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Sample records for active volcano monitoring

  1. Monitoring active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most spectacular, awesomely beautiful, and at times destructive displays of natural energy is an erupting volcano, belching fume and ash thousands of meters into the atmosphere and pouring out red-hot molten lava in fountains and streams. Countless eruptions in the geologic past have produced volcanic rocks that form much of the Earth's present surface. The gradual disintegration and weathering of these rocks have yielded some of the richest farmlands in the world, and these fertile soils play a significant role in sustaining our large and growing population. Were it not for volcanic activity, the Hawaiian Islands with their sugar cane and pineapple fields and magnificent landscapes and seascapes would not exist to support their residents and to charm their visitors. Yet, the actual eruptive processes are catastrophic and can claim life and property.

  2. Monitoring active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.

    1980-01-01

    One of the most spectacular, awesomely beautiful, and at times, most destructive displays of natural energy is an erupting volcano, belching fume and ash thousands of feet into the atmoshpehere and pouring out red-hot molten lava in fountains and streams. 

  3. Active Volcano Monitoring using a Space-based Hyperspectral Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipar, J. J.; Dunn, R.; Cooley, T.

    2010-12-01

    Active volcanoes occur on every continent, often in close proximity to heavily populated areas. While ground-based studies are essential for scientific research and disaster mitigation, remote sensing from space can provide rapid and continuous monitoring of active and potentially active volcanoes [Ramsey and Flynn, 2004]. In this paper, we report on hyperspectral measurements of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Hyperspectral images obtained by the US Air Force TacSat-3/ARTEMIS sensor [Lockwood et al, 2006] are used to obtain estimates of the surface temperatures for the volcano. ARTEMIS measures surface-reflected light in the visible, near-infrared, and short-wave infrared bands (VNIR-SWIR). The SWIR bands are known to be sensitive to thermal radiation [Green, 1996]. For example, images from the NASA Hyperion hyperspectral sensor have shown the extent of wildfires and active volcanoes [Young, 2009]. We employ the methodology described by Dennison et al, (2006) to obtain an estimate of the temperature of the active region of Kilauea. Both day and night-time images were used in the analysis. To improve the estimate, we aggregated neighboring pixels. The active rim of the lava lake is clearly discernable in the temperature image, with a measured temperature exceeding 1100o C. The temperature decreases markedly on the exterior of the summit crater. While a long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensor would be ideal for volcano monitoring, we have shown that the thermal state of an active volcano can be monitored using the SWIR channels of a reflective hyperspectral imager. References: Dennison, Philip E., Kraivut Charoensiri, Dar A. Roberts, Seth H. Peterson, and Robert O. Green (2006). Wildfire temperature and land cover modeling using hyperspectral data, Remote Sens. Environ., vol. 100, pp. 212-222. Green, R. O. (1996). Estimation of biomass fire temperature and areal extent from calibrated AVIRIS spectra, in Summaries of the 6th Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, Pasadena, CA

  4. GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, Lucia; Ratti, Raffaella; Borgström, Sven; Seifert, Frank Martin; Peltier, Aline; Kaminski, Edouard; Bianchi, Marco; Branson, Wendy; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Hirn, Barbara; van der Voet, Paul; van Geffen, J.

    2010-05-01

    The GlobVolcano project (2007-2010) is part of the Data User Element programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The project aims at demonstrating Earth Observation (EO) based integrated services to support the Volcano Observatories and other mandate users (e.g. Civil Protection) in their monitoring activities. The information services are assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. In a first phase, a complete information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations. In the currently on-going second phase, GlobVolcano is delivering pre-operational services over 15 volcanic sites located in three continents and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. The set of GlobVolcano offered EO based information products is composed as follows: Deformation Mapping DInSAR (Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been used to study a wide range of surface displacements related to different phenomena (e.g. seismic faults, volcanoes, landslides) at a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and cm-level precision. Permanent Scatterers SAR Interferometry method (PSInSARTM) has been introduced by Politecnico of Milano as an advanced InSAR technique capable of measuring millimetre scale displacements of individual radar targets on the ground by using multi-temporal data-sets, estimating and removing the atmospheric components. Other techniques (e.g. CTM) have followed similar strategies and have shown promising results in different scenarios. Different processing approaches have been adopted, according to data availability, characteristic of the area and dynamic characteristics of the volcano. Conventional DInSAR: Colima (Mexico), Nyiragongo (Congo), Pico (Azores), Areanal (Costa Rica) PSInSARTM: Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island

  5. Aerial monitoring in active mud volcano by UAV technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Capasso, Giorgio; Madonia, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    UAV photogrammetry opens various new applications in the close range domain, combining aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry, but also introduces low-cost alternatives to the classical manned aerial photogrammetry. Between 2014 and 2015 tree aerial surveys have been carried out. Using a quadrotor drone, equipped with a compact camera, it was possible to generate high resolution elevation models and orthoimages of The "Salinelle", an active mud volcanoes area, located in territory of Paternò (South Italy). The main risks are related to the damages produced by paroxysmal events. Mud volcanoes show different cyclic phases of activity, including catastrophic events and periods of relative quiescence characterized by moderate activity. Ejected materials often are a mud slurry of fine solids suspended in liquids which may include water and hydrocarbon fluids, the bulk of released gases are carbon dioxide, with some methane and nitrogen, usually pond-shaped of variable dimension (from centimeters to meters in diameter). The scope of the presented work is the performance evaluation of a UAV system that was built to rapidly and autonomously acquire mobile three-dimensional (3D) mapping data in a volcanic monitoring scenario.

  6. Remote sensing for active volcano monitoring in Barren Island, India

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, A.; Reddy, C.S.S.; Srivastav, S.K. )

    1993-08-01

    The Barren Island Volcano, situated in the Andaman Sea of the Bay of Bengal, erupted recently (March, 1991) after a prolonged period of quiescence of about 188 years. This resumed activity coincides with similar outbreaks in the Philippines and Japan, which are located in an identical tectonic environment. This study addresses (1) remote sensing temporal monitoring of the volcanic activity, (2) detecting hot lava and measuring its pixel-integrated and subpixel temperatures, and (3) the importance of SWIR bands for high temperature volcanic feature detection. Seven sets of TM data acquired continuously from 3 March 1991 to 8 July 1991 have been analyzed. It is concluded that detectable pre-eruption warming took place around 25 March 1991 and volcanic activity started on 1 April 1991. It is observed that high temperature features, such as an erupting volcano, can register emitted thermal radiance in SWIR bands. Calculation of pixel-integrated and sub-pixel temperatures related to volcanic vents has been made, using the dual-band method. 6 refs.

  7. A Broadly-Based Training Program in Volcano Hazards Monitoring at the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.; Bevens, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes, in cooperation with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program at HVO and CVO, offers a broadly based volcano hazards training program targeted toward scientists and technicians from developing nations. The program has been offered for 25 years and provides a hands-on introduction to a broad suite of volcano monitoring techniques, rather than detailed training with just one. The course content has evolved over the life of the program as the needs of the trainees have changed: initially emphasizing very basic monitoring techniques (e.g. precise leveling, interpretation of seismic drum records, etc.) but, as the level of sophistication of the trainees has increased, training in more advanced technologies has been added. Currently, topics of primary emphasis have included volcano seismology and seismic networks; acquisition and modeling of geodetic data; methods of analysis and monitoring of gas geochemistry; interpretation of volcanic deposits and landforms; training in LAHARZ, GIS mapping of lahar risks; and response to and management of volcanic crises. The course also provides training on public outreach, based on CSAV's Hawaii-specific hazards outreach programs, and volcano preparedness and interactions with the media during volcanic crises. It is an intensive eight week course with instruction and field activities underway 6 days per week; it is now offered in two locations, Hawaii Island, for six weeks, and the Cascades volcanoes of the Pacific Northwest, for two weeks, to enable trainees to experience field conditions in both basaltic and continental volcanic environments. The survival of the program for more than two decades demonstrates that a need for such training exists and there has been interaction and contribution to the program by the research community, however broader engagement with the latter continues to present challenges. Some of the reasons for this will be discussed.

  8. Using the Landsat Thematic Mapper to detect and monitor active volcanoes - An example from Lascar volcano, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, P. W.; Rothery, D. A.

    1987-07-01

    The Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) offers a means of detecting and monitoring thermal features of active volcanoes. Using the TM, a prominent thermal anomaly has been discovered on Lascar volcano, northern Chile. Data from two short-wavelength infrared channels of the TM show that material within a 300-m-diameter pit crater was at a temperature of at least 380 C on two dates in 1985. The thermal anomaly closely resembles in size and radiant temperature the anomaly over the active lava lake at Erta'ale in Ethiopia. An eruption took place at Lascar on Sept. 16, 1986. TM data acquired on Oct. 27, 1986, revealed significant changes within the crater area. Lascar is in a much more active state than any other volcano in the central Andes, and for this reason it merits further careful monitoring. Studies show that the TM is capable of confidently identifying thermal anomalies less than 100 m in size, at temperatures of above 150 C, and thus it offers a valuable means of monitoring the conditions of active or potentially active volcanoes, particularly those in remote regions.

  9. Using the Landsat Thematic Mapper to detect and monitor active volcanoes - An example from Lascar volcano, northern Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. W.; Rothery, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) offers a means of detecting and monitoring thermal features of active volcanoes. Using the TM, a prominent thermal anomaly has been discovered on Lascar volcano, northern Chile. Data from two short-wavelength infrared channels of the TM show that material within a 300-m-diameter pit crater was at a temperature of at least 380 C on two dates in 1985. The thermal anomaly closely resembles in size and radiant temperature the anomaly over the active lava lake at Erta'ale in Ethiopia. An eruption took place at Lascar on Sept. 16, 1986. TM data acquired on Oct. 27, 1986, revealed significant changes within the crater area. Lascar is in a much more active state than any other volcano in the central Andes, and for this reason it merits further careful monitoring. Studies show that the TM is capable of confidently identifying thermal anomalies less than 100 m in size, at temperatures of above 150 C, and thus it offers a valuable means of monitoring the conditions of active or potentially active volcanoes, particularly those in remote regions.

  10. Embedded ARM system for volcano monitoring in remote areas: application to the active volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

  11. Embedded ARM System for Volcano Monitoring in Remote Areas: Application to the Active Volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica)

    PubMed Central

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

  12. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  13. VEPP Exercise: Volcanic Activity and Monitoring of Pu`u `O`o, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    A 10-week project will be tested during the Fall semester 2010, for a Volcanic Hazards elective course, for undergraduate Geology students of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. This exercise was developed during the Volcanoes Exploration Project: Pu`u `O`o (VEPP) Workshop, held on the Big Island of Hawaii in July 2010. For the exercise the students will form groups (of 2-4 students), and each group will be assigned a monitoring technique or method, among the following: seismic (RSAM data), deformation (GPS and tilt data), observations (webcam and lava flow maps), gas and thermal monitoring. The project is designed for Geology undergraduates who have a background in introductory geology, types of volcanoes and eruptions, magmatic processes, characteristics of lava flows, and other related topics. It is divided in seven tasks, starting with an introduction and demonstration of the VEPP website and the VALVE3 software, which is used to access monitoring data from the current eruption of Pu`u `O`o, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The students will also familiarize themselves with the history of Kilauea volcano and its current eruption. At least weekly the groups will acquire data (mostly near-real-time) from the different monitoring techniques, in the form of time series, maps, videos, and images, in order to identify trends in the data. The groups will meet biweekly in the computer laboratory to work together in the analysis and interpretation of the data, with the support of the instructor. They will give reports on the progress of the exercise, and will get feedback from the instructor and from the other expert groups. All groups of experts will relate their findings to the recent and current activity of Kilauea volcano, and the importance of their specific type of monitoring. The activity will culminate with a written report and an oral presentation. The last task of the project consists of a wrap-up volcano monitoring exercise, in which the students will

  14. Infrasound Monitoring of the Volcanic Activities of Japanese Volcanoes in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. I.; Che, I. Y.; Shin, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Since 1999 when our first infrasound array station(CHNAR) has been installed at Cheolwon, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources(KIGAM) is continuously observing infrasound signals with an infrasound array network, named KIN(Korean Infrasound Network). This network is comprised of eight seismo-acoustic array stations(BRDAR, YPDAR, KMPAR, CHNAR, YAGAR, KSGAR, ULDAR, TJIAR). The aperture size of the smallest array is 300m and the largest is about 1.4km. The number of infrasound sensors are between 4(TJIAR) and 18(YAGAR), and 1~5 seismometers are collocated with infrasound sensors. Many interesting infrasound signals associated with different type of sources, such as blasting, large earthquake, bolide, volcanic explosion are detected by KIN in the past 15 years. We have analyzed the infrasound signals possibly associated with the japanese volcanic explosions with reference to volcanic activity report published by Japanese Meteorological Agency. Analysis results of many events, for example, Asama volcano explosion in 2004 and Shinmoe volcano in 2011, are well matched with the official report. In some cases, however, corresponding infrasound signals are not identified. By comparison of the infrasound signals from different volcanoes, we also found that the characteristics of signals are distinguishing. It may imply that the specific volcano has its own unique fingerprint in terms of infrasound signal. It might be investigated by long-term infrasound monitoring for a specific volcano as a ground truth generating repetitive infrasound signal.

  15. Autonomous thermal camera system for monitoring the active lava lake at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, N.; Oppenheimer, C.; Kyle, P.

    2014-02-01

    In December 2012, the Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory installed a thermal infrared camera system to monitor the volcano's active lava lake. The new system is designed to be autonomous, and capable of capturing images of the lava lake continuously throughout the year. This represents a significant improvement over previous systems which required the frequent attention of observatory researchers and could therefore only be operated during a few weeks of the annual field campaigns. The extreme environmental conditions at the summit of Erebus pose significant challenges for continuous monitoring equipment, and a custom-made system was the only viable solution. Here we describe the hardware and software of the new system in detail and report on a publicly available online repository where data will be archived. Aspects of the technical solutions we had to find in order to overcome the challenges of automating this equipment may be relevant in other environmental science domains where remote instrument operation is involved.

  16. Autonomous thermal camera system for monitoring the active lava lake at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, N.; Oppenheimer, C.; Kyle, P.

    2013-10-01

    In December 2012, the Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory installed a thermal infrared camera system to monitor the volcano's active lava lake. The new system is designed to be autonomous, and capable of capturing images of the lava lake continuously throughout the year. This represents a significant improvement over previous systems which required the frequent attention of observatory researchers and could therefore only be operated during a few weeks of the annual field campaigns. The extreme environmental conditions at the summit of Erebus pose significant challenges for continuous monitoring equipment, and a custom made system was the only viable solution. Here we describe the hardware and software of the new system in detail and report on a publicly-available online repository where data will be archived. Aspects of the technical solutions we had to find in order to overcome the challenges of automating this equipment may be relevant in other environmental science domains where remote instrument operation is involved.

  17. Hydrogochemical tools for monitoring active volcanoes: Applications to El Chichón volcano, México.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, M. A.; de La Cruz-Reyna, S.; Ramos, S.; Morton, O.; Ceniceros, N.; Aguayo, A.; Cruz, O.

    2010-03-01

    In 1982, a series of eruptions resulted in the worst disaster linked with volcanic activity in México. The characteristics of the phenomena together with a lack of prevention measures resulted in approximately 2000 deaths. An important aspect to prevent disasters is a thorough knowledge and monitoring of the potentially destructive natural phenomena. Monitoring the activity of dormant or active volcanoes by various methods is thus a key measure to estimate the hazard and design adequate risk reduction measures. Despite of the 1982 volcanic disaster, until only a few years, hydrogeochemical monitoring was the only regular surveillance of El Chichón post-eruptive activity. The first samples of the crater-lake water were collected by Casadevall et al. in 1983. Since 1985, a systematic sampling and chemical analyses program has been carried out by the Geophysics Institute in collaboration with local authorities from the State of Chiapas. Chemical analyses of main ions and Rare Earth elements (REE) are performed in the Laboratorio de Química Analítica and Laboratorio ICP-MS of the Instituto de Geofísica, UNAM. Results are interpreted considering the physico-chemical changes that may be recognized as precursors of volcanic activity. The problem is difficult because at least two main water reservoirs feed the crater lake; besides, dissolution of acid volcanic gases, water-rock interactions and geochemical processes among dissolved species have resulted in a complex chemical behavior of the lake-water along the years. The calculated degree of neutralization, pH values, and chloride and sulfate concentrations of samples taken at different dates result in a classification of the volcano as active or inactive according to the method developed by Varekamp. A pH of 0.5, very high conductivity and a temperature of about 50°C characterized the first years following the eruptions. An overall decrease on the temperature and ionic concentrations, along with a less acid p

  18. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards. PMID:26892716

  19. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards.

  20. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards. PMID:26892716

  1. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  2. Monitoring eruption activity from temporal stress changes at Mt. Ontake volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, T.; Kato, A.; Yamanaka, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Horikawa, S.; Matsuhiro, K.; Okuda, T.

    2015-12-01

    On 27 September 2014, Mt. Ontake in Japan produced a phreatic (steam type) eruption with a Volcanic Explosivity Index value of 2 after being dormant for seven years. The local stress field around volcanoes is the superposition of the regional stress field and stress perturbations related to volcanic activity. Temporal stress changes over periods of weeks to months are generally attributed to volcanic processes. Here we show that monitoring temporal changes in the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake, using focal mechanism solutions of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, is an effective tool for assessing the state of volcanic activity. We estimated focal mechanism solutions of 157 VT earthquakes beneath Mt. Ontake from August 2014 to March 2015, assuming that the source was double-couple. Pre-eruption seismicity was dominated by normal faulting with east-west tension, whereas most post-eruption events were reverse faulting with east-west compression. The misfit angle between observed slip vectors and those derived theoretically from the regional (i.e., background) stress pattern is used to evaluate the deviation of the local stress field, or the stress perturbation related to volcanic activity. The moving average of misfit angles tended to exceed 90° before the eruption, and showed a marked decrease immediately after the eruption. This indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was rotated by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids. Post-eruption events of reverse faulting acted to shrink the volcanic edifice after expulsion of volcanic ejecta, controlled by the regional stress field. The misfit angle is a good indicator of the state of volcanic activity. The monitoring method by using this indicator is applicable to other volcanoes and may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards.

  3. Fiber Bragg grating strain sensors to monitor and study active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrentino, Fiodor; Beverini, Nicolò; Carbone, Daniele; Carelli, Giorgio; Francesconi, Francesco; Gambino, Salvo; Giacomelli, Umberto; Grassi, Renzo; Maccioni, Enrico; Morganti, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Stress and strain changes are among the best indicators of impending volcanic activity. In volcano geodesy, borehole volumetric strain-meters are mostly utilized. However, they are not easy to install and involve high implementation costs. Advancements in opto-electronics have allowed the development of low-cost sensors, reliable, rugged and compact, thus particularly suitable for field application. In the framework of the EC FP7 MED-SUV project, we have developed strain sensors based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology. In comparison with previous implementation of the FBG technology to study rock deformations, we have designed a system that is expected to offer a significantly higher resolution and accuracy in static measurements and a smooth dynamic response up to 100 Hz, implying the possibility to observe seismic waves. The system performances are tailored to suit the requirements of volcano monitoring, with special attention to power consumption and to the trade-off between performance and cost. Preliminary field campaigns were carried out on Mt. Etna (Italy) using a prototypal single-axis FBG strain sensor, to check the system performances in out-of-the-lab conditions and in the harsh volcanic environment (lack of mains electricity for power, strong diurnal temperature changes, strong wind, erosive ash, snow and ice during the winter time). We also designed and built a FBG strain sensor featuring a multi-axial configuration which was tested and calibrated in the laboratory. This instrument is suitable for borehole installation and will be tested on Etna soon.

  4. A Wireless Seismoacoustic Sensor Network for Monitoring Activity at Volcano Reventador, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, M.; Werner-Allen, G.; Lorincz, K.; Marcillo, O.; Ruiz, M.; Johnson, J.; Lees, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    We developed a wireless sensor network for monitoring seismoacoustic activity at Volcano Reventador, Ecuador. Wireless sensor networks are a new technology and our group is among the first to apply them to monitoring volcanoes. The small size, low power, and wireless communication capabilities can greatly simplify deployments of large sensor arrays. The network consisted of 16 wireless sensor nodes, each outfitted with an 8 MHz CPU (TI MSP430) and a 2.4 GHz IEEE 802.15.4 radio (Chipcon CC2420) with data rates up to 80 Kbps. Each node acquired acoustic and seismic data at 24-bit resolution, with a microphone and either a single-axis geophone or triaxial short-period seismometer. Each node is powered by two D-cell batteries with a lifetime of about 1 week, and measures 18 x 10 x 8 cm. Nodes were distributed radially from the vent over a 3 km aperture. Control and data messages are relayed via radio to a base station node, with inter-node distances of up to 420 m. The base station transmits data using a FreeWave radio modem, via a repeater, to a laptop located 4 km from the deployment site. Each node samples continuous sensor data and a simple event-detection algorithm is used to trigger data collection. When a sensor detects an event, it relays a short message to the base station via radio. If several nodes report an event within a short time interval, the last 60 seconds of data is downloaded from each node in turn. One of the sensor nodes is programmed to transmit continuous data; due to limited radio bandwidth, it is not possible to collect continuous data from all nodes in the array. A GPS receiver and time synchronization protocol is used to establish a global timebase across all sensor nodes.

  5. Measuring volcanic gases at Taal Volcano Main Crater for monitoring volcanic activity and possible gas hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpa, M.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Reniva, P.; Bariso, E.; Padilla, G.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Barrancos, J.; Calvo, D.; Nolasco, D.; Padron, E.; Garduque, R.; Villacorte, E.; Fajiculay, E.; Perez, N.; Solidum, R.

    2012-12-01

    Taal is an active volcano located in southwest Luzon, Philippines. It consists of mainly tuff cones which have formed an island at the center of a 30 km wide Taal Caldera. Most historical eruptions, since 1572 on Taal Volcano Island, have been characterized as hydromagmatic eruptions. Taal Main Crater, produced during the 1911 eruption, is the largest crater in the island currently filled by a 1.2 km wide, 85 m deep acidic lake. The latest historical eruption occurred in 1965-1977. Monitoring of CO2 emissions from the Main Crater Lake (MCL) and fumarolic areas within the Main Crater started in 2008 with a collaborative project between ITER and PHIVOLCS. Measurements were done by accumulation chamber method using a Westsystem portable diffuse fluxmeter. Baseline total diffuse CO2 emissions of less than 1000 t/d were established for the MCL from 3 campaign-type surveys between April, 2008 to March, 2010 when seismicity was within background levels. In May, 2010, anomalous seismic activity from the volcano started and the total CO2 emission from the MCL increased to 2716±54 t/d as measured in August, 2010. The CO2 emission from the lake was highest last March, 2011 at 4670±159 t/d when the volcano was still showing signs of unrest. Because CO2 emissions increased significantly (more than 3 times the baseline value) at this time, this activity may be interpreted as magmatic and not purely hydrothermal. Most likely deep magma intrusions occurred but did not progress further to shallower depths and no eruption occurred. No large increase in lake water temperature near the surface (average for the whole lake area) during the period when CO2 was above background, it remained at 30-34°C and a few degrees lower than average ambient temperature. Total CO2 emissions from the MCL have decreased to within baseline values since October, 2011. Concentrations of CO2, SO2 and H2S in air in the fumarolic area within the Main Crater also increased in March, 2011. The measurements

  6. Broadband seismic monitoring of active volcanoes using deterministic and stochastic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Nakano, M.; Maeda, T.; Yepes, H.; Palacios, P.; Ruiz, M. C.; Arrais, S.; Vaca, M.; Molina, I.; Yamashina, T.

    2009-12-01

    of Tungurahua. We determined best-fit source locations at depths of 2.6-2.9 km beneath the summit region, and these sources were consistently explained by volumetric changes caused by bubble growth in magma. The stochastic approach of the source location method and the deterministic approach based on the waveform inversion are both useful to better utilize broadband seismic signals observed at a limited number of stations at active volcanoes, and would contribute to improved seismic volcano monitoring.

  7. Continuous monitoring of Mount St. Helens Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1980-01-01

    Day by day monitoring of the Mount St. Helens Volcano. These are four scenarios, very different scenarios, that can occur in a average week at Mount St. Helens. Ranging from eruptions of gas and to steam to eruptions of ash and pyroclastic flows to even calm days. This example of monitoring illustrates the differences from day to day volcanic activities at Mount St. Helens. 

  8. Monitoring crater-wall collapse at active volcanoes: a study of the 12 January 2013 event at Stromboli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvari, Sonia; Intrieri, Emanuele; Di Traglia, Federico; Bonaccorso, Alessandro; Casagli, Nicola; Cristaldi, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Crater-wall collapses are fairly frequent at active volcanoes and they are normally studied through the analysis of their deposits. In this paper, we present an analysis of the 12 January 2013 crater-wall collapse occurring at Stromboli volcano, investigated by means of a monitoring network comprising visible and infrared webcams and a Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar. The network revealed the triggering mechanisms of the collapse, which are comparable to the events that heralded the previous effusive eruptions in 1985, 2002, 2007 and 2014. The collapse occurred during a period of inflation of the summit cone and was preceded by increasing explosive activity and the enlargement of the crater. Weakness of the crater wall, increasing magmastatic pressure within the upper conduit induced by ascending magma and mechanical erosion caused by vent opening at the base of the crater wall and by lava fingering, are considered responsible for triggering the collapse on 12 January 2013 at Stromboli. We suggest that the combination of these factors might be a general mechanism to generate crater-wall collapse at active volcanoes.

  9. The critical role of volcano monitoring in risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, R. I.

    2008-01-01

    Data from volcano-monitoring studies constitute the only scientifically valid basis for short-term forecasts of a future eruption, or of possible changes during an ongoing eruption. Thus, in any effective hazards-mitigation program, a basic strategy in reducing volcano risk is the initiation or augmentation of volcano monitoring at historically active volcanoes and also at geologically young, but presently dormant, volcanoes with potential for reactivation. Beginning with the 1980s, substantial progress in volcano-monitoring techniques and networks - ground-based as well space-based - has been achieved. Although some geochemical monitoring techniques (e.g., remote measurement of volcanic gas emissions) are being increasingly applied and show considerable promise, seismic and geodetic methods to date remain the techniques of choice and are the most widely used. Availability of comprehensive volcano-monitoring data was a decisive factor in the successful scientific and governmental responses to the reawakening of Mount St. elens (Washington, USA) in 1980 and, more recently, to the powerful explosive eruptions at Mount Pinatubo (Luzon, Philippines) in 1991. However, even with the ever-improving state-of-the-art in volcano monitoring and predictive capability, the Mount St. Helens and Pinatubo case histories unfortunately still represent the exceptions, rather than the rule, in successfully forecasting the most likely outcome of volcano unrest.

  10. A new method to monitor water vapor cycles in active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girona, T.; Costa Rodriguez, F.; Taisne, B.

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of different gas species of volcanic plumes is crucial to understand the mechanisms involved in persistent degassing, and to anticipate volcanic unrest episodes and magma ascent towards the surface. Progress in gas remote-sensing techniques during the last decades has led to the development of ultraviolet absorption spectrometers and UV cameras, which enable to monitor SO2 emission cycles in real time, at very high-frequency (~ 1Hz), and from several kilometers away from the volcanic plume. However, monitoring of the more abundant gases, i.e., H2O and CO2, is limited to volcanoes where infrared spectrometers and infrared lamps can be installed at both sides of the crater rims. In this study, we present a new and simple methodology to register H2O emission cycles from long distances (several kilometers), which is based on the light scattered by the micrometric water droplets of condensed plumes. The method only requires a commercial digital camera and a laptop for image processing, since, as we demonstrate, there is a linear correlation between the digital brightness of the plume and its volcanogenic water content. We have validated the method experimentally by generating controlled condensed plumes with an ultrasonic humidifier, and applied it to the plume of Erebus volcano using a 30 minutes-long movie [1]. The wavelet transforms of the plume brightness and SO2 time series (measured with DOAS [1]) show two common periodic components in the bands ~100­-250 s and ~500-­650 s. However, there is a third periodic component in the band ~300-­450 s in the SO2 time series that is absent in the brightness time series. We propose that the common periodic components are induced by magmatic foams collapsing intermittently beneath shallow geometrical barriers composed by bubbles with high content of both H2O and SO2, whereas the third periodic component could be induced by foams collapsing beneath a deeper geometrical barrier composed by bubbles with

  11. Locadiff with ambient seismic noise : theoretical background and application to monitoring volcanoes and active faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larose, Eric; Obermann, Anne; Planes, Thomas; Rossetto, Vincent; Margerin, Ludovic; Sens-Schoenfelder, Christoph; Campillo, Michel

    2015-04-01

    This contribution will cover recent theoretical, numerical, and field data processing developments aiming at modeling how coda waves are perturbed (in phase and amplitude) by mechanical changes in the crust. Using continuous ambient seismic noise, we cross-correlate data every day and compare the coda of the correlograms. We can relative velocity changes and waveform decorrelation along the year, that are related to mechanical changes in the shallow crust, associated to the seismic or volcanic activity, but also to environmental effects such as hydrology. Bibliography : Anne Obermann, Thomas Planes, Eric Larose and Michel Campillo, Imaging pre- and co-eruptive structural changes of a volcano with ambient seismic noise, J. Geophys. Res. 118 6285-6294 (2013). A. Obermann, B. Froment, M. Campillo, E. Larose, T. Planès, B. Valette, J. H. Chen, and Q. Y. Liu, Seismic noise correlations to image structural and mechanical changes associated with the Mw7.9 2008-Wenchuan earthquake, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 119, 1-14,(2014). Thomas Planès, Eric Larose, Ludovic Margerin, Vincent Rossetto, Christoph Sens-Schoenfelder, Decorrelation and phase-shift of coda waves induced by local changes : Multiple scattering approach and numerical validation, Waves in Random and Complex Media 24, 99-125, (2014)

  12. Landform monitoring in active volcano by UAV and SfM-MVS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, T.; Kamiya, I.; Tobita, M.; Iwahashi, J.; Nakajima, H.

    2014-11-01

    Nishinoshima volcano in Ogasawara Islands has erupted since November, 2013. This volcanic eruption formed and enlarged a new island, and fused the new island with the old Nishinoshima Island. We performed automated aerial photographing using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) over the joined Nishinoshima Island on March 22 and July 4, 2014. We produced ortho-mosaic photos and digital elevation model (DEM) data by new photogrammetry software with computer vision technique, i.e. Structure from Motion (SfM) for estimating the photographic position of the camera and Multi-view Stereo (MVS) for generating the 3-D model. We also estimated the area and volume of the new island via analysis of ortho-mosaic photo and DEM data. Transition of volume estimated from the UAV photographing and other photographing shows the volcanic activity still keeps from initial level. The ortho-mosaic photos and DEM data were utilized to create an aerial photo interpretation map and a 3-D map. These operations revealed new knowledge and problems to be solved on the photographing and analysis using UAV and new techniques as this was first case in some respects.

  13. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at

  14. Active submarine volcano sampled

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.

    1983-01-01

    On June 4, 1982, two full dredge hauls of fresh lava were recovered from the upper flanks of Kavachi submarine volcano, Solomon Islands, in the western Pacific Ocean, from the water depths of 1,200 and 2,700 feet. the shallower dredge site was within 0.5 mile of the active submarine vent shown at the surface by an area of slick water, probably caused by gas emissions. Kavachi is a composite stratovolcano that has been observed to erupt every year or two for at least the last 30 years (see photographs). An island formed in 1952, 1961, 1965, and 1978; but, in each case, it rapidly eroded below sea level. The latest eruption was observed by Solair pilots during the several weeks up to and including May 18, 1982. 

  15. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  16. Rock fall photogrammetric monitoring in the active crater of Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Reunion Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibert, Clément; Dewez, Thomas; Mangeney, Anne; Grandjean, Gilles; Boissier, Patrice; Catherine, Philippe; Kowalski, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    The collapse of the active crater at Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Reunion Island, 5th April 2007, offers a rare opportunity to observe frequent rock fall and granular landslides, and test new monitoring techniques. Events concern volumes ranging from single blocks to more massive cliff collapse. The purpose of the presentation is two fold: first, we present a comparison between a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) obtained prior to crater collapse and a DTM extracted from aerial photographs shot in October 2010 (before the eruptive crisis of November 2009 and January 2010). This provides an assessment of morphological changes at the scale of the crater. The second purpose is to describe slope instabilities on the south-western flank of the crater observed since October 2009. These ground-based observations were obtained from a pair of photogrammetric stations deployed along the northern and eastern edges of the crater. These works were conducted within UNDERVOLC project. With this monitoring system we mapped zones affected by rockfalls (departure and accumulation areas) and propose a first estimate of volumes of lava produced by the eruption affecting the inside of the crater since January 2.

  17. Long-range infrasound monitoring of eruptive volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Emanuele; Innocenti, Lorenzo; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    The efficient long-range propagation in the atmosphere makes infrasound of active volcanoes extremely promising and opens new perspectives for volcano monitoring at large scale. In favourable propagation conditions, long-range infrasound observations can be used to track the occurrence and the duration of volcanic eruptions also at remote non-monitored volcanoes, but its potential to infer volcanic eruptive source term is still debated. We present results of comparing five years of infrasound of eruptive activity at Mt.Etna volcano (Italy) recorded both at local (~5 km) and at regional distances (~600 km) from the source. Infrasound of lava fountains at Etna volcano, occurring in between 2010 and 2015, are analysed in terms of the local and regional wavefield record, and by comparing to all available volcanic source terms (i.e. plume height and mass eruption rates). Besides, the potential of near real-time notification of ongoing volcanic activity at Etna volcano at a regional scale is investigated. In particular we show how long range infrasound, in the case of Etna volcano, can be used to promptly deliver eruption notification and reliability is constrained by the results of the local array. This work is performed in the framework of the H2020 ARISE2 project funded by the EU in the period 2015-2018.

  18. Diffuse H_{2} emission: a useful geochemical tool to monitor the volcanic activity at El Hierro volcano system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys; González-Santana, Judit; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of interfering processes affecting reactive gases as CO2 during its ascent from magmatic bodies or hydrothermal systems toward the surface environment hinders the interpretation of their enrichments in the soil atmosphere and fluxes for volcano monitoring purposes (Marini and Gambardella, 2005). These processes include gas scrubbing by ground-waters and interaction with rocks, decarbonatation processes, biogenic production, etc. Within the rest of the soil gases, particularly interest has been addressed to light and highly mobile gases. They offer important advantages for the detection of vertical permeability structures, because their interaction with the surrounding rocks or fluids during the ascent toward the surface is minimum. H2 is one of the most abundant trace species in volcano-hydrothermal systems and is a key participant in many redox reactions occurring in the hydrothermal reservoir gas (Giggenbach, 1987). Although H2 can be produced in soils by N2-fixing and fertilizing bacteria, soils are considered nowadays as sinks of molecular hydrogen (Smith-Downey et al., 2006). Because of its chemical and physical characteristics, H2 generated within the crust moves rapidly and escapes to the atmosphere. These characteristics make H2 one of the best geochemical indicators of magmatic and geothermal activity at depth. El Hierro is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands and the scenario of the last volcanic eruption of the archipelago, a submarine eruption that took place 2 km off the southern coast of the island from October 2011 to March 2012. Since at El Hierro Island there are not any surface geothermal manifestations (fumaroles, etc), we have focused our studies on soil degassing surveys. Here we show the results of soil H2 emission surveys that have been carried out regularly since mid-2012. Soil gas samples were collected in ˜600 sites selected based on their accessibility and geological criteria. Soil gases were sampled at ˜40

  19. Global data collection and the surveillance of active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    Data relay systems on existing earth-orbiting satellites provide an inexpensive way to collect environmental data from numerous remote sites around the world. This technology could be used effectively for fundamental monitoring of most of the world's active volcanoes. Such global monitoring would focus attention on the most dangerous volcanoes that are likely to significantly impact the geosphere and the biosphere. ?? 1990.

  20. An Interactive Geospatial Database and Visualization Approach to Early Warning Systems and Monitoring of Active Volcanoes: GEOWARN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogu, R. C.; Schwandner, F. M.; Hurni, L.; Dietrich, V. J.

    2002-12-01

    Large parts of southern and central Europe and the Pacific rim are situated in tectonically, seismic and volcanological extremely active zones. With the growth of population and tourism, vulnerability and risk towards natural hazards have expanded over large areas. Socio-economical aspects, land use, tourist and industrial planning as well as environmental protection increasingly require needs of natural hazard assessment. The availability of powerful and reliable satellite, geophysical and geochemical information and warning systems is therefore increasingly vital. Besides, once such systems have proven to be effective, they can be applied for similar purposes in other European areas and worldwide. Technologies today have proven that early warning of volcanic activity can be achieved by monitoring measurable changes in geophysical and geochemical parameters. Correlation between different monitored data sets, which would improve any prediction, is very scarce or missing. Visualisation of all spatial information and integration into an "intelligent cartographic concept" is of paramount interest in order to develop 2-, 3- and 4-dimensional models to approach the risk and emergency assessment as well as environmental and socio-economic planning. In the framework of the GEOWARN project, a database prototype for an Early Warning System (EWS) and monitoring of volcanic activity in case of hydrothermal-explosive and volcanic reactivation has been designed. The platform-independent, web-based, JAVA-programmed, interactive multidisciplinary multiparameter visualization software being developed at ETH allows expansion and utilization to other volcanoes, world-wide databases of volcanic unrest, or other types of natural hazard assessment. Within the project consortium, scientific data have been acquired on two pilot sites: Campi Flegrei (Italy) and Nisyros Greece, including 2&3D Topography and Bathymetry, Elevation (DEM) and Landscape models (DLM) derived from conventional

  1. A wireless sensor network for monitoring volcano-seismic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Pereira, R.; Trindade, J.; Gonçalves, F.; Suresh, L.; Barbosa, D.; Vazão, T.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring of volcanic activity is important for learning about the properties of each volcano and for providing early warning systems to the population. Monitoring equipment can be expensive, and thus the degree of monitoring varies from volcano to volcano and from country to country, with many volcanoes not being monitored at all. This paper describes the development of a wireless sensor network (WSN) capable of collecting geophysical measurements on remote active volcanoes. Our main goals were to create a flexible, easy-to-deploy and easy-to-maintain, adaptable, low-cost WSN for temporary or permanent monitoring of seismic tremor. The WSN enables the easy installation of a sensor array in an area of tens of thousands of m2, allowing the location of the magma movements causing the seismic tremor to be calculated. This WSN can be used by recording data locally for later analysis or by continuously transmitting it in real time to a remote laboratory for real-time analyses. We present a set of tests that validate different aspects of our WSN, including a deployment on a suspended bridge for measuring its vibration.

  2. Living on Active Volcanoes - The Island of Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, Christina; Stauffer, Peter H.; Hendley, James W., II

    1997-01-01

    People on the Island of Hawai'i face many hazards that come with living on or near active volcanoes. These include lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, damaging earthquakes, and tsunamis (giant seawaves). As the population of the island grows, the task of reducing the risk from volcano hazards becomes increasingly difficult. To help protect lives and property, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory closely monitor and study Hawai'i's volcanoes and issue timely warnings of hazardous activity.

  3. Multidisciplinary Monitoring Experiments at Kawah Ijen Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Hendra; Pallister, John; Caudron, Corentin

    2014-12-01

    "Wet volcanoes" with crater lakes and extensive hydrothermal systems pose challenges for monitoring and forecasting eruptions. That's because their lakes and hydrothermal systems serve as reservoirs for magmatic heat and fluid emissions, filtering and delaying the surface expressions of magmatic unrest.

  4. The Anatahan volcano-monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marso, J. N.; Lockhart, A. B.; White, R. A.; Koyanagi, S. K.; Trusdell, F. A.; Camacho, J. T.; Chong, R.

    2003-12-01

    A real-time 24/7 Anatahan volcano-monitoring and eruption detection system is now operational. There had been no real-time seismic monitoring on Anatahan during the May 10, 2003 eruption because the single telemetered seismic station on Anatahan Island had failed. On May 25, staff from the Emergency Management Office (EMO) of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) established a replacement telemetered seismic station on Anatahan whose data were recorded on a drum recorder at the EMO on Saipan, 130 km to the south by June 5. In late June EMO and USGS staff installed a Glowworm seismic data acquisition system (Marso et al, 2003) at EMO and hardened the Anatahan telemetry links. The Glowworm system collects the telemetered seismic data from Anatahan and Saipan, places graphical display products on a webpage, and exports the seismic waveform data in real time to Glowworm systems at Hawaii Volcano Observatory and Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO). In early July, a back-up telemetered seismic station was placed on Sarigan Island 40 km north of Anatahan, transmitting directly to the EMO on Saipan. Because there is currently no population on the island, at this time the principal hazard presented by Anatahan volcano would be air traffic disruption caused by possible erupted ash. The aircraft/ash hazard requires a monitoring program that focuses on eruption detection. The USGS currently provides 24/7 monitoring of Anatahan with a rotational seismic duty officer who carries a Pocket PC-cell phone combination that receives SMS text messages from the CVO Glowworm system when it detects large seismic signals. Upon receiving an SMS text message notification from the CVO Glowworm, the seismic duty officer can use the Pocket PC - cell phone to view a graphic of the seismic traces on the EMO Glowworm's webpage to determine if the seismic signal is eruption related. There have been no further eruptions since the monitoring system was

  5. Active faults on the eastern flank of Etna volcano (Italy) monitored through soil radon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, M.; Giammanco, S.; Ferrera, E.; Patanè, G.; Zanon, V.

    2012-04-01

    This study concerns measurements of radon and thoron emissions from soil carried out in 2004 on the unstable eastern flank of Mt. Etna, in a zone characterized by the presence of numerous seismogenic and aseismic faults. The statistical treatment of the geochemical data allowed recognizing anomaly thresholds for both parameters and producing distribution maps that highlighted a significant spatial correlation between soil gas anomalies and tectonic lineaments. In particular, the highest anomalies were found at the intersection between WNW-ESE and NW-SE -running faults. The seismic activity occurring in and around the study area during 2004 was analyzed, producing maps of hypocentral depth and released seismic energy. These maps revealed a progressive deepening of hypocenters from NW to SE, with the exception of a narrow zone in the central part of the area, with a roughly WNW-ESE direction. Also, the highest values of seismic energy were released during events in the southern and northwestern sectors of the area. Both radon and thoron anomalies were located in areas affected by relatively deep (5-10 km depth) seismic activity, while less evident correlation was found between soil gas anomalies and the released seismic energy. This study confirms that mapping the distribution of radon and thoron in soil gas can reveal hidden faults buried by recent soil cover or faults that are not clearly visible at the surface. The correlation between soil gas data and earthquake depth and intensity can give some hints on the source of gas and/or on fault dynamics. Lastly, an important spin-off of this study is the recognition of some areas where radon activity was so high (>50000 Bq/m3) that it may represent a potential hazard to the local population. In fact, radon is the leading cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoke for long exposures and, due to its molecular weight, it accumulates in underground rooms or in low ground, particularly where air circulation is low or absent

  6. Collaborative Monitoring and Hazard Mitigation at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. J.; Bluth, G. J.; Rose, W. I.; Patrick, M.; Johnson, J. B.; Stix, J.

    2007-05-01

    A portable, digital sensor network has been installed to closely monitor changing activity at Fuego volcano, which takes advantage of an international collaborative effort among Guatemala, U.S. and Canadian universities, and the Peace Corps. The goal of this effort is to improve the understanding shallow internal processes, and consequently to more effectively mitigate volcanic hazards. Fuego volcano has had more than 60 historical eruptions and nearly-continuous activity make it an ideal laboratory to study volcanic processes. Close monitoring is needed to identify base-line activity, and rapidly identify and disseminate changes in the activity which might threaten nearby communities. The sensor network is comprised of a miniature DOAS ultraviolet spectrometer fitted with a system for automated plume scans, a digital video camera, and two seismo-acoustic stations and portable dataloggers. These sensors are on loan from scientists who visited Fuego during short field seasons and donated use of their sensors to a resident Peace Corps Masters International student from Michigan Technological University for extended data collection. The sensor network is based around the local volcano observatory maintained by Instituto National de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Metrologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH). INSIVUMEH provides local support and historical knowledge of Fuego activity as well as a secure location for storage of scientific equipment, data processing, and charging of the batteries that power the sensors. The complete sensor network came online in mid-February 2007 and here we present preliminary results from concurrent gas, seismic, and acoustic monitoring of activity from Fuego volcano.

  7. Monitoring active volcanoes and mitigating volcanic hazards: the case for including simple approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoiber, Richard E.; Williams, Stanley N.

    1990-07-01

    Simple approaches to problems brought about eruptions and their ensuing hazardous effects should be advocated and used by volcanologists while awaiting more sophisticated remedies. The expedients we advocate have all or many of the following attributes: only locally available materials are required; no extensive training of operators or installation is necessary; they are affordable and do not require foreign aid or exports; they are often labor intensive and are sustainable without outside assistance. Where appropriate, the involvement of local residents is advocated. Examples of simple expedients which can be used in forecasting or mitigating the effects of crises emphasize the relative ease and the less elaborate requirements with which simple approaches can be activated. Emphasis is on visual observations often by untrained observers, simple meteorogical measurements, observations of water level in lakes, temperature and chemistry of springs and fumaroles, new springs and collapse areas and observations of volcanic plumes. Simple methods are suggested which can be applied to mitigating damage from mudflows, nuées ardentes, tephra falls and gas discharge. A review in hindsight at Ruiz includes the use of both chemical indicators and simple mudflow alarms. Simple expedients are sufficiently effective that any expert volcanologist called to aid in a crisis must include them in the package of advice offered. Simple approaches are a critical and logical complement to highly technical solutions to hazardous situations.

  8. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  9. Elevated Seismic Activity Beneath the Slumbering Morne aux Diables Volcano, Northern Dominica and the Monitoring Role of the Seismic Research Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, R. B.; Robertson, R. E.; Abraham, W.; Cole, P.; de Roche, T.; Edwards, S.; Higgins, M.; Johnson, M.; Joseph, E. P.; Latchman, J.; Lynch, L.; Nath, N.; Ramsingh, C.; Stewart, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Since June 2009, periods of elevated seismic activity have been experienced around the flanks of Morne Aux Diables Volcano in northern Dominica. This long-dormant volcano is a complex of 7 andesitic lava domes with a central depression where a cold soufrière is evident. Prior to this activity, seismicity was very quiet except for a short period in 2000 and an intense short-lived swarm in April 2003. The most recent earthquake activity has been regularly felt by residents in villages on all flanks of the complex. In Dec 09/Jan10, scientists from the Seismic Research Centre (SRC), based in Trinidad & Tobago, in collaboration with staff of the Office of Disaster Management (ODM) and Dominica Public Seismic Network (DPSN) improved the monitoring capacity around this volcano from 1 to 7 seismic stations. Earthquakes are determined to be volcano-tectonic in nature and located at shallow depths (<4 km) beneath the central depression. Additionally, in Jan/Feb 10 geothermal sampling was undertaken and 2 permanent GPS sites were deployed. Public information leaflets prepared by SRC scientists using a "Question & Answer" format have been distributed to concerned citizens whilst many public meetings were carried out by ODM staff. Field investigations indicate that the previous Late Pleistocene activity of Morne Aux Diables switched from Pelèan dome growth and gravitational collapse to more explosive pumice-falls and associated ignimbrites, both styles forming extensive pyroclastic fans around the central complex. The town of Portsmouth is located on one of these fans ~5 km southwest of the central depression. Sporadic, short bursts of seismic activity continue at the time of writing.

