06-01

    Many explosive terrestrial volcanic eruptions are accompanied by lightning and other atmospheric electrical phenomena. The plumes produced generate large perturbations in the surface atmospheric electric potential gradient and high charge densities have been measured on falling volcanic ash particles. The complex nature of volcanic plumes (which contain gases, solid particles, and liquid drops) provides several possible charging mechanisms. For plumes rich in solid silicate particles, fractoemission (the ejection of ions and atomic particles during fracture events) is probably the dominant source of charge generation. In other plumes, such as those created when lava enters the sea, different mechanisms, such as boiling, may be important. Further charging mechanisms may also subsequently operate, downwind of the vent. Other solar system bodies also show evidence for volcanism, with activity ongoing on Io. Consequently, volcanic electrification under different planetary scenarios (on Venus, Mars, Io, Moon, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Triton) is also discussed.

  12. Electrical Charging of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Wilson, L.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.; Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Martin, R. S.

    Many explosive terrestrial volcanic eruptions are accompanied by lightning and other atmospheric electrical phenomena. The plumes produced generate large perturbations in the surface atmospheric electric potential gradient and high charge densities have been measured on falling volcanic ash particles. The complex nature of volcanic plumes (which contain gases, solid particles, and liquid drops) provides several possible charging mechanisms. For plumes rich in solid silicate particles, fractoemission (the ejection of ions and atomic particles during fracture events) is probably the dominant source of charge generation. In other plumes, such as those created when lava enters the sea, different mechanisms, such as boiling, may be important. Further charging mechanisms may also subsequently operate, downwind of the vent. Other solar system bodies also show evidence for volcanism, with activity ongoing on Io. Consequently, volcanic electrification under different planetary scenarios (on Venus, Mars, Io, Moon, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Triton) is also discussed.

  13. Integrating science and education during an international, multi-parametric investigation of volcanic activity at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée, Yan; Johnson, Jeffrey; Andrews, Benjamin; Wolf, Rudiger; Rose, William; Chigna, Gustavo; Pineda, Armand

    2016-04-01

    In January 2016, we held the first scientific/educational Workshops on Volcanoes (WoV). The workshop took place at Santiaguito volcano - the most active volcano in Guatemala. 69 international scientists of all ages participated in this intensive, multi-parametric investigation of the volcanic activity, which included the deployment of seismometers, tiltmeters, infrasound microphones and mini-DOAS as well as optical, thermographic, UV and FTIR cameras around the active vent. These instruments recorded volcanic activity in concert over a period of 3 to 9 days. Here we review the research activities and present some of the spectacular observations made through this interdisciplinary efforts. Observations range from high-resolution drone and IR footage of explosions, monitoring of rock falls and quantification of the erupted mass of different gases and ash, as well as morphological changes in the dome caused by recurring explosions (amongst many other volcanic processes). We will discuss the success of such integrative ventures in furthering science frontiers and developing the next generation of geoscientists.

  14. Chemosynthetic microbial activity at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirsen, Carl O.; Jannasch, Holger W.; Molyneaux, Stephen J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemosynthetic production of microbial biomass, determined by 14CO2 fixation and enzymatic (RuBisCo) activity, at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) 23° and 26°N vent sites was found in various niches: warm water emissions, loosely rock-attached flocculent material, dense morphologically diverse bacterial mats covering the surfaces of polymetal sulfide deposits, and filamentous microbes on the carapaces of shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata). The bacterial mats on polymetal sulfide surfaces contained unicellular and filamentous bacteria which appeared to use as their chemolithotrophic electron or energy source either dissolved reduced minerals from vent emissions, mainly sulfur compounds, or solid metal sulfide deposits, mainly pyrite. Moderately thermophilic Chemosynthetic activity was observed in carbon dioxide fixation experiments and in enrichments, but no thermophilic aerobic sulfur oxidizers could be isolated. Both obligate and facultative chemoautotrophs growing at mesophilic temperatures were isolated from all chemosynthetically active surface scrapings. The obligate autotrophs could oxidize sterilized MAR natural sulfide deposits as well as technical pyrite at near neutral pH, in addition to dissolved reduced sulfur compounds. While the grazing by shrimp on the surface mats of MAR metal sulfide deposits was observed and deemed important, the animals' primary occurrence in dense swarms near vent emissions suggests that they were feeding at these sites, where conditions for Chemosynthetic growth of their filamentous microbial epiflora were optimal. The data show that the transformation of geothermal energy at the massive polymetal sulfide deposits of the MAR is based on the lithoautotrophic oxidation of soluble sulfides and pyrites into microbial biomass.

  15. Frequency Based Volcanic Activity Detection through Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, A. K.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing has proved to offer a useful and relatively inexpensive method for monitoring large areas where field work is logistically unrealistic, and potentially dangerous. Current sensors are able to detect the majority of explosive volcanic activity; those that tend to effect and represent larger scale changes in the volcanic systems, eventually relating to ash producing periods of extended eruptive activity, and effusive activity. As new spaceborne sensors are developed, the ability to detect activity improves so that a system to gauge the frequency of volcanic activity can be used as a useful monitoring tool. Four volcanoes were chosen for development and testing of a method to monitor explosive activity: Stromboli (Italy); Shishaldin and Cleveland (Alaska, USA); and Karymsky (Kamchatka, Russia). Each volcano studied had similar but unique signatures of pre-cursory and eruptive activity. This study has shown that this monitoring tool could be applied to a wide range of volcanoes and still produce useful and robust data. Our method deals specifically with the detection of small scale explosive activity. The method described here could be useful in an operational setting, especially at remote volcanoes that have the potential to impact populations, infrastructure, and the aviation community. A number of important factors will affect the validity of application of this method. They are: (1) the availability of a continuous and continually populated dataset; (2) appropriate and reasonable sensor resolutions; (3) a recorded history of the volcano's previous activity; and, if available, (4) some ground-based monitoring system. We aim to develop the method further to be able to capture and evaluate the frequency of other volcanic processes such as lava flows, phreatomagmatic eruptions and dome growth and collapse. The work shown here has served to illustrate the capability of this method and monitoring tool for use at remote, un-instrumented volcanoes.

  16. Assessing the volcanic hazard for Rome: 40Ar/39Ar and In-SAR constraints on the most recent eruptive activity and present-day uplift at Colli Albani Volcanic District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Gaeta, M.; Giaccio, B.; Jicha, B. R.; Palladino, D. M.; Polcari, M.; Sottili, G.; Taddeucci, J.; Florindo, F.; Stramondo, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar data which allow us to refine the recurrence time for the most recent eruptive activity occurred at Colli Albani Volcanic District (CAVD) and constrain its geographic area. Time elapsed since the last eruption (36 kyr) overruns the recurrence time (31 kyr) in the last 100 kyr. New interferometric synthetic aperture radar data, covering the years 1993-2010, reveal ongoing inflation with maximum uplift rates (>2 mm/yr) in the area hosting the most recent (<200 ka) vents, suggesting that the observed uplift might be caused by magma injection within the youngest plumbing system. Finally, we frame the present deformation within the structural pattern of the area of Rome, characterized by 50 m of regional uplift since 200 ka and by geologic evidence for a recent (<2000 years) switch of the local stress-field, highlighting that the precursors of a new phase of volcanic activity are likely occurring at the CAVD.

  17. Sensor web enables rapid response to volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Ashley G.; Chien, Steve; Wright, Robert; Miklius, Asta; Kyle, Philip R.; Welsh, Matt; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Tran, Daniel; Schaffer, Steven R.; Sherwood, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Rapid response to the onset of volcanic activity allows for the early assessment of hazard and risk [Tilling, 1989]. Data from remote volcanoes and volcanoes in countries with poor communication infrastructure can only be obtained via remote sensing [Harris et al., 2000]. By linking notifications of activity from ground-based and spacebased systems, these volcanoes can be monitored when they erupt.Over the last 18 months, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has implemented a Volcano Sensor Web (VSW) in which data from ground-based and space-based sensors that detect current volcanic activity are used to automatically trigger the NASA Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) spacecraft to make highspatial-resolution observations of these volcanoes.

  18. Influence of explosive volcanic events on the activation versus de-activation of a modern turbidite system: the example of the Dohrn canyon-fan in the continental slope of the Campania volcanic district (Naples Bay, Italy - Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, M.; Budillon, F.; Pappone, G.; Insinga, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between volcanic activity, volcano-clastic yield and activation/deactivation of a turbidite system can be evaluated along the continental margin of Campania region (Tyrrhenian Sea - Italy), an active volcanic area, where three wide canyon-fans occur at short distances one to another. Actually, the Dohrn, Magnaghi and Cuma canyons cut the continental slope and shelf off Ischia and Procida volcanic islands and off the Campania Plain where Phlegraean Field and Mt. Vesuvius active vents are located. This research, partly supported by the Italian Flagship Project Ritmare, is based on single-channel, high-resolution seismic profiles (Sparker-One 16 kJ, 0.5 s twtt), swath-bathymetry and litho- and tephra-stratigraphy of gravity cores. We focused on the stratigraphic constraint of paleo-thalweg features and channel/levees deposits in seismics, debris flow, turbidites and hemipelagites in cores, to learn more on the activation/deactivation stages of the canyon Dohrn, in the frame of relative eustatic sea level variations over the Middle Pleistocene-Holocene time span.Preliminary outcomes suggest that even major volcanic events occurred in the last 300 ky, such as ignimbrite eruptions or large fallouts, have caused the infilling of the canyon head and the cover of pre-existing seabed morphology. As a consequence, the temporary deactivation of the turbidite system has occurred, despite the volcano-clastic overload in the coastal environment. Phases of renewed activities of the thalweg are observed to be in step with falling stages of sea level, which have driven the re-incision of canyon valleys through continuous volcano-clastic debris and turbidites down-flows. Since Holocene, the quiescence of the Dohrn Canyon has been documented, despite the intense volcano-tectonic activity in the area.

  19. The Variation of Volcanic Tremor During Active Stage in the 1986 Izu-Oshima Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Aika; Kurita, Kei

    2014-05-01

    Izu-Oshima is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan. The latest eruption of Nov. 1986 exhibited a curious eruption sequence; the strombolian type eruption started on 15 Nov. at the central vent and it had continued for 4 days. Then after it ceased, subplinian type fissure eruptions occurred inside and outside the caldera where several hundreds meters to few kilometers away from the central vent. Lava flows were associated with these two eruption episodes. Petrologically compositions of these two kinds of lava are completely dissimilar; magma from the central vent is basaltic with narrow range of chemical composition, which is almost same as that of the previous stages while magma from the fissures is evolved one with wider variations of composition [Aramaki and Fujii, 1988]. This means that two distinct magma sources, which were chemically separated but mechanically coupled, should have existed prior to the eruption. The most important issue concerning this eruption is how the mechanical interaction between two magma sources took place and evolved. Throughout the eruption sequence, remarkable activities of seismic tremor have been observed. In this presentation we report evolution of tremor sources to characterize the interaction based on the recently recovered seismic records and we propose a reinterpretation of the eruption sequence. We analyzed volcanic tremor in Nov. 1986 on digitized seismic records of 7 stations in the Island. The aim of this analysis is to estimate the movement of two kinds of magma associated with the change of the eruption styles. Firstly root mean square amplitudes of the filtered seismic signals and their spectrum were calculated. The tremor style changed from continuous mode to intermittent, sporadic mode at the period between the summit eruption and the fissure eruptions. The dominant frequency also changed around the same time. Secondly to derive the location of tremor source, Amplitude Inversion Method [Battaglia and Aki, 2003

  20. Discovery of abundant hydrothermal venting on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, H N; Michael, P J; Baker, E T; Connelly, D P; Snow, J E; Langmuir, C H; Dick, H J B; Mühe, R; German, C R; Graham, D W

    2003-01-16

    Submarine hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges is an important contributor to ridge thermal structure, and the global distribution of such vents has implications for heat and mass fluxes from the Earth's crust and mantle and for the biogeography of vent-endemic organisms. Previous studies have predicted that the incidence of hydrothermal venting would be extremely low on ultraslow-spreading ridges (ridges with full spreading rates <2 cm x yr(-1)-which make up 25 per cent of the global ridge length), and that such vent systems would be hosted in ultramafic in addition to volcanic rocks. Here we present evidence for active hydrothermal venting on the Gakkel ridge, which is the slowest spreading (0.6-1.3 cm x yr(-1)) and least explored mid-ocean ridge. On the basis of water column profiles of light scattering, temperature and manganese concentration along 1,100 km of the rift valley, we identify hydrothermal plumes dispersing from at least nine to twelve discrete vent sites. Our discovery of such abundant venting, and its apparent localization near volcanic centres, requires a reassessment of the geologic conditions that control hydrothermal circulation on ultraslow-spreading ridges.

  1. Stratospheric ozone, solar activity and volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komitov, Boris; Stoychev, Konstantin

    The aim of this study is to investigate the long-term (multiannual) variations of the total ozone content (TOC) on the base of TOMS instrument measurements on the board of Nimbus-7 satellite for the period 1979 -- 1993 AD. The total effects of the solar activity influence over stratosphere ozone has been investigated by using multiple regression analysis. The monthly radio-index F10.7, the cosmic rays neutron flux, the geomagnetic index Ap and the number of GOES x-ray X-class flares have been used as solar or solar-modulated parameters as predictors in the model. The global mean-monthly TOC-parameter has been used as a predictant. It has been found that the coefficient of correlation of the model between TOC and above-mentioned solar and geomagnetic factors is about 0.544. Thus the corresponding factor variance is about 37%. The results calculated by the model have been removed from the original TOC data. It has been found out that during the first 12 years since 1979 the downward trend is predominantly caused by the solar and solar-modulated processes. However during the remaining 3 years after 1990 the slope of the negative trend has been essentially increased. This phenomenon could only be explained by some catastrophic event. Most probably such one is the Pinatubo volcano eruption in June, 1991. An evidence for the possibility that the last one is caused by trigger effect from the extremely high solar flare activity in May -- June 1991, is given.

  2. Aqueous Volatiles in Hydrothermal fluids from the Main Endeavour Vent Field: Temporal Variability Following Earthquake Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seewald, J. S.; Cruse, A. M.; Saccocia, P. J.

    2001-12-01

    Volatile species play a critical role in a broad spectrum of physical, chemical, and biological processes associated with hydrothermal circulation at oceanic spreading centers. Earthquake activity at the Main Endeavour vent field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge in June 1999 [1] provided and opportunity to assess factors that regulate the flux of volatile species from the oceanic crust to the water column following a rapid change in subsurface reaction zone conditions. High temperature vent fluids were collected in gas-tight samplers at the Main Endeavour field in September 1999, approximately four months after the earthquakes, and again in July 2000, and were analyzed for the abundance of aqueous volatile and non-volatile species. Measured concentrations of aqueous H2, H2S, and CO2 increased substantially in September 1999 relative to pre-earthquake values [2,3], and subsequently decreased in July 2000, while aqueous Cl concentrations initially decreased in 1999 and subsequently increased in 2000. Concentrations of Cl in all fluids were depleted relative to seawater values. Aqueous CH4 and NH3 concentrations decreased in both the 1999 and 2000 samples relative to pre- earthquake values. Variations in Cl concentration of Endeavour fluids reflect varying degrees of phase separation under near critical temperature and pressure conditions. Because volatile species efficiently partition into the vapor phase, variations in their abundance as a function of Cl concentration can be used to constrain conditions of phase separation and fluid-rock interaction. For example, concentrations of volatile species that are not readily incorporated into minerals (CH4 and NH3) correlated weakly with Cl suggesting phase separation was occurring under supercritical conditions after the earthquake activity. In contrast, compositional data for fluids prior to the earthquakes indicate a strong negative correlation between these species and Cl suggesting phase separation under subcritical

  3. Active seafloor gas vents on the Shelf and upper Slope in Canadian Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Hughes Clarke, J. E.; Blasco, S.; Taylor, A. E.; Melling, H.; Vagle, S.; Conway, K.; Riedel, M.; Lundsten, E.; Gwiazda, R.

    2012-12-01

    seafloor topographic features on the continental slope suggests these are also active vent sites. Vigorous degassing of methane and pore water freshening in cores from features suggest the presence of near seafloor gas hydrate accumulations. If correct, a feature at 290m depth hosts the shallowest known marine gas hydrate occurrence. Here a layer of very cold ocean waters (-1.7°C) extends to ~200m depths, below which the temperature increases slowly with depth. A consequence of the exceptionally low upper water column temperatures is that the top of the methane hydrate stability zone is only slightly shallower that the 290m seafloor feature. Thus, gas hydrate harbored within seafloor sediments at 290m is vulnerable to decomposition with even subtle climatically-induced warming of the overlying water. Further geoscience studies are planned for 2012 and 2013 to study geological processes, geohazards and the sensitivity of the shelf / slope setting to climate change in the Arctic.

  4. Silicic volcanism in Iceland: Composition and distribution within the active volcanic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónasson, Kristján

    2007-01-01

    Silicic volcanic rocks within the active volcanic zones of Iceland are mainly confined to central volcanoes. The volcanic zones of Iceland can be divided into rift zones and flank zones. Each of these zones contains several central volcanoes, most of which have produced minor amounts of silicic rocks. The silicic rocks occur as lavas and domes or as tephra layers, welded tuffs and ignimbrites, formed both in effusive and explosive eruptions. They tend to be glassy or very fine-grained, containing small amounts of phenocrysts. Plagioclase (andesine-oligoclase), anorthoclase or occasionally sanidine coexist with minerals such as augite, fayalite, pigeonite, orthopyroxene and magnetite. Quartz phenocrysts are exceedingly rare. Zoning of phenocrysts is limited and the pattern is variable. A set of 90 samples representing all active central volcanoes that have erupted silicic rocks was analysed for major- and trace-elements. The silicic rocks can be classified as dacites, trachytes, low-alkali rhyolites and alkalic rhyolites. Some of the trachytes and alkalic rhyolites are peralkaline (mostly comenditic). Trachytes and alkalic rhyolites are only found within the flank zones, while dacites and low-alkali rhyolites are mostly confined to the rift zones. The Icelandic rhyolites plot close to the thermal minimum in the "granite" system, while dacites and trachytes plot within the plagioclase field and towards the alkali feldspar temperature minimum. The silicic rocks are relatively Fe-rich and Ca-poor indicating low water pressure in the source. Trace element concentrations follow similar patterns in most central volcanoes. Exceptions are Torfajökull where silicic rocks display a negative correlation of Ba to Th and unusually high Th-contents, and the western flank zone where Ba-concentrations are highly variable. The ratios of different high field-strength elements are generally similar within each central volcano or region, which probably reflects different ratios in the

  5. Jovian dust streams: A monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kruger, H.; Geissler, P.; Horanyi, M.; Graps, A.L.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Moissl, R.; Johnson, T.V.; Grun, E.

    2003-01-01

    Streams of high speed dust particles originate from Jupiter's moon Io. After release from Io, the particles collect electric charges in the Io plasma torus, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and leave the Jovian system into interplanetary space with escape speeds over 200 km s-1. The Galileo spacecraft has continuously monitored the dust streams during 34 revolutions about Jupiter between 1996 and 2002. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to systematic and stochastic changes. After removal of the systematic variations, the total dust emission rate of Io has been calculated. It varies between 10-3 and 10 kg s-1, and is typically in the range of 0.1 to 1 kg s-1. We compare the dust emission rate with other markers of volcanic activity on Io like large-area surface changes caused by volcanic deposits and sightings of volcanic plumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Relationship between Jovian Hectometric Attenuation Lanes And Io Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Within the Galileo plasma wave instrument data a narrow (in frequency) attenuation band is seen in the hectometric (HOM) emission that varies in frequency with system III longitude. This attenuation lane is believed to be the result of near-grazing incidence or coherent scattering of radio emission near the outer edge of the Io torus, i.e., when the ray path is nearly tangent to an L shell containing the Io flux tube. Such a process should, therefore, be enhanced when the Io volcanic activity is increased and the Io flux tube has enhanced density. We have performed a systematic study of the existing Galileo radio emission data in an effort to determine the phenomenology and frequency of occurrence of the attenuation lanes and the association, if any, with published volcanic activity of Io. Our results indicate that the attenuation lanes are present almost all of the time but are enhanced on occasion. The best examples of attenuation lanes occur when Galileo is within approximately 65 R(sub J) of Jupiter and thus are probably more apparent because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio of the radio receivers. The lack of continuous monitoring of Io activity and the lack of known activity on the anti-Earthward side of Io are problematic and make detailed correlation with radio emission very difficult at this time. Nevertheless, if the data are displayed for periods when the spacecraft is within 65 R(sub J) (i.e., for each perijove pass), then the highest-contrast lanes occur on most passes when the Io volcanic activity is also high for that pass. These results support our current understanding of attenuation lane formation and suggest that future efforts can be made to better understand the interaction of HOM emission with the Io flux tube.

  7. Passive vs. active degassing modes at an open-vent volcano (Stromboli, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, G.; Aiuppa, A.; Kantzas, E. P.; McGonigle, A. J. S.; Ripepe, M.

    2012-12-01

    We report here on a UV-camera based field experiment performed on Stromboli volcano during 7 days in 2010 and 2011, aimed at obtaining the very first simultaneous assessment of all the different forms (passive and active) of SO2 release from an open-vent volcano. Using the unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution of the UV camera, we obtained a 0.8 Hz record of the total SO2 flux from Stromboli over a timeframe of ∼14 h, which ranged between 0.4 and 1.9 kg s-1 around a mean value of 0.7 kg s-1 and we concurrently derived SO2 masses for more than 130 Strombolian explosions and 50 gas puffs. From this, we show erupted SO2 masses have a variability of up to one order of magnitude, and range between 2 and 55 kg (average ∼20 kg), corresponding to a time integrated flux of 0.05±0.01 kg s-1. Our experimental constraints on individual gas puff mass (0.03-0.42 kg of SO2, averaging 0.19 kg) are the first of their kind, equating to an emission rate ranging from 0.02 to 0.27 kg s-1. On this basis, we conclude that puffing is two times more efficient than Strombolian explosions in the magmatic degassing process, and that active degassing (explosions+puffing) accounts for ∼23% (ranging from 10% to 45%) of the volcano's total SO2 flux, e.g., passive degassing between the explosions contributes the majority (∼77%) of the released gas. We furthermore integrate our UV camera gas data for the explosions and puffs, with independent geophysical data (infrared radiometer data and very long period seismicity), to offer key and novel insights into the degassing dynamics within the shallow conduit systems of this open-vent volcano.

  8. The search for active release of volcanic gases on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Alain; Villanueva, Geronimo; Mumma, Michael; Tokunaga, Alan

    2015-11-01

    The study of planetary atmospheres by means of spectroscopy is important for understanding their origin and evolution. The presence of short-lived trace gases in the martian atmosphere would imply recent production, for example, by ongoing geologic activity. On Earth, sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfur monoxide (SO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are the main sulfur-bearing gases released during volcanic outgassing. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), also released from some volcanoes on Earth (e.g., Erebus and Nyiragongo), could be formed by reactions involving SO2 or H2S inside magma chambers. We carried out the first ground-based, semi-simultaneous, multi-band and multi-species search for such gases above the Tharsis and Syrtis volcanic regions on Mars. The submillimeter search extended between 23 November 2011 and 13 May 2012 which corresponded to Mars’ mid Northern Spring and early Northern Summer seasons (Ls = 34-110°). The strong submillimeter rotational transitions of SO2, SO and H2S were targeted using the high-resolution heterodyne receiver (aka Barney) on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We reached sensitivities sufficient to detect a volcanic release on Mars that is 4% of the SO2 released continuously from Kilauea volcano in Hawaii, or 5% that of the Masaya volcano in Nicaragua. The infrared search covered OCS in its combination band (ν2+ν3) at 3.42 μm at two successive Mars years, during Mars’ late Northern Spring and mid Northern Summer seasons, spanning Ls= 43º and Ls= 147º. The targeted volcanic districts were observed during the two intervals, 14 Dec. 2011 to 6 Jan. 2012 in the first year, and 30 May 2014 to 16 June 2014 in the second year, using the high resolution infrared spectrometer (CSHELL) on NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility (NASA/IRTF). We will present our results and discuss their implications for current volcanic outgassing activity on the red planet. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program under NASA

  9. Observations of Seafloor Deformation and Methane Venting within an Active Fault Zone Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Brewer, P. G.; Vrijenhoek, R.; Lundsten, L.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed mapping surveys of the floor and flanks of the Santa Monica Basin, San Pedro Basin, and San Diego Trough were conducted during the past seven years using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) built and operated by MBARI specifically for seafloor mapping. The AUV collected data provide up to 1 m resolution multibeam bathymetric grids with a vertical precision of 0.15 m. Along with high-resolution multibeam, the AUV also collects chirp seismic reflection profiles. Structures within the uppermost 10-20 m of the seafloor, which in the surveys presented here is composed of recent sediment drape, can typically be resolved in the sub-bottom reflectors. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives allowed for ground-truth observations and sampling within the surveyed areas. The objectives of these dives included finding evidence of recent seafloor deformation and locating areas where chemosynthetic biological communities are supported by fluid venting. Distinctive seafloor features within an active fault zone are revealed in unprecedented detail in the AUV generated maps and seismic reflection profiles. Evidence for recent fault displacements include linear scarps which can be as small as 20 cm high but traceable for several km, right lateral offsets within submarine channels and topographic ridges, and abrupt discontinuities in sub-bottom reflectors, which in places appear to displace seafloor sediments. Several topographic highs that occur within the fault zone appear to be anticlines related to step-overs in these faults. These topographic highs are, in places, topped with circular mounds that are up to 15 m high and have ~30° sloping sides. The crests of the topographic highs and the mounds both have distinctive rough morphologies produced by broken pavements of irregular blocks of methane-derived authigenic carbonates, and by topographic depressions, commonly more than 2 m deep. These areas of distinctive rough topography are commonly associated with living

  10. Observations on Multi-Slug Activity - Implications for Volcanic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pering, T. D.; McGonigle, A. J. S.; James, M. R.; Lane, S. J.; Capponi, A.; Tamburello, G.; Aiuppa, A.

    2014-12-01

    The study of single gas slugs in volcanic conduits has received a large amount of focus within the literature. However, the more complex behaviour associated with the rise and burst of multiple slugs has yet to be considered in detail in a volcanic context. Here we combine observations and analyses of such activity using a three-pronged approach consisting of existing gas mass data collected during rapid slug driven activity at Mt. Etna, scaled laboratory analogue experiments, and computer simulations using the Ansys Fluent® fluid dynamics software. Particular focus was applied to the process of coalescence and wake capture during slug expansion and rise. The results indicate a variety of potential features and relationships, including: promotion of coalescence at distances further than predicted wake lengths, approximate maximum gas volume fraction and minimum magma viscosity values for the occurrence of stable multi-slug activity, and in the laboratory regimes a series of linear trends are associated with overall gas volume fraction and burst volume. A previously observed phenomenon at Mt. Etna, whereby larger slug bursting events are subject to a longer repose period prior to the following event, than smaller events, is also evident in the lab setting. By combining all acquired and modelled data, we derive an approximate relation, using existing formulae for slug base rise speed (Viana et al. 2003) and wake length (Campos and Guedes de Carvalho, 1988), to describe a minimum repose period which is likely to follow the burst of a slug at the surface. The outlined work has significant fluid dynamic implications for possible magma and conduit properties which can allow multi-slug activity at volcanic targets.

  11. Are midwater shrimp trapped in the craters of submarine volcanoes by hydrothermal venting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishner, Karen F.; Graff, Jason R.; Martin, Joel W.; Carey, S.; Sigurdsson, H.; Seibel, B. A.

    2005-08-01

    The biology of Kick'em Jenny (KEJ) submarine volcano, part of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc and located off the coast of Grenada in the Caribbean Sea, was studied during a cruise in 2003. Hydrothermal venting and an associated biological assemblage were discovered in the volcanic crater (˜250 m depth). Warm water with bubbling gas emanated through rock fissures and sediments. Shrimp (some of them swimming) were clustered at vents, while other individuals lay immobile on sediments. The shrimp fauna consisted of 3 mesopelagic species that had no prior record of benthic or vent association. We suggest that these midwater shrimp, from deeper water populations offshore, were trapped within the crater during their downward diel vertical migration. It is unknown whether they then succumbed to the hostile vent environment (immobile individuals) or whether they are potentially opportunistic vent residents (active individuals). Given the abundance of submarine arc volcanoes worldwide, this phenomenon suggests that volcanic arcs could be important interaction sites between oceanic midwater and vent communities.

  12. Discovery of Active Hydrothermal Sites Along the Mariana Volcanic Arc, Western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Embley, R. W.; Resing, J. A.; Lupton, J. E.; Massoth, G. J.; de Ronde, C. E.; Nakamura, K.; Walker, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    Some 20,000 km of volcanic arcs, roughly one-third the total length of the global midocean ridge (MOR) system, rim the western Pacific Ocean. But compared to 25 years of hydrothermal investigations along MORs, exploration of similar activity on the estimated 600 submarine arc volcanoes is only beginning. In February 2003, as part of the Submarine Ring of Fire project funded by NOAA's Ocean Exploration Program, we made the first systematic survey of hydrothermal activity along the 1270-km-long Mariana intraoceanic volcanic arc, which lies almost entirely within the US EEZ. Prior fieldwork had documented active (but low-temperature) hydrothermal discharge on only three volcanoes: Kasuga 2, Kasuga 3, and Esmeralda Bank. During the cruise, we conducted 70 CTD operations over more than 50 individual volcanoes from 13° N to 23° N, plus a continuous CTD survey along 75 km of the back-arc spreading center (13° 15'N to 13° 41'N) adjacent to the southern end of the arc. We found evidence for active hydrothermal venting at 11 submarine volcanoes with summit (or caldera floor) depths ranging from 50 to 1550 m. Two additional sites were identified on the back-arc spreading center. Ongoing analyses of collected water samples could increase these totals. Our results confirmed continuing hydrothermal activity at Kasuga 2 (but not Kasuga 3) and Esmeralda Bank, in addition to newly discovered sites on nine other volcanoes. Many of these sites produce intense and widely dispersed plumes indicative of vigorous, high-temperature discharge. The volcanoes with active hydrothermal systems are about equally divided between those with and without summit calderas. The addition of the Marianas data greatly improves our view of hydrothermal sources along arcs. The 20,000 km of Pacific arcs can be divided between 6380 km of intraoceanic (i.e., mostly submarine) arcs and 13,880 km of island (i.e., mostly subaerial) arcs. At present, ˜15% of the total length of Pacific arcs has been surveyed

  13. Thyroid cancer incidence in relation to volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Arnbjoernsson, E.A.; Arnbjoernsson, A.O.; Olafsson, A.

    1986-01-01

    Environmental or genetic factors are sought to explain the high incidence of thyroid cancer in Iceland. At present, it is impossible to cite any environmental factor, particularly one related to the volcanic activity in the country, which could explain the high incidence of thyroid cancer in Iceland. However, the thyroid gland in Icelanders is very small due to the high intake of iodine from seafood. It is, therefore, easier for physicians to find thyroid tumors. Furthermore, genetic factors are very likely to be of great importance in the small, isolated island of Iceland.

  14. Soil radon measurements as potential tracer of seismic and volcanic activity at Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Giammanco, Salvatore; Galli, Gianfranco; Ferrera, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    Radon is a radioactive noble gas present in all rocks of the Earth. It's used by the scientific community as a tracer of natural phenomena related to outgassing from the soil along faults, fractures and crustal discontinuity. Recently, radon has also been used on active volcanoes such as Etna, both as a precursor of volcanic phenomena as well as in the study of the dynamics of faults. The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) performs discrete and continuous measurements of radon from soil at Etna since 2002. First studies concerned measurements of radon and thoron emissions from soil carried out on the E and SW flanks of Etna, in zones characterized by the presence of numerous seismogenic and aseismic faults. The statistical treatment of the geochemical data allowed recognizing anomaly thresholds, producing distribution maps that highlighted a significant spatial correlation between soil gas anomalies and tectonic lineaments. These studies confirmed that mapping the distribution of radon and thoron in soil gas can reveal hidden faults buried by recent soil cover. INGV permanent radon monitoring network was installed in July 2005. First results were obtained during the July 2006 eruption. The radon signal recorded at Torre del Filosofo (TdF, ~2950 m asl) was compared with volcanic tremor and thermal radiance data. The onset of explosive activity and a lava fountaining episode were preceded by some hours with increases in radon activity and more gradual increases in volcanic tremor. After 2006, Etna produced dozens of paroxysmal episodes from a new vent opened on the eastern flank of the Southeast Crater (summit area), that have built up a new, huge pyroclastic cone. In many cases we observed increase in radon activity some hours before the eruptive events. These observations suggest that radon emissions from the TdF zone are sensitive to the local geodynamic pressure induced by magma dynamics in the conduit systems. Other promising results were

  15. Monitoring active volcanism using ASTER satellite remote sensing: Volcan de Colima, Colima, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvertooth, Maggie Lin

    Scope and Method of Study. ASTER satellite data was collected and analyzed in order to quantify changes in temperature, vesicularity, and morphology of the dome and crater that support evidence of constructive and destructive phases of lava dome growth and destruction cycles. These cycles are characterized by sporadic growth of a lava dome that is subsequently destroyed by a Vulcanian or Pelean style eruption. Activity reports were compared with ASTER images and new deposits were mapped along the flanks of the volcano. There is no way to distinguish between pyroclastic material, rockfall deposits, lahar deposits or lava flows therefore all new flows were mapped. Findings and Conclusions. During a constructive phase, magma that is low in volatiles rises and forms a new dome. The low amount of volatiles leads to a decrease in vesicularity. Therefore during a destructive phase vesicularity is increased. Examining changes in temperature on the dome, it appears that temperatures are at a maximum before an eruptive event, such as incandescent material being extruded at the edge of the dome. Immediately after the lava dome is removed by an explosive event, a decrease in temperature is observed. Once activity resumes, increase in temperature is seen. Morphological changes on the dome can be due to explosive events, gravitational collapse, and factors affecting the endogenous and exogenous growth of the dome. Satellite data provides a synoptic view allowing for observation of new activity to be observed earlier than ground based data may allow. In the case of the Volcan de Colima, satellite remote sensing provided insight to the constructive and destructive phases of the lava dome and current activity.

  16. Active seismic sources as a proxy for seismic surface processes: An example from the 2012 Tongariro volcanic eruptions, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, A. D.; Lokmer, I.; Kennedy, B.; Keys, H. J. R.; Proctor, J.; Lyons, J. J.; Jolly, G. E.

    2014-10-01

    The 6 August 2012 eruption from Tongariro volcano's Te Maari vent comprised a complex sequence of events including at least 4 eruption pulses, a large chasm collapse, and a debris avalanche (volume of ~ 7 × 105 m3) that propagated ~ 2 km beyond the eruptive vent. The eruption was poorly observed, being obscured by night time darkness, and the eruption timing must be unravelled instead from a complex seismic record that includes discrete volcanic earthquakes, a sequence of low to moderate level spasmodic tremor and an intense burst of seismic and infrasound activity that marked the eruption onset. We have discriminated the evolution of the complex surface activity by comparing active seismic source data to the seismic sequence in a new cross correlation source location approach. We dropped 11 high impact masses from helicopter to generate a range of active seismic sources in the vicinity of the eruption vent, chasm, and debris avalanche areas. We obtained 8 successful drops having an impact energy ranging from 3 to 9 × 106 Nm producing observable seismic signals to a distance of 5 to 10 km and having good signal to noise characteristics in the 3-12 Hz range. For the 8 drops, we picked first-P arrival times and calculated amplitude spectra for a uniform set of four stations. We then compared these proxy source excitations to the natural eruption and pre-eruption data using a moving window cross correlation approach. From the correlation processing, we obtain a best matched source position in the near vent region for the eruption period and significant down channel excitations during both the pre and post eruption periods. The total seismic energy release calculated from the new method is ~ 8 × 1011 Nm, similar to an independently estimated calculation based on the radiated seismic energy. The new energy estimate may be more robust than those calculated from standard seismic radiation equations, which may include uncertainties about the path and site effects. The

  17. A comparison of active seismic source data to seismic excitations from the 2012 Tongariro volcanic eruptions, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Kennedy, Ben; Keys, Harry; Lokmer, Ivan; Proctor, Jon; Lyons, John; Jolly, Gillian

    2014-05-01

    The 6 August 2012 eruption from Tongariro volcano's Te Maari vent comprised a complex sequence of events including at least 4 eruption jets, a large chasm collapse, and a debris avalanche (volume of ~7x105 m3) that propagated ~2 km beyond the eruptive vent. The eruption was poorly observed, being obscured by night time darkness, and the eruption chronology must be unravelled instead from a complex seismic record that includes discrete volcanic earthquakes, a sequence of low to moderate level spasmodic tremor and an intense burst of seismic and infrasound activity starting at 11:52:18 UTC that marked the eruption onset. We have discriminated the timing of the complex surface activity by comparing active seismic source data to the eruptive sequence. We dropped 11 high impact masses from helicopter to generate a range of active seismic sources in the vicinity of the eruption vent, chasm, and debris avalanche areas. We obtained 8 successful drops having an impact energy ranging from 3 to 9x106 joules producing seismic signals to a distance of 5 to 10 km and having good signal to noise characteristics in the 3-12 Hz range. For the 8 drops, we picked first-P arrival times and calculated amplitude spectra for a uniform set of four 3-component stations. From these, we obtained a distribution of amplitudes across the network for each drop position which varied systematically from the eruption vent and avalanche scar to the debris avalanche toe. We then compared these proxy source excitations to the natural eruption and pre-eruption data using a moving window cross-correlation approach. From the correlation processing, we found evidence for the debris avalanche a few minutes prior to the eruption in both the broad spectrum and narrow frequency (5-10 Hz) analysis. The total seismic energy release calculated from the new method is ~8x1011 joules, similar to an independently estimated calculation based on the radiated seismic energy. The inferred seismic energy release for the

  18. Galileo SSI Observations of Volcanic Activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Keszthely, L. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A. G.; Turtle, E. P.; Geissler, P.; Klaasen, K. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: We report on the analysis of the Galileo SSI's observations of the volcanic activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io as discussed by Milazzo et al. Galileo's Solid State Imager (SSI) observed Tvashtar Catena (63 deg N, 120 deg W) four times between November 1999 and October 2001, providing a unique look at the distinctive high latitude volcanism on Io. The November 1999 observation spatially resolved, for the first time, an active extraterrestrial fissure eruption. The brightness temperature of the lavas at the November 1999 fissure eruption was 1300 K. The second observation (orbit I27, February 2000) showed a large (approx. 500 sq km) region with many, small spots of hot, active lava. The third observation was taken in conjunction with a Cassini observation in December 2000 and showed a Pele-like plume deposition ring, while the Cassini images revealed a 400 km high Pele-type plume above the Catena. The final Galileo SSI observation of Tvashtar was acquired in October 2001, and all obvious (to SSI) activity had ceased, although data from Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) indicated that there was still significant thermal emission from the Tvashtar region. We have concentrated on analyzing the style of eruption during orbit I27 (February 2000). Comparison with a lava flow cooling model indicates that the behavior of the Tvashtar eruption during I27 does not match that of "simple" advancing lava flows. Instead, it may be an active lava lake or a complex set of lava flows with episodic, overlapping (in time and space) eruptions.

  19. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of volcanic samples: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, W.H.; Finnegan, D.L.; Crowe, B.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of volcanic emissions have been collected between and during eruptions of both Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes during the last three years. Airborne particles have been collected on Teflon filters and acidic gases on base-impregnated cellulose filters. Chemically neutral gas-phase species are collected on charcoal-coated cellulose filters. The primary analytical technique used is nondestructive neutron activation analysis, which has been used to determine the quantities of up to 35 elements on the different filters. The use of neutron activation analysis makes it possible to analyze for a wide range of elements in the different matrices used for the collection and to learn about the distribution between particles and gas phases for each of the elements.

  20. Using Spatial Density to Characterize Volcanic Fields on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C. B.; Connor, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new tool to planetary geology for quantifying the spatial arrangement of vent fields and volcanic provinces using non parametric kernel density estimation. Unlike parametricmethods where spatial density, and thus the spatial arrangement of volcanic vents, is simplified to fit a standard statistical distribution, non parametric methods offer more objective and data driven techniques to characterize volcanic vent fields. This method is applied to Syria Planum volcanic vent catalog data as well as catalog data for a vent field south of Pavonis Mons. The spatial densities are compared to terrestrial volcanic fields.

  1. Stonewall Mountain Volcanic Center, southern Nevada: Stratigraphic, structural, and facies relations of outflow sheets, near-vent tuffs, and intracaldera units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Steven I.; Noble, Donald C.

    1989-05-01

    Directly south and southeast of Stonewall Mountain, Nevada, a depression and north facing caldera scarp were formed during and(or) after eruption of the Spearhead Member of the late Miocene Stonewall Flat Tuff. Abundant large lithic and juvenile blocks are present in the Spearhead Member within 0.5 km of this topographic margin but absent elsewhere in the ash-flow sheet, consistent with eruption from vents in the Stonewall Mountain area. Within about 100,000 years, comendite tuff of the overlying Civet Cat Canyon Member of the Stonewall Flat Tuff buried the depression and associated scarp. The Civet Cat Canyon Member is traceable continuously to the north from an outflow sheet capping northwestern Pahute Mesa, into near-vent tuff on the southeastern flank of Stonewall Mountain. Proximal outflow-sheet tuff locally exhibits strong rheomorphic disruption and is overlain without a cooling break by surge, flow, and fall deposits of trachytic composition. Much of Stonewall Mountain is composed of welded tuff and megabreccia interpreted as intracaldera tuff of the Civet Cat Canyon Member, strongly suggesting that the vent area of the member was largely within Stonewall Mountain. Welded tuff of trachytic composition comprises an important part of the intracaldera Civet Cat Canyon Member, which was intruded by dikes and plugs of trachyte and rhyolite. Juvenile inclusions of basalt dispersed in near-vent facies trachyte tuff provide direct evidence for the high-level involvement of basaltic magma in the evolution of the highly potassic Stonewall Mountain center. Complex discordant compaction foliations and the widespread presence of megabreccia within the intracaldera tuff suggest, following Foley (1978), cauldron subsidence by piecemeal collapse during eruption of the Civet Cat Canyon Member. The elevation of intracaldera tuff and intrusions in Stonewall Mountain above the surrounding ashflow sheet suggests a significant amount of magmatic uplift, perhaps involving the

  2. A reduced crustal magnetization zone near the first observed active hydrothermal vent field on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Lin, Jian; Chen, Yongshun J.; Tao, Chunhui; German, Christopher R.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Tivey, Maurice A.

    2010-09-01

    Inversion of near-bottom magnetic data reveals a well-defined low crustal magnetization zone (LMZ) near a local topographic high (37°47‧S, 49°39‧E) on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). The magnetic data were collected by the autonomous underwater vehicle ABE on board R/V DaYangYiHao in February-March 2007. The first active hydrothermal vent field observed on the SWIR is located in Area A within and adjacent to the LMZ at the local topographic high, implying that this LMZ may be the result of hydrothermal alteration of magnetic minerals. The maximum reduction in crustal magnetization is 3 A/M. The spatial extent of the LMZ is estimated to be at least 6.7 × 104 m2, which is larger than that of the LMZs at the TAG vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), as well as the Relict Field, Bastille, Dante-Grotto, and New Field vent-sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdF). The calculated magnetic moment, i.e., the product of the spatial extent and amplitude of crustal magnetization reduction is at least -3 × 107 Am2 for the LMZ on the SWIR, while that for the TAG field on the MAR is -8 × 107 Am2 and that for the four individual vent fields on the JdF range from -5 × 107 to -3 × 107 Am2. Together these results indicate that crustal demagnetization is a common feature of basalt-hosted hydrothermal vent fields at mid-ocean ridges of all spreading rates. Furthermore, the crustal demagnetization of the Area A on the ultraslow-spreading SWIR is comparable in strength to that of the TAG area on the slow-spreading MAR.

  3. Evidence from acoustic imaging for submarine volcanic activity in 2012 off the west coast of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Somoza, Luis; Hernández, Pedro A.; de Vallejo, Luis González; León, Ricardo; Sagiya, Takeshi; Biain, Ander; González, Francisco J.; Medialdea, Teresa; Barrancos, José; Ibáñez, Jesús; Sumino, Hirochika; Nogami, Kenji; Romero, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    We report precursory geophysical, geodetic, and geochemical signatures of a new submarine volcanic activity observed off the western coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands. Submarine manifestation of this activity has been revealed through acoustic imaging of submarine plumes detected on the 20-kHz chirp parasound subbottom profiler (TOPAS PS18) mounted aboard the Spanish RV Hespérides on June 28, 2012. Five distinct "filament-shaped" acoustic plumes emanating from the flanks of mounds have been recognized at water depth between 64 and 88 m on a submarine platform located NW El Hierro. These plumes were well imaged on TOPAS profiles as "flares" of high acoustic contrast of impedance within the water column. Moreover, visible plumes composed of white rafts floating on the sea surface and sourcing from the location of the submarine plumes were reported by aerial photographs on July 3, 2012, 5 days after acoustic plumes were recorded. In addition, several geophysical and geochemical data support the fact that these submarine vents were preceded by several precursory signatures: (i) a sharp increase of the seismic energy release and the number of daily earthquakes of magnitude ≥2.5 on June 25, 2012, (ii) significant vertical and horizontal displacements observed at the Canary Islands GPS network (Nagoya University-ITER-GRAFCAN) with uplifts up to 3 cm from June 25 to 26, 2012, (iii) an anomalous increase of the soil gas radon activity, from the end of April until the beginning of June reaching peak values of 2.7 kBq/m3 on June 3, 2012, and (iv) observed positive peak in the air-corrected value of 3He/4He ratio monitored in ground waters (8.5 atmospheric 3He/4He ratio ( R A)) at the northwestern El Hierro on June 16, 2012. Combining these submarine and subaerial information, we suggest these plumes are the consequence of submarine vents exhaling volcanic gas mixed with fine ash as consequence of an event of rapid rise of volatile-rich magma beneath the NW submarine ridge

  4. GRID based Thermal Images Processing for volcanic activity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiagli, S.; Coco, S.; Drago, L.; Laudani, A.,; Lodato, L.; Pollicino, G.; Torrisi, O.

    2009-04-01

    Since 2001, the Catania Section of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) has been running the video stations recording the volcanic activity of Mount Etna, Stromboli and the Fossa Crater of Vulcano island. The video signals of 11 video cameras (seven operating in the visible band and four in infrared) are sent in real time to INGV Control Centre where they are visualized on monitors and archived on a dedicated NAS storage. The video surveillance of the Sicilian volcanoes, situated near to densely populated areas, helps the volcanologists providing the Civil Protection authorities with updates in real time on the on-going volcanic activity. In particular, five video cameras are operating on Mt. Etna and they record the volcano from the south and east sides 24 hours a day. During emergencies, mobile video stations may also be used to better film the most important phases of the activity. Single shots are published on the Catania Section intranet and internet websites. On June 2006 a A 40 thermal camera was installed in Vulcano La Fossa Crater. The location was in the internal and opposite crater flank (S1), 400 m distant from the fumarole field. The first two-year of data on temperature distribution frequency were recorded with this new methodology of acquisition, and automatically elaborated by software at INGV Catania Section. In fact a dedicated software developed in IDL, denominated Volcano Thermo Analysis (VTA), was appositely developed in order to extract a set of important features, able to characterize with a good approssimation the volcanic activity. In particular the program first load and opportunely convert the thermal images, then according to the Region Of Interest (ROI) and the temperature ranges defined by the user provide to automatic spatial and statistic analysis. In addition the VTA is able to analysis all the temporal series of images available in order to achieve the time-event analysis and the dynamic of the volcanic

  5. The geophysical contribution to the safeguard of historical sites in active volcanic areas.. The Vesuvius case-history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patella, Domenico; Mauriello, Paolo

    1999-03-01

    The Earth's surface is characterized by the presence of many active volcanoes, most of which are surrounded by ancient villages. High-valued historical sites are often so exposed that it becomes imperative to perform volcanic risk assessment including cultural heritage. For the safeguard of the historical property in volcanic areas, two major problems are definition of (a) criteria for diagnosis and evaluation of hazard and vulnerability, and (b) methods for risk prevention and mitigation. In this paper, we first review the state-of-the-art and most outstanding geophysical prospecting and modeling methods currently on the use, which contribute to the solution of the problems mentioned above. We then show the results of an application on the most alarming volcano in Italy, Mount Vesuvius in the Neapolitan area. The imaged configuration of the feeding and plumbing systems induces to consider Vesuvius a high-risk volcano with a high probability of pyroclastic flow in case of reactivation. Finally, we show the results from a modeling approach of a pyroclastic flow simulating the eruptive scenario of Vesuvius compatible with its internal structure and dynamics. The simulation shows that the emplacement of artificial barriers close to the eruptive vent is a practical solution to reduce the local radial momentum of the pyroclastic flow and to transfer the related energy to the vertical buoyant cloud. The Vesuvius case history allows us to conclude that the integrated geophysical surveying and modeling approach can notably contribute to make decisions and also for the protection of the historical heritage in active volcanic areas.

  6. Tectono-volcanic control of fissure type vents for the 28 Ma Panalillo ignimbrite in the Villa de Reyes Graben, San Luis Potosí, México.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tristán-González, Margarito; Labarthe-Hernández, Guillermo; Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo J.; Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo

    2008-10-01

    The volcano-tectonic events at the Villa de Reyes Graben (VRG), in the southern Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico, include 1) a regional NNE fault system developed before 32 Ma, 2) this pre-32 Ma faulting controlled the emplacement of 31.5 Ma dacitic domes, 3) NE faulting at 28 Ma that displaced the 31.5 Ma dacitic domes and formed the VRG, as well as the oblique grabens of Bledos and Enramadas oriented NW, 4) emplacement of Panalillo ignimbrite at 28 Ma filling the VRG and erupting from fissures related to the oblique grabens, and eruption of Placa basalt apparently also from fault-controlled vents.

  7. Biogeography and biodiversity in sulfide structures of active and inactive vents at deep-sea hydrothermal fields of the Southern Mariana Trough.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shingo; Takano, Yoshinori; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Oba, Hironori; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Chiyori; Utsumi, Motoo; Marumo, Katsumi; Kobayashi, Kensei; Ito, Yuki; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2010-05-01

    The abundance, diversity, activity, and composition of microbial communities in sulfide structures both of active and inactive vents were investigated by culture-independent methods. These sulfide structures were collected at four hydrothermal fields, both on- and off-axis of the back-arc spreading center of the Southern Mariana Trough. The microbial abundance and activity in the samples were determined by analyzing total organic content, enzymatic activity, and copy number of the 16S rRNA gene. To assess the diversity and composition of the microbial communities, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries including bacterial and archaeal phylotypes were constructed from the sulfide structures. Despite the differences in the geological settings among the sampling points, phylotypes related to the Epsilonproteobacteria and cultured hyperthermophilic archaea were abundant in the libraries from the samples of active vents. In contrast, the relative abundance of these phylotypes was extremely low in the libraries from the samples of inactive vents. These results suggest that the composition of microbial communities within sulfide structures dramatically changes depending on the degree of hydrothermal activity, which was supported by statistical analyses. Comparative analyses suggest that the abundance, activity and diversity of microbial communities within sulfide structures of inactive vents are likely to be comparable to or higher than those in active vent structures, even though the microbial community composition is different between these two types of vents. The microbial community compositions in the sulfide structures of inactive vents were similar to those in seafloor basaltic rocks rather than those in marine sediments or the sulfide structures of active vents, suggesting that the microbial community compositions on the seafloor may be constrained by the available energy sources. Our findings provide helpful information for understanding the biogeography, biodiversity and

  8. Crustal structure along the active Costa Rican volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarralde, D.; Holbrook, W. S.; van Avendonk, H. J.; Mora Fernandez, M.; Alvarado, G. E.; Harder, S. H.

    2010-12-01

    We present results from an explosion-source seismic refraction transect along the entire active Costa Rican volcanic arc. The seismic data were acquired in 2005 as part of the TICO-CAVA experiment with the goals of delineating the basic crustal architecture of this relatively young volcanic arc, understanding magmatic emplacement processes, and estimating the bulk composition and growth rates of arc crust. The seismic transect extends ~280 km along the axis of the arc and consists of 16 shots (200 - 1200 kg) recorded by 710 seismometers. The active Costa Rican arc consists of two segments with distinct morphologies, the Guanacaste Cordillera (GC) in the north and Central Cordillera (CC) in the south. This segmentation is linked to the subducting Cocos ridge, which occurs beneath the CC and has a northern boundary roughly coincident with the arc segment boundary. Volcanoes of the GC rise from a plateau of ~500 m elevation to maximum heights of ~1500 m, while the CC volcanoes rise from ~1500 m to heights of 3500 m. The crustal structure beneath these segments is distinctly different. The entire arc is covered by a ~5-km-thick carapace with velocities of 4.5-5.8 km/s that probably represent volcaniclastics, flows and small plutons. Beneath the GC, a 1- to 2-km-thick “grainitic” layer (6.0-6.1 km/s) lies beneath the carapace. Velocities below this granitic layer suggest a somewhat more mafic composition, but they increase slowly with depth from 6.2-6.3 km/s between 6-15 km depth. Total crustal thickness beneath the GC is ~40 km, but analysis of crustal thickness is ongoing. The crust beneath Guanacaste thus has a velocity structure very similar to average continental crust, though with slightly slower velocities, perhaps due to high temperatures beneath the arc. As the arc has only been active in this location for <5 m.y., this suggests that either the earlier Neogene arc to the west substantially modified the oceanic-plateau crustal foundation here or that the

  9. Gish Bar Patera, Io: Geology and Volcanic Activity, 1996-2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jason; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly; McEwen, Alfred; Keszthelyi, Laszlo

    2003-01-01

    Since the two Voyagers passed by Jupiter in 1979, it has been known that volcanic activity is ubiquitous on the surface of Io. With over 400 volcanic centers, Io is even more volcanically active than the earth with massive flood basalt-style eruptions and komatitite lavas a common occurrence. Additionally, some volcanoes appear to be giant lava lakes, with violent activity churning the crust of the lake for periods of 20 years or more. Finally, sulfur is believed to play a large role in Io's volcanism, be it as a primary lava or as a secondary product of large, high-temperature eruptions. By studying one volcano in particular, Gish Bar Patera, one can observe many of these characteristics in one volcanic center.

  10. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  11. Vented Capacitor

    DOEpatents

    Brubaker, Michael Allen; Hosking, Terry Alan

    2006-04-11

    A technique of increasing the corona inception voltage (CIV), and thereby increasing the operating voltage, of film/foil capacitors is described. Intentional venting of the capacitor encapsulation improves the corona inception voltage by allowing internal voids to equilibrate with the ambient environment.

  12. Io's Diverse Styles of Volcanic Activity: Results from Galileo NIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L. W.; Doute, S.; Carlson, R.; McEwen, A.; Geissler, P.

    2001-01-01

    Observations by Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer were used to map the thermal structure of several of Io's hot spots, revealing different styles of volcanism Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  13. Catastrophic volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  14. Volcanic activity recorded in deep-sea sediments and the geodynamic evolution of western Pacific island arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambray, Hervé; Pubellier, Manuel; Jolivet, Laurent; Pouclet, André

    A compilation of volcanic ashes interbedded in deep-sea sediments was carried out from DSDP-IPOD and ODP data collected along the western Pacific margin. Using a tephrochronological method, we attempted to reconstruct the Cenozoic and Quaternary volcanic activity of major western Pacific arcs. For every arc, established volcanic episodes and volcanic-tectonic evolution recorded on land were compared. This study reveals close connections between tectonic events and volcanic activity of arcs, as well a temporal relationship between the opening of marginal basins and arc volcanism. In the Tohoku (NE Japan) and Bonin arcs (SE Japan), arc volcanic activity clearly vanishes during backarc spreading. In contrast, intense volcanism occurs during both arc rifting and intervals of no spreading. Detailed comparisons show that the maximum volcanic output is closely connected with the stress field evolution recorded on land. The case of Seinan arc (SW Japan) shows a good fit between volcanic episodes and periods of release of the compressional stress field after major orogenic events. Furthermore, in the marine sediments off Japan, a systematic late Miocene volcanic hiatus interpreted as a quiescence of volcanic activity corresponds to a changing stress field on the Tohoku and Bonin arcs. These correlations between volcanic episodicity and tectonic evolution of island arcs allow us to discuss the influence of subduction process on arc volcanism. In the Philippines, the volcanic signal in marine sediments is compromised by rapid alteration and diagenesis of ashes. Nonetheless, only the main events of arc volcanic activity are preserved. A comparison with on land volcanism shows that this filtered volcanic signal in different places corresponds to incipient subduction (transition from passive to active margins) or to the final stages of basin closure.

  15. 1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

  16. Isolated communities of Epsilonproteobacteria in hydrothermal vent fluids of the Mariana Arc seamounts.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julie A; Cantin, Holly V; Huse, Susan M; Welch, David B Mark; Sogin, Mitchell L; Butterfield, David A

    2010-09-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal vent fluids represent access points to diverse microbial communities living in oceanic crust. This study examined the distribution, relative abundance, and diversity of Epsilonproteobacteria in 14 low-temperature vent fluids from five volcanically active seamounts of the Mariana Arc using a 454 tag sequencing approach. Most vent fluids were enriched in cell concentrations compared with background seawater, and quantitative PCR results indicated that all fluids were dominated by bacteria. Operational taxonomic unit-based statistical tools applied to 454 data show that all vents from the northern end of the Mariana Arc grouped together, to the exclusion of southern arc seamounts, which were as distinct from one another as they were from northern seamounts. Statistical analysis also showed a significant relationship between seamount and individual vent groupings, suggesting that community membership may be linked to geographical isolation and not geochemical parameters. However, while there may be large-scale geographic differences, distance is not the distinguishing factor in the microbial community composition. At the local scale, most vents host a distinct population of Epsilonproteobacteria, regardless of seamount location. This suggests that there may be barriers to exchange and dispersal for these vent endemic microorganisms at hydrothermal seamounts of the Mariana Arc.

  17. Genetic diversity and connectivity of deep-sea hydrothermal vent metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2010-10-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents provide ephemeral habitats for animal communities that depend on chemosynthetic primary production. Sporadic volcanic and tectonic events destroy local vent fields and create new ones. Ongoing dispersal and cycles of extirpation and colonization affect the levels and distribution of genetic diversity in vent metapopulations. Several species exhibit evidence for stepping-stone dispersal along relatively linear, oceanic, ridge axes. Other species exhibit very high rates of gene flow, although natural barriers associated with variation in depth, deep-ocean currents, and lateral offsets of ridge axes often subdivide populations. Various degrees of impedance to dispersal across such boundaries are products of species-specific life histories and behaviours. Though unrelated to the size of a species range, levels of genetic diversity appear to correspond with the number of active vent localities that a species occupies within its range. Pioneer species that rapidly colonize nascent vents tend to be less subdivided and more diverse genetically than species that are slow to establish colonies at vents. Understanding the diversity and connectivity of vent metapopulations provides essential information for designing deep-sea preserves in regions that are under consideration for submarine mining of precious metals.

  18. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distingushing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Lava Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts [1-3]. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  19. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distinguishing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  20. Violent Gas Venting on the Heng-Chun Mud Volcano, South China Sea Active Continental Margin offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Cheng, W. Y.; Tseng, Y. T.; Chen, N. C.; Hsieh, I. C.; Yang, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of methane as gas hydrate under the sea floor has been considered a major trap for both thermal and biogenic gas in marine environment. Aided by rapid AOM process near the sea floor, fraction of methane escaping the sea floor has been considered at minuscule. However, most studies focused mainly on deepwater gas hydrate systems where gas hydrate remain relatively stable. We have studied methane seeps on the active margin offshore Taiwan, where rapid tectonic activities occur. Our intention is to evaluate the scale and condition of gas seeps in the tectonic active region. Towcam, coring, heat probe, chirp, multibeam bathymetric mapping and echo sounding were conducted at the study areas. Our results showed that gas is violently venting at the active margin, not only through sediments, but also through overlying sea water, directly into the atmosphere. Similar ventings, but, not in this scale, have also been identified previously in the nearby region. High concentrations of methane as well as traces of propane were found in sediments and in waters with flares. In conjunction, abundant chemosynthetic community, life mussel, clams, tube worms, bacterial mats together with high concentrations of dissolve sulfide, large authigenic carbonate buildups were also found. Our results indicate that methane could be another major green house gas in the shallow water active margin region.

  1. Chemical evolution at the coasts of active volcanic islands in a primordial salty ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasdeit, H.; Fox, S.

    2008-09-01

    The Prebiotic Hot-Volcanic-Coast Scenario It has been suggested that in the Hadean eon (4.5-3.8 Ga before present) no permanent continents but volcanic islands and short-lived protocontinents protruded from the first ocean [1, 2]. As the geothermal heat production was considerably higher than today, it is reasonable to assume that hot volcanic coasts were much more abundant. The salinity of the ocean was probably up to two times higher than the modern value [3]. Under these conditions, the evaporation of seawater at active volcanic coasts must have produced sea salt crusts - a process that can still be observed today [4]. On the hot lava rock, the salt crusts can subsequently experience temperatures up to some hundred degrees Celsius. The seawater probably contained abiotically formed organic molecules such as amino acids, which were inevitably embedded into the sea salt crusts. Different prebiotic sources of amino acids have been discussed: (i) comets and meteorites [5], electrical discharges in the atmosphere [6, 7], and deep-sea hydrothermal vents [8]. We undertook a systematic study of solid salt-amino acid mixtures, especially of their formation and thermal behavior under simulated conditions of the hotvolcanic- coast scenario. Laboratory Experiments Amino acids@salts Artificial Hadean seawater was prepared by dissolving NaCl (705 mmol), MgCl2 (80 mmol), KCl (15 mmol), CaCl2 (15 mmol), and an α-amino acid (5-10 mmol) or a mixture of α-amino acids. In order to model the first step of the hot-volcanic-coast scenario, the solutions were evaporated to dryness. Vibrational spectroscopy (IR, Raman) and X-ray powder diffraction showed that the resulting solid residues were not heterogeneous mixtures of salt and amino acid crystals. Instead the amino acid molecules were coordinated in calcium or magnesium complexes. We have studied the rac-alanine ( + H3NCH(CH3)COO -, Hala) system in more detail and found that the complex that is present in the mixture has the

  2. Molecular Diversity and Activity of Methanogens in the Subseafloor at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents of the Pacific Ocean (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Merkel, A.; Holden, J. F.; Lilley, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Methanogenesis is thought to represent one of the most ancient metabolic pathways on Earth, and methanogens may serve as important primary producers in warm crustal habitats at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Many of these obligate chemolithoautotrophs depend solely on geochemically-derived energy and carbon sources and grow at high temperatures under strictly anaerobic conditions. A combined geochemical and microbiological approach was used to determine the distribution and molecular diversity of methanogens in low temperature diffuse vent fluids from the Endeavour Segment R2K ISS site, as well as Axial Seamount and volcanoes of the Mariana Arc. Geochemical data from hot and adjacent warm diffuse vent fluids provided chemical indicators to guide sample selection for detailed polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis of the key enzyme for methane formation, methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), as well as archaeal 16S rRNA genes. At most Endeavour vent sites, hydrogen concentrations were too low to support hydrogenotrophic methanogensis directly and only one diffuse site, Easter Island, had a positive signal for the mcrA gene. These sequences were most closely related to members of the order Methanococcales, as well as anaerobic methane oxidizers (ANME-1). The presence of ANME, which are rarely found in non-sedimented marine environments, is another line of evidence supporting the occurrence of buried sediments at Endeavour. At Axial, a number of diffuse vents have strong chemical indicators of methanogenesis. Methanogenic communities were detected at 3 sites on the southeast side of the caldera: the northern end of the 1998 lava flow, the International District, and on the pre-1987 lava flow. Time series work at Marker 113 showed that in 4 different years over the last 6 years methanogenic communities are active and abundant, suggesting a stable anaerobic, warm subseafloor habitat. Results show that members of the order Methanococcales dominate at this site

  3. On-line image analysis of the stromboli volcanic activity recorded by the surveillance camera helps the forecasting of the major eruptive events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristaldi, A.; Coltelli, M.; Mangiagli, S.; Pecora, E.

    2003-04-01

    The typical activity of Stromboli consists of intermittent mild explosions lasting a few seconds, which take place at different vents and at variable intervals, the most common time interval being 10-20 minutes. However, the routine activity can be interrupted by more violent, paroxysmal explosions, that eject m-sized scoriaceous bombs and lava blocks to a distance of several hundreds of meters from the craters, endangering the numerous tourists that watch the spectacular activity from the volcano's summit located about two hundreds meters from the active vents. On average, 1-2 paroxysmal explosions occurred per year over the past century, but this statistic may be underestimated in absence of continuous monitoring. For this reason from summer 1996 a remote surveillance camera works on Stromboli recording continuously the volcanic activity. It is located on Pizzo Sopra la Fossa, 100 metres above the crater terrace where are the active vents. Using image analysis we seeks to identify any change of the explosive activity trend that could precede a particular eruptive event, like paroxysmal explosions, fire fountains, lava flows. From the day of the camera installation up to present 12 paroxysmal events and lava flows occurred. The analysis include the counting of the explosions occurred at the different craters and the parameterization in classes of intensity for each explosion on the base of tephra dispersion and kinetics energy. The plot of dissipated energy by each crater versus time shows a cyclic behavior with max and min of explosive activity ranging from a few days to a month. Often the craters show opposite trends so when the activity decreases in a crater, increases in the other. Before every paroxysmal explosions recorded, the crater that produced the event decreased and then stopped its activity from a few days to weeks before. The other crater tried to compensate increasing its activity and when it declined the paroxysmal explosion occurred suddenly at

  4. Fissural volcanism, polygenetic volcanic fields, and crustal thickness in the Payen Volcanic Complex on the central Andes foreland (Mendoza, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, F.; Fornaciai, A.; Bistacchi, A.; Pasquarè, F. A.

    2008-09-01

    Shield volcanoes, caldera-bearing stratovolcanoes, and monogenetic cones compose the large fissural Payen Volcanic Complex, located in the Andes foreland between latitude 35°S and 38°S. The late Pliocene-Pleistocene and recent volcanic activity along E-W trending eruptive fissures produced basaltic lavas showing a within-plate geochemical signature. The spatial distribution of fractures and monogenetic vents is characterized by self-similar clustering with well defined power law distributions. Vents have average spacing of 1.27 km and fractal exponent D = 1.33 defined in the range 0.7-49.3 km. The fractal exponent of fractures is 1.62 in the range 1.5-48.1 km. The upper cutoffs of fractures and vent fractal distributions (about 48-49 km) scale to the crustal thickness in the area, as derived from geophysical data. This analysis determines fractured media (crust) thickness associated with basaltic retroarc eruptions. We propose that the Payen Volcanic Complex was and is still active under an E-W crustal shortening regime.

  5. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  6. A continuous 770-year record of volcanic activity from east Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John C.; Narita, Hideki; Maeno, Norikazu

    1991-09-01

    A 100-m ice core from east Antarctica has been analyzed for volcanic activity using dielectric profiling. Reasonably accurate dates are given for the eruptions of Tambora (1815), Agung (1963), Krakatoa (1883), and the well-known eruption of 1259.

  7. Distribution, activity and function of short-chain alkane degrading phylotypes in hydrothermal vent sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Joye, S. B.; Hoarfrost, A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Global geochemical analyses suggest that C2-C4 short chain alkanes are a common component of the utilizable carbon pool in deep-sea sediments worldwide and have been found in diverse ecosystems. From a thermodynamic standpoint, the anaerobic microbial oxidation of these aliphatic hydrocarbons is more energetically yielding than the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Therefore, the preferential degradation of these hydrocarbons may compete with AOM for the use of oxidants such as sulfate, or other potential oxidants. Such processes could influence the fate of methane in the deep-sea. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) from hydrocarbon seep sediments of the Gulf of Mexico and Guaymas Basin have previously been enriched that anaerobically oxidize short chain alkanes to generate CO2 with the preferential utilization of 12C-enriched alkanes (Kniemeyer et al. 2007). Different temperature regimens along with multiple substrates were tested and a pure culture (deemed BuS5) was isolated from mesophilic enrichments with propane or n-butane as the sole carbon source. Through comparative sequence analysis, strain BuS5 was determined to cluster with the metabolically diverse Desulfosarcina / Desulfococcus cluster, which also contains the SRB found in consortia with anaerobic, methane-oxidizing archaea in seep sediments. Enrichments from a terrestrial, low temperature sulfidic hydrocarbon seep also corroborated that propane degradation occurred with most bacterial phylotypes surveyed belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, particularly Desulfobacteraceae (Savage et al. 2011). To date, no microbes capable of ethane oxidation or anaerobic C2-C4 alkane oxidation at thermophilic temperature have been isolated. The sediment-covered, hydrothermal vent systems found at Middle Valley (Juan de Fuca Ridge, eastern Pacific Ocean) are a prime environment for investigating mesophilic to thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved

  8. G-EVER Activities and the Next-generation Volcanic Hazard Assessment System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarada, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER) is a consortium of Asia-Pacific geohazard research institutes that was established in 2012. G-EVER aims to formulate strategies to reduce the risks of disasters worldwide caused by the occurrence of earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions. G-EVER is working on enhancing collaboration, sharing of resources, and making information on the risks of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions freely available and understandable. The 1st G-EVER International Symposium was held in Tsukuba, Japan in March 11, 2013. The 2nd Symposium is scheduled in Sendai, Tohoku Japan, in Oct. 19-20, 2013. Currently, 4 working groups were proposed in the G-EVER Consortium. The next-generation volcano hazard assessment WG is developing a useful system for volcanic eruption prediction, risk assessment, and evacuation at various eruption stages. The assessment system is based on volcanic eruption history datasets, volcanic eruption database, and numerical simulations. Volcanic eruption histories including precursor phenomena leading to major eruptions of active volcanoes are very important for future prediction of volcanic eruptions. A high quality volcanic eruption database, which contains compilations of eruption dates, volumes, and types, is important for the next-generation volcano hazard assessment system. Proposing international standards on how to estimate the volume of volcanic products is important to make a high quality volcanic eruption database. Spatial distribution database of volcanic products (e.g. tephra and pyroclastic flow distributions), encoded into a GIS based database is necessary for more precise area and volume estimation and risk assessments. The volcanic eruption database is developed based on past eruption results, which only represents a subset of possible future scenarios. Therefore, numerical simulations with controlled parameters are needed for more precise volcanic eruption

  9. Exploring a long-lasting volcanic eruption by means of in-soil radon measurements and seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsaperla, Susanna; Neri, Marco; Di Grazia, Giuseppe; Langer, Horst; Spampinato, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    We analyze in-soil radon (Rn) emission and ambient parameters (barometric pressure and air temperature measurements) along with seismic activity during the longest flank eruption of this century at Mt. Etna, Italy. This eruption occurred between 14 May 2008 and 6 July 2009, from a N120-140°E eruptive fissure extending between 3050 and 2620 m above sea level. It was heralded by a short-lived (~5 hours) episode of lava fountaining three days before a dike-forming intrusion fed a lava emission, which affected the summit area of the volcano over ~15 months. The peculiar position of the station for the Rn measurement, which was at an altitude of 2950 m above sea level and near (~1 km) the summit active craters, offered us the uncommon chance: i) to explore the temporal development of the gas emission close (<2 km) to the 2008-2009 eruptive vents in the long term, and ii) to analyze the relationship between in-soil Rn fluxes and seismic signals (in particular, local earthquakes and volcanic tremor) during the uninterrupted lava emission. This approach reveals important details about the recharging phases characterizing the 2008-2009 eruption, which are not visible with other methods of investigation. Our study benefitted from the application of methods of pattern classification developed in the framework of the European MEDiterrranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED­SUV) project.

  10. Volcanic hazards of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1994-12-01

    Potential volcanic hazards are assessed, and hazard zone maps are developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. The basis of the hazards assessment and mapping is the past volcanic history of the INEL region, and the apparent similarity of INEL volcanism with equivalent, well-studied phenomena in other regions of active volcanism, particularly Hawaii and Iceland. The most significant hazards to INEL facilities are associated with basaltic volcanism, chiefly lava flows, which move slowly and mainly threaten property by inundation or burning. Related hazards are volcanic gases and tephra, and ground disturbance associated with the ascent of magma under the volcanic zones. Several volcanic zones are identified in the INEL area. These zones contain most of the volcanic vents and fissures of the region and are inferred to be the most probable sites of future INEL volcanism. Volcanic-recurrence estimates are given for each of the volcanic zones based on geochronology of the lavas, together with the results of field and petrographic investigations concerning the cogenetic relationships of INEL volcanic deposits and associated magma intrusion. Annual probabilities of basaltic volcanism within the INEL volcanic zones range from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 16,000-year interval between eruptions) for the axial volcanic zone near the southern INEL boundary and the Arco volcanic-rift zone near the western INEL boundary, to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 100,000-year interval between eruptions) for the Howe-East Butte volcanic rift zone, a geologically old and poorly defined feature of the central portion of INEL. Three volcanic hazard zone maps are developed for the INEL area: lava flow hazard zones, a tephra (volcanic ash) and gas hazard zone, and a ground-deformation hazard zone. The maps are useful in land-use planning, site selection, and safety analysis.

  11. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  12. Short-term spasmodic switching of volcanic tremor source activation in a conduit of the 2011 Kirishima eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, T.; Uehira, K.; Yamashita, Y.; Nakamoto, M.; Miyazaki, M.; Chikura, H.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic tremors are seismic indicators providing clues for magma behavior, which is related to volcanic eruptions and activity. Detection of spatial and temporal variations of volcanic tremors is important for understanding the mechanism of volcanic eruptions. However, temporal variations of tremor activity in short-term than a minute have not been previously detected by seismological observations around volcanoes. Here, we show that volcanic tremor sources were activated at the top of the conduit (i.e. the crater) and at its lower end by analyzing seismograms from a dense seismic array during the 2011 Kirishima eruption. We observed spasmodic switching in the seismic ray direction during a volcanic tremor sequence. Such fine volcanic tremor structure suggests an interaction between tremor sources located in both deep and shallow depths. Our result suggests that seismic array observations can monitor the magma behavior and contribute to the evaluation of the activity's transition.

  13. Effects of Vent Asymmetry on Steady and Unsteady Eruption Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, S.; Ogden, D.

    2013-12-01

    Models of volcanic eruptions are typically based on symmetric vent and conduit geometries. However, in natural settings, these features are rarely perfectly symmetric. For example, the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St Helens (MSH) took place through a highly asymmetrical crater due to the preceding landslide and subsequent vent erosion. In supersonic, high-pressure eruptions, such as what may have occurred at MSH, vent and crater asymmetry can strongly affect the directionality of the eruption. Here we explore flow dynamics resulting from a supersonic, high-pressure eruption though an asymmetric volcanic vent and a symmetric vent using a both unsteady numerical simulations and semi-analytical steady-state models. Preliminary results from both methods suggest that asymmetric vent shape may provide a first-order effect on dynamics of the initial phases of explosive eruptions.

  14. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. Reduction of Carbon Dioxide in Filtering Facepiece Respirators with an Active-Venting System: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Birgersson, Erik; Tang, Ee Ho; Lee, Wei Liang Jerome; Sak, Kwok Jiang

    2015-01-01

    During expiration, the carbon dioxide (CO2) levels inside the dead space of a filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) increase significantly above the ambient concentration. To reduce the CO2 concentration inside the dead space, we attach an active lightweight venting system (AVS) comprising a one-way valve, a blower and a battery in a housing to a FFR. The achieved reduction is quantified with a computational-fluid-dynamics model that considers conservation of mass, momentum and the dilute species, CO2, inside the FFR with and without the AVS. The results suggest that the AVS can reduce the CO2 levels inside the dead space at the end of expiration to around 0.4% as compared to a standard FFR, for which the CO2 levels during expiration reach the same concentration as that of the expired alveolar air at around 5%. In particular, during inspiration, the average CO2 volume fraction drops to near-to ambient levels of around 0.08% with the AVS. Overall, the time-averaged CO2 volume fractions inside the dead space for the standard FFR and the one with AVS are around 3% and 0.3% respectively. Further, the ability of the AVS to vent the dead-space air in the form of a jet into the ambient - similar to the jets arising from natural expiration without a FFR - ensures that the expired air is removed and diluted more efficiently than a standard FFR.

  16. Reduction of Carbon Dioxide in Filtering Facepiece Respirators with an Active-Venting System: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Birgersson, Erik; Tang, Ee Ho; Lee, Wei Liang Jerome; Sak, Kwok Jiang

    2015-01-01

    During expiration, the carbon dioxide (CO2) levels inside the dead space of a filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) increase significantly above the ambient concentration. To reduce the CO2 concentration inside the dead space, we attach an active lightweight venting system (AVS) comprising a one-way valve, a blower and a battery in a housing to a FFR. The achieved reduction is quantified with a computational-fluid-dynamics model that considers conservation of mass, momentum and the dilute species, CO2, inside the FFR with and without the AVS. The results suggest that the AVS can reduce the CO2 levels inside the dead space at the end of expiration to around 0.4% as compared to a standard FFR, for which the CO2 levels during expiration reach the same concentration as that of the expired alveolar air at around 5%. In particular, during inspiration, the average CO2 volume fraction drops to near-to ambient levels of around 0.08% with the AVS. Overall, the time-averaged CO2 volume fractions inside the dead space for the standard FFR and the one with AVS are around 3% and 0.3% respectively. Further, the ability of the AVS to vent the dead-space air in the form of a jet into the ambient – similar to the jets arising from natural expiration without a FFR – ensures that the expired air is removed and diluted more efficiently than a standard FFR. PMID:26115090

  17. Imaging of volcanic activity on Jupiter's moon Io by Galileo during the Galileo Europa Mission and the Galileo Millennium Mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.; Phillips, C.B.; Milazzo, M.; Geissler, P.; Turtle, E.P.; Radebaugh, J.; Williams, D.A.; Simonelli, D.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Klaasen, K.P.; Levanas, G.; Denk, T.; Alexander, D.D.A.; Capraro, K.; Chang, S.-H.; Chen, A.C.; Clark, J.; Conner, D.L.; Culver, A.; Handley, T.H.; Jensen, D.N.; Knight, D.D.; LaVoie, S.K.; McAuley, M.; Mego, V.; Montoya, O.; Mortensen, H.B.; Noland, S.J.; Patel, R.R.; Pauro, T.M.; Stanley, C.L.; Steinwand, D.J.; Thaller, T.F.; Woncik, P.J.; Yagi, G.M.; Yoshimizu, J.R.; Alvarez, Del; Castillo, E.M.; Belton, M.J.S.; Beyer, R.; Branston, D.; Fishburn, M.B.; Mueller, B.; Ragan, R.; Samarasinha, N.; Anger, C.D.; Cunningham, C.; Little, B.; Arriola, S.; Carr, M.H.; Asphaug, E.; Moore, J.; Morrison, D.; Rages, K.; Banfield, D.; Bell, M.; Burns, J.A.; Carcich, B.; Clark, B.; Currier, N.; Dauber, I.; Gierasch, P.J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mann, M.; Othman, O.; Rossier, L.; Solomon, N.; Sullivan, R.; Thomas, P.C.; Veverka, J.; Becker, T.; Edwards, K.; Gaddis, L.; Kirk, R.; Lee, E.; Rosanova, T.; Sucharski, R.M.; Beebe, R.F.; Simon, A.; Bender, K.; Chuang, F.; Fagents, S.; Figueredo, P.; Greeley, R.; Homan, K.; Kadel, S.; Kerr, J.; Klemaszewski, J.; Lo, E.; Schwarz, W.; Williams, K.; Bierhaus, E.; Brooks, S.; Chapman, C.R.; Merline, B.; Keller, J.; Schenk, P.; Tamblyn, P.; Bouchez, A.; Dyundian, U.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Showman, A.; Spitale, J.; Stewart, S.; Vasavada, A.; Cunningham, W.F.; Johnson, T.V.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Meredith, M.K.; Orton, G.S.; Senske, D.A.; West, A.; Winther, D.; Collins, G.; Fripp, W.J.; Head, J. W.; Pappalardo, R.; Pratt, S.; Procter, L.; Spaun, N.; Colvin, T.; Davies, M.; DeJong, E.M.; Hall, J.; Suzuki, S.; Gorjian, Z.; Giese, B.; Koehler, U.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Roatsch, T.; Tost, W.; Schuster, P.; Wagner, R.; Dieter, N.; Durda, D.; Greenberg, R.J.; Hoppa, G.; Jaeger, W.; Plassman, J.; Tufts, R.; Fanale, F.P.; Gran,

    2001-01-01

    The Solid-State Imaging (SSI) instrument provided the first high- and medium-resolution views of Io as the Galileo spacecraft closed in on the volcanic body in late 1999 and early 2000. While each volcanic center has many unique features, the majority can be placed into one of two broad categories. The "Promethean" eruptions, typified by the volcanic center Prometheus, are characterized by long-lived steady eruptions producing a compound flow field emplaced in an insulating manner over a period of years to decades. In contrast, "Pillanian" eruptions are characterized by large pyroclastic deposits and short-lived but high effusion rate eruptions from fissures feeding open-channel or open-sheet flows. Both types of eruptions commonly have ???100-km-tall, bright, SO2-rich plumes forming near the flow fronts and smaller deposits of red material that mark the vent for the silicate lavas. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  19. Hot vents in an ice-cold ocean: Indications for phase separation at the southernmost area of hydrothermal activity, Bransfield Strait, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dählmann, A.; Wallmann, K.; Sahling, H.; Sarthou, G.; Bohrmann, G.; Petersen, S.; Chin, C. S.; Klinkhammer, G. P.

    2001-12-01

    During the expeditions ANT-XV/2 with R/V Polarstern in 1997/98 and NBP 99-04 with R/V IB N.B. Palmer in 1999, the first samples of hydrothermally influenced sediments of Bransfield Strait were obtained at Hook Ridge, a volcanic edifice in the Central Basin of the Strait. The vent sites are characterized by white siliceous crusts on top of the sediment layer and temperatures measured immediately on deck are up to 48.5°C. The shallow depth of these vent sites (1050 m) particularly controls the chemistry of the pore fluids that are enriched in silica and sulfide and show low pH values. Chloride is depleted up to 20% and the calculated hydrothermal endmember concentration is in the range of 1-84 mM. Since other mechanisms for Cl depletion can be ruled out clearly, the composition of this fluid is attributed to phase separation. While the Cl-depleted fluid is emanating at Hook Ridge, a Cl-enriched fluid can be identified in the adjacent King George Basin. Using a p,x diagram the two corresponding endmember concentrations reveal that the phase separation takes place at subcritical conditions (total depth: ˜2500 m), probably along the whole volcanic edifice.

  20. Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

  1. Decline of a Hydrothermal Vent Field - Escanaba Trough 12 Years Later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Davis, A. S.; Lilley, M. D.; McClain, J. S.; Olson, E. S.; Ross, S. L.; Von Damm, K. L.

    2001-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting was discovered in Escanaba Trough, the southern sediment-covered portion of the Gorda Ridge, in 1988. Large pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide mounds are abundant at each of the volcanic/intrusive centers that have been investigated in Escanaba Trough, but the only area of known hydrothermal venting is the NESCA site along the ridge axis at 41\\deg N. Hydrothermal fluids venting at 217\\deg C and 108\\deg C were sampled in 1988 on two sulfide mounds separated by about 275 m. The end-member fluid compositions were indistinguishable within analytical errors. Several sulfide mounds were observed in 1988 which had diffusely venting low temperature (< 20\\deg C) fluids that supported extensive vent communities dominated by fields of Ridgia. Nine holes were drilled in the NESCA area in 1996 on ODP Leg 169, including Hole 1036I that penetrated to basaltic basement at 405 m below sea floor (mbsf). Surveys of the area using the drill string camera located only one area of active venting at the same mound where 217\\deg C vent fluids were sampled from two active vents in 1988. Drill hole 1036A was spudded between the two active vents on this sulfide mound (approximately 4 and 8 m away) and penetrated to 115 mbsf. The NESCA site was revisited in 2000 using MBARI's R/V Western Flyer and ROV Tiburon. The hydrothermal vents appeared essentially identical to observations made from the drill string camera in 1996 despite the presence of a drill hole within meters of the two vents. The maximum vent temperature measured in 2000 was 212\\deg C. Fluid samples have major element and isotopic compositions very similar to those collected in 1988. The vent fluids have higher methane ( ~19 mmol/kg) than those from the geologically similar Middle Valley vent field, but lower values than those at Guaymas Basin. Drill hole 1036A was weakly venting, but the diffuse hydrothermal fluids could not be sampled with the equipment available. The walls of the drill hole were

  2. FAMoUS goes to Guatemala: Integrated thermal and high-speed imaging of explosive activity at Santiaguito dome and Volcan de Fuego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlato, P.; Andronico, D.; Cimarelli, C.; Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; Johnson, J. B.

    2012-04-01

    ballistics on the active lavas and dome surroundings; iv) after the first main explosion, a minor ash emission follows within a few minutes from the tumuli area; iv) continuous degassing is restricted to the high temperatures fumaroles at the rim of the tumuli while degassing from the summit is driven by the intermittent explosions. At Fuego, two days of quasi-continuous recording was carried out from an observation point located at ca. 900 m horizontal and 200 m vertical distance from the summit crater, respectively. Here the volcanic activity consisted of mildly to moderate energetic explosions producing cannon-like ejection of incandescent meter-sized ballistics up to 850 meters from the vents, and of small buoyant volcanic plumes rising for 100-300 m and rapidly dispersed in atmosphere by the strong winds, and short-lasting ash-venting. This two-fold activity was randomly interchanging and discontinuously occurring in time. Although our observation point prevented the direct view of the active vents, thermal images were able to distinguish at least three eruptive vents from which gas-solid mixture jets issued. Combined high-speed thermal and visible images allow the discrimination of gas-particles coupling/decoupling, the estimate of ejection velocity of ballistics and the thermal evolution of the observed plumes.

  3. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors <2 km. These events concentrated mainly below Tres Virgenes volcanoes, and the geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  4. Recurrence Rate and Magma Effusion Rate for the Latest Volcanism on Arsia Mons, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Jacob A.; Wilson, James A.; Connor, Charles B.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Kiyosugi, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Magmatism and volcanism have evolved the Martian lithosphere, surface, and climate throughout the history of Mars. Constraining the rates of magma generation and timing of volcanism on the surface clarifies the ways in which magma and volcanic activity have shaped these Martian systems. The ages of lava flows on other planets are often estimated using impact crater counts, assuming that the number and size-distribution of impact craters per unit area reflect the time the lava flow has been on the surface and exposed to potential impacts. Here we show that impact crater age model uncertainty is reduced by adding stratigraphic information observed at locations where neighboring lavas abut each other, and demonstrate the significance of this reduction in age uncertainty for understanding the history of a volcanic field comprising 29 vents in the 110-kilometer-diameter caldera of Arsia Mons, Mars. Each vent within this caldera produced lava flows several to tens of kilometers in length; these vents are likely among the youngest on Mars, since no impact craters in their lava flows are larger than 1 kilometer in diameter. First, we modeled the age of each vent with impact crater counts performed on their corresponding lava flows and found very large age uncertainties for the ages of individual vents, often spanning the estimated age for the entire volcanic field. The age model derived from impact crater counts alone is broad and unimodal, with estimated peak activity in the field around 130Ma (megaannum, 1 million years). Next we applied our volcano event age model (VEAM), which uses a directed graph of stratigraphic relationships and random sampling of the impact crater age determinations to create alternative age models. Monte Carlo simulation was used to create 10,000 possible vent age sets. The recurrence rate of volcanism is calculated for each possible age set, and these rates are combined to calculate the median recurrence rate of all simulations. Applying this

  5. Recurrence rate and magma effusion rate for the latest volcanism on Arsia Mons, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jacob A.; Wilson, James A.; Connor, Charles B.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Kiyosugi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Magmatism and volcanism have evolved the Martian lithosphere, surface, and climate throughout the history of Mars. Constraining the rates of magma generation and timing of volcanism on the surface clarifies the ways in which magma and volcanic activity have shaped these Martian systems. The ages of lava flows on other planets are often estimated using impact crater counts, assuming that the number and size-distribution of impact craters per unit area reflect the time the lava flow has been on the surface and exposed to potential impacts. Here we show that impact crater age model uncertainty is reduced by adding stratigraphic information observed at locations where neighboring lavas abut each other, and demonstrate the significance of this reduction in age uncertainty for understanding the history of a volcanic field comprising 29 vents in the 110-km-diameter caldera of Arsia Mons, Mars. Each vent within this caldera produced lava flows several to tens of kilometers in length; these vents are likely among the youngest on Mars, since no impact craters in their lava flows are larger than 1 km in diameter. First, we modeled the age of each vent with impact crater counts performed on their corresponding lava flows and found very large age uncertainties for the ages of individual vents, often spanning the estimated age for the entire volcanic field. The age model derived from impact crater counts alone is broad and unimodal, with estimated peak activity in the field around 130 Ma. Next we applied our volcano event age model (VEAM), which uses a directed graph of stratigraphic relationships and random sampling of the impact crater age determinations to create alternative age models. Monte Carlo simulation was used to create 10,000 possible vent age sets. The recurrence rate of volcanism is calculated for each possible age set, and these rates are combined to calculate the median recurrence rate of all simulations. Applying this approach to the 29 volcanic vents, volcanism

  6. Sulfur dioxide - Episodic injection shows evidence for active Venus volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    1984-03-01

    Pioneer Venus ultraviolet spectra from the first 5 years of operation show a decline (by more than a factor of 10) in sulfur dioxide abundance at the cloud tops and in the amount of submicron haze above the clouds. At the time of the Pioneer Venus encounter, the values for both parameters greatly exceeded earlier upper limits. However, Venus had a similar appearance in the late 1950's, implying the episodic injection of sulfur dioxide possibly caused by episodic volcanism. The amount of haze in the Venus middle atmosphere is about ten times that found in earth's stratosphere after the most recent major volcanic eruptions, and the thermal energy required for this injection on Venus is greater by about an order of magnitude than the largest of these recent earth eruptions and about as large as the Krakatoa eruption of 1883. The episodic behavior of sulfur dioxide implies that steady-state models of the chemistry and dynamics of cloud-top regions may be of limited use.

  7. Sulfur dioxide - Episodic injection shows evidence for active Venus volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Pioneer Venus ultraviolet spectra from the first 5 years of operation show a decline (by more than a factor of 10) in sulfur dioxide abundance at the cloud tops and in the amount of submicron haze above the clouds. At the time of the Pioneer Venus encounter, the values for both parameters greatly exceeded earlier upper limits. However, Venus had a similar appearance in the late 1950's, implying the episodic injection of sulfur dioxide possibly caused by episodic volcanism. The amount of haze in the Venus middle atmosphere is about ten times that found in earth's stratosphere after the most recent major volcanic eruptions, and the thermal energy required for this injection on Venus is greater by about an order of magnitude than the largest of these recent earth eruptions and about as large as the Krakatoa eruption of 1883. The episodic behavior of sulfur dioxide implies that steady-state models of the chemistry and dynamics of cloud-top regions may be of limited use.

  8. Eruption processes and deposit characteristics at the monogenetic Mt. Gambier Volcanic Complex, SE Australia: implications for alternating magmatic and phreatomagmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Otterloo, Jozua; Cas, Raymond A. F.; Sheard, Malcolm J.