  10. The effects of environmental parameters on diffuse degassing at Stromboli volcano: Insights from joint monitoring of soil CO2 flux and radon activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiolo, M.; Ranaldi, M.; Tarchini, L.; Carapezza, M. L.; Coppola, D.; Ricci, T.; Cigolini, C.

    2016-04-01

    Soil CO2 flux and 222Rn activity measurements may positively contribute to the geochemical monitoring of active volcanoes. The influence of several environmental parameters on the gas signals has been substantially demonstrated. Therefore, the implementation of tools capable of removing (or minimising) the contribution of the atmospheric effects from the acquired time series is a challenge in volcano surveillance. Here, we present 4 years-long continuous monitoring (from April 2007 to September 2011) of radon activity and soil CO2 flux collected on the NE flank of Stromboli volcano. Both gases record higher emissions during fall-winter (up to 2700 Bq * m- 3 for radon and 750 g m- 2 day- 1 for CO2) than during spring-summer seasons. Short-time variations on 222Rn activity are modulated by changes in soil humidity (rainfall), and changes in soil CO2 flux that may be ascribed to variations in wind speed and direction. The spectral analyses reveal diurnal and semi-diurnal cycles on both gases, outlining that atmospheric variations are capable to modify the gas release rate from the soil. The long-term soil CO2 flux shows a slow decreasing trend, not visible in 222Rn activity, suggesting a possible difference in the source depth of the of the gases, CO2 being deeper and likely related to degassing at depth of the magma batch involved in the February-April 2007 effusive eruption. To minimise the effect of the environmental parameters on the 222Rn concentrations and soil CO2 fluxes, two different statistical treatments were applied: the Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and the Principal Component Regression (PCR). These approaches allow to quantify the weight of each environmental factor on the two gas species and show a strong influence of some parameters on the gas transfer processes through soils. The residual values of radon and CO2 flux, i.e. the values obtained after correction for the environmental influence, were then compared with the eruptive episodes that

  11. Expert Systems for Real-Time Volcano Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, C.; Cannavo, F.; Montalto, P.; Motta, P.; Schembra, G.; Aliotta, M. A.; Cannata, A.; Patanè, D.; Prestifilippo, M.

    2014-12-01

    In the last decade, the capability to monitor and quickly respond to remote detection of volcanic activity has been greatly improved through use of advanced techniques and semi-automatic software applications installed in most of the 24h control rooms devoted to volcanic surveillance. Ability to monitor volcanoes is being advanced by new technology, such as broad-band seismology, microphone networks mainly recording in the infrasonic frequency band, satellite observations of ground deformation, high quality video surveillance systems, also in infrared band, improved sensors for volcanic gas measurements, and advances in computer power and speed, leading to improvements in data transmission, data analysis and modeling techniques. One of the most critical point in the real-time monitoring chain is the evaluation of the volcano state from all the measurements. At the present, most of this task is delegated to one or more human experts in volcanology. Unfortunately, the volcano state assessment becomes harder if we observe that, due to the coupling of highly non-linear and complex volcanic dynamic processes, the measurable effects can show a rich range of different behaviors. Moreover, due to intrinsic uncertainties and possible failures in some recorded data, precise state assessment is usually not achievable. Hence, the volcano state needs to be expressed in probabilistic terms that take account of uncertainties. In the framework of the project PON SIGMA (Integrated Cloud-Sensor System for Advanced Multirisk Management) work, we have developed an expert system approach to estimate the ongoing volcano state from all the available measurements and with minimal human interaction. The approach is based on hidden markov model and deals with uncertainties and probabilities. We tested the proposed approach on data coming from the Mt. Etna (Italy) continuous monitoring networks for the period 2011-2013. Results show that this approach can be a valuable tool to aid the

  12. Monitoring and analyses of volcanic activity using remote sensing data at the Alaska Volcano Observatory: Case study for Kamchatka, Russia, December 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Dean, K., G.; Dehn, J.; Miller, T., P.; Kirianov, V. Yu.

    There are about 100 potentially active volcanoes in the North Pacific Ocean region that includes Alaska, the Kamchatka Peninsula, and the Kurile Islands, but fewer than 25% are monitored seismically. The region averages about five volcanic eruptions per year, and more than 20,000 passengers and millions of dollars of cargo fly the air routes in this region each day. One of the primary public safety objectives of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) is to mitigate the hazard posed by volcanic ash clouds drifting into these busy air traffic routes. The AVO uses real-time remote sensing data (AVHRR, GOES, and GMS) in conjunction with other methods (primarily seismic) to monitor and analyze volcanic activity in the region. Remote sensing data can be used to detect volcanic thermal anomalies and to provide unique information on the location, movement, and composition of volcanic eruption clouds. Satellite images are routinely analyzed twice each day at AVO and many times per day during crisis situations. As part of its formal working relationship with the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), the AVO provides satellite observations of volcanic activity in Kamchatka and distributes notices of volcanic eruptions from KVERT to non-Russian users in the international aviation community. This paper outlines the current remote sensing capabilities and operations of the AVO and describes the responsibilities and procedures of federal agencies and international aviation organizations for volcanic eruptions in the North Pacific region. A case study of the December 4, 1997, eruption of Bezymianny volcano, Russia, is used to illustrate how real-time remote sensing and hazard communication are used to mitigate the threat of volcanic ash to aircraft.

  13. Magmatic gas scrubbing: implications for volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symonds, R. B.; Gerlach, T. M.; Reed, M. H.

    2001-08-01

    Despite the abundance of SO 2(g) in magmatic gases, precursory increases in magmatic SO 2(g) are not always observed prior to volcanic eruption, probably because many terrestrial volcanoes contain abundant groundwater or surface water that scrubs magmatic gases until a dry pathway to the atmosphere is established. To better understand scrubbing and its implications for volcano monitoring, we model thermochemically the reaction of magmatic gases with water. First, we inject a 915°C magmatic gas from Merapi volcano into 25°C air-saturated water (ASW) over a wide range of gas/water mass ratios from 0.0002 to 100 and at a total pressure of 0.1 MPa. Then we model closed-system cooling of the magmatic gas, magmatic gas-ASW mixing at 5.0 MPa, runs with varied temperature and composition of the ASW, a case with a wide range of magmatic-gas compositions, and a reaction of a magmatic gas-ASW mixture with rock. The modeling predicts gas and water compositions, and, in one case, alteration assemblages for a wide range of scrubbing conditions; these results can be compared directly with samples from degassing volcanoes. The modeling suggests that CO 2(g) is the main species to monitor when scrubbing exists; another candidate is H 2S (g), but it can be affected by reactions with aqueous ferrous iron. In contrast, scrubbing by water will prevent significant SO 2(g) and most HCl (g) emissions until dry pathways are established, except for moderate HCl (g) degassing from pH<0.5 hydrothermal waters. Furthermore, it appears that scrubbing will prevent much, if any, SO 2(g) degassing from long-resident boiling hydrothermal systems. Several processes can also decrease or increase H 2(g) emissions during scrubbing making H 2(g) a poor choice to detect changes in magma degassing. We applied the model results to interpret field observations and emission rate data from four eruptions: (1) Crater Peak on Mount Spurr (1992) where, except for a short post-eruptive period, scrubbing appears

  14. Volcano monitoring with an infrared camera: first insights from Villarrica Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas Sotomayor, Florencia; Amigo Ramos, Alvaro; Velasquez Vargas, Gabriela; Medina, Roxana; Thomas, Helen; Prata, Fred; Geoffroy, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    This contribution focuses on the first trials of the, almost 24/7 monitoring of Villarrica volcano with an infrared camera. Results must be compared with other SO2 remote sensing instruments such as DOAS and UV-camera, for the ''day'' measurements. Infrared remote sensing of volcanic emissions is a fast and safe method to obtain gas abundances in volcanic plumes, in particular when the access to the vent is difficult, during volcanic crisis and at night time. In recent years, a ground-based infrared camera (Nicair) has been developed by Nicarnica Aviation, which quantifies SO2 and ash on volcanic plumes, based on the infrared radiance at specific wavelengths through the application of filters. Three Nicair1 (first model) have been acquired by the Geological Survey of Chile in order to study degassing of active volcanoes. Several trials with the instruments have been performed in northern Chilean volcanoes, and have proven that the intervals of retrieved SO2 concentration and fluxes are as expected. Measurements were also performed at Villarrica volcano, and a location to install a ''fixed'' camera, at 8km from the crater, was discovered here. It is a coffee house with electrical power, wifi network, polite and committed owners and a full view of the volcano summit. The first measurements are being made and processed in order to have full day and week of SO2 emissions, analyze data transfer and storage, improve the remote control of the instrument and notebook in case of breakdown, web-cam/GoPro support, and the goal of the project: which is to implement a fixed station to monitor and study the Villarrica volcano with a Nicair1 integrating and comparing these results with other remote sensing instruments. This works also looks upon the strengthen of bonds with the community by developing teaching material and giving talks to communicate volcanic hazards and other geoscience topics to the people who live "just around the corner" from one of the most active volcanoes

  15. The iGrav superconducting gravimeter as a tool to monitor and study active volcanoes. Preliminary results from Mt. Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Greco, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    Microgravity observation have been proven to be a valuable tool to monitor and study active volcanoes, thanks to their ability to detect mass redistributions induced by volcanic processes. Gravity changes are usually observed through time-lapse measurements. The latter can provide a good spatial resolution, but do not supply enough information on the rate at which the volcanic processes occur. Indeed, only changes between successive surveys (usually separated by intervals longer than 1 month) can be assessed. Continuous gravity measurements at active volcanoes are relatively rare, mainly due to the difficulty of running continuously spring instruments (the most widely used gravimeters), especially in harsh conditions. Indeed, spring gravimeters are subject to an important instrumental drift and are severely affected by ambient parameters (mainly ambient temperature). Superconducting gravimeters provide much better performances than spring instruments. In particular, the iGravTM superconducting gravimeter by GWR, more portable and easier to use than GWR Observatory Superconducting Gravimeters, features a sub-microGal precision, is practically drift-free (instrumental drift rate less than 0.5 microGal/month) and totally insensitive to local changes in ambient parameters. This instrument needs about 1kw of electricity to work, implying that it cannot be permanently installed in remote sites where mains electricity is not available. However, thanks to its stability and precision, the iGravTM meter can supply important information about volcano-related processes, over period of minutes to years, even if it is installed relatively far from the active structures. Here we report on the installation of an iGravTM meter at Mt. Etna (Italy). iGrav#16 was installed at the astrophysical observatory of Serra La Nave (southwestern flank of the volcano; 1740 m asl) in September 2014 and has acquired gravity data almost continuously even since, at a rate of 1Hz. The main features

  16. Magmatic gas scrubbing: Implications for volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Gerlach, T.M.; Reed, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the abundance of SO2(g) in magmatic gases, precursory increases in magmatic SO2(g) are not always observed prior to volcanic eruption, probably because many terrestrial volcanoes contain abundant groundwater or surface water that scrubs magmatic gases until a dry pathway to the atmosphere is established. To better understand scrubbing and its implications for volcano monitoring, we model thermochemically the reaction of magmatic gases with water. First, we inject a 915??C magmatic gas from Merapi volcano into 25??C air-saturated water (ASW) over a wide range of gas/water mass ratios from 0.0002 to 100 and at a total pressure of 0.1 MPa. Then we model closed-system cooling of the magmatic gas, magmatic gas-ASW mixing at 5.0 MPa, runs with varied temperature and composition of the ASW, a case with a wide range of magmatic-gas compositions, and a reaction of a magmatic gas-ASW mixture with rock. The modeling predicts gas and water compositions, and, in one case, alteration assemblages for a wide range of scrubbing conditions; these results can be compared directly with samples from degassing volcanoes. The modeling suggests that CO2(g) is the main species to monitor when scrubbing exists; another candidate is H2S(g), but it can be affected by reactions with aqueous ferrous iron. In contrast, scrubbing by water will prevent significant SO2(g) and most HCl(g) emissions until dry pathways are established, except for moderate HCl(g) degassing from pH 100 t/d (tons per day) of SO2(g) in addition to CO2(g) and H2S(g) should be taken as a criterion of magma intrusion. Finally, the modeling suggests that the interpretation of gas-ratio data requires a case-by-case evaluation since ratio changes can often be produced by several mechanisms; nevertheless, several gas ratios may provide useful indices for monitoring the drying out of gas pathways. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Degassing Processes at Persistently Active Explosive Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, Jean-Francois

    Among volcanic gases, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is by far the most commonly measured. More than a monitoring proxy for volcanic degassing, SO 2 has the potential to alter climate patterns. Persistently active explosive volcanoes are characterized by short explosive bursts, which often occur at periodic intervals numerous times per day, spanning years to decades. SO 2 emissions at those volcanoes are poorly constrained, in large part because the current satellite monitoring techniques are unable to detect or quantify plumes of low concentration in the troposphere. Eruption plumes also often show high concentrations of ash and/or aerosols, which further inhibit the detection methods. In this work I focus on quantifying volcanic gas emissions at persistently active explosive volcanoes and their variations over short timescales (minutes to hours), in order to document their contribution to natural SO2 flux as well as investigate the physical processes that control their behavior. In order to make these measurements, I first develop and assemble a UV ground-based instrument, and validate it against an independently measured source of SO2 at a coal-burning power plant in Arizona. I establish a measurement protocol and demonstrate that the instrument measures SO 2 fluxes with < 20 % error. Using the same protocol, I establish a record of the degassing patterns at Semeru volcano (Indonesia), a volcano that has been producing cycles of repeated explosions with periods of minutes to hours for the past several decades. Semeru produces an average of 21-71 tons of SO2 per day, amounting to a yearly output of 8-26 Mt. Using the Semeru data, along with a 1-D transient numerical model of magma ascent, I test the validity of a model in which a viscous plug at the top of the conduit produces cycles of eruption and gas release. I find that it can be a valid hypothesis to explain the observed patterns of degassing at Semeru. Periodic behavior in such a system occurs for a very narrow range

  18. Alaska - Russian Far East connection in volcano research and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Neal, C. A.; Chebrov, V. N.; Girina, O. A.; Demyanchuk, Y. V.; Rybin, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Kurile-Kamchatka-Alaska portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans for nearly 5400 km. It includes more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three integrated components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) volcanological field schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT). Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in August 2011 in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and brought together more than 130 scientists and students from Russia, Japan, and the United States. The key educational component of our collaborative program

  19. When the hazard you're monitoring is the least of your troubles… the early days of a ubiquitous computing citizen science initiative on active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Manen, S. M.; Richards, M.; Seaton, R.; Cameron, I.; Avard, G.; Martinez, M.

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 500 million people live in close proximity to one or more of the world's 1500 active volcanoes, and this number is set to increase through population growth. The corresponding human, social, environmental and economic costs of volcanic activity are likewise set to rise. Monitoring of active volcanoes is imperative to minimize the impact of volcanic activity. However, people's responses towards risk are not just determined by objective scientific information, but also by socio-cognitive factors such as hazard salience; risk perception; anxiety levels and sense of self efficacy. This project aims to take a citizen science approach to the monitoring of hazardous volcanic gases: a low-cost automated ubiquitous technology station will increase spatial and temporal data resolution while providing citizens access to relevant, accurate, timely and local information. This means a single data stream can be used to develop a better understanding of volcanic degassing and raise levels of hazard salience and increase feelings of self efficacy. A year and two prototypes into the project, this work presents the lessons learnt to date. Careful consideration was given to the station design in light of the harsh conditions it may encounter. Once the first prototypes were built, results from the initial lab tests were encouraging. Yet it wasn't until the stations were taken into the field that unexpected challenges were encountered: humans. During the very first field trial the prototype was vandalised, our second attempt was thwarted by customs and courier services. As a result, we've had to be flexible in our approach and adapt our strategy and station design in response to these events, which will eventually result in a better outcome. However, this case study serves as a reminder of the importance of considering factors beyond the equipment, data, interpretation and involvement of the public, when planning and implementing a citizen science initiative.

  20. Terrestrial Real-Time Volcano Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, M.

    2013-12-01

    As volcano monitoring involves more and different sensors from seismic to GPS receivers, from video and thermal cameras to multi-parameter probes measuring temperature, ph values and humidity in the ground and the air, it becomes important to design real-time networks that integrate and leverage the multitude of available parameters. In order to do so some simple principles need to be observed: a) a common time base for all measurements, b) a packetized general data communication protocol for acquisition and distribution, c) an open and well documented interface to the data permitting standard and emerging innovative processing, and d) an intuitive visualization platform for scientists and civil defense personnel. Although mentioned as simple principles, the list above does not necessarily lead to obvious solutions or integrated systems, which is, however, required to take advantage of the available data. Only once the different data streams are put into context to each other in terms of time and location can a broader view be obtained and additional information extracted. The presentation is a summary of currently available technologies and how they can achieve the goal of an integrated real-time volcano monitoring system. A common time base are standard for seismic and GPS networks. In different projects we extended this to video feeds and time-lapse photography. Other probes have been integrated with vault interface enclosures (VIE) as used in the Transportable Array (TA) of the USArray. The VIE can accommodate the sensors employed in volcano monitoring. The TA has shown that Antelope is a versatile and robust middleware. It provides the required packetized general communication protocol that is independent from the actual physical communication link leaving the network design to adopt appropriate and possible hybrid solutions. This applies for the data acquisition and the data/information dissemination providing both a much needed collaboration platform, as

  1. Geochemical monitoring of volcano unrest and multi-step magma propagation: the example of the 2007-2011 Piton de la Fournaise activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Muro, Andrea; Métrich, Nicole; Deloule, Etienne; Civetta, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    between our petrological estimates of the potential SO2 release and the remotely derived fluxes, together with absence of hydrothermal signature in bulk rocks and melt inclusions, rule out a significant contribution of external fluids to PdF volatile budget. Regular monitoring of magma, crystal and glass compositions is an effective strategy for monitoring and interpreting magma storage and dynamics at a very active volcano like Piton de la Fournaise.

  2. Volcano monitoring using short wavelength infrared data from satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothery, D. A.; Francis, P. W.; Wood, C. A.

    1988-07-01

    It is shown that Landsat TM and MSS data provide useful and sometimes unique information on magmatic and fumarolic events at poorly monitored active volcanoes. The digital number data recorded in each spectral band by TM and MSS can be converted into spectral radiance, measured in W/sq m per micron per sr, using calibration data such as those provided by Markham and Barker (1986) and can provide temperature information on the lava fountain, lava lakes, pahoehoe flows, blocky lava, pyroclastic flow, and fumarole. The examples of Landsat data documenting otherwise unobserved precursors and/or activity include the September 1986 eruption of Lascar volcano, Chile; the continued presence of lava lakes at Erta 'Ale, Ethiopia (in the absence of any ground-based observations); and minor eruptions at Mount Erebus, Antarctica.

  3. Volcano monitoring using short wavelength infrared data from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothery, D. A.; Francis, P. W.; Wood, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that Landsat TM and MSS data provide useful and sometimes unique information on magmatic and fumarolic events at poorly monitored active volcanoes. The digital number data recorded in each spectral band by TM and MSS can be converted into spectral radiance, measured in W/sq m per micron per sr, using calibration data such as those provided by Markham and Barker (1986) and can provide temperature information on the lava fountain, lava lakes, pahoehoe flows, blocky lava, pyroclastic flow, and fumarole. The examples of Landsat data documenting otherwise unobserved precursors and/or activity include the September 1986 eruption of Lascar volcano, Chile; the continued presence of lava lakes at Erta 'Ale, Ethiopia (in the absence of any ground-based observations); and minor eruptions at Mount Erebus, Antarctica.

  4. Seismic monitoring at Deception Island volcano (Antarctica): Recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, E.; Almendros, J.; Martín, R.; Cortés, G.; Alguacil, G.; Moreno, J.; Martín, B.; Martos, A.; Serrano, I.; Stich, D.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Deception Island (South Shetland Island, Antarctica) is an active volcano with recent eruptions (e.g. 1967, 1969 and 1970). It is also among the Antarctic sites most visited by tourists. Besides, there are currently two scientific bases operating during the austral summers, usually from late November to early March. For these reasons it is necessary to deploy a volcano monitoring system as complete as possible, designed specifically to endure the extreme conditions of the volcanic environment and the Antarctic climate. The Instituto Andaluz de Geofísica of University of Granada, Spain (IAG-UGR) performs seismic monitoring on Deception Island since 1994 during austral summer surveys. The seismicity basically includes volcano-tectonic earthquakes, long-period events and volcanic tremor, among other signals. The level of seismicity is moderate, except for a seismo-volcanic crisis in 1999. The seismic monitoring system has evolved during these years, following the trends of the technological developments and software improvements. Recent advances have been mainly focused on: (1) the improvement of the seismic network introducing broadband stations and 24-bit data acquisition systems; (2) the development of a short-period seismic array, with a 12-channel, 24-bit data acquisition system; (3) the implementation of wireless data transmission from the network stations and also from the seismic array to a recording center, allowing for real-time monitoring; (4) the efficiency of the power supply systems and the monitoring of the battery levels and power consumption; (5) the optimization of data analysis procedures, including database management, automated event recognition tools for the identification and classification of seismo-volcanic signals, and apparent slowness vector estimates using seismic array data; (6) the deployment of permanent seismic stations and the transmission of data during the winter using a satellite connection. A single permanent station is operating

  5. Satellite monitoring of African volcanoes by means of RSTVOLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergola, Nicola; Coviello, Irina; Falconieri, Alfredo; Filizzola, Carolina; Lacava, Teodosio; Liuzzi, Mariangela; Marchese, Francesco; Paciello, Rossana; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2015-04-01

    RSTVOLC is an algorithm for volcanic hot spot detection from space based on the Robust Satellite Techniques (RST) multi-temporal approach. This algorithm was firstly tested on Mt. Etna area, analyzing a long-term time series of infrared Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite records, and was then implemented on data provided by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to study a number of volcanoes in different geographic areas, including Asamayama (Japan) and Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland). Recently, RSTVOLC has been exported on data provided by geostationary sensors such as the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI), onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, allowing for the timely detection and real time monitoring of thermal volcanic phenomena. In this work, recent results achieved studying some important African volcanoes by means of polar and geostationary satellite data are presented. Outcomes and results achieved by RSTVOLC studying some past Ol Donyo Lengai (Tanzania) eruptions and the recent Nyamuragira (Congo) activity are reported and discussed, also for comparison with other independent hot spot detection techniques. This study confirms that RSTVOLC may be successfully used to monitor volcanoes at a global scale and to detect low level thermal activities, thanks to its intrinsic self-adaptivity to different observational/environmental conditions as well as to its high sensitivity to sublte hot spots, contributing to volcanic risk mitigation.

  6. Embedded multiparametric system for volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moure, David; Torres, Pedro A.; Meletlidis, Stavros; Lopez, Carmen; José Blanco, María

    2014-05-01

    A low cost and low power consumption multiparametric system designed for volcano monitoring is presented. Once tested with various sensors, at present it is installed in two locations in Tenerife, Canary Islands, acquiring and transmitting data in real time. The system is based on a commercial board (Raspberry Pi®, RPi®) that uses an embedded ARMTM processor with a Debian (Wheezy-Raspbian) Linux Operating System. This configuration permits different standard communication systems between devices as USB and ETHERNET, and also communication with integrated circuits is possible. The whole system includes this platform and self-developed hardware and software. Analog signals are acquired at an expansion board with an ADC converter with three 16 bits channels. This board, which is powered directly from the RPi®, provides timing to the sampling data using a Real Time Clock (RTC). Two serial protocols (I2C and SPI) are responsible for communications. Due to the influence of atmospheric phenomena on the volcano monitoring data, the system is complemented by a self-developed meteorological station based on ArduinoCC and low cost commercial sensors (atmospheric pressure, humidity and rainfall). It is powered with the RPi® and it uses a serial protocol for communications. Self-developed software run under Linux OS and handles configuration, signal acquisition, data storage (USB storage or SD card) and data transmission (FTP, web server). Remote configuration, data plotting and downloading is available through a web interface tool. Nowadays, the system is used for gravimetric and oceanic tides data acquisition in Tenerife and soon it will be applied for clinometric data.

  7. Monitoring Santorini volcano (Greece) breathing from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foumelis, Michael; Trasatti, Elisa; Papageorgiou, Elena; Stramondo, Salvatore; Parcharidis, Issaak

    2013-04-01

    Since its last eruption in 1950, Santorini volcano (Greece) remained in a dormant state. This is also evidenced for the period 1992-2010 by the gradual deflation signal over Nea Kameni as measured by satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) with low rates of about 5-6 mm yr-1 as well as by the absence of seismic activity within the caldera. However, at the beginning of 2011 the volcano showed signs of unrest with increased microseismic activity and significant ground uplift, reaching 14 cm within a year (2011 March-2012 March), according to InSAR time-series. ALOS PALSAR data indicate the onset of the phenomenon in early 2010 where an aseismic pre-unrest phase of increased subsidence (1-3 cm) preceded the uplift. Joint inversions of SAR and GPS velocities using spherical and spheroidal magmatic source types indicate their location offshore at about 1 km north of Nea Kameni and between 3.5 and 3.8 km depth. The estimated volume variation rate is 6 × 106 m3 yr-1 to 9 × 106 m3 yr-1. A gradual slowing in the rate of inflation within the first quarter of 2012 is apparent by ENVISAT data, while subsequent observations from RADARSAT-2 confirm the observed trend.

  8. Volcano and Earthquake Monitoring Plan for the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, 2006-2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    2006-01-01

    To provide Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and its surrounding communities with a modern, comprehensive system for volcano and earthquake monitoring, the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO) has developed a monitoring plan for the period 2006-2015. Such a plan is needed so that YVO can provide timely information during seismic, volcanic, and hydrothermal crises and can anticipate hazardous events before they occur. The monitoring network will also provide high-quality data for scientific study and interpretation of one of the largest active volcanic systems in the world. Among the needs of the observatory are to upgrade its seismograph network to modern standards and to add five new seismograph stations in areas of the park that currently lack adequate station density. In cooperation with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and its Plate Boundary Observatory Program (PBO), YVO seeks to install five borehole strainmeters and two tiltmeters to measure crustal movements. The boreholes would be located in developed areas close to existing infrastructure and away from sensitive geothermal features. In conjunction with the park's geothermal monitoring program, installation of new stream gages, and gas-measuring instruments will allow YVO to compare geophysical phenomena, such as earthquakes and ground motions, to hydrothermal events, such as anomalous water and gas discharge. In addition, YVO seeks to characterize the behavior of geyser basins, both to detect any precursors to hydrothermal explosions and to monitor earthquakes related to fluid movements that are difficult to detect with the current monitoring system. Finally, a monitoring network consists not solely of instruments, but requires also a secure system for real-time transmission of data. The current telemetry system is vulnerable to failures that could jeopardize data transmission out of Yellowstone. Future advances in monitoring technologies must be accompanied by improvements in the infrastructure for

  9. Orographic Flow over an Active Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulidis, Alexandros-Panagiotis; Renfrew, Ian; Matthews, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Orographic flows over and around an isolated volcano are studied through a series of numerical model experiments. The volcano top has a heated surface, so can be thought of as "active" but not erupting. A series of simulations with different atmospheric conditions and using both idealised and realistic configurations of the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model have been carried out. The study is based on the Soufriere Hills volcano, located on the island of Montserrat in the Caribbean. This is a dome-building volcano, leading to a sharp increase in the surface skin temperature at the top of the volcano - up to tens of degrees higher than ambient values. The majority of the simulations use an idealised topography, in order for the results to have general applicability to similar-sized volcanoes located in the tropics. The model is initialised with idealised atmospheric soundings, representative of qualitatively different atmospheric conditions from the rainy season in the tropics. The simulations reveal significant changes to the orographic flow response, depending upon the size of the temperature anomaly and the atmospheric conditions. The flow regime and characteristic features such as gravity waves, orographic clouds and orographic rainfall patterns can all be qualitatively changed by the surface heating anomaly. Orographic rainfall over the volcano can be significantly enhanced with increased temperature anomaly. The implications for the eruptive behaviour of the volcano and resulting secondary volcanic hazards will also be discussed.

  10. Volcano Monitor: Autonomous Triggering of In-Situ Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Davies, Ashley; Tran, Daniel Q.; Boudreau, Kate; Cecava, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    In-situ sensors near volcanoes would be alerted by the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) craft to take more frequent data readings. This project involves developing a sulfur-dioxide-sensing volcano monitor that will be able to transmit its readings through an Iridium modem.

  11. Continuous monitoring of Hawaiian volcanoes using thermal cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Antolik, L.; Lee, R.; Kamibayashi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal cameras are becoming more common at volcanoes around the world, and have become a powerful tool for observing volcanic activity. Fixed, continuously recording thermal cameras have been installed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in the last two years at four locations on Kilauea Volcano to better monitor its two ongoing eruptions. The summit eruption, which began in March 2008, hosts an active lava lake deep within a fume-filled vent crater. A thermal camera perched on the rim of Halema`uma`u Crater, acquiring an image every five seconds, has now captured about two years of sustained lava lake activity, including frequent lava level fluctuations, small explosions , and several draining events. This thermal camera has been able to "see" through the thick fume in the crater, providing truly 24/7 monitoring that would not be possible with normal webcams. The east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983, has chiefly consisted of effusion through lava tubes onto the surface, but over the past two years has been interrupted by an intrusion, lava fountaining, crater collapse, and perched lava lake growth and draining. The three thermal cameras on the east rift zone, all on Pu`u `O`o cone and acquiring an image every several minutes, have captured many of these changes and are providing an improved means for alerting observatory staff of new activity. Plans are underway to install a thermal camera at the summit of Mauna Loa to monitor and alert to any future changes there. Thermal cameras are more difficult to install, and image acquisition and processing are more complicated than with visual webcams. Our system is based in part on the successful thermal camera installations by Italian volcanologists on Stromboli and Vulcano. Equipment includes custom enclosures with IR transmissive windows, power, and telemetry. Data acquisition is based on ActiveX controls, and data management is done using automated Matlab scripts. Higher-level data processing, also done with

  12. Continuous monitoring of Hawaiian volcanoes with thermal cameras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.; Antolik, Loren; Lee, Robert Lopaka; Kamibayashi, Kevan P.

    2014-01-01

    Continuously operating thermal cameras are becoming more common around the world for volcano monitoring, and offer distinct advantages over conventional visual webcams for observing volcanic activity. Thermal cameras can sometimes “see” through volcanic fume that obscures views to visual webcams and the naked eye, and often provide a much clearer view of the extent of high temperature areas and activity levels. We describe a thermal camera network recently installed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to monitor Kīlauea’s summit and east rift zone eruptions (at Halema‘uma‘u and Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō craters, respectively) and to keep watch on Mauna Loa’s summit caldera. The cameras are long-wave, temperature-calibrated models protected in custom enclosures, and often positioned on crater rims close to active vents. Images are transmitted back to the observatory in real-time, and numerous Matlab scripts manage the data and provide automated analyses and alarms. The cameras have greatly improved HVO’s observations of surface eruptive activity, which includes highly dynamic lava lake activity at Halema‘uma‘u, major disruptions to Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater and several fissure eruptions.

  13. Radar volcano monitoring system in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arason, Þórður; Yeo, Richard F.; Sigurðsson, Geirfinnur S.; Pálmason, Bolli; von Löwis, Sibylle; Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Bjornsson, Halldór

    2013-04-01

    Weather radars are valuable instruments in monitoring explosive volcanic eruptions. Temporal variations in the eruption strength can be monitored as well as variations in plume and ash dispersal. Strength of the reflected radar signal of a volcanic plume is related to water content and droplet sizes as well as type, shape, amount and the grain size distribution of ash. The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) owns and operates three radars and one more is planned for this radar volcano monitoring system. A fixed position 250 kW C-band weather radar was installed in 1991 in SW-Iceland close to Keflavík International Airport, and upgraded to a doppler radar in 2010. In cooperation with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), IMO has recently invested in two mobile X-band radars and one fixed position C-band radar. The fixed position 250 kW doppler C-band weather radar was installed in April 2012 at Fljótsdalsheiði, E-Iceland, and in June 2012 IMO received a mobile 65 kW dual-polarization doppler X-band radar. Early in 2013 IMO will acquire another mobile radar of the same type. Explosive volcanic eruptions in Iceland during the past 22 years were monitored by the Keflavík radar: Hekla 1991, Gjálp 1996, Grímsvötn 1998, Hekla 2000, Grímsvötn 2004, Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Grímsvötn 2011. Additionally, the Grímsvötn 2011 eruption was mointored by a mobile X-band radar on loan from the Italian Civil Protection Authorities. Detailed technical information is presented on the four radars with examples of the information acquired during previous eruptions. This expanded network of radars is expected to give valuable information on future volcanic eruptions in Iceland.

  14. Continuous monitoring of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at Stromboli volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, Roberto M. R.; Camarda, Marco; Gurrieri, Sergio; Valenza, Mariano

    2015-04-01

    Geochemical monitoring of fumarole and soil gases is a powerful tool for volcano surveillance, for investigating the subsurface magma dynamics, and for hazard assessment in volcanic areas. The monitoring of both carbon dioxide (CO2) flux, and hydrogen (H2) concentration in active volcanic areas helps to improve the understanding of the processes linking the surface gas emissions, the chemistry of the magmatic gases, and the volcanic activity. The CO2 flux measurement is a routine technique for volcano monitoring purposes, because of CO2 is the second-abundant component of the gas phase in silicate magmas, attaining saturation at the mantle to deep crustal level. The H2 concentration has provided indications concerning the oxygen fugacity of magmatic gases, a parameter that changes over a wide range of low values (10-16 - 10-8 bar), and affects the redox state of multivalent elements. This study reports on the use a tailor-made automatic system developed for continuous monitoring purposes of H2 concentration and CO2 flux in the summit area of Stromboli volcano (Aeolian islands). The automatic device consists of an H2-selective electrochemical sensor, and two IR-spectrophotometers for measuring the CO2 flux in agreement with the dynamic concentration method. The data collected by the automatic system deployed at Stromboli from 19 May 2009 to 15 December 2010 are presented herein. The data processing provides a better understanding of the relationships between the evolution of the low temperature fumarolic emissions, and the volcanic activity. The results of the data analysis indicates that the high frequency variations exhibited by CO2 flux and H2 concentration are positively correlated with the eruptive activity of Stromboli, typically changing on time scale of hours or days. Furthermore, the investigation of the relationships between CO2 flux and H2 concentration provides an evaluation of the depth of the degassing source, by which the gas mixture containing H2 and

  15. Recent volcano monitoring in Costa Rica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, R.; Brown, G.; Rymer, H.; Barritt, S.; Randal, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Costa Rican volacno Rincon de la Vieja is loosely but mysteriously translated as the "Old Lady's Corner." It consists of six volcanic centers that form a remote elongated ridge standing some 1300m above the surrounding terraine. Geologically speaking, the Guanacaste province of northern Costa Rica consists of a series of composite volcanic cones built on a shield of ignimbrites (welded and unwelded ash flows) of Pliocene-Pleistocene age (up to 2 million years old), that themselves lie on basement crust of Cretaceious-Tertiary age (up to 90 million years old). the active volcanoes are aligned on a northwest-southeast axis parallel to the Middle American oceanic trench in the Pacific Ocean that is the site of subduction of hte Cocos oceanic plate underneath Central America.  

  16. Thermal-Infrared Image Analysis Application to the Real-Time Monitoring of the Explosive Activity of Etna and Stromboli Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltelli, M.; Biale, E.; Cristaldi, A.; Mangiagli, S.; Pecora, E.

    2005-12-01

    Starting from 1993 video-cameras were used for the monitoring of the explosive activity at Etna and Stromboli volcanoes. Using image analysis we were seeking to identify, classify and quantify the explosive events and any change of the activity trend that could precede a strong eruptive event, like paroxysmal explosion, fire fountain, lava flow. The visible-band cameras suffered of a low sensitivity that limited the early warning capability of the system at night and during poor weather. Taking into account the high-temperature of the erupted material, infrared cameras appeared the best choice to overcome this observational limitation, unfortunately at that time commercial infrared devises were still too much expensive and fragile to put in operation in such unsafe and extreme environment. In very recent time the availability of solid-state uncooled sensors made possible the use of these devices for volcano monitoring at Etna and Stromboli since their 2002 and 2003 eruptions. Presently three types of Thermal-Infrared image based surveillance systems are in operation at Etna and Stromboli. They are focused to identify, classify and quantify different types of explosive events from small strombolian explosions to large volcanic-cloud forming eruptions. VAMOS on-line image analyzer that operates detection and classification of the strombolian explosive events in real-time. The analysis include the counting of the explosions occurred at the different craters of Stromboli and the parameterization in classes of intensity for each explosion on the base of clast dispersion and kinetics energy. A week report of the trend of the volcanic activity is available at INGV web. SARATERM on-line analyzer of thermal images for recognizing, in function of the temperature, the emission of spatter, ashes or gas from the summit craters of Etna and Stromboli. This system is presently used to alert in real-time the on-duty volcanologists. Finally a network of IR cameras working in

  17. Measuring thermal budgets of active volcanoes by satellite remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L.; Francis, P. W.; Rothery, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Thematic Mapper measurements of the total radiant energy flux Q at Lascar volcano in north Chile for December 1984 are reported. The results are consistent with the earlier suggestion that a lava lake is the source of a reported thermal budget anomaly, and with values for 1985-1986 that are much lower, suggesting that fumarolic activity was then a more likely heat source. The results show that satellite remote sensing may be used to monitor the activity of a volcano quantitatively, in a way not possible by conventional ground studies, and may provide a method for predicting eruptions.

  18. Long-term monitoring on active volcanoes. Time relationship between surface variations of temperature and changes of energy release from magmatic sources, verified by multi-parameter and interdisciplinary comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diliberto, I. S.; Bellomo, S.; Camarda, M.; D'Alessandro, W.; Gagliano Candela, E.; Gagliano, A. L.; Longo, M.; Pisciotta, F.; Pecoraino, G.; Vita, F.

    2015-12-01

    The longest records of temperature data from active volcanoes in southern Italy are presented. One dataset comes from continuous monitoring of fumaroles temperature of la Fossa cone of Vulcano (Aeolian Islands), it runs from 1990 to 2014, but the first measurements started in 1984. Another dataset is from thermal aquifers of Mount Etna volcano, since 1989 the acquisition period has been one month, more recently data with hourly frequency are registered on the continuous monitoring network. Both monitoring systems are still ongoing. In 1984 at Vulcano the monitoring of fumaroles suffered of a pioneering approach, our technicians faced for the first time with extreme condition, absence of energy power, temperature range covering up to 2 order of magnitude (from normal ambient to several hundreds °C), steam, corrosive acidic fluids released by fumaroles (Sulphur and Chlorine compounds, Carbon dioxide). The experience matured in the high temperature fumarole field of Vulcano can be useful to support new surveillance programs on other volcanoes around the world. Time series analysis applied to fumaroles temperature highlighted the cyclic character of the main observed variations and major trends, lasting some years. Long term monitoring allowed comparisons of many temperature subsets with other validated geochemical and geophysical dataseries and highlighted common source mechanisms accounting for endogenous processes. Changes in the magma source and/or seismo-tectonic activity are the primary causes of the main time variations. A similar comparative approach has been applied to time series of temperature data recorded on Etna volcano. Time relationships have been found with the eruptive activity, particularly with the emission rates of volcanic products, although the monitoring sites are far from the eruptive vents. The collected data show confirmation about the effectiveness of the geochemical approach to follow in real time changes from the source, even being far

  19. Monitoring Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes (Kamchatka) using seismic noise records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, Clara; Brenguier, Florent; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Droznin, Dmitry V.; Droznina, Svetlana Y.; Chebrov, Victor N.; Gordeev, Evgenii I.

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, extraction of Green functions from seismic ambient noise has been used extensive and efficiently in different contexts and scales: from imaging to monitoring the Earth's interior and from global to local scales. By using coda waves of noise cross-correlations to estimate travel time perturbations, we can assign changes in delay times to changes in the medium's velocity. Due to this technique attribute of continuous recording of the medium, it can accurately detect very small seismic velocity changes linked to small disturbances in volcano interiors. However, cross-correlation functions (CCF) do not necessary converge to media Green function: measurements of waveforms perturbations within a volcanic edifice are affected by the noise fluctuation. The Klyuchevskoy volcanic group, located above the edge of the Pacific Plate subducting beneath Kamchatka, is one of the most active clusters of volcanoes in the word. It is characterized by strongly localized volcanic tremor sources, which often dominate the recorded wavefield. To monitor and get measurements of temporal changes of these active volcanoes, we use coda waves of daily CCF from a total of 19 seismic stations from the seismic network operated by the Kamchatka Branch of the Geophysical Service (KBGS) of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Our study period goes from January 2009 to July 2013 in which two eruptions occurred: one from the Klyuchevskoy volcano (2009-2010) and the other from the Tolbachik volcano (2012-2013). After a quality checking of the records and testing different filters, we filter data in the frequency range 0.08 - 7 Hz and we use the Moving Window Cross Spectrum (MWCS) method to measure the relative time shifts. As both eruptions are characterized by emissions of seismic tremors, we avoid the choice of an arbitrary reference CCF: we compute velocity changes between all pairs of daily CCF. We retrieve a continuous velocity change time series for each station pair using a

  20. Linking petrology and seismology at an active volcano.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Kate; Blundy, Jon; Dohmen, Ralf; Cashman, Kathy

    2012-05-25

    Many active volcanoes exhibit changes in seismicity, ground deformation, and gas emissions, which in some instances arise from magma movement in the crust before eruption. An enduring challenge in volcano monitoring is interpreting signs of unrest in terms of the causal subterranean magmatic processes. We examined over 300 zoned orthopyroxene crystals from the 1980-1986 eruption of Mount St. Helens that record pulsatory intrusions of new magma and volatiles into an existing larger reservoir before the eruption occurred. Diffusion chronometry applied to orthopyroxene crystal rims shows that episodes of magma intrusion correlate temporally with recorded seismicity, providing evidence that some seismic events are related to magma intrusion. These time scales are commensurate with monitoring signals at restless volcanoes, thus improving our ability to forecast volcanic eruptions by using petrology. PMID:22628652

  1. Seismic Monitoring studies at Popocatepetl volcano, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Pimentel, T. A.; Cárdenas-Soto, M.

    2013-05-01

    We present the analysis of seven months of continuous record (March-September, 2012) of the seismic monitoring of Popocatépetl volcano in four broad band stations (the maximum aperture is 12 km). The aim is to explore whether the seismic interferometry method provides complimentary information about the tectonic stress before eruptive stages. In that period of time several eruptive events have occurred. One of them was a subduction-related earthquake (March, 20, 2012, M=7.4) that produced an increase in the volcanic activity. On March 30 the volcano registered a train of 10 hours of exhalations and from March 11 to 29 a swarm of 15 volcanotectonic events. Another important event lasted from April 13 to June 3, in which around 276 hours of harmonic and spasmodic tremor were recorded. One of the biggest events was on May 11, a volcano emissions of around 4 km above the crater with incandescent fragments falling on the volcano slope. From March to September 90 volcanotectonic events were registered the biggest occurred on April 14 and July 23 with Mc=3.2 and 2.9 respectively. Also we analyze the volcano activity with the SSEM analysis, which can be related with regional tectonic earthquakes. We take advantage of seismic noise to get daily correlograms for each motion component (Z, R, T) by stacking 40s time windows. We observe that there are consecutive days for which it is not possible to obtain correlations between pairs of stations, probably caused by instrumental problems or variations in absolute time. Between the nearest stations, 4 km on average, we get consistent correlations, but not in the days of major volcanic activity. The similarity between the Z and R correlograms indicate an appropriate extraction of Rayleigh waves, while in the T component we have the Love wave. Over longer distances it is not possible to extract the dispersion properties; however, the loss of correlation prevails for those days of increased activity. It is important to mention that

  2. Extending permanent volcano monitoring networks into Iceland's ice caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Bergsson, Bergur H.; Kjartansson, Vilhjálmur; Jónsson, Thorsteinn; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.; Roberts, Matthew J.; Jóhannesson, Tómas; Pálsson, Finnur; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Erlendsson, Pálmi; Ingvarsson, Thorgils; Pálssson, Sighvatur K.

    2015-04-01

    The goals of the FUTUREVOLC project are the establishment of a volcano Supersite in Iceland to enable access to volcanological data from the country's many volcanoes and the development of a multiparametric volcano monitoring and early warning system. However, the location of some of Iceland's most active volcanoes inside the country's largest ice cap, Vatnajökull, makes these goals difficult to achieve as it hinders access and proper monitoring of seismic and deformation signals from the volcanoes. To overcome these obstacles, one of the developments in the project involves experimenting with extending the permanent real-time networks into the ice cap, including installation of stations in the glacier ice. At the onset of the project, only one permanent seismic and GPS site existed within Vatnajökull, on the caldera rim of the Grímsvötn volcano. Two years into the project both seismic and GPS stations have been successfully installed and operated inside the glacier; on rock outcrops as well as on the glacier surface. The specific problems to overcome are (i) harsh weather conditions requiring sturdy and resilient equipment and site installations, (ii) darkness during winter months shutting down power generation for several weeks, (iii) high snow accumulation burying the instruments, solar panels and communication and GPS antennae, and in some locations (iv) extreme icing conditions blocking transmission signals and connection to GPS satellites, as well as excluding the possibility of power generation by wind generators. In 2013, two permanent seismic stations and one GPS station were installed on rock outcrops within the ice cap in locations with 3G connections and powered by solar panels and enough battery storage to sustain operation during the darkest winter months. These sites have successfully operated for over a year with mostly regular maintenance requirements, transmitting data in real-time to IMO for analysis. Preparations for two permanent seismic

  3. Numerical model of heat conduction in active volcanoes induced by magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmojo, Antono Arif; Rosandi, Yudi

    2015-09-01

    We study the heat transfer mechanism of active volcanoes using the numerical thermal conduction model. A 2D model of volcano with its conduit filled by magma is considered, and acts as a constant thermal source. The temperature of the magma activity diffuses through the rock layers of the mountain to the surface. The conduction equation is solved using finite-difference method, with some adaptations to allow temperature to flow through different materials. Our model allows to simulate volcanoes having dikes, branch-pipes, and sills by constructing the domain appropriately, as well as layers with different thermal properties. Our research will show the possibility to monitor magma activity underneath a volcano by probing its surface temperature. The result of our work will be very useful for further study of volcanoes, eruption prediction, and volcanic disaster mitigation.

  4. AVHotRR version 2.0. Enhanced routine for near-real time monitoring of active volcanoes using IR satellite data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    The AVHotRR routine operates since 2006 to process satellite data for monitoring active volcanoes in the Mediterranean area. AVHotRR is a continually evolving program. It needs to adapt both to the availability of new incoming data and to the variability of volcanic phenomena. Though originally developed to work with Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data, AVHotRR has been improved over the years to adapt to other sensors. Currently implemented version allows to integrate results from different dataset in order to better constrain the detection of volcanic hot-spots. In particular, the high temporal resolution of the SEVIRI instrument aboard MSG provides a key to reduce false positives in AVHRR and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer MODIS images. A new detection method based on the wavelet transform of SEVIRI data is proposed. Results from the application of AVHotRR to a dataset of AVHRR and SEVIRI images from Mt Etna, Italy, are presented and discussed to advantages and limitations of the algorithm.