    2013-08-01

    The ˜5 ka Mt. Gambier Volcanic Complex in the Newer Volcanics Province, Australia is an extremely complex monogenetic, volcanic system that preserves at least 14 eruption points aligned along a fissure system. The complex stratigraphy can be subdivided into six main facies that record alternations between magmatic and phreatomagmatic eruption styles in a random manner. The facies are (1) coherent to vesicular fragmental alkali basalt (effusive/Hawaiian spatter and lava flows); (2) massive scoriaceous fine lapilli with coarse ash (Strombolian fallout); (3) bedded scoriaceous fine lapilli tuff (violent Strombolian fallout); (4) thin-medium bedded, undulating very fine lapilli in coarse ash (dry phreatomagmatic surge-modified fallout); (5) palagonite-altered, cross-bedded, medium lapilli to fine ash (wet phreatomagmatic base surges); and (6) massive, palagonite-altered, very poorly sorted tuff breccia and lapilli tuff (phreato-Vulcanian pyroclastic flows). Since most deposits are lithified, to quantify the grain size distributions (GSDs), image analysis was performed. The facies are distinct based on their GSDs and the fine ash to coarse+fine ash ratios. These provide insights into the fragmentation intensities and water-magma interaction efficiencies for each facies. The eruption chronology indicates a random spatial and temporal sequence of occurrence of eruption styles, except for a "magmatic horizon" of effusive activity occurring at both ends of the volcanic complex simultaneously. The eruption foci are located along NW-SE trending lineaments, indicating that the complex was fed by multiple dykes following the subsurface structures related to the Tartwaup Fault System. Possible factors causing vent migration along these dykes and changes in eruption styles include differences in magma ascent rates, viscosity, crystallinity, degassing and magma discharge rate, as well as hydrological parameters.

  9. U.S. Geological Survey's Alert Notification System for Volcanic Activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Cynthia A.; Guffanti, Marianne C.

    2006-01-01

    The United States and its territories have about 170 volcanoes that have been active during the past 10,000 years, and most could erupt again in the future. In the past 500 years, 80 U.S. volcanoes have erupted one or more times. About 50 of these recently active volcanoes are monitored, although not all to the same degree. Through its five volcano observatories, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) issues information and warnings to the public about volcanic activity. For clarity of warnings during volcanic crises, the USGS has now standardized the alert-notification system used at its observatories.

  10. Characterization of Io's Volcanic Activity by Infrared Polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Goguen, J D; Sinton, W M

    1985-10-04

    The thermal emission from Io's volcanic hot spots is linearly polarized. Infrared measurements at 4.76 micrometers show disk-integrated polarization as large as 1.6 percent. The degree and position angle of linear polarization vary with Io's rotation in a manner characteristic of emission from a small number of hot spots. A model incorporating three hot spots best fits the data. The largest of these hot spots lies to the northeast of Loki Patera, as mapped from Voyager, and the other spot on the trailing hemisphere is near Ra Patera. The hot spot on the leading hemisphere corresponds to no named feature on the Voyager maps. The value determined for the index of refraction of the emitting surface is a lower bound; it is similar to that of terrestrial basalts and is somewhat less than that of sulfur.

  11. Characterization of Io's volcanic activity by infrared polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Goguen, J.D.; Sinton, W.M.

    1985-10-01

    The thermal emission from Io's volcanic hot spots is linearly polarized.Infrared measurements at 4.76 micrometers show disk-integrated polarization as large as 1.6 percent. The degree and position angle of linear polarization vary with Io's rotation in a manner characteristic of emission from a small number of hot spots. A model incorporating three hot spots best fits the data. The largest of these hot spots lies to the northeast of Loki Patera, as mapped from Voyager, and the other spot on the trailing hemisphere is near Ra Patera. The hot spot on the leading hemisphere corresponds to no named feature on the Voyager maps. The value determined for the index of refraction of the emitting surface is a lower bound; it is similar to that of terrestrial basalts and is somewhat less than that of sulfur. 25 references.

  12. Short Term Forecasts of Volcanic Activity Using An Event Tree Analysis System and Logistic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junek, W. N.; Jones, W. L.; Woods, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    An automated event tree analysis system for estimating the probability of short term volcanic activity is presented. The algorithm is driven by a suite of empirical statistical models that are derived through logistic regression. Each model is constructed from a multidisciplinary dataset that was assembled from a collection of historic volcanic unrest episodes. The dataset consists of monitoring measurements (e.g. InSAR, seismic), source modeling results, and historic eruption activity. This provides a simple mechanism for simultaneously accounting for the geophysical changes occurring within the volcano and the historic behavior of analog volcanoes. The algorithm is extensible and can be easily recalibrated to include new or additional monitoring, modeling, or historic information. Standard cross validation techniques are employed to optimize its forecasting capabilities. Analysis results from several recent volcanic unrest episodes are presented.

  13. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-08-14

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  14. The impact of a volcanic edifice on intrusive and eruptive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Alberto; Jaupart, Claude

    2014-12-01

    In a volcanic area, the orientation and composition of dikes record the development of the magmatic system that feeds intrusive and eruptive activity. At Spanish Peaks, Colorado, curved dike trajectories issuing from a single focal area have been attributed to horizontal propagation from a pressurized central reservoir in a deviatoric tectonic stress field. These dikes, however, are nowhere in contact with the central intrusion, are younger than it by about 1 My and are not filled with the same magma. They were emplaced at shallow depths (≈ 1 km), where the local stress field is very sensitive to surface loads. Here, we show that their trajectories can be set by the load of a volcanic edifice in a tectonic stress field. The orientation and distribution of the Spanish Peaks dikes have changed in the course of two million years as magmas were evolving chemically. Early dikes that were parallel to each another and filled with primitive melts document ascent in the regional tectonic stress field. They were replaced by curved dikes carrying evolved melts, which record the influence of a sizable volcanic edifice. Beneath this edifice, the induced compression prevented dense primitive magmas from erupting in the focal area and diverted intermediate magmas sideways. The growth of this large volcanic cone was probably responsible for the formation of a magma reservoir. The mechanisms that have shaped the Spanish Peaks dike swarm may control the spatial distribution and migration of eruptive centers in many active volcanic areas.

  15. Echo-resonance and hydraulic perturbations in magma cavities: application to the volcanic tremor of Etna (Italy) in relation to its eruptive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, A.; Longo, V.; Patanè, G.

    1995-08-01

    A study is presented of spectral features of volcanic tremor recorded at Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy) following the methods of analysis suggested by the resonant scattering formalism of Gaunaurd and Überall (1978, 1979a, 1979b) and the model for hydraulic origin of Seidl et al. (1981). The periods investigated include summit and flank eruptions that occurred between 1984 and 1993. Recordings from a permanent station located near the top of the volcano were used, and the temporal patterns associated with (a) the average spacing (bar Δ ) between consecutive spectral peaks in the frequency range 1 6 Hz, (b) the spectral shape and (c) the overall spectral amplitude were analyzed. bar Δ values are thought to depend on the physical properties of magma, such as its density, which, in turn, is controlled by the degree of gas exsolution. Variations in the spectral shape are tentatively attributed to changes in the geometrical scattering from the boundary of resonant conduits and magma batches. Finally, the overall amplitude at the station should essentially reflect the state of turbulence of magma within the superficial ascending path. A limit in the application of the resonant scattering formalism to the study of volcanic tremor is given by the fact that the fundamental modes and integer harmonics are difficult to identify in the frequency spectra, as tremor sources are likely within cavities of very complex geometry, rather than in spherical or cylindrical chambers, as expected by theory. This study gives evidence of some correlations between the analyzed temporal patterns and the major events in the volcanic activity, related to both lava flow and explosions at the summit vents. In particular, relatively high values of bar Δ have been attained during the SE crater eruption of 1984, the complex eruptive phases of September October 1989 and the 1991 1993 flank eruption, suggesting the presence of a relatively dense magma for all of these events. Conversely, very low

  16. Coupled RNA-SIP and metatranscriptomics of active chemolithoautotrophic communities at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Huber, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. A combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses were used to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and active autotrophic bacteria and archaea and their pathways present in low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic results showed the presence of genes and transcripts for sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, oxygen respiration, denitrification, and methanogenesis, as well as multiple carbon fixation pathways. In RNA-SIP experiments across a range of temperatures under reducing conditions, the enriched 13C fractions showed differences in taxonomic and functional diversity. At 30 °C and 55 °C, Epsilonproteobacteria were dominant, oxidizing hydrogen and primarily reducing nitrate. Methanogenic archaea were also present at 55 °C, and were the only autotrophs present at 80 °C. Correspondingly, the predominant CO2 fixation pathways changed from the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle to the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway with increasing temperature. By coupling RNA-SIP with meta-omics, this study demonstrates the presence and activity of distinct chemolithoautotrophic communities across a thermal gradient of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. PMID:26872039

  17. Coupled RNA-SIP and metatranscriptomics of active chemolithoautotrophic communities at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Huber, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. A combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses were used to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and active autotrophic bacteria and archaea and their pathways present in low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic results showed the presence of genes and transcripts for sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, oxygen respiration, denitrification, and methanogenesis, as well as multiple carbon fixation pathways. In RNA-SIP experiments across a range of temperatures under reducing conditions, the enriched (13)C fractions showed differences in taxonomic and functional diversity. At 30 °C and 55 °C, Epsilonproteobacteria were dominant, oxidizing hydrogen and primarily reducing nitrate. Methanogenic archaea were also present at 55 °C, and were the only autotrophs present at 80 °C. Correspondingly, the predominant CO2 fixation pathways changed from the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle to the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway with increasing temperature. By coupling RNA-SIP with meta-omics, this study demonstrates the presence and activity of distinct chemolithoautotrophic communities across a thermal gradient of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

  18. On the global distribution of hydrothermal vent fields: One decade later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, S. E.; Baker, E. T.; German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Since the last global compilation one decade ago, the known number of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields has almost doubled. At the end of 2009, a total of 518 active vent fields was catalogued, with about half (245) visually confirmed and others (273) inferred active at the seafloor. About half (52%) of these vent fields are at mid-ocean ridges (MORs), 25% at volcanic arcs, 21% at back-arc spreading centers (BASCs), and 2% at intra-plate volcanoes and other settings. One third are in high seas, and the nations with the most known active vent fields within EEZs are Tonga, USA, Japan, and New Zealand. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. Here, we have comprehensively documented the percentage of strike length at MORs and BASCs that has been systematically explored for hydrothermal activity. As of the end of 2009, almost 30% of the ~60,000 km of MORs had been surveyed at least with spaced vertical profiles to detect hydrothermal plumes. A majority of the vents discovered at MORs in the past decade occurred at segments with < 60 mm/yr full spreading rate. Discoveries at ultra-slow MORs in the past decade included the deepest known vent (Beebe at Mid-Cayman Rise) and high-temperature black smoker vents (e.g., Dragon at SWIR and Loki's Castle at Mohns Ridge), and the highest temperature vent was measured at the slow-spreading S MAR (Turtle Pits). Using a previously published equation for the linear relationship between the number of active vent fields per 100 km strike length (F_s) vs. weighted-average full spreading rate (u_s), we predicted 676 vent fields remaining to be discovered at MORs. Even accounting for the lower F_s at slower spreading rates, almost half of the vents that are predicted remaining to be discovered at MORs are at ultra-slow to slow spreading rates (< 40 mm/yr) and about 1/3 at intermediate rates (40-80 mm

  19. The influence of volcanic activity on suspended sediment yield of rivers (Kamchatka, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksina, Ludmila

    2014-05-01

    Kamchatka is specific region of suspended sediment yield formation. This fact is particularly connected with active volcanism in the territory. The influence of volcanism on suspended sediment yield characteristics was studied in various time scales - into-diurnal, seasonal and long-term ones. The study of spatial variability of these characteristics reveals the maximum values characterize river basins in zones of strong impact of volcanic eruptions, especially, rivers draining slopes and flanks of active volcanoes. Into-diurnal fluctuations were studied for rivers in volcanic areas. They are characterized by synchronous changes of water flow and turbidity. It's determined by weak erosion-preventive capacity of friable volcanic deposits and big slopes of channels (2.5 - 6.0 %). The maximum of water flow and turbidity is observed at the period between 12 and 6 pm. The air temperature reaches its maximum by that time, and consequently, the intensity of snow melting is also maximum one. The maximum of turbidity advances diurnal maximum of water flow a little, and it's connected with the features of flood wave moving and consecutive maximums of slopes, turbidity, velocity, water flow, and capacity of stream during flush. Into-diurnal fluctuations are determined by complicated and little-studied processes of mass transfer between stream and channel deposits. These processes are connected with into-diurnal changes of stream capacity and water transfer between channel and underflow. As the result water regime is pulsating. Rivers under the influence of volcanic eruptions transport the main amount of sediments during floods which usually occur in summer-autumn period (in the absence of extreme floods in winter-spring period during volcanic eruptions). Combination of maximum snow supply, significant precipitation in warm part of the year and weak erosion-preventive capacity of friable volcanic deposits on volcanoes slopes is the reason of the most intense erosion in this

  20. Impacts of anthropogenic disturbances at deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems: a review.

    PubMed

    Van Dover, Cindy Lee

    2014-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal-vent ecosystems have stimulated decades of scientific research and hold promise of mineral and genetic resources that also serve societal needs. Some endemic taxa thrive only in vent environments, and vent-associated organisms are adapted to a variety of natural disturbances, from tidal variations to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. In this paper, physicochemical and biological impacts of a range of human activities at vents are considered. Mining is currently the only anthropogenic activity projected to have a major impact on vent ecosystems, albeit at a local scale, based on our current understanding of ecological responses to disturbance. Natural recovery from a single mining event depends on immigration and larval recruitment and colonization; understanding processes and dynamics influencing life-history stages may be a key to effective minimization and mitigation of mining impacts. Cumulative impacts on benthic communities of several mining projects in a single region, without proper management, include possible species extinctions and shifts in community structure and function.

  1. Temporal and Spatial Analysis of Monogenetic Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosugi, Koji

    Achieving an understanding of the nature of monogenetic volcanic fields depends on identification of the spatial and temporal patterns of volcanism in these fields, and their relationships to structures mapped in the shallow crust and inferred in the deep crust and mantle through interpretation of geochemical, radiometric and geophysical data. We investigate the spatial and temporal distributions of volcanism in the Abu Monogenetic Volcano Group, Southwest Japan. E-W elongated volcano distribution, which is identified by a nonparametric kernel method, is found to be consistent with the spatial extent of P-wave velocity anomalies in the lower crust and upper mantle, supporting the idea that the spatial density map of volcanic vents reflects the geometry of a mantle diapir. Estimated basalt supply to the lower crust is constant. This observation and the spatial distribution of volcanic vents suggest stability of magma productivity and essentially constant two-dimensional size of the source mantle diapir. We mapped conduits, dike segments, and sills in the San Rafael sub-volcanic field, Utah, where the shallowest part of a Pliocene magmatic system is exceptionally well exposed. The distribution of conduits matches the major features of dike distribution, including development of clusters and distribution of outliers. The comparison of San Rafael conduit distribution and the distributions of volcanoes in several recently active volcanic fields supports the use of statistical models, such as nonparametric kernel methods, in probabilistic hazard assessment for distributed volcanism. We developed a new recurrence rate calculation method that uses a Monte Carlo procedure to better reflect and understand the impact of uncertainties of radiometric age determinations on uncertainty of recurrence rate estimates for volcanic activity in the Abu, Yucca Mountain Region, and Izu-Tobu volcanic fields. Results suggest that the recurrence rates of volcanic fields can change by more

  2. Search for possible relationship between volcanic ash particles and thunderstorm lightning activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Várai, A.; Vincze, M.; Lichtenberger, J.; Jánosi, I. M.

    2011-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions that eject columns of ash from the crater often generate lightning discharges strong enough to be remotely located by very low frequency radio waves. A fraction of volcanic ash particles can stay and disperse long enough to have an effect on weather phenomena days later such as thunderstorms and lightnings. In this work we report on lightning activity analysis over Europe following two recent series of volcanic eruptions in order to identify possible correlations between ash release and subsequent thunderstorm flash frequency. Our attempts gave negative results which can be related to the fact that we have limited information on local atmospheric variables of high enough resolution, however lightning frequency is apparently determined by very local circumstances.

  3. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-15

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009-2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  4. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes. PMID:27079264

  5. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  6. Significance of an Active Volcanic Front in the Far Western Aleutian Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hoernle, K.

    2015-12-01

    Discovery of a volcanic front west of Buldir Volcano, the western-most emergent Aleutian volcano, demonstrates that the surface expression of Aleutian volcanism falls below sea level just west of 175.9° E longitude, but is otherwise continuous from mainland Alaska to Kamchatka. The newly discovered sites of western Aleutian seafloor volcanism are the Ingenstrem Depression, a 60 km-long structural depression just west of Buldir, and an unnamed area 300 km further west, referred to as the Western Cones. These locations fall along a volcanic front that stretches from Buldir to Piip Seamount near the Komandorsky Islands. Western Aleutian seafloor volcanic rocks include large quantities of high-silica andesite and dacite, which define a highly calc-alkaline igneous series and carry trace element signatures that are unmistakably subduction-related. This indicates that subducting oceanic lithosphere is present beneath the westernmost Aleutian arc. The rarity of earthquakes below depths of 200 km indicates that the subducting plate is unusually hot. Some seafloor volcanoes are 6-8 km wide at the base, and so are as large as many emergent Aleutian volcanoes. The seafloor volcanoes are submerged in water depths >3000 m because they sit on oceanic lithosphere of the Bering Sea. The volcanic front is thus displaced to the north of the ridge of arc crust that underlies the western Aleutian Islands. This displacement, which developed since approximately 6 Ma when volcanism was last active on the islands, must be a consequence of oblique convergence in a system where the subducting plate and large blocks of arc crust are both moving primarily in an arc-parallel sense. The result is a hot-slab system where low subduction rates probably limit advection of hot mantle to the subarc, and produce a relatively cool and perhaps stagnant mantle wedge. The oceanic setting and highly oblique subduction geometry also severely limit rates of sediment subduction, so the volcanic rocks, which

  7. Submarine Volcanic Morphology of Santorini Caldera, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomikou, P.; Croff Bell, K.; Carey, S.; Bejelou, K.; Parks, M.; Antoniou, V.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini volcanic group form the central part of the modern Aegean volcanic arc, developed within the Hellenic arc and trench system, because of the ongoing subduction of the African plate beneath the European margin throughout Cenozoic. It comprises three distinct volcanic structures occurring along a NE-SW direction: Christianna form the southwestern part of the group, Santorini occupies the middle part and Koloumbo volcanic rift zone extends towards the northeastern part. The geology of the Santorini volcano has been described by a large number of researchers with petrological as well as geochronological data. The offshore area of the Santorini volcanic field has only recently been investigated with emphasis mainly inside the Santorini caldera and the submarine volcano of Kolumbo. In September 2011, cruise NA-014 on the E/V Nautilus carried out new surveys on the submarine volcanism of the study area, investigating the seafloor morphology with high-definition video imaging. Submarine hydrothermal vents were found on the seafloor of the northern basin of the Santorini caldera with no evidence of high temperature fluid discharges or massive sulphide formations, but only low temperature seeps characterized by meter-high mounds of bacteria-rich sediment. This vent field is located in line with the normal fault system of the Kolumbo rift, and also near the margin of a shallow intrusion that occurs within the sediments of the North Basin. Push cores have been collected and they will provide insights for their geochemical characteristics and their relationship to the active vents of the Kolumbo underwater volcano. Similar vent mounds occur in the South Basin, at shallow depths around the islets of Nea and Palaia Kameni. ROV exploration at the northern slopes of Nea Kameni revealed a fascinating underwater landscape of lava flows, lava spines and fractured lava blocks that have been formed as a result of 1707-1711 and 1925-1928 AD eruptions. A hummocky topography at

  8. Crustal deformation induced by volcanic activity measured by InSAR time series analysis (Volcan de Colima-Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunori, Carlo Alberto; Norini, Gianluca; Stramondo, Salvatore; Capra, Lucia; Zucca, Francesco; Groppelli, Gianluca; Bignami, Christian; Chini, Marco; Manea, Marina; Manea, Vlad

    2010-05-01

    The Volcán de Colima (CV) is currently the most active Mexican volcano. After the 1913 plinian activity the volcano presented several eruptive phases that lasted few years, but since 1991 its activity became more persistent with vulcanian eruptions, lava and dome extrusions. During the last 15 years the volcano suffered several eruptive episodes as in 1991, 1994, 1998-1999, 2001-2003, 2004 and 2005 with the emplacement of pyroclastic flows. During rain seasons lahars are frequent affecting several infrastructures such as bridges and electric towers. This work is focused on the detection of surface deformation with centimetre or sub-centimeter accuracy of the Volcán de Colima and surrounding areas. We try to assess the amount and the spatial extension of surface movements of the CV and to get insights into the causes of the surface deformation by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), a powerful tool ensuring measurements at high-accuracy over large areas. The image dataset acquired by ESA ENVISAT ASAR (C band) sensor, has been processed using Advanced interferometric techniques (A-InSAR) to overcome the really challenging sources of decorrelation related to the setting context, mainly vegetation and atmosphere, in order to give us the opportunity to detect also very low rates of deformations. The main objectives of the interferometric analysis is the measurement of deformations in the CV in relation with active tectonics and gravity induced spreading, the identification of magma migration below the surface in the last decade, the detection of the incipient movements of volcanic landslides and large scale volcano instability, and the kinematics of the Colima rift. We present preliminary results of the A-InSAR processing, in the framework of the interdisciplinary Colima Deformation project (ColDef).

  9. Effects of Vent Asymmetry on Explosive Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, S.; Ogden, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Current computer models of volcanic eruptions are typically based on symmetric vent and conduit geometries. However, in natural settings, these features are rarely perfectly symmetric. For example, the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St Helens (MSH) took place through a highly asymmetrical crater due to the preceding landslide and subsequent vent erosion. In supersonic, high pressure eruptions, such as what may have occurred at MSH, vent and crater asymmetry can strongly affect the directionality of the gas-thrust region. These effects on eruption direction may have implications for the formation of lateral blasts and pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Here, we present preliminary results from numerical simulations using CartaBlanca, a Java based simulation tool for non-linear physics as developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using 2D time-dependent simulations of explosive volcanic eruptions, we study the effects of vent asymmetry on a variety of eruptive conditions. Preliminary results suggest that asymmetric vent shape may provide an additional mechanism for the formation of lateral blasts and PDCs.

  10. Implications of historical eruptive-vent migration on the northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, J.P. )

    1990-07-01

    Five times within the past 138 yr (1852, 1855-1856, 1880-1881, 1942, and 1984), lava flows from vents on the northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano have reached within a few kilometres of Hilo (the largest city on the Island of Hawaii). Most lavas erupted on this right zone in historical time have traveled northeastward (toward Hilo), because their eruptive vents have been concentrated north of the rift zone's broad topographic axis. However, with few exceptions each successive historical eruption on the northeast rift zone has occurred farther southeast than the preceding one. Had the 1984 eruptive vents (the most southeasterly yet) opened less than 200 m farther southeast, the bulk of the 1984 lavas would have flowed away from Hilo. If this historical vent-migration pattern continues, the next eruption on the northeast rift zone could send lavas to the southeast, toward less populated areas. The historical Mauna Loa vent-migration patterns mimic southeastern younging of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain and may be cryptically related to northwestward movement of the Pacific plate. Systematic temporal-spatial vent-migration patterns may characterize eruptive activity at other volcanoes with flank activity and should be considered as an aid to long-term prediction of eruption sites.

  11. Exploratory Data Analysis Using a Dedicated Visualization App: Looking for Patterns in Volcanic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Manen, S. M.; Chen, S.

    2015-12-01

    Here we present an App designed to visualize and identify patterns in volcanic activity during the last ten years. It visualizes VEI (volcanic explosivity index) levels, population size, frequency of activity, and geographic region, and is designed to address the issue of oversampling of data. Often times, it is difficult to access a large set of data that can be scattered at first glance and hard to digest without visual aid. This App serves as a model that solves this issue and can be applied to other data. To enable users to quickly assess the large data set it breaks down the apparently chaotic abundance of information into categories and graphic indicators: color is used to indicate the VEI level, size for population size within 5 km of a volcano, line thickness for frequency of activity, and a grid to pinpoint a volcano's latitude. The categories and layers within them can be turned on and off by the user, enabling them to scroll through and compare different layers of data. By visualising the data this way, patterns began to emerge. For example, certain geographic regions had more explosive eruptions than others. Another good example was that low frequency larger impact volcanic eruptions occurred more irregularly than smaller impact volcanic eruptions, which had a more stable frequencies. Although these findings are not unexpected, the easy to navigate App does showcase the potential of data visualization for the rapid appraisal of complex and abundant multi-dimensional geoscience data.

  12. Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonenko, I.; Head, J. W.; Pieters, C. W.

    1998-01-01

    The final report consists of 10 journal articles concerning Planetary Volcanism. The articles discuss the following topics: (1) lunar stratigraphy; (2) cryptomare thickness measurements; (3) spherical harmonic spectra; (4) late stage activity of volcanoes on Venus; (5) stresses and calderas on Mars; (6) magma reservoir failure; (7) lunar mare basalt volcanism; (8) impact and volcanic glasses in the 79001/2 Core; (9) geology of the lunar regional dark mantle deposits; and (10) factors controlling the depths and sizes of magma reservoirs in Martian volcanoes.

  13. Volcanic tremor at Volcán de Colima, México recorded during May 2002 and its interactions with the seismic signals produced by low-energy explosive activity and rockfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobin, Vyacheslav M.; Reyes, Gabriel A.; Bretón, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    The May 2002 eruption episode at Volcán de Colima, México represented the transition period between two stages of effusive activity which were characterized by the formation of lava flows. The short-period seismic signals, recorded during May 2002 at a distance of 1.6 km from the crater, were represented by volcanic tremor and the signals produced by low-energy explosions and rockfalls. Two types of volcanic tremor were recognized: harmonic with two fundamental spectral frequencies of 1.2-1.4 Hz and 1.6-1.7 Hz and non-harmonic. The existence of two fundamental frequencies of volcanic tremor may indicate a two-vent magmatic conduit. No clear relationship between the variations in the spectral content of tremor and occurrence of explosions was observed. The waveforms of the signals, produced by low-energy explosions and rockfalls and recorded on the background of volcanic tremor, were strongly modulated by the low-frequency harmonic tremor signals, forming, in this manner, pseudo-long period events. Fourier analysis of the seismic signals associated with low-energy explosions and rockfalls but recorded on the background of regular seismic noise indicated their high-frequency sources characterized by dominant frequencies within 2-3 Hz and 3-4.5 Hz, respectively.

  14. The STRATegy COLUMN for Precollege Science Teachers: Volcanic Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Ellen Pletcher

    1995-01-01

    Describes resources for information and activities involving volcanoes. Includes an activity that helps students become familiar with the principal types of volcanoes and explores how the viscosity of magma affects the way a volcano erupts. (MKR)

  15. High resolution DEM from Tandem-X interferometry: an accurate tool to characterize volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, Francois

    2013-04-01

    Tandem-X mission was launched by the German agency (DLR) in June 2010. It is a new generation high resolution SAR sensor mainly dedicated to topographic applications. For the purpose of our researches focused on the study of the volcano-tectonic activity in the Kivu Rift area, a set of Tandem-X bistatic radar images were used to produce a high resolution InSAR DEM of the Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP). The VVP is part of the Western branch of the African rift, situated at the boundary between D.R. Congo, Rwanda and Uganda. It has two highly active volcanoes, Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira. A first task concerns the quantitative assessment of the vertical accuracy that can be achieved with these new data. The new DEMs are compared to other space borne datasets (SRTM, ASTER) but also to field measurements given by differential GPS. Multi-temporal radar acquisitions allow us to produce several DEM of the same area. This appeared to be very useful in the context of an active volcanic context where new geomorphological features (faults, fissures, volcanic cones and lava flows) appear continuously through time. For example, since the year 2000, time of the SRTM acquisition, we had one eruption at Nyiragongo (2002) and six eruptions at Nyamulagira (2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2010 and 2011) which all induce large changes in the landscape with the emplacement of new lava fields and scoria cones. From our repetitive Tandem-X DEM production, we have a tool to identify and also quantify in term of size and volume all the topographic changes relative to this past volcanic activity. These parameters are high value information to improve the understanding of the Virunga volcanoes; the accurate estimation of erupted volume and knowledge of structural features associated to past eruptions are key parameters to understand the volcanic system, to ameliorate the hazard assessment, and finally contribute to risk mitigation in a densely populated area.

  16. NAUDUR explorers discover recent volcanic activity along the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, Jean-Marie; Sinton, John

    Surveying an ultra-fast spreading ridge along the East Pacific Rise (EPR), explorers aboard the submersible Nautile examined features such as lava pillows and tubes, sulfide chimneys, black smokers, hot shimmering waters, and colonies of animals living in hydrothermal vents to learn more about the processes of accretion and tectonics on the ocean floor. Taken together, the observations of the EPR between 17°S and 19°S from the 1993 NAUDUR cruise (a French acronym for Nautile on Ultra-fast Ridge) indicate recent volcanic eruptions occurring as frequently as every few years.The NAUDUR cruise was designed to study the interaction between magmatic, tectonic, and hydrothermal processes at an ultra-fast spreading axis of the EPR. Researchers performing twenty three dives in five regions (Figure 1) along the axis of the Garrett fracture zone collected more than 150 rock samples and made 52 gravity measurements [Auzende et al., 1994]. The Garrett fracture zone (13°S) and the Easter Microplate limit a large segment of the East Pacific Rise where the accretion rate is near the upper limit for present-day spreading values (141 to 162mm/yr) [Perram et al., 1993]. The five dive regions with distinct morphological characteristics represent different stages in the accretion process.

  17. Io volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. The Voyage spacecraft observed nine active eruption plumes in 1979, and detected numerous thermal anomalies. Loki the most active volcanic region has been emitting 1.5 x 10/sup 13/ W over the last few years. Many of the volcanic features have been interpreted as the result of sulfur volcanism because 1) the spectral reflectance of the surface resembles sulfur, 2) SO/sub 2/ has been positively identified, 3) the satellite leaves a trail of sulfur atoms in its wake; and 4) many of the hot spots have surfaces temperatures less than 400/sup 0/K, compatible with low-temperature melts. The evidence for sulfur has led to suggestions of sulfur lava flows hundreds of kilometers long, and sulfur lava lakes as large as Lake Erie. The observations are, however, equally compatible with basaltic volcanism. Modeling of the cooling of basaltic lava flows indicates that regions of basaltic volcanism on Io should have temperatures similar to those detected by the Voyager spacecraft. High eruption rates are required. High rates of fumarolic activity accompanying the eruptions and expulsion of volatiles by the plumes give the surface its sulfur-like spectral reflectance.

  18. Evidence of recent deep magmatic activity at Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic complex, central Colombia. Implications for future volcanic activity at Nevado del Ruiz, Cerro Machín and other volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, John Makario

    2016-09-01

    In the last nine years (2007-2015), the Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic complex (CBCMVC), located in central Colombia, has experienced many changes in volcanic activity. In particular at Nevado del Ruiz volcano (NRV), Cerro Machin volcano (CMV) and Cerro Bravo (CBV) volcano. The recent activity of NRV, as well as increasing seismic activity at other volcanic centers of the CBCMVC, were preceded by notable changes in various geophysical and geochemical parameters, that suggests renewed magmatic activity is occurring at the volcanic complex. The onset of this activity started with seismicity located west of the volcanic complex, followed by seismicity at CBV and CMV. Later in 2010, strong seismicity was observed at NRV, with two small eruptions in 2012. After that, seismicity has been observed intermittently at other volcanic centers such as Santa Isabel, Cerro España, Paramillo de Santa Rosa, Quindío and Tolima volcanoes, which persists until today. Local deformation was observed from 2007 at NRV, followed by possible regional deformation at various volcanic centers between 2011 and 2013. In 2008, an increase in CO2 and Radon in soil was observed at CBV, followed by a change in helium isotopes at CMV between 2009 and 2011. Moreover, SO2 showed an increase from 2010 at NRV, with values remaining high until the present. These observations suggest that renewed magmatic activity is currently occurring at CBCMVC. NRV shows changes in its activity that may be related to this new magmatic activity. NRV is currently exhibiting the most activity of any volcano in the CBCMVC, which may be due to it being the only open volcanic system at this time. This suggests that over the coming years, there is a high probability of new unrest or an increase in volcanic activity of other volcanoes of the CBCMVC.

  19. Potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C. Dan

    1989-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the last 10,000 years. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State\\'s citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. The potentially more hazardous eruptions in the State are those that involve explosive eruption of large volumes of silicic magma. Such eruptions could occur at vents in as many as four areas in California. They could eject pumice high into the atmosphere above the volcano, produce destructive blasts, avalanches, or pyroclastic flows that reach distances of tens of kilometers from a vent, and produce mudflows and floods that reach to distances of hundreds of kilometers. Smaller eruptions produce similar, but less severe and less extensive, phenomena. Hazards are greatest close to a volcanic vent; the slopes on or near a volcano, and valleys leading away from it, are affected most often and most severely by such eruptions. In general, risk from volcanic phenomena decreases with increasing distance from a vent and, for most flowage processes, with increasing height above valley floors or fan surfaces. Tephra (ash) from explosive eruptions can affect wide areas downwind from a vent. In California, prevailing winds cause the 180-degree sector east of the volcano to be affected most often and most severely. Risk to life from ashfall decreases rapidly with increasing distance from a vent, but thin deposits of ash could disrupt communication

  20. Volcanic activity before and after large tectonic earthquakes: Observations and statistical significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, S.; Walter, T. R.

    2009-04-01

    The study of volcanic triggering and coupling to the tectonic surroundings has received special attention in recent years, using both direct field observations and historical descriptions of eruptions and earthquake activity. Repeated reports of volcano-earthquake interactions in, e.g., Europe and Japan, may imply that clustered occurrence is important in some regions. However, the regions likely to suffer clustered eruption-earthquake activity have not been systematically identified, and the processes responsible for the observed interaction are debated. We first review previous works about the correlation of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, and describe selected local clustered events. Following an overview of previous statistical studies, we further elaborate the databases of correlated eruptions and earthquakes from a global perspective. Since we can confirm a relationship between volcanic eruptions and earthquakes on the global scale, we then perform a statistical study on the regional level, showing that time and distance between events follow a linear relationship. In the time before an earthquake, a period of volcanic silence often occurs, whereas in the time after, an increase in volcanic activity is evident. Our statistical tests imply that certain regions are especially predisposed to concurrent eruption-earthquake pairs, e.g., Japan, whereas such pairing is statistically less significant in other regions, such as Europe. Based on this study, we argue that individual and selected observations may bias the perceptible weight of coupling. Volcanoes located in the predisposed regions (e.g., Japan, Indonesia, Melanesia), however, indeed often have unexpectedly changed in association with either an imminent or a past earthquake.

  1. Cordon Caulle: an active volcanic-geothermal extensional system of Southern Andes of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda, F.

    2013-05-01

    Cordon Caulle (CC; 40.5° S) is an active volcanic-geothermal system of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ; 37°-44°S). Morphologically, the CC system is a 6 km x 13 km volcanic plateau bordered by NW-trending structures, limited by Puyehue Volcano to the SE and by Caldera Nevada Caldera to the NW. While the SVZ is dominantly basaltic, CC is unique in that it has produced a wide compositional spectrum from basalt to rhyolite. The most recent volcanic activity of Puyehue-CC (last 70 ky) is dominantly silicic, including two historic fissure eruptions (1921-1922; 1960) and a recent central eruption from Puyehue Volcano (2011). Abnormally silicic volcanism was formerly attributed to a localized compression and long-term magma residence and differentiation, resulting from the NW orientation of underlying CC structures with respect to a NE-oriented σ1 (linked to regional strike-slip stress state). However, later studies, including examination of morpho-tectonic features; detailed structural analysis of the 1960 eruption (triggered by Mw 9.5 1960 Chilean Earthquake); InSAR deformation and gravity surveys, point to both historic and long-term extension at CC with σhmax oriented NNW to NW. The pre-2011 (i.e. Puyehue Volcano eruption) geothermal features of CC included boiling hot springs and geysers (Caldera Nevada) and fumaroles (CC and Puyehue Volcano). Both water and gas chemistry surveys were undertaken to assess the source fluid composition and equilibrium temperature. The combination of water and gas geothermometers led to a conceptual model of a stratified geothermal reservoir, with shallow, low-chloride, steam-heated aquifers equilibrated at temperatures between 150°-180°C, overlying a deeper, possibly dominated reservoir with temperatures in excess of 280°C. Gas chemistry also produced the highest He ratios of the SVZ, in agreement with a relatively pure, undiluted magmatic signature and heat source fueling the geothermal system. Other indicators such as N2/Ar

  2. Observations and coupled models of flow, salinity, and hydrate formation in deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Fulton, P. M.

    2010-12-01

    Natural vents in the Gulf of Mexico are actively expelling water, and hydrocarbons. They are ubiquitous across the deepwater and we characterize them in 3 locations: the Auger Basin, the Popeye Basin, and the Ursa Basin. In seismic data, they look like volcanic edifices. Vents are elevated as much as 100 meters relative to the surrounding area and their cores have negative amplitudes that record lower impedance than the overlying water column: this low impedance is interpreted to record the presence of gas. The bottom simulating reflector, which is interpreted to record the boundary between hydrate above and gas and water below, rises toward to the seafloor at the center of the vent. Studies of these vents at Ursa have documented significant temperature anomalies, flow, and high salinities (Paull et al., 2005; Ruppel et al. 2005). We model the coexistence of high salinity fluids, elevated temperatures, and an uplifted bottom simulating reflector with two approaches. First, we assume that high salinity fluids are generated by dissolution of salt bodies at depth and that these hot, saline, fluids are expelled vertically. Second, we model the solidification of gas hydrate during upward flow of gas and water. In this model, free gas combines with water to generate hydrate: salt is excluded, resulting in the generation of a high salinity brine. The two models result in predictable differences of salinity and possibly temperature. A better understanding of the hydrogeological processes at vent zones is important for understanding the fluxes of heat and mass from submarine vents, and it is important for understanding the conditions under which deep sea biological communities exist at these vent locations.

  3. Factors limiting microbial activity in volcanic tuff at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Kovacik, W.P.; Taylor, J.

    1996-09-01

    Samples of tuff aseptically collected from 10 locations in the Exploratory Shaft Facility at the site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site were analyzed for microbiological populations, activities, and factors limiting microbial activity. Radiotracer assays ({sup 14}C-labeled organic substrate mineralization), direct microscopic counts, and plate counts were used. Radiolabeled substrates were glucose, acetate, and glutamate. Radiotracer experiments were carried out with and without moisture and inorganic nutrient amendments to determine factors limiting to microbial activities. Nearly all samples showed the presence of microorganisms with the potential to mineralize organic substrates. Addition of inorganic nutrients stimulated activities in a small number of samples. The presence of viable microbial communities within the tuff has implications for transport of contaminants.

  4. Analysis of volcanic activity patterns using MODIS thermal alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothery, Dave A.; Coppola, Diego; Saunders, Charlotte

    2005-07-01

    We investigate eruptive activity by analysis of thermal-alert data from the MODIS (moderate resolution imaging spectrometer) thermal infrared satellite instrument, detected by the MODVOLC (MODIS Volcano alert) algorithm. These data are openly available on the Internet, and easy to use. We show how such data can plug major gaps in the conventional monitoring record of volcanoes in an otherwise generally poorly documented region (Melanesia), including: characterising the mechanism of lava effusion at Pago; demonstrating an earlier-than-realised onset of lava effusion at Lopevi; extending the known period of lava lake activity at Ambrym; and confirming ongoing activity at Bagana, Langila and Tinakula. We also add to the record of activity even at some generally better-monitored volcanoes in Indonesia, but point out that care must be taken to recognise and exclude fires.

  5. Compilation of Disruptions to Airports by Volcanic Activity (Version 1.0, 1944-2006)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, Marianne; Mayberry, Gari C.; Casadevall, Thomas J.; Wunderman, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. To more fully characterize the nature and scope of volcanic hazards to airports, we collected data on incidents of airports throughout the world that have been affected by volcanic activity, beginning in 1944 with the first documented instance of damage to modern aircraft and facilities in Naples, Italy, and extending through 2006. Information was gleaned from various sources, including news outlets, volcanological reports (particularly the Smithsonian Institution's Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network), and previous publications on the topic. This report presents the full compilation of the data collected. For each incident, information about the affected airport and the volcanic source has been compiled as a record in a Microsoft Access database. The database is incomplete in so far as incidents may not have not been reported or documented, but it does present a good sample from diverse parts of the world. Not included are en-route diversions to avoid airborne ash clouds at cruise altitudes. The database has been converted to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. To make the PDF version of table 1 in this open-file report resemble the spreadsheet, order the PDF pages as 12, 17, 22; 13, 18, 23; 14, 19, 24; 15, 20, 25; and 16, 21, 26. Analysis of the database reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were impacted on 171 occasions from 1944 through 2006 by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. The number of affected airports (101) probably is better constrained than the number of incidents (171) because recurring disruptions at a given airport may have been lumped together or not reported by news agencies, whereas the initial disruption likely is noticed and reported and thus the airport correctly counted.

  6. Video Observations by Telepresence Reveal Two Types of Hydrothermal Venting on Kawio Barat Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Shank, T. M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Sherrin, J.; Herrera, S.; Baker, E. T.; Lovalvo, D.; Makarim, S.; Malik, M. A.; Wirasantosa, S.; Hammond, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    The INDEX-SATAL 2010 expedition began an international exploration of the seafloor in Indonesian waters using the methodology of telepresence, conducting EM302 multibeam mapping, water column CTD, and ROV high-definition video operations and sending data back to Exploration Command Centers in Indonesia and Seattle. Science observers in other locations in the US and Canada were engaged in real-time observations and interpretation of results. One mission goal was to locate hydrothermal or volcanic activity. Intense light scattering and redox potential measurements in the water column over Kawio Barat (KB)indicated a high level of hydrothermal activity, and direct video observations confirmed venting near the summit. None of the other volcanic features west of the Sangihe arc that were investigated during the mission had confirmed hydrothermal activity. ROV capabilities did not include physical sampling or temperature measurement, so our interpretation is based on visual comparison to other known sites. The steep western flank of KB from 2000 m depth to the summit (1850 m) has many areas of white and orange staining on exposed rocks, with some elemental sulfur, and broad areas covered with dark volcaniclastic sand, but no active venting was seen. KB has a summit ridge running WNW-ESE, with a major cross-cutting ridge on the western portion of the summit. Hydrothermal activity is concentrated near the eastern side of this intersection, on both the northern and southern sides of the summit ridge. Venting on the northern side of the summit ridge is characterized by intense white particle-rich fluids emanating directly from the rocky substrate with frozen flows of elemental sulfur down slope. This type of venting is visually very similar to the venting seen on NW Rota-1, an actively erupting volcano in the Mariana arc, and suggests that KB is actively releasing magmatic gases rich in sulfur dioxide to produce the elemental sulfur flows, inferred fine particulate sulfur

  7. Electrical activity during the 2006 Mount St. Augustine volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Edens, H. E.; Aulich, G. D.; McNutt, S.R.; Tytgat, Guy; Clark, E.

    2007-01-01

    By using a combination of radio frequency time-of-arrival and interferometer measurements, we observed a sequence of lightning and electrical activity during one of Mount St. Augustine's eruptions. The observations indicate that the electrical activity had two modes or phases. First, there was an explosive phase in which the ejecta from the explosion appeared to be highly charged upon exiting the volcano, resulting in numerous apparently disorganized discharges and some simple lightning. The net charge exiting the volcano appears to have been positive. The second phase, which followed the most energetic explosion, produced conventional-type discharges that occurred within plume. Although the plume cloud was undoubtedly charged as a result of the explosion itself, the fact that the lightning onset was delayed and continued after and well downwind of the eruption indicates that in situ charging of some kind was occurring, presumably similar in some respects to that which occurs in normal thunderstorms.

  8. Explosive activity associated with the growth of volcanic domes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhall, C.G.; Melson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Domes offer unique opportunities to measure or infer the characteristics of magmas that, at domes and elsewhere, control explosive activity. A review of explosive activity associated with historical dome growth shows that: 1. (1) explosive activity has occurred in close association with nearly all historical dome growth; 2. (2) whole-rock SiO2 content, a crude but widely reported indicator of magma viscosity, shows no systematic relationship to the timing and character of explosions; 3. (3) the average rate of dome growth, a crude indicator of the rate of supply of magma and volatiles to the near-surface enviornment, shows no systematic relationship to the timing or character of explosions; and 4. (4) new studies at Arenal and Mount St. Helens suggest that water content is the dominant control on explosions from water-rich magmas, whereas the crystal content and composition of the interstitial melt (and hence magma viscosity) are equally or more important controls on explosions from water-poor magmas. New efforts should be made to improve current, rather limited techniques for monitoring pre-eruption volatile content and magma viscosity, and thus the explosive potential of magmas. ?? 1983.

  9. Generation and propagation of infrasonic airwaves from volcanic explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. B.

    2003-02-01

    Analysis of infrasonic pressure waves generated by active volcanoes is essential to the understanding of volcanic explosion dynamics. Unlike seismic waves propagating in the earth, infrasonic airwaves offer a relatively unfiltered representation of source motions at the vent during an eruption. Time-varying acoustic propagation filters caused by changeable atmospheric conditions are minimal for microphones deployed at intermediate distances (<5 km from the vent). Thus the recorded excess pressure time series directly reflects the impulsivity of the degassing source at the vent. In the most simple experiments, infrasound monitoring is valuable for differentiation of subsurface seismicity from the seismicity associated with an eruption. In other instances, infrasound monitoring may be used in conjunction with seismic monitoring to understand the style of eruption and information about the physical source processes and source location. This manuscript is an introductory overview of the generation and propagation of volcanic infrasound. An analysis of infrasonic records generated from five volcanic case studies is provided in an accompanying article [ Johnson et al., J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., in press].

  10. Long-term global temperature variations under total solar irradiance, cosmic rays, and volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Biktash, Lilia

    2017-07-01

    The effects of total solar irradiance (TSI) and volcanic activity on long-term global temperature variations during solar cycles 19-23 were studied. It was shown that a large proportion of climate variations can be explained by the mechanism of action of TSI and cosmic rays (CRs) on the state of the lower atmosphere and other meteorological parameters. The role of volcanic signals in the 11-year variations of the Earth's climate can be expressed as several years of global temperature drop. Conversely, it was shown that the effects of solar, geophysical, and human activity on climate change interact. It was concluded that more detailed investigations of these very complicated relationships are required, in order to be able to understand issues that affect ecosystems on a global scale.

  11. Hawaiian oral tradition describes 400 years of volcanic activity at Kīlauea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Culturally significant oral tradition involving Pele, the Hawaiian volcano deity, and her youngest sister Hi'iaka may involve the two largest volcanic events to have taken place in Hawai'i since human settlement: the roughly 60-year-long ‘Ailā’au eruption during the 15th century and the following development of Kīlauea's caldera. In 1823, Rev. William Ellis and three others became the first Europeans to visit Kīlauea's summit and were told stories about Kīlauea's activity that are consistent with the Pele–Hi'iaka account and extend the oral tradition through the 18th century. Recent geologic studies confirm the essence of the oral traditions and illustrate the potential value of examining other Hawaiian chants and stories for more information about past volcanic activity in Hawai‘i.

  12. 30,000 years of hydrothermal activity at the lost city vent field.

    PubMed

    Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Kelley, Deborah S; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Karson, Jeffrey A; Ludwig, Kristin A; Butterfield, David A; Boschi, Chiara; Proskurowski, Giora

    2003-07-25

    Strontium, carbon, and oxygen isotope data and radiocarbon ages document at least 30,000 years of hydrothermal activity driven by serpentinization reactions at Lost City. Serpentinization beneath this off-axis field is estimated to occur at a minimum rate of 1.2 x 10(-4) cubic kilometers per year. The access of seawater to relatively cool, fresh peridotite, coupled with faulting, volumetric expansion, and mass wasting processes, are crucial to sustain such systems. The amount of heat produced by serpentinization of peridotite massifs, typical of slow and ultraslow spreading environments, has the potential to drive Lost City-type systems for hundreds of thousands, possibly millions, of years.

  13. Quantifying unsteadiness and dynamics of pulsatory volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, L.; Pioli, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Connor, C. B.; Andronico, D.; Harris, A. J. L.; Ripepe, M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulsatory eruptions are marked by a sequence of explosions which can be separated by time intervals ranging from a few seconds to several hours. The quantification of the periodicities associated with these eruptions is essential not only for the comprehension of the mechanisms controlling explosivity, but also for classification purposes. We focus on the dynamics of pulsatory activity and quantify unsteadiness based on the distribution of the repose time intervals between single explosive events in relation to magma properties and eruptive styles. A broad range of pulsatory eruption styles are considered, including Strombolian, violent Strombolian and Vulcanian explosions. We find a general relationship between the median of the observed repose times in eruptive sequences and the viscosity of magma given by η ≈ 100 ṡtmedian. This relationship applies to the complete range of magma viscosities considered in our study (102 to 109 Pa s) regardless of the eruption length, eruptive style and associated plume heights, suggesting that viscosity is the main magma property controlling eruption periodicity. Furthermore, the analysis of the explosive sequences in terms of failure time through statistical survival analysis provides further information: dynamics of pulsatory activity can be successfully described in terms of frequency and regularity of the explosions, quantified based on the log-logistic distribution. A linear relationship is identified between the log-logistic parameters, μ and s. This relationship is useful for quantifying differences among eruptive styles from very frequent and regular mafic events (Strombolian activity) to more sporadic and irregular Vulcanian explosions in silicic systems. The time scale controlled by the parameter μ, as a function of the median of the distribution, can be therefore correlated with the viscosity of magmas; while the complexity of the erupting system, including magma rise rate, degassing and fragmentation efficiency

  14. Middle Miocene hiatus in volcanic activity in the Great Basin area of the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.H.; Noble, D.C.; Silberman, M.L.

    1970-01-01

    A summary of potassium-argon dates shows that a high level of igneous activity in the Great Basin and adjacent regions during middle Tertiary time (40 to 20 my ago) was followed by a period of relative quiescence in middle Miocene time that lasted for several million years (from 20 to 17 my ago). Volcanism resumed 16 my ago mainly at the margins of the region and has continued to the present. ?? 1970.

  15. Volcanic activity before and after large tectonic earthquakes: Observations and statistical significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Silke; Walter, Thomas R.

    2009-06-01

    The study of volcanic triggering and interaction with the tectonic surroundings has received special attention in recent years, using both direct field observations and historical descriptions of eruptions and earthquake activity. Repeated reports of clustered eruptions and earthquakes may imply that interaction is important in some subregions. However, the subregions likely to suffer such clusters have not been systematically identified, and the processes responsible for the observed interaction remain unclear. We first review previous works about the clustered occurrence of eruptions and earthquakes, and describe selected events. We further elaborate available databases and confirm a statistically significant relationship between volcanic eruptions and earthquakes on the global scale. Moreover, our study implies that closed volcanic systems in particular tend to be activated in association with a tectonic earthquake trigger. We then perform a statistical study at the subregional level, showing that certain subregions are especially predisposed to concurrent eruption-earthquake sequences, whereas such clustering is statistically less significant in other subregions. Based on this study, we argue that individual and selected observations may bias the perceptible weight of coupling. The activity at volcanoes located in the predisposed subregions (e.g., Japan, Indonesia, Melanesia), however, often unexpectedly changes in association with either an imminent or a past earthquake.

  16. Trace element geochemistry of volcanic gases and particles from 1983--1984 eruptive episodes of Kilauea volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.; Finnegan, D.L.; Zoller, W.H.; Boynton, W.V.

    1987-12-10

    Compositional data have been obtained for volcanic gases and particles collected from fume emitted at the Pu'u O'o vent on the east rift zone of Kilauea volcano. The samples were collected by pumping fume through a filter pack system consisting of a front stage particulate filter followed by four base-treated filters (/sup 7/LiOH). Particles and condensed phases are trapped on the particulate filter, and acidic gases are collected on the treated filters. The filters are analyzed for 30 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Fume samples were collected from the Pu'u O'o vent for two eruptive episodes: (1) 7 days after episode 11 (cooling vent samples) and (2) the stage of episode 13 (active vent samples).

  17. Relationship between the latest activity of mare volcanism and topographic features of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinsuke; Morota, Tomokatsu; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Watanabe, Sei-ichiro; Otake, Hisashi; Ohtake, Makiko

    2016-04-01

    Lunar mare basalts provide insights into compositions and thermal history of lunar mantle. According to crater counting analysis with remote sensing data, the model ages of mare basalt units indicate a second peak of magma activity at the end of mare volcanism (~2 Ga), and the latest eruptions were limited in the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT), which has high abundances of heat-producing elements. In order to understand the mechanism for causing the second peak and its magma source, we examined the correlation between the titanium contents and eruption ages of mare basalt units using compositional and chronological data updated by SELENE/Kaguya. Although no systematic relationship is observed globally, a rapid increase in mean titanium (Ti) content occurred at 2.3 Ga in the PKT, suggesting that the magma source of mare basalts changed at that time. The high-Ti basaltic eruption, which occurred at the late stage of mare volcanism, can be correlated with the second peak of volcanic activity at ~2 Ga. The latest volcanic activity can be explained by a high-Ti hot plume originated from the core-mantle boundary. If the hot plume was occurred, the topographic features formed by the hot plume may be remained. We calculated the difference between topography and selenoid and found the circular feature like a plateau in the center of the PKT, which scale is ~1000 km horizontal and ~500 m vertical. We investigated the timing of ridge formation in the PKT by using stratigraphic relationship between mare basalts and ridges. The ridges were formed before and after the high-Ti basaltic eruptions and seem to be along with the plateau. These results suggest that the plateau formation is connected with the high-Ti basaltic eruptions.

  18. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  19. Infrasonic waves and volcanic tremor at Stromboli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripepe, M.; Poggi, P.; Braun, T.; Gordeev, E.

    The origin of the volcanic tremor is still under debate. Many theories have been proposed in the last years, but none has yet been completely accepted. In 1993, highly sensitive pressure sensors (2.175 Pa/Volt) used to monitor the explosive activity at Stromboli have revealed unexpected correlation between small spike-shaped pressure signals (1-2 Pa) and volcanic tremor. These pressure pulses repeat regularly in time with a recurrent period of ca. 1 s. Video camera images allowed us to correlate the pressure pulses with small gas bursts occurring at one of the active vents. The striking correlation (0.971) between infrasonic and seismic energy fluctuations is particularly meaningful in the frequency domain. Infrasonic and seismic signal share the same spectral content (3 Hz) for every station within a range of 700 m around the craters. Correlations in time and frequency domain remained unaltered during the 1994 field experiments. Moreover, during 1994, the increased degassing activity has been followed by an increase in pressure release (7-8 Pa) and by a shift towards higher frequencies (8 Hz) both in the infrasonic and seismic records. Infrasonic waves and volcanic tremor show similar energy fluctuations and frequency contents, appearing therefore to be produced by the same dynamical process. On this basis, we claim that volcanic tremor at Stromboli originates by continuous outbursting of small gas bubbles in the upper part of the magmatic column.

  20. 1995 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    1996-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity (SVA) at 6 volcanic centers in 1995: Mount Martin (Katmai Group), Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Kliuchef/Korovin, and Kanaga. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) on the 1995 eruptions of 2 Russian volcanoes: Bezymianny and Karymsky. This report summarizes volcanic activity in Alaska during 1995 and the AVO response, as well as information on the 2 Kamchatkan eruptions. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a "significant" investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of phone calls throughout the year reporting steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1995 response record.

  1. Evaluation of results from the fourth and fifth IAVCEI field workshops on volcanic gases, Vulcano island, Italy and Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giggenbach, W. F.; Tedesco, D.; Sulistiyo, Y.; Caprai, A.; Cioni, R.; Favara, R.; Fischer, T. P.; Hirabayashi, J.-I.; Korzhinsky, M.; Martini, M.; Menyailov, I.; Shinohara, H.

    2001-08-01

    The major purpose of field workshops on volcanic gases, organized by the IAVCEI Commission on the Chemistry of Volcanic Gases, is the collection and analysis of volcanic gas discharges with the aim to develop and improve techniques for the geochemical surveillance of active volcanoes. The fourth and fifth workshops were held at Vulcano island, Italy, in 1991 and on Java island, Indonesia, in 1994, respectively. Gas samples were collected from four gas vents by nine groups at Vulcano and from eight gas vents by eight groups on Java. The quality (e.g. scatter of the data) of most of the results, reported from these two workshops, is sufficient to permit a broad chemical classification of the discharge and meaningful thermodynamic interpretation. In most cases, the majority of the data for individual gas vents cluster closely around the median values, suggesting that the median values are the best estimates of chemical composition. There is, however, also a considerable scatter of the analytical data, and this scatter warns us to not rely too heavily on a single analytical value, in particular on a value for CH 4 and CO, because analytical data for these species often show a wide scatter. This warning is particularly relevant for chemical monitoring of volcanic activity. Further improvement of the sampling and analytical techniques as well as more detailed comparison of the techniques is required to reduce such uncertainty in order to interpret the volcanic activity and hydrothermal conditions.

  2. Conceptual model of volcanism and volcanic hazards of the region of Ararat valley, Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliksetian, Khachatur; Connor, Charles; Savov, Ivan; Connor, Laura; Navasardyan, Gevorg; Manucharyan, Davit; Ghukasyan, Yura; Gevorgyan, Hripsime

    2015-04-01

    Armenia and the adjacent volcanically active regions in Iran, Turkey and Georgia are located in the collision zone between the Arabian and Eurasian lithospheric plates. The majority of studies of regional collision related volcanism use the model proposed by Keskin, (2003) where volcanism is driven by Neo-Tethyan slab break-off. In Armenia, >500 Quaternary-Holocene volcanoes from the Gegham, Vardenis and Syunik volcanic fields are hosted within pull-apart structures formed by active faults and their segments (Karakhanyan et al., 2002), while tectonic position of the large in volume basalt-dacite Aragats volcano and periphery volcanic plateaus is different and its position away from major fault lines necessitates more complex volcano-tectonic setup. Our detailed volcanological, petrological and geochemical studies provide insight into the nature of such volcanic activity in the region of Ararat Valley. Most magmas, such as those erupted in Armenia are volatile-poor and erupt fairly hot. Here we report newly discovered tephra sequences in Ararat valley, that were erupted from historically active Ararat stratovolcano and provide evidence for explosive eruption of young, mid K2O calc-alkaline and volatile-rich (>4.6 wt% H2O; amph-bearing) magmas. Such young eruptions, in addition to the ignimbrite and lava flow hazards from Gegham and Aragats, present a threat to the >1.4 million people (~ ½ of the population of Armenia). We will report numerical simulations of potential volcanic hazards for the region of Ararat valley near Yerevan that will include including tephra fallout, lava flows and opening of new vents. Connor et al. (2012) J. Applied Volcanology 1:3, 1-19; Karakhanian et al. (2002), JVGR, 113, 319-344; Keskin, M. (2003) Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 24, 8046.

  3. Multi-Source Autonomous Response for Targeting and Monitoring of Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Ashley G.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Tran, Daniel Q.

    2014-01-01

    The study of volcanoes is important for both purely scientific and human survival reasons. From a scientific standpoint, volcanic gas and ash emissions contribute significantly to the terrestrial atmosphere. Ash depositions and lava flows can also greatly affect local environments. From a human survival standpoint, many people live within the reach of active volcanoes, and therefore can be endangered by both atmospheric (ash, debris) toxicity and lava flow. There are many potential information sources that can be used to determine how to best monitor volcanic activity worldwide. These are of varying temporal frequency, spatial regard, method of access, and reliability. The problem is how to incorporate all of these inputs in a general framework to assign/task/reconfigure assets to monitor events in a timely fashion. In situ sensing can provide a valuable range of complementary information such as seismographic, discharge, acoustic, and other data. However, many volcanoes are not instrumented with in situ sensors, and those that have sensor networks are restricted to a relatively small numbers of point sensors. Consequently, ideal volcanic study synergistically combines space and in situ measurements. This work demonstrates an effort to integrate spaceborne sensing from MODIS (Terra and Aqua), ALI (EO-1), Worldview-2, and in situ sensing in an automated scheme to improve global volcano monitoring. Specifically, it is a "sensor web" concept in which a number of volcano monitoring systems are linked together to monitor volcanic activity more accurately, and this activity measurement automatically tasks space assets to acquire further satellite imagery of ongoing volcanic activity. A general framework was developed for evidence combination that accounts for multiple information sources in a scientist-directed fashion to weigh inputs and allocate observations based on the confidence of an events occurrence, rarity of the event at that location, and other scientists

  4. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru

    2012-09-04

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  5. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  6. Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Doukas, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    During 1993, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to episodes of eruptive activity or false alarms at nine volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. Additionally, as part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also responded to eruptions on the Kamchatka Peninsula, details of which are summarized in Miller and Kurianov (1993). In 1993, AVO maintained seismic instrumentation networks on four volcanoes of the Cook Inlet region--Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine--and two stations at Dutton Volcano near King Cove on the Alaska Peninsula. Other routine elements of AVO's volcano monitoring program in Alaska include periodic airborne measurement of volcanic SO2 and CO2 at Cook Inlet volcanoes (Doukas, 1995) and maintenance of a lightning detection system in Cook Inlet (Paskievitch and others, 1995).

  7. Eruptions in space and time: durations, intervals, and comparison of world's active volcanic belts

    SciTech Connect

    Simkin, T.; McClelland, L.

    1986-07-01

    A computerized data bank, compiled over the last 12 years at the Smithsonian Institution, allows summaries to be made of Holocene volcanism. The Scientific Event Alert Network tracks current volcanic activity. However, the record of most volcanoes is poor before the last 100 years, and some eruptions still pass unreported. The time interval since the previous eruption can be calculated for 4835 of the 5564 compiled eruptions. The median interval is 5.0 years, but much longer intervals commonly precede unusually violent eruptions. For the 25 most violent eruptions in the file (with known preceding interval), the medium interval is 865 years. Of the historic eruptions in this group, 50% resulted in fatalities. The interval between an eruption's start and its most violent paroxysm may be measured in months or years, but it is usually short. Of the 205 larger eruptions for which data are available, 92 had the paroxysmal event within the first day of the eruption, allowing little time for emergency preparations after the eruption's opening phase. To compare the recent vigor of different volcanic belts, they calculated the number of years in which each volcano was active in the last 100 years, summed these for each belt, and divided by belt length. Another index of recent vigor is the number of recognized Holocene volcanoes divided by belt length. A third index is the number of large explosive eruptions (volcanic explosive index greater than or equal to 3) of the last 100 years, again normalized by belt length. These three measures correlate reasonably well, serving to contrast vigorous belts such as Kamchatka, Central America, and Java with relatively quiet belts such as the Cascades, South Sandwich Islands, Greece, and southern Chile.

  8. Volcanic Lightning in Eruptions of Sakurajima Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edens, Harald; Thomas, Ronald; Behnke, Sonja; McNutt, Stephen; Smith, Cassandra; Farrell, Alexandra; Van Eaton, Alexa; Cimarelli, Corrado; Cigala, Valeria; Eack, Ken; Aulich, Graydon; Michel, Christopher; Miki, Daisuke; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-04-01

    In May 2015 a field program was undertaken to study volcanic lightning at the Sakurajima volcano in southern Japan. One of the main goals of the study was to gain a better understanding of small electrical discharges in volcanic eruptions, expanding on our earlier studies of volcanic lightning at Augustine and Redoubt volcanoes in Alaska, USA, and Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. In typical volcanic eruptions, electrical activity occurs at the onset of an eruption as a near-continual production of VHF emissions at or near to the volcanic vent. These emissions can occur at rates of up to tens of thousands of emissions per second, and are referred to as continuous RF. As the ash cloud expands, small-scale lightning flashes of several hundred meters length begin to occur while the continuous RF ceases. Later on during the eruption larger-scale lightning flashes may occur within the ash cloud that are reminiscent of regular atmospheric lightning. Whereas volcanic lightning flashes are readily observed and reasonably well understood, the nature and morphology of the events producing continuous RF are unknown. During the 2015 field program we deployed a comprehensive set of instrumentation, including a 10-station 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that operated in 10 μs high time resolution mode, slow and fast ΔE antennas, a VHF flat-plate antenna operating in the 20-80 MHz band, log-RF waveforms within the 60-66 MHz band, an infra-red video camera, a high-sensitivity Watec video camera, two high-speed video cameras, and still cameras. We give an overview of the Sakurajima field program and present preliminary results using correlated LMA, waveforms, photographs and video recordings of volcanic lightning at Sakurajima volcano.

  9. Recent and Hazardous Volcanic Activity Along the NW Rift Zone of Piton De La Fournaise Volcano, La Réunion Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, G.; Frese, I.; Di Muro, A.; Kueppers, U.; Michon, L.; Metrich, N.

    2014-12-01

    Shield volcanoes are a common feature of basaltic volcanism. Their volcanic activity is often confined to a summit crater area and rift systems, both characterized by constructive (scoria and cinder cones; lava flows) and destructive (pit craters; caldera collapse) phenomena. Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) shield volcano (La Réunion Island, Indian Ocean) is an ideal place to study these differences in eruptive behaviour. Besides the frequent eruptions in the central Enclos Fouqué caldera, hundreds of eruptive vents opened along three main rift zones cutting the edifice during the last 50 kyrs. Two short rift zones are characterized by weak seismicity and lateral magma transport at shallow depth (above sea level). Here we focus on the third and largest rift zone (15km wide, 20 km long), which extends in a north-westerly direction between PdF and nearby Piton des Neiges volcanic complex. It is typified by deep seismicity (up to 30 km), emitting mostly primitive magmas, testifying of high fluid pressures (up to 5 kbar) and large-volume eruptions. We present new field data (including stratigraphic logs, a geological map of the area, C-14 dating and geochemical analyses of the eruption products) on one of the youngest (~6kyrs) and largest lava field (Trous Blancs eruption). It extends for 24km from a height of 1800 m asl, passing Le Tampon and Saint Pierre cities, until reaching the coast. The source area of this huge lava flow has been identified in an alignment of four previously unidentified pit craters. The eruption initiated with intense fountaining activity, producing a m-thick bed of loose black scoria, which becomes densely welded in its upper part; followed by an alternation of volume rich lava effusions and strombolian activity, resulting in the emplacement of meter-thick, massive units of olivine-basalt alternating with coarse scoria beds in the proximal area. Activity ended with the emplacement of a dm-thick bed of glassy, dense scoria and a stratified lithic

  10. Mercury accumulation in hydrothermal vent mollusks from the southern Tonga Arc, southwestern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seyong; Kim, Se-Joo; Ju, Se-Jong; Pak, Sang-Joon; Son, Seung-Kyu; Yang, Jisook; Han, Seunghee

    2015-05-01

    We provide the mercury (Hg) and monomethylmercury (MMHg) levels of the plume water, sulfide ore, sediment, and mollusks located at the hydrothermal vent fields of the southern Tonga Arc, where active volcanism and intense seismic activity occur frequently. Our objectives were: (1) to address the potential release of Hg from hydrothermal fluids and (2) to examine the distribution of Hg and MMHg levels in hydrothermal mollusks (mussels and snails) harboring chemotrophic bacteria. While high concentrations of Hg in the sediment and Hg, As, and Sb in the sulfide ore indicates that their source is likely hydrothermal fluids, the MMHg concentration in the sediment was orders of magnitude lower than the Hg (<0.001%). It suggests that Hg methylation may have not been favorable in the vent field sediment. In addition, Hg concentrations in the mollusks were much higher (10-100 times) than in other hydrothermal vent environments, indicating that organisms located at the Tonga Arc are exposed to exceedingly high Hg levels. While Hg concentration was higher in the gills and digestive glands than in the mantles and residues of snails and mussels, the MMHg concentrations in the gills and digestive glands were orders of magnitude lower (0.004-0.04%) than Hg concentrations. In summary, our results suggest that the release of Hg from the hydrothermal vent fields of the Tonga Arc and subsequent bioaccumulation are substantial, but not for MMHg.

  11. Detection of active hydrothermal vent fields in the Pescadero Basin and on the Alarcon Rise using AUV multibeam and CTD data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caress, D. W.; Troni, G.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.; Thomas, H. J.; Thompson, D.; Conlin, D.; Martin, E. J.; meneses-Quiroz, E.; Nieves-Cardoso, C.; Angel Santa Rosa del Rio, M.

    2015-12-01

    The MBARI AUV D. Allan B. collected high resolution bathymetry, sidescan, and subbottom profiles along the neovolcanic zone of the Alarcon Rise and across the southern Pescadero Basin during 2012 and 2015 MBARI expeditions to the Gulf of California (GOC). The combination of high resolution multibeam bathymetry and seawater temperature data has proven effective in identifying active high temperature vent fields, as validated by inspection and sampling during ROV dives. The AUV carries a 200 kHz multibeam sonar, 110 kHz chirp sidescan sonar, a 1-6 kHz chirp subbottom profiler, and a conductivity, temperature and depth (CTD) sensor for ~17-hour duration missions. Flying at 5.4 km/hr at 50 m altitude, the processed AUV bathymetry has a 0.1 m vertical precision and a 1 m lateral resolution. Chimneys taller than 1.5 m are sufficiently distinctive to allow provisional identification. The CTD temperature data have a nominal 0.002°C accuracy. Following calculation of potential temperature and correcting for average local variation of potential temperature with depth, anomalies greater than 0.05 °C can be reliably identified using a spike detection filter. MBARI AUV mapping surveys are typically planned using a 150 m survey line spacing, so the CTD data may be collected as much as 75 m away from any vent plume source. Five active high temperature vent fields were discovered in the southern GOC, with the Auka Field in the southern Pescadero Basin, and the Ja Sít, Pericú, Meyibó, and Tzab-ek Fields along the Alarcon Rise. In all five cases, hydrothermal vent chimneys are readily identifiable in the multibeam bathymetry, and temperature anomalies are observed above background variability. Other apparent hydrothermal chimneys were observed in the bathmetry that did not exhibit water temperature anomalies; most of these were visited during ROV dives and confirmed to be inactive sites. The maximum water column anomalies are 0.13°C observed above the Meyibó field and 0.25

  12. Temporal and geochemical constraints on active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. P.; Baldwin, S.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Webb, L. E.; Hollocher, K.

    2010-12-01

    Active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea occurs on the Papuan Peninsula (Mt. Lamington and Mt. Victory), in the Woodlark Rift (Dobu Island, SE Goodenough Island, and Western Fergusson Island), and in the Woodlark Basin. In the Woodlark Basin seafloor spreading is active and decompression melting of the mantle produces basalts. However, the cause of volcanism on the Papuan Peninsula and immediately west of active seafloor spreading rift tip in the Woodlark Basin is controversial. Previous studies have suggested active volcanism there results from 1) southward subduction of Solomon Sea lithosphere at the Trobriand Trough or 2) decompression melting as the lithosphere is extended and eventually ruptures. To evaluate these possibilities 20 samples were collected from a bimodal basalt-rhyolite suite in the D’Entrecasteaux Islands approximately 80 km west of the sea floor spreading rift tip. Siliceous ash flow tuffs on Dobu Island, Sanaroa Island, and Eastern Fergusson Island consist of sanidine/anorthoclase + Fe/Ti oxides (illmenite/ magnetite) ± quartz ± nepheline ± clinopyroxene ± xenocrystic olivine. Sanidine and K-feldspar from these ash flow tuffs yielded flat age spectra with 40Ar/39Ar isochron ages of 0.008 ± 0.002 Ma and 0.553 ± 0.001 Ma. ICP-MS trace and REE geochemistry on felsic rocks from Dobu Island and Eastern Fergusson Island yielded multi-element diagrams with enriched incompatible elements, and corresponding negative Nb, Sr, Eu, and Ti anomalies. In contrast, mafic volcanics from SE Goodenough Island are comprised of plagioclase + olivine + Fe/Ti oxides ± orthopyroxene ± clinopyroxene ± hornblende ± biotite. Biotite yielded a 40Ar/39Ar isochron age of 0.376 ± 0.05 Ma. MORB-normalized multi-element diagrams of mafic rocks from SE Goodenough Island are LREE-enriched patterns with negative Nb and positive Sr anomalies. In comparison, multi-element diagrams from previous work on mafic rocks from the New Britain arc to the north also

  13. Infrasound Monitoring of the Volcanic Activities of Japanese Volcanoes in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. I.; Che, I. Y.; Shin, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Since 1999 when our first infrasound array station(CHNAR) has been installed at Cheolwon, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources(KIGAM) is continuously observing infrasound signals with an infrasound array network, named KIN(Korean Infrasound Network). This network is comprised of eight seismo-acoustic array stations(BRDAR, YPDAR, KMPAR, CHNAR, YAGAR, KSGAR, ULDAR, TJIAR). The aperture size of the smallest array is 300m and the largest is about 1.4km. The number of infrasound sensors are between 4(TJIAR) and 18(YAGAR), and 1~5 seismometers are collocated with infrasound sensors. Many interesting infrasound signals associated with different type of sources, such as blasting, large earthquake, bolide, volcanic explosion are detected by KIN in the past 15 years. We have analyzed the infrasound signals possibly associated with the japanese volcanic explosions with reference to volcanic activity report published by Japanese Meteorological Agency. Analysis results of many events, for example, Asama volcano explosion in 2004 and Shinmoe volcano in 2011, are well matched with the official report. In some cases, however, corresponding infrasound signals are not identified. By comparison of the infrasound signals from different volcanoes, we also found that the characteristics of signals are distinguishing. It may imply that the specific volcano has its own unique fingerprint in terms of infrasound signal. It might be investigated by long-term infrasound monitoring for a specific volcano as a ground truth generating repetitive infrasound signal.

  14. A newly discovered Pliocene volcanic field on the western Sardinia continental margin (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, Alessandro; Budillon, Francesca; Tonielli, Renato; De Falco, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    A previously unknown submerged volcanic field offshore western Sardinia (western Mediterranean Sea), has been identified based on swath bathymetric data collected in 2009, 2010 and 2013, and high-resolution seismic profiles collected in 2011 and 2013. About 40 conical-shaped volcanic edifices (maximum width of about 1600 m and maximum height of about 180 m) and several lava outcrops (up to 1,200 m wide) were recognized at 20 to 150 m water depth over an area of 800 km2. The volcanic edifices are mainly eruptive monogenic vents, mostly isolated with a rather distinct shape, or grouped to form a coalescent volcanic body in which single elements are often still recognizable. High-resolution seismics enabled identifying relationships between the volcanic bodies and continental margin successions. The edifices overlie a major erosional surface related to the margin exposure following the Messinian salinity crisis, and are overlain by or interbedded with an early Pliocene marine unit. This seismo-stratigraphic pattern dates the volcanic activity to the early Pliocene, in agreement with the radiometric age of the Catalano island lavas (4.7 Ma) reported in earlier studies. The morphometry of the volcanic bodies suggests that cone erosion was higher at shallow water depths. Indeed, most of the shallow edifices are strongly eroded and flattened at 125 to 130 m water depth, plausibly explained by recurrent sub-aerial exposure during Pleistocene sea-level lowstands, whereas cones in deeper water are much better preserved. Volcanic vents and lava deposits, hereafter named the Catalano volcanic field (CVF), are emplaced along lineaments corresponding to the main directions of the normal fault system, which lowered the Sinis Basin and the western Sardinia continental margin. The CVF represents a volumetrically relevant phase of the late Miocene - Quaternary anorogenic volcanic cycle of Sardinia, which is related to the first stage of the extensional tectonics affecting the island

  15. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  16. Trace elements in scalp hair of children chronically exposed to volcanic activity (Mt. Etna, Italy).

    PubMed

    Varrica, D; Tamburo, E; Dongarrà, G; Sposito, F

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this survey was to use scalp hair as a biomonitor to evaluate the environmental exposure to metals and metalloids of schoolchildren living around the Mt. Etna area, and to verify whether the degree of human exposure to trace elements is subject to changes in local environmental factors. Twenty trace elements were determined in 376 samples of scalp hair from schoolboys (11-13 years old) of both genders, living in ten towns located around the volcanic area of Mt. Etna (Sicily). The results were compared with those (215 samples) from children living in areas of Sicily characterized by a different geological setting (reference site). As, U and V showed much higher concentrations at the volcanic site whereas Sr was particularly more abundant at the reference site. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) indicated an Etna factor, made up of V, U and Mn, and a second factor, concerning the reference site, characterized by Ni and Sr, and to a lesser extent by Mo and Cd. Significant differences in element concentrations were also observed among three different sectors of Mt. Etna area. Young people living in the Mt. Etna area are naturally exposed to enhanced intakes of some metals (V, U, Mn) and non-metals (e.g., As) than individuals of the same age residing in other areas of Sicily, characterized by different lithologies and not influenced by volcanic activity. The petrographic nature of local rocks and the dispersion of the volcanic plume explain the differences, with ingestion of water and local food as the most probable exposure pathways.

  17. Assessing microbial activities in metal contaminated agricultural volcanic soils--An integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Parelho, C; Rodrigues, A S; Barreto, M C; Ferreira, N G C; Garcia, P

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources, extensively used for agricultural purposes and with particular physicochemical properties that may result in accumulation of toxic substances, such as trace metals. Trace metal contaminated soils have significant effects on soil microbial activities and hence on soil quality. The aim of this study is to determine the soil microbial responses to metal contamination in volcanic soils under different agricultural land use practices (conventional, traditional and organic), based on a three-tier approach: Tier 1 - assess soil microbial activities, Tier 2 - link the microbial activity to soil trace metal contamination and, Tier 3 - integrate the microbial activity in an effect-based soil index (Integrative Biological Response) to score soil health status in metal contaminated agricultural soils. Our results showed that microbial biomass C levels and soil enzymes activities were decreased in all agricultural soils. Dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase activities, soil basal respiration and microbial biomass C were the most sensitive responses to trace metal soil contamination. The Integrative Biological Response value indicated that soil health was ranked as: organic>traditional>conventional, highlighting the importance of integrative biomarker-based strategies for the development of the trace metal "footprint" in Andosols.

  18. Eruption probabilities for the Lassen Volcanic Center and regional volcanism, northern California, and probabilities for large explosive eruptions in the Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel; Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Chronologies for eruptive activity of the Lassen Volcanic Center and for eruptions from the regional mafic vents in the surrounding area of the Lassen segment of the Cascade Range are here used to estimate probabilities of future eruptions. For the regional mafic volcanism, the ages of many vents are known only within broad ranges, and two models are developed that should bracket the actual eruptive ages. These chronologies are used with exponential, Weibull, and mixed-exponential probability distributions to match the data for time intervals between eruptions. For the Lassen Volcanic Center, the probability of an eruption in the next year is 1.4x10-4 for the exponential distribution and 2.3x10-4 for the mixed exponential distribution. For the regional mafic vents, the exponential distribution gives a probability of an eruption in the next year of 6.5x10-4, but the mixed exponential distribution indicates that the current probability, 12,000 years after the last event, could be significantly lower. For the exponential distribution, the highest probability is for an eruption from a regional mafic vent. Data on areas and volumes of lava flows and domes of the Lassen Volcanic Center and of eruptions from the regional mafic vents provide constraints on the probable sizes of future eruptions. Probabilities of lava-flow coverage are similar for the Lassen Volcanic Center and for regional mafic vents, whereas the probable eruptive volumes for the mafic vents are generally smaller. Data have been compiled for large explosive eruptions (>≈ 5 km3 in deposit volume) in the Cascade Range during the past 1.2 m.y. in order to estimate probabilities of eruption. For erupted volumes >≈5 km3, the rate of occurrence since 13.6 ka is much higher than for the entire period, and we use these data to calculate the annual probability of a large eruption at 4.6x10-4. For erupted volumes ≥10 km3, the rate of occurrence has been reasonably constant from 630 ka to the present, giving

  19. Submarine radial vents on Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanless, V. Dorsey; Garcia, M.O.; Trusdell, F.A.; Rhodes, J.M.; Norman, M.D.; Weis, Dominique; Fornari, D.J.; Kurz, M.D.; Guillou, Herve

    2006-01-01

    A 2002 multibeam sonar survey of Mauna Loa's western flank revealed ten submarine radial vents and three submarine lava flows. Only one submarine radial vent was known previously. The ages of these vents are constrained by eyewitness accounts, geologic relationships, Mn-Fe coatings, and geochemical stratigraphy; they range from 128 years B.P. to possibly 47 ka. Eight of the radial vents produced degassed lavas despite eruption in water depths sufficient to inhibit sulfur degassing. These vents formed truncated cones and short lava flows. Two vents produced undegassed lavas that created “irregular” cones and longer lava flows. Compositionally and isotopically, the submarine radial vent lavas are typical of Mauna Loa lavas, except two cones that erupted alkalic lavas. He-Sr isotopes for the radial vent lavas follow Mauna Loa's evolutionary trend. The compositional and isotopic heterogeneity of these lavas indicates most had distinct parental magmas. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter results, along with photography and sampling during four JASON2 dives, are used to produce a detailed geologic map to evaluate Mauna Loa's submarine geologic history. The new map shows that the 1877 submarine eruption was much larger than previously thought, resulting in a 10% increase for recent volcanism. Furthermore, although alkalic lavas were found at two radial vents, there is no systematic increase in alkalinity among these or other Mauna Loa lavas as expected for a dying volcano. These results refute an interpretation that Mauna Loa's volcanism is waning. The submarine radial vents and flows cover 29 km2 of seafloor and comprise a total volume of ∼2×109 m3 of lava, reinforcing the idea that submarine lava eruptions are important in the growth of oceanic island volcanoes even after they emerged above sea level.

  20. Emitted short wavelength infrared radiation for detection and monitoring of volcanic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothery, D. A.; Francis, P. W.; Wood, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Thematic Mapper images from LANDSAT were used to monitor volcanoes. Achievements include: (1) the discovery of a magmatic precursor to the 16 Sept. 1986 eruption of Lascar, northern Chile, on images from Mar. and July 1985 and of continuing fumarolic activity after the eruption; (2) the detection of unreported major changes in the distribution of lava lakes on Erta'Ale, Ethiopia; and (3) the mapping of a halo of still-hot spatter surrounding a vent on Mount Erebus, Antarctica, on an image acquired 5 min after a minor eruption otherwise known only from seismic records. A spaceborne short wavelength infrared sensor for observing hot phenomena of volcanoes is proposed. A polar orbit is suggested.

  1. Developing International Guidelines on Volcanic Hazard Assessments for Nuclear Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Charles

    2014-05-01

    tremendous challenge in quantitative volcanic hazard assessments to encompass alternative conceptual models, and to create models that are robust to evolving understanding of specific volcanic systems by the scientific community. A central question in volcanic hazards forecasts is quantifying rates of volcanic activity. Especially for long-dormant volcanic systems, data from the geologic record may be sparse, individual events may be missing or unrecognized in the geologic record, patterns of activity may be episodic or otherwise nonstationary. This leads to uncertainty in forecasting long-term rates of activity. Hazard assessments strive to quantify such uncertainty, for example by comparing observed rates of activity with alternative parametric and nonparametric models. Numerical models are presented that characterize the spatial distribution of potential volcanic events. These spatial density models serve as the basis for application of numerical models of specific phenomena such as development of lava flow, tephra fallout, and a host of other volcanic phenomena. Monte Carlo techniques (random sampling, stratified sampling, importance sampling) are methods used to sample vent location and other key eruption parameters, such as eruption volume, magma rheology, and eruption column height for probabilistic models. The development of coupled scenarios (e.g., the probability of tephra accumulation on a slope resulting in subsequent debris flows) is also assessed through these methods, usually with the aid of event trees. The primary products of long-term forecasts are a statistical model of the conditional probability of the potential effects of volcanism, should an eruption occur, and the probability of such activity occurring. It is emphasized that hazard forecasting is an iterative process, and board consideration must be given to alternative conceptual models of volcanism, weighting of volcanological data in the analyses, and alternative statistical and numerical models

  2. Database for potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Melissa N.; Ramsey, David W.; Miller, C. Dan

    2011-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the past 10,000 yr. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State's citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. This digital release contains information from maps of potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in the state of California, published as Plate 1 in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1847. The main component of this digital release is a spatial database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains links to files to view or print the map plate, main report text, and accompanying hazard tables from Bulletin 1847. It should be noted that much has been learned about the ages of eruptive events in the State of California since the publication of Bulletin 1847 in 1989. For the most up to date information on the status of California volcanoes, please refer to the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website.

  3. Scaling and extended scaling in sediment registers of a paleolake perturbed by volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugalde, Edgardo; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Vilaclara, Gloria

    2006-07-01

    We analyze a sequence of density variations of sedimentary material from an extinct paleolake of the state of Tlaxcala, Mexico, which we previously obtained by means of computer-aided tomography [J. Miranda, A. Oliver, G. Vilaclara, R. Rico-Montiel, V.M. Macias, J.L. Ruvalcava, M.A. Zenteno, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 85 (1994) 886]. In the stratified blocks chiselled out of mines at the lake bed, low-density sediments have a high concentration of diatomite, while high-density strata show a considerable amount of material external to the lake, mostly of volcanic origin. Two regions can be distinguished by visual inspection: a darker and older one which we attribute to a strongly externally perturbed regime, and a whiter more recent one which appears to have been subjected to less frequent volcanic perturbations. By means of a scaling analysis of the distribution function of density fluctuations, we show that for the most recent region there is a range of scales where these fluctuations present a self-similar behavior. We attribute this observation to a rare event response, namely, the onset of correlations in the lake relaxation processes to steady-state conditions following intense volcanic disturbances. Based on scaling properties of the structure function, we also show that the complete data series presents extended self-similarity as encountered in turbulence studies [R. Benzi, S. Ciliberto, R. Tripiccione, C. Baudet, F. Massoli, S. Succi, Phys. Rev. E 48 (1993) R29]. Our characterization of the statistical behavior of the density fluctuations contributes to our knowledge of the volcanic activity over a period of thousands of years, as well as aspects of ecological interest of the lake's response to these disturbances [G. Vilaclara, E. Ugalde, E. Cuna, G. Martinez-Mekler, Complex dynamics of the evolution of a Paleolake subjected to volcanic activity: geology meets ecology, submitted for publication]. Our approach can be implemented in general to other

  4. A new model for the development of the active Afar volcanic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pik, Raphaël; Stab, Martin; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic passive margins, that represent more than the three quarters of continental margins worldwide, are privileged witnesses of the lithospheric extension processes thatform new oceanic basins. They are characterized by voluminous amounts of underplated, intruded and extruded magmas, under the form of massive lavas prisms (seaward-dipping reflectors, or SDR) during the course of thinning and stretching of the lithosphere, that eventually form the ocean-continent transition. The origin and mechanisms of formation of these objects are still largely debated today. We have focussed our attention in the last few years on the Afar volcanic province which represents an active analogue of such volcanic margins. We explored the structural and temporal relationships that exist between the development of the major thinning and stretching structures and the magmatic production in Central Afar. Conjugate precise fieldwork analysis along with lavas geochronology allowed us to revisit the timing and style of the rift formation, since the early syn-rift period of time in the W-Afar marginal area to present days. Extension is primarily accommodated over a wide area at the surface since the very initial periods of extension (~ 25 Ma) following the emplacement of Oligocene CFBs. We propose in our reconstruction of central Afar margin history that extension has been associated with important volumes of underplated mafic material that compensate crustal thinning. This has been facilitated by major crustal-scale detachments that help localize the thinning and underplating at depth. In line with this 'magmatic wide-rift' mode of extension, we demonstrate that episodic extension steps alternate with more protracted magmatic phases. The production of syn-rift massive flood basalts (~ 4 Ma) occurs after early thinning of both the crust and the lithosphere, which suggests that SDR formation, is controlled by previous tectonic event. We determined how the melting regime evolved in

  5. Volcanic hazard on Deception Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, S.; Geyer, A.; Martí, J.; Pedrazzi, D.; Aguirre-Díaz, G.

    2014-09-01

    Deception Island is the most active volcano in the South Shetland Islands and has been the scene of more than twenty identified eruptions over the past two centuries. In this contribution we present the first comprehensive long-term volcanic hazard assessment for this volcanic island. The research is based on the use of probabilistic methods and statistical techniques to estimate volcanic susceptibility, eruption recurrence and the most likely future eruptive scenarios. We perform a statistical analysis of the time series of past eruptions and the spatial extent of their products, including lava flows, fallout, pyroclastic density currents and lahars. The Bayesian event tree statistical method HASSET is applied to calculate eruption recurrence, while the QVAST tool is used in an analysis of past activity to calculate the possibility that new vents will open (volcanic susceptibility). On the basis of these calculations, we identify a number of significant scenarios using the GIS-based VORIS 2.0.1 and LAHARZ software and evaluate the potential extent of the main volcanic hazards to be expected on the island. This study represents a step forward in the evaluation of volcanic hazard on Deception Island and the results obtained are potentially useful for long-term emergency planning.

  6. Constraints on Martian Surface Material from a Study of Volcanic Alteration in Iceland and Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Schiffman, P.; Southard, R. J.; Drief, A.; Verosub, K. L.

    2003-01-01

    Subaerial volcanic activity on Hawaii and subglacial volcanic activity on Iceland has led to the formation of a variety of silicate and iron oxiderich alteration products that may serve as models for chemical alteration on Mars. Multiple samples have been collected from palagonitic tuffs, altered pillow lavas, altered tephra, and S-rich vents for study in the lab. Variations in the kinds of alteration products have been observed depending on the alteration environment of the sample. We are working on building associations between the alteration products and formation conditions that can be used to provide information about environmental conditions on Mars.