  5. Seismic activity of Erebus volcano, antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada

    1987-11-01

    Mount Erebus is presently the only Antarctic volcano with sustained eruptive activity in the past few years. It is located on Ross Island and a convecting anorthoclase phonolite lava lake has occupied the summit crater of Mount Erebus from January 1973 to September 1984. A program to monitor the seismic activity of Mount Erebus named IMESS was started in December 1980 as an international cooperative program among Japan, the United States and New Zealand. A new volcanic episode began on 13 September, 1984 and continued until December. Our main observations from the seismic activity from 1982 1985 are as follows: (1) The average numbers of earthquakes which occurred around Mount Erebus in 1982, 1983 and January August 1984 were 64, 134 and 146 events per day, respectively. Several earthquake swarms occurred each year. (2) The averag number of earthquakes in 1985 is 23 events per day, with only one earthquake swarm. (3) A remarkable decrease of the background seismicity is recognized before and after the September 1984 activity. (4) Only a few earthquakes were located in the area surrounding Erebus mountain after the September 1984 activity. A magma reservoir is estimated to be located in the southwest area beneath the Erebus summit, based on the hypocenter distributions of earthquakes.

  6. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  7. Developing monitoring capability of a volcano observatory: the example of the Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todman, S.; Garaebiti, E.; Jolly, G. E.; Sherburn, S.; Scott, B.; Jolly, A. D.; Fournier, N.; Miller, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Vanuatu lies on the Pacific 'Ring of Fire'. With 6 active subaerial and 3 submarine (identified so far) volcanoes, monitoring and following up their activities is a considerable work for a national observatory. The Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory is a good example of what can be done from ‘scratch’ to develop a volcanic monitoring capability in a short space of time. A fire in June 2007 completely destroyed the old observatory building and many valuable records leaving Vanuatu with no volcano monitoring capacity. This situation forced the Government of Vanuatu to reconsider the structure of the hazards monitoring group and think about the best way to rebuild a complete volcano monitoring system. Taking the opportunity of the re-awakening of Gaua volcano (North of Vanuatu), the Vanuatu Geohazards section in partnership with GNS Science, New Zealand developed a new program including a strategic plan for Geohazards from 2010-2020, the installation of a portable seismic network with real-time data transmission in Gaua, the support of the first permanent monitoring station installation in Ambrym and the design and implementation of volcano monitoring infrastructure and protocol. Moreover the technology improvements of the last decade and the quick extension of enhanced communication systems across the islands of Vanuatu played a very important role for the development of this program. In less than one year, the implementation of this program was beyond expectations and showed considerable improvement of the Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory volcano monitoring capability. In response to increased volcanic activity (or unrest) in Ambae, the Geohazards section was fully capable of the installation of a portable seismic station in April 2010 and to follow the development of the activity. Ultimately, this increased capability results in better and timelier delivery of information and advice on the threat from volcanic activity to the National Disaster Management Office and

  8. Advances in volcano monitoring and risk reduction in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCausland, W. A.; White, R. A.; Lockhart, A. B.; Marso, J. N.; Assitance Program, V. D.; Volcano Observatories, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    We describe results of cooperative work that advanced volcanic monitoring and risk reduction. The USGS-USAID Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) was initiated in 1986 after disastrous lahars during the 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz dramatizedthe need to advance international capabilities in volcanic monitoring, eruption forecasting and hazard communication. For the past 28 years, VDAP has worked with our partners to improve observatories, strengthen monitoring networks, and train observatory personnel. We highlight a few of the many accomplishments by Latin American volcano observatories. Advances in monitoring, assessment and communication, and lessons learned from the lahars of the 1985 Nevado del Ruiz eruption and the 1994 Paez earthquake enabled the Servicio Geológico Colombiano to issue timely, life-saving warnings for 3 large syn-eruptive lahars at Nevado del Huila in 2007 and 2008. In Chile, the 2008 eruption of Chaitén prompted SERNAGEOMIN to complete a national volcanic vulnerability assessment that led to a major increase in volcano monitoring. Throughout Latin America improved seismic networks now telemeter data to observatories where the decades-long background rates and types of seismicity have been characterized at over 50 volcanoes. Standardization of the Earthworm data acquisition system has enabled data sharing across international boundaries, of paramount importance during both regional tectonic earthquakes and during volcanic crises when vulnerabilities cross international borders. Sharing of seismic forecasting methods led to the formation of the international organization of Latin American Volcano Seismologists (LAVAS). LAVAS courses and other VDAP training sessions have led to international sharing of methods to forecast eruptions through recognition of precursors and to reduce vulnerabilities from all volcano hazards (flows, falls, surges, gas) through hazard assessment, mapping and modeling. Satellite remote sensing data

  9. Prediction and monitoring of volcanic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sudradjat, A.

    1986-07-01

    This paper summarizes the state of the art for predicting and monitoring volcanic activities, and it emphasizes the experience obtained by the Volcanological Survey Indonesia for active volcanoes. The limited available funds, the large number of active volcanoes to monitor, and the high population density of the volcanic area are the main problems encountered. Seven methods of volcano monitoring are applied to the active volcanoes of Indonesia: seismicity, ground deformation, gravity and magnetic studies, self-potential studies, petrochemistry, gas monitoring, and visual observation. Seismic monitoring augmented by gas monitoring has proven to be effective, particularly for predicting individual eruptions at the after-initial phase. However, the success of the prediction depends on the characteristics of each volcano. In general, the initial eruption phase is the most difficult phenomenon to predict. The preparation of hazard maps and the continuous awareness of the volcanic eruption are the most practical ways to mitigate volcanic danger.

  10. PS-InSAR measurements at the most active volcanoes in Iceland: role of the GEO supersite initiative in deformation monitoring at Bárðarbunga, Askja, Hekla, Katla and Eyjafjallajökull volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Michelle; Dumont, Stéphanie; Drouin, Vincent; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Spaans, Karsten; Hooper, Andrew; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Árnadóttir, Þóra; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Michalczewska, Karolina; Hjaltadóttir, Sigurlaug; María Friðriksdóttir, Hildur; Rut Hjartardóttir, Ásta; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hensch, Martin; Guðmundsson, Gunnar; Geirsson, Halldór; Sturkell, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of a time series of ground deformation measurements at active volcanoes can provide an improved understanding of sub-volcanic and sub-aerial processes; including those related to magmatic, hydrothermal and structural development. Interpreting a long time series may also help determine background behavior, and identify any deviations from this, including the migration of new melt. We use Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PS-InSAR) techniques to generate a time series of high-resolution deformation measurements, in the vicinity of the most active volcanoes in Iceland: Bárðarbunga, Askja, Hekla, Katla and Eyjafjallajökull and compare these to other geodetic measurements. A comprehensive network of continuous GPS stations is already deployed at these volcanoes and a series of campaign GPS measurements are routinely undertaken each summer. InSAR observations are complementary to these field based measurements and their high spatial resolution assists in resolving the geometry of the deformation field hence gaining improved constraints on the inferred source. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites has recently declared Iceland a Permanent Geohazard Supersite, based on its propensity for relatively frequent eruptions and their potentially hazardous, long ranging effects. The recent Supersite award ensures a considerable amount of SAR data is made available for both past and future satellite acquisitions, including new X-band images (acquired by TerraSAR-X and Cosmo-SkyMed satellites), and historic C-band images from ERS and ENVISAT. We present a series of long-term deformation measurements for Hekla, Katla, Eyjafjallajökull and Askja volcanoes, derived using PS-InSAR techniques, and include recent interferograms spanning the 2014 unrest and eruption within the Bárðarbunga volcanic system. InSAR and tilt measurements at Hekla indicate renewed melt supply to a sub-volcanic reservoir after the last eruption in 2000. Recent

  11. Development of a wireless seismic array for volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moure, David; Toma, Daniel; Lázaro, Antoni Manuel; Del Río, Joaquín; Carreras, Normandino; José Blanco, María

    2014-05-01

    Volcano monitoring is mainly based on three sciences: seismology, geodesy and geochemistry. Seismic arrays are used to locate the seismic source, based on analysis of signals recorded by each seismometer. The most important advantages of arrays over classical seismic networks are: painless deployment, no major infrastructures needed, able to provide an approximate location of a signal that is not feasible by a seismic network. In this paper the design of a low-power wireless array is presented. All sensors transmit acquired data to a central node which is capable to calculate the possible location of the seismic source in real-time. The reliability of those locations depends, among other parameters (number of sensors and geometrical distribution), on precision of time synchronization between the nodes. To achieve the necessary precision, the wireless seismic array implements a time synchronization protocol based on the IEEE1588 protocol, which ensures clock synchronization between nodes better than a microsecond, therefore, signal correlation between sensors is achieved correlating the signals from all the sensors. The ultimate challenge would be that the central node receives data from all the seismometers locating the seismic source, only transmitting the result, which dramatically reduces data traffic. Often, active volcano areas are located far from inhabited areas and data transmission options are limited. In situ calculation is crucial in order to reduce data volume transmission generated by the seismic array.

  12. Volcano monitoring by short wavelength infrared satellite remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothery, D. A.; Francis, P. W.; Wood, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The use of short wavelength IR Landsat TM data for volcano monitoring is examined. By determining the pixel-integrated from the TM data, it is possible to estimate the temperature and size of hot areas which occupy less than one complete pixel. Examples of volcano monitoring with remote sensing data are discussed. It is suggested that the entire volcanic temperature range (100-1200 C) could be accomplished by decreasing the band 6 gain by just one order of magnitude so that it was sensitive to radiance from 1 to 100 mW/sq cm/sr/micron.

  13. Monitoring for volcano-hydrothermal activity using continuous gravity and local ground acceleration measurements: New deployments at Inferno Crater, Waimangu and White Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Fournier, Nico; Cole-Baker, Jeremy; Miller, Craig

    2010-05-01

    Volcanoes with crater lakes are often characterised by shallow hydrothermal systems which display cyclic behaviour (temperature, lake level, chemistry, etc.) and shallow seismic tremor. Present monitoring programmes in New Zealand include routine collection of these observables, but the associated shallow sub-surface processes are still inadequately modelled and poorly understood. Models would be better constrained with the incorporation of additional geophysical parameters. To this end, we have established a new test programme to continuously monitor for micro-gravity variations at New Zealand volcanoes. We utilise a Micro-g-LaCoste gPhone relative gravity meter having 1 Hz sample rate and a measurement precision of 1 microgal to test the viability of gravity monitoring for volcano-hydrothermal systems. We have initially tested the new sensor in a short term deployment (~2 months) at Inferno Crater, Waimangu, New Zealand. Inferno shows dramatic variations in crater lake level (> 7 m range), temperature (>40o C range) and hydrothermally derived tremor, all over a period of ~5 weeks. The amplitude and period of these observables are ideal for testing gravity variations associated with a cycling hydrothermal system because several cycles can be obtained in a relatively short campaign. We have deployed the gravity sensor into a buried vault having a stable concrete base to minimise local environmental influences. This vault is located ~20 meters from Inferno Lake edge (at high stand) and offers sufficient noise reduction to measure the gravitational effects associated with lake level changes. We will show results for the new gravity meter including raw relative gravity measurements and first order corrections (earth-tide, ocean loading, sensor level, temperature, and barometric pressure) to obtain both residual gravity and overprinted local ground accelerations (earthquakes and local tremor). To examine the effects of local ground vibrations on the gravity meter, we

  14. Citizen Empowerment in Volcano Monitoring, Communication and Decision-Making at Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, B.; Mothes, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    Trained citizen volunteers called vigías have worked to help monitor and communicate warnings about Tungurahua volcano, in Ecuador, since the volcano reawoke in 1999. The network, organized by the scientists of Ecuacor's Instituto Geofísico de la Escuela Politécnica Nacional (Geophysical Institute) and the personnel from the Secretaría Nacional de Gestión de Riesgos (Risk Management, initially the Civil Defense), has grown to well over 20 observers living around the volcano who communicate regularly via handheld two-way radios. Interviews with participants in 2010 indicate that the network enables direct communication between communities and authorities, engenders trust in scientists and emergency response personnel, builds community, and empowers communities to make decisions in times of crisis.

  15. Citizen empowerment in volcano monitoring, communication and decision-making at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, B. A.; Mothes, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Trained citizen volunteers called vigías have worked to help monitor and communicate warnings about Tungurahua volcano, in Ecuador, since the volcano reawoke in 1999. The network, organized by the scientists of Ecuador's Instituto Geofísico de la Escuela Politécnica Nacional (Geophysical Institute) and the personnel from the Secretaría Nacional de Gestión de Riesgos (Risk Management, initially the Civil Defense), has grown to more than 20 observers living around the volcano who communicate regularly via handheld two-way radios. Interviews with participants conducted in 2010 indicate that the network enables direct communication between communities and authorities; engenders trust in scientists and emergency response personnel; builds community; and empowers communities to make decisions in times of crisis.

  16. Interagency collaboration on an active volcano: a case study at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, James P.; Orlando, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    Because Kilauea and Mauna Loa are included within the National Park, there is a natural intersection of missions for the National Park Service (NPS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). HAVO staff and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists have worked closely together to monitor and forecast multiple eruptions from each of these volcanoes since HAVO’s founding in 1916.

  17. One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, J.; Poland, M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Klauea volcano (Figure 1)one of the most active volcanoes on Earthhas provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  18. One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, Jim; Poland, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Kilauea volcano (Figure 1)—one of the most active volcanoes on Earth—has provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  19. Design of smart sensing components for volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, M.; Song, W.-Z.; Huang, R.; Peng, Y.; Shirazi, B.; LaHusen, R.; Kiely, A.; Peterson, N.; Ma, A.; Anusuya-Rangappa, L.; Miceli, M.; McBride, D.

    2009-01-01

    In a volcano monitoring application, various geophysical and geochemical sensors generate continuous high-fidelity data, and there is a compelling need for real-time raw data for volcano eruption prediction research. It requires the network to support network synchronized sampling, online configurable sensing and situation awareness, which pose significant challenges on sensing component design. Ideally, the resource usages shall be driven by the environment and node situations, and the data quality is optimized under resource constraints. In this paper, we present our smart sensing component design, including hybrid time synchronization, configurable sensing, and situation awareness. Both design details and evaluation results are presented to show their efficiency. Although the presented design is for a volcano monitoring application, its design philosophy and framework can also apply to other similar applications and platforms. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  20. The potential for synthesizing multi-sensor remote sensing data for global volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtney, M.; Pritchard, M. E.; Carn, S. A.; McCormick, B.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Jay, J.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanoes exhibit variable eruption frequencies and styles, from near-continuous eruptions of effusive lavas to more intermittent, explosive eruptions. The monitoring frequency necessary to capture precursory signals at any volcano remains uncertain, as some warnings allot hours for evacuation. Likewise, no precursory signal appears deterministic for each volcano. Volcanic activity manifests in a variety of ways (i.e. tremor, deformation), thus requiring multiple monitoring mechanisms (i.e. geodetic, geochemical, geothermal). We are developing databases to compare relationships among remotely sensed volcanic unrest signals and eruptions. Satellite remote sensing utilizes frequent temporal measurements (daily to bi-weekly), an essential component of worldwide volcano monitoring. Remote sensing methods are also capable of detecting diverse precursory signals such as ground deformation from satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar—InSAR— (multiple space agencies), degassing from satellite spectroscopy (i.e. OMI SO2 from NASA), and hot spots from thermal infrared (i.e. MODIS from NASA). We present preliminary results from seven SAR satellites and two thermal infrared satellites for 24 volcanoes with prominent SO2 emissions. We find near-continuous emissions at Ibu (Indonesia) since 2008 corresponded with hotspots and 10 cm of subsidence, with degassing and comparable subsidence observed at Pagan (Marianas). A newcomer to volcano monitoring, remote sensing data are only beginning to be utilized on a global scale, let alone as a synthesized dataset for monitoring developing eruptions. We foresee a searchable tool for rapidly accessing basic volcanic unrest characteristics for different types of volcanoes and whether or not they resulted in eruption. By including data from multiple satellite sensors in our database we hope to develop quantitative assessments for calculating the likelihood of eruption from individual events.

  1. Monitoring Volcanoes by Use of Air-Dropped Sensor Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Sharon; Rivellini, Tommaso; Webb, Frank; Blaes, Brent; Bracho, Caroline; Lockhart, Andrew; McGee, Ken

    2003-01-01

    Sensor packages that would be dropped from airplanes have been proposed for pre-eruption monitoring of physical conditions on the flanks of awakening volcanoes. The purpose of such monitoring is to gather data that could contribute to understanding and prediction of the evolution of volcanic systems. Each sensor package, denoted a volcano monitoring system (VMS), would include a housing with a parachute attached at its upper end and a crushable foam impact absorber at its lower end (see figure). The housing would contain survivable low-power instrumentation that would include a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, an inclinometer, a seismometer, a barometer, a thermometer, and CO2 and SO2 analyzers. The housing would also contain battery power, control, data-logging, and telecommunication subsystems. The proposal for the development of the VMS calls for the use of commercially available sensor, power, and telecommunication equipment, so that efforts could be focused on integrating all of the equipment into a system that could survive impact and operate thereafter for 30 days, transmitting data on the pre-eruptive state of a target volcano to a monitoring center. In a typical scenario, VMSs would be dropped at strategically chosen locations on the flanks of a volcano once the volcano had been identified as posing a hazard from any of a variety of observations that could include eyewitness reports, scientific observations from positions on the ground, synthetic-aperture-radar scans from aircraft, and/or remote sensing from aboard spacecraft. Once dropped, the VMSs would be operated as a network of in situ sensors that would transmit data to a local monitoring center. This network would provide observations as part of an integrated volcano-hazard assessment strategy that would involve both remote sensing and timely observations from the in situ sensors. A similar strategy that involves the use of portable sensors (but not dropping of sensors from aircraft) is

  2. Integrating ALOS-2 and Sentinel-1 InSAR data for systematic volcano deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Biggs, Juliet; Ebmeier, Susanna; Parker, Amy

    2016-04-01

    The recent launches of the Sentinel-1 and ALOS-2 satellites provide a wealth of new Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data for Earth observation purposes. We exploit these data for volcano deformation monitoring with a particular focus on Latin America, which is nominated as a priority target area under the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites volcano pilot program. By conducting an integrated survey that employs both Sentinel-1 and ALOS-2 we are able to achieve previously unprecedented levels of spatial and temporal resolution and combat decorrelation arising from vegetation cover. Latin America is an ideal target region as it has a diversity of geographic volcano locations (e.g., dense rainforest to high-altitude deserts), as well as abundant and varied volcanic activity. The numerous local volcano observatories can also directly benefit from this additional InSAR data when integrating it alongside ground-based observations. To further facilitate this impact we are directing our data outputs to a global volcano deformation database in near-real-time to provide a first-order access point for observatory staff and research scientists in need of satellite-derived ground-deformation results. We will draw upon a selection of case studies within Latin America to demonstrate our approach and how it can enhance volcano monitoring and eruption forecasting efforts.

  3. Monitoring quiescent volcanoes by diffuse He degassing: case study Teide volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Calvo, David; Alonso, Mar

    2016-04-01

    Tenerife (2,034 km2), the largest of the Canary Islands, is the only island that has developed a central volcanic complex (Teide-Pico Viejo stratovolcanoes), characterized by the eruption of differentiated magmas. This central volcanic complex has been built in the intersection of the three major volcanic rift-zones of Tenerife, where most of the historical volcanic activity has taken place. The existence of a volcanic-hydrothermal system beneath Teide volcano is suggested by the occurrence of a weak fumarolic system, steamy ground and high rates of diffuse CO2 degassing all around the summit cone of Teide (Pérez et al., 2013). Diffuse emission studies of non-reactive and/or highly mobile gases such as helium have recently provided promising results to detect changes in the magmatic gas component at surface related to volcanic unrest episodes (Padrón et al., 2013). The geochemical properties of He minimize the interaction of this noble gas on its movement toward the earth's surface, and its isotopic composition is not affected by subsequent chemical reactions. It is highly mobile, chemically inert, physically stable, non-biogenic, sparingly soluble in water under ambient conditions, almost non-adsorbable, and highly diffusive with a diffusion coefficient ˜10 times that of CO2. As part of the geochemical monitoring program for the volcanic surveillance of Teide volcano, yearly surveys of diffuse He emission through the surface of the summit cone of Teide volcano have been performed since 2006. Soil He emission rate was measured yearly at ˜130 sampling sites selected in the surface environment of the summit cone of Teide volcano (Tenerife, Canary Islands), covering an area of ˜0.5 km2, assuming that He emission is governed by convection and diffusion. The distribution of the sampling sites was carefully chosen to homogeneously cover the target area, allowing the computation of the total He emission by sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs). Nine surveys have been

  4. Continuous thermal infrared monitoring at Campi Flegrei and Vesuvius (Italy) by automated data processing: an effective surveillance tool of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansivero, Fabio; Vilardo, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The INGV-Osservatorio Vesuviano Thermal Infrared Imagery Monitoring Network (TIIMNet) is made up of IR acquisition stations designed to continuously acquire IR scenes of diffuse degassing areas in the Neapolitan volcanic district. Every station consists of a RMS (Remote Monitoring Station) which manages the shooting functionalities of the IR camera and the connection to the surveillance Centre of INGV-Osservatorio Vesuviano in Naples. The first developed station was equipped with a NEC Thermo Tracer TS7302 IR camera (with 320x240 pixel FPA uncooled microbolometer); a newer one is equipped with a FLIR SC645 IR camera (with 640x480 pixel FPA uncooled microbolometer) and is supported by an in-house developed hardware which manages a fully real-time control of data acquisition and transfer procedures. As a whole, TIIMNet is composed of four permanent stations and three transportable ones. The first permanent NEC Station was installed at Vesuvius on July 2004 and dismissed on May 2007. A new permanent FLIR Station was set up on June 2011 and it acquires IR scenes from the inner SW slope of Vesuvius crater. In the Campi Flegrei caldera (Pozzuoli, Italy) a permanent NEC Station was operative at Solfatara since September 2004 and it acquired scenes of the major fumaroles area located on the SE inner slope at the intersection of two active, SW-NE and NW-SE main faults. A permanent FLIR Station has been installed at Solfatara on June 2013 and takes IR shots of a significant thermal anomaly on the Northern inner slope of the crater. At Pisciarelli locality, on the Solfatara NE outer slope, a transportable NEC Station was set up on October 2006 and dismissed on September 2013. It was abreast of a permanent FLIR Station on March 2013. Both stations stored IR scenes of the outer eastern flank of the Solfatara tuff-cone characterized by heavy water vapor and CO2 emissions close to an active NW-SE fault. IR scenes are acquired every night by the TIIMNet stations and in real time

  5. Using Bayesian Belief Networks To Assess Volcano State from Multiple Monitoring Timeseries And Other Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odbert, Henry; Aspinall, Willy

    2013-04-01

    When volcanoes exhibit unrest or become eruptively active, science-based decision support invariably is sought by civil authorities. Evidence available to scientists about a volcano's internal state is usually indirect, secondary or very nebulous.Advancement of volcano monitoring technology in recent decades has increased the variety and resolution of multi-parameter timeseries data recorded at volcanoes. Monitoring timeseries may be interpreted in real time by observatory staff and are often later subjected to further analytic scrutiny by the research community at large. With increasing variety and resolution of data, interpreting these multiple strands of parallel, partial evidence has become increasingly complex. In practice, interpretation of many timeseries involves familiarity with the idiosyncracies of the volcano, the monitoring techniques, the configuration of the recording instrumentation, observations from other datasets, and so on. Assimilation of this knowledge is necessary in order to select and apply the appropriate statistical techniques required to extract the required information. Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) use probability theory to treat and evaluate uncertainties in a rational and auditable scientific manner, but only to the extent warranted by the strength of the available evidence. The concept is a suitable framework for marshalling multiple observations, model results and interpretations - and associated uncertainties - in a methodical manner. The formulation is usually implemented in graphical form and could be developed as a tool for near real-time, ongoing use in a volcano observatory, for example. We explore the application of BBNs in analysing volcanic timeseries, the certainty with which inferences may be drawn, and how they can be updated dynamically. Such approaches provide a route to developing analytical interface(s) between volcano monitoring analyses and probabilistic hazard analysis. We discuss the use of BBNs in hazard

  6. Seismic Activity at Vailulu'u, Samoa's Youngest Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konter, J.; Staudigel, H.; Hart, S.

    2002-12-01

    Submarine volcanic systems, as a product of the Earth's mantle, play an essential role in the Earth's heat budget and in the interaction between the solid Earth and the hydrosphere and biosphere. Their eruptive and intrusive activity exerts an important control on these hydrothermal systems. In March 2000, we deployed an array of five ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) on the summit region (625-995 m water depth) of Vailulu'u Volcano (14°12.9'S;169°03.5'W); this volcano represents the active end of the Samoan hotspot chain and is one of only a few well-studied intra-plate submarine volcanoes. We monitored seismic activity for up to 12 months at low sample rate (25 Hz), and for shorter times at a higher sample rate (125 Hz). We have begun to catalogue and locate a variety of acoustic events from this network. Ambient ocean noise was filtered out by a 4th-order Butterworth bandpass filter (2.3 - 10 Hz). We distinguish small local earthquakes from teleseismic activity, mostly identified by T- (acoustic) waves, by comparison with a nearby GSN station (AFI). Most of the detected events are T-phases from teleseismic earthquakes, characterized by their emergent coda and high frequency content (up to 30 Hz); the latter distinguishes them from low frequency emergent signals associated with the volcano (e.g. tremor). A second type of event is characterized by impulsive arrivals, with coda lasting a few seconds. The differences in arrival times between stations on the volcano are too small for these events to be T-waves; they are very likely to be local events, since the GSN station in Western Samoa (AFI) shows no arrivals close in time to these events. Preliminary locations show that these small events occur approximately once per day and are located within the volcano (the 95% confidence ellipse is similar to the size of the volcano, due to the small size of the OBH network). Several events are located relatively close to each other (within a km radius) just NW of the crater.

  7. The 2008 Eruption of Chaitén Volcano, Chile and National Volcano-Monitoring Programs in the U.S. and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, J. W.; Lara, L. E.; Moreno, H.

    2008-12-01

    Chaitén volcano, southern Chile, began erupting on 2 May 2008. The eruption produced 3 Plinian eruption pulses between May 2 and 8. Between Plinian phases the volcano emitted a constant column of ash to approximately 10 km, gradually diminishing to approximately 3 km by the end of June. The eruption of Chaitén was remarkable on several counts--it was the first rhyolite eruption on the planet since Novarupta (Katmai) erupted in 1912, and Chaitén had apparently lain dormant for approximately 9300 years. Though Chaitén is located in a generally sparsely populated region, the eruption had widespread impacts. More than 5000 people had to be quickly evacuated from proximal areas and aviation in southern South America was disrupted for weeks. Within 10 days secondary lahars had overrun much of the town of Chaitén complicating the prospects of the townspeople to return to their homes. Prior to the eruption onset, the nearest real-time seismic station was 300 km distant, and earthquakes were not felt by local citizens until approximately 30 hours before the eruption onset. No other signs of unrest were noted. Owing to the lack of near-field monitoring, and the nighttime eruption onset, there was initial confusion about which volcano was erupting: Chaitén or nearby Michinmahuida. Lack of monitoring systems at Chaitén meant that warning time for the public at risk was extremely short, and owing to the nature of the eruption and the physical geography of the area, it was very difficult to install monitoring instruments to track its progress after the eruption started. The lack of geophysical monitoring also means that an important data set on precursory behavior for silicic systems was not collected. With more than 120 Pleistocene to Holocene-age volcanoes within its continental territory, Chile is one of the more volcanically active countries in the world. The eruption of Chaitén has catalyzed the creation of a new program within the Servicio Nacional de Geología y

  8. WOVOdat Progress 2012: Installable DB template for Volcano Monitoring Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratdomopurbo, A.; Widiwijayanti, C.; Win, N.-T.-Z.; Chen, L.-D.; Newhall, C.

    2012-04-01

    WOVOdat is the World Organization of Volcano Observatories' (WOVO) Database of Volcanic Unrest. Volcanoes are frequently restless but only a fraction of unrest leads to eruptions. We aim to compile and make the data of historical volcanic unrest available as a reference tool during volcanic crises, for observatory or other user to compare or look for systematic in many unrest episodes, and also provide educational tools for teachers and students on understanding volcanic processes. Furthermore, we promote the use of relational databases for countries that are still planning to develop their own monitoring database. We are now in the process of populating WOVOdat in collaboration with volcano observatories worldwide. Proprietary data remains at the observatories where the data originally from. Therefore, users who wish to use the data for publication or to obtain detail information about the data should directly contact the observatories. To encourage the use of relational database system in volcano observatories with no monitoring database, WOVOdat project is preparing an installable standalone package. This package is freely downloadable through our website (www.wovodat.org), ready to install and serve as database system in the local domain to host various types of volcano monitoring data. The WOVOdat project is now hosted at Earth Observatory of Singapore (Nanyang Technological University). In the current stage of data population, our website supports interaction between WOVOdat developers, observatories, and other partners in building the database, e.g. accessing schematic design, information and documentation, and also data submission. As anticipation of various data formats coming from different observatories, we provide an interactive tools for user to convert their data into standard WOVOdat format file before then able to upload and store in the database system. We are also developing various visualization tools that will be integrated in the system to ease

  9. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  10. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  11. Seismicity characteristics of a potentially active Quaternary volcano: The Tatun Volcano Group, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos I.; Lin, Cheng-Horng; Liang, Wen-Tzong

    2007-02-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is located at the northern tip of Taiwan, near the capital Taipei and close to two nuclear power plants. Because of lack of any activity in historical times it has been classified as an extinct volcano, even though more recent studies suggest that TVG might have been active during the last 20 ka. In May 2003 a seismic monitoring project at the TVG area was initiated by deploying eight three-component seismic stations some of them equipped with both short-period and broadband sensors. During the 18 months observation period local seismicity mainly consisted of high frequency earthquakes either occurring as isolated events, or as a continuous sequence in the form of spasmodic bursts. Mixed and low frequency events were also present during the same period, even though they occurred only rarely. Arrival times from events with clear P-/S-wave phases were inverted in order to obtain a minimum 1D velocity model with station corrections. Probabilistic nonlinear earthquake locations were calculated for all these events using the newly derived velocity model. Most high frequency seismicity appeared to be concentrated near the areas of hydrothermal activity, forming tight clusters at depths shallower than 4 km. Relative locations, calculated using the double-difference method and utilising catalogue and cross-correlation differential traveltimes, showed insignificant differences when compared to the nonlinear probabilistic locations. In general, seismicity in the TVG area seems to be primarily driven by circulation of hydrothermal fluids as indicated by the occurrence of spasmodic bursts, mixed/low frequency events and a b-value (1.17 ± 0.1) higher than in any other part of Taiwan. These observations, that are similar to those reported in other dormant Quaternary volcanoes, indicate that a magma chamber may still exist beneath TVG and that a future eruption or period of unrest should not be considered unlikely.

  12. Recent Seismic and Geodetic Activity at Multiple Volcanoes in the Ecuadorean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, S.; Ruiz, M. C.; McCausland, W. A.; Prejean, S. G.; Mothes, P. A.; Bell, A. F.; Hidalgo, S.; Barrington, C.; Yepez, M.; Aguaiza, S.; Plain, M.

    2015-12-01

    The state of volcanic activity often fluctuates between periods of repose and unrest. The transition time between a period of repose and unrest, or vice versa for an open system, can occur within a matter of hours or days. Because of this short time scale, real-time seismic and geodetic (e.g. tiltmeter, GPS) monitoring networks are crucial for characterizing the state of activity of a volcano. In the Ecuadorean Andes, 5 volcanoes demonstrate long-term (Tungurahua, Reventador, and Guagua Pichincha) or recently reactivated (Cotopaxi, Chiles-Cerro Negro) seismic and geodetic activity. The Instituto Geofisico regularly characterizes volcano seismicity into long period, very long period, volcano-tectonic, and tremor events. Significant recent changes at these volcanoes include: rigorous reactivation of glacier-capped Cotopaxi, drumbeat seismicity absent a dome extrusion at Tungurahua, and regularly reoccurring (~7 day recurrence interval), shallow seismic swarms at Guagua Pichincha. These volcanoes locate along both the Western and Eastern Cordillera of the Ecuadorean Andes and, where data are available, manifest important variations in chemical composition, daily gas flux, and surficial deformation. We summarize the long-term geophysical parameters measured at each volcano and place recent changes in each parameter in a larger magmatic and hydrothermal context. All of the studied volcanoes present significant societal hazards to local and regional communities.

  13. Volcanic Environments Monitoring by Drones Mud Volcano Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amici, S.; Turci, M.; Giulietti, F.; Giammanco, S.; Buongiorno, M. F.; La Spina, A.; Spampinato, L.

    2013-08-01

    Volcanic activity has often affected human life both at large and at small scale. For example, the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption caused severe economic damage at continental scale due to its strong effect on air traffic. At a local scale, ash fall and lava flow emission can cause harm and disruption. Understanding precursory signals to volcanic eruptions is still an open and tricky challenge: seismic tremor and gas emissions, for example, are related to upcoming eruptive activity but the mechanisms are not yet completely understood. Furthermore, information related to gases emission mostly comes from the summit crater area of a volcano, which is usually hard to investigate with required accuracy. Although many regulation problems are still on the discussion table, an increasing interest in the application of cutting-edge technology like unmanned flying systems is growing up. In this sense, INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) started to investigate the possibility to use unmanned air vehicles for volcanic environment application already in 2004. A flight both in visual- and radio-controlled mode was carried out on Stromboli volcano as feasibility test. In this work we present the preliminary results of a test performed by INGV in collaboration with the University of Bologna (aerospace division) by using a multi-rotor aircraft in a hexacopter configuration. Thermal camera observations and flying tests have been realised over a mud volcano located on its SW flank of Mt. Etna and whose activity proved to be related to early stages of magma accumulation within the volcano.

  14. Baseline Hydrothermal Monitoring Data from Cascade Range Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crankshaw, I. M.; Ingebritsen, S.; Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Newman, A. C.; Evans, W.; Spicer, K. R.; Ledingham, G.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2009 the U.S. Geological Survey has systematically monitored hydrothermal behavior at selected Cascade Range volcanoes in order to define baseline hydrothermal and geochemical conditions. Gas and water data have been collected at 25 monitoring sites on 10 of the highest-risk volcanoes in the Cascade Range. These sites include summit-fumarole groups and springs/streams that show clear evidence of magmatic influence in the form of high 3He/4He ratios and (or) large fluxes of magmatic CO2 or heat. The monitoring data are intended to (1) be suitable for comparison with other continuous geophysical monitoring data and (2) provide baseline data that will be useful during future episodes of volcanic unrest. Site records consist mainly of hourly temperature and (or) hydrothermal solute flux data spanning multiple years. Many of the hydrothermal time series data show considerable variability during quiescent periods, including diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variability. Having established baseline conditions, we are reducing our monitoring frequency, and data are being archived and analyzed with a view to providing useful and succinct summaries of baseline behavior during quiescent periods. The hydrothermal response to recent (November 2014 to present) unrest at Lassen Volcanic Center demonstrates the utility of long-term background data, which has made it straightforward to isolate symptoms of unrest.

  15. Study of Seismic Activity at Ceboruco Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rodríguez Ayala, N. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt and towards the Sierra de San Pedro southeast, which is a key communication point for coast of Jalisco and Nayarit and the northwest of Mexico. It last eruptive activity was in 1875, and during the following five years it presents superficial activity such as vapor emissions, ash falls and riodacitic composition lava flows along the southeast side. Although surface activity has been restricted to fumaroles near the summit, Ceboruco exhibits regular seismic unrest characterized by both low frequency seismic events and volcano-tectonic earthquakes. From March 2003 until July 2008 a three-component short-period seismograph Marslite station with a Lennartz 3D (1Hz) was deployed in the south flank (CEBN) and within 2 km from the summit to monitoring the seismic activity at the volcano. The LF seismicity recorded was classified using waveform characteristics and digital analysis. We obtained four groups: impulsive arrivals, extended coda, bobbin form, and wave package amplitude modulation earthquakes. The extended coda is the group with more earthquakes and present durations of 50 seconds. Using the moving particle technique, we read the P and S wave arrival times and estimate azimuth arrivals. A P-wave velocity of 3.0 km/s was used to locate the earthquakes, most of the hypocenters are below the volcanic edifice within a circular perimeter of 5 km of radius and its depths are calculated relative to the CEBN elevation as follows. The impulsive arrivals earthquakes present hypocenters between 0 and 1 km while the other groups between 0 and 4 km. Results suggest fluid activity inside the volcanic building that could be related to fumes on the volcano. We conclude that the Ceboruco volcano is active. Therefore, it should be continuously monitored due to the

  16. Use of infrared cameras for monitoring and research at Costa Rican volcanoes and thermal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, C. J.; Mora-Amador, R.; González, G.

    2012-12-01

    Since November 2010, the Costa Rican volcanoes and hot springs began monitored and research by 5 infrared cameras, 4 steady fixed FLIR A320 and 1 portable FLIR P660. All the A320's are located on different settings depending on the volcano or the constant use. At Turrialba volcano 2 of the cameras are set permanent at the crater rim, focused on the new vents formed on January 2010 and 2012, from there at ≈500m it is possible to monitor 24/7 the temperature of the gases from the new vents plus the direction and speed of the plumes, that data helps the improve of the use of equipment like Mini-DOAS, MultiGas or FTIR; at Poás volcano the camera is permanent fixed on a bunker structure located at ≈650m from the active hyperacid hot lagoon, from there it is possible to cover the complete crater with the use of a wide angle lens, that way is safely to track phreatic eruptions, observe convective cells from the lagoon, fumaroles activity, as well as temperature, direction and speed of the gas plume. Finally the last A320 is set for temporary set up, so far is being used on places like Arenal volcano because of the changing of the pattern of the lava flows and gas plume, also at Rincón de la Vieja crater rim because so far is difficult to set up a permanent camera, and finally to do over flights on active volcanoes. The FLIR P660, it has been used to carry out periodic measurements of specific thermal spots. At Turrialba and Poás volcanoes, it is possible to get closer views, measuring more precise inaccessible high temperature fumaroles like the new vents at Turrialba or the ones at Poás dome, places that can reach temperatures of more than 600°C, also is being a lot of support to track lagoon convection cells (61°C), fumaroles migration, lagoon phreatic eruptions (130°C), and better characterization of hot springs, small hot lagoons, and mud pools, with temperatures of ≈ 90C that allow the life of extreme organisms to survive. The use of the thermal cameras

  17. Use of satellite data in volcano monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclelland, Lindsay

    1987-01-01

    It is argued that Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data, especially data on sulfur dioxide detection in volcanic clouds, and weather satellite data complement each other. TOMS data is most useful for discovering previously unknown eruptions and indicating a minimum volume of SO sub 2 produced by a given eruption. Once an eruption has been reported, weather satellite data can be used to accurately monitor its progress. To be used effectively, these data need to be analyzed jointly and in real time. Toward this end, it is hoped that full and timely utilization can be made of existing TOMS data, a polar orbiting TOMS can be launched in the near future, and that TOMS type instruments can be included on future geostationary satellites.

  18. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  19. Global Real-Time Volcano Hazard Monitoring with Satellites: The Anatahan Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, L.; Wright, R.; Pilger, E.; Garbeil, H.

    2003-12-01

    On May 10, 2003, the island of Anatahan in the northern Mariana Islands experienced its first historical eruption. Anatahan is a 9 km long and 4 km wide island dominated by two volcanoes having E-W trending elongated and overlapping summit calderas. Following seismic activity in the 1990's, the island was largely evacuated. Thermal satellite data not only confirmed the eruption of the eastern crater of Anatahan but also pinpointed the location of continuing activity over a two-week period following the start of the eruption. These data were forwarded to hazard mitigation officials within hours of acquisition. NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observes the Earth in the visible to infrared portion of the spectrum at 1 km x 1 km spatial resolution. Two MODIS instruments on Terra and Aqua provide global coverage 2-4 times per day, more towards higher latitudes. The Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology researchers developed an algorithm (MODVOLC) that mines the global Aqua and Terra data sets in order to pinpoint locations of volcanic activity. Currently, the time lag between data acquisition by MODIS and display on the web site is ~2-4 hours. Weekly hotspot reports identify active volcanoes around the globe. Many volcanoes (Erebus, Heard, Anatahan, Michael) are in remote locations and otherwise would have gone unobserved or underobserved. The MODIS hotspot monitoring system provides reliable, and readily-accessible coverage of the world's volcanoes to support volcanic hazard mitigation efforts.

  20. July 1973 ground survey of active Central American volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground survey has shown that thermal anomalies of various sizes associated with volcanic activity at several Central American volcanoes should be detectable from Skylab. Anomalously hot areas of especially large size (greater than 500 m in diameter) are now found at Santiaguito and Pacaya volcanoes in Guatemala and San Cristobal in Nicaragua. Smaller anomalous areas are to be found at least seven other volcanoes. This report is completed after ground survey of eleven volcanoes and ground-based radiation thermometry mapping at these same points.

  1. Volcano Monitoring with Coda Wave Interferometry at Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gret, A.; Snieder, R.; Aster, R.

    2003-12-01

    Multiply-scattered waves dominate the late seismic coda. Small changes in the medium that would have no detectable influence on the first arrivals can be highly amplified by multiple scattering and readily observed in the coda. We apply coda wave interferometry to monitor subsurface temporal changes at Mount Erebus Volcano, Ross Island, Antarctica. Erebus is one of the few volcanoes known to have an open conduit system hosting a persistent convecting lava lake. Strombolian eruptions, caused by the explosive decompression of large bubbles of exsolved volatiles disrupt the lake itself, which subsequently refills within a few minutes. Because of the recoverability of this system, these eruptions provide a repeatable seismic source of seismic waves for sampling the strongly scattering volcano. Repeating eruption seismograms have been recorded at fixed station sites over several years, and the coda is seen to be highly reproducible over extended periods of time. We find waveform correlation coefficients as high as 0.98 for short-period seismograms recorded up to several days apart. However, in comparing seismograms separated by approximately a month, we note a small decrease in correlation. Furthermore, we see a much larger decorrelation of the waveforms spanning a time period of one or even two years. Coda energy is thus providing information on systematic source and/or subsurface changes.

  2. Research on identification of active volcano features based on Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangsheng; Qian, Yonggang

    2009-10-01

    Volcanic activity can present unpredictable disasters to city populations living within regions and for people traveling in plane that intersect with ash-laden eruption clouds. Methods of monitoring volcanic activity include searching for variations in the thermal anomaly, clouds resource and subsidence deformation from active volcano. Over any active volcanoes, low spatial resolution satellite image are used to identify changes in eruptive activity, but are of insufficient spatial resolution to map active volcanic features. The Landsat data can be used to identify the thermal characteristics of a series of lava flows at Fuego volcano and Pacaya volcano, Guatemala. We use Landsat TM/ETM+ 7, 5, 4 (displayed in red, green, and blue, respectively) false-color composite of the research region, acquired on 18 December 1989 and 23 January 2000 to indicate the volcano image features which appear halo structure with blue red and yellow. The interpretation flag is obvious which indicate the difference temperature of volcano crater. Spatially varying haze emitted by volcano activity is identified and removed based on Improved Haze Optimized Transform (HOT) which is a robust haze assessing method. With improved spatial resolution in the thermal IR, we are able to map the bifurcation and braiding of underground lava tubes. With higher spatial resolution panchromatic data, we are able to map lava flow fields, trace very high temperature lava channels, and identify an accurate feature associated with a collapsed crater floor. At both Fuego and Pacaya, we are able to use the thermal data to estimate temperature. We can monitor the dynamic change of the two volcanoes using two difference date Landsat data.

  3. Digital data set of volcano hazards for active Cascade Volcanos, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, Steve P.

    1996-01-01

    Scientists at the Cascade Volcano Observatory have completed hazard assessments for the five active volcanos in Washington. The five studies included Mount Adams (Scott and others, 1995), Mount Baker (Gardner and others, 1995), Glacier Peak (Waitt and others, 1995), Mount Rainier (Hoblitt and others, 1995) and Mount St. Helens (Wolfe and Pierson, 1995). Twenty Geographic Information System (GIS) data sets have been created that represent the hazard information from the assessments. The twenty data sets have individual Open File part numbers and titles

  4. The volcano in a gravel pit: Volcano monitoring meets experimental volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, U.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M.; Hort, M. K.; Kremers, S. B.; Meier, K.; Scarlato, P.; Scharff, L.; Scheu, B.; Taddeucci, J.; Wagner, R.; Walk, F.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are an inevitable natural threat. During explosive eruptions, gas and pyroclasts are ejected at high speed over variable time spans and at variable intensity. As magma fragmentation inside a volcanic edifice defies direct observation, our mechanistic understanding of the syn-eruptive processes is still incomplete. In an attempt to bridge this gap, we combined volcanic monitoring devices and experimental volcanology. We performed 34 field-based fragmentation experiments using cylindrical samples, drilled from natural volcanic rock samples. Decompression and particle ejection were monitored with a variety of scientific instruments, namely 1) Doppler Radar (DR), 2) high-speed and high-definition cameras, 3) high-speed thermal camera, 4) acoustic and infrasound sensors and 5) pressure transducers. The experiments were performed at controlled sample porosity (25 to 75 vol.%) and size (60 mm height and 25 mm and 60 mm diameter, respectively), confinement geometry, applied pressure (4 to 18 MPa) and temperature (25 and 850 °C). We present how the velocity of the ejected pyroclasts was measured by and evaluated for the different approaches and how it was affected by the experimental conditions and sample characteristics. We show that all deployed instruments successfully measured the pyroclast ejection, giving coherent results of up to 130 m/s. Using different set-ups (length and internal volume), we were able to reveal the influence on the infrasound signals. This is a very encouraging result and of paramount importance as it proves the applicability of these independent methods to volcano monitoring. Each method by itself may enhance our understanding of the pressurisation state of a volcano, an essential factor in ballistic hazard evaluation and eruption energy estimation.

  5. Volcano monitoring using the Global Positioning System: Filtering strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, K.M.; Cervelli, Peter; Lisowski, M.; Miklius, Asta; Segall, P.; Owen, S.

    2001-01-01

    Permanent Global Positioning System (GPS) networks are routinely used for producing improved orbits and monitoring secular tectonic deformation. For these applications, data are transferred to an analysis center each day and routinely processed in 24-hour segments. To use GPS for monitoring volcanic events, which may last only a few hours, real-time or near real-time data processing and subdaily position estimates are valuable. Strategies have been researched for obtaining station coordinates every 15 min using a Kalman filter; these strategies have been tested on data collected by a GPS network on Kilauea Volcano. Data from this network are tracked continuously, recorded every 30 s, and telemetered hourly to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. A white noise model is heavily impacted by data outages and poor satellite geometry, but a properly constrained random walk model fits the data well. Using a borehole tiltmeter at Kilauea's summit as ground-truth, solutions using different random walk constraints were compared. This study indicates that signals on the order of 5 mm/h are resolvable using a random walk standard deviation of 0.45 cm/???h. Values lower than this suppress small signals, and values greater than this have significantly higher noise at periods of 1-6 hours. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. The evolution of seismic monitoring systems at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory: Chapter 2 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okubo, Paul G.; Nakata, Jennifer S.; Koyanagi, Robert Y.

    2014-01-01

    In the century since the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) put its first seismographs into operation at the edge of Kīlauea Volcano’s summit caldera, seismic monitoring at HVO (now administered by the U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]) has evolved considerably. The HVO seismic network extends across the entire Island of Hawai‘i and is complemented by stations installed and operated by monitoring partners in both the USGS and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The seismic data stream that is available to HVO for its monitoring of volcanic and seismic activity in Hawai‘i, therefore, is built from hundreds of data channels from a diverse collection of instruments that can accurately record the ground motions of earthquakes ranging in magnitude from <1 to ≥8. In this chapter we describe the growth of HVO’s seismic monitoring systems throughout its first hundred years of operation. Although other references provide specific details of the changes in instrumentation and data handling over time, we recount here, in more general terms, the evolution of HVO’s seismic network. We focus not only on equipment but also on interpretative products and results that were enabled by the new instrumentation and by improvements in HVO’s seismic monitoring, analytical, and interpretative capabilities implemented during the past century. As HVO enters its next hundred years of seismological studies, it is well situated to further improve upon insights into seismic and volcanic processes by using contemporary seismological tools.

  7. Using infrared spectroscopy and satellite data to accurately monitor remote volcanoes and map their eruptive products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to detect the onset of new activity at a remote volcano commonly relies on high temporal resolution thermal infrared (TIR) satellite-based observations. These observations from sensors such as AVHRR and MODIS are being used in innovative ways to produce trends of activity, which are critical for hazard response planning and scientific modeling. Such data are excellent for detection of new thermal features, volcanic plumes, and tracking changes over the hour time scale, for example. For some remote volcanoes, the lack of ground-based monitoring typically means that these sensors provide the first and only confirmation of renewed activity. However, what is lacking is the context of the higher spatial scale, which provides the volcanologist with meter-scale information on specific temperatures and changes in the composition and texture of the eruptive products. For the past eleven years, the joint US-Japanese ASTER instrument has been acquiring image-based data of volcanic eruptions around the world, including in the remote northern Pacific region. There have been more ASTER observations of Kamchatka volcanoes than any other location on the globe due mainly to an operational program put into place in 2004. Automated hot spot alarms from AVHRR data trigger ASTER acquisitions using the instrument's "rapid response" mode. Specifically for Kamchatka, this program has resulted in more than 700 additional ASTER images of the most thermally-active volcanoes (e.g., Shiveluch, Kliuchevskoi, Karymsky, Bezymianny). The scientific results from this program at these volcanoes will be highlighted. These results were strengthened by several field seasons used to map new products, collect samples for laboratory-based spectroscopy, and acquire TIR camera data. The fusion of ground, laboratory and space-based spectroscopy provided the most accurate interpretation of the eruptions and laid the ground work for future VSWIR/TIR sensors such as HyspIRI, which are a critically

  8. Preliminary study of volcano monitoring using geochemical composition of lichen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KUAN, S.

    2012-12-01

    Taipei City, the capital of Taiwan, is bounded with Tatun Volcano Group (TVG), which is not active since 200 ka. However, some evidences indicate that the latest explosion of volcanic ash was dated to 5-6 ka as well as TVG is so close to metropolis. The monitoring on TVG is crucial for crisis management. For monitoring TVG, changes of geochemical signal in some volcanic gases and hot springs are currently assessed by monthly sampling. The geochemistry of volcanic gas and hot spring represents a short-term condition on sampling time and is highly controlled by temperature and precipitation on the surface. A long-term average geochemistry will be very helpful to be compared with the results of volcanic gas and hot spring. A bioindicator not only has the ability to store geochemical compositions in their tissues but also has a wide geographical distribution. It is very suitable in this kind of study and lichen is one of the best bioindicators mainly because lichens grow slowly and have a large-scale dependence upon the environment for their nutrition, In TVG, the high SO2 content in the atmosphere results in the absence of fruticose lichen. On the contrary, crustos lichen is the most common species in the study area. For the preliminary analysis, one fruticose, four foliose and four crustos lichens were collected around the major emission centers of volcanic gas. According to the results of ICP-MS analysis, the abundances of heavy metals are generally in the order of Zn, Fe, Mn, Cu, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, V, Co and U. Factor analysis (FA) demonstrates that most of the metals show very high loadings in the first factor. This means that the fractionation of metals among different lichen species is minor and the geochemical compositions of lichen are possibly controlled by the same source (atmosphere). The second factor of FA includes Mn, Sr and Ba, which share the same oxidation state of +2 in acidic environment. This factor can describe the variation of Mn, Sr and Ba in the

  9. Seismically Articulating Kilauea Volcano's Active Conduits, Rift Zones, and Faults through HVO's Second Fifty Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, P.; Nakata, J.; Klein, F.; Koyanagi, R.; Thelen, W.

    2011-12-01

    While seismic monitoring of active Hawaiian volcanoes began 100 years ago, the build-up of the U. S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) seismographic network to its current configuration began in 1955, when Jerry Eaton established remote stations that telemetered data via landline to recorders at HVO. With network expansion through the 1960's, earthquake location and cataloging capabilities have evolved to afford a computer processed seismic catalog now spanning fifty years. Location accuracy and catalog completeness to smaller magnitudes have increased. Research and insights developed using HVO's seismic record have exploited the ability to seismically monitor volcanic activity at depth, to identify active regions within the volcanoes on the basis of computed hypocentral locations, to infer regions of magma storage by recognizing different families of volcanic earthquakes, and to forecast volcanic activity in both short and longer term from seismicity patterns. HVO's seismicity catalog was central to calculations of probabilistic seismic hazards. The ability to develop and implement additional analytical and interpretive capabilities has kept pace with improvements in both field and laboratory hardware and software. While the basic capabilities continue as part of HVO's core monitoring, additional interpretive capabilities now include adding details of volcanic and earthquake source regions, and viewing seismic data in juxtaposition with other observatory data streams. As HVO looks to its next century of volcano studies, research and development continue to shape the future. Broadband seismic recording at HVO has enabled extensive study by Chouet, Dawson, and co-workers of the relationship of very-long-period seismic sources beneath Kilauea's summit caldera to magma supply and transport. Recent upgrades have improved the ability to use these data in seismic cataloging and research. Data processing upgrades have bolstered the ability to

  10. Monitoring rapid temporal change in a volcano with coda wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grêt, Alexander; Snieder, Roel; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2005-03-01

    Multiply-scattered waves typically dominate the late part of the seismic coda in local earthquake seismograms. Small medium changes that have no detectable influence on the first arrivals are amplified by multiple scattering and may thus be readily observed in the coda. We exploit this idea using Coda Wave Interferometry to monitor temporal changes at Mount Erebus Volcano, Antarctica. Erebus is one of the few volcanoes on Earth with a long-lived convecting lava lake. Large exsolved gas bubbles generate impulsive Strombolian explosions that provide a repeating seismic source of seismic energy propagating through the strongly scattering geology of the volcano. We examined these signals during a particularly active eruptive two-month period between December, 1999 and February, 2000. Early seismograms are highly reproducible throughout this period. During the first month this is also the case for the coda. Approximately midway through this period, however, the seismic coda decorrelates rapidly over a period of several days. This indicates a rapid change in the scattering properties of the volcano, likely reflecting subtle changes in the near-summit magma/conduit system that would not be discernible using direct- or single-scattered seismic wave methods.

  11. Fluid geochemistry monitoring at three California volcanoes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, W.; Hunt, A. G.; Kennedy, B. M.; Ingebritsen, S.; McGeehin, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain, Lassen, and Shasta are high-threat volcanoes where aqueous and gas geochemistry is studied as part of ongoing monitoring efforts. All three volcanoes host high-elevation gas vents at near-boiling temperatures, and time series of samples from these features can reveal changes in the underlying magma-hydrothermal system. Most notably, a steam vent on Mammoth Mountain has shown significant increases in 3He/4He ratios that correlate with seismic swarms, initially in 1989-1990 and again in 2010-2012. The correlations provide strong evidence that those seismic swarms reflect enhanced upflow of magmatic fluids. Difficult access limits the frequency of sampling at the vents on Lassen and Shasta, but background data do exist, and sampling frequency could be increased in the event of unrest. Geochemical monitoring at the three volcanoes also includes sampling spring waters of diverse types that discharge on the flanks. Lassen supports a large hydrothermal system on its SE flanks consisting of numerous acid-sulfate springs and mudpots and at lower elevations, high-Cl hot springs. Dilute springs on the NE flank contain a few mg/L Cl and are a few °C above normal but are distinctly enriched in magmatic CO2 and represent potentially useful monitoring targets. Similar dilute, slightly thermal springs constitute the only anomalous spring discharges at Shasta (which lacks hot springs), and carbon and helium isotopes demonstrate a magmatic gas component in these features. Mammoth Mountain has one ~50°C hot spring (Reds Meadow tub) at its western base but also hosts a large number of dilute cold springs that are highly enriched in magmatic CO2. These cold springs show no detectable anomalies in Cl or temperature and the CO2 enrichment is best explained as a consequence of direct dissolution of magmatic gas into cold groundwater. Direct gas dissolution into cold groundwater likely occurs at Lassen and Shasta as well, in addition to the small input of geothermal

  12. Evolving Hazard Monitoring and Communication at San Vicente Volcano, El Salvador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, L. J.; Gierke, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    El Salvador has 20 potentially active volcanoes, four of which have erupted in the last 100 years. Since San Vicente Volcano has had no historic eruptions, monitoring is not a high priority; especially given the current eruptive crisis at San Miguel Volcano. Though probability of eruptive hazards remains low at San Vicente, it is arguably one of the most hazardous volcanoes in the country due to rainfall-induced landslides and debris-flow risk. At least 250 deaths occurred in November 2009 from landslides and debris flows triggered by Hurricane Ida. This disaster caused the Universidad de El Salvador - Facultad Multidisciplinaria Paracentral (UES-FMP, San Vicente, El Salvador) to partner with governmental and nongovernmental organizations (including the U.S. Peace Corps, U.S. Fulbright Program, Korean International Cooperation Agency, Protección Civil and the Centro de Protección para Desastres (CEPRODE)) to focus its faculty and student research toward hazard monitoring and risk studies. Newly established monitoring efforts include: measurement of surface cracks and localized rainfall by Protección Civil and local residents using crude extensometers and rain gauges; installation of six weather stations that operate within the most at-risk municipalities; seismic refraction surveys to better characterize stratigraphy and seasonal water table changes; and most recently, a USAID/NSF-funded initiative partnered with the UES-FMP to monitor seasonal hydrologic conditions related to flooding and groundwater recharge. The information from these initiatives is now used to communicate current conditions and warnings through a network of two-way radios established by CEPRODE and Protección Civil. Representatives from the multi-institutional team also communicate the data to authorities who make better-informed decisions regarding warnings and evacuations, as well as determine suitable areas for population relocation in the event of a crisis. Data will eventually be used

  13. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  14. A Benthic Invertebrate Survey of Jun Jaegyu Volcano: An active undersea volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinones, G.; Brachfeld, S.; Gorring, M.; Prezant, R. S.; Domack, E.

    2005-12-01

    organism. These results can establish a qualitative baseline survey for other young volcanoes, and be used to monitor changes in the benthic assemblages and biodiversity as a function of environmental change and environmental health.

  15. Real-time GNSS volcano deformation monitoring (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, M.; Langbein, J. O.; Hudnut, K. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present comparisons of the precision obtained from several alternative real-time GNSS processing methods, and show how offsets caused by snow and ice on an antenna can be automatically identified in real time using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data. We monitor ground deformation using continuous GNSS stations installed on several volcanoes in the Cascade Range and elsewhere, and many of these stations transmit high-rate (1s) data in real-time. We examine real-time, high-rate station position solutions obtained with two implementations of centralized RTNet (GPS Solutions, Inc.) processing, and find that the precision is roughly the same for ambiguity-fixed network solutions and for ambiguity-fixed precise point position solutions (PPPAR). The PPPAR method uses satellite clock corrections provided by GPS Solutions from a network of Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) stations in western Oregon. The precision of network solutions that include GPS and GLONASS data is similar to the GPS-only solutions, except at stations with a relatively poor view of the sky. An alternative method of processing the real-time GPS data uses clock corrections transmitted directly to the receiver, which then autonomously calculates and transmits positions. We will compare our RTNet results with autonomous point position solutions calculated using Trimble's CenterPoint RTX corrections. RTX performance in repeated, controlled, large antenna-motion tests by USGS and UNAVCO indicates that it meets requirements of USGS volcano-monitoring applications; more thorough testing and performance checks on an ongoing basis would be desirable. GNSS antennas on volcanoes often become temporarily coated with ice or buried by snow in the winter. In these situations, signal delays introduce an apparent offset in the monitoring station's position. We address this problem by implementing in real time a technique developed by Kristine Larson that uses changes in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of GNSS signals

  16. Evaluating life-safety risk of fieldwork at New Zealand's active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, Natalia; Jolly, Gill; Taig, Tony; Webb, Terry

    2014-05-01

    Volcano observatories monitor active or potentially active volcanoes. Although the number and scope of remote monitoring instruments and methods continues to grow, in-person field data collection is still required for comprehensive monitoring. Fieldwork anywhere, and especially in mountainous areas, contains an element of risk. However, on volcanoes with signs of unrest, there is an additional risk of volcanic activity escalating while on site, with potentially lethal consequences. As an employer, a volcano observatory is morally and sometimes legally obligated to take reasonable measures to ensure staff safety and to minimise occupational risk. Here we present how GNS Science evaluates life-safety risk for volcanologists engaged in fieldwork on New Zealand volcanoes with signs of volcanic unrest. Our method includes several key elements: (1) an expert elicitation for how likely an eruption is within a given time frame, (2) quantification of, based on historical data when possible, given a small, moderate, or large eruption, the likelihood of exposure to near-vent processes, ballistics, or surge at various distances from the vent, and (3) estimate of fatality rate given exposure to these volcanic hazards. The final product quantifies hourly fatality risk at various distances from a volcanic vent; various thresholds of risk (for example, zones with more than 10-5 hourly fatality risk) trigger different levels of required approval to undertake work. Although an element of risk will always be present when conducting fieldwork on potentially active volcanoes, this is a first step towards providing objective guidance for go/no go decisions for volcanic monitoring.

  17. Geodetic monitoring of Mt. Vesuvius Volcano, Italy, based on EDM and GPS surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingue, Folco; Troise, Claudia; De Luca, Gaetano; Grassi, Vittorio; Scarpa, Roberto

    1998-06-01

    The geophysical monitoring system of Mt. Vesuvius volcano includes a geodetic EDM network having average basis lengths amounting to 6 km. This trilateration network is localised around the central crater and consists of 21 stations with a geometry allowing measurement of 60 slope distances. In order to relate this network to more stable areas and to other networks in the Apennines, the EDM net has been extended using GPS methods. In summer 1993 four GPS receivers (Leica System 200) were used on the same points measured with EDM method. During this survey two long bases from the volcano to the more stable limestone platform located in the S direction were measured. The same baselines were previously measured by using an AGA 600 laser geodimeter. In January 1995 a new survey was performed by using two infrared distantiometers (1 DISTOMAT DI3000 and an AGA 142). The comparison with the data since 1975 does not show any significant ground deformation to be ascribed to the volcanic activity. Moreover the consistency between GPS and EDM data allows to exclude systematic differences between these two methodologies for volcano monitoring.

  18. Volcano Deformation and Modeling on Active Volcanoes in the Philippines from ALOS InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Rivera, Anieri M.; Amelung, Falk; Eco, Rodrigo

    2015-05-01

    Bulusan, Kanlaon, and Mayon volcanoes have erupted over the last decade, and Taal caldera showed signs of volcanic unrest within the same time range. Eruptions at these volcanoes are a threat to human life and infrastructure, having over 1,000,000 people living within 10 km from just these 4 volcanic centers. For this reason, volcano monitoring in the Philippines is of extreme importance. We use the ALOS-1 satellite from the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to make an InSAR time series analysis over Bulusan, Kanlaon, Mayon, and Taal volcanoes for the 2007-2011 period. Time-dependent deformation was detected at all of the volcanoes. Deformation related to changes in pressurization of the volcanic systems was found on Taal caldera and Bulusan volcanoes, with best fitting Mogi sources located at half-space depths of 3.07 km and 0.5 km respectively.

  19. Developing geophysical monitoring at Mayon volcano, a collaborative project EOS-PHIVOLCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, D.; Laguerta, E.; Baloloy, A.; Valerio, R.; Marcial, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Mayon is an openly-degassed volcano, producing mostly small, frequent eruptions, most recently in Aug-Sept 2006 and Dec 2009. Mayon volcano status is level 1 with low seismicity dominated mostly local and regional tectonic earthquakes with continuous emission of SO2 from its crater. A research collaboration between Earth Observatory of Singapore-NTU and Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) have been initiated in 2010 with effort to develop a multi-disciplinary monitoring system around Mayon includes geophysical monitoring, gas geochemical monitoring, and petrologic studies. Currently there are 4 broadband seismographs, 3 short period instruments, and 4 tiltmeters. These instruments will be telemetered to the Lignon Hill Volcano Observatory through radio and 3G broadband internet. We also make use of our self-made low-cost datalogger which has been operating since Jan 2011, performing continuous data acquisition with sampling rate of 20 minute/sample and transmitted through gsm network. First target of this monitoring system is to obtain continuous multi parameter data transmitted in real time to the observatory from different instruments. Tectonically, Mayon is located in the Oas Graben, a northwest-trending structural depression. Previous study using InSAR data, showing evidence of a left-lateral oblique slip movement of the fault North of Mayon. Understanding on what structures active deformation is occurring and how deformation signal is currently partitioned between tectonic and volcanic origin is a key for characterizing magma movement in the time of unrest. Preliminary analysis of the tangential components of tiltmeters (particularly the stations 5 and 7.5 NE from the volcano) shows gradual inflation movement over a few months period. The tangential components for tiltmeters are roughly perpendicular to the fault north of Mayon. This may suggest downward tilting of the graben in the northern side of Mayon. Another possibility is that

  20. Imaging an Active Volcano Edifice at Tenerife Island, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Rietbrock, Andreas; García-Yeguas, Araceli

    2008-08-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Teide volcano is being carried out on Tenerife, a volcanic island in Spain's Canary Islands archipelago. The main objective of the Tomography at Teide Volcano Spain (TOM-TEIDEVS) experiment, begun in January 2007, is to obtain a three-dimensional (3-D) structural image of Teide volcano using seismic tomography and seismic reflection/refraction imaging techniques. At present, knowledge of the deeper structure of Teide and Tenerife is very limited, with proposed structural models based mainly on sparse geophysical and geological data. The multinational experiment-involving institutes from Spain, the United Kingdom, Italy, Ireland, and Mexico-will generate a unique high-resolution structural image of the active volcano edifice and will further our understanding of volcanic processes.

  1. Development and field-testing of the BENTO box: A new satellite-linked data collection system for volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, D. C.; Behar, A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Fouch, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    'i; Etna Volcano, Italy, and Hengill Volcano, Iceland. Together, the data from these BENTO boxes and previously established volcano monitoring instruments are allowing us to test and refine the system design and deployment strategy. 'BENTO 2' boxes, equipped with broadband seismic sensors, are currently undergoing bench testing, and will be deployed on active volcanoes for field-testing beginning in early 2014.

  2. Volcano Monitoring in Ecuador: Three Decades of Continuous Progress of the Instituto Geofisico - Escuela Politecnica Nacional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, M. C.; Yepes, H. A.; Hall, M. L.; Mothes, P. A.; Ramon, P.; Hidalgo, S.; Andrade, D.; Vallejo Vargas, S.; Steele, A. L.; Anzieta, J. C.; Ortiz, H. D.; Palacios, P.; Alvarado, A. P.; Enriquez, W.; Vasconez, F.; Vaca, M.; Arrais, S.; Viracucha, G.; Bernard, B.

    2014-12-01

    In 1988, the Instituto Geofisico (IG) began a permanent surveillance of Ecuadorian volcanoes, and due to activity on Guagua Pichincha, SP seismic stations and EDM control lines were then installed. Later, with the UNDRO and OAS projects, telemetered seismic monitoring was expanded to Tungurahua, Cotopaxi, Cuicocha, Chimborazo, Antisana, Cayambe, Cerro Negro, and Quilotoa volcanoes. In 1992 an agreement with the Instituto Ecuatoriano de Electrificacion strengthened the monitoring of Tungurahua and Cotopaxi volcanoes with real-time SP seismic networks and EDM lines. Thus, background activity levels became established, which was helpful because of the onset of the 1999 eruptive activity at Tungurahua and Guagua Pichincha. These eruptions had a notable impact on Baños and Quito. Unrest at Cotopaxi volcano was detected in 2001-2002, but waned. In 2002 Reventador began its eruptive period which continues to the present and is closely monitored by the IG. In 2006 permanent seismic BB stations and infrasound sensors were installed at Tungurahua and Cotopaxi under a cooperative program supported by JICA, which allowed us to follow Tungurahua's climatic eruptions of 2006 and subsequent eruptions up to the present. Programs supported by the Ecuadorian Secretaria Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia and the Secretaria Nacional de Planificacion resulted in further expansion of the IG's monitoring infrastructure. Thermal and video imagery, SO2 emission monitoring, geochemical analyses, continuous GPS and tiltmeters, and micro-barometric surveillance have been incorporated. Sangay, Soche, Ninahuilca, Pululahua, and Fernandina, Cerro Azul, Sierra Negra, and Alcedo in the Galapagos Islands are now monitored in real-time. During this time, international cooperation with universities (Blaise Pascal & Nice-France, U. North Carolina, New Mexico Tech, Uppsala-Sweden, Nagoya, etc.), and research centers (USGS & UNAVCO-USA, IRD-France, NIED-Japan, SGC-Colombia, VAAC, MIROVA) has introduced

  3. Monitoring Popocatepetl volcano's glaciers (Mexico): case study of glacier extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, H.; Julio, P.; Huggel, C.; Brugman, M.

    2003-04-01

    Popocatépetl volcano is located 60 km southeast of Mexico City and is one of the three ice-clad volcanoes in Mexico. The two glaciers of Popocatépetl became extinct after a strong retreat due to the combination of at least three causes: global change, change in regional meteorological conditions (induced by the vicinity to highly polluted areas) and local enforcement (namely volcanic eruption). Glacier dimensions of Popocatépetl glaciers have been measured by photogrammetric means, and even though continuous monitoring was not feasible for decades, in recent years availability of aerial photographs allowed a better documentation of glacier areal changes. The first inventory made in 1958 threw an areal extent of 0.89 km2. A second inventory of the areal extent of the two small glaciers of Popocatépetl in 1982 reported 0.56 km2. Average retreat rate resulted nearly 14,000 m2/year. An areal measurement for 1996 resulted in an-order-of-magnitude smaller retreat rate (more than 1,500 m2/year). In early 1997, the retreat rate was nearly 12,500 m2/year, an order of magnitude similar as that of the 1958-1982 period. This scheme changed strongly in the following years when retreat rate was twice in 1998 and more than 7 times greater in 1999. By the end of the year 2000, the retreat rate remained in the same order of magnitude as in early 1999. Since the year 2000 and up to the present, the glaciers are just a series of independent ice masses (seracs) and the bedrock is seen in between them. GPR determinations made in 1995 showed a 40 m average ice thickness. During ice drilling in the year 2000 at nearly the same spot where GPR determinations were made in 1995, a thickness of 4 m was found. Therefore, glacier shrinkage has been documented not only by areal restriction but also by strong changes in thickness. The strong retreat experienced by Popocatépetl’s glaciers along the last decades, were possibly due to global climatic enforcement and proximity to industrial

  4. Monitoring changes in seismic velocity related to an ongoing rapid inflation event at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennington, Ninfa; Haney, Matt; De Angelis, Silvio; Thurber, Clifford; Freymueller, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Okmok is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. In an effort to improve our ability to detect precursory activity leading to eruption at Okmok, we monitor a recent, and possibly ongoing, GPS-inferred rapid inflation event at the volcano using ambient noise interferometry (ANI). Applying this method, we identify changes in seismic velocity outside of Okmok’s caldera, which are related to the hydrologic cycle. Within the caldera, we observe decreases in seismic velocity that are associated with the GPS-inferred rapid inflation event. We also determine temporal changes in waveform decorrelation and show a continual increase in decorrelation rate over the time associated with the rapid inflation event. Themagnitude of relative velocity decreases and decorrelation rate increases are comparable to previous studies at Piton de la Fournaise that associate such changes with increased production of volatiles and/ormagmatic intrusion within the magma reservoir and associated opening of fractures and/or fissures. Notably, the largest decrease in relative velocity occurs along the intrastation path passing nearest to the center of the caldera. This observation, along with equal amplitude relative velocity decreases revealed via analysis of intracaldera autocorrelations, suggests that the inflation sourcemay be located approximately within the center of the caldera and represent recharge of shallow magma storage in this location. Importantly, there is a relative absence of seismicity associated with this and previous rapid inflation events at Okmok. Thus, these ANI results are the first seismic evidence of such rapid inflation at the volcano.

  5. Monitoring changes in seismic velocity related to an ongoing rapid inflation event at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, Ninfa L.; Haney, Matthew; De Angelis, Silvio; Thurber, Clifford H.; Freymueller, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Okmok is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. In an effort to improve our ability to detect precursory activity leading to eruption at Okmok, we monitor a recent, and possibly ongoing, GPS-inferred rapid inflation event at the volcano using ambient noise interferometry (ANI). Applying this method, we identify changes in seismic velocity outside of Okmok's caldera, which are related to the hydrologic cycle. Within the caldera, we observe decreases in seismic velocity that are associated with the GPS-inferred rapid inflation event. We also determine temporal changes in waveform decorrelation and show a continual increase in decorrelation rate over the time associated with the rapid inflation event. The magnitude of relative velocity decreases and decorrelation rate increases are comparable to previous studies at Piton de la Fournaise that associate such changes with increased production of volatiles and/or magmatic intrusion within the magma reservoir and associated opening of fractures and/or fissures. Notably, the largest decrease in relative velocity occurs along the intrastation path passing nearest to the center of the caldera. This observation, along with equal amplitude relative velocity decreases revealed via analysis of intracaldera autocorrelations, suggests that the inflation source may be located approximately within the center of the caldera and represent recharge of shallow magma storage in this location. Importantly, there is a relative absence of seismicity associated with this and previous rapid inflation events at Okmok. Thus, these ANI results are the first seismic evidence of such rapid inflation at the volcano.

  6. Hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines): Implications to volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, T.; Alanis, P. B.; Yamaya, Y.; Takeuchi, A.; Bornas, M. V.; Cordon, J. M.; Puertollano, J.; Clarito, C. J.; Hashimoto, T.; Mogi, T.; Sasai, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The first recorded eruption was in 1573. Since then it has erupted 33 times resulting in thousands of casualties and large damages to property. In 1995, it was declared as one of the 15 Decade Volcanoes. Beginning in the early 1990s it has experienced several phases of abnormal activity, including seismic swarms, episodes of ground deformation, ground fissuring and hydrothermal activities, which continues up to the present. However, it has been noted that past historical eruptions of Taal Volcano may be divided into 2 distinct cycles, depending on the location of the eruption center, either at Main Crater or at the flanks. Between 1572-1645, eruptions occurred at the Main Crater, in 1707 to 1731, they occurred at the flanks. In 1749, eruptions moved back to the Main Crater until 1911. During the 1965 and until the end of the 1977 eruptions, eruptive activity once again shifted to the flanks. As part of the PHIVOLCS-JICA-SATREPS Project magnetotelluric and audio-magnetotelluric surveys were conducted on Volcano Island in March 2011 and March 2012. Two-dimensional (2-D) inversion and 3-D forward modeling reveals a prominent and large zone of relatively high resistivity between 1 to 4 kilometers beneath the volcano almost directly beneath the Main Crater, surrounded by zones of relatively low resistivity. This anomalous zone of high resistivity is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir filled with volcanic fluids. The presence of this large hydrothermal reservoir could be related to past activities of Taal Volcano. In particular we believe that the catastrophic explosion described during the 1911 eruption was the result of the hydrothermal reservoir collapsing. During the cycle of Main Crater eruptions, this hydrothermal reservoir is depleted, while during a cycle of flank eruptions this reservoir is replenished with hydrothermal fluids.

  7. Use of SAR data to study active volcanoes in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, K.G.; Engle, K.; Lu, Zhiming; Eichelberger, J.; Near, T.; Doukas, M.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of the Westdahl, Veniaminof, and Novarupta volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska were analysed to investigate recent surface volcanic processes. These studies support ongoing monitoring and research by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in the North Pacific Ocean Region. Landforms and possible crustal deformation before, during, or after eruptions were detected and analysed using data from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS) and the US Seasat platforms. Field observations collected by scientists from the AVO were used to verify the results from the analysis of SAR data.

  8. Use of SAR data to study active volcanoes in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, K.G.; Engle, K.; Lu, Zhiming; Eichelberger, J.; Neal, T.; Doukas, M.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of Westdahl, Veniaminof, and Novarupta volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska were analyzed to investigate recent surface volcanic processes. These studies support ongoing monitoring and research by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in the North Pacific Ocean Region. Landforms and possible crustal deformation before, during, or after eruptions were detected and analyzed using data from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS) and the U. S. Seasat platforms. Field observations collected by scientists from the AVO were used to verify the results from the analysis of SAR data.

  9. Monitoring very-long-period seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Benítez, M. C.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Wilson, David; Okubo, Paul G.

    2010-09-01

    On 19 March, 2008 eruptive activity returned to the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii with the formation of a new vent within the Halemaumau pit crater. The new vent has been gradually increasing in size, and exhibiting sustained degassing and the episodic bursting of gas slugs at the surface of a lava pond ˜200 m below the floor of Halemaumau. The spectral characteristics, source location obtained by radial semblance, and Hidden Markov Model pattern recognition of the degassing burst signals are consistent with an increase in gas content in the magma transport system beginning in October, 2007. This increase plateaus between March - September 2008, and exhibits a fluctuating pattern until 31 January, 2010, suggesting that the release of gas is slowly diminishing over time.

  10. Temporary seismic networks on active volcanoes of Kamchatka (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; Abkadyrov, Ilyas; Shapiro, Nikolay; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Deev, Evgeny; Gordeev, Evgeny; Chebrov, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    We present details of four field campaigns carried out on different volcanoes of Kamchatka in 2012-2015. Each campaign was performed in three main steps: (i) installation of the temporary network of seismic stations; (ii) autonomous continuous registration of three component seismic signal; (III) taking off the network and downloading the registered data. During the first campaign started in September 2012, 11 temporary stations were installed over the Avacha group of volcanoes located 30 km north to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky in addition to the seven permanent stations operated by the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey (KBGS). Unfortunately, with this temporary network we faced with two obstacles. The first problem was the small amount of local earthquakes, which were detected during operation time. The second problem was an unexpected stop of several stations only 40 days after deployment. Nevertheless, after taking off the network in August 2013, the collected data appeared to be suitable for analysis using ambient noise. The second campaign was conducted in period from August 2013 to August 2014. In framework of the campaign, 21 temporary stations were installed over Gorely volcano, located 70 km south to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. Just in time of the network deployment, Gorely Volcano became very seismically active - every day occurred more than 100 events. Therefore, we obtain very good dataset with information about thousands of local events, which could be used for any type of seismological analysis. The third campaign started in August 2014. Within this campaign, we have installed 19 temporary seismic stations over Tolbachik volcano, located on the south side of the Klyuchevskoy volcano group. In the same time on Tolbachik volcano were installed four temporary stations and several permanent stations operated by the KBGS. All stations were taking off in July 2015. As result, we have collected a large dataset, which is now under preliminary analysis

  11. Active volcanoes observed through Art: the contribution offered by the social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Neri, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes have always fascinated people for the wild beauty of their landscapes and also for the fear that they arouse with their eruptive actions, sometimes simply spectacular, but other times terrifying and catastrophic for human activities. In the past, volcanoes were sometimes imagined as a metaphysical gateway to the otherworld; they have inspired the creation of myths and legends ever since three thousand years ago, also represented by paintings of great artistic impact. Modern technology today offers very sophisticated and readily accessed digital tools, and volcanoes continue to be frequently photographed and highly appreciated natural phenomena. Moreover, in recent years, the spread of social networks (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, etc.) have made the widespread dissemination of graphic contributions even easier. The result is that very active and densely inhabited volcanoes such as Etna, Vesuvius and Aeolian Islands, in Italy, have become among the most photographed subjects in the world, providing a popular science tool with formidable influence and usefulness. The beauty of these landscapes have inspired both professional artists and photographers, as well as amateurs, who compete in the social networks for the publication of the most spectacular, artistic or simply most informative images. The end result of this often frantic popular scientific activity is at least two-fold: on one hand, it provides geoscientists and science communicators a quantity of documentation that is almost impossible to acquire through the normal systems of volcano monitoring, while on the other it raises awareness and respect for the land among the civil community.

  12. Infrasound network implementation in Iceland - examples of volcano monitoring in an extreme environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Ripepe, Maurizio; Barsotti, Sara; Björnsson, Halldór; Del Donne, Dario; Vogfjörð, Kristín

    2015-04-01

    The installation of a network of infrasound arrays for volcano monitoring has been initiated in Iceland. In collaboration with the University of Florence (UNIFI), The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) has been operating infrasound arrays since the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in 2010. An important support came through the 26 partner FP7 FUTUREVOLC project which runs from 2012 - 2016. This project which is relevant to the EU "Supersite concept" for long term monitoring in geologically active regions of Europe, is led by the University of Iceland together with IMO which leads long-term monitoring of geohazards in Iceland and is responsible for maintaining instrument networks for this purpose. As a part of the ground based FUTUREVOLC network, infrasound arrays, are used to monitor volcanic eruptive activity. The arrays are composed of 4 elements with a triangular geometry and an aperture of 120 m where each element has a differential pressure transducer with a sensitivity of 25 mV/Pa in the frequency band 0.001-50 Hz and a noise level of 10-2 Pa. Infrasound is recorded on site at 100 Hz and 24 bits and transmitted via Internet link both to the IMO and UNIFI. Three arrays are installed in South Iceland, one in Gunnarsholt, one in Þjórsárdalur and one in Kirkjubæjarklaustur. These places were chosen with the aim to optimize wind noice reduction (onsite bushes and trees) and close proximity to volcanoes such as Hekla, Katla, Torfajökull, Eyjafjallajökull, Vestmannaeyjar and the Vatnajökull ice cap which covers four central volcanoes known for explosive eruptions. In September 2014, the fourth array was installed a few km north of Vatnajökull glacier, just north of the large effusive eruption in Holuhraun which started on 29 August 2014 and is still ongoing in January 2015. The eruption is associated with the ongoing Bárðarbunga volcanic unrest and caldera collapse which is being monitored closely by the IMO and FUTUREVOLC partners. The new array has the

  13. Redox change during magma ascent; Observation from three volcanoes and implication for gas monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussallam, Yves; Oppenheimer, Clive; Schipper, Ian C.; Hartley, Magaret; Scaillet, Bruno; Gaillard, Fabrice; Peters, Nial; Kyle, Phil

    2015-04-01

    The oxidation state of volcanic gases dictates their speciation and hence their reactivity in the atmosphere. It has become increasingly recognized that the oxidation state of a magma can be strongly affected by degassing. The oxidation state of gases will equally be impacted and the composition of gases emitted by volcanoes will therefore be function of the magma degassing history. This presentation will show results from three volcanoes where the oxidation state of the magma has been tracked during degassing. At Erebus and Laki we used Fe X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) on extensive suites of melt inclusions and glasses, while at Surtsey we used S-Kα peak shifts measurements by electron microprobe (EPMA) on melt inclusions, embayment and glasses. At all three locations we found that a strong reduction of both Fe and S is associated with magma ascent. At Erebus this reduction is greatest, corresponding to a fall in magmatic fO2 of more than two log units. We propose that sulfur degassing can explain the observed evolution of the redox state with ascent and show that forward modeling using initial melt composition can successfully predict the composition of the gas phase measured at the surface. We suggest that the redox state of volcanic gases (expressed in term of redox couples: H2O/H2, SO2/H2S and CO2/CO) can be used to monitor the depth of gas-melt segregation at active volcanoes.

  14. Probabilistic Reasoning Over Seismic Time Series: Volcano Monitoring by Hidden Markov Models at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, Carmelo; Prestifilippo, Michele; Cannata, Andrea; Montalto, Placido; Patanè, Domenico; Privitera, Eugenio

    2016-07-01

    From January 2011 to December 2015, Mt. Etna was mainly characterized by a cyclic eruptive behavior with more than 40 lava fountains from New South-East Crater. Using the RMS (Root Mean Square) of the seismic signal recorded by stations close to the summit area, an automatic recognition of the different states of volcanic activity (QUIET, PRE-FOUNTAIN, FOUNTAIN, POST-FOUNTAIN) has been applied for monitoring purposes. Since values of the RMS time series calculated on the seismic signal are generated from a stochastic process, we can try to model the system generating its sampled values, assumed to be a Markov process, using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). HMMs analysis seeks to recover the sequence of hidden states from the observations. In our framework, observations are characters generated by the Symbolic Aggregate approXimation (SAX) technique, which maps RMS time series values with symbols of a pre-defined alphabet. The main advantages of the proposed framework, based on HMMs and SAX, with respect to other automatic systems applied on seismic signals at Mt. Etna, are the use of multiple stations and static thresholds to well characterize the volcano states. Its application on a wide seismic dataset of Etna volcano shows the possibility to guess the volcano states. The experimental results show that, in most of the cases, we detected lava fountains in advance.

  15. Probabilistic Reasoning Over Seismic Time Series: Volcano Monitoring by Hidden Markov Models at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, Carmelo; Prestifilippo, Michele; Cannata, Andrea; Montalto, Placido; Patanè, Domenico; Privitera, Eugenio

    2016-04-01

    From January 2011 to December 2015, Mt. Etna was mainly characterized by a cyclic eruptive behavior with more than 40 lava fountains from New South-East Crater. Using the RMS (Root Mean Square) of the seismic signal recorded by stations close to the summit area, an automatic recognition of the different states of volcanic activity (QUIET, PRE-FOUNTAIN, FOUNTAIN, POST-FOUNTAIN) has been applied for monitoring purposes. Since values of the RMS time series calculated on the seismic signal are generated from a stochastic process, we can try to model the system generating its sampled values, assumed to be a Markov process, using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). HMMs analysis seeks to recover the sequence of hidden states from the observations. In our framework, observations are characters generated by the Symbolic Aggregate approXimation (SAX) technique, which maps RMS time series values with symbols of a pre-defined alphabet. The main advantages of the proposed framework, based on HMMs and SAX, with respect to other automatic systems applied on seismic signals at Mt. Etna, are the use of multiple stations and static thresholds to well characterize the volcano states. Its application on a wide seismic dataset of Etna volcano shows the possibility to guess the volcano states. The experimental results show that, in most of the cases, we detected lava fountains in advance.

  16. 2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  17. Instrumental lahar monitoring at Merapi Volcano, Central Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavigne, F.; Thouret, J.-C.; Voight, B.; Young, K.; LaHusen, R.; Marso, J.; Suwa, H.; Sumaryono, A.; Sayudi, D.S.; Dejean, M.

    2000-01-01

    More than 50 volcanic debris flows or lahars were generated around Mt Merapi during the first rainy season following the nuees ardentes of 22 November 1994. The rainfalls that triggered the lahars were analyzed, using such instruments as weather radar and telemetered rain gauges. Lahar dynamics were also monitored, using new non-contact detection instrumentation installed on the slopes of the volcano. These devices include real-time seismic amplitude measurement (RSAM), seismic spectral amplitude measurement (SSAM) and acoustic flow monitoring (AFM) systems. Calibration of the various systems was accomplished by field measurements of flow velocities and discharge, contemporaneously with instrumental monitoring. The 1994–1995 lahars were relatively short events, their duration in the Boyong river commonly ranging between 30 min and 1 h 30 min. The great majority (90%) of the lahars was recognized at Kaliurang village between 13:00 and 17:30 h, due to the predominance of afternoon rainfalls. The observed mean velocity of lahar fronts ranged between 1.1 and 3.4 m/s, whereas the peak velocity of the flows varied from 11 to 15 m/s, under the Gardu Pandang viewpoint location at Kaliurang, to 8–10 m/s at a section 500 m downstream from this site. River slopes vary from 28 to 22 m/km at the two sites. Peak discharges recorded in various events ranged from 33 to 360 m3/s, with the maximum value of peak discharge 360 m3/s, on 20 May 1995. To improve the lahar warning system along Boyong river, some instrumental thresholds were proposed: large and potentially hazardous lahars may be detected by RSAM units exceeding 400, SSAM units exceeding 80 on the highest frequency band, or AFM values greater than 1500 mV on the low-gain, broad-band setting.

  18. Optical satellite data volcano monitoring: a multi-sensor rapid response system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Ramsey, Michael; Wessels, Rick L.; Dehn, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, the use of satellite remote sensing to monitor active geological processes is described. Specifically, threats posed by volcanic eruptions are briefly outlined, and essential monitoring requirements are discussed. As an application example, a collaborative, multi-agency operational volcano monitoring system in the north Pacific is highlighted with a focus on the 2007 eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Russia. The data from this system have been used since 2004 to detect the onset of volcanic activity, support the emergency response to large eruptions, and assess the volcanic products produced following the eruption. The overall utility of such integrative assessments is also summarized. The work described in this chapter was originally funded through two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth System Science research grants that focused on the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument. A skilled team of volcanologists, geologists, satellite tasking experts, satellite ground system experts, system engineers and software developers collaborated to accomplish the objectives. The first project, Automation of the ASTER Emergency Data Acquisition Protocol for Scientific Analysis, Disaster Monitoring, and Preparedness, established the original collaborative research and monitoring program between the University of Pittsburgh (UP), the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, and affiliates on the ASTER Science Team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as well as associates at the Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC) in Japan. This grant, completed in 2008, also allowed for detailed volcanic analyses and data validation during three separate summer field campaigns to Kamchatka Russia. The second project, Expansion and synergistic use

  19. Monitoring the Hazards of Silicic Volcanoes with Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan; Wessels, Rick; Eisinger, Chris; Ramsey, Michael; Hellman, Melanie; Kuhn, Sally

    2004-01-01

    This report details the final progress on the Solid Earth and Natural Hazards project: Monitoring of Hazards of Silicic Volcanoes with Remote Sensing (SENH99-0000-0159). The original award went to Arizona State University (ASU) with Dr. Jonathan Fink as the P.I. and Dr. Michael Ramsey as the Co-I. In May 2000, Dr. Ramsey left ASU to take a tenure-track faculty position at the University of Pittsburgh. The principle investigators and NASA Headquarters agreed to split the grant award at the HQ level and therefore avoid the double overhead charges that would arise from a university subcontract. The objectives of the science were divided, and coordinated yearly progress reports have been submitted from each University. This report details the final progress on work carried out at Arizona State. A report by Dr. Ramsey at the University of Pittsburgh has already been submitted. The work from both institutions is closely related and this report will reflect that connection.

  20. Seismic and Acoustic Array Monitoring of Signal from Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terbush, B. R.; Anthony, R. E.; Johnson, J. B.; Ruiz, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Tungurahua Volcano is an active stratovolcano located in Ecuador's eastern Cordillera. Since its most recent cycle of eruptive activity, beginning in 1999, it has produced both strombolian-to-vulcanian eruptions, and regular vapor emissions. Tungurahua is located above the city of Baños, so volcanic activity is well-monitored by Ecuador's Instituto Geofisico Nacional with a seismic and infrasound network, and other surveillance tools. Toward better understanding of the complex seismic and acoustic signals associated with low-level Tungurahua activity, and which are often low in signal-to-noise, we deployed temporary seismo-acoustic arrays between June 9th and 20th in 2012. This deployment was part of a Field Volcano Geophysics class, a collaboration between New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the Escuela Politecnica Nacional's Instituto Geofísico in Ecuador. Two six-element arrays were deployed on the flank of the volcano. A seismo-acoustic array, which consisted of combined broadband seismic and infrasound sensors, possessed 100-meter spacing, and was deployed five kilometers north of the vent in an open field at 2700 m. The second array had only acoustic sensors with 30-meter spacing, and was deployed approximately six kilometers northwest of the vent, on an old pyroclastic flow deposit. The arrays picked up signals from four distinct explosion events, a number of diverse tremor signals, local volcano tectonic and long period earthquakes, and a regional tectonic event of magnitude 4.9. Coherency of both seismic and acoustic array data was quantified using Fisher Statistics, which was effective for identifying myriad signals. For most signals Fisher Statistics were particularly high in low frequency bands, between 0.5 and 2 Hz. Array analyses helped to filter out noise induced by cultural sources and livestock signals, which were particularly pronounced in the deployment site. Volcan Tungurahua sources were considered plane wave signals and could

  1. IESID: Automatic system for monitoring ground deformation on the Deception Island volcano (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Páez, Raúl; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; de Gil, Amós

    2012-11-01

    When establishing the relative distance between two GNSS-GPS stations with sub-centimeter accuracy, it is necessary to have auxiliary data, some of which can only be collected some time after the moment of measurement. However, for monitoring highly-active geodynamic areas, such as volcanoes and landslides, data precision is not as essential as rapid availability, processing of data in real-time, and fast interpretation of the results. This paper describes the development of an integrated automatic system for monitoring volcanic deformation in quasi real-time, applied to the Deception volcano (Antarctica). This experimental system integrates two independent modules that enable researchers to monitor and control the status of the GNSS-GPS stations, and to determine a surface deformation parameter. It comprises three permanent stations, one of which serves as the reference for assessing the relative distance in relation to the other two. The availability of GNSS-GPS data in quasi real-time is achieved by means of a WiFi infrastructure and automated data processing. This system provides, in quasi real-time, a time series of varying distances that tells us the extent to which any ground deformation is taking place.

  2. A tactical, permanent telemetered volcano monitoring station design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, A. B.; LaFevers, M.; Couchman, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The USGS-USAID Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) designs, constructs and installs telemetered volcano-monitoring stations for use in developing countries, at a wide range of latitudes and elevations, weather and environmental conditions. The stations typically house seismometers, GPS and webcams, singly or in combination. They are frequently installed quickly during a volcanic crisis, but are expected to function over the long term as permanent stations. The primary design goal is for a simple, highly portable station that can be installed in less than a day, but not require maintenance until the natural end of battery life, usually 2-5 years. The station consists of a pair of aluminum boxes (43x46x71cm, approx.) placed on the ground facing each other, 2-3m apart, forming the lower part of a metal framework made of 2" pipe to mount solar panels and antennae. Vertical sections of 2" pipe, 3-4m long, are clamped to each end of both the boxes, the lower ends buried into cement-filled holes. This makes 4 masts on a rectangular footprint of 1m X 3-4m. Two horizontal crosspieces of 2" pipe 3-4m long are clamped across the masts. Solar panels are laid across the crosspieces, mounted with 2" angle aluminum extending from the high crosspiece to the low one. Relative height of the crosspieces controls the angle of the solar panels. The crosspieces can be lengthened to increase mounting space for additional solar panels. Inside the aluminum boxes, the radios and electronics are housed in plastic boxes. All external cables are protected by flexible aluminum conduit. Important elements of the design include: -Redundant dual solar power supplies of expandable capacity for loads from 1W to 10W or more. -Robust lightning protection afforded by grounded metal footlockers and framework, and a built-in common grounding point. -Strongly resistant to ice loads. -Waterproof, insect-proof plastic boxes for radios and electronics. -Aluminum boxes are easily fabricated, fit within

  3. Internet-accessible, near-real-time volcano monitoring data for geoscience education: the Volcanoes Exploration Project—Pu`u `O`o

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, M. P.; Teasdale, R.; Kraft, K.