  7. Volcanic activity in the Acambay Graben: a < 25 Ka subplinian eruption from the Temascalcingo volcano and implications for volcanic hazard.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Aguirre Díaz, Gerardo; Sunyé Puchol, Ivan; Bartolini, Stefania; Geyer, Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) contains a large number of stratovolcanoes, some well-known, as Popocatepetl, Iztaccihuatl, Nevado de Toluca, or Colima and many others of more modest dimensions that are not well known but constitute the majority in the TMVB. Such volcanoes are, for example, Tequila, San Juan, Sangangüey, Cerro Culiacán, Cerro Grande, El Zamorano, La Joya, Palo Huerfano, Jocotitlán, Altamirano and Temascalcingo, among many others. The Temascalcingo volcano (TV) is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) at the eastern part of the Acambay Graben (northwest portion of Estado de México). The TV is composed mainly by dacitic, porphyritic lavas, block and ash deposits and subordinate pumice fall deposits and ignimbrites (Roldán-Quintana et al., 2011). The volcanic structure includes a summit caldera that has a rectangular shape, 2.5×3.5 km, with the largest side oriented E-W, parallel to major normal faults affecting the edifice. The San Mateo Pumice eruption is one of the greatest paroxysmal episodes of this volcano with pumice deposits mainly exposed at the scarp of the Acambay-Tixmadeje fault and at the northern and northeastern flanks of TV. It overlies a paleosol dated at 25 Ka. A NE-trending dispersion was obtained from field data covering an area of at least 80 km2. These deposits overlie older lava flows and mud flows and are discontinuously covered and eroded by younger reworked deposits of Temascalcingo volcano. This event represents a highly explosive phase that generated a relatively thick and widespread pumice fallout deposit that may occur again in future eruptions. A similar eruption today would have a significantly impact in the region, overall due to the fact that there has been no systematic assessment of the volcanic hazard in any of the studies that have been conducted so far in the area. So, this is a pending and urgent subject that must be tackled without delay. Financed by

  8. 3D structure and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjoberg, Sigurd; Schmiedel, Tobias; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Galland, Oliver; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Norwegian Møre margin is regarded as a type example of a volcanic rifted margin, with its formation usually related to the influence of the Icelandic plume activity. The area is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic complexes such as extrusive lava sequences, intrusive sills and dikes, and hydrothermal vent complexes within the Møre Basin. Emplacement of hydrothermal vent complexes is accommodated by deformation of the host rock. The edges of igneous intrusions mobilize fluids by heat transfer into the sedimentary host rock (aureoles). Fluid expansion may lead to formation of piercing structures due to upward fluid migration. Hydrothermal vent complexes induce bending of overlying strata, leading to the formation of dome structures at the paleo-surface. These dome structures are important as they indicate the accommodation created for the intrusions by deformation of the upper layers of the stratigraphy, and may form important structures in many volcanic margins. Both the morphological characteristics of the upper part and the underlying feeder-structure (conduit-zone) can be imaged and studied on 3D seismic data. Seismic data from the Tulipan prospect located in the western part of the Møre Basin have been used in this study. The investigation focusses on (1) the vent complex geometries, (2) the induced surface deformation patterns, (3) the relation to the intrusions (heat source), as well as (4) the emplacement depth of the hydrothermal vent complexes. We approach this by doing a detailed 3D seismic interpretation of the Tulipan seismic data cube. The complexes formed during the initial Eocene, and are believed to be a key factor behind the rapid warming event called the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The newly derived understanding of age, eruptive deposits, and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin enables us to contribute to the general understanding of the igneous plumbing system in volcanic basins and

  9. Dynamics of an open basaltic magma system: The 2008 activity of the Halema‘uma‘u Overlook vent, Kīlauea Caldera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychenne, Julia; Houghton, Bruce; Swanson, Don; Carey, Rebecca; Swavely, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    On March 19, 2008 a small explosive event accompanied the opening of a 35-m-wide vent (Overlook vent) on the southeast wall of Halema‘uma‘u Crater in Kīlauea Caldera, initiating an eruptive period that extends to the time of writing. The peak of activity, in 2008, consisted of alternating background open-system outgassing and spattering punctuated by sudden, short-lived weak explosions, triggered by collapses of the walls of the vent and conduit. Near-daily sampling of the tephra from this open system, along with exceptionally detailed observations, allow us to study the dynamics of the activity during two eruptive sequences in late 2008. Each sequence includes background activity preceding and following one or more explosions in September and October 2008 respectively. Componentry analyses were performed for daily samples to characterise the diversity of the ejecta. Nine categories of pyroclasts were identified in all the samples, including wall-rock fragments. The six categories of juvenile clasts can be grouped in three classes based on vesicularity: (1) poorly, (2) uniformly highly to extremely, and (3) heterogeneously highly vesicular. The wall-rock and juvenile clasts show dissimilar grainsize distributions, reflecting different fragmentation mechanisms. The wall-rock particles formed by failure of the vent and conduit walls above the magma free surface and were then passively entrained in the eruptive plume. The juvenile componentry reveals consistent contrasts in degassing and fragmentation processes before, during and after the explosive events. We infer a crude ‘layering’ developed in the shallow melt, in terms of both rheology and bubble and volatile contents, beneath a convecting free surface during background activity. A tens-of-centimetres thick viscoelastic surface layer was effectively outgassed and relatively cool, while at depths of less than 100 m, the melt remained slightly supersaturated in volatiles and actively vesiculating

  10. The Cenozoic volcanism in the Kivu rift: Assessment of the tectonic setting, geochemistry, and geochronology of the volcanic activity in the South-Kivu and Virunga regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouclet, A.; Bellon, H.; Bram, K.

    2016-09-01

    The Kivu rift is part of the western branch of the East African Rift system. From Lake Tanganyika to Lake Albert, the Kivu rift is set in a succession of Precambrian zones of weakness trending NW-SE, NNE-SSW and NE-SW. At the NW to NNE turn of the rift direction in the Lake Kivu area, the inherited faults are crosscut by newly born N-S fractures which developed during the late Cenozoic rifting and controlled the volcanic activity. From Lake Kivu to Lake Edward, the N-S faults show a right-lateral en echelon pattern. Development of tension gashes in the Virunga area indicates a clockwise rotation of the constraint linked to dextral oblique motion of crustal blocks. The extensional direction was W-E in the Mio-Pliocene and ENE-WSW in the Pleistocene to present time. The volcanic rocks are assigned to three groups: (1) tholeiites and sodic alkali basalts in the South-Kivu, (2) sodic basalts and nephelinites in the northern Lake Kivu and western Virunga, and (3) potassic basanites and potassic nephelinites in the Virunga area. South-Kivu magmas were generated by melting of spinel + garnet lherzolite from two sources: an enriched lithospheric source and a less enriched mixed lithospheric and asthenospheric source. The latter source was implied in the genesis of the tholeiitic lavas at the beginning of the South-Kivu tectono-volcanic activity, in relationships with asthenosphere upwelling. The ensuing outpouring of alkaline basaltic lavas from the lithospheric source attests for the abortion of the asthenospheric contribution and a change of the rifting process. The sodic nephelinites of the northern Lake Kivu originated from low partial melting of garnet peridotite of the sub-continental mantle due to pressure release during swell initiation. The Virunga potassic magmas resulted from the melting of garnet peridotite with an increasing degree of melting from nephelinite to basanite. They originated from a lithospheric source enriched in both K and Rb, suggesting the

  11. Preliminary results on the reproduction of a deep-sea snailfish Careproctus rhodomelas around the active hydrothermal vent on the Hatoma Knoll, Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Takemura, A; Tamotsu, S; Miwa, T; Yamamoto, H

    2010-11-01

    Deep-sea snailfish Careproctus rhodomelas were collected from an active hydrothermal vent using a remotely operated vehicle (R.O.V. Hyper-dolphin) and a pressurized device (Deep-Aquarium). Careproctus rhodomelas exhibited a cystovarian-type ovary containing a small number of developing oocytes at different stages, suggesting that the fish is a batch-spawner that spawns large eggs (c. 6·0 mm) several times within its life span. In vitro culture of the oocytes in the presence of human chorionic gonadotropin showed that oestradiol-17β production fluctuated with oocyte development, suggesting that the oocytes were at the vitellogenic stage.

  12. Neutron-induced prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) of metalsand non-metals in ocean floor geothermal vent-generated samples

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.L.; Firestone, R.B.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.; Kasztovszky, Zs.; Gatti, R.C.; Wilde, P.

    2002-12-05

    Neutron-induced prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) hasbeen used to analyze ocean floor geothermal vent-generated samples thatare composed of mixed metal sulfides, silicates, and aluminosilicates.The modern application of the PGAA technique is discussed, and elementalanalytical results are given for 25 elements observed in the samples. Theelemental analysis of the samples is consistent with the expectedmineralogical compositions, and very consistent results are obtained forcomparable samples. Special sensitivity to trace quantities of hydrogen,boron, cadmium, dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium isdiscussed.

  13. Evidence of lightning and volcanic activity on Venus - Pro and con

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, Frederick L.; Russell, Christopher T.

    1988-01-01

    It is argued that the impulsive 100-Hz noise bursts detected with the use of the electric field antenna on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) have plasma wave charcteristics that can only be explained if they are whistler mode signals of a type that can be produced by atmospheric discharges. It is further argued that these data are evidence for lightning and volcanic activity on Venus. A reply contends that the PVO electric field measurements are unrelated to either the lower atmosphere or the surface of Venus.

  14. A probabilistic spatial-temporal model for vent opening clustering at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, A.; Isaia, R.; Flandoli, F.; Neri, A.; Quaranta, D.

    2014-12-01

    Campi Flegrei (CF) is a densely urbanized caldera with a very high volcanic risk. Its more recent volcanic activity was characterized in the last 15 kyrs by more than 70 explosive events of variable scale and vent location. The sequence of eruptive events at CF is remarkably inhomogeneous, both in space and time. Eruptions concentred over periods from a few centuries to a few millennia, and were alternated by periods of quiescence lasting up to several millennia. As a consequence, activity has been subdivided into three distinct epochs, i.e. Epoch I, 15 - 9.5 kyrs, Epoch II, 8.6 - 8.2 kyrs, and Epoch III, 4.8 - 3.7 kyrs BP [e.g. Orsi et al., 2004; Smith et al., 2011]. The eruptive record also shows the presence of clusters of events in space-time, i.e. the opening of a new vent in a particular location and at a specific time seems to increase the probability of another vent opening in the nearby area and in the next decades-centuries (self-exciting effect). Probabilistic vent opening mapping conditional the occurrence of a new event and able to account for some of the intrinsic uncertainties affecting the system, has been investigated in some recent studies [e.g. Selva et al. 2011, Bevilacqua et al. 2014, in preparation], but a spatial-temporal model of the sequence of volcanic activity remains an open issue. Hence we have developed a time-space mathematical model that takes into account both the self-exciting behaviour of the system and the significant uncertainty affecting the eruptive record. Based on the past eruptive record of the volcano, the model allows to simulate sequences of future events as well as to better understand the spatial and temporal evolution of the system. In addition, based on the assumption that the last eruptive event occurred in 1538 AD (Monte Nuovo eruption) is the first event of a new epoch of activity, the model can estimate the probability of new vent opening at CF in the next decades.

  15. Battery Vent Mechanism And Method

    DOEpatents

    Ching, Larry K. W.

    2000-02-15

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  16. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, Thomas J.; Ching, Larry K. W.; Baer, Jose T.; Swan, David H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  17. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

  18. Probabilistic constraints from existing and future radar imaging on volcanic activity on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore the quantitative limits that may be placed on Venus' present-day volcanic activity by radar imaging of surface landforms. The apparent nondetection of new lava flows in the areas observed twice by Magellan suggests that there is a ~60% chance that the eruption rate is ~1 km3/yr or less, using the eruption history and area/volume flow geometry of terrestrial volcanoes (Etna, Mauna Loa and Merapi) as a guide. However, if the detection probability of an individual flow is low (e.g. ~10%) due to poor resolution or quality and unmodeled viewing geometry effects, the constraint (<10 km3/yr) is not useful. Imaging at Magellan resolution or better of only ~10% of the surface area of Venus on a new mission (30 years after Magellan) would yield better than 99% chance of detecting a new lava flow, even if the volcanic activity is at the low end of predictions (~0.01 km3/yr) and is expressed through a single volcano with a stochastic eruption history. Closer re-examination of Magellan data may be worthwhile, both to search for new features, and to establish formal (location-dependent) limits on activity against which data from future missions can be tested. While Magellan-future and future-future comparisons should offer much lower detection thresholds for erupted volumes, a probabilistic approach will be required to properly understand the implications.

  19. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  20. 2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  1. Volcanic activity and its link to glaciation cycles: Single-grain age and geochemistry of Early to Middle Miocene volcanic glass from ANDRILL AND-2A core, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, R. E.; Panter, K. S.; Rocchi, S.; Di Vincenzo, G.; Del Carlo, P.; Tiepolo, M.; Field, B.; Gorsevski, P.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the ANtarctic DRILLing Program, volcanic glass fragments were collected from the AND-2A core between ~ 354 and 765 m below sea floor (mbsf) as accumulations (5-70 vol.%) within sediments. Here, we present the physical characteristics, age and geochemistry of the glass, which enable us to reconstruct Early to Middle Miocene volcanic activity in southern McMurdo Sound and, for the first time, document the response of volcanism to climate change in Antarctica. Glass-rich sediments include muddy-to-fine sandstone and stratified diamictite. Glass varies in color, size, vesicularity, crystal content, angularity, and degree of alteration. The mostly fresh glass exhibits delicate cuspate forms indicating deposition as primary ash fall. 40Ar-39Ar age determinations on individual glass grains are in good agreement with the depositional age model of the sediments (ca. 15.6 to 18.6 Ma), supporting for most of them a primary origin, however, some samples do contain older fragments that indicate glass recycling during times of enhanced glacial erosion. Most glasses are mafic (MgO = 3 to 9 wt.%) and vary from hypersthene to nepheline normative with a restricted range in SiO2 (45.2 ± 0.8 wt.%, 1σ) and trace element concentrations typical of the rift-related alkaline rocks in the Erebus Volcanic Province. The glass extends known composition of early phase Mount Morning activity (ca. 11-19 Ma), the only known Early to Middle Miocene source, to a more mafic end, revealing a previously unknown explosive, strongly alkaline, basaltic phase and the most primitive forms of both strongly alkaline (basanite to phonolite) and moderately alkaline (alkali basalt to trachyte) magma associations. The glass-rich sediments occur in glacimarine sequences that record 56 cycles of glacial advance and retreat. Volcanic response to glacial cyclicity is observed both physically and geochemically in AND-2A glass. Higher glass volumes in sediments correlate with ice minimum conditions

  2. Activity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria in the subsurface biosphere of diffuse hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Juniper, S. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Lavik, G.; Hallam, S. J.; Wenk, C. B.; Chang, B. X.; Murdock, S. A.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known about nitrogen (N) transformations in general, and the elimination of N in particular, at diffuse vents where anoxic hydrothermal fluids have mixed with oxygenated crustal seawater prior to discharge. Oceanic N sinks that remove bio-available N ultimately affect chemosynthetic primary productivity in these ecosystems. Using 15N paired isotope techniques, we determined potential rates of fixed N-loss pathways (denitrification, anammox) and dissimilative nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in sulfidic hydrothermal vent fluids discharging from the subsurface at several sites at Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We also measured physico-chemical parameters (i.e. temperature, pH, nutrients, H2S and N2O concentrations) as well as the biodiversity and abundance of chemolithotrophic nitrate-reducing, sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria (SUP05 cluster) using sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes in combination with taxon-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Denitrification was the dominant N-loss pathway in the subsurface biosphere of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, with rates of up to ~1000 nmol N l-1 day-1. In comparison, anammox rates were always <5 nmol N l-1 day-1 and below the detection limit at most of the sites. DNRA rates were up to 152 nmol N l-1 day-1. These results suggest that bacterial denitrification out-competes anammox in sulfidic hydrothermal vent waters. Taxon-specific qPCR revealed that γ-proteobacteria of the SUP05 cluster sometimes dominated the microbial community (SUP05/total bacteria up to 38%). Significant correlation existed between fixed N-loss (i.e., denitrification, anammox) rates and in-situ nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficits in the fluids, indicating that DIN availability may ultimately regulate N-loss in the subsurface. Based on our rate measurements, and on published data on hydrothermal fluid fluxes and residence

  3. Activity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria in the subsurface biosphere of diffuse hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Juniper, S. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Lavik, G.; Hallam, S. J.; Wenk, C. B.; Chang, B. X.; Murdock, S. A.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about fixed nitrogen (N) transformation and elimination at diffuse hydrothermal vents where anoxic fluids are mixed with oxygenated crustal seawater prior to discharge. Oceanic N sinks that remove bio-available N ultimately affect chemosynthetic primary productivity in these ecosystems. Using 15N paired isotope techniques, we determined potential rates of fixed N loss pathways (denitrification, anammox) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in sulfidic hydrothermal vent fluids discharging from the subsurface at several sites at Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We also measured physico-chemical parameters (i.e., temperature, pH, nutrients, H2S and N2O concentrations) as well as the biodiversity and abundance of chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-reducing, sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria (SUP05 cluster) using sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes in combination with taxon-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Denitrification was the dominant N loss pathway in the subsurface biosphere of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, with rates of up to ~1000 nmol N l-1 day-1. In comparison, anammox rates were always < 5 nmol N l-1 day-1 and below the detection limit at most of the sites. DNRA rates were up to ~150 nmol N l-1 day-1. These results suggest that bacterial denitrification out-competes anammox in sulfidic hydrothermal vent waters. Taxon-specific qPCR revealed that γ-proteobacteria of the SUP05 cluster sometimes dominated the microbial community (SUP05/total bacteria up to 38%). Significant correlations were found between fixed N loss (i.e., denitrification, anammox) rates and in situ nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficits in the fluids, indicating that DIN availability may ultimately regulate N loss in the subsurface. Based on our rate measurements, and on published data on hydrothermal fluid fluxes and residence times, we estimated

  4. Variable explosive energy partitioning during open vent activity at Fuego volcano, Guatemala 2007-2009: constraining explosion source processes and implications for monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. J.; Waite, G. P.; Rose, W. I.

    2009-12-01

    Fuego volcano, Guatemala is a 3800 m-high stratovolcano that has displayed open vent behavior since 1999, and has had several periods of historic open vent activity as well as more than 60 historical subplinian eruptions. Two years of continuous visual observations (2005-2007) and six months of seismic and acoustic data (2007) showed a repeating cycle of eruptive behavior that consisted of 1) passive lava effusion and minor strombolian explosions, 2) paroxysmal eruptions lasting 24-48 hours, and 3) degassing explosions with no associated effusion. The strombolian explosions that occurred during periods of passive lava effusion are characteristically distinct from degassing explosions. In this study, we quantify the ratio of radiated infrasound to seismic energy for each class of eruption during study periods in 2007, 2008 and 2009 to distinguish between potential models for the events. More than 25,000 people inhabit the high hazard zone around Fuego volcano, and the potential to track activity using explosive energy partitioning has monitoring and hazard implications. Strombolian explosions during passive effusion typically occur several times per hour, eject incandescent bombs, and produce ash-poor eruptive clouds. Degassing explosions characteristically occur once per hour, produce ash-rich eruptive clouds, and eject primarily lithic blocks. Two general types of degassing explosions are observed, 1) impulsive events with high excess pressure and 2) emergent, lower pressure transients in the acoustic traces without clear ground-coupled airwaves in the seismic data. On the other hand, strombolian explosions are nearly always impulsive in the acoustic traces but the seismic expressions of these events are variable. During the 2007 experiment, degassing explosions recorded at ~7 km from the vent show stable seismic-to-acoustic amplitude ratios ranging over less than an order of magnitude, while the energy partitioning during strombolian explosions varies widely with

  5. 1997 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Wallace, Kristi L.

    1999-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors over 40 historically active volcanoes along the Aleutian Arc. Twenty are seismically monitored and for the rest, the AVO monitoring program relies mainly on pilot reports, observations of local residents and ship crews, and daily analysis of satellite images. In 1997, AVO responded to eruptive activity or suspect volcanic activity at 11 volcanic centers: Wrangell, Sanford, Shrub mud volcano, Iliamna, the Katmai group (Martin, Mageik, Snowy, and Kukak volcanoes), Chiginagak, Pavlof, Shishaldin, Okmok, Cleveland, and Amukta. Of these, AVO has real-time, continuously recording seismic networks at Iliamna, the Katmai group, and Pavlof. The phrase “suspect volcanic activity” (SVA), used to characterize several responses, is an eruption report or report of unusual activity that is subsequently determined to be normal or enhanced fumarolic activity, weather-related phenomena, or a non-volcanic event. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) about the 1997 activity of 5 Russian volcanoes--Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Karymsky, and Alaid (SVA). This report summarizes volcanic activity and SVA in Alaska during 1997 and the AVO response, as well as information on the reported activity at the Russian volcanoes. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a “significant” investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of reports throughout the year of steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1997 response record.

  6. Active fault systems and tectono-topographic configuration of the central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szynkaruk, Ewa; Graduño-Monroy, Víctor Hugo; Bocco, Gerardo

    2004-07-01

    The central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) reflects the interplay between three regional fault systems: the NNW-SSE to NW-SE striking Taxco-Querétaro fault system, the NE-SW striking system, and the E-W striking Morelia-Acambay fault system. The latter is the youngest and consists of fault scarps up to 500 m high, whose formation caused structural and morphological reorganization of the region. In this paper, we investigate possible activity of the three systems within the central TMVB, and assess the role that they play in controlling the tectono-topographic configuration of the area. Our study is based on DEM-derived morphometric maps, longitudinal river profiles, geomorphologic mapping, and structural field data concerning recent faulting. We find that all three regional fault systems are active within the central TMVB, possibly with different displacement rates and/or type of motion; and that NNW-SSE and NE-SW striking faults control the major tectono-topographic elements that build up the region, which are being re-shaped by E-W striking faults. We also find that tectonic information can be deciphered from the topography of the youthful volcanic arc in question, regardless its complexity.

  7. Gravity monitoring of Tatun Volcanic Group activities and inference for underground fluid circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouyen, Maxime; Chao, Benjamin Fong; Hwang, Cheinway; Hsieh, Wen-Chi

    2016-12-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group (TVG), located on the northern coast of Taiwan adjacent to the city of Taipei, experiences active hydrothermalism but has no historical record of volcanic eruption. Yet recent studies suggest that TVG is dormant-active rather than extinct. To monitor mass transfers and to gain further understanding of this volcanic area, gravity variations have been recorded continuously since 2012 using a superconducting gravimeter, and once every few months since 2005 using absolute gravimeters. We analyze the continuous gravity time series and propose a model that best explains the gravity variations due to local groundwater redistribution. By correcting these variations, we identify gravity changes as large as 35 μGal that occurred concomitantly to fluid pressure-induced earthquakes and changes in the gas composition at Dayoukeng, one of TVG's fumaroles, over 2005-2007. We examine several fluid movements that can match the gravity observations, yet too few additional constraints exist to favor any of them. In particular, no significant ground displacements are observed when these gravity variations occurred. On the other hand, the model of gravity changes due to local groundwater redistribution can be routinely computed and removed from the ongoing time gravity measurements in order to quickly identify any unusual mass transfer occurring beneath TVG.

  8. Ultra-long-range hydroacoustic observations of submarine volcanic activity at Monowai, Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, D.; Watts, A. B.; Grevemeyer, I.; Rodgers, M.; Paulatto, M.

    2016-02-01

    Monowai is an active submarine volcanic center in the Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of 5 days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic T phases. We show, using cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that the eruption is detected as far as Ascension Island, equatorial South Atlantic Ocean, where a bottom moored hydrophone array is operated as part of the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. Hydroacoustic phases from the volcanic center must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing and Ranging channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans, a source-receiver distance of ~15,800 km. We believe this to be the furthest documented range of a naturally occurring underwater signal above 1 Hz. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and long-range, acoustic parabolic equation modeling, have implications for submarine volcano monitoring.

  9. Autonomous Volcanic Activity Detection with ASE on EO-1 Hyperion: Applications for Planetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Baker, V.; Castano, R.; Chien, S.; Cichy, B.; Doggett, T.; Dohm, J.; Greeley, R.; Rabideau, G.; Sherwood, R.; Williams, K.; ASE Project Team

    2003-05-01

    The New Millennium Program (NMP) Space Technology 6 (ST-6) Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) will fly two scene classifiers on the Earth Orbiting 1 (EO-1) spacecraft in the fall of 2003, and will demonstrate autonomous, onboard processing of Hyperion imager 0.4-2.4 micron hyperspectral data, and autonomous, science-driven planning and acquisition of subsequent observations. ASE is an experiment to meet NASA's call for systems with reduced downlink and onboard data processing to enable autonomous missions. ASE software is divided into three classes: (1) spacecraft command and control; (2) an onboard planner (CASPER); and (3) modular science algorithms, which are used to process raw data to search out specific features and spectral signatures. The ASE Science Team has developed scene classifiers to detect thermal emission in both day and nighttime Hyperion data, and are continuing to develop other scene classifiers for ice, snow, water and land for future release and flight on EO-1. Once uploaded, the thermal scene classifier effectively turns the EO-1 spacecraft into an autonomously operating and reacting volcanic activity detector. It is possible to envision such a capability on spacecraft observing volcanism on Io and Triton, autonomously identifying and classifying activity, identifying sites deserving of closer scrutiny, and retasking the spacecraft to observe them, thus fulfilling NASA's goal of fully-autonomous, science-driven spacecraft. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA.

  10. Evidence for Subglacial Volcanic Activity Beneath the area of the Divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    There is an increasing body of aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, heat flow, subglacial volcanic earthquakes, several exposed active and subglacial volcanoes and other lines of evidence for volcanic activity associated with the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) since the origin (~25 Ma) of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), which flows through it. Exposed late Cenozoic, alkaline volcanic rocks, 34 Ma to present concentrated in Marie Byrd Land (LeMasurier and Thomson, 1990), but also exposed along the rift shoulder on the Transantarctic Mountains flank of the WR, and >1 million cubic kilometers, of mostly subglacially erupted 'volcanic centers' beneath the WAIS inferred from aeromagnetic data, have been interpreted as evidence of a magmatic plume. About 18 high relief, (~600-2000 m) 'volcanic centers' presently beneath the WAIS surface, probably were erupted subaerially when the WAIS was absent, based on the 5-km orthogonally line spaced Central West Antarctica aerogeophysical survey. All would be above sea level after ice removal and isostatic adjustment. Nine of these high relief peaks are in the general area beneath the divide of the WAIS. This high bed relief topography was first interpreted in the 1980s as the volcanic 'Sinuous Ridge ' based on a widely spaced aeromagnetic -radar ice sounding survey (Jankowski et al,. 1983). A 70-km wide, circular ring of interpreted subglacial volcanic rocks was cited as evidence of a volcanic caldera underlying the ice sheet divide based on the CWA survey (Behrendt et al., 1998). A broad magnetic 'low' surrounding the caldera area possibly is evidence of a shallow Curie isotherm. High heat flow reported from temperature logging (Clow et al., 2012) in the WAISCORE and a thick volcanic ash layer in the core (Dunbar et al., 2012) are consistent with this interpretation. A 2 km-high subaerially erupted volcano (subglacial Mt Thiel, ~78.5 degrees S, 111 degrees W) ~ 100 km north from the WAISCORE could be the source of the ash

  11. Spatial distribution of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation in active volcanic islands - II: Deception Island images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Posadas, Antonio M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we present regional maps of the inverse intrinsic quality factor (Qi-1), the inverse scattering quality factor (Qs-1) and total inverse quality factor (Qt-1) for the volcanic environment of Deception Island (Antarctica). Our attenuation study is based on diffusion approximation, which permits us to obtain the attenuation coefficients for every single couple source-receiver separately. The data set used in this research is derived from an active seismic experiment using more than 5200 offshore shots (air guns) recorded at 32 onshore seismic stations and four ocean bottom seismometers. To arrive at a regional distribution of these values, we used a new mapping technique based on a Gaussian space probability function. This approach led us to create `2-D probabilistic maps' of values of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation. The 2-D tomographic images confirm the existence of a high attenuation body below an inner bay of Deception Island. This structure, previously observed in 2-D and 3-D velocity tomography of the region, is associated with a massive magma reservoir. Magnetotelluric studies reach a similar interpretation of this strong anomaly. Additionally, we observed areas with lower attenuation effects that bear correlation with consolidated structures described in other studies and associated with the crystalline basement of the area. Our calculations of the transport mean-free path and absorption length for intrinsic attenuation gave respective values of ≈ 950 m and 5 km, which are lower than the values obtained in tectonic regions or volcanic areas such as Tenerife Island. However, as observed in other volcanic regions, our results indicate that scattering effects dominate strongly over the intrinsic attenuation.

  12. A New Way to estimate volcanic hazards and present multi-hazard maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, A.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Malservisi, R.

    2013-12-01

    To understand long term hazards in distributed volcanic systems, we are developing a research framework to relate statistical models of spatial intensity (vents per unit area), volume intensity (erupted volume per unit area) and volume-flux intensity (erupted volume per unit time and area) to conceptual models of the subsurface processes of magma storage and transport. The distribution of mapped vents and volumes erupted from these vents are used to develop nonparametric (kernel density) statistical models for distributed volcanic systems. Using radiometric age determinations of vents and erupted units, we then estimate the recurrence rate of volcanism and associated uncertainty using a Monte Carlo approach. The outputs of Monte Carlo simulation of recurrence rates allow us to produce dynamic statistical maps that reveal the spatio-temporal evolution of volcanic activity within the field studied. To further improve our research framework, we have implemented solutions to differential equations governing magma production and transport to model subsurface processes of magma ascent. This behavior can be statistically approximated by modeling the flow of a viscous fluid within a homogeneous porous medium using Darcy's law with variable conductivity dependent on flow rate and lithospheric stresses (Bonafede and Boschi, 1992; Bonafede and Cenni, 1998). Using this continuous formulation, additional complexities that influence magma migration such as complex sources, magma generation, magma rheology, tectonic stresses, and/or anisotropic/heterogeneous behavior of the porous medium, can be simply implemented by varying the choice of source and conductivity parameters. In this way we can explore physical processes that may give rise to heterogeneous flux in numerical models and relate these outputs to observed vent distributions and volume flux at the surface. Overall, data extracted from our research framework should link statistical models of volcano distribution with the

  13. Geochemical constraints on the diversity and activity of H2 -oxidizing microorganisms in diffuse hydrothermal fluids from a basalt- and an ultramafic-hosted vent.

    PubMed

    Perner, Mirjam; Petersen, Jillian M; Zielinski, Frank; Gennerich, Hans-Hermann; Seifert, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Mixing processes of reduced hydrothermal fluids with oxygenated seawater and fluid-rock reactions contribute to the chemical signatures of diffuse venting and likely determine the geochemical constraints on microbial life. We examined the influence of fluid chemistry on microbial diversity and activity by sampling diffuse fluids emanating through mussel beds at two contrasting hydrothermal vents. The H(2) concentration was very low at the basalt-hosted Clueless site, and mixing models suggest O(2) availability throughout much of the habitat. In contrast, effluents from the ultramafic-hosted Quest site were considerably enriched in H(2) , while O(2) is likely limited to the mussel layer. Only two different hydrogenase genes were identified in clone libraries from the H(2) -poor Clueless fluids, but these fluids exhibited the highest H(2) uptake rates in H(2) -spiked incubations (oxic conditions, at 18 °C). In contrast, a phylogenetically diverse H(2) -oxidizing potential was associated with distinct thermal conditions in the H(2) -rich Quest fluids, but under oxic conditions, H(2) uptake rates were extremely low. Significant stimulation of CO(2) fixation rates by H(2) addition was solely illustrated in Quest incubations (P-value <0.02), but only in conjunction with anoxic conditions (at 18 °C). We conclude that the factors contributing toward differences in the diversity and activity of H(2) oxidizers at these sites include H(2) and O(2) availability.

  14. Effects of Hemagglutination Activity in the Serum of a Deep-Sea Vent Endemic Crab, Shinkaia Crosnieri, on Non-Symbiotic and Symbiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fujiyoshi, So; Tateno, Hiroaki; Watsuji, Tomoo; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Daisuke; Mino, Sayaka; Sugimura, Makoto; Sawabe, Tomoo; Takai, Ken; Sawayama, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    In deep-sea hydrothermal environments, most invertebrates associate with dense populations of symbiotic microorganisms in order to obtain nutrition. The molecular interactions between deep-sea animals and environmental microbes, including their symbionts, have not yet been elucidated in detail. Hemagglutinins/lectins, which are carbohydrate-binding proteins, have recently been reported to play important roles in a wide array of biological processes, including the recognition and control of non-self materials. We herein assessed hemagglutination activity in the serum of a deep-sea vent endemic crab, Shinkaia crosnieri, which harbors chemosynthetic epibionts on its plumose setae. Horse and rabbit erythrocytes were agglutinated using this serum (opt. pH 7.5 and opt. temperature 15°C). Agglutinating activity was inhibited by eight kinds of sugars and several divalent cations, did not require any divalent metal ions, and remained detectable even after heating the serum at 100°C for 30 min. By using fluorescently labeled serum, we demonstrated that deep-sea crab serum components bound to the epibionts even in the presence of sugars. This study represents the first immunological assessment of a deep-sea vent endemic crab and demonstrated the possibility of a non-lectin-mediated symbiont-host interaction.

  15. Effects of Hemagglutination Activity in the Serum of a Deep-Sea Vent Endemic Crab, Shinkaia Crosnieri, on Non-Symbiotic and Symbiotic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, So; Tateno, Hiroaki; Watsuji, Tomoo; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Daisuke; Mino, Sayaka; Sugimura, Makoto; Sawabe, Tomoo; Takai, Ken; Sawayama, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    In deep-sea hydrothermal environments, most invertebrates associate with dense populations of symbiotic microorganisms in order to obtain nutrition. The molecular interactions between deep-sea animals and environmental microbes, including their symbionts, have not yet been elucidated in detail. Hemagglutinins/lectins, which are carbohydrate-binding proteins, have recently been reported to play important roles in a wide array of biological processes, including the recognition and control of non-self materials. We herein assessed hemagglutination activity in the serum of a deep-sea vent endemic crab, Shinkaia crosnieri, which harbors chemosynthetic epibionts on its plumose setae. Horse and rabbit erythrocytes were agglutinated using this serum (opt. pH 7.5 and opt. temperature 15°C). Agglutinating activity was inhibited by eight kinds of sugars and several divalent cations, did not require any divalent metal ions, and remained detectable even after heating the serum at 100°C for 30 min. By using fluorescently labeled serum, we demonstrated that deep-sea crab serum components bound to the epibionts even in the presence of sugars. This study represents the first immunological assessment of a deep-sea vent endemic crab and demonstrated the possibility of a non-lectin-mediated symbiont-host interaction. PMID:26212518

  16. Postcaldera volcanism and hydrothermal activity revealed by autonomous underwater vehicle surveys in Myojin Knoll caldera, Izu-Ogasawara arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honsho, Chie; Ura, Tamaki; Kim, Kangsoo; Asada, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Myojin Knoll caldera, one of the submarine silicic calderas lying on the volcanic front of the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc, has attracted increasing attention since the discovery of a large hydrothermal field called the Sunrise deposit. Although numerous submersible surveys have been conducted in Myojin Knoll caldera, they have not sufficiently explored areas to produce a complete picture of the caldera and understand the origin of the Sunrise deposit. We conducted comprehensive deep-sea surveys using an autonomous underwater vehicle and obtained high-resolution bathymetric and magnetic data and sonar images from ~70% of the caldera. The detailed bathymetric map revealed that faulting and magma eruptions, possibly associated with an inflation-deflation cycle of the magma reservoir during postcaldera volcanism, had generally occurred in the caldera wall. The main dome of the central cone was covered with lava flows and exhibits exogenous growth, which is unusual for rhyolitic domes. The magnetization distribution in the central cone indicates preferential magma intrusion along a NW-SE direction. It is presumed that magma migrated along this direction and formed a rhyolite dome at the foot of the southeastern caldera wall, where the Sunrise deposit occurs. The Sunrise deposit is composed mainly of three ridges extending in slope directions and covers ~400 × ~400 m. Magnetization reduction in the deposit area is small, indicating that the alteration zone beneath the Sunrise deposit is slanting rather than vertical. It is presumed that several slanting and near-vertical volcanic vents serve as pathways of hydrothermal fluid in Myojin Knoll caldera.

  17. Connecting Io's volcanic activity to the Io plasma torus: comparison of Galileo/NIMS volcanic and ground-based torus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhaes, F. P.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Rathbun, J. A.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Morgenthaler, J. P.; Echer, E.; Echer, M. P. D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Io, the innermost of the Jupiter's four Galilean moons, is a remarkable object in the Solar System, due to its intense and energetic volcanic activity. The volcanic sulfur and oxygen in Io's tenuous atmosphere escapes forming an extended neutral cloud around Io and Jupiter. Subsequently, by ionization and pickup ions, a ring of charged particles encircling Jupiter is created, forming the Io plasma torus. Considering this scenario, it is reasonable to expect that the Io plasma torus should be affected by changes in Io's volcanism. Interactions between Io and the Jovian environment is unique and yet not very well understood. Here we present two sets of observations. One from the Galileo Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (NIMS) instrument, which obtained spectral image cubes between 0.7 and 5.2 microns. The other dataset is from ground-based observations of the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines from the Io plasma torus, obtained at McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope, at Kitt Peak. Our dataset from the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines cover more years than the one from the NIMS data. The years presented in this work for a comparative study are from 1998 through 2001. Using the NIMS instrument we were able to identify which volcanoes were active and measure their level of activity. From the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines we were able to trace the densest part of the torus and also the brightness of both ansa. By comparing the results from the Galileo instrument and the ground-based observations, we are exploring how the Io plasma torus responds to large eruptions from Io. We aim with this study to help improve our understanding of this complex coupled system, Jupiter-Io.

  18. Linking geology, fluid chemistry, and microbial activity of basalt- and ultramafic-hosted deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    PubMed

    Perner, M; Hansen, M; Seifert, R; Strauss, H; Koschinsky, A; Petersen, S

    2013-07-01

    Hydrothermal fluids passing through basaltic rocks along mid-ocean ridges are known to be enriched in sulfide, while those circulating through ultramafic mantle rocks are typically elevated in hydrogen. Therefore, it has been estimated that the maximum energy in basalt-hosted systems is available through sulfide oxidation and in ultramafic-hosted systems through hydrogen oxidation. Furthermore, thermodynamic models suggest that the greatest biomass potential arises from sulfide oxidation in basalt-hosted and from hydrogen oxidation in ultramafic-hosted systems. We tested these predictions by measuring biological sulfide and hydrogen removal and subsequent autotrophic CO2 fixation in chemically distinct hydrothermal fluids from basalt-hosted and ultramafic-hosted vents. We found a large potential of microbial hydrogen oxidation in naturally hydrogen-rich (ultramafic-hosted) but also in naturally hydrogen-poor (basalt-hosted) hydrothermal fluids. Moreover, hydrogen oxidation-based primary production proved to be highly attractive under our incubation conditions regardless whether hydrothermal fluids from ultramafic-hosted or basalt-hosted sites were used. Site-specific hydrogen and sulfide availability alone did not appear to determine whether hydrogen or sulfide oxidation provides the energy for primary production by the free-living microbes in the tested hydrothermal fluids. This suggests that more complex features (e.g., a combination of oxygen, temperature, biological interactions) may play a role for determining which energy source is preferably used in chemically distinct hydrothermal vent biotopes.

  19. Impact of atmospheric water vapor on the thermal infrared remote sensing of volcanic sufur dioxide emmisions: A case study from Pu'u 'O'o vent of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, V. J.; Worden, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    The December 18, 1999, launch of NASA's Terra satellite put two multispectral thermal infrared imaging instruments into Earth orbit. Experiments with airborne instruments have demonstrated that the data from such instruments can be used to detect volcanic SO2 plumes and clouds.

  20. Observations of volcanic Lightning (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Behnke, S. A.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Edens, H. E.; McNutt, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    We have made detailed observations of lightning during four volcanic eruptions using lightning mapping array (LMA) stations. In January 2006 we observed several explosive eruptions from Augustine Volcano in Alaska with two LMA stations. While two stations only gave us the direction to the lightning it gave a detailed time history of the lightning in relationship to the eruption as measured by seismic and acoustic instruments. We inferred that there were two phases (explosive and plume) and three types of lightning (small discharges near the vent, larger discharges in the volcanic column, thunderstorm like lightning in the plume). In May 2008 we mapped lightning in the plume of Chaitan (Chile) three weeks after the initial eruption. In 2009 we observed the entire sequence of explosive eruptions of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska with 4 distant stations. This provided good 2-D locations of the electrical activity. In 2010 we mapped much of the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull using 6 LMA stations that provided 3-D locations. All the observations have reinforced the basic conclusions that we found at the Augustine eruption, and let us expand and refine the these ideas.

  1. Ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, R.A.; Kennish, M.J. )

    1993-08-01

    The present article reviews studies of the past 15 years of active and inactive hydrothermal vents. The focus of the discussion is on the ecology of the biological communities inhabiting hydrothermal vents. These communities exhibit high densities and biomass, low species diversity, rapid growth rates, and high metabolic rates. The authors attempt to relate the biology of hydrothermal vent systems to geology. Future directions for hydrothermal vent research are suggested. Since many vent populations are dependent on hydrothermal fluids and are consequently unstable, both short- and long-term aspects of the ecology of the vent organisms and the influence of chemical and geological factors on the biology of vent systems need to be established. 200 refs., 28 figs.

  2. Microbial colonization of post eruptive vents on the EPR at 9N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetriani, C.

    2008-12-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to understand the role of microbial colonists at newly formed vents as "mediators" in the transfer of energy from the geothermal source to the higher trophic levels, and their role in altering fluid chemistry and in "conditioning" the vent environment for metazoans to settle. Following the 2005-06 volcanic eruption along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) ridge crest between 9°N and 9°N, we had several opportunities to investigate the microbial colonization of the post-eruptive vents: in 2006 (about six months after the eruption), in January 2007 (one year after the eruption), and in December 2007/January 2008 (two years after the eruption). In order to investigate microbial colonization, we designed and deployed several experimental microbial colonizers on active diffuse flow vents characterized by different temperatures (approximate range 20-60°C) chemical (different redox conditions), and biological (e.g., presence or absence of metazoan colonists) regimes. Analyses of the 16S rRNA and fuctional gene transcripts from the colonizing communities indicated that Epsilonproteobacteria represented the dominant and active fraction of the chemosynthetic early microbial colonists, and that they expressed in-situ the genes involved in carbon dioxide fixation and nitrate respiration. However, data from our semi quantitative culture experiments indicated that Epsilonproteobacteria were not the only microorganisms that attached to basalts or to the experimental colonizers during the early phases of colonization. Sulfur dependent, chemosynthetic members of the Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria were isolated from up to 10-5 dilutions of original samples along with heterotrophic Gammaproteobacteria capable of growth on n-alkanes as their sole carbon source. We propose a model that links the chemistry of hydrothermal fluids to the colonization of newly formed vents and suggests a role for chemosynthetic and heterotrophic bacteria in the

  3. Interactions between active faulting, volcanism, and sedimentary processes at an island arc: Insights from Les Saintes channel, Lesser Antilles arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, F.; Feuillet, N.; Deplus, C.

    2016-07-01

    New high-resolution marine geophysical data allow to characterize a large normal fault system in the Lesser Antilles arc, and to investigate the interactions between active faulting, volcanism, sedimentary, and mass-wasting processes. Les Saintes fault system is composed of several normal faults that form a 30 km wide half-graben accommodating NE-SW extension. It is bounded by the Roseau fault, responsible for the destructive Mw 6.3 21 November 2004 earthquake. The Roseau fault has been identified from the island of Basse-Terre to Dominica. It is thus 40 km long, and it could generate Mw 7 earthquakes in the future. Several submarine volcanoes are also recognized. We show that the fault system initiated after the main volcanic construction and subsequently controls the emission of volcanic products. The system propagates southward through damage zones. At the tip of the damage zones, several volcanic cones were recently emplaced probably due to fissures opening in an area of stress increase. A two-way interaction is observed between active faulting and sedimentary processes. The faults control the development of the main turbiditic system made of kilometer-wide canyons, as well as the location of sediment ponding. In turn, erosion and sedimentation prevent scarp growth at the seafloor. Faulting also enhances mass-wasting processes. Since its initiation, the fault system has consequently modified the morphologic evolution of the arc through perturbation of the sedimentary processes and localization of the more recent volcanic activity.

  4. Shrimp Populations on Northwest Rota, an Active Volcano of the Mariana Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnicliffe, V.; Juniper, S. K.; Limén, H.; Jones, W. J.; Vrijenhoek, R.; Webber, R.; Eerkes-Medrano, D.

    2004-12-01

    NW Rota-1 is a submarine volcano that manifested active volcanic and hydrothermal activity during submersible surveys in March 2004 (see Embley et al.). Substratum on the volcano summit (520 m depth) was entirely basalt outcrop or variously-sized ejecta lying near the angle of repose. While no fauna inhabited the rim of the volcanic pit, patches of shrimp were located within 25 m and on the nearby summit. Two species are present. Opaepele cf. loihi shows few morphological differences from either a nearby population on Eifuku Volcano (see Chadwick et al.) at 1700 m depth or from the type locality in Hawaii. A molecular comparison of COI sequences of 13 specimens found little difference from two Hawaiian sequences. Video observations detail frequent feeding activity using spatulate chelipeds to trim microbial filaments as the cephalothorax sways across the substratum. The second species is an undescribed Alvinocaris. Juveniles of this species appear to form clusters distinct from Opaepele where they also graze on filaments. Sparse adults of Alvinocaris range up to 5.5 cm long and display aggressive behaviour moving through patches of smaller shrimp. Densities of Opaepele were highest on sloping rock walls (over 500 per sq.m.) whereas adult Alvinocaris were more abundant on rubble. This division may reflect food preference: microbial filaments versus polychaetes and meiofauna. Characterization of particulates from these substrata was conducted using visual sorting and stable isotope composition. As Alvinocaris matures, the chelipeds enlarge, enabling a greater predatory capacity. Measurements of Opaepele from digital in situ images reveal a population structure suggesting a recent recruitment. Average size is significantly smaller than the Eifuku population and no egg-bearing females were collected. The disjunct range of this species where it occurs on active volcanoes 6000 km apart is puzzling. Further work on intermediate sites and into the reproductive strategy of

  5. Volcanic Gas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazards Tephra/Ash Lava Flows Lahars Volcanic Gas Climate Change Pyroclastic Flows Volcanic Landslides Preparedness Volcano Hazard Zones ... Please see our discussion of volcanic gases and climate change for additional information. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is ...

  6. Analysis of radar images of the active volcanic zone at Krafla, Iceland: The effects of look azimuth biasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Williams, R. S., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The geomorphic expression of Mid-Ocean-Ridge (MOR) volcanism in a subaerial setting occurs uniquely on Earth in Iceland, and the most recent MOR eruptive activity has been concentrated in the Northeastern Volcanic Zone in an area known as Krafla. Within the Krafla region are many of the key morphologic elements of MOR-related basaltic volcanism, as well as volcanic explosion craters, subglacial lava shields, tectonic fissure swarms known as gjar, and basaltic-andesite flows with well developed ogives (pressure-ridges). The objective was to quantify the degree to which the basic volcanic and structural features can be mapped from directional SAR imagery as a function of the look azimuth. To accomplish this, the current expression of volcanic and tectonic constructs was independently mapped within the Krafla region on the E, W, and N-looking SAR images, as well as from SPOT Panchromatic imagery acquired in 1987. The initial observations of the E, W, and N images indicates that fresh a'a lava surfaces are extremely radar bright (rough at 3 cm to meter scales) independent of look direction; this suggests that these flows do not have strong flow direction related structures at meter and cm scales, which is consistent with typical Icelandic a'a lava surfaces in general. The basic impression from a preliminary analysis of the effects of look azimuth biasing on interpretation of the geology of an active MOR volcanic zone is that up to 30 percent of the diagnostic features can be missed at any given look direction, but that having two orthogonal look direction images is probably sufficient to prevent gross misinterpretation.