    2010-12-01

    Internet-accessible real- and near-real-time Earth science datasets are an important resource for geoscience education, but relatively few comprehensive datasets are available, and background information to aid interpretation is often lacking. In response to this need, the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa, established the Volcanoes Exploration Project: Pu‘u ‘O‘o (VEPP). The VEPP Web site provides access, in near-real time, to geodetic, seismic, and geologic data from the Pu‘u ‘O‘o eruptive vent on Kilauea Volcano, Hawai‘i. On the VEPP Web site, a time series query tool provides a means of interacting with continuous geophysical data. In addition, results from episodic kinematic GPS campaigns and lava flow field maps are posted as data are collected, and archived Webcam images from Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater are available as a tool for examining visual changes in volcanic activity over time. A variety of background information on volcano surveillance and the history of the 1983-present Pu‘u ‘O‘o-Kupaianaha eruption puts the available monitoring data in context. The primary goal of the VEPP Web site is to take advantage of high visibility monitoring data that are seldom suitably well-organized to constitute an established educational resource. In doing so, the VEPP project provides a geoscience education resource that demonstrates the dynamic nature of volcanoes and promotes excitement about the process of scientific discovery through hands-on learning. To support use of the VEPP Web site, a week-long workshop was held at Kilauea Volcano in July 2010, which included 25 participants from the United States and Canada. The participants represented a diverse cross-section of higher learning, from community colleges to research universities, and included faculty who teach both large introductory non-major classes

  4. Volcanic Activities of Hakkoda Volcano after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Miura, S.

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku Earthquake of 11 March 2011 generated large deformation in and around the Japanese islands, and the large crustal deformation raises fear of further disasters including triggered volcanic activities. In this presentation, as an example of such potential triggered volcanic activities, we report the recent seismic activities of Hakkoda volcano, and discuss the relation to the movement of volcanic fluids. Hakkoda volcano is a group of stratovolcanoes at the northern end of Honshu Island, Japan. There are fumaroles and hot springs around the volcano, and phreatic eruptions from Jigoku-numa on the southwestern flank of Odake volcano, which is the highest peak of the volcanic group, were documented in its history. Since just after the occurrence of the Tohokui Earthquake, the seismicity around the volcano became higher, and the migration of hypocenters of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes was observed.In addition to these VT earthquakes, long-period (LP) events started occurring beneath Odake at a depth of about 2-3 km since February, 2013, and subtle crustal deformation caused by deep inflation source was also detected by the GEONET GNSS network around the same time. The spectra of LP events are common between events irrespective of the magnitude of events, and they have several spectral peaks at 6-7 sec, 2-3 sec, 1 sec, and so on. These LP events sometimes occur like a swarm with an interval of several minutes. The characteristics of observed LP events at Hakkoda volcano are similar to those of LP events at other active volcanoes and hydrothermal area in the world, where abundant fluids exist. Our further analysis using far-field Rayleigh radiation pattern observed by NIED Hi-net stations reveals that the source of LP events is most likely to be a nearly vertical tensile crack whose strike is NE-SW direction. The strike is almost perpendicular to the direction of maximum extensional strain estimated from the geodetic analysis, and is almost parallel to

  5. Multiple Active Volcanoes in the Northeast Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Lupton, J. E.; Walker, S. L.; Embley, R. W.; Rubin, K. H.; Buck, N.; de Ronde, C. E.; Arculus, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    The northeast Lau Basin occupies a complex geological area between the Tafua arc front, the E-W trending Tonga Trench, and the Northeast Lau Spreading Center. These boundaries create multiple zones of extension and thus provide abundant opportunities for magma to invade the crust. The 25-km-long chain of “Mata” volcanoes lies near the center of this area, separated from both the arc front and the spreading ridge. In 2008 we discovered hydrothermal venting on the largest and most southerly of these volcanoes, W and E Mata. In 2010 we visited the 7 smaller volcanoes that form a 15-km-long arcuate sweep to the north from W and E Mata (the “North Matas”). We also revisited W and E Mata. Over each volcano we conducted CTD tows to map plumes and collect water samples. Based on the CTD results, camera tows searched for seafloor sources on three volcanoes. The N Mata volcanoes, extending from Mata Taha (1) in the south to Mata Fitu (7) in the north, lie within a prominent gap in the shallow bathymetry along the southern border of the Tonga trench. Northward from E Mata the Mata volcanoes degrade from large symmetrical cones to smaller and blocky volcanic edifices. Summit depths range from 1165 m (W Mata) to 2670 m (Mata Nima (5)). The most active volcano in the chain is the erupting W Mata, with an intense plume that extended 250 m above the summit. Hydrothermal temperature anomalies (Δθ, corrected for hydrographic masking effects) reached ˜1.7°C, with light-scattering values as high as 2-5 ΔNTU. The 2010 surveys now show that 6 of the 7 N Mata volcanoes are also hydrothermally active. Along the N Matas, Δθ and ΔNTU signals ranged from robust to weak, but distinct oxidation-reduction potential (aka Eh) anomalies confirmed active venting in each case. The most concentrated plumes were found near Mata Ua (2) and Mata Fitu (7), with Δθ and ΔNTU maxima of 0.1-0.17°C and 0.3, respectively. Despite the variability in plume strength, however, ΔNTU/Δθ ratios

  6. Temporal Variations of Magnetic Field Associated with Seismic Activity at Cerro Machin Volcano, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, J. M.; Serna, J. P.; Guzman, J.

    2011-12-01

    A study of magnetic variations was carried out at Cerro Machin Volcano, Colombia for the period 2009 -2010, with two permanent magnetometers located at South and North of the central dome, separated about 2.5 km each other. After corrections, we found that there is no clear correlation between volcanic seismicity and temporal changes of magnetic field for each magnetometer station, if they are analyzed individually. On the contrary, when we calculated the residual Magnetic field (RMF), for each magnetometer, and then we made the subtraction between them, and plot it vs time, we found a clear correlation of changes in local magnetic field with the occurrence of volcanic seismicity (ML >1.6). We found a change in the RMF between 1584 nT and 1608 nT, each time that a volcano-tectonic earthquake occurred. The máximum lapse time between the previous change in RMF and the further occurrence of the earthquake is 24 days, with an average of 11 days. This pattern occurred more than 9 times during the studied period. Based on the results, we believed that the simple methodology proposed here, is a good tool for monitoring changes in seismicity associated with activity at Cerro Machín volcano. We suggest that the temporal changes of RMF at Cerro Machín Volcano, are associated with piezo-magnetic effects, due to changes in strain-stress inside the volcano, produced by the interaction between local faulting and magma movement.

  7. Real-time Seismic Amplitude Measurement (RSAM): a volcano monitoring and prediction tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Endo, E.T.; Murray, T.

    1991-01-01

    Seismicity is one of the most commonly monitored phenomena used to determine the state of a volcano and for the prediction of volcanic eruptions. Although several real-time earthquake-detection and data acquisition systems exist, few continuously measure seismic amplitude in circumstances where individual events are difficult to recognize or where volcanic tremor is prevalent. Analog seismic records provide a quick visual overview of activity; however, continuous rapid quantitative analysis to define the intensity of seismic activity for the purpose of predicing volcanic eruptions is not always possible because of clipping that results from the limited dynamic range of analog recorders. At the Cascades Volcano Observatory, an inexpensive 8-bit analog-to-digital system controlled by a laptop computer is used to provide 1-min average-amplitude information from eight telemetered seismic stations. The absolute voltage level for each station is digitized, averaged, and appended in near real-time to a data file on a multiuser computer system. Raw realtime seismic amplitude measurement (RSAM) data or transformed RSAM data are then plotted on a common time base with other available volcano-monitoring information such as tilt. Changes in earthquake activity associated with dome-building episodes, weather, and instrumental difficulties are recognized as distinct patterns in the RSAM data set. RSAM data for domebuilding episodes gradually develop into exponential increases that terminate just before the time of magma extrusion. Mount St. Helens crater earthquakes show up as isolated spikes on amplitude plots for crater seismic stations but seldom for more distant stations. Weather-related noise shows up as low-level, long-term disturbances on all seismic stations, regardless of distance from the volcano. Implemented in mid-1985, the RSAM system has proved valuable in providing up-to-date information on seismic activity for three Mount St. Helens eruptive episodes from 1985 to

  8. Output rate of magma from active central volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadge, G.

    1980-01-01

    For part of their historic records, nine of the most active volcanoes on earth have each erupted magma at a nearly constant rate. These output rates are very similar and range from 0.69 to 0.26 cu m/s. The volcanoes discussed - Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Fuego, Santiaguito, Nyamuragira, Hekla, Piton de la Fournaise, Vesuvius and Etna - represent almost the whole spectrum of plate tectonic settings of volcanism. A common mechanism of buoyantly rising magma-filled cracks in the upper crust may contribute to the observed restricted range of the rates of output.

  9. 1997 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Wallace, Kristi L.

    1999-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors over 40 historically active volcanoes along the Aleutian Arc. Twenty are seismically monitored and for the rest, the AVO monitoring program relies mainly on pilot reports, observations of local residents and ship crews, and daily analysis of satellite images. In 1997, AVO responded to eruptive activity or suspect volcanic activity at 11 volcanic centers: Wrangell, Sanford, Shrub mud volcano, Iliamna, the Katmai group (Martin, Mageik, Snowy, and Kukak volcanoes), Chiginagak, Pavlof, Shishaldin, Okmok, Cleveland, and Amukta. Of these, AVO has real-time, continuously recording seismic networks at Iliamna, the Katmai group, and Pavlof. The phrase “suspect volcanic activity” (SVA), used to characterize several responses, is an eruption report or report of unusual activity that is subsequently determined to be normal or enhanced fumarolic activity, weather-related phenomena, or a non-volcanic event. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) about the 1997 activity of 5 Russian volcanoes--Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Karymsky, and Alaid (SVA). This report summarizes volcanic activity and SVA in Alaska during 1997 and the AVO response, as well as information on the reported activity at the Russian volcanoes. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a “significant” investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of reports throughout the year of steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1997 response record.

  10. Real-time radon monitoring at Stromboli volcano: influence of environmental parameters on 222Rn degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigolini, C.; Ripepe, M.; Poggi, P.; Laiolo, M.

    2008-12-01

    Two real-time stations for radon monitoring are currently operative at Stromboli volcano. The 222Rn electronic dosimeters are interfaced with an electronic board connected to a radiomodem for wireless data transfer (through a directional antenna) to a receiving station at the volcano observatory (COA). Radon activity data and enviromental parameters (soil temperature and atmospheric pressure) are sampled every 15 minutes and are instantaneously elaborated and transferred via web so that they can be checked in remote. Collected time series show that there is an overall inverse correlation between radon emissions and seasonal temperature variations. Signal processing analysis show that radon emissions in sectors of diffuse degassing are modulated by tidal forces as well. In addition, radon activities recorded at the summit station, located along the summit fracture zone where the gas flux is concentrated, are positively correlated with changes in atmospheric pressure and confirm the occurrence of the 'atmospheric stack effect'. It is not excluded that this process may play an active role in modulating Stromboli explosivity.

  11. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embley, R.W.; Chadwick, W.W., Jr.; Baker, E.T.; Butterfield, D.A.; Resing, J.A.; De Ronde, C. E. J.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Lupton, J.E.; Juniper, S.K.; Rubin, K.H.; Stern, R.J.; Lebon, G.T.; Nakamura, K.-I.; Merle, S.G.; Hein, J.R.; Wiens, D.A.; Tamura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. GPS and EDM monitoring of Unzen volcano ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Takeshi; Takagi, Akimichi

    2000-11-01

    Following 198 years of dormancy, an eruption started at Mt. Fugen, the main peak of Unzen volcano, in Kyushu, Japan, in November 1990. A dacite lava dome began to grow in May 1991. We installed the surveying points of GPS in 1992 around the lava dome in order to observe the ground deformation that accompanied the growth of the lava dome. In the winters of 1993 and 1994, we observed swift ground deformations that radiated from the vent of the volcano. It was presumed that rising magma accumulated and expanded the volcano body. After the lava effusion stopped in 1995, we also installed surveying points on the lava dome. EDM mirrors were permanently fixed to the large rocks with bolts. A GPS survey was carried out 2 or 3 times each year to estimate the 3-dimensional displacement. The result of the EDM survey showed that the baselines from the flank of the volcano were shortening 5 mm per day, and the result of the GPS survey showed that the displacement vector of the dome was parallel to the direction of the steepest slope of the old volcano body. This indicates that the inside of the lava dome is still very hot, and that deformation of the dome is viscous.

  13. Monitoring and modeling ice-rock avalanches from ice-capped volcanoes: A case study of frequent large avalanches on Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huggel, C.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Waythomas, C.F.; Wessels, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Iliamna is an andesitic stratovolcano of the Aleutian arc with regular gas and steam emissions and mantled by several large glaciers. Iliamna Volcano exhibits an unusual combination of frequent and large ice-rock avalanches in the order of 1 ?? 106??m3 to 3 ?? 107??m3 with recent return periods of 2-4??years. We have reconstructed an avalanche event record for the past 45??years that indicates Iliamna avalanches occur at higher frequency at a given magnitude than other mass failures in volcanic and alpine environments. Iliamna Volcano is thus an ideal site to study such mass failures and its relation to volcanic activity. In this study, we present different methods that fit into a concept of (1) long-term monitoring, (2) early warning, and (3) event documentation and analysis of ice-rock avalanches on ice-capped active volcanoes. Long-term monitoring methods include seismic signal analysis, and space-and airborne observations. Landsat and ASTER satellite data was used to study the extent of hydrothermally altered rocks and surface thermal anomalies at the summit region of Iliamna. Subpixel heat source calculation for the summit regions where avalanches initiate yielded temperatures of 307 to 613??K assuming heat source areas of 1000 to 25??m2, respectively, indicating strong convective heat flux processes. Such heat flow causes ice melting conditions and is thus likely to reduce the strength at the base of the glacier. We furthermore demonstrate typical seismic records of Iliamna avalanches with rarely observed precursory signals up to two hours prior to failure, and show how such signals could be used for a multi-stage avalanche warning system in the future. For event analysis and documentation, space- and airborne observations and seismic records in combination with SRTM and ASTER derived terrain data allowed us to reconstruct avalanche dynamics and to identify remarkably similar failure and propagation mechanisms of Iliamna avalanches for the past 45??years

  14. Monitoring of volcanic gas composition at Asama volcano, Japan, during 2004-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Hiroshi; Ohminato, Takao; Takeo, Minoru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke

    2015-09-01

    The composition of the volcanic gases discharged from the summit crater of Asama volcano has been monitored since 2004 by Multi-GAS and alkaline-filter techniques. The persistent degassing activity at Asama volcano is characterized by large variation of SO2 flux. The CO2/SO2 and H2O/SO2 ratios did not show clear variation irrespective of the SO2 flux variation and a few eruptions that occurred during active degassing periods. The estimated ratios have large uncertainty due to variable contribution of the different fumaroles in the summit crater to the volcanic plume and lack of a systematic variation can be due to the large uncertainty. The SO2/Cl ratio showed a systematic decrease after the eruption to the inactive period, suggesting that degassing pressure did not significantly increase after the eruption. Low-pressure degassing along with the continuous and intensive gas discharge suggests that the degassing is due to conduit magma convection. The apparently stable CO2/SO2 ratios imply a lack of significant volatile differentiation in the magma reservoir, such as CO2-rich bubble accumulation. The large variation of the SO2 flux along with stable gas composition implies that the large changes in magma convection rate are caused by changes in the radius of the convecting magma conduit.

  15. A multipurpose camera system for monitoring Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.; Lee, Lopaka; Moniz, Cyril J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a low-cost, compact multipurpose camera system designed for field deployment at active volcanoes that can be used either as a webcam (transmitting images back to an observatory in real-time) or as a time-lapse camera system (storing images onto the camera system for periodic retrieval during field visits). The system also has the capability to acquire high-definition video. The camera system uses a Raspberry Pi single-board computer and a 5-megapixel low-light (near-infrared sensitive) camera, as well as a small Global Positioning System (GPS) module to ensure accurate time-stamping of images. Custom Python scripts control the webcam and GPS unit and handle data management. The inexpensive nature of the system allows it to be installed at hazardous sites where it might be lost. Another major advantage of this camera system is that it provides accurate internal timing (independent of network connection) and, because a full Linux operating system and the Python programming language are available on the camera system itself, it has the versatility to be configured for the specific needs of the user. We describe example deployments of the camera at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, to monitor ongoing summit lava lake activity

  16. Rapid response of a hydrologic system to volcanic activity: Masaya volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, S.C.P.; Connor, C.B.; Sanford, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrologic systems change in response to volcanic activity, and in turn may be sensitive indicators of volcanic activity. Here we investigate the coupled nature of magmatic and hydrologic systems using continuous multichannel time series of soil temperature collected on the flanks of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, one of the most active volcanoes in Central America. The soil temperatures were measured in a low-temperature fumarole field located 3.5 km down the flanks of the volcano. Analysis of these time series reveals that they respond extremely rapidly, on a time scale of minutes, to changes in volcanic activity also manifested at the summit vent. These rapid temperature changes are caused by increased flow of water vapor through flank fumaroles during volcanism. The soil temperature response, ~5 °C, is repetitive and complex, with as many as 13 pulses during a single volcanic episode. Analysis of the frequency spectrum of these temperature time series shows that these anomalies are characterized by broad frequency content during volcanic activity. They are thus easily distinguished from seasonal trends, diurnal variations, or individual rainfall events, which triggered rapid transient increases in temperature during 5% of events. We suggest that the mechanism responsible for the distinctive temperature signals is rapid change in pore pressure in response to magmatism, a response that can be enhanced by meteoric water infiltration. Monitoring of distal fumaroles can therefore provide insight into coupled volcanic-hydrologic-meteorologic systems, and has potential as an inexpensive monitoring tool.

  17. Broadband Seismometer to Tilt Conversion for Monitoring Kīlauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, W. A.; Lyons, J. J.; Haney, M. M.; Anderson, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Tilt transients are common at active volcanoes and potentially mark magma and gas movements in a frequency band between GPS and typical broadband seismometers. Tiltmeters record such signals, but for optimal sensitivity, require a borehole installation, which especially restricts their use in remote or culturally sensitive areas. The summit of Kīlauea Volcano hosts a network of 4 tiltmeters within 5 km of the summit vent, but none within 2 km because of the culturally sensitive nature of Kīlauea Caldera. The almost equidistant configuration of the tilt network limits the ability to resolve the depth of the source of tilting, and the distance from the source limits the resolution of near-surface events, such as those associated with processes affecting the lava lake. There is, however, an 11 station broadband seismometer network within 5 km of the summit vent, with 5 stations within 2 km. Data from these seismometers can be converted to tilt to augment the existing tiltmeter network. This improved network of tiltmeters and seismometers has the potential to support detailed modeling of processes operating on the timescale of hours to a day. We develop a set of parameters to enable the transform of velocity to tilt in near-real-time for use in volcano monitoring and rapid modeling. We also investigate the use of recursive filtering to rapidly and efficiently transform a streaming broadband signal to tilt and enable its near-real time interpretive utility. We look at a variety of signals, including crater rim collapses, very long period earthquakes, long period earthquake swarms and lava lake overflows in order to better understand the sensitivity of the broadband seismometers to different frequencies of tilt. To validate the transform from velocity to tilt, especially the amplitude, we examine two collocated tiltmeter-broadband seismometer stations. In general, the broadband seismometer network has more sensitivity to minor tilt transients because of its proximity

  18. Thermal Monitoring of Nisyros Volcano (Greece) by Digital Processing of Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganas, A.; Vassilopoulou, S.; Sakkas, V.; Lagios, E.; Dietrich, V.; Hurni, L.; Stavrakakis, G.

    2003-04-01

    Nisyros is an active strato-volcano at the eastern end of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc. The volcano experienced a recent episode of unrest during 1995--1998 with the nucleation of numerous earthquakes and considerable increase of temperatures of the hydrothermal system. In the year 2000, we started monitoring the volcano from space using thermal satellite data of high-resolution sensors within the framework of the European Union IST project GEOWARN. Three Landsat 7 ETM+ scenes (60-m spatial resolution) and two ASTER Level 1B scenes (90-m spatial resolution) showing the broader Nisyros area were processed by use of Geomatica(v8.2.1, ERDAS Imagine(8.5 and ATCOR(v2.0.1 software. The ETM+ scenes were obtained during the night imaging mode of the sensor on 20-10-2000, 19-5-2002 and 26-10-2002, respectively. Ground data (1-D point observations) were also collected during the satellite overpass. Data processing, including orthorectification and atmospheric correction show clearly the existence of a thermal anomaly inside the Nisyros caldera with surface temperatures 10--15^oC warmer than the surroundings. The ASTER scenes were delivered in HDF format and were acquired on the 26-4-2002 (Daytime) and 13-6-2002 (night-time), respectively. We processed band 13 (10.25-10.95 (m) using a scene-specific standard atmosphere from the ATCOR atmospheric libraries, because there were no ground data at the time of the overpass. The results show a good comparison with the ETM+ data. The crater region was clearly located and it was mapped warmer than the surroundings within the range of surface temperatures measured over previous campaigns (27-35 (C). Our 2002 results were validated (2-D thermal maps) by the use of portable IR digital thermal camera.

  19. Optimized Autonomous Space In-situ Sensor-Web for volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Shirazi, B.; Kedar, S.; Chien, S.; Webb, F.; Tran, D.; Davis, A.; Pieri, D.; LaHusen, R.; Pallister, J.; Dzurisin, D.; Moran, S.; Lisowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    In response to NASA's announced requirement for Earth hazard monitoring sensor-web technology, a multidisciplinary team involving sensor-network experts (Washington State University), space scientists (JPL), and Earth scientists (USGS Cascade Volcano Observatory (CVO)), is developing a prototype dynamic and scaleable hazard monitoring sensor-web and applying it to volcano monitoring. The combined Optimized Autonomous Space -In-situ Sensor-web (OASIS) will have two-way communication capability between ground and space assets, use both space and ground data for optimal allocation of limited power and bandwidth resources on the ground, and use smart management of competing demands for limited space assets. It will also enable scalability and seamless infusion of future space and in-situ assets into the sensor-web. The prototype will be focused on volcano hazard monitoring at Mount St. Helens, which has been active since October 2004. The system is designed to be flexible and easily configurable for many other applications as well. The primary goals of the project are: 1) integrating complementary space (i.e., Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite) and in-situ (ground-based) elements into an interactive, autonomous sensor-web; 2) advancing sensor-web power and communication resource management technology; and 3) enabling scalability for seamless infusion of future space and in-situ assets into the sensor-web. To meet these goals, we are developing: 1) a test-bed in-situ array with smart sensor nodes capable of making autonomous data acquisition decisions; 2) efficient self-organization algorithm of sensor-web topology to support efficient data communication and command control; 3) smart bandwidth allocation algorithms in which sensor nodes autonomously determine packet priorities based on mission needs and local bandwidth information in real-time; and 4) remote network management and reprogramming tools. The space and in-situ control components of the system will be

  20. China's Changbaishan volcano showing signs of increased activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-10-01

    Roughly 1100 years ago, the Changbaishan volcano that lies along the border between northeastern China and North Korea erupted, sending pyroclastic flows dozens of kilometers and blasting a 5-kilometer-wide chunk off of the tip of the stratovolcano. The eruption, known as the Millennium eruption because of its proximity to the turn of the first millennium, was one of the largest volcanic events in the Common Era. In the subsequent period, there have been three smaller eruptions, the most recent of which took place in 1903. Starting in 1999, spurred by signs of resumed activity, scientists established the Changbaishan Volcano Observatory, a network to track changing gas compositions, seismic activity, and ground deformation. Reporting on the data collected over the past 12 years, Xu et al. found that these volcanic indices each leapt during a period of heightened activity from 2002 to 2006.

  1. Probabilistic reasoning over seismic RMS time series: volcano monitoring through HMMs and SAX technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliotta, M. A.; Cassisi, C.; Prestifilippo, M.; Cannata, A.; Montalto, P.; Patanè, D.

    2014-12-01

    During the last years, volcanic activity at Mt. Etna was often characterized by cyclic occurrences of fountains. In the period between January 2011 and June 2013, 38 episodes of lava fountains has been observed. Automatic recognition of the volcano's states related to lava fountain episodes (Quiet, Pre-Fountaining, Fountaining, Post-Fountaining) is very useful for monitoring purposes. We discovered that such states are strongly related to the trend of RMS (Root Mean Square) of the seismic signal recorded in the summit area. In the framework of the project PON SIGMA (Integrated Cloud-Sensor System for Advanced Multirisk Management) work, we tried to model the system generating its sampled values (assuming to be a Markov process and assuming that RMS time series is a stochastic process), by using Hidden Markov models (HMMs), that are a powerful tool for modeling any time-varying series. HMMs analysis seeks to discover the sequence of hidden states from the observed emissions. In our framework, observed emissions are characters generated by SAX (Symbolic Aggregate approXimation) technique. SAX is able to map RMS time series values with discrete literal emissions. Our experiments showed how to predict volcano states by means of SAX and HMMs.

  2. 1. Fourteen Years Of Diffuse CO2 Monitoring At Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrancos Martinez, Jose; Melián, Gladys; Ibarra, Martha; Álvarez, Julio; Rodríguez, Fátima; Nolasco, Dácil; Padilla, Germán; Calvo, David; Dionis, Samara; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Iñigo; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Muñoz, Angélica

    2013-04-01

    7. Cerro Negro is an active basaltic volcano belonging to the active Central American Volcanic Belt, which includes a 1,100 Km long chain of 41 active volcanoes from Guatemala to Panama. Cerro Negro first erupted in 1850 and has experienced 21 eruptive eruptions with inter eruptive average periods between 7 and 9 years. Since the last eruption occurred on 5 August 1999, with erupted lava flows and ash clouds together with gas emissions, a collaborative research program between INETER and ITER was established for monitoring diffuse CO2 emissions from this volcano. Until 2012, twelve soil CO2 emission surveys covering an area of 0,6 km2 have been performed by means of the accumulation chamber method to evaluate the spatial and temporal variations of CO2 degassing rate in relation to the eruptive cycle of Cerro Negro. A total diffuse CO2 emission output of 1,869 t•d-1 was estimated for the 1999 survey; just 3 months after the 1999 eruption which can be considered within the post-eruptive phase. For the April, 2002 and March, 2008 surveys, considered within the inter-eruptive phase, a clear decreasing tendency on the total diffuse CO2 output was observed, with estimates of 431 and 10 t•d-1, respectively, except a small increment in 2004, to 256 t d-1, associated with an anomalous seismic activity. The higher anomalies are located around the crater of 1995 and 1999. An increasing on the total CO2 emission has been observed, from December 2008 to February 2011, with total diffuse CO2 output estimates from 12 t•d-1 to 43 t•d-1, respectively. These temporal variations show a close relationship between diffuse CO2 emission and the eruptive cycle at Cerro Negro. This relationship indicates that monitoring CO2 emission is an important geochemical tool for the volcanic surveillance at Cerro Negro. References: (1) Rodríguez et al. (2009) AGU Fall Meeting 2009. EOS, AGU,V21-2017 . (2) Padilla et al. (2008). IV Reunión de la Red Española de Volcanología, Almagro 2008

  3. Monitoring of volcanic emissions for risk assessment at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Hugo; Campion, Robin; Fickel, Matthias; Cortés Ramos, Jorge; Alvarez Nieves, José Manuel; Taquet, Noemi; Grutter, Michel; Osiris García Gómez, Israel; Darío Sierra Mondragón, Rubén; Meza Hernández, Israel

    2015-04-01

    In January 2014, the Mexican Agency FOPREDEN (Natural Disaster Prevention Fund) accepted to fund a project to renew, upgrade and complement the gas monitoring facilities. The UNAM-CENAPRED (National Center for Disaster Prevention) gas monitoring system currently consists of: • A COSPEC instrument and two mini-DOAS used for mobile traverse measurements • An SO2 camera used for punctual campaign • A network of three permanent scanning mini-DOAS (NOVAC type 1 instrument) and one permanent mini-DOAS (NOVAC type II, currently under repair). The activity planed in the framework of the new project, of which several of them are already successfully implemented, include: • Completely refurbished permanent scanning mini-DOAS network consisting of four stations and the punctual deployment of three RADES (Rapid Deployment System) for assessing plume geometry and chemistry or for responding to emergency situations. • Prolongation of the mobile traverse measurements in order to continuously update the 20 years-long SO2 flux database obtained with the COSPEC, now coupled with a mobile DOAS for redundancy. • The development and installation of a permanent SO2 camera, for monitoring in real time the short timescale variations of the SO2 emissions. • The installation of two permanent FTIR spectrometers, one measuring the plume thermal emissions and the other measuring with the solar occultation geometry, for frequent measurements of molecular ratio between SO2, HCl, HF and SiF4 • The exploitation in near-real time of the satellite imagery (OMI, MODIS and ASTER) available for the volcano. A special attention will be paid to increase the reliability and graphical representation of these data stream in order to facilitate their use for decision-making by the civil protection authority in charge of the volcano.

  4. Remote sensing of volcanos and volcanic terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Francis, Peter W.; Wilson, Lionel; Pieri, David C.; Self, Stephen; Rose, William I.; Wood, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of using remote sensing to monitor potentially dangerous volcanoes is discussed. Thermal studies of active volcanoes are considered along with using weather satellites to track eruption plumes and radar measurements to study lava flow morphology and topography. The planned use of orbiting platforms to study emissions from volcanoes and the rate of change of volcanic landforms is considered.

  5. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  6. Continuous gravity observations at active volcanoes through superconducting gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Greco, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    Continuous gravity measurements at active volcanoes are usually taken through spring gravimeters that are easily portable and do not require much power to work. However, intrinsic limitations dictate that, when used in continuous, these instruments do not provide high-quality data over periods longer than some days. Superconducting gravimeters (SG), that feature a superconducting sphere in a magnetic field as the proof mass, provide better-quality data than spring gravimeters, but are bigger and need mains electricity to work, implying that they cannot be installed close to the active structures of high volcanoes. An iGrav SG was installed on Mt. Etna (Italy) in September 2014 and has worked almost continuously since then. It was installed about 6km from the active craters in the summit zone of the volcano. Such distance is normally too much to observe gravity changes due to relatively fast (minutes to days) volcanic processes. Indeed, mass redistributions in the shallowest part of the plumbing system induce short-wavelength gravity anomalies, centered below the summit craters. Nevertheless, thanks to the high precision and long-term stability of SGs, it was possible to observe low-amplitude changes over a wide range of timescales (minutes to months), likely driven by volcanic activity. Plans are in place for the implementation of a mini-array of SGs at Etna.

  7. Anatahan Activity and Monitoring, 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, A.; White, R.; Koyanagi, S.; Trusdell, F.; Kauahikaua, J.; Marso, J.; Ewert, J.

    2005-12-01

    Anatahan volcano began erupting in 2003 and continued with a second eruptive phase in 2004. In January 2005 the volcano began a sequence of eruptions and unrest that continues as of September 2005. The activity has been characterized by punctuated episodes of very steamy strombolian activity and vigorous ash emission. Some of the ash emissions have reached 50,000-foot elevations, with VOG and ash occasionally reaching the Philippines and southernmost Japan, over 1000 miles away. Vigorous ash emission has been almost continuous since June 2005. A M4.8 long-period earthquake (LP) occurred in mid-August, one of the largest LPs recorded on the planet in the last quarter-century. Real-time monitoring consisting of a few telemetered short-period seismometers and acoustic sensors has been severely hampered by ashfall on the small island. Monitoring efforts have been focused on the aircraft/ash hazard, with the goal of providing the FAA and airline industry with rapid notice of seismic signatures that may indicate ash columns rising to the altitude of airline traffic, or nominally above 20,000-30,000 ft.

  8. Towards a Network Matched Filter Observatory for Alaska/Aleutian Volcano Monitoring and Research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Network Matched Filtering (NMF, commonly referred to as template matching), is a procedure which utilizes waveforms recorded from a cataloged seismic event (the "template event") to find additional seismic events by cross-correlating the template event with continuous seismic data over the time period of interest. NMF has been successfully used to populate seismic catalogs for a wide variety of seismic signals which are difficult to identify, such as tectonic low frequency earthquakes, early or triggered aftershocks, and small magnitude induced seismic sequences. NMF provides robust event detection of signals with signal to noise ratios near one, and the output of the filter is largely independent of unrelated seismic noise, making it an ideal technique for identifying events during noisy time periods, such as immediately following a large earthquake or during a volcanic eruption. We also show how NMF can be used over longer time periods, with dynamic seismic network status, to more robustly compare time periods with disparate network geometries. Here, we present efforts to develop processing infrastructure for semi-automated execution of the NMF technique applied to volcanoes in the state of Alaska. We present a series of case studies involving both monitored and unmonitored volcanoes. Given the large scope of this endeavor, we focus our preliminary efforts on cataloging deep long period (DLP) seismicity, as DLP's have high scientific interest (as well as providing a reasonable benchmark), have been cataloged at many of Alaska's volcanoes, and yet are rare enough to speed up code development and testing. At Redoubt, for example, we use NMF to develop a catalog of ~300 DLP's from 2008 through July 2015. Most cataloged DLP's and new matches from NMF occurred close in time to the 2009 eruption, but we find that DLP activity has continued through July 2015. At Kasatochi, an unmonitored volcano which erupted in 2008, we show that NMF is more effective at cataloging

  9. Assessing and optimizing infrasound network performance: application to remote volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailpied, D.; LE Pichon, A.; Marchetti, E.; Kallel, M.; Ceranna, L.

    2014-12-01

    Infrasound is an efficient monitoring technique to remotely detect and characterize explosive sources such as volcanoes. Simulation methods incorporating realistic source and propagation effects have been developed to quantify the detection capability of any network. These methods can also be used to optimize the network configuration (number of stations, geographical location) in order to reduce the detection thresholds taking into account seasonal effects in infrasound propagation. Recent studies have shown that remote infrasound observations can provide useful information about the eruption chronology and the released acoustic energy. Comparisons with near-field recordings allow evaluating the potential of these observations to better constrain source parameters when other monitoring techniques (satellite, seismic, gas) are not available or cannot be made. Because of its regular activity, the well-instrumented Mount Etna is in Europe a unique natural repetitive source to test and optimize detection and simulation methods. The closest infrasound station part of the International Monitoring System is located in Tunisia (IS48). In summer, during the downwind season, it allows an unambiguous identification of signals associated with Etna eruptions. Under the European ARISE project (Atmospheric dynamics InfraStructure in Europe, FP7/2007-2013), experimental arrays have been installed in order to characterize infrasound propagation in different ranges of distance and direction. In addition, a small-aperture array, set up on the flank by the University of Firenze, has been operating since 2007. Such an experimental setting offers an opportunity to address the societal benefits that can be achieved through routine infrasound monitoring.

  10. Tungurahua Volcano's 1999-2007 Eruptive Process, Monitoring Results and Risk Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mothes, P. A.; Staff, I.

    2007-05-01

    The eruptive process at Tungurahua volcano (5023m), in central Ecuador, began in August 1999 with SO2-rich steam emissions. In the previous 8 months, the IG's telemetered net had registered some 1300 volcano-tectonic (VT) seismic events, interpreted to be fracturing by magma ascent. VT's practically ceased in early Sept. 1999, followed by a transition to hybrid and long period (LP) seismic events and continual multispectral tremor and emissions. In October, Strombolian fountaining characterized the activity. This onset of magmatic activity prompted Ecuador's president to evacuate inhabitants from mid October to late December. November saw a shift to vulcanian explosions, which showered the cone with ballistics and fine ash over the region, but no large eruptions or pyroclastic flows transpired. During these early months SO2 outputs rose to 8-10 KT/day, while magma discharge remained low-probably less than 5 x 106 m3. Low level eruptive activity (VEI =1) continued from 1999 to mid 2006, punctuated by periods in Aug. 2001, Sept. 2002, Oct. 2003 and in mid 2006 of high energy release, persistent Strombolian fountaining, large explosions, and light regional ash fallout. Quiet periods were also registered, notably from Feb. to Dec. 2005. From Jan. to Mar. 2006 another rash of VT's was registered followed by a reactivation in May to July, when the number of explosions/day increased (N= 900), SO2 levels rose, deformation accelerated and there was a temporary evolution of LP seismicity with hypocenters ascending from 7 to 3 km beneath the summit. Due to these changes, on May 12, the IG issued a report to authorities stating that activity at Tungurahua could lead to several scenarios-the generation of ash falls and pyroclastic flow were main concerns. Subsequently, the 14 July (VEI= 2) and the 16-17 August (VEI= 4) eruptions were preceded by heightened activity in all monitored parameters roughly 10 days before each eruption, followed by several days of calm, then by 3 to

  11. Deep structure and origin of active volcanoes in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.

    2010-12-01

    Recent geophysical studies have provided important constraints on the deep structure and origin of the active intraplate volcanoes in Mainland China. Magmatism in the western Pacific arc and back-arc areas is caused by the corner flow in the mantle wedge and dehydration of the subducting slab (e.g., Zhao et al., 2009a), while the intraplate magmatism in China has different origins. The active volcanoes in Northeast China (such as the Changbai and Wudalianchi) are caused by hot upwelling in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone and deep slab dehydration as well (Zhao et al., 2009b). The Tengchong volcano in Southwest China is caused by a similar process in the BMW above the subducting Burma microplate (or Indian plate) (Lei et al., 2009a). The Hainan volcano in southernmost China is a hotspot fed by a lower-mantle plume which may be associated with the Pacific and Philippine Sea slabs' deep subduction in the east and Indian slab's deep subduction in the west down to the lower mantle (Lei et al., 2009b; Zhao, 2009). The stagnant slab finally collapses down to the bottom of the mantle, which can trigger the upwelling of hot mantle materials from the lower mantle to the shallow mantle beneath the subducting slabs and may cause the slab-plume interactions (Zhao, 2009). References Lei, J., D. Zhao, Y. Su, 2009a. Insight into the origin of the Tengchong intraplate volcano and seismotectonics in southwest China from local and teleseismic data. J. Geophys. Res. 114, B05302. Lei, J., D. Zhao, B. Steinberger et al., 2009b. New seismic constraints on the upper mantle structure of the Hainan plume. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 173, 33-50. Zhao, D., 2009. Multiscale seismic tomography and mantle dynamics. Gondwana Res. 15, 297-323. Zhao, D., Z. Wang, N. Umino, A. Hasegawa, 2009a. Mapping the mantle wedge and interplate thrust zone of the northeast Japan arc. Tectonophysics 467, 89-106. Zhao, D., Y. Tian, J. Lei, L. Liu, 2009b. Seismic

  12. Eruptive history, current activity and risk estimation using geospatial information in the Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Camarena-Garcia, M.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Flores-Peña, S.

    2013-12-01

    avocado orchards and fruits like blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries within the radius of 15 km from the crater. The population dynamics in the Colima volcano area had a population of 552,954 inhabitants in 2010, and a growth at an annual rate of 1.6 percent of the total population. 60 percent of the populations live in 105 towns with a population less than 250 inhabitants. Also, the region showed an increase in vulnerability for the development of economic activities, supported by the highway, railway, natural gas pipelines and electrical infrastructure that connect to the Port of Manzanillo to Guadalajara city. With the use of geospatial information quantify the vulnerability, together with the hazard maps and exposure, enabled us to build the following volcanic risk maps: a) Exclusion areas and moderate hazard for explosive events (ballistic) and pyroclastic flows, b) Hazard map of lahars and debris flow, and c) Hazard map of ash-fall. The geospatial database, a GIS mapping and current volcano monitoring, are the basis of the Operational Plan Colima Volcano. Civil Protection by the state of Jalisco and the updating of urban development plans of municipalities converge on the volcano. These instruments of land planning will help reduce volcanic risk in the region.

  13. Noise-based seismic velocity monitoring at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano, La Réunion (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, F.; Obermann, A.; Rivet, D. N.; Clarke, D. S.; Shapiro, N.; Campillo, M.; Larose, E. F.; Ferrazzini, V.; Lecocq, T.

    2013-12-01

    Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) Volcano, a shield basaltic volcano located on La Réunion island, has been strongly active these last 15 years with 2 eruptions per year on average. In April 2007, an unusually strong eruption occurred on the volcano's south-eastern flank, ejecting a volume of over 240.10^6 m^3 of lava, that is, ten times more than the typical value during the preceding decade (Staudacher et al. 2009). A few days later (5 April 2007), the summit crater collapsed by 340 m. Since then, magmatic activity at PdF decayed (last eruption in December 2010). Since 2000, Piton de la Fournaise Volcano Observatory has recorded seismic signals continuously from 20 short-period sensors located on PdF Volcano. This set of data together with recent fundamental advances in ambient noise seismology (Campillo 2006) have led to the development of a novel method to measure volcanic edifice seismic velocity changes continuously along time. We show observations of pre-eruptive changes of seismic velocities at PdF volcano that are interpreted as being linked to the edifice deformation induced by magmatic activity (magma pressure buildup, Brenguier et al. 2008). In order to measure highly precise seismic velocity changes we deployed 15 new broad-band seismic sensors on PdF volcano between 2009 and 2011 in the framework of an international project (UnderVolc, Brenguier et al. 2012). During that time period, 5 eruptions occurred and the last 10 months of records were characterized by an unusually low level of volcanic activity. We focus on the location and characterization of edifice seismic velocity changes observed few weeks prior to the October 2010 PdF eruption. We present results of lateral location of seismic velocity changes for this precursory episode. We also study long-term changes of seismic velocities for the entire studied period from 2000 to 2012. We observe an unusual strong velocity drop in 2007. A detailed analysis of this velocity drop and the comparison with

  14. The implementation of a volcano seismic monitoring network in Sete Cidades Volcano, São Miguel, Açores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallenstein, N.; Montalvo, A.; Barata, U.; Ortiz, R.

    2003-04-01

    Sete Cidades is one of the three active central volcanoes of S. Miguel Island, in the Azores archipelago. With a 5 kilometres wide caldera, it has the highest eruptive record in the last 5000 years with 17 intracaldera explosive events (Queiroz, 1997). Only submarine volcanic eruptions occurred in Sete Cidades volcano-tectonic system since the settlement of the island, in the 15th century. Small seismic swarms, some of which were interpreted as being related with magmatic and/or deep hydrothermal origin, characterize the most recent seismo-volcanic activity of Sete Cidades volcano. To complement the regional seismic network, operating since the early 80's, a new local seismic network was designed and installed at Sete Cidades Volcano. It includes 5 digital stations being one 5-seconds three-component station located inside the caldera and four 10-seconds one-component stations placed on the caldera rim. The solution found for the digital telemetry is based on UHF 19,2 Kbps radio modems linking four of the seismic stations to a central point, where the fifth station is installed. At this site, signals are synchronised with a GPS receiver, stored in a PC and re-transmitted to the Azores University Volcanological Observatory by an 115,2 Kbps Spread Spectrum 2.4 Ghz Radio Modem Network. Seismic signal tests carried out in all the area showed that cultural and sea noise, as well as some scattering effects due to the geological nature of the terrain (composed by thick pumice and ash deposits) and the topographic effects are factors that can not be avoidable and will be present in future records. This low cost network with locally developed and assembled components, based on short-period sensors without signal filtering in the field and digital telemetry, will improve the detection and location of low magnitude events in the Sete Cidades volcano area. Future developments of this program will include the installation of a seismic array inside the caldera to identify and

  15. Venus lives!. [evidence for active volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles A.; Francis, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Observational evidence which supports the contention that Venus is a volcanically and tectonically active planet is discussed. It is argued that, although there are no observations to date that would prove that Venus has been volcanically active during the last decade, planetological studies presented evidence for youthful volcanic mountains on Venus: the surface of the northern quarter of Venus is considered to be younger than 1 Gy, and some units are likely to be much younger. Because of the small sizes of likely volcanic manifestations and the long intervals expected between eruptions, it is unlikely that any direct evidence of eruptions will be detected with existing and planned spacecraft. It is suggested that future studies of the dynamics and the chemical mixing of the Venusian atmosphere might supply an unequivocal evidence for active volcanism on this planet.

  16. Dike propagation in active volcanoes: importance, evidence, models and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, V.

    2011-12-01

    Most eruptions are fed by dikes; therefore, better knowledge of dike propagation is crucial to improve our understanding of how magma is transferred and extruded at volcanoes. Dike pattern data from a few tens of active volcanic edifices show how dike propagation in a volcano is not a random process; rather, it depends from the following factors (listed in order of importance): the presence of relief, the shape of the edifice, the proximity to the surface, and regional tectonic control. Relief enhances the development of radial dikes, which may also cluster following volcano elongation or regional patterns. Dikes approaching the surface of volcanic edifices, regardless of their initial orientation, reorient to become radial (parallel to the maximum gravitational stress); in presence of scarps, dikes reorient subparallel to the scarp (perpendicular to the minimum gravitational stress). These relationships have been also observed or inferred during eruptions at Etna, Stromboli, Vesuvio (Italy), Erta Ale (Afar) and Faial (Azores). While numerical modelling of dike propagation remains challenging, analogue models of dike emplacement have been performed over a few decades, also supporting part of the above-described evidence. Analogue models have been mostly conducted injecting air or water within gelatine and, recently, injecting vegetable oil within sand. More sophisticated analogue modelling is foreseen for the future, using a more appropriate scaling, a larger sensitivity and providing a more quantitative approach in capturing relationships. More in general, future research on dikes should be devoted towards identifying dike propagation paths, dike arrest mechanisms, and likely locations of vent formation at specific volcanoes, to better aid hazards assessment.

  17. Monitoring Changing Eruption Styles of Kilauea Volcano Over the Summer of 2007 With Spaceborne Infrared Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, M.; Wessels, R.

    2007-12-01

    On June 19, 2007 episode 56 (the Father's Day intrusion) of the ongoing eruption at Kilauea Volcano culminated with a small eruption of lava from a 250 m long fissure approximately 6 km west of Pu'u 'O'o. The event was preceded by an earthquake swarm and attributed to the intrusion of magma. This intrusion was also associated with cessation of activity at Pu'u 'O'o and deflation of its summit region. On July 21, 2007 new lava then erupted along a set of fissures that extended eastward from Pu'u 'O'o toward the old Kupaianaha vent. By early September, this eruption continued to supply a lava channel approximately 1 km long, which has fed two 'a'a flow lobes advancing to the northeast and southeast. We describe the application of spaceborne imaging data from the visible to the thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths for monitoring activity throughout this period. Satellite thermal infrared (TIR) data with low spatial resolution (i.e., kms/pixel) have been used for years to monitor changes in surface thermal features such as volcanic flows. However, the use of higher spatial resolution data allows for the extraction of physical parameters at meter to sub-meter scales. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) provides TIR, shortwave infrared (SWIR), and visible-near infrared (VNIR) data ideal for this type of analysis, hazard assessment, and smaller-scale monitoring of active lava flows. From June-August of 2007, ASTER was scheduled 23 times and collected 11 independent scenes of the new flow activity at Kilauea. Of these, 7 were clear to partly-cloudy and show excellent coverage of the activity following the Father's Day intrusion. TIR and SWIR data, converted to atmospherically corrected emitted surface radiance, have been used to extract flow extent, areal coverage, flow advance rate, and maximum brightness temperature. These data correlate well with descriptions of the flow activity documented by Hawaiian Volcano Observatory field crews

  18. Dueling Volcanoes: How Activity Levels At Kilauea Influence Eruptions At Mauna Loa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusdell, F.