  7. Volcanism-sedimentation interaction in the Campo de Calatrava Volcanic Field (Spain): a magnetostratigraphic and geochronological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Hernández, Antonio; López-Moro, Francisco Javier; Gallardo-Millán, José Luis; Martín-Serrano, Ángel; Gómez-Fernández, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the influence of Cenozoic volcanism of the Campo de Calatrava volcanic field on the sedimentation of two small continental basins in Spain (Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins). The volcanism in this area was mainly monogenetic, according to the small-volume volcanic edifices of scoria cones that were generated and the occurrence of tuff rings and maars. A sedimentological analysis of the volcaniclastic deposits led to the identification of facies close to the vents, low-density (dilute) pyroclastic surges, secondary volcanic deposits and typical maar deposits. Whole-rock K/Ar dating, together with palaeomagnetic constraints, yielded an age of 3.11-3.22 Ma for the onset of maar formation, the deposition finished in the Late Gauss-Early Matuyana. Using both techniques and previous paleontological data allowed it to be inferred that the maar formation and the re-sedimentation stage that occurred in Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins were roughly coeval. The occurrence of syn-eruption volcaniclastic deposits with small thicknesses that were separated by longer inter-eruption periods, where fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation was prevalent, together with the presence of small-volume volcanic edifices indicated that there were short periods of volcanic activity in this area. The volcanic activity was strongly controlled by previous basement faults that favoured magma feeding, and the faults also controlled the location of volcanoes themselves. The occurrence of the volcanoes in the continental basins led to the creation of shallow lakes that were related to the maar formation and the modification of sedimentological intra-basinal features, specifically, valley slope and sediment load.

  8. Sex-biased dispersal and volcanic activities shaped phylogeographic patterns of extant Orangutans (genus: Pongo).

    PubMed

    Nater, Alexander; Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Arora, Natasha; van Schaik, Carel P; van Noordwijk, Maria A; Willems, Erik P; Singleton, Ian; Wich, Serge A; Goossens, Benoit; Warren, Kristin S; Verschoor, Ernst J; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah; Pamungkas, Joko; Krützen, Michael

    2011-08-01

    The Southeast Asian Sunda archipelago harbors a rich biodiversity with a substantial proportion of endemic species. The evolutionary history of these species has been drastically influenced by environmental forces, such as fluctuating sea levels, climatic changes, and severe volcanic activities. Orangutans (genus: Pongo), the only Asian great apes, are well suited to study the relative impact of these forces due to their well-documented behavioral ecology, strict habitat requirements, and exceptionally slow life history. We investigated the phylogeographic patterns and evolutionary history of orangutans in the light of the complex geological and climatic history of the Sunda archipelago. Our study is based on the most extensive genetic sampling to date, covering the entire range of extant orangutan populations. Using data from three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes from 112 wild orangutans, we show that Sumatran orangutans, Pongo abelii, are paraphyletic with respect to Bornean orangutans (P. pygmaeus), the only other currently recognized species within this genus. The deepest split in the mtDNA phylogeny of orangutans occurs across the Toba caldera in northern Sumatra and, not as expected, between both islands. Until the recent past, the Toba region has experienced extensive volcanic activity, which has shaped the current phylogeographic patterns. Like their Bornean counterparts, Sumatran orangutans exhibit a strong, yet previously undocumented structuring into four geographical clusters. However, with 3.50 Ma, the Sumatran haplotypes have a much older coalescence than their Bornean counterparts (178 kya). In sharp contrast to the mtDNA data, 18 Y-chromosomal polymorphisms show a much more recent coalescence within Sumatra compared with Borneo. Moreover, the deep geographic structure evident in mtDNA is not reflected in the male population history, strongly suggesting male-biased dispersal. We conclude that volcanic activities have played an important role in the

  9. California's potential volcanic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions have occurred infrequently in California during the last few thousand years, the potential danger to life and property from volcanoes in the state is great enough to be of concern, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publication. The 17-page bulletin, Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California, gives a brief history of volcanic activity in California during the past 100,000 years, descriptions of the types of volcanoes in the state, the types of potentially hazardous volcanic events that could occur, and hazard-zonation maps and tables depicting six areas of the state where volcanic eruptions might occur. The six areas and brief descriptions of their past volcanic history and potential for future volcanic hazards are briefly summarized here.

  10. Tectonic Controls on Pyroclastic Volcanism on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, M.; Klimczak, C.

    2015-12-01

    Over much of Mercury's geologic history the planet has contracted as a response to cooling of its interior. Such contraction is evident as landforms formed by thrust faults, which have accommodated a radius decrease of ~5 km. Stresses from global contraction imposed on the lithosphere are not favorable for and prevent volcanism. Yet, there are examples on Mercury where pyroclastic deposits superpose thrust faults, indicating that explosive volcanism has occurred after the onset of global contraction. To better understand the spatial relationships of thrust faults with the pyroclastic vents, we used MESSENGER image data to categorize 343 vents by their occurrence either (1) within 30 km, (2) within 100 km, or (3) farther than 100 km from a thrust fault, using ArcGIS. Vents were also classified by their association with impact craters. Results show that 75% of all vents are located within impact structures, with 36% of vents within 30 km of thrust faults, 41% located farther than 30 but within 100 km of thrust faults, and 23% of vents are farther than 100 km from a thrust fault. To investigate whether this geospatial relationship is tectonically controlled, three areas —representing the three categories of vents— were mapped, and the locations and orientations of vents and faults were recorded. Stress changes around these faults were then numerically modeled with the COULOMB 3.4 software, using elastic rock properties, a background stress field, and fault size- and dislocation parameters applicable to conditions of Mercury's global contractional tectonic environment. Preliminary results indicate that stress changes can locally produce conditions beneficial for volcanism. Further modeling will determine if such beneficial conditions are geospatially correlated with the pyroclastic vents and thus enable a better understanding of pyroclastic volcanism on Mercury after the onset of global contraction.

  11. Prolonged eruptive history of a compound volcano on Mercury: volcanic and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothery, D. A.; . T. Thomas, R.; Kerber, L.

    2013-09-01

    High resolution orbital imaging by MESSENGER under a variety of illuminations reveals that a 27 × 13 km rimless depression 100 km inside the southwest rim of the Caloris basin consists of at least nine overlapping volcanic vents, each individually up to 8 km in diameter. This is thus a 'compound' volcano, indicative of localised migration of the site of the active vent. The vent floors are at a least 1 km below their brinks, but lack the flat shape that is characteristically produced by piston-like subsidence of a caldera floor or by flooding of a crater bottom by a lava lake. They bear a closer resemblance to volcanic craters sculpted by explosive eruptions and/or modified by collapse into void spaces created by magma withdrawal back down into a conduit. This complex of overlapping vents is at the summit of a subtle edifice at least 100 km across, with flank slopes of about 0.2 degrees, after correction for the regional slope. This is consistent with previous interpretation as a locus of pyroclastic eruptions. Construction of the edifice could have been contributed to by effusion of very low viscosity lava, but high resolution images show that the vent-facing rim of a nearby impact crater is not heavily embayed as previously supposed. Contrasts in morphology (sharpness versus blurredness of the texture) and different densities of superposed sub-km impact craters inside each vent suggest significant differences in the age of the most recent activity at each vent. This implies a long duration of episodic magmagenesis at a restricted locus. The age range is hard to quantify, but could be of the order of a billion years. If each vent was fed from the same source, geometric considerations suggest a source depth of at least 50 km. The migration of the active vent may be partly controlled by a deep-seated fault that is radial to the Caloris basin. Other rimless depressions in this part of the Caloris basin fall on or close to radial lines, suggesting that elements of

  12. Prolonged eruptive history of a compound volcano on Mercury: Volcanic and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothery, David A.; Thomas, Rebecca J.; Kerber, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A 27×13 km ‘rimless depression’ 100 km inside the southwest rim of the Caloris basin is revealed by high resolution orbital imaging under a variety of illuminations to consist of at least nine overlapping volcanic vents, each individually up to 8 km in diameter. It is thus a ‘compound’ volcano, indicative of localised migration of the site of the active vent. The vent floors are at a least 1 km below their brinks, but lack the flat shape characteristically produced by piston-like subsidence of a caldera floor or by flooding of a crater bottom by a lava lake. They bear a closer resemblance to volcanic craters sculpted by explosive eruptions and/or modified by collapse into void spaces created by magma withdrawal back down into a conduit. This complex of overlapping vents is at the summit of a subtle edifice at least 100 km across, with flank slopes of about only 0.2 degrees, after correction for the regional slope. This is consistent with previous interpretation as a locus of pyroclastic eruptions. Construction of the edifice could have been contributed to by effusion of very low viscosity lava, but high resolution images show that the vent-facing rim of a nearby impact crater is not heavily embayed as previously supposed on the basis of lower resolution flyby imaging. Contrasts in morphology (sharpness versus blurredness of the texture) and different densities of superposed sub-km impact craters inside each vent are consistent with (but do not prove) substantial differences in the age of the most recent activity at each vent. This suggests a long duration of episodic magmagenesis at a restricted locus. The age range cannot be quantified, but could be of the order of a billion years. If each vent was fed from the same point source, geometric considerations suggest a source depth of at least 50 km. However, the migration of the active vent may be partly controlled by a deep-seated fault that is radial to the Caloris basin. Other rimless depressions in this

  13. Geomorphological evidence of the influence of pre-volcanic basement structure on emplacement and deformation of volcanic edifices at the Cofre de Perote Pico de Orizaba chain and implications for avalanche generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Dimas, Aline; Cerca, Mariano; Rodríguez, Sergio R.; Watters, Robert J.

    2005-12-01

    Pre-volcanic structure of the basement influences volcanism distribution and avalanche generation in volcanic edifices. Therefore, systematic studies of basement structure below volcanic chains are necessary to understand the deformation effects observed in the surface and vice versa. Based on a compilation of pre-existing data, interpretation of aerial photographs and satellite images, and a collection of structural data we analyzed morphological and structural features of the Cofre de Perote-Pico de Orizaba (CP-PO) volcanic chain and its basement. We have identified three sets of regional lineaments that are related to basement trends. (1) NW 55° SE fractures are parallel to anticline folds observed in Cretaceous rocks that originated during Laramide shortening. These folds present an abrupt morphology observed only in the eastern flank but that is likely to continue below the volcanic chain. (2) NE 55° SW fractures are parallel to normal faults at the basement. We infer that these basement faults confine the CP-PO chain within a stepped graben with a total normal displacement of about 400 m. These faults have been active through time since they have affected volcanic deposits and induced the emplacement of monogenetic vents. Notably, lineaments of monogenetic vents concentrate where the basement is relatively shallow. (3) Another set of faults, oriented N-S, has been observed affecting the scarce basement outcrops at the western flank of the chain covered by lacustrine deposits. Lineaments measured in the volcanic edifice of Pico de Orizaba correlate with the regional trends. In particular, the NE 55° SW alignment of monogenetic vents and fractures at Pico de Orizaba suggest that the same dike trend exists within the volcanic edifice. A normal fault with similar orientation was documented at the NE continuation of an alignment crossing the volcanic edifice along the Jamapa canyon. In the absence of magmatic activity related to collapses, the displacement of

  14. GEOFIM: A WebGIS application for integrated geophysical modeling in active volcanic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currenti, Gilda; Napoli, Rosalba; Sicali, Antonino; Greco, Filippo; Negro, Ciro Del

    2014-09-01

    We present GEOFIM (GEOphysical Forward/Inverse Modeling), a WebGIS application for integrated interpretation of multiparametric geophysical observations. It has been developed to jointly interpret scalar and vector magnetic data, gravity data, as well as geodetic data, from GPS, tiltmeter, strainmeter and InSAR observations, recorded in active volcanic areas. GEOFIM gathers a library of analytical solutions, which provides an estimate of the geophysical signals due to perturbations in the thermal and stress state of the volcano. The integrated geophysical modeling can be performed by a simple trial and errors forward modeling or by an inversion procedure based on NSGA-II algorithm. The software capability was tested on the multiparametric data set recorded during the 2008-2009 Etna flank eruption onset. The results encourage to exploit this approach to develop a near-real-time warning system for a quantitative model-based assessment of geophysical observations in areas where different parameters are routinely monitored.

  15. Recent and episodic volcanic and glacial activity on Mars revealed by the High Resolution Stereo Camera.

    PubMed

    Neukum, G; Jaumann, R; Hoffmann, H; Hauber, E; Head, J W; Basilevsky, A T; Ivanov, B A; Werner, S C; van Gasselt, S; Murray, J B; McCord, T

    2004-12-23

    The large-area coverage at a resolution of 10-20 metres per pixel in colour and three dimensions with the High Resolution Stereo Camera Experiment on the European Space Agency Mars Express Mission has made it possible to study the time-stratigraphic relationships of volcanic and glacial structures in unprecedented detail and give insight into the geological evolution of Mars. Here we show that calderas on five major volcanoes on Mars have undergone repeated activation and resurfacing during the last 20 per cent of martian history, with phases of activity as young as two million years, suggesting that the volcanoes are potentially still active today. Glacial deposits at the base of the Olympus Mons escarpment show evidence for repeated phases of activity as recently as about four million years ago. Morphological evidence is found that snow and ice deposition on the Olympus construct at elevations of more than 7,000 metres led to episodes of glacial activity at this height. Even now, water ice protected by an insulating layer of dust may be present at high altitudes on Olympus Mons.

  16. Visual Observations and Geologic Settings of the Newly-Discovered Black Smoker Vent Sites Across the Galapagos Ridge-Hotspot Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P.; Haymon, R.; MacDonald, K.; White, S.

    2006-12-01

    Nearly one-fifth of the global mid-ocean ridge is hotspot-affected, yet very little is known about how hotspots affect quantity and distribution of high-temperature hydrothermal vents along the ridge. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, acoustic and plume sensor surveys were conducted across the Galapagos ridge- hotspot intersection, lon. 94.5ºW- lon. 89.5ºW, to map fine scale geologic features and locate hydrothermal plumes emanating from the ridge crest. Where significant plumes were detected, the Medea fiber-optic camera sled was used successfully to find and image high-temperature vents on the seafloor. With Medea we discovered and imaged the first active and recently extinct black smokers known along the entire Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), and documented the geologic setting of these vents. The Medea survey imaged numerous inactive vents as well as 3 active high-temperature vent fields along the ridge at 94º 04.5'W (Navidad Site), 91º56.2'W (Iguanas Site) and 91º54.3'W (Pinguinos Site). Two recently extinct vent fields also were identified at 91º23.4'-23.7'W and 91º13.8'W. All of the high-temperature vent sites that we identified along the GSC are found above relatively shallow AMC reflectors and are located in the middle 20% of ridge segments. Without exception the vent sites are located along fissures atop constructional axial volcanic ridges (AVR's) composed of relatively young pillow basalts. In some cases, the vents were associated with collapses adjacent to the fissures. The fissures appear to be eruptive sources of the pillow lavas comprising the AVR's. Video images of the chimneys show mature, cylindrical structures, up to 14m high; little diffuse flow; few animals; and some worm casts and dead clam shells, suggesting prior habitation. We conclude that distribution of the vents is controlled by magmatic processes, (i.e., by locations of shallow AMC magma reservoirs and eruptive fissures above dike intrusions), and that there is

  17. The vent microbiome: patterns and drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachiadaki, M.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial processes within deep-sea hydrothermal vents affect the global biogeochemical cycles. Still, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the microbiology and the biogeochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal systems. Vents differ in temperature, host rock composition and fluid chemistry; factors that are hypothesized to shape the distribution of the microbial communities, their metabolic capabilities and their activities. Using large-scale single cell genomics, we obtained insights into the genomic content of several linkages of a diffuse flow vent. The genomes show high metabolic versatility. Sulfur oxidation appears to be predominant but there is the potential of using a variety of e- donors and acceptors to obtain energy. To further assess the ecological importance of the vent auto- and heterotrophs, the global biogeography of the analyzed lineages will be investigated by fragment recruitment of metagenomes produced from the same site as well as other hydrothermal systems. Metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic data will be integrated to examine the expression of the predominant metabolic pathways and thus the main energy sources driving chemoautotrophic production. The comparative analysis of the key players and associated pathways among various vent sites that differ in physicochemical characteristics is anticipated to decipher the patterns and drivers of the global dispersion and the local diversification of the vent microbiome.

  18. Igneous activity and related ore deposits in the western and southern Tushar Mountains, Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steven, Thomas A.

    1984-01-01

    PART A: Igneous activity in the Marysvale volcanic field of western Utah can be separated into many episodes of extrusion, intrusion, and hydrothermal activity. The rocks of the western Tushar Mountains, near the western part of the volcanic field, include intermediate-composition, calc-alkalic volcanic rocks erupted from scattered volcanoes in Oligocene through earliest Miocene time and related monzonitic intrusions emplaced 24-23 m.y. ago. Beginning 22-21 m.y. ago and extending through much of the later Cenozoic, a bimodal basalt-rhyolite assemblage was erupted widely throughout the volcanic field. Only volcanic and intrusive rocks belonging to the rhyolitic end member of this bimodal assemblage are present in the western Tushar Mountains; most of these rocks either fill the Mount Belknap caldera (19 m.y. old) or are part of the rhyolite of Gillies Hill (9---8 m.y. old). Episodic hydrothermal activity altered and mineralized rocks at many places in the western Tushar Mountains during Miocene time. The earliest activity took place in and adjacent to monzonitic calcalkalic intrusions emplaced in the vicinity of Indian Creek and Cork Ridge. These rocks were widely propylitized, and gold-bearing quartz-pyrite-carbonate veins formed in local fractures. Hydrothermal activity associated with the Mount Belknap caldera mobilized and redeposited uranium contained in the caldera-fill rocks and formed primary concentrations of lithophile elements (including molybdenum and uranium) in the vicinity of intrusive bodies. Hydrothermal activity associated with the rhyolite of Gillies Hill altered and mineralized rocks at several places along the fault zone that marks the western margin of the Tushar Mountains; the zoned alunite and gold deposits at Sheep Rock, the gold deposit at the Sunday Mine, and an alunite deposit near Indian Creek were thus produced. Resetting of isotopic ages suggests that another center of hydrothermally altered rocks associated with a buried pluton about

  19. Into the Cone: A Ground Penetrating Radar Investigation of Near Vent Processes at Cerro Negro Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtland, L. M.; Kruse, S. E.; Connor, C.

    2009-12-01

    Cinder cones are often assumed to grow via Strombolian activity as described by McGetchin et al (1974). Data with which to evaluate this and other models has historically been collected via eyewitness accounts, photography of eruptions, and mapping of exposed deposits. However, the dangerous nature of eruptions often prohibits near vent observations and accessible deposits are rare. Therefore, in order to gain a better understanding of near vent processes which may be used in volcanic modeling and hazard assessment, new data collection techniques must be implemented. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging of tephra can reveal details of deposits at depths of approximately 2-20+ meters. Data collected in the fall of 2007 is here used to investigate the near vent processes of Cerro Negro, an active basaltic cinder cone in Nicaragua. Each of three GPR profiles begins at the crater rim and continues down the cone to the tephra blanket. One transect follows the prevailing wind direction (SW) while the other two head off at angles to the first: one to the NW and one to the SSW. The data display evidence of cone steepening over time, patterns of ballistic and tephra dispersal, and faulting within the cone, among other features.

  20. Autonomous Sensorweb Operations for Integrated Space, In-Situ Monitoring of Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.; Doubleday, Joshua; Kedar, Sharon; Davies, Ashley G.; Lahusen, Richard; Song, Wenzhan; Shirazi, Behrooz; Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    We have deployed and demonstrated operations of an integrated space in-situ sensorweb for monitoring volcanic activity. This sensorweb includes a network of ground sensors deployed to the Mount Saint Helens volcano as well as the Earth Observing One spacecraft. The ground operations and space operations are interlinked in that ground-based intelligent event detections can cause the space segment to acquire additional data via observation requests and space-based data acquisitions (thermal imagery) can trigger reconfigurations of the ground network to allocate increased bandwidth to areas of the network best situated to observe the activity. The space-based operations are enabled by an automated mission planning and tasking capability which utilizes several Opengeospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensorweb Enablement (SWE) standards which enable acquiring data, alerts, and tasking using web services. The ground-based segment also supports similar protocols to enable seamless tasking and data delivery. The space-based segment also supports onboard development of data products (thermal summary images indicating areas of activity, quicklook context images, and thermal activity alerts). These onboard developed products have reduced data volume (compared to the complete images) which enables them to be transmitted to the ground more rapidly in engineering channels.

  1. Speciation of dissolved copper within an active hydrothermal edifice on the Lucky Strike vent field (MAR, 37 degrees N).

    PubMed

    Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Waeles, Matthieu; Bernagout, Solène; Le Gall, Christian; Sarrazin, Jozée; Riso, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of different fractions of dissolved copper (after filtration at 0.45 microm) along the cold part of the hydrothermal fluid-seawater mixing zone on the Tour Eiffel edifice (MAR). Dissolved copper was analyzed by stripping chronopotentiometry (SCP) after chromatographic C(18) extraction. Levels of total dissolved copper (0.03 to 5.15 microM) are much higher than those reported for deep-sea oceanic waters but in accordance with data previously obtained in this area. Speciation measurements show that the hydrophobic organic fraction (C(18)Cu) is very low (2+/-1%). Dissolved copper is present mainly as inorganic and hydrophilic organic complexes (nonC(18)Cu). The distribution of copper along the pH gradient shows the same pattern for each fraction. Copper concentrations increase from pH 5.6 to 6.5 and then remain relatively constant at pH>6.5. Concentrations of oxygen and total sulphides demonstrate that the copper anomaly corresponds to the transition between suboxic and oxic waters. The increase of dissolved copper should correspond to the oxidative redissolution of copper sulphide particles formed in the vicinity of the fluid exit. The presence of such a secondary dissolved copper source, associated with the accumulation of metal sulphide particles, could play a significant role in the distribution of fauna in the different habitats available at vents.

  2. Water-quality effects on Baker Lake of recent volcanic activity at Mount Baker, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bortleson, Gilbert Carl; Wilson, Reed T.; Foxworthy, B.L.

    1976-01-01

    Increased volcanic activity on Mount Baker, which began in March 1975, represents the greatest known activity of a Cascade Range volcano since eruptions at Lassen Peak, Calif. during 1914-17. Emissions of dust and increased emanations of steam, other gases, and heat from the Sherman Crater area of the mountain focused attention on the possibility of hazardous events, including lava flows, pyroclastic eruptions, avalanches, and mudflows. However, the greatest undesirable natural results that have been observed after one year of the increased activity are an increase in local atmospheric pollution and a decrease in the quality of some local water resources, including Baker Lake. Baker Lake, a hydropower reservoir behind Upper Baker Dam, supports a valuable fishery resource and also is used for recreation. The lake's feedwater is from Baker River and many smaller streams, some of which, like Boulder Creek, drain parts of Mount Baker. Boulder Creek receives water from Sherman Crater, and its channel is a likely route for avalanches or mudflows that might originate in the crater area. Boulder Creek drains only about 5 percent of the total drainage area of Baker Lake, but during 1975 carried sizeable but variable loads of acid and dissolved minerals into the lake. Sulfurous gases and the fumarole dust from Sherman Crater are the main sources for these materials, which are brought into upper Boulder Creek by meltwater from the crater. In September 1973, before the increased volcanic activity, Boulder Creek near the lake had a pH of 6.0-6.6; after the increase the pH ranged as low as about 3.5. Most nearby streams had pH values near 7. On April 29, in Boulder Creek the dissolved sulfate concentration was 6 to 29 times greater than in nearby creeks or in Baker River; total iron was 18-53 times greater than in nearby creeks; and other major dissolved constituents generally 2 to 7 times greater than in the other streams. The short-term effects on Baker Lake of the acidic

  3. Morphometric characterization of monogenetic volcanic cones of the Chichinautzin and Michoacán-Guanajuato monogenetic volcanic fields in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarazua-Carbajal, Maria Cristina; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2014-05-01

    Morphometric characterization of volcanic edifices is one of the main approaches providing information about a volcano eruptive history, whether it has one or more eruptive vents or if it had any sector collapses. It also provides essential information about the physical processes that modify their shapes during periods of quietness, and quite significantly, about the volcanoes' ages. In the case of monogenetic activity, a volcanic field can be characterized by the size and slope distributions, and other cone's morphometric parameter distributions that may provide valuable information about the temporal evolution of the volcanic field. The increasingly available high-resolution digital elevation models and the continuously developing computer tools have allowed a faster development and more detailed morphometric characterization techniques. We present here a methodology to readily obtain diverse volcanic cone shape parameters from the contour curves such as mean slope, slope distribution, dimensions of the cone and crater, crater location within the cone, orientation of the cone's principal axis, eccentricity, and other morphological features using an analysis algorithm that we developed, programmed in Python and ArcPy. Preliminary results from the implementation of this methodology to the Chichinautzin and Michoacán-Guanajuato monogenetic volcanic fields in Mexico have permitted a preliminary estimation of the age distribution of some of the cones with an acceptable correlation with the available radiometric ages. A large part of the Chichinautzin region DEM was obtained from a LIDAR survey by the Mexican National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI).

  4. Diverse mid-Miocene silicic volcanism associated with the Yellowstone Newberry thermal anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueseke, Matthew E.; Hart, William K.; Heizler, Matthew T.

    2008-01-01

    The Santa Rosa Calico volcanic field (SC) of northern Nevada is a complex, multi-vent mid-Miocene eruptive complex that formed in response to regional lithospheric extension and flood basalt volcanism. Santa Rosa Calico volcanism initiated at ˜16.7 Ma, concurrent with regional Steens Columbia River flood basalt activity and is characterized by a complete compositional spectrum of basalt through high-silica rhyolite. To better understand the relationships between upwelling mafic magmatism, coeval extension, and magmatic system development on the Oregon Plateau we have conducted the first comprehensive study of Santa Rosa Calico silicic volcanism. Detailed stratigraphic-based field sampling and mapping illustrate that silicic activity in this volcanic field was primarily focused along its eastern and western margins. At least five texturally distinct silicic units are found in the western Santa Rosa Calico volcanic field, including abundant lava flows, near vent deposits, and shallow intrusive bodies. Similar physical features are found in the eastern portion of the volcanic field where four physically distinct units are present. The western and eastern Santa Rosa Calico units are characterized by abundant macro- and microscopic disequilibrium textures, reflecting a complex petrogenetic history. Additionally, unlike other mid-Miocene Oregon Plateau volcanic fields (e.g. McDermitt), the Santa Rosa Calico volcanic field is characterized by a paucity of caldera-forming volcanism. Only the Cold Springs tuff, which crops out across the central portion of the volcanic field, was caldera-derived. Major and trace element geochemical variations are present within and between eastern and western Santa Rosa Calico silicic units and these chemical differences, coupled with the observed disequilibrium textures, illustrate the action of open-system petrogenetic processes and melt derivation from heterogeneous source materials. The processes and styles of Santa Rosa Calico silicic

  5. Discovery of New Hydrothermal Venting Sites in the Lau Basin, Tonga Back Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowhurst, P. V.; Arculus, R. J.; Massoth, G. J.; Baptista, L.; Stevenson, I.; Angus, R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2009-12-01

    Between 22 April and 25 June 2009, a systematic search for hydrothermal venting along 1340 km of back-arc features was conducted throughout the Lau Basin aboard the CSIRO owned RV Southern Surveyor. The selection of survey areas was based on bathymetry, sidescan and water column anomaly datasets collected during previous marine science research and commercial exploration voyages. During 54 operational days, 76 CTD tows were completed using real-time plume mapping protocols, augmented with mini autonomous plume recorders, to discern anomalies in light scattering, and oxidation-reduction potential with water samples collected within the peak anomalies. Coincident with CTD towing at an average speed of 1.1 knots high resolution EM300 bathymetry and backscatter data was collected which significantly enhanced geological interpretation of possible source sites for follow up cross tows. 32 venting sites were detected, 24 of which are believed to be new discoveries. 13 dredge operations were conducted on 7 of these sites. Sulfides were recovered from 2 sites, one being a new discovery on the NE Lau spreading centre, ~14 km north of the commercial discovery by Teck and ~7km north of the eruption site discovery during a RV Thompson NOAA survey, both during 2008. The new venting field discoveries at North Mata, northern extent of the CLSC and far southern Valu Fa ridge are beyond any previously known areas of hydrothermal activity and further enhances the reputation of the Lau Basin as one of the most productive back arc regions for hydrothermally active spreading centers. A significant number of filter residue samples collected from the vent sites yielded greater than background values for metals including Cu and Zn, which is interpreted to imply they were sourced from active seafloor massive sulfide systems rather than volcanic activity.

  6. Volcanic gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  7. Monitoring of low-energy seismic activity in Elbrus volcanic area with the use of underground seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, V.; Sobisevitch, A.

    2012-04-01

    Results of experiment with underground seismic array for studying low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area are presented. Linear seismic array of 2.5 km aperture is created in the tunnel of Baksan neutrino observatory. Horizontal tunnel of 4.3 km length is drilled in the mount Andyrchi at a distance of 20 km from Elbrus volcano. Array includes 6 three-component seismic sensors with 24-byte recorders installed with 500 m interval one from another along the tunnel. Underground seismic array is the new instrument of geophysical observatory organized for studies of geophysical processes in the Elbrus volcanic area. The observatory equipped with modern geophysical instruments including broadband tri-axial seismometers, quartz tilt-meters, magnetic variometers, geo-acoustic sensors, hi-precision distributed thermal sensors and gravimeters. The initial analysis of seismic signals recorded by seismic array allows us to detect low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area beginning from the distance of 3-5 km (the faults in a vicinity of mount Andyrchi) up to 15-25 km (area of Elbrus volcano). The regional micro-earthquakes with magnitude 1-2 at the distances 50-100 km was also recorded. 2.5 km aperture of the underground linear seismic array make it possible to determine with high accuracy hypocenters of local seismic events associated with geodynamic of volcanic magmatic structures and to realize seismo-emission tomography of the active zones of Elbrus volcano.

  8. Why does a mature volcano need new vents? The case of the New Southeast Crater at Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, Valerio; Neri, Marco; Behncke, Boris; Bonforte, Alessandro; Del Negro, Ciro; Ganci, Gaetana

    2016-06-01

    Mature volcanoes usually erupt from a persistent summit crater. Permanent shifts in vent location are expected to occur after significant structural variations and are seldom documented. Here we provide such an example that recently occurred at Etna. Eruptive activity at Mount Etna during 2007 focused at the Southeast Crater (SEC), the youngest (formed in 1971) and most active of the four summit craters, and consisted of six paroxysmal episodes. The related erupted volumes, determined by field-based measurements and radiant heat flux curves measured by satellite, totalled 8.67 x 106 m3. The first four episodes occurred, between late-March and early-May, from the summit of the SEC and short fissures on its flanks. The last two episodes occurred, in September and November, from a new vent ("pit crater" or "proto-NSEC") at the SE base of the SEC cone; this marked the definitive demise of the old SEC and the shift to the new vent. The latter, fed by NW-SE striking dikes propagating from the SEC conduit, formed since early 2011 an independent cone (the New Southeast Crater, or "NSEC") at the base of the SEC. Detailed geodetic reconstruction and structural field observations allow defining the surface deformation pattern of Mount Etna in the last decade. These suggest that the NSEC developed under the NE-SW trending tensile stresses on the volcano summit promoted by accelerated instability of the NE flank of the volcano during inflation periods. The development of the NSEC is not only important from a structural point of view, as its formation may also lead to an increase in volcanic hazard. The case of the NSEC at Etna here reported shows how flank instability may control the distribution and impact of volcanism, including the prolonged shift of the summit vent activity in a mature volcano.

  9. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  10. Volcanic Hazards Survey in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Michael; Siebe, Claus; Macias, Jose Luis

    1996-01-01

    We have assembled a digital mosaic of 11 Landsat Thematic images to serve as a mapping base for reconnaissance activities within the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. This will aid us in interpretation and in the evaluation of potential activity of all the volcanic centers there. One result is a volcanic hazards map of the area.

  11. Volcanic hazard assessment in the Phlegraean Fields: a contribution based on stratigraphic and historical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosi, M.; Santacroce, R.

    1984-06-01

    Phenomena occurring since 1982 in the Phlegraean Fields, interpreted as precursors of a potential renewal of volcanic activity, have forced us to anticipate some conclusions of a volcanic-hazard study based on the reconstruction of past eruptions in the area, to serve as basis for civil defense preparedness plans. The eruptive history of the Phlegraean Fields suggests a progressive decrease with time in the strength of eruptive phenomena paralleling a migration of vents towards the center of the Phlegraean caldera. Studies concerning the volcanic risk zonation were therefore concentrated on activities during the last 4,500 years and two eruptions (Monte Nuovo and Agnano Monte Spina), that occurred in 1538 and 4,400 years B.P., respectively were selected as the «reference eruptions» from which possible eruption scenarios were drawn.

  12. Classifying Terrestrial Volcanic Alteration Processes and Defining Alteration Processes they Represent on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Schiffman, P.; Southard, R. J.; Drief, A.; Verosub, K. L.; Smith, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Characterizing alteration of the rocks on Mars is difficult, but some guidelines can be made through comparison with terrestrial volcanic alteration. Subaerial volcanic activity on the Hawaiian islands and subglacial volcanic activity on Iceland have led to the formation of a variety of silicate and iron oxide-rich alteration products that may serve as models for chemical alteration on Mars. Multiple samples have been collected from palagonitized tuffs, altered pillow lavas, altered tephra, and S-rich vents for study in the lab. Variations in the kinds of alteration products have been observed depending on the sample environment. We are defining associations between the alteration products and formation conditions that can be used to provide information about environmental conditions on Mars. In particular, we are providing definitions for palagonitic, pedogenic and solfataric alteration that can be used to characterize these alteration processes.

  13. Microbial Communities at Non-Volcanic and Volcanic Sites of the Gakkel Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmke, E.; Juergens, J.; Tausendfreund, M.; Wollenburg, J.; Shank, T.; Edmonds, H.; Humphris, S.; Nakamura, K.; Liljebladh, B.; Winsor, P.; Singh, H.; Reves-Sohn, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the eastern Arctic Ocean is the slowest spreading, deepest, and most isolated portion of the global mid-ocean ridge system and therefore predestined for comparative investigations on deep-sea vent communities. However, the perennial cover of thick sea ice has made this area largely inaccessible to science. The Arctic Gakkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE) utilized the icebreaker ODEN and newly developed vehicles for exploration and sampling in connection with a CTD/rosette equipped with different sensors and a high-resolution multi-beam bathymetry system. We focused our studies on the peridotite-hosted region at 85°N, 7°E and on the basaltic volcanism area at 85°N, 85°E. Water, sediment, and rock samples were taken to describe the microbial communities in different zones of these two sites. Sampling was guided by anomalies of backscattering, temperature, Eh, as well as by high-resolution seafloor imagery. Samples were preserved or processed on board immediately after sampling. Molecular analyses, cultural methods, total bacterial counts, and activity measurements were employed to describe the structure of the microbial communities, their phylogeny, potential adaptations, and possible role in biogeochemical cycles. The first molecular biological results of the bacterial communities of the 85°E site indicated atypical of deep- sea venting communities. These preliminary results were supported by the images of the under-ice vehicle "Camper" which showed thick yellow "fluffy" mats (often > 5cm thick) and orange "pebbly" material without any smell of H2S markedly different than the white, consolidated Beggiatoa mats often observable at deep venting sites. Foraminifera occurred regularly on top of basalt rocks as well as within the bacterial mats.

  14. Methanotrophic activity and diversity of methanotrophs in volcanic geothermal soils at Pantelleria (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-10-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic or geothermal soils are not only a source of methane, but are also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated at about 2.5 Mg a-1 (t a-1). Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values of up to 59.2 nmol g-1 soil d.w. h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile, the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer, and values greater than 6.23 nmol g-1 h-1 were still detected up to a depth of 13 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still detectable consumption at 80 °C (> 1.25 nmol g-1 h-1) was recorded. The soil total DNA extracted from the three samples was probed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers, targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected at sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not at FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site (FAV2) pointed to a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs, distantly related to Methylocaldum-Metylococcus genera, and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic Verrucomicrobia methanotrophs. Alphaproteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated from enrichment cultures under a methane

  15. Methanotrophic activity and bacterial diversity in volcanic-geothermal soils at Pantelleria island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-04-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils are source of methane, but also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria island (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated in about 2.5 t a-1. Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values up to 950 ng g-1 dry soil h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile and the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer but values > 100 ng g-1 h-1 were maintained up to a depth of 15 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still recognizable consumption at 80 °C (> 20 ng g-1 h-1) was recorded. In order to estimate the bacterial diversity, total soil DNA was extracted from Favara Grande and analysed using a Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) analysis of the amplified bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The three soil samples were probed by PCR using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected in sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not in FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site FAV2 pointed out a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs distantly related to Methylococcus/Methylothermus genera and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic methanotrophs

  16. Evaluation of Soil Venting Application

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ability of soil venting to inexpensively remove large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated soils is well established. However, the time required using venting to remediate soils to low contaminant levels often required by..

  17. Activity of antioxidant enzymes in response to atmospheric pressure induced physiological stress in deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus.

    PubMed

    Martins, Inês; Romão, Célia V; Goulart, Joana; Cerqueira, Teresa; Santos, Ricardo S; Bettencourt, Raul

    2016-03-01

    Deep sea hydrothermal Bathymodiolus azoricus mussels from Portuguese EEZ Menez Gwen hydrothermal field possess the remarkable ability to overcome decompression and survive successfully at atmospheric pressure conditions. We investigated the potential use of antioxidant defense enzymes in mussel B. azoricus as biomarkers of oxidative stress induced by long term acclimatization to atmospheric pressure conditions. Mussels collected at Menez Gwen hydrothermal field were acclimatized for two weeks in three distinct conditions suitable of promoting physiological stress, (i) in plain seawater for concomitant endosymbiont bacteria loss, (ii) in plain seawater under metal iron exposure, (iii) constant bubbling methane and pumped sulfide for endosymbiont bacteria survival. The enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and iron storage proteins in addition to electrophoretic profiles were examined in vent mussel gills and digestive gland. Gills showed approximately 3 times more SOD specific activity than digestive glands. On the other hand, digestive glands showed approximately 6 times more CAT specific activity than gills. Iron storage proteins were identified in gill extracts from all experimental conditions mussels. However, in digestive gland extracts only fresh collected mussels and after 2 weeks in FeSO4 showed the presence of iron storage proteins. The differences between SOD, CAT specific activities and the presence of iron storage proteins in the examined tissues reflect dissimilar metabolic and antioxidant activities, as a result of tissue specificities and acclimatization conditions influences on the organism.

  18. The Evaluation of Antibacterial, Antifungal and Antioxidant Activity of Methanolic Extract of Mindium Laevigatum (Vent.) Rech. F., From Central Part of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Modaressi, Masoud; Shahsavari, Roia; Ahmadi, Farhad; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Abiri, Ramin; Mikaeli, Ali; Batoli, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Mindium laevigatum (Vent.) Rech. F. plant grows in central part of Iran. And used by local people as medical plant. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activities of the methanolic extracts of aerial and flower parts of plant. Materials and Methods The leaves and stem and flower of bark from M. laevigatum were separately collected, air-dried and powdered. Then the plant species extracts were prepared with methanol, water 80:20 and two polar and non-polar subfractions were realized. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by scavenging the radicals 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), β-Carotene linoleic acid assay and reducing power methods. The antifungal and antibacterial evaluation was performed by disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods. Results The total phenolic analysis of subfractions found 182 ± 4.2 µg.gr-1 for polar and 158 ± 3.9 µg.gr-1 for non-polar extracts. The antifungal activity of the extracts against the various fungal varied from 14.0 to 34 mm. MIC values from 50 to 400 µg.mL-1 were satisfactory when compared with other plant products. The antibacterial results revealed that the subfraction extracts are mostly effective against Staphylococcus aureus. The antioxidant results showed polar subfraction has more activity against non-polar subfraction. Conclusion These findings demonstrated that the extract of Mindium laevigatum has remarkable in vitro antifungal and antioxidant activity. PMID:24624184

  19. Acute health effects associated with exposure to volcanic air pollution (vog) from increased activity at Kilauea Volcano in 2008.

    PubMed

    Longo, Bernadette M; Yang, Wei; Green, Joshua B; Crosby, Frederick L; Crosby, Vickie L

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, the Kilauea Volcano on the island of Hawai'i increased eruption activity and emissions of sulfurous volcanic air pollution called vog. The purpose of this study was to promptly assess for a relative increase in cases of medically diagnosed acute illnesses in an exposed Hawaiian community. Using a within-clinic retrospective cohort design, comparisons were made for visits of acute illnesses during the 14 wk prior to the increased volcanic emissions (low exposure) to 14 wk of high vog exposure when ambient sulfur dioxide was threefold higher and averaged 75 parts per billion volume per day. Logistic regression analysis estimated effect measures between the low- and high-exposure cohorts for age, gender, race, and smoking status. There were statistically significant positive associations between high vog exposure and visits for medically diagnosed cough, headache, acute pharyngitis, and acute airway problems. More than a sixfold increase in odds was estimated for visits with acute airway problems, primarily experienced by young Pacific Islanders. These findings suggest that the elevated volcanic emissions in 2008 were associated with increased morbidity of acute illnesses in age and racial subgroups of the general Hawaiian population. Continued investigation is crucial to fully assess the health impact of this natural source of sulfurous air pollution. Culturally appropriate primary- and secondary-level health prevention initiatives are recommended for populations in Hawai'i and volcanically active areas worldwide.

  20. Genetic diversity and demographic instability in Riftia pachyptila tubeworms from eastern Pacific hydrothermal vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coykendall, D.K.; Johnson, S.B.; Karl, S.A.; Lutz, R.A.; Vrijenhoek, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals occupy patchy and ephemeral habitats supported by chemosynthetic primary production. Volcanic and tectonic activities controlling the turnover of these habitats contribute to demographic instability that erodes genetic variation within and among colonies of these animals. We examined DNA sequences from one mitochondrial and three nuclear gene loci to assess genetic diversity in the siboglinid tubeworm, Riftia pachyptila, a widely distributed constituent of vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galpagos Rift. Results: Genetic differentiation (FST) among populations increased with geographical distances, as expected under a linear stepping-stone model of dispersal. Low levels of DNA sequence diversity occurred at all four loci, allowing us to exclude the hypothesis that an idiosyncratic selective sweep eliminated mitochondrial diversity alone. Total gene diversity declined with tectonic spreading rates. The southernmost populations, which are subjected to superfast spreading rates and high probabilities of extinction, are relatively homogenous genetically. Conclusions: Compared to other vent species, DNA sequence diversity is extremely low in R. pachyptila. Though its dispersal abilities appear to be effective, the low diversity, particularly in southern hemisphere populations, is consistent with frequent local extinction and (re)colonization events. ?? 2011 Coykendall et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Scientists as stakeholders in conservation of hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Godet, Laurent; Zelnio, Kevin A; VAN Dover, Cindy L

    2011-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents are deep-sea ecosystems that are almost exclusively known and explored by scientists rather than the general public. Continuing scientific discoveries arising from study of hydrothermal vents are concommitant with the increased number of scientific cruises visiting and sampling vent ecosystems. Through a bibliometric analysis, we assessed the scientific value of hydrothermal vents relative to two of the most well-studied marine ecosystems, coral reefs and seagrass beds. Scientific literature on hydrothermal vents is abundant, of high impact, international, and interdisciplinary and is comparable in these regards with literature on coral reefs and seagrass beds. Scientists may affect hydrothermal vents because their activities are intense and spatially and temporally concentrated in these small systems. The potential for undesirable effects from scientific enterprise motivated the creation of a code of conduct for environmentally and scientifically benign use of hydrothermal vents for research. We surveyed scientists worldwide engaged in deep-sea research and found that scientists were aware of the code of conduct and thought it was relevant to conservation, but they did not feel informed or confident about the respect other researchers have for the code. Although this code may serve as a reminder of scientists' environmental responsibilities, conservation of particular vents (e.g., closures to human activity, specific human management) may effectively ensure sustainable use of vent ecosystems for all stakeholders.

  2. Development of an automatic volcanic ash sampling apparatus for active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimano, Taketo; Nishimura, Takeshi; Chiga, Nobuyuki; Shibasaki, Yoshinobu; Iguchi, Masato; Miki, Daisuke; Yokoo, Akihiko

    2013-12-01

    We develop an automatic system for the sampling of ash fall particles, to be used for continuous monitoring of magma ascent and eruptive dynamics at active volcanoes. The system consists of a sampling apparatus and cameras to monitor surface phenomena during eruptions. The Sampling Apparatus for Time Series Unmanned Monitoring of Ash (SATSUMA-I and SATSUMA-II) is less than 10 kg in weight and works automatically for more than a month with a 10-kg lead battery to obtain a total of 30 to 36 samples in one cycle of operation. The time range covered in one cycle varies from less than an hour to several months, depending on the aims of observation, allowing researchers to target minute-scale fluctuations in a single eruptive event, as well as daily to weekly trends in persistent volcanic activity. The latest version, SATSUMA-II, also enables control of sampling parameters remotely by e-mail commands. Durability of the apparatus is high: our prototypes worked for several months, in rainy and typhoon seasons, at windy and humid locations, and under strong sunlight. We have been successful in collecting ash samples emitted from Showa crater almost everyday for more than 4 years (2008-2012) at Sakurajima volcano in southwest Japan.

  3. Active volcanism beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet and implications for ice-sheet stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blankenship, D.D.; Bell, R.E.; Hodge, S.M.; Brozena, J.M.; Behrendt, John C.; Finn, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    IT is widely understood that the collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) would cause a global sea level rise of 6 m, yet there continues to be considerable debate about the detailed response of this ice sheet to climate change1-3. Because its bed is grounded well below sea level, the stability of the WAIS may depend on geologically controlled conditions at the base which are independent of climate. In particular, heat supplied to the base of the ice sheet could increase basal melting and thereby trigger ice streaming, by providing the water for a lubricating basal layer of till on which ice streams are thought to slide4,5. Ice streams act to protect the reservoir of slowly moving inland ice from exposure to oceanic degradation, thus enhancing ice-sheet stability. Here we present aerogeophysical evidence for active volcanism and associated elevated heat flow beneath the WAIS near the critical region where ice streaming begins. If this heat flow is indeed controlling ice-stream formation, then penetration of ocean waters inland of the thin hot crust of the active portion of the West Antarctic rift system could lead to the disappearance of ice streams, and possibly trigger a collapse of the inland ice reservoir.

  4. Aerogeophysical evidence for active volcanism beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Donald D.; Bell, Robin E.; Hodge, Steven M.; Brozena, John M.; Behrendt, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Although it is widely understood that the collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) would cause a global sea-level rise of 6 m, there continues to be considerable debate about the response of this ice sheet to climate change. The stability of the WAIS, which is characterized by a bed grounded well below sea level, may depend on geologically controlled conditions at the base, which are independent of climate. Ice streams moving up to 750 m/yr disperse material from the interior through to the oceans. As these ice streams tend to buffer the reservoir of slow-moving inland ice from exposure to oceanic degradation, understanding the ice-streaming process is important for evaluating WAIS stability. There is strong evidence that ice streams slide on a lubricating layer of water-saturated till. Development of this basal layer requires both water and easily eroded sediments. Active lithospheric extension may elevate regional heat flux, increase basal melting, and trigger ice streaming. If a geologically defined boundary with a sharp contrast in geothermal flux exists beneath the WAIS, ice streams may only be capable of operating as a buffer over a restricted region. Should ocean waters penetrate beyond this boundary, the ice-stream buffer would disappear, possibly triggering a collapse of the inland ice reservoir. Aerogeophysical evidence for active volcanism and elevated heat flux beneath the WAIS near the critical region where ice streaming begins is presented.

  5. Seismicity and active tectonics at Coloumbo Reef (Aegean Sea, Greece): Monitoring an active volcano at Santorini Volcanic Center using a temporary seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, I.; Karagianni, E.; Panagiotopoulos, D.; Papazachos, C.; Hatzidimitriou, P.; Bohnhoff, M.; Rische, M.; Meier, T.

    2009-02-01

    The volcanic center of Santorini Island is the most active volcano of the southern Aegean volcanic arc. Α dense seismic array consisting of fourteen portable broadband seismological stations has been deployed in order to monitor and study the seismo-volcanic activity at the broader area of the Santorini volcanic center between March 2003 and September 2003. Additional recordings from a neighbouring larger scale temporary network (CYCNET) were also used for the relocation of more than 240 earthquakes recorded by both arrays. A double-difference relocation technique was used, in order to obtain optimal focal parameters for the best-constrained earthquakes. The results indicate that the seismic activity of the Santorini volcanic center is strongly associated with the tectonic regime of the broader Southern Aegean Sea area as well as with the volcanic processes. The main cluster of the epicenters is located at the Coloumbo Reef, a submarine volcano of the volcanic system of Santorini Islands. A smaller cluster of events is located near the Anydros Islet, aligned in a NE-SW direction, running almost along the main tectonic feature of the area under study, the Santorini-Amorgos Fault Zone. In contrast, the main Santorini Island caldera is characterized by the almost complete absence of seismicity. This contrast is in very good agreement with recent volcanological and marine studies, with the Coloumbo volcanic center showing an intense high-temperature hydrothermal activity, in comparison to the corresponding low-level activity of the Santorini caldera. The high-resolution hypocentral relocations present a clear view of the volcanic submarine structure at the Coloumbo Reef, showing that the main seismic activity is located within a very narrow vertical column, mainly at depths between 6 and 9 km. The focal mechanisms of the best-located events show that the cluster at the Coloumbo Reef is associated with the "Kameni-Coloumbo Fracture Zone", which corresponds to the

  6. Measure Guideline: Passive Vents

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, David; Neri, Robin

    2016-02-05

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated source of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.

  7. Volcanic thermal features observed by AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheimer, Clive; Pieri, David; Carrere, Veronique; Abrams, Michael; Rothery, David; Francis, Peter

    1992-01-01

    In July 1991, Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) was flown over Mount Etna and Stromboli, Italy. Lava-filled vents were then present within summit craters of both volcanoes. Since surfaces at magmatic temperatures radiate strongly over the wavelength ranges of the AVIRIS C- and D-spectrometers, it was hoped that the data collected would reveal clear thermal signatures, even of sub-pixel sized features, as have been observed in the 1.65 and 2.22 microns bands of Landsat Thematic Mapper images. This would provide an opportunity to explore the potential of imaging spectrometers for deriving temperature distributions of hot volcanic surfaces. Such research has implications for volcano monitoring in the EOS era, and also for any future AVIRIS deployments above active lava flows, lakes, and domes, where understanding of their behavior may be advanced by detailed thermal observations.

  8. Quantifying diffuse and discrete venting at the Tour Eiffel vent site, Lucky Strike hydrothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric; EscartíN, Javier; Gracias, Nuno; Olive, Jean-Arthur; Barreyre, Thibaut; Davaille, Anne; Cannat, Mathilde; Garcia, Rafael

    2012-04-01

    The relative heat carried by diffuse versus discrete venting of hydrothermal fluids at mid-ocean ridges is poorly constrained and likely varies among vent sites. Estimates of the proportion of heat carried by diffuse flow range from 0% to 100% of the total axial heat flux. Here, we present an approach that integrates imagery, video, and temperature measurements to accurately estimate this partitioning at a single vent site, Tour Eiffel in the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Fluid temperatures, photographic mosaics of the vent site, and video sequences of fluid flow were acquired during the Bathyluck'09 cruise (Fall, 2009) and the Momarsat'10 cruise (Summer, 2010) to the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field by the ROV Victor6000 aboard the French research vessel the "Pourquoi Pas"? (IFREMER, France). We use two optical methods to calculate the velocities of imaged hydrothermal fluids: (1) for diffuse venting, Diffuse Flow Velocimetry tracks the displacement of refractive index anomalies through time, and (2) for discrete jets, Particle Image Velocimetry tracks eddies by cross-correlation of pixel intensities between subsequent images. To circumvent video blurring associated with rapid velocities at vent orifices, exit velocities at discrete vents are calculated from the best fit of the observed velocity field to a model of a steady state turbulent plume where we vary the model vent radius and fluid exit velocity. Our results yield vertical velocities of diffuse effluent between 0.9 cm s-1 and 11.1 cm s-1 for fluid temperatures between 3°C and 33.5°C above that of ambient seawater, and exit velocities of discrete jets between 22 cm s-1 and 119 cm s-1 for fluid temperatures between 200°C and 301°C above ambient seawater. Using the calculated fluid velocities, temperature measurements, and photo mosaics of the actively venting areas, we calculate a heat flux due to diffuse venting from thin fractures of 3.15 ± 2.22 MW, discrete venting of

  9. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  10. Hydrothermal vent yields multitude of manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A rising plume of water from an active submarine hydrothermal spring discovered 500 km west of Newport, Ore., contains the highest concentrations of manganese yet reported, according to researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park and at the University of Washington in Seattle. The vent, one of many submarine springs that have deposited large deposits of zinc- and silver-rich metals along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, may be a source of renewable minerals.‘The discovery of the active water discharge from the vent sites is particularly significant because it indicates that the polymetallic deposits are still being deposited and may represent a renewable mineral deposit,’ according to William R. Normark, a marine geologist with the USGS and chief scientist aboard the S. P. Lee, the USGS research ship that was used to collect water samples above the hydrothermal vent.

  11. The role of volcanic activity and climate in alluvial fan growth at volcanic areas: an example from southern Campania (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchetta, G.; Sulpizio, R.; Di Vito, M. A.

    2004-06-01

    Volcaniclastic-rich alluvial fans developed in the southern Campanian Plain (Italy) during the late Pleistocene and Holocene in an area eastward of the Somma-Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei volcanoes. Meanwhile, bedrock-rich alluvial fans developed in areas unaffected by pyroclastic deposition. Late Pleistocene and Holocene volcaniclastic-rich alluvial fans show some important differences: (i) late Pleistocene alluvial fans were dominated by hyperconcentrated flow deposits, whereas the Holocene ones were dominated by debris flows deposits; and (ii) late Pleistocene fans consist of several superimposed sedimentary bodies, characterized by homogeneous volcaniclastic material, whereas Holecene fans show either volcaniclastic bodies with homogenous lithology or mixed lithology (i.e., juvenile fractions eroded from different tephra layers). These differences are not related to the amount of volcaniclastic supply in time, but seem to be linked to changes in climatic condition between late Pleistocene and Holocene. Rapid remobilization of the pyroclastic material was favored by climatic and vegetation conditions of the study area during the late Pleistocene, when a semiarid setting dominated by steppe-like vegetation prevailed. During Holocene, the general increase in temperature and humidity favored vegetation and soil development and stabilization of the loose volcaniclastic materials. Thus, part of volcaniclastic material was stored in the catchments and was available for erosion a long time after an eruption. Shallow soil slips, active also today, generated volcaniclastic debris flows characterized by mixed lithology of pumice and scoria.

  12. Role of tectonic and volcanic activity in hydrothermal systems at the southern Mariana Trough: detailed bathymetric characteristics of the hydrothermal sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, S.; Okino, K.; Asada, M.; Nogi, Y.; Mochizuki, N.; Nakamura, K.

    2012-12-01

    We present the detailed bathymetric characterization of field-scale geological features associated with hydrothermal systems in the southern Mariana Trough near 12°57'N, 143°37'E, using near-bottom swath mapping data collected by the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Urashima during cruise YK09-08 and dive observation data acquired by the submersible Shinkai6500 during cruise YK10-11. In the study area, two of the hydrothermal sites are located on the active backarc spreading axis (the Snail and Yamanaka sites), one is located at the eastern foot of the axial high (the Archean site), and two are located on an off-axis knoll about 5 km from the spreading axis (the Pika and Urashima sites). We examined 1) the nature of' tectonic and volcanic controls on the hydrothermal systems, and 2) the relationship between geomorphological characteristics and hydrothermal activity based on the survey results (Yoshikawa et al., 2012). The two on-axis hydrothermal sites are possibly locally developed on a 4th order spreading segment, in association with diking events (on the basis of comparisons with previously studied cases on the East Pacific Rise). The three off-axis sites (the Archean, Urashima, and Pika sites) appear to represent locations of sustained hydrothermal activity that has created relatively large-scale hydrothermal features compared with those in the on-axis area. The formation of off-axis hydrothermal sites is likely to be closely related to an off-axis magma upwelling system, as evidenced by the absence of fault systems and the undeformed morphology of the mound and knoll. The three off-axis hydrothermal sites are composed mainly of breccia assemblages that probably originated from hydrothermal activity with black smoker venting. These areas are characterized by numerous ridge lines (height, mainly 1-6 m), conical mounds (height: < 100 m, diameter: < 300 m), and bumpy seabed. Most of the ridge lines have formed as a result of collapse of the seafloor. The

  13. Complex explosive volcanic activity on the Moon within Oppenheimer crater, Icarus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, Kristen A; Horgan, Briony H N; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Allen, Carlton C.; Hayne, Paul O; Bell, James F III; Paige, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Oppenheimer Crater is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic volcanism on the Moon is thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rate, Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. We use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images and Diviner Radiometer mid-infrared data, Chandrayaan-1 orbiter Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, and Clementine orbiter Ultraviolet/Visible camera images to test the hypothesis that the pyroclastic deposits in Oppenheimer crater were emplaced via Vulcanian activity by constraining their composition and mineralogy. Mineralogically, we find that the deposits are variable mixtures of orthopyroxene and minor clinopyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene, and juvenile iron-rich glass, and that the mineralogy of the pyroclastics varies both across the Oppenheimer deposits as a whole and within individual deposits. We observe similar variability in the inferred iron content of pyroclastic glasses, and note in particular that the northwest deposit, associated with Oppenheimer U crater, contains the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon, which could be a useful future resource. We propose that this variability in mineralogy indicates variability in eruption style, and that it cannot be explained by a simple Vulcanian eruption. A Vulcanian eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit; however, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least the most recent portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire

  14. Paterae on Io: Volcanic Activity Observed by Galileo's NIMS and SSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, Rosaly; Kamp, Lucas; Smythe, W. D.; Carlson, R.; Radebaugh, Jani; Gregg, Tracy K.

    2003-01-01

    Paterae are the most ubiquitous volcanic construct on Io s surface. Paterae are irregular craters, or complex craters with scalloped edges, interpreted as calderas or pit craters. Data from Galileo has shown that the activity of Ionian paterae is often confined to its interior and that generally lava flows are not seen spilling out over the edges. We use observations from Galileo s Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) to study the thermal emission from several Ionian paterae and compare them with images in visible wavelengths obtained by Galileo s Solid State Imaging System (SSI). Galileo s close fly-bys of Io from 1999 to 2001 have allowed NIMS to image the paterae at high spatial resolution (1-30 km pixel). At these scales, several of these features reveal greater thermal emission around the edges, which can be explained as the crust of a lava lake breaking up against the paterae walls. Comparisons with imaging data show that lower albedo areas (which are indicative of young lavas) coincide with higher thermal emission areas on NIMS data. Other paterae, however, show thermal emission and features in the visible that are more consistent with lava flows over a solid patera floor. Identifying eruption styles on Io is important for constraining eruption and interior models on Io.

  15. Intumescence and pore structure of alkali-activated volcanic glasses upon exposure to high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdogan, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Structures formed with ground perlite, a natural volcanic glass, activated with NaOH solutions, are shown to possess the ability to expand up to ~225 % of their original volumes upon exposure to temperatures in the 200-600 °C range. Porous solid with 3-7 MPa compressive strength and ˜450 kg/m3 or higher density are obtained. The observed expansion is believed to occur due to a loss of silanol condensation water, as vapor and is accompanied by an up to ~20 % loss in mass. A drop in pH to near-neutral values supports this idea. The size and total amount of pores in the final solid are controlled by concentration of the NaOH solution and thermal processing conditions. The pores formed are observed to be ~1-10 μm to mm-sized. The ability of perlite-based solids to intumesce over specific temperature ranges could be beneficial in applications where absorption of thermal energy is necessary, such as passive fire protection.

  16. Lung clearance of neutron-activated Mount St. Helens volcanic ash in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wehner, A P; Wilerson, C L; Stevens, D L

    1984-10-01

    To determine pulmonary deposition and clearance of inhaled volcanic ash, rats received a single 60-min, nose-only exposure to neutron-activated ash. Over a period of 128 days after exposure, the rats were sacrificed in groups of five animals. Lungs were analyzed for the radionuclide tracers 46Sc, 59Fe, and 60Co by gamma-ray spectrometry. The alveolar ash burdens, determined by the radionuclides 46Sc and 59Fe, are in good agreement for the majority of samples analyzed, indicating ash particulate levels in the lungs, rather than leached radionuclides. The ash deposition estimates based on 60Co were appreciably lower for the lungs, indicating that 60Co leached from the ash. Approximately 110 micrograms ash, or 6% of the inhaled ash, was initially retained in the deep lung. The biological half-time of the alveolar ash burden was 39 days. After 90 days, the mean lung burden had decreased to about 20% of its initial value; 128 days after exposure, about 10% remained.

  17. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  18. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  19. Combining observations and model simulations to reduce the hazard of Etna volcanic ash plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scollo, Simona; Boselli, Antonella; Coltelli, Mauro; Leto, Giuseppe; Pisani, Gianluca; Prestifilippo, Michele; Spinelli, Nicola; Wang, Xuan; Zanmar Sanchez, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world with a recent activity characterized by powerful lava fountains that produce several kilometres high eruption columns and disperse volcanic ash in the atmosphere. It is well known that, to improve the volcanic ash dispersal forecast of an ongoing explosive eruption, input parameters used by volcanic ash dispersal models should be measured during the eruption. In this work, in order to better quantify the volcanic ash dispersal, we use data from the video-surveillance system of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, and from the lidar system together with a volcanic ash dispersal model. In detail, the visible camera installed in Catania, 27 km from the vent is able to evaluate the evolution of column height with time. The Lidar, installed at the "M.G. Fracastoro" astrophysical observatory (14.97° E, 37.69° N) of the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Catania, located at a distance of 7 km from the Etna summit craters, uses a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser source operating at a 532-nm wavelength, with a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Backscattering and depolarization values measured by the Lidar system can give, with a certain degree of uncertainty, an estimation of volcanic ash concentration in atmosphere. The 12 August 2011 activity is considered a perfect test case because volcanic plume was retrieved by both camera and Lidar. We evaluated the mass eruption rate from the column height and used best fit procedures comparing simulated volcanic ash concentrations with those extracted by the Lidar data. During this event, powerful lava fountains were well visible at about 08:30 GMT and a sustained eruption column was produced since about 08:55 GMT. Ash emission completely ceased around 11:30 GMT. The proposed approach is an attempt to produce more robust ash dispersal forecasts reducing the hazard to air traffic during Etna volcanic crisis.

  20. The nature of the volcanic activity at Loki: Insights from Galileo NIMS and PPR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Robert R.; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.

    2007-02-01

    Loki is the largest patera and the most energetic hotspot on Jupiter's moon Io, in turn the most volcanically active body in the Solar System, but the nature of the activity remains enigmatic. We present detailed analysis of Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and PhotoPolarimeter/Radiometer (PPR) observations covering the 1.5-100 μm wavelength range during the I24, I27, and I32 flybys. The general pattern of activity during these flybys is consistent with previously proposed models of a resurfacing wave periodically crossing a silicate lava lake. In particular our analysis of the I32 NIMS observations shows, over much of the observed patera, surface temperatures and implied ages closely matching those expected for a wave advancing counterclockwise at 0.94-1.38 km/day. The age pattern is different than other published analyses which do not show as clearly this azimuthal pattern. Our analysis also shows two additional distinctly different patera surfaces. The first is located along the inner and outer margins where components with a 3.00-4.70-μm color temperature of 425 K exist. The second is located at the southwestern margin where components with a 550-K color temperature exist. Although the high temperatures could be caused by disruption of a lava lake crust, some additional mechanism is required to explain why the southwest margin is different from the inner or outer ones. Finally, analysis of the temperature profiles across the patera reveal a smoothness that is difficult to explain by simple lava cooling models. Paradoxically, at a subpixel level, wide temperature distributions exist which may be difficult to explain by just the presence of hot cracks in the lava crust. The resurfacing wave and lava cooling models explain well the overall characteristics of the observations. However, additional physical processes, perhaps involving heat transport by volatiles, are needed to explain the more subtle features.

  1. Local influences of geothermal anomalies on permafrost distribution in an active volcanic island (Deception Island, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyanes, G.; Vieira, G.; Caselli, A.; Cardoso, M.; Marmy, A.; Santos, F.; Bernardo, I.; Hauck, C.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at understanding the spatial distribution and characteristics of the frozen and unfrozen terrain in an alluvial fan on Deception Island, which is an active strato-volcano located in the Bransfield Strait (South Shetland Islands) with recent eruptions in 1967, 1969 and 1970. The alluvial fan is dominated by debris-flow, run-off and rock fall processes and permafrost occurs in several parts in the vicinity of anomalous geothermal heat flux. The aim is to assess the ways volcanic activity controls permafrost development and associated geomorphic dynamics using shallow subsurface, surface and air temperature measurements as well as thaw depth and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys. Results show a temperature increase with depth in the lower part of the fan reaching 13 °C at 0.80 m depth, without the presence of permafrost. The shallow borehole located at this site showed a stable thermal stratification all year-round, with only the upper 0.20 m reacting to meteorological forcing. In the upper part of the alluvial fan and debris cones, c. 100 m from the coast, frozen ground is present at c. 0.70 m depth. There, the shallow borehole shows a good coupling with air temperatures and the thermal regime favours the presence of permafrost. ERT shows the lowest resistivity values in the lower part of the alluvial fan and a highly resistivity zone in the upper sector of the fan and in the debris cones. These large variations in resistivity mark the presence of a saline water wedge from the sea into the fan, reaching frozen ground conditions about 100 m inland. It can be shown that the volcano-hydrothermal activity only inhibits frost development very locally, with frozen ground conditions occurring about 100 m away.

  2. Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.

    1991-09-13

    There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent (magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3) fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and (4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors, including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards, which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within well-dispersed eruption plumes. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Can we detect, monitor, and characterize volcanic activity using 'off the shelf' webcams and low-light cameras?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrild, M.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to detect and monitor precursory events, thermal signatures, and ongoing volcanic activity in near-realtime is an invaluable tool. Volcanic hazards often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing to detect and monitor this activity is essential, but the required equipment is often expensive and difficult to maintain, which increases the risk to public safety and the likelihood of financial impact. Our investigation explores the use of 'off the shelf' cameras, ranging from computer webcams to low-light security cameras, to monitor volcanic incandescent activity in near-realtime. These cameras are ideal as they operate in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, are relatively cheap to purchase, consume little power, are easily replaced, and can provide telemetered, near-realtime data. We focus on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate each image according to pixel brightness, in order to automatically detect and identify increases in potentially hazardous activity. The cameras used here range in price from 0 to 1,000 and the script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential users and increase the accessibility of these tools, particularly in developing nations. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures to be correlated to pixel brightness. Data collected from several volcanoes; (1) Stromboli, Italy (2) Shiveluch, Russia (3) Fuego, Guatemala (4) Popcatépetl, México, along with campaign data from Stromboli (June, 2013), and laboratory tests are presented here.

  4. Soil temperature and CO2 degassing, SO2 fluxes and field observations before and after the February 29, 2016 new vent inside Nyiragongo crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagizi, Charles M.; Yalire, Mathieu M.; Ciraba, Honoré M.; Kajeje, Vicky B.; Minani, Abel S.; Kinja, Annie B.; Kasereka, Marcellin M.

    2016-09-01

    Nyiragongo volcano threatens ˜1.5 million inhabitants of Goma (DR Congo) and Gisenyi (Rwanda) cities and people living in the surrounding villages. In 2002, the volcano produced lava flows which invaded Goma and destroyed the economic district of the city, forced a mass exodus of the population and caused the loss of several lives. Nyiragongo volcanic activity is therefore closely followed by the inhabitants, and any news related to increased activity agitates people in the area, especially those in Goma. Here, we report a short time series of soil temperature and carbon dioxide degassing for four locations, and plume sulphur dioxide fluxes preceding and following the opening of a new vent inside the main Nyiragongo crater on February 29, 2016. The observed sudden and unexpected changes in Nyiragongo activity raised the fear of a new volcanic eruption and led to panic in Goma and the surroundings, inducing some people to leaving the city. We use the dataset and field observations before and after the opening of the new vent, in conjunction with published information about Nyiragongo's eruptive mechanism and of the volcano's plumbing system geometry (mainly the crater), to show that the new vent was fed by magma intruded from the lava lake or the upper conduit.

  5. Volcanism on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Io, 1610 to 1995: Galileo to Galileo: 1. Io, 1610-1979; 2. Between Voyager and Galileo: 1979-95; 3. Galileo at Io; Part II. Planetary Volcanism: Evolution and Composition: 4. Io and Earth: formation, evolution, and interior structure; 5. Magmas and volatiles; Part III. Observing and Modeling Volcanic Activity: 6. Observations: thermal remote sensing of volcanic activity; 7. Models of effusive eruption processes; 8. Thermal evolution of volcanic eruptions; Part IV. Galileo at Io: the Volcanic Bestiary: 9. The view from Galileo; 10. The lava lake at Pele; 11. Pillan and Tvashtar: lava fountains and flows; 12. Prometheus and Amirani: Effusive activity and insulated flows; 13. Loki Patera: Io's powerhouse; 14. Other volcanoes and eruptions; Part V. Volcanism on Io: The Global View: 15. Geomorphology: paterae, shields, flows and mountains; 16. Volcanic plumes; 17. Hot spots; Part VI. Io after Galileo: 18. Volcanism on Io: a post-Galileo view; 19. The future of Io observations; Appendix 1; Appendix 2; References; Index.

  6. Volcanism on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard

    2007-08-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Io, 1610 to 1995: Galileo to Galileo: 1. Io, 1610-1979; 2. Between Voyager and Galileo: 1979-1995; 3. Galileo at Io; Part II. Planetary Volcanism: Evolution and Composition: 4. Io and Earth: formation, evolution, and interior structure; 5. Magmas and volatiles; Part III. Observing and Modeling Volcanic Activity: 6. Observations: thermal remote sensing of volcanic activity; 7. Models of effusive eruption processes; 8. Thermal evolution of volcanic eruptions; Part IV. Galileo at Io: the Volcanic Bestiary: 9. The view from Galileo; 10. The lava lake at Pele; 11. Pillan and Tvashtar: lava fountains and flows; 12. Prometheus and Amirani: Effusive activity and insulated flows; 13. Loki Patera: Io's powerhouse; 14. Other volcanoes and eruptions; Part V. Volcanism on Io: The Global View: 15. Geomorphology: paterae, shields, flows and mountains; 16. Volcanic plumes; 17. Hot spots; Part VI. Io after Galileo: 18. Volcanism on Io: a post-Galileo view; 19. The future of Io observations; Appendix 1; Appendix 2; References; Index.

  7. Volcanic Lightning: in nature and in the lab.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel A.; Aizawa, Koki; Díaz Marina, Ana I.; Yokoo, Akihiko; Kueppers, Ulrich; Mueller, Sebastian; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-04-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes that are responsible for injecting large quantities of aerosols into the atmosphere are often associated with intense electrical activity and the generation of volcanic lightning. Although the hazard of volcanic lightning is mostly confined to the area proximal to the vent, monitoring electrical discharges associated with explosive eruptions can provide crucial information on the dynamics and structure of the plume as well as on the mass eruption rate and cargo of erupted fine ash. Nevertheless, our understanding of volcanic lightning is still limited due to lacking of both i) systematic instrumental observation of electric activity in volcanic plumes and ii) the limited number of experimental investigations on the electrical properties of volcanic materials and the opportunity of replicating volcanic plume conditions in the lab. We recently contributed to the understanding of both these aspects by performing multi-parametric observation of volcanic lightning at Sakurajima volcano in Japan and by achieving volcanic lightning in particle-laden jets generated in the lab. At Sakurajima volcano we combined high-speed imaging with magnetotelluric and acoustic measurements of ash-rich plumes generating electrical discharges and compare our observation with maximum plume height measurement and atmospheric soundings. Our observations at Sakurajima allow the measurement of flash properties with respect to the plume evolution as well as magnetic and electric field variation and associated transferred current. In addition, weather-balloon soundings rule out the contribution of hydrometeors in the electrification of the plume. We complement the field observation by performing rapid decompression experiments of well-constrained (composition and granulometry) ash samples and analogue materials (micrometric glass beads). The experiments have a similar character to the cannon-like vulcanian explosions observed at Sakurajima and show many similarities with

  8. Semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries: Validation and application to the cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region (Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Morelli, Stefano; Casagli, Nicola; Garduño Monroy, Victor Hugo

    2014-08-01

    The shape and size of monogenetic volcanoes are the result of complex evolutions involving the interaction of eruptive activity, structural setting and degradational processes. Morphological studies of cinder cones aim to evaluate volcanic hazard on the Earth and to decipher the origins of various structures on extraterrestrial planets. Efforts have been dedicated so far to the characterization of the cinder cone morphology in a systematic and comparable manner. However, manual delimitation is time-consuming and influenced by the user subjectivity but, on the other hand, automatic boundary delimitation of volcanic terrains can be affected by irregular topography. In this work, the semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries proposed by Grosse et al. (2009) for stratovolcanoes was tested for the first time over monogenetic cinder cones. The method, based on the integration of the DEM-derived slope and curvature maps, is applied here to the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region of the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico), where 309 Plio-Quaternary cinder cones are located. The semiautomatic extraction allowed identification of 137 of the 309 cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region, recognized by means of the manual extraction. This value corresponds to the 44.3% of the total number of cinder cones. Analysis on vent alignments allowed us to identify NE-SW vent alignments and cone elongations, consistent with a NE-SW σmax and a NW-SE σmin. Constructing a vent intensity map, based on computing the number of vents within a radius r centred on each vent of the data set and choosing r = 5 km, four vent intensity maxima were derived: one is positioned in the NW with respect to the Volcano Tancitaro, one in the NE, one to the S and another vent cluster located at the SE boundary of the studied area. The spacing of centroid of each cluster (24 km) can be related to the thickness of the crust (9-10 km) overlying the magma reservoir.

  9. Intracaldera volcanic activity, Toledo caldera and embayment, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Stix, J.; Shafiqullah, M.; Garcia, S.; Hagan, R.

    1986-02-10

    The Toledo caldera was formed at 1.47 +- 0.06 Ma during the catastrophic eruption of the lower member, Bandelier Tuff. The caldera was obscured at 1.12 +- 0.03 Ma during eruption of the equally voluminous upper member of the Bandelier Tuff that led to formation of the Valles caldera. Earlier workers interpreted a 9-km-diameter embayment, located NE of the Valles caldera (Toledo embayment), to be a remnant of the Toledo caldera. Drill hole data and new K-Ar dates of Toledo intracaldera domes redefine the position of Toledo caldera, nearly coincident with and of the same dimensions as the younger Valles caldera. the Toledo embayment may be of tectonic origin or a small Tschicoma volcanic center caldera. This interpretation is consistent with distribution of the lower member of the Bandelier Tuff and with several other field and drilling-related observations. Explosive activity associated with Cerro Toledo Rhyolite domes is recorded in tuff deposits located between the lower and upper members of the Bandelier Tuff on the northeast flank of the Jemez Mountains. Recorded in the tuff deposits are seven cycles of explosive activity. Most cycles consists of phreatomagmatic tuffs that grade upward into Plinian pumice beds. A separate deposit, of the same age and consisting of pyroclastic surges and flows, is associated with Rabbit Mountain, located on the southeast rim of the Valles-Toledo caldera complex. These are the surface expression of what may be a thicker, more voluminous intracaldera tuff sequence. The combined deposits of the lower and upper members of the Bandelier Tuff, Toledo and Valles intracaldera sediments, tuffs, and dome lavas form what we interpret to be a wedge-shaped caldera fill. This sequence is confirmed by deep drill holes and gravity surveys.

  10. Active submarine volcanism on the Society hotspot swell (west Pacific): A geochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Devey, C.W.; Albarede, F.; Michard, A. ); Cheminee, J.L. ); Muehe, R.; Stoffers, P. )

    1990-04-10

    The present work deals with the petrography and geochemistry of lavas dredged from five active submarine volcanoes (named Mehetia, Moua Pihaa, Rocard, Teahitia, and Cyana) from the southeast end of the Society Islands hotspot trace. Most samples are basic and alkaline. Fractionation modelling based on major and minor compatible element variations suggests that olivine and minor clinopyroxene were the major fractionating phases. Rocard and Cyana have yielded more evolved, trachy-phonolitic, glassy samples. Both basaltic and phonolitic samples are incompatible-element enriched. The trachy-phonolite patterns show middle (REE) depletion and negative Eu anomalies. The Moua Pihaa basalts have flatter patterns than the other basalts. All smaples, with the exception of a sample from Moua Pihaa which has elevated {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, fall on linear Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic arrays, suggesting two end-member mixing. The Sr isotopic variations in the samples excluding Moua Pihaa correlate positively with Rb/Nb, Pb/Ce, and SiO{sub 2} variations, idicating a component of mantle enriched by injection of material from a subducted oceanic slab. Correlation of {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb with {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr suggests that the subducted material is geochemically old. The absence of a MORB component in the Society magmatism, the small volumes of the Polynesian hotspot volcanoes, and the lack of more intense volcanic activity near the center of the Pacific Superswell, all lead to the conclusion that the latter is unlikely to be caused by a large convective plume.

  11. Discovery of an active shallow submarine silicic volcano in the northern Izu-Bonin Arc: volcanic structure and potential hazards of Oomurodashi Volcano (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, K.; Ishizuka, O.; Nichols, A. R.; Hirahara, Y.; Carey, R.; McIntosh, I. M.; Masaki, Y.; Kondo, R.; Miyairi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Oomurodashi is a bathymetric high located ~20 km south of Izu-Oshima, an active volcanic island of the northern Izu-Bonin Arc. Using the 200 m bathymetric contour to define its summit dimensions, the diameter of Oomurodashi is ~20 km. Oomurodashi has been regarded as inactive, largely because it has a vast flat-topped summit at 100 - 150 meters below sea level (mbsl). During cruise NT07-15 of R/V Natsushima in 2007, we conducted a dive survey in a small crater, Oomuro Hole, located in the center of the flat-topped summit, using the remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) Hyper-Dolphin. The only heat flow measurement conducted on the floor of Oomuro Hole during the dive recorded an extremely high value of 4,200 mW/m2. Furthermore, ROV observations revealed that the southwestern wall of Oomuro Hole consists of fresh rhyolitic lavas. These findings suggest that Oomurodashi is in fact an active silicic submarine volcano. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted detailed geological and geophysical ROV Hyper-Dolphin (cruise NT12-19). In addition to further ROV surveys, we carried out single-channel seismic (SCS) surveys across Oomurodashi in order to examine the shallow structures beneath the current edifice. The ROV surveys revealed numerous active hydrothermal vents on the floor of Oomuro Hole, at ~200 mbsl, with maximum water temperature measured at the hydrothermal vents reaching 194°C. We also conducted a much more detailed set of heat flow measurements across the floor of Oomuro Hole, detecting very high heat flows of up to 29,000 mW/m2. ROV observations revealed that the area surrounding Oomuro Hole on the flat-topped summit of Oomurodashi is covered by extensive fresh rhyolitic lava and pumice clasts with minimum biogenetic or manganese cover, suggesting recent eruption(s). These findings strongly indicate that Oomurodashi is an active silicic submarine volcano, with recent eruption(s) occurring from Oomuro Hole. Since the summit of Oomurodashi is in shallow water, it

  12. Impact of solar versus volcanic activity variations on tropospheric temperatures and precipitation during the Dalton Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anet, J. G.; Muthers, S.; Rozanov, E. V.; Raible, C. C.; Stenke, A.; Shapiro, A. I.; Brönnimann, S.; Arfeuille, F.; Brugnara, Y.; Beer, J.; Steinhilber, F.; Schmutz, W.; Peter, T.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to elucidate the impact of changes in solar irradiance and energetic particles versus volcanic eruptions on tropospheric global climate during the Dalton Minimum (DM, AD 1780-1840). Separate variations in the (i) solar irradiance in the UV-C with wavelengths λ < 250 nm, (ii) irradiance at wavelengths λ > 250 nm, (iii) in energetic particle spectrum, and (iv) volcanic aerosol forcing were analyzed separately, and (v) in combination, by means of small ensemble calculations using a coupled atmosphere-ocean chemistry-climate model. Global and hemispheric mean surface temperatures show a significant dependence on solar irradiance at λ > 250 nm. Also, powerful volcanic eruptions in 1809, 1815, 1831 and 1835 significantly decreased global mean temperature by up to 0.5 K for 2-3 years after the eruption. However, while the volcanic effect is clearly discernible in the Southern Hemispheric mean temperature, it is less significant in the Northern Hemisphere, partly because the two largest volcanic eruptions occurred in the SH tropics and during seasons when the aerosols were mainly transported southward, partly because of the higher northern internal variability. In the simulation including all forcings, temperatures are in reasonable agreement with the tree ring-based temperature anomalies of the Northern Hemisphere. Interestingly, the model suggests that solar irradiance changes at λ < 250 nm and in energetic particle spectra have only an insignificant impact on the climate during the Dalton Minimum. This downscales the importance of top-down processes (stemming from changes at λ < 250 nm) relative to bottom-up processes (from λ > 250 nm). Reduction of irradiance at λ > 250 nm leads to a significant (up to 2%) decrease in the ocean heat content (OHC) between 0 and 300 m in depth, whereas the changes in irradiance at λ < 250 nm or in energetic particles have virtually no effect. Also, volcanic aerosol yields a very strong response, reducing

  13. Impact of solar vs. volcanic activity variations on tropospheric temperatures and precipitation during the Dalton Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anet, J. G.; Muthers, S.; Rozanov, E. V.; Raible, C. C.; Stenke, A.; Shapiro, A. I.; Brönnimann, S.; Arfeuille, F.; Brugnara, Y.; Beer, J.; Steinhilber, F.; Schmutz, W.; Peter, T.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work is to elucidate the impact of changes in solar irradiance and energetic particles vs. volcanic eruptions on tropospheric global climate during the Dalton Minimum (DM, 1780-1840 AD). Separate variations in the (i) solar irradiance in the UV-C with wavelengths λ < 250 nm, (ii) irradiance at wavelengths λ > 250 nm, (iii) in energetic particle spectrum, and (iv) volcanic aerosol forcing were analyzed separately, and (v) in combination, by means of small ensemble calculations using a coupled atmosphere-ocean chemistry-climate-model. Global and hemispheric mean surface temperatures show a significant dependence on solar irradiance at λ > 250 nm. Also, powerful volcanic eruptions in 1809, 1815, 1831 and 1835 significantly decrease global mean temperature by up to 0.5 K for 2-3 yr after the eruption. However, while the volcanic effect is clearly discernible in the southern hemispheric mean temperature, it is less significant in the Northern Hemisphere, partly because the two largest volcanic eruptions occurred in the SH tropics and during seasons when the aerosols were mainly transported southward, partly because of the higher northern internal variability. In the simulation including all forcings, temperatures are in reasonable agreement with the tree-ring-based temperature anomalies of the Northern Hemisphere. Interestingly, the model suggests that solar irradiance changes at λ < 250 nm and in energetic particle spectra have only insignificant impact on the climate during the Dalton Minimum. This downscales the importance of top-down processes (stemming from changes at λ < 250 nm) relative to bottom-up processes (from λ > 250 nm). Reduction of irradiance at λ > 250 nm leads to a significant (up to 2%) decrease of the ocean heat content (OHC) between the 0 and 300 m of depth, whereas the changes in irradiance at λ < 250 nm or in energetic particle have virtually no effect. Also, volcanic aerosol yields a very strong response, reducing the OHC

  14. New inferences from spectral seismic energy measurement of a link between regional seismicity and volcanic activity at Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, R.; Falsaperla, S.; Marrero, J. M.; Messina, A.

    2009-04-01

    The existence of a relationship between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity has been the subject of several studies in the last years. Generally, activity in basaltic volcanoes such as Villarica (Chile) and Tungurahua (Ecuador) shows very little changes after the occurrence of regional earthquakes. In a few cases volcanic activity has changed before the occurrence of regional earthquakes, such as observed at Teide, Tenerife, in 2004 and 2005 (Tárraga et al., 2006). In this paper we explore the possible link between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity at Mt. Etna in 2006 and 2007. On 24 November, 2006 at 4:37:40 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 4.7 stroke the eastern coast of Sicily. The epicenter was localized 50 km SE of the south coast of the island, and at about 160 km from the summit craters of Mt. Etna. The SSEM (Spectral Seismic Energy Measurement) of the seismic signal at stations at 1 km and 6 km from the craters highlights that four hours before this earthquake the energy associated with volcanic tremor increased, reached a maximum, and finally became steady when the earthquake occurred. Conversely, neither before nor after the earthquake, the SSEM of stations located between 80 km and 120 km from the epicentre and outside the volcano edifice showed changes. On 5 September, 2007 at 21:24:13 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 3.2 and 7.9 km depth stroke the Lipari Island, at the north of Sicily. About 38 hours before the earthquake occurrence, there was an episode of lava fountain lasting 20 hours at Etna volcano. The SSEM of the seismic signal recorded during the lava fountain at a station located at 6 km from the craters highlights changes heralding this earthquake ten hours before its occurrence using the FFM method (e.g., Voight, 1988; Ortiz et al., 2003). A change in volcanic activity - with the onset of ash emission and Strombolian explosions - was observed a couple of hours before the occurrence of the regional

  15. Volcanic Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    volcanism on humankind in the North Pacific, where Holocene time saw many caldera-forming eruptions in an area of comparatively intense human activity.

  16. The Whitsunday Volcanic Province, Central Queensland, Australia: lithological and stratigraphic investigations of a silicic-dominated large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, S. E.; Ewart, A.; Stephens, C. J.; Parianos, J.; Downes, P. J.

    2000-06-01

    Contrary to general belief, not all large igneous provinces (LIPs) are characterised by rocks of basaltic composition. Silicic-dominated LIPs, such as the Whitsunday Volcanic Province of NE Australia, are being increasingly recognised in the rock record. These silicic LIPs are consistent in being: (1) volumetrically dominated by ignimbrite; (2) active over prolonged periods (40-50 m.y.), based on available age data; and (3) spatially and temporally associated with plate break-up. This silicic-dominated LIP, related to the break-up of eastern continental Gondwana, is also significant for being the source of >1.4×10 6 km3 of coeval volcanogenic sediment preserved in adjacent sedimentary basins of eastern Australia. The Whitsunday Volcanic Province is volumetrically dominated by medium- to high-grade, dacitic to rhyolitic lithic ignimbrites. Individual ignimbrite units are commonly between 10 and 100 m thick, and the ignimbrite-dominated sequences exceed 1 km in thickness. Coarse lithic lag breccias containing clasts up to 6 m diameter are associated with the ignimbrites in proximal sections. Pyroclastic surge and fallout deposits, subordinate basaltic to rhyolitic lavas, phreatomagmatic deposits, and locally significant thicknesses of coarse-grained volcanogenic conglomerate and sandstone are interbedded with the ignimbrites. The volcanic sequences are intruded by gabbro/dolerite to rhyolite dykes (up to 50 m in width), sills and comagmatic granite. Dyke orientations are primarily from NW to NNE. The volcanic sequences are characterised by the interstratification of proximal/near-vent lithofacies such as rhyolite domes and lavas, and basaltic agglomerate, with medial to distal facies of ignimbrite. The burial of these near-vent lithofacies by ignimbrites, coupled with the paucity of mass wastage products such as debris-flow deposits indicates a low-relief depositional environment. Furthermore, the volcanic succession records a temporal change in: (1) eruptive styles

  17. Transtension controlling volcanic morphology: Insights from oblique-to-the-arc tectonic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielfeld, G.; Cembrano, J. M.; Lara, L. E.

    2014-12-01

    Long and short-term tectonic activity plays an essential role in the segregation, transport and emplacement of fluids and magmas within the continental crust. Magma ascent and emplacement mechanisms within volcanic arcs are largely controlled by the interplay between pre-existing structural anisotropies, regional stress field, magmatic driving pressure, and the viscous resistance to magma flow. For the upper crust, many authors have stated that the orientation of principal tectonic stresses may determine the spatial distribution and geometry of eruptive vents and related feeder dykes Thus, regional and/or local tectonics (differential stresses) may exert a fundamental control in volcanic morphology and produce linear eruptive arrays of Andean-type strato-volcanoes, as a result of stability on long-lived structural system of sub-parallel dyke swarms and aligned minor eruptive centers along volcano flanks. In South-central Chile, the Callaqui Volcano consists of tens of aligned Pleisto-Holocene eruptive vents and hundreds of sub-parallel dykes, preserved along the ENE-WSW Callaqui volcano ridge. Morpho-structural field mapping and remote sensing analysis yields that Pleistocene eruptive vents are aligned into a N60°E-trending en echelon array, whereas its elliptical craters maximum diameter trend N66°E. Post-glacial eruptive vents also are organized into a N60°E trend, observed in both, isolated talweg scoria cone and flank fissural eruption. In addition, sub-parallel, underlying dyke swarms strike N60°E in it central portion of the volcanic system, becoming nearly E-W on distal zones. Examination of morphometrical and structural data yields that emplacement of magma occurs within a dextral transtensional regime, along a major regional discontinuity recognized previously by other authors. The strain field obtained within this study is consistent with the regional ENE shortening derived by the oblique convergence between Nazca and South-American plates.