    2011-12-01

    Loa inflates its flank is not buttressed on the southeast. Consequently, asymmetrical spreading occurs resulting in dilation of the shallow magma storage centers, which ultimately culminates in decreased magma pressure and therefore lessened ability to erupt. Whether or not this hypothesis is accurate, there is growing geologic evidence for inverse activity levels at both volcanoes. This hypothesis is readily testable and can have profound implications on how we monitor shield volcanoes, which impacts our ability to forecast eruptions, conduct hazard assessments, and risk analysis.

  19. Kizimen Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia: 2010-2012 Eruptive Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, E.; Droznin, V.; Malik, N.; Muravyev, Y.

    2012-12-01

    New eruptive activity at Kizimen Volcano began in October 2010 after 1.5 years of seismic build up. Two vents located at the summit of the volcano had been producing occasional steam-and-gas emissions with traces of ash until early December. Kizimen is located at a junction between Shapensky graben in the Central Kamchatka Depression and a horst of Tumrok Ridge. Kizimen is a 2376 m a.s.l. complex stratovolcano. The only single eruption reported in historic time occurred from December 1928 to January 1929. Little is known about the volcano; explosive activity was preceded by strong local earthquakes, and ashfalls were reported in neighboring settlements. During the period between eruptions the volcano was producing constant fumarolic activity, reported since 1825. During the cause of the current (2010-2012) eruption, the volcano produced several eruptive phases: moderate explosive activity was observed from December 10, 2010 to late February 2011 (ashfalls and descend of pyroclastic flows resulted in a large lahar traveling along the valley of the Poperechny Creek on December 13, 2010); from late February to mid-December the volcano produced an explosive-effusive phase (the lava flow descended eastern flank, while explosive activity has decreased), which resulted in strong explosions on December 14, 2011 accompanied by scores of pyroclastic flows of various thickness to the NE foot on the volcano. Since then, a constant growth of the large lava flow has been accompanied by strong steam-and-gas emissions from the summit crater. The erupted materials are tephra and deposits of pyroclastic and lava flows consisted of high-aluminous andesites and dacites of potassium-sodium series: SiO2 content varied from 61% in December 2010 to 65-68% in January-February 2011, and up to 62% in December 2011. Ashfalls area exceeded 100 km2 (the weight of erupted tephra > 107 tons), while the total area of pyroclastic flows was estimated to be 15.5 km2 (V= 0.16 km3). Until late May 2012

  20. An automated SO2 camera system for continuous, real-time monitoring of gas emissions from Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Christoph; Sutton, Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Lee, Lopaka; Kamibayashi, Kevan; Antolik, Loren; Werner, Cynthia

    2015-07-01

    SO2 camera systems allow rapid two-dimensional imaging of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from volcanic vents. Here, we describe the development of an SO2 camera system specifically designed for semi-permanent field installation and continuous use. The integration of innovative but largely "off-the-shelf" components allowed us to assemble a robust and highly customizable instrument capable of continuous, long-term deployment at Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater. Recorded imagery is telemetered to the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) where a novel automatic retrieval algorithm derives SO2 column densities and emission rates in real-time. Imagery and corresponding emission rates displayed in the HVO operations center and on the internal observatory website provide HVO staff with useful information for assessing the volcano's current activity. The ever-growing archive of continuous imagery and high-resolution emission rates in combination with continuous data from other monitoring techniques provides insight into shallow volcanic processes occurring at the Overlook Crater. An exemplary dataset from September 2013 is discussed in which a variation in the efficiency of shallow circulation and convection, the processes that transport volatile-rich magma to the surface of the summit lava lake, appears to have caused two distinctly different phases of lake activity and degassing. This first successful deployment of an SO2 camera for continuous, real-time volcano monitoring shows how this versatile technique might soon be adapted and applied to monitor SO2 degassing at other volcanoes around the world.

  1. Underwater observations of active lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tribble, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Underwater observation of active submarine lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, in March-June 1989 revealed both pillow lava and highly channelized lava streams flowing down a steep and unconsolidated lava delta. The channelized streams were 0.7-1.5 m across and moved at rates of 1-3 m/s. The estimated flux of a stream was 0.7 m3/s. Jets of hydrothermal water and gas bubbles were associated with the volcanic activity. The rapidly moving channelized lava streams represent a previously undescribed aspect of submarine volcanism. -Author

  2. Volcano Monitoring: A Case Study in Pervasive Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Nina; Anusuya-Rangappa, Lohith; Shirazi, Behrooz A.; Song, Wenzhan; Huang, Renjie; Tran, Daniel; Chien, Steve; Lahusen, Rick

    Recent advances in wireless sensor network technology have provided robust and reliable solutions for sophisticated pervasive computing applications such as inhospitable terrain environmental monitoring. We present a case study for developing a real-time pervasive computing system, called OASIS for optimized autonomous space in situ sensor-web, which combines ground assets (a sensor network) and space assets (NASA’s earth observing (EO-1) satellite) to monitor volcanic activities at Mount St. Helens. OASIS’s primary goals are: to integrate complementary space and in situ ground sensors into an interactive and autonomous sensorweb, to optimize power and communication resource management of the sensorweb and to provide mechanisms for seamless and scalable fusion of future space and in situ components. The OASIS in situ ground sensor network development addresses issues related to power management, bandwidth management, quality of service management, topology and routing management, and test-bed design. The space segment development consists of EO-1 architectural enhancements, feedback of EO-1 data into the in situ component, command and control integration, data ingestion and dissemination and field demonstrations.

  3. The unrest of the San Miguel volcano (El Salvador, Central America): installation of the monitoring network and observed volcano-tectonic ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Hernandez, Douglas Antonio; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Handal, Louis; Polío, Cecilia; Rapisarda, Salvatore; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2016-08-01

    On 29 December 2013, the Chaparrastique volcano in El Salvador, close to the town of San Miguel, erupted suddenly with explosive force, forming a column more than 9 km high and projecting ballistic projectiles as far as 3 km away. Pyroclastic density currents flowed to the north-northwest side of the volcano, while tephras were dispersed northwest and north-northeast. This sudden eruption prompted the local Ministry of Environment to request cooperation with Italian scientists in order to improve the monitoring of the volcano during this unrest. A joint force, made up of an Italian team from the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and a local team from the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, was organized to enhance the volcanological, geophysical and geochemical monitoring system to study the evolution of the phenomenon during the crisis. The joint team quickly installed a multiparametric mobile network comprising seismic, geodetic and geochemical sensors (designed to cover all the volcano flanks from the lowest to the highest possible altitudes) and a thermal camera. To simplify the logistics for a rapid installation and for security reasons, some sensors were colocated into multiparametric stations. Here, we describe the prompt design and installation of the geodetic monitoring network, the processing and results. The installation of a new ground deformation network can be considered an important result by itself, while the detection of some crucial deforming areas is very significant information, useful for dealing with future threats and for further studies on this poorly monitored volcano.

  4. Using near-real-time monitoring data from Pu'u 'Ō'ō vent at Kīlauea Volcano for training and educational purposes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teasdale, Rachel; Kraft, Katrien van der Hoeven; Poland, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Training non-scientists in the use of volcano-monitoring data is critical preparation in advance of a volcanic crisis, but it is currently unclear which methods are most effective for improving the content-knowledge of non-scientists to help bridge communications between volcano experts and non-experts. We measured knowledge gains for beginning-(introductory-level students) and novice-level learners (students with a basic understanding of geologic concepts) engaged in the Volcanoes Exploration Program: Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō (VEPP) “Monday Morning Meeting at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory” classroom activity that incorporates authentic Global Positioning System (GPS), tilt, seismic, and webcam data from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō eruptive vent on Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i (NAGT website, 2010), as a means of exploring methods for effectively advancing non-expert understanding of volcano monitoring. Learner groups consisted of students in introductory and upper-division college geology courses at two different institutions. Changes in their content knowledge and confidence in the use of data were assessed before and after the activity using multiple-choice and open-ended questions. Learning assessments demonstrated that students who took part in the exercise increased their understanding of volcano-monitoring practices and implications, with beginners reaching a novice stage, and novices reaching an advanced level (akin to students who have completed an upper-division university volcanology class). Additionally, participants gained stronger confidence in their ability to understand the data. These findings indicate that training modules like the VEPP: Monday Morning Meeting classroom activity that are designed to prepare non-experts for responding to volcanic activity and interacting with volcano scientists should introduce real monitoring data prior to proceeding with role-paying scenarios that are commonly used in such courses. The learning gains from the combined

  5. Scaling and Transition of the Explosive Activity at Stromboli Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripepe, M.; Marchetti, E.; Genco, R.; Lacanna, G.; Delle Donne, D.; Valade, S.; Ulivieri, G.

    2014-12-01

    Explosive activity at Stromboli volcano covers a wide energetic and temporal spectrum, spanning from small puffing to violent paroxysms and with the corresponding mass discharge rate ranging 7 orders of magnitude. At the lowest end, puffing activity is characterized by discrete small pulses of gas and fragments with limited excess pressure, driving gas and ejecta at the rate of 1 kg/s few meters high above the vents and repeating almost persistently at the rate of ~ 1 event every 2 seconds. With increasing mass discharge rate ordinary explosive activity (103 kg/s) is repeating every ~ few minutes ejecting hot lava fragments at ~200 m height whereas larger (Mayor) explosions are occurring every year with a mass eruptive rate of 105 kg/s driving progressively higher eruptive clouds at ~500 m above the vent. At the other end of the activity, the paroxysms have a mass discharge rate of 107 kg/s, driving the eruptive column up to few km above the crater and repeating at a rate of one event every ~10 years. Clear limits among these different eruptive styles have not been defined and the dynamics driving this broad explosive spectrum is still debated. We show how seismic, ground tilt and infrasonic data collected at Stromboli since 2008 for a total of ~24000 events provide a geophysical-based classification of explosive activity at Stromboli volcano highlighting changes in eruptive dynamics.

  6. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground

  7. The explosive activity of the Colima volcano in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nuñez-Cornu, F.; Diaz-Torres, J.

    2005-12-01

    The Colima volcano, Mexico, showed a new cycle of explosive activity beginning in March and April the 2005. This increased gradually and in May it appeared an explosive event which generated piroclastic flows on all flanks of the volcano. On May 23 a new dome was created, and it was observed from the Volcanological Observatory of the Nevado de Colima. Hours later its dome was destroyed by a strong explosion, which formed a column 3 km hight and piroclastic flows that reached a distance of 5 km on the ravines of the South sector. On May 30 the most intense explosion from 1999 occurred when the plume reached heights over 3.500 m above the crater, and piroclastic flows. In the month of June it generated four explosive events of characteristics similar to those of May. These constant explosions caused constant morphological changes on the top, being the most significant the collapse of the North and South walls of the crater in the first week of June, and the creation of a new crater in July. This activity was similar to the one shown in 1902-1903 and reported by Severo Diaz (1906), but without reaching the maximum levels of activity reported for 1903, where it had levels of three to five maximum explosive events per day. The explosions deposited great amount of nonconsolidated materials, like ash, lithics and rocks on the flanks of the volcano, which with the present rainy season have generated lahares, two in the month of June, ten in July and eight in August (RESCO reports). These have flowed in small flows on the ravines of La Lumbre, Montegrande, San Antonio and La Arena. None of them have caused damages until August, 2005.

  8. Review of eruptive activity at Tianchi volcano, Changbaishan, northeast China: implications for possible future eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Haiquan; Liu, Guoming; Gill, James

    2013-04-01

    One of the largest explosive eruptions in the past several thousand years occurred at Tianchi volcano, also known as Changbaishan, on the China-North Korea border. This historically active polygenetic central volcano consists of three parts: a lower basaltic shield, an upper trachytic composite cone, and young comendite ash flows. The Millennium Eruption occurred between 938 and 946 ad, and was preceded by two smaller and chemically different rhyolitic pumice deposits. There has been at least one additional, small eruption in the last three centuries. From 2002 to 2005, seismicity, deformation, and the helium and hydrogen gas contents of spring waters all increased markedly, causing regional concern. We attribute this event to magma recharge or volatile exhalation or both at depth, followed by two episodes of addition of magmatic fluids into the overlying aquifer without a phreatic eruption. The estimated present magma accumulation rate is too low by itself to account for the 2002-2005 unrest. The most serious volcanic hazards are ash eruption and flows, and lahars. The available geological information and volcano monitoring data provide a baseline for comprehensive assessment of future episodes of unrest and possible eruptive activity.

  9. The use of EO Optical data for the Italian Supersites volcanoes monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Malvina

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the INGV experience in the capability to import many different EO optical data into in house developed systems and to maintain a repository where the acquired data have been stored. These data are used for generating selected products which are functional to face the different volcanic activity phases. Examples on the processing of long time series based EO data of Mt Etna activity and Campi Flegrei observation by using remote sensing techniques and at different spatial resolution data (ASTER - 90mt, AVHRR -1km, MODIS-1km, MSG SEVIRI-3km) are also showed. Both volcanoes belong to Italian Supersites initiative of the geohazard scientific community. In the frame of the EC FP7 MED-SUV project (call FP7 ENV.2012.6.4-2), this work wants to describe the main activities concerning the generation of brightness temperature map from the satellite data acquired in real-time from INGV MEOS Multi-mission Antenna (for MODIS, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and geostationary satellite data) and AVHRR-TERASCAN (for AVHRR, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data). The advantage of direct download of EO data by means INGV antennas (with particular attention to AVHRR and MODIS) even though low spatial resolution offers the possibility of a systematic data processing having a daily updating of information for prompt response and hazard mitigation. At the same time it has been necessary the use of large archives to inventory and monitor dynamic and dangerous phenomena, like volcanic activity, globally.

  10. Monitoring the evolution of Deception Island volcano from magnetic anomaly data (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Manuel; Martos, Yasmina M.; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Funaki, Minoru

    2014-12-01

    Deception Island is a young and active volcano located in the south-western part of Bransfield back-arc basin. During the last twenty years the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy has carried out geophysical surveys in the area. In addition, an unmanned aerial vehicle flight was conducted in 2011 at 800 m height on the northern half of Deception Island. Analysing and comparing magnetic grids obtained in different periods and tie point readings allow us to detect temporal changes and isolate signals of volcanic origin. Magnetic survey cruises performed in Deception Island's inner bay (1988, 1999 and 2008), and the study of its outer area's magnetic anomaly changes, point to a period of high variations concentrated between December 1989 and December 1999 that may be related to the two main recent periods of seismic activity (1992 and January 1999). From December 1999 to December 2008, there were no significant changes in seismic activity; nevertheless, our data show some magnetic alterations, which might signal the slow progress of a volcanic environment towards equilibrium. Interpreting these magnetic changes called for the construction of several forward models. Additionally, we put forth this kind of study as a suitable, economical and easy method for monitoring an active volcanic system whenever it is possible to measure the magnetic field with accurate positioning, and if the external field components are removed correctly.

  11. Seismic exploration of Fuji volcano with active sources in 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, J.; Kagiyama, T.; Tanaka, S.; Miyamachi, H.; Tsutsui, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Katayama, H.; Matsuo, N.; Oshima, H.; Nishimura, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Watanabe, T.; Yamazaki, F.

    2004-12-01

    the Tanzawa Range to the east. This uplifted body is formed by plate subduction and collision with the Izu Peninsula, and is believed to have influence at significant depth. This is considered to be the reason for the change in the geologic structure beneath Fuji volcano from west to east. The dome structure of the bedrock layer (second layer) directly beneath the summit is considered to have formed in the initial period of volcanic activity that formed Mt. Fuji, leading to the subsequent formation of Komitake volcano, Ko-Fuji volcano and the present day Fuji volcano.

  12. Flank instability of Stromboli volcano detected by long-term GB-InSAR monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrieri, Emanuele; Di Traglia, Federico; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Gigli, Giovanni; Mugnai, Francesco; Luzi, Guido; Casagli, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Stromboli is a volcanic island in Southern Italy characterized by explosions of variable energy every 10-20 minutes and periodically interrupted by more energetic blasts emitting large volumes of material. The pressurization of volatile-poor, high-porphyritic magma column that is gas-recharged by the deep-seated, volatile-rich, low-porphyritic magma precedes such events and produces deformations on the NW flank of the volcano, called Sciara del Fuoco. By integrating geomorphological observations with long-term deformations measured by a ground-based interferometric radar since December 2007, we managed to map two landslides whose movements are strongly related with volcanic activity. Deformation patterns obtained through a novel long-term analysis of GB-InSAR data, usually exploited for real time monitoring and early warning of slope with high risk, permitted us to hypothesize the type of movement and depth for both landslides. During the last 5 years their deformation velocity reached a maximum of more than 2 mm/day. Furthermore their position allowed us to affirm that the effusive vent formed in 2007 at 400 m a.s.l., was the result of the deflection of a feeder dike operated by landslide fractures, thus showing the important role of geomorphological discontinuities in volcanic environments. The study of slope instability of the Sciara del Fuoco is also relevant with reference to tsunami risk, especially considering that mass movements similar to those detected may take place also in other portions of the volcano flank not visible by the current installation.

  13. GNSS-monitoring of Natural Hazards: Ionospheric Detection of Earthquakes and Volcano Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shults, K.; Astafyeva, E.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    During the last few decades earthquakes as sources of strong perturbations in the ionosphere have been reported by many researchers, and in the last few years the seismo-ionosphere coupling has been more and more discussed (e.g., Calais and Minster, 1998, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 105, 167-181; Afraimovich et al., 2010, Earth, Planets, Space, V.62, No.11, 899-904; Rolland et al., 2011, Earth Planets Space, 63, 853-857). Co-volcanic ionospheric perturbations have come under the scrutiny of science only in recent years but observations have already shown that mass and energy injections of volcanic activities can also excite oscillations in the ionosphere (Heki, 2006, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L14303; Dautermann et al., 2009, Geophys. Res., 114, B02202). The ionospheric perturbations are induced by acoustic and gravity waves generated in the neutral atmosphere by seismic source or volcano eruption. The upward propagating vibrations of the atmosphere interact with the plasma in the ionosphere by the particle collisions and excite variations of electron density detectable with dual-frequency receivers of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). In addition to co-seismic ionospheric disturbances (CID) observations, ionospheric GNSS measurements have recently proved to be useful to obtain ionospheric images for the seismic fault allowing to provide information on its' parameters and localization (Astafyeva et al., 2011, Geophys. Res. Letters, 38, L22104). This work describes how the GNSS signals can be used for monitoring of natural hazards on examples of the 9 March 2011 M7.3 Tohoku Foreshock and April 2015 M7.8 Nepal earthquake as well as the April 2015 Calbuco volcano eruptions. We also show that use of high-resolution GNSS data can aid to plot the ionospheric images of seismic fault.

  14. Holocene recurrent explosive activity at Chimborazo volcano (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, Diego; Robin, Claude; Samaniego, Pablo; Eissen, Jean-Philippe

    2008-09-01

    Ice-capped Chimborazo is one of the large composite Ecuadorian volcanoes whose recent eruptive activity is poorly known. This paper presents the characteristics and the ages of a newly discovered Holocene sequence of pyroclastic deposits on the east and north sides of the cone. Lying upon a moraine of the Late-Glacial period, the most complete section of ~ 4.5 m in thickness is located 5 km from the present summit crater. It consists of seven massive or diffusely stratified ash flow layers and four fallout layers interbedded with seven paleosoils. Based on field study, most flow deposits were assessed as surge layers, and six radiocarbon analyses obtained from charcoal fragments and paleosoils indicate that eruptions occurred at quite regular intervals between about 8000 and 1000 years ago. The first two and most potent events generated thick lahars over the north and west flanks of the cone. Surface textures of volcanic clasts were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Blocky and blocky/fluidal vitric clasts indicate fragmentation during vulcanian explosions of a quite solidified shallow magma body. In addition, aggregates either cemented at a cooling stage (with surface fluidal textures), or consisting of fine particles (moss-looking aggregates), form a large part of the surge deposits. These characteristics indicate powerful explosions and intense fragmentation due to phreatic water reaching the conduit, probably from the ice-cap. Since the last eruption occurred between the early part of the 5th century (~ AD 420) and the end of the 7th century, these results highlight that Chimborazo is a potentially active volcano. Given its dominating presence over the densely populated Ambato and Riobamba basins, and owing its large ice-cap, Chimborazo should be considered a dangerous volcano.

  15. Geophysical monitoring from seafloor observatories in Italian volcanic sites: Marsili Seamount, Etna Volcano and Stromboli Island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanetti, Gabriele; Monna, Stephen; Lo Bue, Nadia; Embriaco, Davide; Frugoni, Francesco; Marinaro, Giuditta; De Caro, Mariagrazia; Sgroi, Tiziana; Montuori, Caterina; De Santis, Angelo; Cianchini, Gianfranco; Favali, Paolo; Beranzoli, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Many volcanoes on Earth are located within or near the oceans and observations from the seafloor can be very important for a more complete understanding of the structure and nature of these volcanoes. We present some results obtained from data acquired in volcanic sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea. Data were taken by means of stand-alone free-fall systems, and fixed-point ocean observatories, both cabled and autonomous, some of which are part of the European research infrastructure EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, www.emso-eu.org). EMSO observatories strongly rely on a multidisciplinary approach, in spite of the many technical challenges that the operation of very different sensors by means of a single acquisition system presents. We focus on three volcanic sites near the coasts of Italy (Marsili seamount, Stromboli Island and Etna Volcano) involved in subduction processes and to the opening of the Central Mediterranean basin. Through multidisciplinary analysis we were able to associate geophysical and oceanographic signals to a common volcanic source in a more reliable way with respect to single sensor analysis, showing the potential of long-term seafloor monitoring in unravelling otherwise still obscure aspects of such volcanoes. The very strong expansion of seafloor monitoring, which is taking place both in the quantity of the infrastructures and in the technological capabilities, suggests that there will be important developments in the near future.

  16. Low Cost Volcano Deformation Monitoring: Optical Strain Measurement and Application to explosive Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, T. R.

    2012-04-01

    Through spatial digital image correlation (DIC) analysis of camera images, a new deformation monitoring technique is introduced into volcanology. Our results are providing evidences that the strain rate of extruding volcanic domes is highly variable in space and time. DIC yielded cumulative and incremental displacements, strain and shear planes at decimeter resolution. It was found that dome extrusion rates are highly non-linear, decelerating prior to partial collapse, followed by a pronounced dome extrusion increase and direction change. Associated processes have been identified through DIC, such as shallow landslides and reworking of talus apron material. The presentation provides examples from Mount St. Helens, Colima and Merapi, and highlights the strengths of camera strain monitoring.

  17. Development of an automatic volcanic ash sampling apparatus for active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimano, Taketo; Nishimura, Takeshi; Chiga, Nobuyuki; Shibasaki, Yoshinobu; Iguchi, Masato; Miki, Daisuke; Yokoo, Akihiko

    2013-12-01

    We develop an automatic system for the sampling of ash fall particles, to be used for continuous monitoring of magma ascent and eruptive dynamics at active volcanoes. The system consists of a sampling apparatus and cameras to monitor surface phenomena during eruptions. The Sampling Apparatus for Time Series Unmanned Monitoring of Ash (SATSUMA-I and SATSUMA-II) is less than 10 kg in weight and works automatically for more than a month with a 10-kg lead battery to obtain a total of 30 to 36 samples in one cycle of operation. The time range covered in one cycle varies from less than an hour to several months, depending on the aims of observation, allowing researchers to target minute-scale fluctuations in a single eruptive event, as well as daily to weekly trends in persistent volcanic activity. The latest version, SATSUMA-II, also enables control of sampling parameters remotely by e-mail commands. Durability of the apparatus is high: our prototypes worked for several months, in rainy and typhoon seasons, at windy and humid locations, and under strong sunlight. We have been successful in collecting ash samples emitted from Showa crater almost everyday for more than 4 years (2008-2012) at Sakurajima volcano in southwest Japan.

  18. A prototype of an automated high resolution InSAR volcano-monitoring system in the MED-SUV project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Tanvir A.; Minet, Christian; Fritz, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic processes which produce a variety of geological and hydrological hazards are difficult to predict and capable of triggering natural disasters on regional to global scales. Therefore it is important to monitor volcano continuously and with a high spatial and temporal sampling rate. The monitoring of active volcanoes requires the reliable measurement of surface deformation before, during and after volcanic activities and it helps for the better understanding and modelling of the involved geophysical processes. Space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR), persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) and small baseline subset algorithm (SBAS) provide a powerful tool for observing the eruptive activities and measuring the surface changes of millimetre accuracy. All the mentioned techniques with deformation time series extraction address the challenges by exploiting medium to large SAR image stacks. The process of selecting, ordering, downloading, storing, logging, extracting and preparing the data for processing is very time consuming has to be done manually for every single data-stack. In many cases it is even an iterative process which has to be done regularly and continuously. Therefore, data processing becomes slow which causes significant delays in data delivery. The SAR Satellite based High Resolution Data Acquisition System, which will be developed at DLR, will automate this entire time consuming tasks and allows an operational volcano monitoring system. Every 24 hours the system runs for searching new acquired scene over the volcanoes and keeps track of the data orders, log the status and download the provided data via ftp-transfer including E-Mail alert. Furthermore, the system will deliver specified reports and maps to a database for review and use by specialists. The user interaction will be minimized and iterative processes will be totally avoided. In this presentation, a prototype of SAR Satellite based High Resolution Data

  19. Combining Volcano Monitoring Timeseries Analyses with Bayesian Belief Networks to Update Hazard Forecast Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odbert, Henry; Hincks, Thea; Aspinall, Willy

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic hazard assessments must combine information about the physical processes of hazardous phenomena with observations that indicate the current state of a volcano. Incorporating both these lines of evidence can inform our belief about the likelihood (probability) and consequences (impact) of possible hazardous scenarios, forming a basis for formal quantitative hazard assessment. However, such evidence is often uncertain, indirect or incomplete. Approaches to volcano monitoring have advanced substantially in recent decades, increasing the variety and resolution of multi-parameter timeseries data recorded at volcanoes. Interpreting these multiple strands of parallel, partial evidence thus becomes increasingly complex. In practice, interpreting many timeseries requires an individual to be familiar with the idiosyncrasies of the volcano, monitoring techniques, configuration of recording instruments, observations from other datasets, and so on. In making such interpretations, an individual must consider how different volcanic processes may manifest as measureable observations, and then infer from the available data what can or cannot be deduced about those processes. We examine how parts of this process may be synthesised algorithmically using Bayesian inference. Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) use probability theory to treat and evaluate uncertainties in a rational and auditable scientific manner, but only to the extent warranted by the strength of the available evidence. The concept is a suitable framework for marshalling multiple strands of evidence (e.g. observations, model results and interpretations) and their associated uncertainties in a methodical manner. BBNs are usually implemented in graphical form and could be developed as a tool for near real-time, ongoing use in a volcano observatory, for example. We explore the application of BBNs in analysing volcanic data from the long-lived eruption at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat. We show how our method

  20. International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Programme global emissions inventory activity: Sulfur emissions from volcanoes, current status

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitz, C.M.

    1995-07-01

    Sulfur emissions from volcanoes are located in areas of volcanic activity, are extremely variable in time, and can be released anywhere from ground level to the stratosphere. Previous estimates of global sulfur emissions from all sources by various authors have included estimates for emissions from volcanic activity. In general, these global estimates of sulfur emissions from volcanoes are given as global totals for an ``average`` year. A project has been initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory to compile inventories of sulfur emissions from volcanoes. In order to complement the GEIA inventories of anthropogenic sulfur emissions, which represent conditions circa specific years, sulfur emissions from volcanoes are being estimated for the years 1985 and 1990.

  1. Using An Extensive Catalogue of Repeatable Strombolian Eruptions to Monitor Small Medium Changes at Mount Erebus Volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, B.; Aster, R. C.; Kyle, P.

    2005-12-01

    A recent study by Gret et al. (2005) reconfirmed earlier work demonstrating remarkable, though variable, repeatability of short-period seismic signals produced by characteristic Strombolian eruptions of Mount Erebus. The eruptions originate as impulsive explosions of large simple gas bubbles from the surface of a long-lived, actively convecting phonolitic lava lake that rapidly refills afterwards. This self-reconstructing eruptive system lends itself to highly repeatable seismic sources. Gret et al. further noted that these repeatable seismograms (extending many 10s of seconds into the coda) and associated seismic energy scattered within the low-velocity waveguide of the volcano conduit might facilitate the novel tracking of small temporal changes in seismic velocity and/or impedance contrast within the near summit magma body and more general conduit system. We expand on this suggestive work using comprehensive correlation-based similar seismogram analysis of an extensive database of over 3000 candidate Strombolian eruptions occurring between Jan 1992 and July 2005, and recorded at up to 9 different seismic stations situated around the volcano. To obviate potential complications caused by nonlinear response (e.g., clipping) at short-period instruments, we incorporate data from broadband, high-dynamic range sensors and digital telemetry installed since 2001, and take advantage of a new period of prolific eruptions, especially since early 2005, Gret, A., Snieder, R., Aster, R., Kyle, P., Monitoring rapid temporal change in a volcano with coda wave interferometry, Geop. Res. Lett., 32, L06304, doi:10.1029/2004GL021143, 2005.

  2. Catalogue of satellite photography of the active volcanoes of the world

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiken, G.

    1976-01-01

    A catalogue is presented of active volcanoes as viewed from Earth-orbiting satellites. The listing was prepared of photographs, which have been screened for quality, selected from the earth resources technology satellite (ERTS) and Skylab, Apollo and Gemini spacecraft. There is photography of nearly every active volcano in the world; the photographs are particularly useful for regional studies of volcanic fields.

  3. Thermal Monitoring of Santa Ana Volcano. El Salvador. C.A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henríquez, B.; Escobar, D.; López, D.; Olmos, R.; Barahona, F.; Hernández, A.; Funes, R.; Benítez, E.

    2006-12-01

    The thermal regime of Santa Ana volcano has been monitored measuring temperatures in the fumaroles and the crater lake from 2002 to 2005. SNET (Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales) monitored five fumaroles and the crater lake, and researchers from UES(Universidad de El Salvador) monitored two fumaroles and the soils within the crater. Temperatures measured within the crater lake indicate a 3.4 °C increase in temperature from 2002 to 2004, suggesting an increase in heat flow to the lake during that period. This increase in heat flow could be produced by new magma input to the magmatic chamber beneath the lake or the opening of new permeable conduits for the transfer of gases and heat to the surface. A continuous monitoring station within the crater soils registered an increase of temperature from 84 to 95 °C three days after a landslide within the crater ejected ash that was dispersed around the volcano (explosion around June 16, 2005). After incandescence was first observed in the crater on August 26, 2005, discrete temperature measurements on August 29, 2005 in one of the fumaroles showed an increase in temperature of 1.8 °C with respect to previous measurements. In addition, the same day, a new fumarolica zone in the SE of the crater was identified presenting high CO2 fluxes and temperatures around 60 to 70 °C. These results show increments in temperature and changes in the thermal regime of Santa Ana volcano that can be summarized as follows: a) gradual increase in the annual temperature of the lake, b) significant increment in the temperatures of fumaroles within the crater, and c) appearance of new fumaroles in the crater border. These thermal observations could be considered as possible precursory signals of the October 1st, 2005 eruption of Santa Ana volcano.

  4. Observing ground surface change series at active volcanoes in Indonesia using backscattering intensity of SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Trianaputri, Mila Olivia

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia contains 27 active volcanoes passing the West through the East part. Therefore, Indonesia is the most hazard front due to the volcanic activities. To obtain the new precursory signals leading to the eruptions, we applied remote sensing technique to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes. Sinabung volcano is located at Karo Region, North Sumatra Province. This volcano is a strato volcano type which is re-activated in August 2010. The eruption continues to the later years by ejecting volcanic products such as lava, pyroclastic flow, and ash fall deposits. This study is targeted to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung volcano since 2007 to 2011. In addition, we also compared the summit ground surface changes after the eruptions of Kelud volcano in 2007. Kelud volcano is also strato volcano type which is located at East Java, Indonesia. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remotely sensed technology makes possible to observe rapidly a wide ground surface changes related to ground surface roughness. Detection series were performed by extracting the backscattering intensity of the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The intensity values were then calculated using a Normalized Radar Cross-Section (NRCS). Based on surface roughness criterion at the summit of Sinabung volcano, we could observe the ground surface changes prior to the early eruption in August 2010. The continuous increment of NRCS values showed clearly at window size 3×3 pixel of the summit of Sinabung volcano. The same phenomenon was also detected at the summit of Kelud volcano after the 2007 eruptions. The detected ground surface changes were validated using optical Landsat-8, backscattering intensity ratio for volcanic products detection, and radial component of a tilt-meter data.

  5. Satellite observations of Lava Lake activity at Nyiragongo volcano, ex-Zaire, during the Rwandan refugee crisis.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, C

    1998-09-01

    In June 1994 the summit crater of Nyiragongo volcano, located in the Great Lakes region of central Africa, began to fill with new lava, ending nearly 12 years of quiescence. An earlier eruption of the volcano in 1977 had culminated in the catastrophic draining of a lava lake through fissures in the crater wall, feeding highly mobile lava flows which reached the outskirts of Goma and killed more than 70 people. By July 1994, as many as 20,000 Hutu refugees were arriving in Goma every hour, only 18 km south from the summit of Nyiragongo. The exodus brought more than one million people to the camps near the town raising fears of a repeat of the 1977 eruption. This paper examines the role that satellite remote sensing could have played in surveillance of the volcano during this time, and demonstrates the potential for monitoring this and other volcanoes in the future. Images recorded by the spaceborne Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)--freely available over the Internet--provide semi-quantitative information on the activity of the volcano. The aim of this paper is to promote the wider use of readily available technologies. PMID:9753815

  6. Assessing and optimizing infrasound network performance: application to remote volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailpied, Dorianne; Le Pichon, Alexis; Marchetti, Emanuele; Ceranna, Lars; Pilger, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Interest in infrasound propagation studies has been revived since the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) was adopted in 1996. The International Monitoring System (IMS) is designed to ensure compliance with the CTBT by detecting and locating explosions in the world using at least 2 stations. Even not yet fully established, the infrasound network already allows studies on a global scale as it has demonstrated to be a major asset to remotely identify and analyze geophysical events such as volcanoes. Simulation methods incorporating realistic source and propagation effects have been developed to quantify the detection capability of this network. These methods can also be used to optimize the network configuration (number of stations, geographical location) in order to reduce the detection thresholds taking into account seasonal effects in infrasound propagation. Recent studies have shown that remote infrasound observations can provide useful information about eruption chronology and the released acoustic energy. Comparisons with near-field recordings allow evaluating the potential of these observations to better constrain source parameters when other monitoring techniques (satellite, seismic, gas) are not available or cannot be made. Because of its regular activity, the well-instrumented Mount Etna is in Europe a unique natural repetitive source to test and optimize detection and simulation methods. In summer, during the downwind season, its eruptions are quasi-permanently detected by IS48 in Tunisia, the closest infrasound station part of the IMS. Under the European ARISE project (Atmospheric dynamics InfraStructure in Europe, FP7/2007-2013), experimental arrays have been installed in order to characterize infrasound propagation in different ranges of distance and direction. Such an experimental setting offers an opportunity to address the societal benefits that can be achieved through routine infrasound monitoring.

  7. Air-dropped sensor network for real-time high-fidelity volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Huang, R.; Xu, M.; Ma, A.; Shirazi, B.; LaHusen, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design and deployment experience of an air-dropped wireless sensor network for volcano hazard monitoring. The deployment of five stations into the rugged crater of Mount St. Helens only took one hour with a helicopter. The stations communicate with each other through an amplified 802.15.4 radio and establish a self-forming and self-healing multi-hop wireless network. The distance between stations is up to 2 km. Each sensor station collects and delivers real-time continuous seismic, infrasonic, lightning, GPS raw data to a gateway. The main contribution of this paper is the design and evaluation of a robust sensor network to replace data loggers and provide real-time long-term volcano monitoring. The system supports UTC-time synchronized data acquisition with 1ms accuracy, and is online configurable. It has been tested in the lab environment, the outdoor campus and the volcano crater. Despite the heavy rain, snow, and ice as well as gusts exceeding 120 miles per hour, the sensor network has achieved a remarkable packet delivery ratio above 99% with an overall system uptime of about 93.8% over the 1.5 months evaluation period after deployment. Our initial deployment experiences with the system have alleviated the doubts of domain scientists and prove to them that a low-cost sensor network system can support real-time monitoring in extremely harsh environments. Copyright 2009 ACM.

  8. Multi-discipline monitoring network at Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Ile de la R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudacher, T.; Boissier, P.; Cathérine, P.; Ferrazzini, V.; Garofalo, K.; Kowalski, P.; Lauret, F.; Peltier, A.

    2009-04-01

    Piton de la Fournaise (PdF), the active volcano at Reunion Island in the western Indian Ocean, is in terms of number of eruptions probably the most active volcano in the world. PdF produced an average of more than one eruption per year within the last two centuries. Since 1998, a particularly intense activity is observed with 28 eruptions, amongst which probably the most important one ever observed, in April 2, 2007, that produced >130xMm3 and triggered the collapse of the Dolomieu crater floor, forming a small caldera on April 5, 2007. For research on volcanology and forecasting of eruptions the "Piton de la Fournaise observatory" (OVPF/IPGP) maintains seismic and deformation networks as well as a miniDOAS network under the european NOVAC program, which measures permanently SO2 around Piton de la Fournaise. The seismic network is composed of about twenty 1Hz and broad band seismic stations; the deformation network is composed of sixteen permanent GPS, seven tiltmeter and three extensometer stations; the miniDOAS network is composed by three 60° permanent stations on the Fouqué caldera rim. These different networks allow us to follow up in real time long term precursors of eruptions (seismic and GPS), as well as short term precursors of magmatic intrusions and to determine from seismic and tiltmeter data locations of eruptions and to follow their intensities and evolutions. The miniDOAS network allows us to follow up for the first time at PdF the gas emission during eruptions. Most of the data are visible on our internal OVPF/IPGP Website and a survey is possible via Internet from everywhere where high debit Internet is available. The OVPF/IPGP networks allowed us to forecast all eruptions since 1980, date of the creation of the observatory, sometimes up to 3 months in advance and since 2008 to monitor the SO2 output, attaining values of 100 up to 2000 tons/day (example Dec. 2008 to Jan. 2009).

  9. Linking subsurface to surface degassing at active volcanoes: A thermodynamic model with applications to Erebus volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovino, Kayla

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic plumbing systems are the pathways through which volatiles are exchanged between the deep Earth and the atmosphere. The interplay of a multitude of processes occurring at various depths in the system dictates the composition and quantity of gas eventually erupted through volcanic vents. Here, a model is presented as a framework for interpreting surface volcanic gas measurements in terms of subsurface degassing processes occurring throughout a volcanic plumbing system. The model considers all possible sources of fluid from multiple depths, including degassing of dissolved volatiles during crystallization and/or decompression as recorded in melt inclusions plus any co-existing fluid phase present in a magma reservoir. The former is achieved by differencing melt inclusion volatile contents between groups of melt inclusions saturated at discrete depths. The latter is calculated using a thermodynamic model, which computes the composition of a C-O-H-S fluid in equilibrium with a melt given a minimum of five thermodynamic parameters commonly known for natural systems (T, P, fO2, either fH2 or one parameter for H2O, and either fS2 or one parameter for CO2). The calculated fluids are thermodynamically decompressed and run through a mixing model, which finds all possible mixtures of subsurface fluid that match the chemistry of surface gas within ±2.0 mol%. The method is applied to Mount Erebus (Antarctica), an active, intraplate volcano whose gas emissions, which emanate from an active phonolitic lava lake, have been well quantified by FTIR, UV spectroscopy, and multi-gas sensors over the last several decades. In addition, a well-characterized suite of lavas and melt inclusions, and petrological interpretations thereof, represent a wealth of knowledge about the shallow, intermediate, and deep parts of the Erebus plumbing system. The model has been used to calculate the compositions of seven C-O-H-S fluids that originate from four distinct regions within the Erebus

  10. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  11. Geophysical gas monitoring using optical techniques: volcanoes, geothermal fields and mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, S.

    2002-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy provides powerful means for studying geophysical gas emissions. An extensive research program in this field has been performed by Swedish researchers in collaboration with European partners during the last 10 years, and a review of the activities and results is given. The techniques suitable for geophysical gas monitoring include the differential absorption lidar (DIAL), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), diode laser spectroscopy and gas correlation imaging. Field experiments regarding atomic mercury emissions from geothermal fields were performed with a mobile lidar laboratory in Iceland and in Italy. The atomic mercury concentrations and fluxes from mercury mines were also determined at Abbadia S. Salvatore (Italy) and Almadén (Spain). The volcanic emissions of sulfur dioxide were studied in four ship-borne campaigns concerning the three Italian volcanoes Mt. Etna, Stromboli and Vulcano. Comparisons between the results from the DIAL and passive techniques (DOAS and correlation spectroscopy) were performed. Infrared spectroscopy for geophysical applications is now being developed and will also be discussed.

  12. Fractal degassing from Erebus and Mayon volcanoes revealed by a new method to monitor H2O emission cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girona, Társilo; Costa, Fidel; Taisne, Benoit; Aggangan, Brian; Ildefonso, Sorvigenaleon

    2015-05-01

    Many active volcanoes around the world release passively large amounts of gas between eruptions. Monitoring how these gas emissions fluctuate over time is crucial to infer the physical processes occurring within volcanic conduits and reservoirs. Here we report a new method to capture remotely the spectral properties of the emissions of H2O, the major component of most volcanic plumes. The method is based on a new theoretical model that correlates the volcanogenic water content of condensed volcanic plumes with the intensity of the light scattered by the droplets moving with the gas. In turn, we show that light intensity of the plume, and thus steam pulses time series, can be obtained with a proper analysis of digital images. The model is experimentally validated by generating condensed plumes with an ultrasonic humidifier, and then the method is applied to the gas plumes of Erebus and Mayon volcanoes. Our analysis reveals three main features: (1) H2O time series are composed of numerous periodic components of finite duration; (2) some periodic components are common in H2O and SO2 time series, but others are not; and (3) the frequency spectra of the H2O emissions follow a well-defined fractal distribution, that is, amplitude (Δ) and frequency (ν) are correlated by means of power laws (Δ ∝ νγ), with exponent γ ≈ - 1 for Erebus and for Mayon. These findings suggest that quiescent degassing emerges from the complex coupling between different processes occurring within magma plumbing systems. Our method is ideal for real-time monitoring of high-frequency H2O cycles at active volcanoes.

  13. The unrest of S. Miguel volcano (El Salvador, CA): installation of the monitoring network and observed volcano-tectonic ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, A.; Hernandez, D.; Gutiérrez, E.; Handal, L.; Polío, C.; Rapisarda, S.; Scarlato, P.

    2015-10-01

    On 29 December 2013, the Chaparrastique volcano in El Salvador, close to the town of S. Miguel, erupted suddenly with explosive force, forming a more than 9 km high column and projecting ballistic projectiles as far as 3 km away. Pyroclastic Density Currents flowed to the north-northwest side of the volcano, while tephras were dispersed northwest and north-northeast. This sudden eruption prompted the local Ministry of Environment to request cooperation with Italian scientists in order to improve the monitoring of the volcano during this unrest. A joint force made up of an Italian team from the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and a local team from the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales was organized to enhance the volcanological, geophysical and geochemical monitoring system to study the evolution of the phenomenon during the crisis. The joint team quickly installed a multi-parametric mobile network comprising seismic, geodetic and geochemical sensors, designed to cover all the volcano flanks from the lowest to the highest possible altitudes, and a thermal camera. To simplify the logistics for a rapid installation and for security reasons, some sensors were co-located into multi-parametric stations. Here, we describe the prompt design and installation of the geodetic monitoring network, the processing and results. The installation of a new ground deformation network can be considered an important result by itself, while the detection of some crucial deforming areas is very significant information, useful for dealing with future threats and for further studies on this poorly monitored volcano.

  14. Towards temporal monitoring using coda correlations of icequakes on Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, J. A.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Knox, H. A.; Aster, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Recent theoretical advances pertaining to the properties of multiply scattered wavefields have yielded a plethora of numerical and controlled source studies aiming to better understand what information may be derived from these otherwise chaotic signals. Where temporal monitoring is concerned, recent advances in data mining have allowed the recovery of remarkably time-coherent correlation functions from ambient noise, and have furthermore permitted the direct mapping of velocity changes due to large earthquakes. Though not directly representative of the Green's function between stations, these time-coherent correlation functions have even been used to predict eruptive sequences on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano by detecting injection events. However, the exact nature of the correlation function in this case, particularly its coda, is unclear.Here, we seek to expand the concept of temporal monitoring to a more deterministic case, where we do in fact have a practical understanding of the correlation functions. In this study, we use a large network of short period and broadband instruments on Erebus volcano, Antarctica, to reconstruct inter-station correlation functions that converge towards a high degree of symmetry. We subsequently use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to iteratively resample the time windows on which are built the correlation functions for maximum symmetry and coherence in time. These resampled correlation functions are then scanned for changes in decoherence, and these changes are then mapped in time and space to the volcanic edifice. We compare these changes to other evidence of temporal variation on Erebus volcano.

  15. Evolution of Deformation Studies on Active Hawaiian Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, Robert; Okamura, Arnold; Miklius, Asta; Poland, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Everything responds to pressure, even rocks. Deformation studies involve measuring and interpreting the changes in elevations and horizontal positions of the land surface or sea floor. These studies are variously referred to as geodetic changes or ground-surface deformations and are sometimes indexed under the general heading of geodesy. Deformation studies have been particularly useful on active volcanoes and in active tectonic areas. A great amount of time and energy has been spent on measuring geodetic changes on Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes in Hawai`i. These changes include the build-up of the surface by the piling up and ponding of lava flows, the changes in the surface caused by erosion, and the uplift, subsidence, and horizontal displacements of the surface caused by internal processes acting beneath the surface. It is these latter changes that are the principal concern of this review. A complete and objective review of deformation studies on active Hawaiian volcanoes would take many volumes. Instead, we attempt to follow the evolution of the most significant observations and interpretations in a roughly chronological way. It is correct to say that this is a subjective review. We have spent years measuring and recording deformation changes on these great volcanoes and more years trying to understand what makes these changes occur. We attempt to make this a balanced as well as a subjective review; the references are also selective rather than exhaustive. Geodetic changes caused by internal geologic processes vary in magnitude from the nearly infinitesimal - one micron or less, to the very large - hundreds of meters. Their apparent causes also are varied and include changes in material properties and composition, atmospheric pressure, tidal stress, thermal stress, subsurface-fluid pressure (including magma pressure, magma intrusion, or magma removal), gravity, and tectonic stress. Deformation is measured in units of strain or displacement. For example, tilt

  16. An active seismic experiment at Tenerife Island (Canary Island, Spain): Imaging an active volcano edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Yeguas, A.; Ibañez, J. M.; Rietbrock, A.; Tom-Teidevs, G.

    2008-12-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Teide Volcano was carried out on Tenerife, a volcanic island in Spain's Canary Islands. The main objective of the TOM-TEIDEVS experiment is to obtain a 3-dimensional structural image of Teide Volcano using seismic tomography and seismic reflection/refraction imaging techniques. At present, knowledge of the deeper structure of Teide and Tenerife is very limited, with proposed structural models mainly based on sparse geophysical and geological data. This multinational experiment which involves institutes from Spain, Italy, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Mexico will generate a unique high resolution structural image of the active volcano edifice and will further our understanding of volcanic processes.

  17. Multi-disciplinary continuous monitoring of Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudron, C.; Lecocq, T.; Syahbana, D.; Camelbeeck, T.; Bernard, A. M.; Surono, S.