  18. Using IMS hydrophone data for detecting submarine volcanic activity: Insights from Monowai, 26°S Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Dirk; Watts, Anthony B.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Rodgers, Mel; Paulatto, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Only little is known on active volcanism in the ocean. As eruptions are attenuated by seawater and fallout does not regularly reach the sea surface, eruption rates and mechanisms are poorly understood. Estimations on the number of active volcanoes across the modern seas range from hundreds to thousands, but only very few active sites are known. Monowai is a submarine volcanic centre in the northern Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of five days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic tertiary waves ('T-phases'), recorded at three broadband seismic stations in the region. We show, using windowed cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that T-phases associated with this eruption are detected as far as Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean, where two bottom-moored hydrophone arrays are operated as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). We observe a high incidence of T-phase arrivals during the time of the eruption, with the angle of arrival stabilizing at the geodesic azimuth between the IMS arrays and Monowai. T-phases from the volcanic centre must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing And Ranging (SOFAR) channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans and over a total geodesic range of approximately 15,800 km, one of the longest source-receiver distances of any naturally occurring underwater signal ever observed. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and two dimensional, long-range, parabolic equation modelling, highlight the exceptional capabilities of the hydroacoustic waveform component of the IMS for remotely detecting episodes of submarine volcanic activity. Using Monowai and the hydrophone arrays at Ascension Island as a natural laboratory, we investigate the long-term eruptive record of a submarine volcano from

  19. Time variability of Io's volcanic activity from near-IR adaptive optics observations on 100 nights in 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, Katherine; de Pater, Imke

    2016-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is a dynamic target, exhibiting extreme and time-variable volcanic activity powered by tidal forcing from Jupiter. We have conducted a campaign of high-cadence observations of Io with the goal of characterizing its volcanic activity. Between Aug 2013 and the end of 2015, we imaged Io on 100 nights in the near-infrared with adaptive optics on the Keck and Gemini N telescopes, which resolve emission from individual volcanic hot spots. During our program, we made over 400 detections of 48 distinct hot spots, some of which were detected 30+ times. We use these observations to derive a timeline of global volcanic activity on Io, which exhibits wide variability from month to month. The timelines of thermal activity at individual volcanic centers have geophysical implications, and will permit future characterization by others. We evaluate hot spot detection limits and give a simple parameterization of the minimum detectable intensity as a function of emission angle, which can be applied to other analyses. We detected three outburst eruptions in August 2013, but no other outburst-scale events were observed in the subsequent ∼90 observations. Either the cluster of events in August 2013 was a rare occurrence, or there is a mechanism causing large events to occur closely-spaced in time. We also detected large eruptions (though not of outburst scale) within days of one another at Kurdalagon Patera and Sethlaus/Gabija Paterae in 2015. As was also seen in the Galileo dataset, the hot spots we detected can be separated into two categories based on their thermal emission: those that are persistently active for 1 year or more at moderate intensity, and those that are only briefly active, are time-variable, and often reach large intensities. A small number of hot spots in the latter category appear and subside in a matter of days, reaching particularly high intensities; although these are not bright enough to qualify as outbursts, their thermal signatures follow

  20. Airbag vent valve and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Leslie D. (Inventor); Zimmermann, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An energy absorbing airbag system includes one or more vent valve assemblies for controlling the release of airbag inflation gases to maintain inflation gas pressure within an airbag at a substantially constant pressure during a ride-down of an energy absorbing event. Each vent valve assembly includes a cantilever spring that is flat in an unstressed condition and that has a free end portion. The cantilever spring is secured to an exterior surface of the airbag housing and flexed to cause the second free end portion of the cantilever spring to be pressed, with a preset force, against a vent port or a closure covering the vent port to seal the vent port until inflation gas pressure within the airbag reaches a preselected value determined by the preset force whereupon the free end portion of the cantilever spring is lifted from the vent port by the inflation gases within the airbag to vent the inflation gases from within the airbag. The resilience of the cantilever spring maintains a substantially constant pressure within the airbag during a ride-down portion of an energy absorbing event by causing the cantilever spring to vent gases through the vent port whenever the pressure of the inflation gases reaches the preselected value and by causing the cantilever spring to close the vent port whenever the pressure of the inflation gases falls below the preselected value.

  1. Morpho-structural evolution of a volcanic island developed inside an active oceanic rift: S. Miguel Island (Terceira Rift, Azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibrant, A. L. R.; Hildenbrand, A.; Marques, F. O.; Weiss, B.; Boulesteix, T.; Hübscher, C.; Lüdmann, T.; Costa, A. C. G.; Catalão, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of volcanic islands is generally marked by fast construction phases alternating with destruction by a variety of mass-wasting processes. More specifically, volcanic islands located in areas of intense regional deformation can be particularly prone to gravitational destabilisation. The island of S. Miguel (Azores) has developed during the last 1 Myr inside the active Terceira Rift, a major tectonic structure materializing the present boundary between the Eurasian and Nubian lithospheric plates. In this work, we depict the evolution of the island, based on high-resolution DEM data, stratigraphic and structural analyses, high-precision K-Ar dating on separated mineral phases, and offshore data (bathymetry and seismic profiles). The new results indicate that: (1) the oldest volcanic complex (Nordeste), composing the easternmost part of the island, was dominantly active between ca. 850 and 750 ka, and was subsequently affected by a major south-directed flank collapse. (2) Between at least 500 ka and 250 ka, the landslide depression was massively filled by a thick lava succession erupted from volcanic cones and domes distributed along the main E-W collapse scar. (3) Since 250 kyr, the western part of this succession (Furnas area) was affected by multiple vertical collapses; associated plinian eruptions produced large pyroclastic deposits, here dated at ca. 60 ka and less than 25 ka. (4) During the same period, the eastern part of the landslide scar was enlarged by retrogressive erosion, producing the large Povoação valley, which was gradually filled by sediments and young volcanic products. (5) The Fogo volcano, in the middle of S. Miguel, is here dated between ca. 270 and 17 ka, and was affected by, at least, one southwards flank collapse. (6) The Sete Cidades volcano, in the western end of the island, is here dated between ca. 91 and 13 ka, and experienced mutliple caldera collapses; a landslide to the North is also suspected from the presence of a

  2. Where are the undiscovered hydrothermal vents on oceanic spreading ridges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    In nearly four decades since the discovery of deep-sea vents, one-third of the length of global oceanic spreading ridges has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity. Active submarine vent fields are now known along the boundaries of 46 out of 52 recognized tectonic plates. Hydrothermal survey efforts over the most recent decade were sparked by national and commercial interests in the mineral resource potential of seafloor hydrothermal deposits, as well as by academic research. Here we incorporate recent data for back-arc spreading centers and ultraslow- and slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to revise a linear equation relating the frequency of vent fields along oceanic spreading ridges to spreading rate. We apply this equation globally to predict a total number of vent fields on spreading ridges, which suggests that ~900 vent fields remain to be discovered. Almost half of these undiscovered vent fields (comparable to the total of all vent fields discovered during 35 years of research) are likely to occur at MORs with full spreading rates less than 60 mm/yr. We then apply the equation regionally to predict where these hydrothermal vents may be discovered with respect to plate boundaries and national jurisdiction, with the majority expected to occur outside of states' exclusive economic zones. We hope that these predictions will prove useful to the community in the future, in helping to shape continuing ridge-crest exploration.

  3. Review of magnetic field monitoring near active faults and volcanic calderas in California: 1974-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, R.J.; Johnston, M.J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Differential magnetic fields have been monitored along the San Andreas fault and the Long Valley caldera since 1974. At each monitoring location, proton precession magnetometers sample total magnetic field intensity at a resolution of 0.1 nT or 0.25 nT. Every 10 min, data samples are transmitted via satellite telemetry to Menlo Park, CA for processing and analysis. The number of active magnetometer sites has varied during the past 21 years from 6 to 25, with 12 sites currently operational. We use this network to identify magnetic field changes generated by earthquake and volcanic processes. During the two decades of monitoring, five moderate earthquakes (M5.9 to M7.3) have occurred within 20 km of magnetometer sites located along the San Andreas fault and only one preseismic signal of 1.5 nT has been observed. During moderate earthquakes, coseismic magnetic signals, with amplitudes from 0.7 nT to 1.3 nT, have been identified for 3 of the 5 events. These observations are generally consistent with those calculated from simple seismomagnetic models of these earthquakes and near-fault coseismic magnetic field disturbances rarely exceed one nanotesla. These data are consistent with the concept of low shear stress and relatively uniform displacement of the San Andreas fault system as expected due to high pore fluid pressure on the fault. A systematic decrease of 0.8-1 nT/year in magnetic field has occurred in the Long Valley caldera since 1989. These magnetic field data are similar in form to observed geodetically measured displacements from inflation of the resurgent dome. A simple volcanomagnetic model involving pressure increase of 50 MPa/a at a depth of 7 km under the resurgent dome can replicate these magnetic field observations. This model is derived from the intrusion model that best fits the surface deformation data. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. 10 Ma of Igneous Activity in the Transmexican Volcanic Belt: Tectonic and Geomagnetic Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Martinez, V. C.; Osete, M. L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2007-05-01

    A total of 51 sites with geochronological control were sampled in the central and western segments of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). Together with other previously published 69 sites from the eastern segment, they span the spatial and temporal activity of the TMVB. Using now the same reference directions and methodologies, they are analyzed in order (i) to determine the possible occurrence and significance (spatially and temporally) of vertical axis crustal block rotations that have been reported in this region; and (ii) to study the geomagnetic Paleo Secular Variation during the last 10 Ma; to check the previously suggested existence of a "Pacific Dipole Window" extending to Mexico. Paleomagnetic results, backed by statistical tests performed according to their geographical distribution (3 structural segments) or according to their ages (Late Miocene, Pliocene or Quaternary), do not support the notion that large vertical axis block rotations (paleomagnetically detectable) occurred in this arc after Late Miocene times. They suggest that the TMVB could be considered paleomagnetically as an unique tectonic domain under a transtensional regime, where its extension component prevails over its left-lateral component. The mean paleomagnetic directions, obtained in the age ranges 10-5 Ma and 5-0 Ma, do not differ from their respective reference directions. In both datasets, VGPs have been selected using quality Fisher's precision parameters and optimum cutoff angles. This results in a circularly symmetrical data distribution with statistically indistinguishable antipodal normal and reverse polarities. VGP dispersions are consistent with those from globally distributed observations at Mexican latitudes for the Miocene and the Plio- Quaternary. An analysis of all the published paleomagnetic data from the TMVB, when combined all together and selected in the same terms, do not support neither the existence of large crustal block rotations nor the persistence of a

  5. Groundwater flow processes and mixing in active volcanic systems: the case of Guadalajara (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Antonio, A.; Mahlknecht, J.; Tamez-Meléndez, C.; Ramos-Leal, J.; Ramírez-Orozco, A.; Parra, R.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Eastoe, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    other active volcanic systems on Earth.

  6. Volcanic Activity on lo at the Time of the Ulysses Encounter.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J R; Howell, R R; Clark, B E; Klassen, D R; O'connor, D

    1992-09-11

    The population of heavy ions in lo's torus is ultimately derived from lo volcanism. Groundbased infrared observations of lo between October 1991 and March 1992, contemporaneous with the 8 February 1992 Ulysses observations of the lo torus, show that volcanic thermal emission was at the low end of the normal range at all lo longitudes during this period. In particular, the dominant hot spot Loki was quiescent. Resolved images show that there were at least four hot spots on lo's Jupiter-facing hemisphere, including Loki and a long-lived spot on the leading hemisphere (Kanehekili), of comparable 3.5-micrometer brightness but higher temperature.

  7. Volcanic activity on Io at the time of the Ulysses encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.; Howell, Robert R.; Clark, Beth E.; Klassen, David R.; O'Connor, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The population of heavy ions in Io's torus is ultimately derived from Io volcanism. Ground-based infrared observations of Io between October 1991 and March 1992, contemporaneous with the 8 February 1992 Ulysses observations of the Io torus, show that volcanic thermal emission was at the low end of the normal range at all Io longitudes during this period. In particular, the dominant hot spot Loki was quiescent. Resolved images show that there were at least four hot spots on Io's Jupiter-facing hemisphere, including Loki and a long-lived spot on the leading hemisphere (Kanehekili), of comparable 3.5-micrometer brightness but higher temperature.

  8. Metal Concentrations in Two Commercial Tuna Species from an Active Volcanic Region in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Torres, Paulo; Rodrigues, Armindo; Soares, Lília; Garcia, Patrícia

    2016-02-01

    Concentrations of cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead [Pb (µg g(-1) wet weight)] were determined in liver and muscle samples of 15 bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and 15 skipjack tunas (Katsuwonus pelamis) caught over an active volcanic region in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean (Azores, Portugal) and evaluated regarding consumption safety. None of the muscle samples (edible part) exceeded the European Union (EU) maximum limits (MLs) for Hg and Pb. Cd concentrations in muscle were much greater than EU MLs with 53 and 26 % of the bigeye tuna and skipjack tuna, respectively, in exceedance of the limits. Results obtained in this work, together with other studies in the same region, support the existence of an important volcanic source of Cd in waters of the Mid-Atlantic region, which should be carefully monitored given the importance of many commercial marine species for human consumption, mainly in Europe.

  9. On the statistics of El Nino occurrences and the relationship of El Nino to volcanic and solar/geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    El Nino is conventionally defined as an anomalous and persistent warming of the waters off the coasts of Ecuador and Peru in the eastern equatorial Pacific, having onset usually in Southern Hemispheric summer/fall. Some of the statistical aspects of El Nino occurrences are examined, especially as they relate to the normal distribution and to possible associations with volcanic, solar, and geomagnetic activity. With regard to the very strong El Nino of 1982 to 1983, it is noted that, although it may very well be related to the 1982 eruptions of El Chichon, the event occurred essentially on time (with respect to the past behavior of elapsed times between successive El Nino events; a moderate-to-stronger El Nino was expected during the interval 1978 to 1982, assuming that El Nino occurrences are normally distributed, having a mean elapsed time between successive onsets of 4 years and a standard deviation of 2 years and a last known occurrence in 1976). Also, although not widely recognized, the whole of 1982 was a record year for geomagnetic activity (based on the aa geomagnetic index, with the aa index registering an all time high in February 1982), perhaps, important for determining a possible trigger for this and other El Nino events. A major feature is an extensive bibliography (325 entries) on El Nino and volcanic-solar-geomagnetic effects on climate. Also, included is a tabular listing of the 94 major volcanic eruptions of 1835 to 1986.

  10. Geophysical exploration on the subsurface geology of La Garrotxa monogenetic volcanic field (NE Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolós, Xavier; Barde-Cabusson, Stéphanie; Pedrazzi, Dario; Martí, Joan; Casas, Albert; Lovera, Raúl; Nadal-Sala, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    We applied self-potential (SP) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to the exploration of the uppermost part of the substrate geology and shallow structure of La Garrotxa monogenetic volcanic field, part of the European Neogene-Quaternary volcanic province. The aim of the study was to improve knowledge of the shallowest part of the feeding system of these monogenetic volcanoes and of its relationship with the subsurface geology. This study complements previous geophysical studies carried out at a less detailed scale and aimed at identifying deeper structures, and together will constitute the basis to establish volcanic susceptibility in La Garrotxa. SP study complemented previous smaller-scale studies and targeted key areas where ERT could be conducted. The main new results include the generation of resistivity models identifying dykes and faults associated with several monogenetic cones. The combined results confirm that shallow tectonics controlling the distribution of the foci of eruptive activity in this volcanic zone mainly correspond to NNW-SSE and accessorily by NNE-SSW Neogene extensional fissures and faults and concretely show the associated magmatic intrusions. These structures coincide with the deeper ones identified in previous studies, and show that previous Alpine tectonic structures played no apparent role in controlling the loci of this volcanism. Moreover, the results obtained show that the changes in eruption dynamics occurring at different vents located at relatively short distances in this volcanic area are controlled by shallow stratigraphical, structural and hydrogeological differences underneath these monogenetic volcanoes.

  11. Development of a portable active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for volcanic gas measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vita, Fabio; Kern, Christoph; Inguaggiato, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) has been an effective tool for measuring atmospheric trace gases for several decades. However, instruments were large, heavy and power-inefficient, making their application to remote environments extremely challenging. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) have now allowed us to design and construct a lightweight, portable, low-power LP-DOAS instrument for use at remote locations and specifically for measuring degassing from active volcanic systems. The LP-DOAS was used to measure sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from La Fossa crater, Vulcano, Italy, where column densities of up to 1.2 × 1018 molec cm−2 (~ 500 ppmm) were detected along open paths of up to 400 m in total length. The instrument's SO2 detection limit was determined to be 2 × 1016 molec cm−2 (~ 8 ppmm), thereby making quantitative detection of even trace amounts of SO2 possible. The instrument is capable of measuring other volcanic volatile species as well. Though the spectral evaluation of the recorded data showed that chlorine monoxide (ClO) and carbon disulfide (CS2) were both below the instrument's detection limits during the experiment, the upper limits for the X / SO2 ratio (X = ClO, CS2) could be derived, and yielded 2 × 10−3 and 0.1, respectively. The robust design and versatility of the instrument make it a promising tool for monitoring of volcanic degassing and understanding processes in a range of volcanic systems.

  12. Spatial vent opening probability map of El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerril, Laura; Cappello, Annalisa; Galindo, Inés; Neri, Marco; Del Negro, Ciro

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of the probable spatial distribution of new eruptions is useful to manage and reduce the volcanic risk. It can be achieved in different ways, but it becomes especially hard when dealing with volcanic areas less studied, poorly monitored and characterized by a low frequent activity, as El Hierro. Even though it is the youngest of the Canary Islands, before the 2011 eruption in the "Las Calmas Sea", El Hierro had been the least studied volcanic Island of the Canaries, with more historically devoted attention to La Palma, Tenerife and Lanzarote. We propose a probabilistic method to build the susceptibility map of El Hierro, i.e. the spatial distribution of vent opening for future eruptions, based on the mathematical analysis of the volcano-structural data collected mostly on the Island and, secondly, on the submerged part of the volcano, up to a distance of ~10-20 km from the coast. The volcano-structural data were collected through new fieldwork measurements, bathymetric information, and analysis of geological maps, orthophotos and aerial photographs. They have been divided in different datasets and converted into separate and weighted probability density functions, which were then included in a non-homogeneous Poisson process to produce the volcanic susceptibility map. Future eruptive events on El Hierro is mainly concentrated on the rifts zones, extending also beyond the shoreline. The major probabilities to host new eruptions are located on the distal parts of the South and West rifts, with the highest probability reached in the south-western area of the West rift. High probabilities are also observed in the Northeast and South rifts, and the submarine parts of the rifts. This map represents the first effort to deal with the volcanic hazard at El Hierro and can be a support tool for decision makers in land planning, emergency plans and civil defence actions.

  13. VEPP Exercise: Volcanic Activity and Monitoring of Pu`u `O`o, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    A 10-week project will be tested during the Fall semester 2010, for a Volcanic Hazards elective course, for undergraduate Geology students of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. This exercise was developed during the Volcanoes Exploration Project: Pu`u `O`o (VEPP) Workshop, held on the Big Island of Hawaii in July 2010. For the exercise the students will form groups (of 2-4 students), and each group will be assigned a monitoring technique or method, among the following: seismic (RSAM data), deformation (GPS and tilt data), observations (webcam and lava flow maps), gas and thermal monitoring. The project is designed for Geology undergraduates who have a background in introductory geology, types of volcanoes and eruptions, magmatic processes, characteristics of lava flows, and other related topics. It is divided in seven tasks, starting with an introduction and demonstration of the VEPP website and the VALVE3 software, which is used to access monitoring data from the current eruption of Pu`u `O`o, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The students will also familiarize themselves with the history of Kilauea volcano and its current eruption. At least weekly the groups will acquire data (mostly near-real-time) from the different monitoring techniques, in the form of time series, maps, videos, and images, in order to identify trends in the data. The groups will meet biweekly in the computer laboratory to work together in the analysis and interpretation of the data, with the support of the instructor. They will give reports on the progress of the exercise, and will get feedback from the instructor and from the other expert groups. All groups of experts will relate their findings to the recent and current activity of Kilauea volcano, and the importance of their specific type of monitoring. The activity will culminate with a written report and an oral presentation. The last task of the project consists of a wrap-up volcano monitoring exercise, in which the students will

  14. Long-term risk in a recently active volcanic system: Evaluation of doses and indoor radiological risk in the quaternary Vulsini Volcanic District (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioni, B.; Cinelli, G.; Mostacci, D.; Tositti, L.

    2012-12-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Vulsini Volcanic District (Central Italy) contain high concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K due to subduction-related metasomatic enrichment of incompatible elements in the mantle source coupled with magma differentiation within the upper crust. Due to their favorable mechanical properties they have been extensively used for construction since the Etruscan age. In the old buildings of the Bolsena village, one of the most populated ancient village in the area, the major source of indoor radioactivity is 222Rn, a radioactive noble gas descendant of 238U. Direct 222Rn indoor measurements have detected extremely high values in the old center due to the combined effect of building materials, radon fluxes from the volcanic basement and low air exchange rates. In these cases the evaluated risk of developing lung cancer within a 75 year lifetime reaches up to 40% for ever smokers. Simulations of "standard rooms" built with different tuffs and lavas collected from the Vulsini Volcanic District have also provided estimations of the effective doses and lifetime risk for radiogenic cancer. Other than by the method adopted for calculation, the total evaluated risk for each volcanic rock depends on different parameters, such as: radionuclide content, radon emanation power, occupancy factor and air exchange rate. Occupancy factor and air exchange rate appear as the only controlling parameters able to mitigate the indoor radiological risk.

  15. Chemical evolution of thermal springs at Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica: Effect of volcanic activity, precipitation, seismic activity, and Earth tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, D. L.; Bundschuh, J.; Soto, G. J.; Fernández, J. F.; Alvarado, G. E.

    2006-09-01

    Arenal Volcano in NW Costa Rica, Central America has been active during the last 37 years. However, only relatively low temperature springs have been identified on its slopes with temperatures less than around 60 °C. The springs are clustered on the NE and NW slopes of the volcano, close to contacts between the recent and older volcanic products or at faults that intercept the volcano. This volcano is located in a rain forest region with annual rainfall averaging around 5 m. During the last 15 years, the temperature and chemical composition of 4 hot springs and 2 cold springs have been monitored approximately every 3 months. In addition, two more thermal sites were identified recently and sampled, as well as two boreholes located on a fault NE of the volcano. Scatter plots of chemical species such as Cl and B suggest that the waters in these discharges belong to the same aquifer with a saline end member similar to Río Tabacón at the beginning of the study period (1990) and the deeper borehole (B-2) in 2004. The waters of Quebrada Bambú and Quebrada Fría represent a more dilute end member. Both long-term (over the 15 years) and short-term or seasonal decreases in concentration and steady or decreasing temperature are noted in NW springs. Springs located at the NE show increasing temperatures and ion concentrations, except for bicarbonate that has decreased in concentration for all the springs. This behavior is likely associated with a shallow source for the solutes and heat for this aquifer. To the NW the early lavas and pyroclastic flows have been cooling down, decreasing the contribution of leaching products to the infiltrating waters. To the NE, pyroclastic flows to the N during the last decade are contributing increasing concentrations of solutes and heat throughout water infiltration and circulation within the faults and the surficial drainage that has a NE regional trend. For the short-term or seasonal variations, concentrations of chemical constituents

  16. Volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1986-01-01

    Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. Often the remnants of an eruption are as revealing as the eruption itself, for they tell us many things about the eruption. Included here are examples of several volcanic products and other magmatic features, with descriptions of how they were formed and what they tell us about volcanism.

  17. Retrieval and intercomparison of volcanic SO2 injection height and eruption time from satellite maps and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Federica; Burton, Mike; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Corradini, Stefano; Salerno, Giuseppe; Merucci, Luca; Di Grazia, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    Syneruptive gas flux time series can, in principle, be retrieved from satellite maps of SO2 collected during and immediately after volcanic eruptions, and used to gain insights into the volcanic processes which drive the volcanic activity. Determination of the age and height of volcanic plumes are key prerequisites for such calculations. However, these parameters are challenging to constrain using satellite-based techniques. Here, we use imagery from OMI and GOME-2 satellite sensors and a novel numerical procedure based on back-trajectory analysis to calculate plume height as a function of position at the satellite measurement time together with plume injection height and time at a volcanic vent location. We applied this new procedure to three Etna eruptions (12 August 2011, 18 March 2012 and 12 April 2013) and compared our results with independent satellite and ground-based estimations. We also compare our injection height time-series with measurements of volcanic tremor, which reflects the eruption intensity, showing a good match between these two datasets. Our results are a milestone in progressing towards reliable determination of gas flux data from satellite-derived SO2 maps during volcanic eruptions, which would be of great value for operational management of explosive eruptions.

  18. Safe venting of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Enhanced Emergency Smoke Venting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    Boeing Airworthiness Offices in both Renton and Everett. The search disclosed at least 26 letters between Boeing and the FAA on the subject of smoke...the ventilation airflow rates and utilizing the effect of the additional outflow valve. .-. 12 FAA Report No. DOT/ FAA /CT-86/41-I, " Aircraft ...lTr !r DOT/ FAA !CT-88/22 Enhanced Emergency FAA Technical Center Sm oke Atlantic City International Airport Venting N.J. 08405 T.DTIC, Q\\SEP 0 21988

  20. Tornado protection by venting

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability to protect a modern nuclear power plant from the effects of a tornado by the use of a system of venting in all safety-related structures outside of the containment. The paper demonstrates this by presenting a method of analysis and of equipment selection that fully complies with the intent and the letter of applicable federal regulatory guides. A report of an actual tornado in the City of Kalamazoo, Michigan, suggests that the concept of sealing a plant during a tornado may not always be applicable.

  1. Geophysical expression of caldera related volcanism, structures and mineralization in the McDermitt volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rytuba, J. J.; Blakely, R. J.; Moring, B.; Miller, R.

    2013-12-01

    30 km trend that then arcs NE into the caldera. These anomalies reflect near surface rhyolite intrusions that underlie the caldera-fill sediments that have been altered to K-feldpar and clay minerals. K gamma ray anomalies also delineate this zone of alteration. The last phase of volcanism occurs in the central part of the caldera and is associated with a broad aeromagnetic high with individual high-amplitude aeromagnetic highs coincident with three large volcanic vents. No hydrothermal alteration is associated with this last phase of volcanism. On the SW side of the McDermitt volcanic field a 10 km wide, 60 km long, NNW-trending zone of late Miocene normal faults developed after cessation of volcanism and prior to Basin and Range faulting. We propose that this extensional fault zone is the eastern continuation of the NW trending Brothers Fault Zone, but changes to a NNW trend where it is deflected by the plutons that underlies the McDermitt volcanic field. Plutons that underlie all three of these Mid Miocene volcanic fields have minimized post-caldera extensional faulting. Thus only caldera ring fracture faults were available for the development of hydrothermal systems in areas where post caldera intrusive activity was localized.

  2. Volcanic gas composition changes during the gradual decrease of the gigantic degassing activity of Miyakejima volcano, Japan, 2000-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Hiroshi; Geshi, Nobuo; Matsushima, Nobuo; Saito, Genji; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke

    2017-02-01

    The composition of volcanic gases discharged from Miyakejima volcano has been monitored during the intensive degassing activity that began after the eruption in 2000. During the 15 years from 2000 to 2015, Miyakejima volcano discharged 25.5 Mt of SO2, which required degassing of 3 km3 of basaltic magma. The SO2 emission rate peaked at 50 kt/day at the end of 2000 and quickly decreased to 5 kt/day by 2003. During the early degassing period, the volcanic gas composition was constant with the CO2/SO2 = 0.8 (mol ratio), H2O/SO2 = 35, HCl/SO2 = 0.08, and SO2/H2S = 15. The SO2 emission rate decreased gradually to 0.5 kt/day by 2012, and the gas composition also changed gradually to CO2/SO2 = 1.5, H2O/SO2 = 150, HCl/SO2 = 0.15, and SO2/H2S = 6. The compositional changes are not likely caused by changes in degassing pressure or volatile heterogeneity of a magma chamber but are likely attributed to an increase of hydrothermal scrubbing caused by large decrease of the volcanic gas emission rate, suggesting a supply of gases with constant composition during the 15 years. The intensive degassing was modeled based on degassing of a convecting magma conduit. The gradual SO2 emission rate that decrease without changes in volcanic gas composition is attributed to a reduction of diameter of the convecting magma conduit.

  3. Submarine radial vents on Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaìi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanless, V. Dorsey; Garcia, M. O.; Trusdell, F. A.; Rhodes, J. M.; Norman, M. D.; Weis, Dominique; Fornari, D. J.; Kurz, M. D.; Guillou, Hervé

    2006-05-01

    A 2002 multibeam sonar survey of Mauna Loa's western flank revealed ten submarine radial vents and three submarine lava flows. Only one submarine radial vent was known previously. The ages of these vents are constrained by eyewitness accounts, geologic relationships, Mn-Fe coatings, and geochemical stratigraphy; they range from 128 years B.P. to possibly 47 ka. Eight of the radial vents produced degassed lavas despite eruption in water depths sufficient to inhibit sulfur degassing. These vents formed truncated cones and short lava flows. Two vents produced undegassed lavas that created "irregular" cones and longer lava flows. Compositionally and isotopically, the submarine radial vent lavas are typical of Mauna Loa lavas, except two cones that erupted alkalic lavas. He-Sr isotopes for the radial vent lavas follow Mauna Loa's evolutionary trend. The compositional and isotopic heterogeneity of these lavas indicates most had distinct parental magmas. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter results, along with photography and sampling during four JASON2 dives, are used to produce a detailed geologic map to evaluate Mauna Loa's submarine geologic history. The new map shows that the 1877 submarine eruption was much larger than previously thought, resulting in a 10% increase for recent volcanism. Furthermore, although alkalic lavas were found at two radial vents, there is no systematic increase in alkalinity among these or other Mauna Loa lavas as expected for a dying volcano. These results refute an interpretation that Mauna Loa's volcanism is waning. The submarine radial vents and flows cover 29 km2 of seafloor and comprise a total volume of ˜2 × 109 m3 of lava, reinforcing the idea that submarine lava eruptions are important in the growth of oceanic island volcanoes even after they emerged above sea level.

  4. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The historical record of volcanic activity in Saudi Arabia suggests that volcanism is dormant. The harrats should be evaluated for their potential as volcanic hazards and as sources of geothermal energy. The volcanic rocks are natural traps for groundwater; thus water resources for agriculture may be significant and should be investigated.

  5. Anti-arthritic activity of root bark of Oroxylum indicum (L.) vent against adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karnati, Mamatha; Chandra, Rodda H; Veeresham, Ciddi; Kishan, Bookya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oroxylum indicum (Bignoniaceae) also known as Sonapatha is an indigenous medicinal plant widely used in Ayurvedic medicine for over thousands of years. It is an active ingredient of well-known Ayurvedic formulations such as Chyawanprash and Dasamula. Root bark of this plant has tonic and astringent properties and it is also used in rheumatism. Objective: The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the anti-arthritic activity of different extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum against adjuvant - induced arthritis in rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used in this study. Arthritis was induced by injecting 0.1 ml Freund's complete adjuvant intra-dermally into the left hind paw of the rats. The paw volume, hematological, biochemical, radiographic and histopathological aspects were evaluated. Results: The relative percentage inhibition potential of paw volume in rats treated with various extracts of Oroxylum indicum was found to be ethyl acetate extract (67.69%) >chloroform extract (64.61%) >n-butanol extract (58.46%) respectively. The hematological parameters like RBC count, hemoglobin content showed significant increase while there was a significant decrease in total WBC count and ESR in all the groups of animals pretreated with root bark extracts. The biochemical parameters such as catalase, glutathione contents showed a significant increase while the lipid peroxide and Cathepsin-D content decreased significantly only in case of ethyl acetate pretreated rats when compared to others. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum exhibit anti-arthritic activity. The order of activity of extracts was found to be ethyl acetate >chloroform >n-butanol respectively. PMID:23798888

  6. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Case Iron Soil Pipe and Fittings, or, Silicone Rubber, Low and High Temperature and Tear Resistant... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vents and venting. 3280.611 Section 3280.611 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  7. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... this section and as otherwise required by this standard. (b) Materials—(1) Pipe. Vent piping shall be... listed materials. (2) Fittings. Appropriate fittings shall be used for all changes in direction or size and where pipes are joined. The material and design of vent fittings shall conform to the type...

  8. Galapagos rift at 86 /sup 0/W 5. Variations in volcanism, structure, and hydrothermal activity along a 30-kilometer segment of the rift valley

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, R.D.; van Andel, T.H.; Holcomb, R.T.

    1982-02-10

    A 30-km segment of the Galapagos Rift near 86 /sup 0/W has been mapped in detail using the Angus towed camera system, the submersible Alvin, and multi-narrowbeam sonar data. Recent volcanic activity and active hydrothermal circulation are evident along the entire length of the segment mapped. There are, however, clear along-strike variations in these processes which render previous two-dimensional models obsolete. Although alternate explanations are possible, eruptive sequences appear to begin with the outpouring of surface-fed sheet flows and end with more channelized pillow flows. In the western portion of the rift studied, sheet flows dominate with the entire valley floor covered by recent flows associated with a broad shield volcano. The eastern portion, on the other hand, is narrower; consisting primarily of less voluminous pillow flows of apparently the same youthful age. Three possible models for the volcanic evolution of this rift segment are presented. According to the first model, the extrusive portion of the crust is formed by a distinct volcanic episode, followed by a long period of volcanic quiescence. The volcanic phase begins with voluminous sheet flows emerging from numerous eruptive fissures, which in time evolve into a narrow pillow ridge. Farther along-strike, where the flows are smaller and the extrusive zone narrow, the marginal portions undergo continued fissuring and subsequent uplift to form marginal highs and lows. This deformational activity also affects the extrusive zone once volcanic activity ends, converting the distinctly lobate topography of the active period into highly lineated fault-controlled terrain. According to the second model, extension and volcanism can be viewed as a continuous process without major periods of volcanic quiescence. The initial lava flows of a new eruptive sequence fill low areas, frequently spilling over local sills and flooding much of the rift valley.

  9. A Mouthful of Dirt: Feedbacks Between the Presence and Nature of In-Vent Debris and the Dynamics of Strombolian Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Capponi, A.; Scarlato, P.; Palladino, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Textural, modelling and observational evidences indicate the presence of loose to molten debris capping the magma column in the conduit of Strombolian-type volcanoes. This debris is thought to have a role in controlling the release of gas during one explosion and the amount and grain size of the eruption products. Here we report direct observations on the behaviour of debris covering the eruptive vents during Strombolian explosions at Stromboli volcano, Italy. During several field campaigns from 2008 onwards, the eruptive vents were in direct view from our observation point, and volcanic activity was recorded using a variety of video equipment, including high-speed and thermal cameras. Debris-covered vents were observed in several cases. In such cases the explosion was preceded by the gradual, time-exponential bulging of the debris cover, followed, in some cases, by a deflation and in-vent collapse of the debris. The amount and grain size distribution of the debris control the eruptive behaviour. Often, blocks and lapilli may not be entirely removed by explosions, which may occur through the debris and around the larger blocks. In such cases the explosions tend to erupt relatively cold (non-plastic) bombs and lapilli, and minor amounts of ash. Finer-grained debris covers are entirely removed by explosions, and can be entrained in the explosions and collapse separately to form small pyroclastic density currents. The ensuing explosions are invariably ash-rich. Both fine and coarse debris is observed to fall back in the vent after each explosion but also to gravitationally accumulate in between the explosions from the seep crater flanks. In contrast, open-vent eruptions tend to erupt hotter (plastically deforming) pyroclasts at a higher exit velocity.

  10. Population ecology of the tonguefish Symphurus thermophilus (Pisces; Pleuronectiformes; Cynoglossidae) at sulphur-rich hydrothermal vents on volcanoes of the northern Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnicliffe, Verena; Tyler, Jennifer; Dower, John F.

    2013-08-01

    Flatfish are a major component of the hydrothermal vent community on three seamounts of the northern Mariana Volcanic Arc in the northwest Pacific. Nikko, Kasuga-2 and Daikoku seamounts host vent fields between 375 and 480 m depth where high temperature vents release molten sulphur. The small cynoglossid tonguefish, Symphurus thermophilus Munroe and Hashimoto, is ubiquitous in all vent habitats observed on these seamounts: among extensive fields of tubeworms and mussels and on solid sulphur surfaces on Nikko; on sulphur-rich sediments and barnacle-covered boulders on Kasuga-2; and on recent sulphur flows and on broad areas of loose and semi-consolidated sediments on Daikoku. We recorded repeated forays by individuals onto flows of molten sulphur as these surfaces cooled. Based on observations using ROVs, the mean density is 90 fish/m2 with maximum counts over 200 fish/m2 on Daikoku sediments. Compared to collected tonguefish from Daikoku and Kasuga-2, those from Nikko have significantly greater lengths and, on average, six times the mass. Otolith data indicate upper ages of 13 years with Nikko tonguefish growing significantly faster. Diets of tonguefish on the three seamounts reflect the different habitats and prey availability; in Daikoku specimens, small crustaceans and polychaetes are most common while on Nikko, gut contents are predominantly larger shrimp. We made the unusual observation of stunned midwater fish falling to the seafloor near the vents where S. thermophilus immediately attacked them. This tonguefish has a wide diet range and foraging behaviour that likely influence the differing growth rates and sizes of fish inhabiting the different vent sites. Limited genetic data suggest that larval exchange probably occurs among sites where the common habitat factor is high levels of elemental sulphur forming hard and partly unconsolidated substrata. Here, in the northern range of the Mariana Trench Marine National Monument, S. thermophilus, despite having an

  11. Distinguishing Phenocrysts From Xenocrysts; Dating the Onset of Volcanic Activity on the Isle of Rum, Scotland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troll, V. R.; Nicoll, G. R.; Emeleus, H. C.; Donaldson, C. H.

    2005-12-01

    Major volcanic activity on the Isle of Rum started with eruption of rhyodacite, now preserved as intrusive and extrusive parts of the intra-caldera succession. A thick sequence of intra-caldera ignimbrites and sedimentary breccias are preserved in the north and south of the island. Twenty feldspar crystals of the rhyodacite were dated using Ar/Ar and yielded a mean apparent age of 60.83 ± 0.27Ma (MSWD = 3.4), consistent with previously published dates for the crosscutting (i.e. younger) ultrabasic-layered intrusion of 60.53 ± 0.08Ma, Hamilton et al., (1998, Nature). On an age versus probability plot the feldspars do not, however, show a simple Gaussian distribution, but a major peak at 60.33Ma and two smaller shoulders at approx 61.4Ma and 63Ma. Our preliminary interpretation of the older ages is that they include a) xenocrysts derived from earlier Tertiary plutonics (61.4Ma peak) and b) older feldspars that have largely re-equilibrated within the rhyodacite magma chamber, possibly derived from Lewisian gneiss (63Ma peak). This may imply a residence time of these xenocrysts in the magma chamber of up to several years; cf. Gansecki et al., (1996, Earth Planet Sci. Lett.). The youngest and strongest age peak at 60.33Ma is suggested to represent the rhyodacite event. The oxygen isotope composition of the rhyodacite feldspars (6.88 ‰) is in the range of magmatic phenocrysts (6-7.5 ‰) and Lewisian gneisses (5-8 ‰) and well above the very low oxygen isotope values usually associated with high-T alteration. Hydrothermal overprint due to the layered ultrabasic intrusion was therefore probably minimal. We suggest the 60.33 ± 0.21Ma crystal age represents the rhyodacite eruption/intrusion event, implying that the ultrabasic-layered suite was already forming at depth and emplaced at shallow structural levels quickly thereafter. These new age dates tie in very well with recent work by Chambers et al., (2005, Lithos), highlighting a very quick succession of events

  12. The discovery of late Quaternary basalt on Mount Bambouto: Implications for recent widespread volcanic activity in the southern Cameroon Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagou Dongmo, Armand; Nkouathio, David; Pouclet, André; Bardintzeff, Jacques-Marie; Wandji, Pierre; Nono, Alexandre; Guillou, Hervé

    2010-04-01

    At the north-eastern flank of Mount Bambouto, a lateral cone, the Totap volcano, is dated at 0.480 ± 0.014 Ma, which corresponds to the most recent activity of this area. The lava is a basanite similar to the older basanites of Mount Bambouto. Two new datations of the lavas of the substratum are 11.75 ± 0.25 Ma, and 21.12 ± 0.45 Ma. A synthetic revision of the volcanic story of Mount Bambouto is proposed as follows. The first stage, ca. 21 Ma, corresponds to the building of the initial basaltic shield volcano. The second stage, from 18.5 to 15.3 Ma, is marked by the collapse of the caldera linked to the pouring out of ignimbritic rhyolites and trachytes. The third stage, from 15 to 4.5 Ma, renews with basaltic effusive activity, together with post-caldera extrusions of trachytes and phonolites. The 0.5 Ma Totap activity could be a fourth stage. In the recent Quaternary, a number of basaltic activities, similar to that of the Totap volcano, are encountered elsewhere in the Cameroon Line, from Mount Oku to Mount Cameroon. The very long-live activity at Mount Bambouto and the volcanic time-space distribution in the southern Cameroon Line are linked to the working of a hotline.

  13. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  14. Preliminary volcano hazard assessment for the Emmons Lake volcanic center, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher; Miller, Thomas P.; Mangan, Margaret T.

    2006-01-01

    The Emmons Lake volcanic center is a large stratovolcano complex on the Alaska Peninsula near Cold Bay, Alaska. The volcanic center includes several ice- and snow-clad volcanoes within a nested caldera structure that hosts Emmons Lake and truncates a shield-like ancestral Mount Emmons edifice. From northeast to southwest, the main stratovolcanoes of the center are: Pavlof Sister, Pavlof, Little Pavlof, Double Crater, Mount Hague, and Mount Emmons. Several small cinder cones and vents are located on the floor of the caldera and on the south flank of Pavlof Volcano. Pavlof Volcano, in the northeastern part of the center, is the most historically active volcano in Alaska (Miller and others, 1998) and eruptions of Pavlof pose the greatest hazards to the region. Historical eruptions of Pavlof Volcano have been small to moderate Strombolian eruptions that produced moderate amounts of near vent lapilli tephra fallout, and diffuse ash plumes that drifted several hundreds of kilometers from the vent. Cold Bay, King Cove, Nelson Lagoon, and Sand Point have reported ash fallout from Pavlof eruptions. Drifting clouds of volcanic ash produced by eruptions of Pavlof would be a major hazard to local aircraft and could interfere with trans-Pacific air travel if the ash plume achieved flight levels. During most historical eruptions of Pavlof, pyroclastic material erupted from the volcano has interacted with the snow and ice on the volcano producing volcanic mudflows or lahars. Lahars have inundated most of the drainages heading on the volcano and filled stream valleys with variable amounts of coarse sand, gravel, and boulders. The lahars are often hot and would alter or destroy stream habitat for many years following the eruption. Other stratocones and vents within the Emmons Lake volcanic center are not known to have erupted in the past 300 years. However, young appearing deposits and lava flows suggest there may have been small explosions and minor effusive eruptive activity

  15. Localization of Volcanic Activity: Topographic Effects on Dike Propagation, Eruption and COnduit Formation

    SciTech Connect

    E.S. Gaffney; B. Damjanac

    2006-05-12

    Magma flow in a dike rising in a crack whose strike runs from a highland or a ridge to an adjacent lowland has been modeled to determine the effect of topography on the flow. It is found that there is a distinct tendency for the flow to be diverted away from the highland end of the strike toward the lowland. Separation of the geometric effect of the topography from its effect on lateral confining stresses on the crack indicates that both contribute to the effect but that the effect of stress is less important. Although this analysis explains a tendency for volcanic eruptions to occur in low lands, it does not preclude eruptions on highlands. The particular configuration modeled mimics topography around the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, so that the results may indicate some reduction in the volcanic hazard to the site.

  16. The climatic effect of explosive volcanic activity: Analysis of the historical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, R. A.; Goodman, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    By using the most complete available records of direct beam radiation and volcanic eruptions, an historical analysis of the role of the latter in modulating the former was made. A very simple fallout and dispersion model was applied to the historical chronology of explosive eruptions. The resulting time series explains about 77 percent of the radiation variance, as well as suggests that tropical and subpolar eruptions are more important than mid-latitude eruptions in their impact on the stratospheric aerosol optical depth. The simpler climatic models indicate that past hemispheric temperature can be stimulated very well with volcanic and CO2 inputs and suggest that climate forecasting will also require volcano forecasting. There is some evidence that this is possible some years in advance.

  17. Paleomagnetic results from Cenozoic volcanics of Lusatia, NW Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabl, P.; Cajz, V.; Tietz, O.; Buechner, J.; Suhr, P.; Pecskay, Z.; Cizkova, K.

    2013-05-01

    Lusatia is situated in the NE continuation of the Ohre Rift (OR) behind Lusatian Overtrust. Compared to the neighbouring volcanic complex of the České stredohorí Mts. (CS) inside the OR. The scattered occurrences of basaltic bodies in Lusatia are spread on wider area. This can be caused by different tectonic development of the regions and from derived erosional conditions. The Lusatian Overtrust, high-order tectonic structure running across the course of the OR, separates Lusatian region into two different geological areas where Cretaceous sediments or granodiorites of Lusatian Massif represent the country rock of the Cenozoic volcanism, respectively. The age of volcanic activity ranges from 19 to 33 Ma, it's proved by newly obtained Ar-Ar data from Freiberg and K-Ar data from Debrecen. Forty two scattered remnants of Cenozoic volcanic products were sampled to get paleomagnetic data. The superficial volcanics with detectable geological position and volcanology were chosen preferentially, several dykes and separate vents were sampled as well. Paleomagnetic research was processed on more than 500 samples which were demagnetized using alternate field in the range 0-80 mT. Q-ratio was counted to prevent the lightning influence - solitary volcanic occurrences build positive morphology and thus, they are prone to be targeted by lightnings. The values of Q-ratio predominantly span from 0.1 to 7.0; those samples having the value over 10, were excluded for evaluation. The mean paleomagnetic direction (MPD) was acquired from several samples on each sampling site. Declination and Inclination show values of 11.8 deg and 62.7 deg (α95 = 9.3 deg) for normal polarity, or 182.1 deg and -59.2 deg (α95 = 6.1 deg) for reverse polarity, respectively,The corresponding paleolatitude of 41.9 deg was counted from the Inclination. This is 1000 km to the South, compared to recent position. The dispersions of the MPD are relatively wide. This coincides well with the idea of long

  18. Ten years of soil CO2 continuous monitoring on Mt. Etna: Exploring the relationship between processes of soil degassing and volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, Marco; Gurrieri, Sergio; Giudice, Gaetano; Giuffrida, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    The measurement of soil CO2 flux variations is a well-established practice in many volcanic areas around the world. Until recently, however, most of these were made using direct sampling methods. These days, a variety of automatic devices providing real-time data now make the continuous monitoring of volcanic areas possible. A network of automatic geochemical monitoring stations (EtnaGas network) was developed by INGV Palermo and installed at various sites on the flanks of Mt. Etna. Here, we present a large set of soil CO2 flux data recorded by the network, dating back 10 years, a period in which several noteworthy eruptive phenomena occurred. Our statistical analysis strongly suggests that anomalous measurements of soil CO2 flux are attributable to volcanic origin and in almost all cases precede volcanic activity. Here, we present the actual data series recorded by EtnaGAS and an interpretative model of the expected behavior of soil CO2 flux (in terms of increase-decrease cycles), which corr