    2012-12-01

    Kawah Ijen volcano (East Java, Indonesia) has been equipped since June 2010 with 3 broadband seismometers, temporary and permanent short-period seismometers. While the volcano did not experience any magmatic eruption for more than a century, several types of unrests occurred during the last years. Apart from the seismometers, temperature and leveling divers have been immerged in the extremely acidic volcanic lake (pH~0) that can be considered as a calorimeter. Finally, a meteorological station has been installed to better assess the influence of strong rainy seasons to the different recordings. While finding instruments capable of resisting in such extreme conditions has been particularly challenging, the coupling of lake monitoring techniques with seismic data improves the understanding and monitoring of the volcanic-hydrothermal system. To detect small velocity changes, the approach developed by Brenguier et al. (2008) and Clarke et al. (2011) has been implemented to the continuous monitoring. First, the influence of several parameters detrimental to the recovering of the NCF will be discussed (i.e.: different types of seismometers and their azimuthal distribution, presence of volcanic tremor in different frequency bands). We will then present the results of this technique compared to other monitored parameters such as the polarization and spectral attributes of the wavefield, seismo volcanic events spectral analysis and lake temperature and levels. Finally, the benefits of monitoring Kawah Ijen magmatic/hydrothermal system with seismic waves will be discussed.

  18. Seismicity study of volcano-tectonic in and around Tangkuban Parahu active volcano in West Java region, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ry, Rexha V.; Priyono, A.; Nugraha, A. D.; Basuki, A.

    2016-05-01

    Tangkuban Parahu is one of the active volcano in Indonesia located about 15 km northern part of Bandung city. The objective of this study is to investigate the seismic activity in the time periods of January 2013 to December 2013. First, we identified seismic events induced by volcano-tectonic activities. These micro-earthquake events were identified as having difference of P-wave and S-wave arrival times less than three seconds. Then, we constrained its location of hypocenter to locate the source of the activities. Hypocenter determination was performed using adaptive simulated annealing method. Using these results, seismic tomographic inversions were conducted to image the three-dimensional velocity structure of Vp, Vs, and the Vp/Vs ratio. In this study, 278 micro-earthquake events have been identified and located. Distribution of hypocenters around Tangkuban Parahu volcano forms an alignment structure and may be related to the stress induced by magma below, also movement of shallow magma below Domas Crater. Our preliminary tomographic inversion results indicate the presences of low Vp, high Vs, and low Vp/Vs ratio that associate to accumulated young volcanic eruption products and hot material zones.

  19. Monitoring of Ash Ejection from Ecuadorean Volcanoes Using Infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzer, C.; Garces, M.; Fee, D.; Bass, H.; McCormack, D.

    2007-12-01

    Two infrasound arrays with 100-meter apertures have been deployed in Ecuador in order to monitor volcanic eruptions that may produce ash clouds. Data is collected continuously and streamed via satellite and internet links to processing centers that apply array processing techniques to display acoustic detections of volcanic eruptions in near-real-time. These data products are delivered to the DC Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), and have been used as additional confirmation of an eruption in ash advisories provided by the VAAC to commercial aircraft. Considerable research has been put into identifying the types of acoustic signals that indicate ash injection, as well as eliminating false alarms and reducing the latency between data collection and notification. Research conducted to date will be discussed, as well as several case studies wherein infrasound data proved useful for quick detection of eruptions. A brief summary of the advantages gained from use of this technique will also be presented.

  20. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  1. Identifying hazard parameter to develop quantitative and dynamic hazard map of an active volcano in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suminar, Wulan; Saepuloh, Asep; Meilano, Irwan

    2016-05-01

    Analysis of hazard assessment to active volcanoes is crucial for risk management. The hazard map of volcano provides information to decision makers and communities before, during, and after volcanic crisis. The rapid and accurate hazard assessment, especially to an active volcano is necessary to be developed for better mitigation on the time of volcanic crises in Indonesia. In this paper, we identified the hazard parameters to develop quantitative and dynamic hazard map of an active volcano. The Guntur volcano in Garut Region, West Java, Indonesia was selected as study area due population are resided adjacent to active volcanoes. The development of infrastructures, especially related to tourism at the eastern flank from the Summit, are growing rapidly. The remote sensing and field investigation approaches were used to obtain hazard parameters spatially. We developed a quantitative and dynamic algorithm to map spatially hazard potential of volcano based on index overlay technique. There were identified five volcano hazard parameters based on Landsat 8 and ASTER imageries: volcanic products including pyroclastic fallout, pyroclastic flows, lava and lahar, slope topography, surface brightness temperature, and vegetation density. Following this proposed technique, the hazard parameters were extracted, indexed, and calculated to produce spatial hazard values at and around Guntur Volcano. Based on this method, the hazard potential of low vegetation density is higher than high vegetation density. Furthermore, the slope topography, surface brightness temperature, and fragmental volcanic product such as pyroclastics influenced to the spatial hazard value significantly. Further study to this proposed approach will be aimed for effective and efficient analyses of volcano risk assessment.

  2. An automated SO2 camera system for continuous, real-time monitoring of gas emissions from Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kern, Christoph; Sutton, Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Lee, Robert Lopaka; Kamibayashi, Kevan P.; Antolik, Loren; Werner, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    SO2 camera systems allow rapid two-dimensional imaging of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from volcanic vents. Here, we describe the development of an SO2 camera system specifically designed for semi-permanent field installation and continuous use. The integration of innovative but largely “off-the-shelf” components allowed us to assemble a robust and highly customizable instrument capable of continuous, long-term deployment at Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater. Recorded imagery is telemetered to the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) where a novel automatic retrieval algorithm derives SO2 column densities and emission rates in real-time. Imagery and corresponding emission rates displayed in the HVO operations center and on the internal observatory website provide HVO staff with useful information for assessing the volcano's current activity. The ever-growing archive of continuous imagery and high-resolution emission rates in combination with continuous data from other monitoring techniques provides insight into shallow volcanic processes occurring at the Overlook Crater. An exemplary dataset from September 2013 is discussed in which a variation in the efficiency of shallow circulation and convection, the processes that transport volatile-rich magma to the surface of the summit lava lake, appears to have caused two distinctly different phases of lake activity and degassing. This first successful deployment of an SO2 camera for continuous, real-time volcano monitoring shows how this versatile technique might soon be adapted and applied to monitor SO2 degassing at other volcanoes around the world.

  3. Late-stage summit activity of Martian shield volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The preservation of morphologically fresh lava flows which pre-date the most recent episodes of caldera collapse at the summits of Ascraeus, Arsia and Olympus Montes indicates that explosive eruptions were not associated with this stage of Tharsis shield volcanism. The existence of resurfaced floor segments, complex wrinkle ridges, and lava terraces within the summit craters suggests that lava lakes comprised the dominant form of the intra-caldera activity. Multiple collapse episodes on Ascraeus and Olympus Montes are indicated by the nested summit craters. The most plausible cause of caldera collapse appears to be large-scale sub-terminal effusive activity, which is corroborated by the previously recognized existence of large lava flows on the flanks of these volcanoes. Due to the implied sequence of large-scale explosive (silicic) volcanism followed by effusive (basaltic) activity, it appears highly unlikely that ignimbrites or other forms of pyroclastic flows (previously proposed as possible deposits within the Olympus Mons aureole material) were ever erupted from the Tharsis Montes.

  4. Seismic image of a CO2 reservoir beneath a seismically active volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Pitt, A.M.; Foulger, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a seismically active volcano 200 000 to 50 000 years old, situated on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Since 1989 it has shown evidence of unrest in the form of earthquake swarms (Hill et al. 1990), volcanic 'long-period' earthquakes (Pitt and Hill 1994), increased output of magmatic 3He (Sorey et al. 1993) and the emission of about 500 tonnes day-1 of CO2 (Farrar et al. 1995; Hill 1996; M. Sorey, personal communication, 1997) which has killed trees and poses a threat to human safety. Local-earthquake tomography shows that in mid-1989 areas of subsequent tree-kill were underlain by extensive regions where the ratio of the compressional and shear elastic-wave speeds Vp/VS was about 9% lower than in the surrounding rocks. Theory (Mavko and Mukerji 1995), experiment (Ito, DeVilbiss and Nur 1979) and experience at other geothermal/volcanic areas (Julian et al. 1996) and at petroleum reservoirs (Harris et al. 1996) indicate that Vp/VS is sensitive to pore-fluid compressibility, through its effect on Vp. The observed Vp/VS anomaly is probably caused directly by CO2, and seismic Vp/VS tomography is thus a promising tool for monitoring gas concentration and movement in volcanoes, which may in turn be related to volcanic activity.

  5. Seismic image of a CO2 reservoir beneath a seismically active volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, Bruce R; Pitt, A. M.; Foulger, G. R.

    1998-04-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a seismically active volcano 200000 to 50000 years old, situated on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Since 1989 it has shown evidence of unrest in the form of earthquake swarms (Hill et al. 1990), volcanic `long-period' earthquakes (Pitt & Hill 1994), increased output of magmatic 3He (Sorey et al. 1993) and the emission of about 500 tonnes day -1 of CO2 (Farrar et al. 1995; Hill 1996; M. Sorey, personal communication, 1997), which has killed trees and poses a threat to human safety. Local-earthquake tomography shows that in mid-1989 areas of subsequent tree-kill were underlain by extensive regions where the ratio of the compressional and shear elastic-wave speeds VP/VS was about 9 per cent lower than in the surrounding rocks. Theory (Mavko & Mukerji 1995), experiment (Ito, DeVilbiss & Nur 1979), and experience at other geothermal/volcanic areas (Julian et al. 1996) and at petroleum reservoirs (Harris et al. 1996) indicate that VP/VS is sensitive to pore-fluid compressibility, through its effect on VP . The observed VP/VS anomaly is probably caused directly by CO2, and seismic VP/VS tomography is thus a promising tool for monitoring gas concentration and movement in volcanoes, which may in turn be related to volcanic activity.

  6. Origin and Distribution of Thiophenes and Furans in Gas Discharges from Active Volcanoes and Geothermal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-01-01

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C2–C20 species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C4H8O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection. PMID:20480029

  7. Nitrogen multitemporal monitoring through mosses in urban areas affected by mud volcanoes around Mt. Etna, Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen emissions were assessed by using mosses as bioindicators in a densely inhabited area affected by mud volcanoes. Such volcanoes, locally called Salinelle, are phenomena that occur around Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy), and are interpreted as the surface outflow of a hydrothermal system located below Mt. Etna, which releases sedimentary fluids (hydrocarbons and Na-Cl brines) along with magmatic gases (mainly CO2 and He). To date, N emissions from such mud volcanoes have been only quantitatively assessed, and no biomonitoring campaigns are reported about the cumulative effects of these emissions. This study analyzed N concentrations in moss, water and soil samples, collected in a 4-year monitoring campaign. The bryophyte Bryum argenteum, a species widely adopted in surveys of atmospheric pollution, was used as a biological indicator. N concentrations in biomonitors showed relatively low values in the study sites. However, the results of this study suggest that N emissions from Salinelle may have an impact on surrounding ecosystems because N values in moss and water showed a significant correlation. N oxides, in particular, contribute to acidification of ecosystems, thus multitemporal biomonitoring is recommended, especially in those areas where N emitting sources are anthropogenic and natural. PMID:23479119

  8. Monitoring methane emission of mud volcanoes by seismic tremor measurements: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarello, D.; Palo, M.; Martinelli, G.

    2012-12-01

    A new approach for estimating methane emission at mud volcanoes is here proposed based on measurements of the seismic tremor on their surface. Data obtained at the Dashgil mud volcano in Azerbaijan reveal the presence of energy bursts characterized by well-determined features (i.e. waveforms, spectra and polarization properties) that can be associated with bubbling at depth. Counting such events provides a possible tool for monitoring gas production in the reservoir, thus minimizing logistic troubles and representing a cheap and effective alternative to more complex approaches. Specifically, we model the energy bursts as the effect of resonant gas bubbles at depth. This modelling allows to estimate the dimension of the bubbles and, consequently, the gas outflow from the main conduit in the assumption that all emissions from depth occur by bubble uprising. The application of this model to seismic events detected at the Dashgil mud volcano during three sessions of measurements carried out in 2006 and 2007 provides gas flux estimates that are in line with those provided by independent measurements at the same structure. This encouraging result suggests that the one here proposed could be considered a new promising, cheap and easy to apply tool for gas flux measurements in bubbling gas seepage areas.

  9. Volcano Monitoring and Early Warning on MT Etna, Italy, Using Volcanic Tremor - Methods and Technical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Marcello; Di Grazia, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Ferruccio; Langer, Horst; Messina, Alfio; Reitano, Danilo; Spampinato, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Recent activity on Mt Etna was characterized by 25 lava fountains occurred on Mt Etna in 2011 and the first semester of 2012. In summer 2012 volcanic activity in a milder form was noticed within the Bocca Nuova crater, before it came to an essential halt in August 2012. Together with previous unrests (e. g., in 2007-08) these events offer rich material for testing automatic data processing and alert issue in the context of volcano monitoring. Our presentation focuses on the seismic background radiation - volcanic tremor - which has a key role in the surveillance of Mt Etna. From 2006 on a multi-station alert system exploiting STA/LTA ratios, has been established in the INGV operative centre of Catania. Besides, also the frequency content has been found to change correspondingly to the type of volcanic activity, and can thus be exploited for warning purposes. We apply Self Organizing Maps and Fuzzy Clustering which offer an efficient way to visualize signal characteristics and its development with time. These techniques allow to identify early stages of eruptive events and automatically flag a critical status before this becomes evident in conventional monitoring techniques. Changes of tremor characteristics are related to the position of the source of the signal. Given the dense seismic network we can base the location of the sources on distribution of the amplitudes across the network. The locations proved to be extremely useful for warning throughout both a flank eruption in 2008 as well as the 2011 lava fountains. During all these episodes a clear migration of tremor sources towards the eruptive centres was revealed in advance. The location of the sources completes the picture of an imminent volcanic unrest and corroborates early warnings flagged by the changes of signal characteristics. Automatic real time data processing poses high demands on computational efficiency, robustness of the methods and stability of data acquisition. The amplitude based multi

  10. Stable and unstable phases of elevated seismic activity at the persistently restless Telica Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Mel; Roman, Diana C.; Geirsson, Halldor; LaFemina, Peter; McNutt, Stephen R.; Muñoz, Angelica; Tenorio, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, is a persistently restless volcano with daily seismicity rates that can vary by orders of magnitude without apparent connection to eruptive activity. Low-frequency (LF) events are dominant and peaks in seismicity rate show little correlation with eruptive episodes, presenting a challenge for seismic monitoring and eruption forecasting. A short period seismic station (TELN) has been operated on Telica's summit since 1993, and in 2010 the installation of a six-station broadband seismic and eleven-station continuous GPS network (the TESAND network) was completed to document in detail the seismic characteristics of a persistently restless volcano. Between our study period of November 2009 and May 2013, over 400,000 events were detected at the TESAND summit station (TBTN), with daily event rates ranging from 5 to 1400. We present spectral analyses and classifications of ~ 200,000 events recorded by the TESAND network between April 2010 and March 2013, and earthquake locations for a sub-set of events between July 2010 and February 2012. In 2011 Telica erupted in a series of phreatic vulcanian explosions. Six months before the 2011 eruption, we observe a sudden decrease in LF events concurrent with a swarm of high-frequency (HF) events, followed by a decline in overall event rates, which reached a minimum at the eruption onset. We observe repeated periods of high and low seismicity rates and suggest these changes in seismicity represent repeated transitions between open-system and closed-system degassing. We suggest that these short- and long-term transitions between open to closed-system degassing form part of a long-term pattern of stable vs. unstable phases at Telica. Stable phases are characterised by steady high-rate seismicity and represent stable open-system degassing, whereas unstable phases are characterised by highly variable seismicity rates and represent repeated transitions from open to closed-system degassing, where the system is

  11. Characterization and interpretation of volcanic activity at Redoubt, Bezymianny and Karymsky volcanoes through direct and remote measurements of volcanic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Taryn M.

    Surface measurements of volcanic emissions can provide critical insight into subsurface processes at active volcanoes such as the influx or ascent of magma, changes in conduit permeability, and relative eruption size. In this dissertation I employ direct and remote measurements of volcanic emissions to characterize activity and elucidate subsurface processes at three active volcanoes around the North Pacific. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, produced elevated SO2 emissions that were detected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite sensor for over three months. This provided a rare opportunity to characterize Redoubt's daily SO2 emissions and to validate the OMI measurements. Order of magnitude variations in daily SO2 mass were observed, with over half of the cumulative SO2 emissions released during the explosive phase of the eruption. Correlations among OMI daily SO2 mass, tephra mass and acoustic energies during the explosive phase suggest that OMI data may be used to infer eruption size and explosivity. From 2007 through 2010 direct and remote measurements of volcanic gas composition and flux were measured at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. During this period Bezymianny underwent five explosive eruptions. Estimates of passive and eruptive SO2 emissions suggest that the majority of SO2 is released passively. Order of magnitude variations in total volatile flux observed throughout the study period were attributed to changes in the depth of gas exsolution and separation from the melt at the time of sample collection. These findings suggest that exsolved gas composition may be used to detect magma ascent prior to eruption at Bezymianny Volcano. Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, is a dynamic volcano which exhibited four end-member activity types during field campaigns in 2011 and 2012, including: discrete ash explosions, pulsatory degassing, gas jetting, and explosive eruption. These activity types were characterized quantitatively

  12. Living with a volcano in your backyard: an educator's guide with emphasis on Mount Rainier

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driedger, Carolyn L.; Doherty, Anne; Dixon, Cheryl; Faust, Lisa M.

    2005-01-01

    The National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program (USGS-VHP) support development and publication of this educator’s guide as part of their mission to educate the public about volcanoes. The USGS-VHP studies the dynamics of volcanoes, investigates eruption histories, develops hazard assessments, monitors volcano-related activity, and collaborates with local officials to lower the risk of disruption when volcanoes become restless.

  13. Chikurachki Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... plume from the April 22, 2003, eruption of the Chikurachki volcano is portrayed in these views from the Multi-angle Imaging ... the volcanically active Kuril Island group, the Chikurachki volcano is an active stratovolcano on Russia's Paramushir Island (just south of ...

  14. Observations of Active Volcanoes Using the EO-1 Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, L. P.; Harris, A. J.; Wright, R.; Oppenheimer, C.; Geschwind, L. R.; Donegan, S.; Garbeil, H.

    2001-12-01

    Previous satellite observations of active volcanoes have been hampered by instruments that are primarily designed to measure surface reflectance of the Earth's vegetation. Sensors detecting radiation in the near-IR and IR are frequently saturated by highly radiant active volcanic features. Two satellite instruments, Hyperion and the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on the Earth Observing -1 (EO-1) offer a means to circumvent saturation issues. Hyperion is a hyperspectral instrument that collects data in 242 narrow spectral bands between 0.4 and 2.5 microns and produces images that are 7.5 km x 100 km. For each 30m x 30m pixel, accurate atmospheric corrections and multiple component thermal models for lava flows can be generated. ALI is a Landsat-like instrument having 10 spectral bands at 0.4 - 2.35 microns. One of these, the 1.2 micron band, is sensitive to high temperature thermal anomalies such as overturning lava lakes and open lava channels. ALI also has a 10-m panchromtic band that allows for greater detailed mapping of volcanic features. ALI and Hyperion analyses for Erta Ale (Ethiopia), Mt. Etna (Sicily), Santiaguito (Guatemala), Popocatepetl (Mexico), and Mayon (Philippines) will be presented. While distribution of these data sets is limited to the EO-1 Science Team, the future of NASA's high spatial resolution terrestrial observation program will likely be based on a hybrid of these EO-1 sensors.

  15. Virtual Investigations of an Active Deep Sea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, L.; Taylor, M. M.; Fundis, A.; Kelley, D. S.; Elend, M.

    2013-12-01

    Axial Seamount, located on the Juan de Fuca spreading ridge 300 miles off the Oregon coast, is an active volcano whose summit caldera lies 1500 m beneath the sea surface. Ongoing construction of the Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) cabled observatory by the University of Washington (funded by the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative) has allowed for exploration of recent lava flows and active hydrothermal vents using HD video mounted on the ROVs, ROPOS and JASON II. College level oceanography/marine geology online laboratory exercises referred to as Online Concept Modules (OCMs) have been created using video and video frame-captured mosaics to promote skill development for characterizing and quantifying deep sea environments. Students proceed at their own pace through a sequence of short movies with which they (a) gain background knowledge, (b) learn skills to identify and classify features or biota within a targeted environment, (c) practice these skills, and (d) use their knowledge and skills to make interpretations regarding the environment. Part (d) serves as the necessary assessment component of the laboratory exercise. Two Axial Seamount-focused OCMs will be presented: 1) Lava Flow Characterization: Identifying a Suitable Cable Route, and 2) Assessing Hydrothermal Vent Communities: Comparisons Among Multiple Sulfide Chimneys.

  16. Optimized autonomous space in-situ sensor web for volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Shirazi, B.; Huang, R.; Xu, M.; Peterson, N.; LaHusen, R.; Pallister, J.; Dzurisin, D.; Moran, S.; Lisowski, M.; Kedar, S.; Chien, S.; Webb, F.; Kiely, A.; Doubleday, J.; Davies, A.; Pieri, D.

    2010-01-01

    In response to NASA's announced requirement for Earth hazard monitoring sensor-web technology, a multidisciplinary team involving sensor-network experts (Washington State University), space scientists (JPL), and Earth scientists (USGS Cascade Volcano Observatory (CVO)), have developed a prototype of dynamic and scalable hazard monitoring sensor-web and applied it to volcano monitoring. The combined Optimized Autonomous Space In-situ Sensor-web (OASIS) has two-way communication capability between ground and space assets, uses both space and ground data for optimal allocation of limited bandwidth resources on the ground, and uses smart management of competing demands for limited space assets. It also enables scalability and seamless infusion of future space and in-situ assets into the sensor-web. The space and in-situ control components of the system are integrated such that each element is capable of autonomously tasking the other. The ground in-situ was deployed into the craters and around the flanks of Mount St. Helens in July 2009, and linked to the command and control of the Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite. ?? 2010 IEEE.

  17. Ground-coupled airwaves at Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, and their potential for eruption monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Cassandra M.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Thompson, Glenn

    2016-07-01

    An abnormally high number of explosion quakes were noted during the monitoring effort for the 2007 eruption of Pavlof Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. In this study, we manually cataloged the explosion quakes from their characteristic ground-coupled airwaves. This study investigates how the ground-coupled airwaves might be used in a monitoring or analysis effort by estimating energy release and gas mass release. Over 3 × 104 quakes were recorded. The energy release from the explosions is approximated to be 3 × 1011 J, and the total gas mass (assuming 100 % water) released was 450 t. The tracking of explosion quakes has the potential to estimate relative eruption intensity as a function of time and is thus a useful component of a seismic monitoring program.

  18. Multi-disciplinary Monitoring of the 2014 Eruption of Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Faria, B. V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Fogo volcano, located in the Cape Verde Archipelago (offshore Western Africa), is a complete stratovolcano system. It is the most recent expression of the Cape Verde hotspot, that has formed the archipelago. The summit reaches ~2830m above sea level, and raises 1100m above Chã das Caldeiras, an almost flat circular area. The last eruption of Fogo started on November 23, 2014 (~10:00UTC), after 19 years of inactivity. C4G, a distributed research infrastructure created in 2014 in the framework of the Portuguese Roadmap for Strategic Research Infrastructures, collaborated immediately with INMG, the Cape Verdean Meteorological and Geophysical Institut with the goal of complementing the permanent geophysical monitoring network in operation on Fogo island. The INMG permanent network is composed of seven seismographic stations and three tiltmeter stations, with real-time data transmitted. On the basis of increased pre-event activity (which started in October 2014), INMG issued a formal alert of an impending eruption to the Civil Protection Agency, about 24 hours before the onset of the eruption. Although the eruption caused no casualties or personal injuries due to the warnings issued, the lava expelled by the eruption (which last until the end of January) destroyed the two main villages in the caldera (~1000 inhabitants) and covered vast areas of agricultural land, causing very large economic losses and an uncertain future of the local populations. The C4G team installed a network of seven GNSS receivers and nine seismometers, distributed by the entire island. The data collection started on 28th November 2014, and continued until the end of January 2015. The mission also included a new detailed gravimetric survey of the island, the acquisition of geological samples, and the analysis of the air quality during the eruption. We present here a detailed description of the monitoring efforts carried out during the eruption as well as initial results of the analysis of the

  19. Shallow outgassing changes disrupt steady lava lake activity, Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Swanson, D. A.; Lev, E.

    2015-12-01

    Persistent lava lakes are a testament to sustained magma supply and outgassing in basaltic systems, and the surface activity of lava lakes has been used to infer processes in the underlying magmatic system. At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, the lava lake in Halema`uma`u Crater has been closely studied for several years with webcam imagery, geophysical, petrological and gas emission techniques. The lava lake in Halema`uma`u is now the second largest on Earth, and provides an unprecedented opportunity for detailed observations of lava lake outgassing processes. We observe that steady activity is characterized by continuous southward motion of the lake's surface and slow changes in lava level, seismic tremor and gas emissions. This normal, steady activity can be abruptly interrupted by the appearance of spattering - sometimes triggered by rockfalls - on the lake surface, which abruptly shifts the lake surface motion, lava level and gas emissions to a more variable, unstable regime. The lake commonly alternates between this a) normal, steady activity and b) unstable behavior several times per day. The spattering represents outgassing of shallowly accumulated gas in the lake. Therefore, although steady lava lake behavior at Halema`uma`u may be deeply driven by upwelling of magma, we argue that the sporadic interruptions to this behavior are the result of shallow processes occurring near the lake surface. These observations provide a cautionary note that some lava lake behavior is not representative of deep-seated processes. This behavior also highlights the complex and dynamic nature of lava lake activity.

  20. Interpreting Low Spatial Resolution Thermal Data from Active Volcanoes on Io and the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keszthelyi, L.; Harris, A. J. L.; Flynn, L.; Davies, A. G.; McEwen, A.

    2001-01-01

    The style of volcanism was successfully determined at a number of active volcanoes on Io and the Earth using the same techniques to interpret thermal remote sensing data. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Application of Structure From Motion (SFM) to volcano monitoring at Popocatépetl (México).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ontiveros, Guillermo; Delgado-Granados, Hugo

    2015-04-01

    Aerial photographs obtained during reconnaissance flights to observe the growth of lava domes inside the crater of Popocatépetl volcano were used to analyze the feasibility of using the photogrammetric technique called structure from motion (SFM) to volcano monitoring. The photographs were used to obtain complete georeferenced 3D models of the volcano, particularly of the inside of the crater. We show here an analysis of the explosive event occurred in the crater of the Popocatépetl volcano on May 14, 2013 applying the SFM technique. Also, an estimate of the volume of the lava dome in the crater and the amount of material expelled during the explosion was estimated. A comparison of their basic needs is presented here, together with their pros and cons in order to provide a perspective on its possibilities and limitations.

  2. MCO Monitoring activity description

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON, R.A.

    1998-11-09

    Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

  3. Seismic monitoring at Deception Island volcano (Antarctica): the 2010-2011 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, R.; Carmona, E.; Almendros, J.; Serrano, I.; Villaseñor, A.; Galeano, J.

    2012-04-01

    As an example of the recent advances introduced in seismic monitoring of Deception Island volcano (Antarctica) during recent years, we describe the instrumental network deployed during the 2010-2011 survey by the Instituto Andaluz de Geofísica of University of Granada, Spain (IAG-UGR). The period of operation extended from December 19, 2010 to March 5, 2011. We deployed a wireless seismic network composed by four three-component seismic stations. These stations are based on 24-bit SL04 SARA dataloggers sampling at 100 sps. They use a PC with embedded linux and SEISLOG data acquisition software. We use two types of three-component seismometers: short-period Mark L4C with natural frequency of 1 Hz and medium-period Lennartz3D/5s with natural frequency of 0.2 Hz. The network was designed for an optimum spatial coverage of the northern half of Deception, where a magma chamber has been reported. Station locations include the vicinity of the Spanish base "Gabriel de Castilla" (GdC), Obsidianas Beach, a zone near the craters from the 1970 eruptions, and the Chilean Shelter located south of Pendulum Cove. Continuous data from the local seismic network are received in real-time in the base by wifi transmission. We used Ubiquiti Networks Nanostation2 antennas with 2.4 GHz, dual-polarity, 10 dBi gain, and 54 Mbps transmission rate. They have shown a great robustness and speed for real-time applications. To prioritize data acquisition when the battery level is low, we have designed a circuit that allows independent power management for the seismic station and wireless transmission system. The reception antenna located at GdC is connected to a computer running SEISCOMP. This software supports several transmission protocols and manages the visualization and recording of seismic data, including the generation of summary plots to show the seismic activity. These twelve data channels are stored in miniseed format and displayed in real time, which allows for a rapid evaluation of

  4. Icelandic Volcanoes Geohazard Supersite and FUTUREVOLC: role of interferometric synthetic aperture radar to identify renewed unrest and track magma movement beneath the most active volcanoes in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Michelle; Dumont, Stéphanie; Spaans, Karsten; Drouin, Vincent; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hooper, Andrew; Michalczewska, Karolina; Ófeigsson, Benedikt

    2014-05-01

    FUTUREVOLC is an integrated volcano monitoring project, funded by the European Commission (FP7) and led by the University of Iceland and the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO). The project is a European collaborative effort, comprising 26 partners, aimed at integrating ground based and satellite observations for improved monitoring and evaluation of volcanic hazards. Iceland has also recently been declared a Geohazard Supersite by the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites, based on its propensity for relatively frequent eruptions and their potentially hazardous, long ranging effects. Generating a long-term time series of ground displacements is key to gaining a better understanding of sub-volcanic processes, including the detection of new melt and migration of magma within the crust. The focus of the FUTUREVOLC deformation team is to generate and interpret an extended time series of high resolution deformation measurements derived from InSAR observations, in the vicinity of the four most active volcanoes in Iceland: Grímsvötn, Katla, Hekla and Bárdarbunga. A comprehensive network of continuous deformation monitoring equipment, led by IMO and collaborators, is already deployed at these volcanoes, including GPS, tilt and borehole strainmeters. InSAR observations are complementary to field based measurements and their high spatial resolution assists in resolving the geometry and location of the source of the deformation. InSAR and tilt measurements at Hekla indicate renewed melt supply to a sub-volcanic reservoir after the last eruption in 2000. Recent deformation studies utilising data spanning this eruption, have provided insight into the shallow plumbing system which may explain the large reduction in eruption repose interval following the 1970 eruption. Although InSAR and GPS observations at Katla volcano (between 2001 and 2009) suggest no indication of magma induced deformation outside the ice-cap, it is possible that a small flood at Mýrdalsjökull in

  5. Integrating science and education during an international, multi-parametric investigation of volcanic activity at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée, Yan; Johnson, Jeffrey; Andrews, Benjamin; Wolf, Rudiger; Rose, William; Chigna, Gustavo; Pineda, Armand

    2016-04-01

    In January 2016, we held the first scientific/educational Workshops on Volcanoes (WoV). The workshop took place at Santiaguito volcano - the most active volcano in Guatemala. 69 international scientists of all ages participated in this intensive, multi-parametric investigation of the volcanic activity, which included the deployment of seismometers, tiltmeters, infrasound microphones and mini-DOAS as well as optical, thermographic, UV and FTIR cameras around the active vent. These instruments recorded volcanic activity in concert over a period of 3 to 9 days. Here we review the research activities and present some of the spectacular observations made through this interdisciplinary efforts. Observations range from high-resolution drone and IR footage of explosions, monitoring of rock falls and quantification of the erupted mass of different gases and ash, as well as morphological changes in the dome caused by recurring explosions (amongst many other volcanic processes). We will discuss the success of such integrative ventures in furthering science frontiers and developing the next generation of geoscientists.

  6. Reawakening of a volcano: Activity beneath Eyjafjallajökull volcano from 1991 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjaltadóttir, Sigurlaug; Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Slunga, Ragnar

    2015-10-01

    The ice-capped Eyjafjallajökull volcano, south Iceland, had been dormant for 170 years when the first signs of reawakening of the volcano were captured by seismic and geodetic measurements in 1994. These were the first clear observed signs of unrest followed by 16 years of intermittent magmatic unrest culminating in 2010 when two eruptions broke out on the flank and at the summit. We analyze seismic data from 1991 through 2008 and GPS data from 1992 to May 2009 to infer magma movements beneath the volcano. The relocated earthquakes reveal an overall pipe-like pattern northeast of the summit crater, sporadically mapping the pathway of magma from the base of the crust towards an intrusion in the upper crust. During the study period, three major seismic swarms were recorded. Two of them, in 1994 and 1999-2000, occurred in the upper and intermediate crust and accompanied crustal deformation centered at the southeastern flank. No uplift was detected during the 19- to 25-km-deep 1996 swarm, near the crust-mantle boundary, but the horizontal, ~ E-W oriented T-axes indicate a period of tension/opening, suggesting magma intruding up into the base of the crust. The GPS measured deformation during 1999-2000 can be modeled as intrusion of a horizontal, circular sill with volume of 0.030 ± 0.007 km3 at 5.0 ± 1.3 km depth. The less constrained 4.5- to 5-km-deep sill model for the 1994 episode indicates a three times smaller intruded volume (0.011 km3) than during 1999-2000. In the years between/following the intrusions, contraction was observed at the southeastern flank. The contraction from 2000.5 to 2009.3 can be fitted by a circular sill model with a volume contraction of - 0.0015 ± 0.0003 km3/year at 5.5 ± 2.0 km depth. The less well constrained model for 1994.7 to 1998.6 gives a volume contraction of -(0.0009-0.0010) km3 at a fixed depth of 5 km. The accumulated volume changes (~- 0.013 km3 for the second period, ~ 0.0037 km3 for the first period) are much larger than

  7. Blast waves from violent explosive activity at Yasur volcano, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, E.; Ripepe, M.; Delle Donne, D.; Genco, R.; Finizola, A.; Garaebiti, E.

    2013-12-01

    The violent Strombolian activity at Yasur volcano (Vanuatu) was recorded with infrasonic, seismic and thermal sensors. Infrasound array allowed to identify and stack ~3000 infrasonic and seismic transiensts of explosions from two distinct vents. The stacked seismic signals evidence a low-frequency (0.15 Hz) signal preceding of ~5-6 s the explosion that was hidden by the high seismic tremor and microseism. Infrasonic signals are self-similar presenting a stable strong asymmetry, with a sharp positive pressure (5-106 Pa) onset followed by a longer lasting negative rarefaction phase. Self-similarity and asymmetry of the recorded pressure waveforms are recalling blast waves. Regardless the pressure amplitude, ratio between the positive and negative phase is constant. This fit the Friedland waveform and support the blast wave model. Thermal imagery detects this pressure wave as soon as it exits the vent as a relative ~20 m thick cold front, which radiates spherically from the source. This front of apparent cold temperature is moving before the volcanic hot gas/fragments cloud at a velocity ranging between 342 and 403 m/s. We interpret this cold front as produced by the change of the atmospheric refraction index induced by the passage of the shock front. Assuming a supersonic dynamics, we calculate that the mean acoustic pressure (25 Pa) recorded at the array is generated by a a gas expansion velocity of 372 m/s equivalent to Mach number of 1.1. Our data are then suggesting that explosive activity at Yasur is able to generate blast waves indicating supersonic gas expansion. Blast waves are expected and well documented for Plinian and Vulcanian eruptions, but have never been recorded during Strombolian events. This evidence has a direct consequence on the source modeling of infrasonic transients explosions as it requires non-linear source dynamics to explain also small scale (VEI<2) explosive processes.

  8. Recent improvements in monitoring Hawaiian volcanoes with webcams and thermal cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Antolik, L.; Lee, R.; Kamibayashi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Webcams have become essential tools for continuous observation of ongoing volcanic activity. The use of both visual webcams and Web-connected thermal cameras has increased dramatically at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory over the past five years, improving our monitoring capability and understanding of both Kilauea's summit eruption, which began in 2008, and the east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983. The recent bolstering of the webcam network builds upon the three sub-megapixel webcams that were in place five years ago. First, several additional fixed visual webcam systems have been installed, using multi-megapixel low-light cameras. Second, several continuously operating thermal cameras have been deployed, providing a new view of activity, easier detection of active flows, and often "seeing" through fume that completely obscures views from visual webcams. Third, a new type of "mobile" webcam - using cellular modem telemetry and capable of rapid deployment - has allowed us to respond quickly to changes in eruptive activity. Fourth, development of automated analysis and alerting scripts provide real-time products that aid in quantitative interpretation of incoming images. Finally, improvements in the archiving and Web-based display of images allow efficient review of current and recent images by observatory staff. Examples from Kilauea's summit and lava flow field provide more detail on the improvements. A thermal camera situated at Kilauea's summit has tracked the changes in the active lava lake in Halema`uma`u Crater since late 2010. Automated measurements from these images using Matlab scripts are now providing real-time quantitative data on lava level and, in some cases, lava crust velocity. Lava level essentially follows summit tilt over short time scales, in which near-daily cycles of deflation and inflation correspond with about ten meters of lava level drop and rise, respectively. The data also show that the long-term Halema`uma`u lava level tracked

  9. Development and testing of an automated High-resolution InSAR volcano-monitoring system in the MED-SUV project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Tanvir Ahmed; Minet, Christian; Fritz, Thomas; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic unrest which produces a variety of geological and hydrological hazards is difficult to predict. Therefore it is important to monitor volcanoes continuously. The monitoring of active volcanoes requires the reliable measurement of surface deformation before, during and after volcanic activities. Besides the improvements of the understanding of geophysical processes underlying the volcanic systems of Vesuvius/ Campi Flegrei and Mt. Etna, one of the main goals of the MED-SUV (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes) project is to design a system for automatically monitoring ground deformations over active volcanoes. Space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR), persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) and small baseline subset algorithm (SBAS) provide powerful tools for observing the surface changes with millimeter accuracy. All the mentioned techniques address the challenges by exploiting medium to large SAR image stacks. The generation of interferometric products constitutes a major effort in terms of processing and planning. It requires a high degree of automation, robustness and quality control of the overall process. As a consequence of these requirements and constrains, the Integrated Wide Area Processor (IWAP) developed at DLR is introduced in the framework of a remote sensing task of MED-SUV project. The IWAP has been conceived and designed to optimize the processing workflow in order to minimize the processing time. Moreover, a quality control concept has been developed and integrated in the workflow. The IWAP is structured into three parts: (i) firstly, preparation of an order file containing some configuration parameters and invokes the processor; (ii) secondly, upon request from the processor, the operator performs some manual interactions by means of visual interfaces; (iii) analysis of the final product supported by extensive product visualization. This visualization supports the interpretation of the results without the need of

  10. Terrestrial Radar Interferometry and Structure-from-Motion Data from Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia for Improved Hazard Assessment and Volcano Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, M.; Dixon, T. H.; Gallant, E.; López, C. M.; Malservisi, R.; Ordoñez, M.; Richardson, J. A.; Voss, N. K.; Xie, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing geodesy has huge potential for volcano monitoring and improved modelling of volcanic hazards. Terrestrial Radar Interferometers (TRI) can rapidly and accurately create DEMs and repeat occupation of sites allows measurement of deformation. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry can be used to construct DEMs and SfM surveys can be carried out with relatively accessible equipment. TRI and SfM techniques are highly complimentary: The upper slopes of a volcano may be cloud covered, but can be imaged by TRI, whereas lower canyons may be in radar shadow, but can be imaged with SfM. Both methods are also complimentary to satellite observations (e.g. SRTM, ASTER), offering some advantages in terms of coverage and resolution. We present the acquisition of two new geodetic datasets at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia (NRV). NRV is a large glacierised volcano that erupted in 1985, generating a glacier-derived lahar that killed over 23,000 people in the city of Armero and 2,000 people in the town of Chinchina. NRV is the most active volcano in Colombia and since 2012 has generated small eruptions (with no casualties) and constant gas and ash emissions. In early 2015, we collected data from several sites close to the crater of NRV and around the Azufrado drainage (the site of previous debris avalanches and lahars). The TRI was operated from three sites, while drone- and ground-based cameras ventured into the canyons to fill in radar shadow gaps. These data have three primary uses: 1) generation of high-precision DEMs for lahar modelling and visualisation of previous events, 2) imaging of summit glacier motion, and 3) establishing a baseline for long-term deformation studies. We discuss ground-based remote sensing geodetic data from high-tech (TRI) to low-tech (SfM) methods and show the importance of combining these complimentary datasets to improve DEMs for hazard modelling and volcano monitoring.

  11. Gravity and deformation changes at two persistently active volcanoes: Insights into magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Jones, G.; Rymer, H.

    2004-05-01

    cycle of activity is also controlled by the convective overturn of shallow degassed, cooled and dense magma that is replaced periodically by lower density, hot, gas-rich magma from depth. Buoyant gas-rich magma rises from depth and is emplaced near the surface, resulting in the formation and fluctuation of a low-density gas-rich layer centred beneath the pit crater complex. The presence of a well developed hydrothermal system such as at Poás, can act as a physical and chemical buffer to the volcanic system and therefore moderate any volcanic processes. Similarly, the chaotic but essentially "open" nature of Masaya's substructure can obscure short-term variations. However, in both situations, long-term multi-component monitoring has proven valuable in explaining the observed cyclic changes, specifically, that gas-driven convection is a fundamental process at these persistently active volcanoes.

  12. Real-time volcano monitoring using GNSS single-frequency receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Yun, Sung-Hyo; Kim, Do Hyeong; Lee, Dukkee; Lee, Young J.; Schutz, Bob E.

    2015-12-01

    We present a real-time volcano monitoring strategy that uses the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and we examine the performance of the strategy by processing simulated and real data and comparing the results with published solutions. The cost of implementing the strategy is reduced greatly by using single-frequency GNSS receivers except for one dual-frequency receiver that serves as a base receiver. Positions of the single-frequency receivers are computed relative to the base receiver on an epoch-by-epoch basis using the high-rate double-difference (DD) GNSS technique, while the position of the base station is fixed to the values obtained with a deferred-time precise point positioning technique and updated on a regular basis. Since the performance of the single-frequency high-rate DD technique depends on the conditions of the ionosphere over the monitoring area, the ionospheric total electron content is monitored using the dual-frequency data from the base receiver. The surface deformation obtained with the high-rate DD technique is eventually processed by a real-time inversion filter based on the Mogi point source model. The performance of the real-time volcano monitoring strategy is assessed through a set of tests and case studies, in which the data recorded during the 2007 eruption of Kilauea and the 2005 eruption of Augustine are processed in a simulated real-time mode. The case studies show that the displacement time series obtained with the strategy seem to agree with those obtained with deferred-time, dual-frequency approaches at the level of 10-15 mm. Differences in the estimated volume change of the Mogi source between the real-time inversion filter and previously reported works were in the range of 11 to 13% of the maximum volume changes of the cases examined.

  13. Cotopaxi volcano's unrest and eruptive activity in 2015: mild awakening after 73 years of quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Silvana; Bernard, Benjamin; Battaglia, Jean; Gaunt, Elizabeth; Barrington, Charlotte; Andrade, Daniel; Ramón, Patricio; Arellano, Santiago; Yepes, Hugo; Proaño, Antonio; Almeida, Stefanie; Sierra, Daniel; Dinger, Florian; Kelly, Peter; Parra, René; Bobrowski, Nicole; Galle, Bo; Almeida, Marco; Mothes, Patricia; Alvarado, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Cotopaxi volcano (5,897 m) is located 50 km south of Quito, the capital of Ecuador. The most dangerous hazards of this volcano are the devastating lahars that can be generated by the melting of its ice cap during pyroclastic flow-forming eruptions. The first seismic station was installed in 1976. Cotopaxi has been monitored by the Instituto Geofísico (Escuela Politécnica Nacional) since 1983. Presently the monitoring network is comprised of 11 broadband and 5 short period seismometers, 4 scanning DOAS, 1 infrared and 5 visible cameras, 7 DGPS, 5 tiltmeters, 11 AFM (lahar detectors) and a network of ashmeters. Due to the recent unrest, the monitoring of the volcano has been complemented by campaign airborne Multi-GAS and thermal IR measurements and ground-based mobile DOAS and stationary solar FTIR. After 73 years of quiescence, the first sign of unrest was a progressive increase in the amplitude of transient seismic events in April 2015. Since May 20, an increase in SO2 emissions from ˜500 t/d to ˜3 kt/day was detected followed by the appearance of seismic tremor on June 4. Both SO2 emissions of up to 5 kt/day and seismic tremor were observed until August 14 when a swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes preceded the first phreatic explosions. These explosions produced ash and gas columns reaching up to 9 km above the crater. The ash fall produced by the opening phase covered over 500 km2 with a submillimetric deposit corresponding to a mass of 1.65E+8 kg (VEI 1). During this period of explosions, SO2 emission rates up to 24 kt/day were observed, the highest thus far. The ash was dominantly hydrothermally altered and oxidized lithic fragments, hydrothermal minerals (alunite, gypsum), free crystals of plagioclase and pyroxenes, and little juvenile material. Unrest continued after August 14, with three episodes of ash emission. However, the intensity of ash fallout, average seismic amplitude, and SO2 emissions during each successive episode progressively decreased

  14. Subglacial melting associated with activity at Bárdarbunga volcano, Iceland, explored using numerical reservoir simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Hannah I.; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Högnadóttir, Thórdís

    2015-04-01

    Increased seismic activity was observed within the caldera of Bárdarbunga, a central volcano beneath Vatnajökull glacier, on 16 August 2014. The seismicity traced the path of a lateral dyke, initially propagating to the south east of the volcano, before changing course and continuing beyond the northern extent of the glacier. A short fissure eruption occurred at the site of the Holuhraun lavas on 29 August, lasting for approximately 5 hours and producing less than 1 million cubic meters of lava, before recommencing in earnest on 31 August with the large effusive eruption, which is still ongoing at the time of writing. The glacier surface has been monitored aerially since the onset of heightened seismic activity, and the caldera and dyke propagation path surveyed using radar profiling. Ice cauldrons are shallow depressions which form on the glacier surface due to basal melting, as a manifestation of heat flux from below; the melting ice acts as a calorimeter, allowing estimations of heat flux magnitude to be made. Several cauldrons were observed outside the caldera, two to the south east of Bárdarbunga, and three located above the path of the dyke under the Dyngjujökull outlet glacier. The cauldrons range in volume from approximately 0.001 km3 to 0.02 km3. We present time series data of the development and evolution of these cauldrons, with estimates of the heat flux magnitudes involved. The nature of the heat source required to generate the aforementioned cauldrons is not obvious and two scenarios are explored: 1) small subglacial eruptions; or 2) increased geothermal activity induced by the dyke intrusion. We investigate these scenarios using analytical and finite element modelling, considering the surface heat flux produced, and timescales and spatial extent of associated surface anomalies. A range of permeabilities has been explored. It is found that an intrusion of a dyke or sill into rocks where the groundwater is near or at the boiling point curve can

  15. Evolution of Deformation Studies on Active Hawaiian Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, R.; Okamura, A.

    2004-12-01

    Summarizing 1600 years of observations and interpretations into a brief presentation forces some difficult choices on highlighting the following techniques that are presented chronologically: Visual Observations, 400 AD to present: Missionary William Ellis' Hawaiian Guides told him that Kilauea "had been burning from time immemorial, or, to use their own words, `mai ka po mai', from chaos till now...that in earlier ages it used to boil up, overflow its banks, and inundate the adjacent country...and on occasions they supposed Pele went by a road under ground from her house in the crater to the shore". Observations of the nearly-continuous lava lake in Kilauea Caldera from 1823 until 1924 established that its surface level fluctuated from about 700 to 1100 m above sea level in 10 up-and-down episodes. Tilt Measurements, 1914 to present: Horizontal-seismometer drift and water-tube tiltmeters show that the range of long-term, ground-surface tilt radial to Halemaumau Crater exceeds 500 microradians. Triangulation and Leveling, 1920: R. M. Wilson measured deformation changes related to major Kilauea summit subsidence in 1924. The caldera area around Halemaumau subsided concentrically as much as 4 m relative to the Volcano House benchmark, and triangulation points moved toward Halemaumau by as much as 1.6 m in the caldera area. K. Mogi in 1958 modeled Kilauea leveling data and inferred 3-4 km-deep magma reservoirs. Gravity Measurements, 1959 to present: Changes were first measured during Kilauea summit subsidence related to the lower-east-rift Kapoho eruption. Surveys made before and after the 1975 M7.2 Kalapana Earthquake show that gravity changes are not a simple proxy for elevation changes. Electronic Distance Measurements (EDM), 1964 to present: D. A. Swanson, W. A. Duffield, and R. S. Fiske use EDM for trilateration proving movement of the south flank of Kilauea toward the sea. EDM show displacements as large as 8.7 m of Kilauea's south flank toward the sea related

  16. The BENTO Box: Development and field-testing of a new satellite-linked data collection system for multiparameter volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, D. C.; Behar, A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.

    2014-12-01

    Predicting volcanic activity requires continuous monitoring for signals of magmatic unrest in harsh, often remote environments. BENTO is a next-generation monitoring system, currently in prototype testing, that is highly portable, low-cost, rapidly deployable, and entirely autonomous. Such a system could be used to provide critical monitoring and data collection capabilities during rapid-onset eruptions, or to provide a crude baseline monitor at large numbers of remote volcanoes to 'flag' the onset of unrest so that costlier resources such as specialized instrumentation can be deployed in the appropriate place at the appropriate time. The BENTO 1 (low-rate data) prototype currently comprises off-the-shelf volcanic gas sensors (SO2, CO2, Fl, Cl, and Br), a weather station (temperature, wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, humidity, pressure), and telemetry via Iridium modem. In baseline mode, BENTO 1 takes a measurement from all of its sensors every two hours and automatically sends the measurements through Iridium to a server that posts them to a dedicated and customizable web page. The measurement interval and other sensor parameters (pumping time, sensor constants) can be adjusted directly or remotely (through the Iridium network) as needed. Currently, BENTO 1 is deployed at Mt. Etna, Italy; Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, Hengill Volcano, Iceland; and Hekla Volcano, Iceland. The BENTO 2 (high-rate) system is motivated by a need to avoid having to telemeter raw seismic data, which at 20-100 Hz/channel is far too voluminous for cost- and power-effective transmission through satellite networks such as Iridium. Our solution is to regularly transmit only state-of-health information and descriptions of the seismic data (e.g., 'triggered' seismic event rates and amplitudes), rather than the data itself. The latter can be accomplished through on-board data analysis and reduction at the installation site. Currently, it is possible to request specific time segments of raw

  17. Nyiragonga Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Nyiragonga volcano eruption in the Congo was acquired on January 28, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: A river of molten rock poured from the Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo on January 18, 2002, a day after it erupted, killing dozens, swallowing buildings and forcing hundreds of thousands to flee the town of Goma. The flow continued into Lake Kivu. The lave flows are depicted in red on the image indicating they are still hot. Two of them flowed south form the volcano's summit and went through the town of Goma. Another flow can be seen at the top of the image, flowing towards the northwest. One of Africa's most notable volcanoes, Nyiragongo contained an active lava lake in its deep summit crater that drained catastrophically through its outer flanks in 1977. Extremely fluid, fast-moving lava flows draining from the summit lava lake in 1977 killed 50 to 100 people, and several villages were destroyed. The image covers an area of 21 x 24 km and combines a thermal band in red, and two infrared bands in green and blue.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the

  18. Chlorine isotopes of thermal springs in arc volcanoes for tracing shallow magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Bonifacie, Magali; Aubaud, Cyril; Crispi, Olivier; Dessert, Céline; Agrinier, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The evaluation of the status of shallow magma body (i.e., from the final intrusion stage, to quiescence, and back to activity), one of the key parameters that trigger and sustain volcanic eruptions, has been challenging in modern volcanology. Among volatile tracers, chlorine (Cl) uniquely exsolves at shallow depths and is highly hydrophilic. Consequently, Cl enrichment in volcanic gases and thermal springs has been proposed as a sign for shallow magmatic activities. However, such enrichment could also result from numerous other processes (e.g., water evaporation, dissolution of old chloride mineral deposits, seawater contamination) that are unrelated to magmatic activity. Here, based on stable isotope compositions of chloride and dissolved inorganic carbon, as well as previous published 3He/4He data obtained in thermal springs from two recently erupted volcanoes (La Soufrière in Guadeloupe and Montagne Pelée in Martinique) in the Lesser Antilles Arc, we show that the magmatic Cl efficiently trapped in thermal springs displays negative δ37Cl values (≤ - 0.65 ‰), consistent with a slab-derived origin but distinct from the isotope compositions of chloride in surface reservoirs (e.g. seawater, local meteoric waters, rivers and cold springs) displaying common δ37Cl values of around 0‰. Using this δ37Cl difference as an index of magmatic Cl, we further examined thermal spring samples including a 30-year archive from two thermal springs in Guadeloupe covering samples from its last eruption in 1976-1977 to 2008 and an island-wide sampling event in Martinique in 2008 to trace the evolution of magmatic Cl in the volcanic hydrothermal systems over time. The results show that magmatic Cl can be rapidly flushed out of the hydrothermal systems within <30 to 80 years after the eruption, much quicker than other volatile tracers such as CO2 and noble gases, which can exsolve at greater depths and constantly migrate to the surface. Because arc volcanoes often have well

  19. Dynamical parameter analysis of continuous seismic signals of Popocatépetl volcano (Central Mexico): A case of tectonic earthquakes influencing volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárraga, Marta; Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana; Carniel, Roberto; Martínez-Bringas, Alicia; García, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2012-06-01

    The continuous background seismic activity contains information on the internal state of a volcanic system. Here, we report the influence of major regional tectonic earthquakes (M > 5 in most cases) on such state, reflected as changes in the spectral and dynamical parameters of the volcano continuous seismic data. Although changes do not always occur, analysis of five cases of earthquake-induced variations in the signals recorded at Popocatépetl volcano in central México reveal significant fluctuations following the tectonic earthquakes. External visible volcanic activity, such as small to moderate explosions and ash emissions, were related to those fluctuations. We briefly discuss possible causes of the variations. We conclude that recognition of fluctuations in the dynamical parameters in volcano monitoring seismic signals after tectonic earthquakes, even those located in the far field, hundreds of kilometers away, may provide an additional criterion for eruption forecasting, and for decision making in the definition of volcanic alert levels.

  20. Hydrologic data and description of a hydrologic monitoring plan for Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Tiffany Rae; McFarland, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    A hydrologic reconnaissance of the Medicine Lake Volcano area was done to collect data needed for the design of a hydrologic monitoring plan. The reconnaissance was completed during two field trips made in June and September 1992, during which geothermal and hydrologic features of public interest in the Medicine Lake area were identified. Selected wells, springs, and geothermal features were located and documented, and initial water-level, discharge, temperature, and specific-conductance measurements were made. Lakes in the study area also were surveyed during the September field trip. Temperature, specific- conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH data were collected by using a multiparameter probe. The proposed monitoring plan includes measurement of water levels in wells, discharge from springs, and lake stage, as well as analysis of well-,spring-, and lake-water quality. In determining lake-water quality, data for both stratified and unstratified conditions would be considered. (Data for stratified conditions were collected during the reconnaissance phase of this project, but data for unstratified conditions were not.) In addition, lake stage also would be monitored. A geothermal feature near Medicine Lake is a "hot spot" from which hot gases discharge from two distinct vents. Gas chemistry and temperature would be monitored in one of these vents.

  1. Soil radon ( 222 Rn) monitoring at Furnas Volcano (São Miguel, Azores): Applications and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Ferreira, T.; Viveiros, F.; Allard, P.

    2015-05-01

    A soil 222Rn continuous monitoring test was performed in three sampling points inside Furnas Volcano caldera and 222Rn concentration varied between 0 and 153000 Bq/m3. Multivariate regression and spectral analyses were applied to the time series registered in order to understand and filter the influence of external factors on soil 222Rn concentration and to recognise anomalies correlated with deep processes. The regression models show that barometric pressure, soil water content, soil temperature, soil CO2 flux, air temperature, relative air humidity and wind speed are the statistical meaningful variables explaining between 15.8% and 73.6% of 222Rn variations. Spectral analysis allowed to identify seasonal variations and daily variations associated with one cycle per day on winter months only in one of the monitored sites. This diurnal variation is correlated with air temperature, relative air humidity and wind speed cycles. The change in the location of the sampling points was caused by both artificial and natural constrains. On the three monitoring sites, after a period of continuous register, a sudden drop on the 222Rn concentration values was observed and the cause is still under debate. The work performed can be applied for seismovolcanic monitoring and for public health risk assessment.

  2. Marapi an active West-Central Sumatra Volcano: a geological and petrological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Marmol, M.; Budianto, A.; Fournelle, J.; Jacobs, P.; Elburg, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Marapi volcano (West - Central Sumatra), Sumatra’s most active volcano (not to be confused with Merapi on Java), located in a densely populated area and where more than 50 explosive eruptions have been recorded in the last 200 years has been studied in detail in the field to gain fundamental understanding of the volcano's activity in terms of its basic geology, petrology and geochemistry. Marapi is one of a few active volcanoes among many dormant volcanoes of this island. Large deposits of the nearby Maninjau caldera, dated 50 ka (n=3), associated with very silica-rich volcanic products is another reason for concern, since caldera formation is linked with severe explosive activity. Those deposits are found at the base of the volcano and largely in the deeply incised valley which follows the Sumatra fault extending parallel to the Sumatra volcanic front. A possible landslide parallel to the Sumatra fault is recognized on the LANDSAT image. Landslides on the external old external side have allowed the collection of the oldest part of the volcano as most of it is covered with a thick primary forest. These landslides occurring on old volcanic terrain are a threat to the surrounding population living nearby the rivers especially during the heavy rainy seasons. A 20 m high stratigraphic column has been studied, with the volcano’s explosive nature seen in the collected samples (i.e. bombs and pumices). A new sketch map of the area of the craters (6 over 2km) replaces the one made in 1921 at the Dutch colonial time. A geological and hazard map have been created showing the extension of the various deposits.

  3. Real-time infrasonic monitoring of the eruption at a remote island volcano using seismoacoustic cross correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Ichihara, Mie

    2016-02-01

    On 2013 November 20, a submarine eruption started close to Nishinoshima island, which lies ˜1000 km south of Tokyo. Real-time monitoring of the eruption is crucial for understanding the formation processes of the new volcano island and related disaster prevention. In situ monitoring, however, is difficult in practice because the closest inhabited island, Chichijima, is 130 km away from Nishinoshima. This study presents an infrasonic monitoring method that uses cross-correlating records at a pair of online stations on Chichijima. One is the horizontal ground velocity recorded at a permanent seismic station operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The seismic records were corrected for atmospheric pressure using an empirical ground response to infrasound. The other is the air pressure recorded at the JMA Meteorological Observatory. For each station, we divided the whole records into 3600-s segments. To suppress outliers, each segment was normalized by the envelope function. We then calculated cross-correlation functions between the pair of stations using the fast Fourier transform. They present clear successive arrivals of infrasound coming from Nishinoshima. We also conducted an offline tripartite-array observation using three low-frequency microphones with a station spacing of ˜50 m installed in 2013 May. The array analysis supports the results obtained from the online stations. The typical root-mean-squared amplitude is on the order of 0.01 Pa, and the typical duration is several days. The amplitudes were primarily controlled by the effective sound velocity structure from Nishinoshima to Chichijima. The infrasonic observations together with the meteorological observation at Chichijima suggest that infrasonic activity was not present in the first two weeks in 2015 January. With the help of a more quantitative estimation of the meteorological effect, we could infer eruptive activity in real time. Now many online seismic stations are available worldwide

  4. Investigating the active hydrothermal field of Kolumbo Volcano using CTD profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleni Christopoulou, Maria; Mertzimekis, Theo; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The submarine Kolumbo volcano NE of Santorini Island and the unique active hydrothermal vent field on its crater field (depth ~ 500 m) have been recently explored in multiple cruises aboard E/V Nautilus. ROV explorations showed the existence of extensive vent activity and almost completely absence of vent-specific macrofauna. Gas discharges have been found to be 99%-rich in CO2, which is sequestered at the bottom of the crater due to a special combination of physicochemical and geomorphological factors. The dynamic conditions existing along the water column in the crater have been studied in detail by means of temperature, salinity and conductivity depth profiles for the first time. CTD sensors aboard the ROV Hercules were employed to record anomalies in those parameters in an attempt to investigate several active and inactive vent locations. Temporal CTD monitoring inside and outside of the crater was carried out over a period of two years. Direct comparison between the vent field and locations outside the main cone, where no hydrothermal activity is known to exist, showed completely different characteristics. CTD profiles above the active vent field (NNE side) are correlated to Kolumbo's cone morphology. The profiles suggest the existence of four distinct zones of physicochemical properties in the water column. The layer directly above the chimneys exhibit gas discharges highly enriched in CO2. Continuous gas motoring is essential to identify the onset of geological hazards in the region.

  5. A comprehensive approach to monitoring volcano deformation as a window on the eruption cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.

    2003-01-01

    Since the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, volcanologists have made considerable progress toward predicting eruptions on the basis of precursors that typically start a few days to several months in advance. Although accurate eruption prediction is by no means routine, it may now be possible in some cases to extend the effective warning period by anticipating the onset of short-term precursors. Three promising indicators of deep magmatic processes are (1) deep, long-period earthquakes and tremor that indicate the ascent of magma through the crust, (2) magmatic CO2 emission rate as a proxy for magma supply rate, and (3) relatively broad, generally aseismic surface uplift caused by magmatic intrusions. In the latter case it is essential to sample the deformation field thoroughly in both time and space to adequately constrain source models. Until recently, this has been nearly impossible because high-precision sensors could not be deployed in sufficient numbers, nor could extensive geodetic surveys be conducted often enough. Advances in instrumentation, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), and telecommunications are helping to overcome these limitations. As a result, comprehensive geodetic monitoring of selected volcanoes is now feasible. A combination of InSAR, large-aperture GPS surveys, microgravity surveys, and dense arrays of continuous GPS stations, strain meters, and tiltmeters can reveal both spatial and temporal patterns of ground deformation throughout the eruption cycle. Improved geodetic monitoring of many of the world's volcanoes would be a major stride toward better understanding of magmatic processes and longer-term eruption forecasts.

  6. Integration of Petrologic, Geophysical, and Gas Monitoring Data at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornber, C. R.; Lee, R. L.; Gansecki, C. A.; Orr, T. R.; Miklius, A.; Sutton, A. J.; Thelen, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Well-quenched, near-vent lava samples taken at weekly to monthly intervals during the past 31 years of near-continuous Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption have yielded an unprecedented temporal record of petrology and geochemistry. Salient petrologic parameters derived from bulk lava major- and trace-element geochemistry, and from microprobe analyses of matrix glasses, phenocrysts, and melt-inclusions, are now incorporated into the USGS Volcano Science Center's near real-time volcano-monitoring software platform, called the Volcano Analysis and Visualization Environment (VALVE). The petrologic parameters now imported into VALVE for correlation with geophysical and gas data streams are: 1) MgO systematics of bulk lava, glass, and olivine, used to portray pre-eruptive magma temperature and temperature of lava erupted at the vent, 2) incompatible element ratios of bulk lava and glass, used to track either sudden or long-term magma-mixing or magma-source changes , and 3) magmatic sulfur, measured within glass inclusions of olivine, used to infer pre-eruptive volatile content of magma. Petrologic data in VALVE provides added insight into magmatic processes. For example, since the onset of Kilauea's summit eruption in 2008, correlations of summit deformation with MgO systematics and magmatic sulfur in coeval summit tephra and ERZ lava, along with their identical incompatible-element signatures, demonstrate summit-to-ERZ magmatic continuity. As constrained by geophysical and geologic observations at both ends of the eruptive plumbing system, changes in petrology of lava erupted at Puu Oo are likely associated with physical maturation of magma pathways along the shallow ERZ conduit, repeated intrusions and systematic over-pressurization during the 2003-2007 surge in magma supply. Two fissure eruptions uprift of Puu Oo in January 1997 and March 2011 also show a strong correlation of geophysical and gas signatures with a petrologic shift to cooler, incompatible

  7. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  8. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  9. Small Active Radiation Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.

    2004-01-01

    A device, named small active radiation monitor, allows on-orbit evaluations during periods of increased radiation, after extravehicular activities, or at predesignated times for crews on such long-duration space missions as on the International Space Station. It also permits direct evaluation of biological doses, a task now performed using a combination of measurements and potentially inaccurate simulations. Indeed the new monitor can measure a full array of radiation levels, from soft x-rays to hard galactic cosmic-ray particles. With refinement, it will benefit commercial (nuclear power-plant workers, airline pilots, medical technicians, physicians/dentists, and others) and military personnel as well as the astronauts for whom thermoluminescent dosimeters are inadequate. Civilian and military personnel have long since graduated from film badges to thermoluminescent dosimeters. Once used, most dosimeters must be returned to a central facility for processing, a step that can take days or even weeks. While this suffices for radiation workers for whom exposure levels are typically very low and of brief duration, it does not work for astronauts. Even in emergencies and using express mail, the results can often be delayed by as much as 24 hours. Electronic dosimeters, which are the size of electronic oral thermometers, and tattlers, small electronic dosimeters that sound an alarm when the dose/dose rate exceeds preset values, are also used but suffer disadvantages similar to those of thermoluminescent dosimeters. None of these devices fully answers the need of rapid monitoring during the space missions. Instead, radiation is monitored by passive detectors, which are read out after the missions. Unfortunately, these detectors measure only the absorbed dose and not the biologically relevant dose equivalent. The new monitor provides a real-time readout, a time history of radiation exposures (both absorbed dose and biologically relevant dose equivalent), and a count of the

  10. European collaboration for improved monitoring of Icelandic volcanoes: Status of the FUTUREVOLC project after the initial 18 months

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Vogfjörð, Kristín; Einarsdóttir, Heiðveig Maria; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnús; Kristinsson, Ingvar; Loughlin, Sue; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Hooper, Andrew; Kylling, Arve; Witham, Claire; Bean, Chris; Braiden, Aoife; Ripepe, Maurizio; Prata, Fred; Pétur Heiðarsson, Einar; Other Members Of The Futurevolc Team

    2014-05-01

    The FUTUREVOLC project funded by the European Union (FP7) is devoted to volcanic hazard assessment and establishing an integrated volcanological monitoring procedure through a European collaboration. To reach these objectives the project combines broad expertise from 26 partners from 10 countries, focusing on the four most active volcanoes of Iceland: Grímsvötn, Katla, Hekla and Bárdarbunga. The geological setting of Iceland, the high rate of eruptions and the various eruption styles make this country an optimal natural laboratory to study volcanic processes from crustal depths to the atmosphere. The project, which began on 1 October 2012, integrates advanced monitoring and analytical techniques in an innovative way, focusing on (i) detailed monitoring to improve our understanding of the seismic/magmatic unrest, in order to estimate the amount of magma available for an eruption and to provide early warnings (ii) the dynamics of magma in the conduit and a near real time estimation of the mass eruption rate and (iii) observing and modelling the plume dynamics. The project design considers effective collaboration between partners and aims for efficient cross-disciplinary workflows. A major step during the first 18 months of the project was the installation of additional equipment in the volcanic regions of Iceland to reinforce and complement the existing monitoring. The instruments include: seismometers, GPS stations, MultigGAS detectors, DOAS, infrasonic arrays, electric field sensors, radars, and optical particle sizers. Data streaming is designed to withstand extreme weather conditions. The FUTUREVOLC project has an open data policy for real and near-time data. Implementation of a data hub is currently under way, based on open access to data from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Access to volcano monitoring data through a common interface will allow timely information on magma movements facilitated through combined analysis. A key part of the project is to

  11. Observed inflation-deflation cycles at Popocatepetl volcano using tiltmeters and its possible correlation with regional seismic activity in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ruiz Esparza, M. G., Sr.; Jimenez Velazquez, J. C., Sr.; Valdes Gonzalez, C. M., Sr.; Reyes Pimentel, T. A.; Galaviz Alonso, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Popocatepetl, the smoking mountain, is a stratovolcano located in central Mexico with an elevation of 5450 masl. The active volcano, close to some of the largest urban centers in Mexico - 60 km and 30 km far from Mexico City and Puebla, respectively - poses a high hazard to an estimated population of 500 thousand people living in the vicinity of the edifice. Accordingly, in July 1994 the Popocatepetl Volcanological Observatory (POVO) was established. The observatory is operated and supported by the National Center for Disaster Prevention of Mexico (CENAPRED), and is equipped to fully monitor different aspects of the volcanic activity. Among the instruments deployed, we use in this investigation two tiltmometers and broad-band seismometers at two sites (Chipiquixtle and Encinos), which send the information gathered continuously to Mexico City.In this research, we study the characteristics of the tiltmeters signals minutes after the occurrence of certain earthquakes. The Popocatepetl volcano starts inflation-deflation cycles due to the ground motion generated by events located at certain regions. We present the analysis of the tiltmeters and seismic signals of all the earthquakes (Mw>5) occurred from January 2013 to June 2014, recorded at Chipiquixtle and Encinos stations. First, we measured the maximum tilt variation after each earthquake. Next, we apply a band-pass filter for different frequency ranges to the seismic signals of the two seismic stations, and estimated the total energy of the strong motion phase of the seismic record. Finally, we compared both measurements and observed that the maximum tilt variations were occurring when the maximum total energy of the seismic signals were in a specific frequency range. We also observed that the earthquake records that have the maximum total energy in that frequency range were the ones with a epicentral location south-east of the volcano. We conclude that our observations can be used set the ground for an early

  12. A new method for monitoring global volcanic activity. [Alaska, Hawaii, Washington, California, Iceland, Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, P. L.; Endo, E.; Harlow, D. H.; Allen, R.; Eaton, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The ERTS Data Collection System makes it feasible for the first time to monitor the level of activity at widely separated volcanoes and to relay these data rapidly to one central office for analysis. While prediction of specific eruptions is still an evasive goal, early warning of a reawakening of quiescent volcanoes is now a distinct possibility. A prototypical global volcano surveillance system was established under the ERTS program. Instruments were installed in cooperation with local scientists on 15 volcanoes in Alaska, Hawaii, Washington, California, Iceland, Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua. The sensors include 19 seismic event counters that count four different sizes of earthquakes and six biaxial borehole tiltmeters that measure ground tilt with a resolution of 1 microradian. Only seismic and tilt data are collected because these have been shown in the past to indicate most reliably the level of volcano activity at many different volcanoes. Furthermore, these parameters can be measured relatively easily with new instrumentation.

  13. Linking space observations to volcano observatories in Latin America: Results from the CEOS DRM Volcano Pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, F.; Pritchard, M. E.; Biggs, J.; Arnold, D. W. D.; Poland, M. P.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Wauthier, C.; Wnuk, K.; Parker, A. L.; Amelug, F.; Sansosti, E.; Mothes, P. A.; Macedo, O.; Lara, L.; Zoffoli, S.; Aguilar, V.

    2015-12-01

    Within Latin American, about 315 volcanoes that have been active in the Holocene, but according to the United Nations Global Assessment of Risk 2015 report (GAR15) 202 of these volcanoes have no seismic, deformation or gas monitoring. Following the 2012 Santorini Report on satellite Earth Observation and Geohazards, the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) has developed a 3-year pilot project to demonstrate how satellite observations can be used to monitor large numbers of volcanoes cost-effectively, particularly in areas with scarce instrumentation and/or difficult access. The pilot aims to improve disaster risk management (DRM) by working directly with the volcano observatories that are governmentally responsible for volcano monitoring, and the project is possible thanks to data provided at no cost by international space agencies (ESA, CSA, ASI, DLR, JAXA, NASA, CNES). Here we highlight several examples of how satellite observations have been used by volcano observatories during the last 18 months to monitor volcanoes and respond to crises -- for example the 2013-2014 unrest episode at Cerro Negro/Chiles (Ecuador-Colombia border); the 2015 eruptions of Villarrica and Calbuco volcanoes, Chile; the 2013-present unrest and eruptions at Sabancaya and Ubinas volcanoes, Peru; the 2015 unrest at Guallatiri volcano, Chile; and the 2012-present rapid uplift at Cordon Caulle, Chile. Our primary tool is measurements of ground deformation made by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) but thermal and outgassing data have been used in a few cases. InSAR data have helped to determine the alert level at these volcanoes, served as an independent check on ground sensors, guided the deployment of ground instruments, and aided situational awareness. We will describe several lessons learned about the type of data products and information that are most needed by the volcano observatories in different countries.

  14. Prokaryotic diversity of an active mud volcano in the Usu City of Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong-Mei; Lou, Kai; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Xiao-Long

    2012-02-01

    The Usu mud volcanoes are the largest group of terrestrial mud volcanoes in China. The volcanoes are located in a typical arid and semi-arid region, and the group consists of 36 erupting active mud volcanoes. In this study, the prokaryotic diversity and community structure in the sediment of an active mud volcano were investigated by constructing bacterial and archaeal clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 100 bacterial and 100 archaeal clones were analysed and found to comprise 11 and 7 distinct phylotypes, respectively. The bacterial phylotypes were classified into three phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria). Of these, Proteobacteria were the most abundant bacterial group, with Deltaproteobacteria dominating the sediment community, and these were affiliated with the order Desulfuromonadales. The archaeal phylotypes were all closely related to uncultivated species, and the majority of the members were related to the orders Methanosarcinales and Halobacteriales of the Euryarchaeota originating from methane hydrate bearing or alkaline sediments. The rest of the archaeal phylotypes belonged to the phylum Crenarchaeota, with representatives from similar habitats. These results suggested that a large number of novel microbial groups and potential methanogenesis may exist in this unique ecosystem. PMID:21656823

  15. Using auto-correlations from seismic ambient noise to monitor velocity changes at Villarrica Volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, K. F.; Waite, G. P.; Richardson, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    We used the Green's functions from auto-correlations and cross-correlations of seismic ambient noise to monitor temporal velocity changes in the subsurface at Villarrica Volcano in the Southern Andes of Chile. Campaigns were conducted from March to October 2010 and February to April 2011 with 8 broadband and 6 short-period stations, respectively. We prepared the data by removing the instrument response, normalizing with a root-mean-square method, whitening the spectra, and filtering from 1 to 10 Hz. This frequency band was chosen based on the relatively high background noise level in that range. Hour-long auto- and cross-correlations were computed and the Green's functions stacked by day and total time. To track the temporal velocity changes we stretched a 24 hour moving window of correlation functions from 90% to 110% of the original and cross correlated them with the total stack. The average increase in velocity gleaned from the auto-correlations during the 2010 array was 0.13%, as seen in the figure. Cross-correlations from station V01, near the summit, to the other stations show comparable increases in velocity. We attribute this change to the closing of cracks in the subsurface due either to seasonal snow loading or regional tectonics. In addition to the common increase in velocity across the stations, there are excursions in velocity on the same order lasting several days. Amplitude decreases as the station's distance from the vent increases suggesting these excursions may be attributed to changes within the volcanic edifice. Two occurrences are highlighted in the figure in which it is seen that the amplitudes at stations V06 and V07, the stations farthest from the vent, are smaller. Similar short temporal excursions were seen in the auto-correlations from 2011, however, there was little to no increase in the overall velocity.ercent change in velocity at Villarrica Volcano, Chile from March to October 2010 (stations offset by 0.2%)

  16. Geochemical monitoring of Chichón volcano (México) trough sulfur speciation of the crater lake's water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Ana Silvia; Aurora Armienta, Maria; Guadalupe Ramos, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of El Chichón volcanic activity is a very important given its eruption of March 28th, 1982 that was the worst volcanic disaster of the modern era in Mexico. To help mitigation of volcanic risk, we intend the establishment of an analytical methodology for the determining various sulfur species (S2-, SO3 2-, S4O6 2-, SO4 2-) occurring in the crater lake which was formed after the 1982 eruption. These species were determined through HPL Chromatography with the aim of establishing links between their presence and concentrations, the general physical and chemical characteristics of the lake, seasonal variations and the activity of El Chichón volcano. Besides, knowledge of sulfur species behavior will contribute to have a better knowledge of the state the hydrothermal system, and the internal dynamics of the volcano, and provide more information to determine periods of increasing hazard. This paper presents advances in the development of the methodologies for the analysis of the above mentioned sulfur species. We have identified the analytical procedures for sampling and analysis of these species (preservation, operating conditions of the equipment, number of samples, dilution, etc.) according to various studies in different volcanoes with crater lakes (Volcano Poas, Costa Rica; Kusatsu-Shirane, Japan). Water samples collected at various locations of the lake on March 29th, and July 11th and October 3rd, 2014, have been analyzed for major ions and sulfur species. Results are being related to the volcanic behavior. Results obtained: Average concentrations (mg/L) at one sampling site: • Sulphide: 1.75 in March, 1.82 in July and 4.99 in October • Sulphite: 4.16 in March, 1.89 in July and 25.23 in October • Tetrathionate: 236.88 in March, 247.46 in July and 152.96 in October • Sulphate: 618.51 in March, 609.91 in July and 620.18 in October Preliminary conclusions: • The proposed Chromatographic method has been successful to separate these sulfur

  17. Linking observations at active volcanoes to physical processes through conduit flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Mark; Neuberg, Jurgen

    2010-05-01

    of the Low frequency events observed on Montserrat is their tightly confined source region. The high degree of similarity of the waveforms from such events indicates a stationary common source within a finite volume of 150m x 150m x 150m (Neuberg et al., 2006). By modelling the physical processes that occur at depth within the volcano it has been possible to identify a potential source region of these events caused by the shape of the conduit, that has a fixed position and will have the potential cause repeatable events whenever magma is moving within the system. Making links of this type is essential to form a better understanding of what the observations made by monitoring systems actually relate to in terms of the volcanoes activity. Tuffen, H., Dingwell, D.B., and Pinkerton, H. 2003. Repeated fracture and healing of silicic magma generate flow banding and earthquakes? Geology, 31(12), 1089-1092. Collier, L. and Neuberg, J. 2006. Incorporating seismic observations into 2D conduit flow modelling. Journal of volcanology and geothermal research, 152, 331-346. Neuberg, J., Tuffen, H., Collier, L., Green, D., Powell, T., and Dingwell, P. 2006. The trigger mechanisms of low-frequency swarms on Montserrat. Journal of volcanology and geothermal research, 153, 37-50.

  18. Investigating hydrological contributions to volcano monitoring signals. A time-lapse gravity example.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmings, B.; Gottsmann, J.; Whitaker, F.; Coco, A.

    2016-07-01

    Geophysical techniques are widely used to monitor volcanic unrest. A number of studies have also demonstrated that hydrological processes can produce or trigger geophysical signals. Hydrologically-induced gravity signals have previously been recorded by specifically designed gravity surveys as well as, inadvertently, by volcano monitoring studies. Water table corrections of microgravity surveys are commonplace. However, the fluctuations of the water table beneath survey locations are often poorly known, and such a correction fails to account of changes in water-mass storage in the unsaturated zone. Here, we combine 2D axis-symmetrical numerical fluid-flow models with an axis-symmetric, distributed-mass, gravity calculation to model gravity changes in response to fluctuating hydrological recharge. Flow simulations are based on tropical volcanic settings where high surface permeabilities promote thick unsaturated zones. Our study highlights that mass storage (saturation) changes within the unsaturated zone beneath a survey point can generate recordable gravity changes. We show that for a tropical climate, recharge variations can generate gravity variations of over 150 μGal; although, we demonstrate that for the scenarios investigated here, the probability of recording such large signals, is low. Our modelling results indicate that microgravity survey corrections based on water table elevation may result in errors of up to 100 μGal. The effect of inter-annual recharge fluctuations dominate over seasonal cycles which makes prediction and correction of the hydrological contribution more difficult. Spatial hydrogeological heterogeneity can also impact on the accuracy of relative gravity surveys, and can even result in the introduction of additional survey errors. The loading fluctuations associated with saturation variations in the unsaturated zone may also have implications for other geophysical monitoring techniques, such as geodetic monitoring of ground deformation.

  19. Volcanic activity and satellite-detected thermal anomalies at Central American volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A large nuee ardente eruption occurred at Santiaguito volcano, within the test area on 16 September 1973. Through a system of local observers, the eruption has been described, reported to the international scientific community, extent of affected area mapped, and the new ash sampled. A more extensive report on this event will be prepared. The eruption is an excellent example of the kind of volcanic situation in which satellite thermal imagery might be useful. The Santiaguito dome is a complex mass with a whole series of historically active vents. It's location makes access difficult, yet its activity is of great concern to large agricultural populations who live downslope. Santiaguito has produced a number of large eruptions with little apparent warning. In the earlier ground survey large thermal anomalies were identified at Santiaguito. There is no way of knowing whether satellite monitoring could have detected changes in thermal anomaly patterns related to this recent event, but the position of thermal anomalies on Santiaguito and any changes in their character would be relevant information.

  20. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  1. Satellite monitoring of volcanic SO2 emissions within the Volcano Fast Response System (Exupéry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rix, Meike; Maerker, Cordelia; Valks, Pieter; Erbertseder, Thilo

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions are a major hazard to the local population near large volcanoes and to aviation. They also play an important role in global climate change. Atmospheric SO2 is an important indicator for volcanic eruptions and volcanic activity like passive degassing. Space based atmospheric sensors such as GOME-2 on MetOp and OMI on EOS-Aura make it possible to detect the emissions of volcanic SO2 in near-real time (NRT) and monitor volcanic activity and eruptions on a global scale. The GOME-2 instrument provides operational measurements of the SO2 columns with a spatial resolution of 80x40 km² and a global coverage within about one day. Volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions are determined from solar backscatter measurements in the ultra-violet spectral range between 315 - 326 nm, applying the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. This retrieval technique uses the high spectral resolution of the instrument to determine the total column density of SO2. The ability to monitor changes in volcanic degassing behavior is of great importance for early warning of volcanic activity, as large increases in SO2 fluxes are often an indicator for new episodes of volcanic unrest. Ensembles of backward trajectories using the FLEXTRA model are applied to relate exceptional SO2 values to particular sources or regions and hence attribute them to a volcanic or anthropogenic origin. Trajectory density maps give an overview of the most probable location of the emission source. Additionally, the moment of the eruption as well as the emission and the plume height can be estimated. Hypothetical forward trajectories starting at potentially active volcanoes allow forecasting the dispersion of volcanic SO2 and ash depending on the emission height in case of an eruption. For validation purposes the dispersion model FLEXPART provides a three dimensional forecast of the plume motion and the transport of SO2 for several days. The GOME-2 observations of volcanic SO2 are used

  2. Dante's volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  3. Dante's Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  4. Inside active volcanoes; an exhibit on the move!

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fiske, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    All of us are aware of the emphasis currently being placed in the United States on science education and public understanding of science. Most of this emphasis is directed toward mass audiences through book publications, school curricula, and television programs; sadly, most of it deals with non-earth science topics. In an effort to take advantage of this awakened consciousness and to highlight the earth sciences, the Smithsonian Institution and the U.S Geological Survey joined forces to prepare a traveling exhibit on volcanoes that is currently touring the country. This note will serve to bring you up to date on the progress of this exhibit as it reaches the mid-point of its tour. 

  5. What more have we learned from thermal infrared remote sensing of active volcanoes other than they are hot? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, M.

    2009-12-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing has been used for decades to detect changes in the heat output of active and reawakening volcanoes. The data from these thermally anomalous pixels are commonly used either as a monitoring tool or to calculate parameters such as effusion rate and eruptive style. First and second generation TIR data have been limited in the number of spectral channels and/or the spatial resolution. Two spectral channels with only one km spatial resolution has been the norm and therefore the number of science applications is limited to very large or very hot events. The one TIR channel of the Landsat ETM+ instrument improved the spatial resolution to 60 m, but it was not until the launch of ASTER in late 1999 that orbital TIR spectral resolution increased to five channels at 90 m per pixel. For the first time, the ability existed to capture multispectral emitted radiance from volcanic surfaces, which has allowed the extraction of emissivity as well as temperature. Over the past decade ASTER TIR emissivity data have been examined for a variety of volcanic processes including lava flow emplacement at Kilauea and Kluichevskoi, silicic lava dome composition at Sheveluch, Bezymianny and Mt. St. Helens, low temperature fumaroles emissions at Cerro Negro, and textural changes on the pyroclastic flow deposits at Merapi, Sheveluch and Bezymianny. Thermal-temporal changes at the 90 m scale are still an important monitoring tool for active volcanoes using ASTER TIR data. However, the ability to extract physical parameters such as micron-scale roughness and bulk mineralogy has added tremendously to the science derived from the TIR region. This new information has also presented complications such as the effects of sub-pixel thermal heterogeneities and amorphous glass on the emissivity spectra. If better understood, these complications can provide new insights into the physical state of the volcanic surfaces. Therefore, new data processing algorithms

  6. Can repeating glacial seismic events be used to monitor stress changes within the underlying volcano? -Case study from the glacier overlain Katla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsdottir, K.; Vogfjord, K. S.; Bean, C. J.; Martini, F.

    2013-12-01

    The glacier overlain Katla volcano in South Iceland, is one of the most active and hazardous volcano in Europe. Katla eruptions result in hazardous glacial floods and intense tephra fall. On average there are eruptions every 50 years but the volcano is long overdue and we are now witnessing the longest quiescence period in 1000 years or since the settlement. Because of the hazard the volcano poses, it is under constant surveillance and gets a good share of the seismic stations from the national seismic network. Every year the seismic network records thousands of seismic events at Katla with magnitudes seldom exceeding M3. The bulk of the seismicity is however not due to volcano tectonics but seems to be caused mainly by shallow processes involving glacial deformation. Katla's ice filled caldera forms a glacier plateau of several hundred meters thick ice. The 9x14 km oval caldera is surrounded by higher rims where the glacier in some places gently and in others abruptly falls off tens and up to hundred meters to the surrounding lowland. The glacier surface is marked with dozen depressions or cauldrons which manifest geothermal activity below, probably coinciding with circular faults around the caldera. Our current understanding is that there are several glacial processes which cause seismicity; these include dry calving, where steep valley glaciers fall off cliffs and movements of glacier ice as the cauldrons deform due to hydraulic changes and geothermal activity at the glacier/bedrock boundary. These glacial events share a common feature of containing low frequency (2-4 hz) and long coda. Because of their shallow origin, surface waves are prominent. In our analysis we use waveforms from all of Katla's seismic events between years 2003-2013, with the criteria M>1 and minimum 4 p-wave picks. We correlate the waveforms of these events with each other and group them into families of highly similar events. Looking at the occurrence of these families we find that

  7. Characterising volcanic activity of Piton de la Fournaise volcano by the spatial distribution of seismic velocity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens-Schoenfelder, C.; Pomponi, E.

    2013-12-01

    We apply Passive Image Interferometry to investigate the seismic noise recorded from October 2009 until December 2011 by 21 stations of the IPGP/OVPF seismic network installed on Piton de la Fournaise volcano within the UnderVolc project. The analyzed period contains three eruptions in 2009 and January 2010, two eruptions plus one dyke intrusion in late 2010, and a seismic crises in 2011. Seismic noise of vertical and horizontal components is cross-correlated to measure velocity changes as apparent stretching of the coda. For some station pairs the apparent velocity changes exceed 1% and a decorrelation of waveforms is observed at the time of volcanic activity. This distorts monitoring results if changes are measured with respect to a global reference. To overcome this we present a method to estimate changes using multiple references that stabilizes the quality of estimated velocity changes. We observe abrupt changes that occur coincident with volcanic events as well as long term transient signals. Using a simple assumption about the spatial sensitivity of our measurements we can map the spatial distribution of velocity changes for selected periods. Comparing these signals with volcanic activity and GPS derived surface deformation we can identify patterns of the velocity changes that appear characteristic for the type of volcanic activity. We can differentiate intrusive processes associated with inflation and increased seismic activity, periods of relaxation without seismicity and eruptions solely based on the velocity signal. This information can help to assess the processes acting in the volcano.

  8. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sánchez, John; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.; Paskievitch, John

    2003-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001; Dixon and others, 2002). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the basic seismic data and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. Appendix G contains a list of publications pertaining to seismicity of Alaskan volcanoes based on these and previously recorded data. The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-four volcanoes in real time in 2002. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). Monitoring highlights in 2002 include an earthquake swarm at Great Sitkin Volcano in May-June; an earthquake swarm near Snowy Mountain in July-September; low frequency (1-3 Hz) tremor and long-period events at Mount Veniaminof in September-October and in December; and continuing volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2002 were the installation of a subnetwork on Okmok Volcano, the establishment of telemetry for the Mount Veniaminof subnetwork, and the change in the data acquisition system to

  9. Methanogenic activity and diversity in the centre of the Amsterdam Mud Volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; John Parkes, R; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stephane; Toffin, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    Marine mud volcanoes are geological structures emitting large amounts of methane from their active centres. The Amsterdam mud volcano (AMV), located in the Anaximander Mountains south of Turkey, is characterized by intense active methane seepage produced in part by methanogens. To date, information about the diversity or the metabolic pathways used by the methanogens in active centres of marine mud volcanoes is limited. (14)C-radiotracer measurements showed that methylamines/methanol, H(2)/CO(2) and acetate were used for methanogenesis in the AMV. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was measured all along the sediment core, Methanosarcinales affiliated sequences were detected using archaeal 16S PCR-DGGE and mcrA gene libraries, and enrichments of methanogens showed the presence of Methanococcoides in the shallow sediment layers. Overall acetoclastic methanogenesis was higher than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, which is unusual for cold seep sediments. Interestingly, acetate porewater concentrations were extremely high in the AMV sediments. This might be the result of organic matter cracking in deeper hotter sediment layers. Methane was also produced from hexadecanes. For the most part, the methanogenic community diversity was in accordance with the depth distribution of the H(2)/CO(2) and acetate methanogenesis. These results demonstrate the importance of methanogenic communities in the centres of marine mud volcanoes. PMID:22458514

  10. Volcano monitoring based on a re-interpretation of seismicity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suteanu, M.; Suteanu, C.

    2012-04-01

    networks undergo consistent transformations: they gradually change, over years, for instance, from states dominated by low connectivity values, to those in which high connectivity plays an increasingly important role. Interestingly, while earthquake swarms systematically coincide with high values of network connectivity, the gradual year-long transformation of the seismicity networks cannot be distinguished by analyzing the earthquake succession alone. This study suggests that the applied approach to volcano monitoring, based on data commonly available, captures property changes in the analyzed volcanic system which may provide fruitful insights with respect to volcanic processes.

  11. Streamlining volcano-related, web-based data display and design with a new U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Science Center website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, W. K.; Randall, M. J.; Cervelli, P. F.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of the newly designed U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Science Center website is to provide a reliable, easy to understand, and accessible format to display volcano monitoring data and scientific information on US volcanoes and their hazards. There are greater than 150 active or potentially active volcanoes in the United States, and the Volcano Science Center aims to advance the scientific understanding of volcanic processes at these volcanoes and to lessen the harmful impacts of potential volcanic activity. To fulfill a Congressional mandate, the USGS Volcano Hazards Program must communicate scientific findings to authorities and the public in a timely and understandable form. The easiest and most efficient way to deliver this information is via the Internet. We implemented a new database model to organize website content, ensuring consistency, accuracy, and timeliness of information display. Real-time monitoring data is available for over 50 volcanoes in the United States, and web-site visitors are able to interact with a dynamic, map-based display system to access and analyze these data, which are managed by scientists from the five USGS volcano observatories. Helicorders, recent hypocenters, webcams, tilt measurements, deformation, gas emissions, and changes in hydrology can be viewed for any of the real-time instruments. The newly designed Volcano Science Center web presence streamlines the display of research findings, hazard assessments, and real-time monitoring data for the U.S. volcanoes.

  12. Time Variation of Seismic Anisotropy, Stress and Cracks on Active Volcanoes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    We summarize measurements of seismic anisotropy and its relation to other geophysical measurements of stress and cracks on eleven active volcanoes; Unzen (Unz), Sakurajima (Sak), Aso, Asama (Asm) and Kirishima (Kir) in Japan; Okmok (Okm) in Alaska, Ruapehu (Rua) and Tongariro (Ton) in New Zealand, Soufriere Hills (Sou) in Montserrat, Kilauea (Kil) in Hawaii and Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) in La Reunion. We used the MFAST shear wave splitting computer code, an objective code that is fully automatic except for the S arrival pick. Fast polarization directions (phi) should be parallel to cracks and hence the maximum horizontal stress direction. Time delays (dt) increase with path length and percent anisotropy, usually related to crack density. Where possible we used S waves from deep earthquakes to ensure that the movement of the earthquakes was not correlated with the volcanic activity. At some volcanoes we used families of repeating events with similar waveforms and at most volcanoes we also computed splitting at earthquakes local to the volcano. We compared the phi and dt variation in time to eruption occurrences and to other available parameters including seismicity rate, b-values, focal mechanisms, isotropic velocity changes from noise cross-correlation, Vp/Vs ratios, Geodetic measurements such as GPS and tilt, and gas flux. All volcanoes had some stations with excellent shear wave arrivals that yielded measureable splitting. Individual measurements showed scatter in most areas, but at most of the volcanoes, moving averages of phi or dt (or both) yielded time variations that correlated with other measurements related to volcanic activity or to stress changes or changes in crack-filling material such as gas flux. The multiplet studies did not yield slowly varying splitting but instead showed distinct jumps in splitting parameters at various times, which appears to be caused in part by cycle skipping. Time resolution of changes depends on the seismicity available

  13. Prokaryotic community structure and diversity in the sediments of an active submarine mud volcano (Kazan mud volcano, East Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Pachiadaki, Maria G; Lykousis, Vasilios; Stefanou, Euripides G; Kormas, Konstantinos A

    2010-06-01

    We investigated 16S rRNA gene diversity at a high sediment depth resolution (every 5 cm, top 30 cm) in an active site of the Kazan mud volcano, East Mediterranean Sea. A total of 242 archaeal and 374 bacterial clones were analysed, which were attributed to 38 and 205 unique phylotypes, respectively (> or = 98% similarity). Most of the archaeal phylotypes were related to ANME-1, -2 and -3 members originating from habitats where anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) occurs, although they occurred in sediment layers with no apparent AOM (below the sulphate depletion depth). Proteobacteria were the most abundant and diverse bacterial group, with the Gammaproteobacteria dominating in most sediment layers and these were related to phylotypes involved in methane cycling. The Deltaproteobacteria included several of the sulphate-reducers related to AOM. The rest of the bacterial phylotypes belonged to 15 known phyla and three unaffiliated groups, with representatives from similar habitats. Diversity index H was in the range 0.56-1.73 and 1.47-3.82 for Archaea and Bacteria, respectively, revealing different depth patterns for the two groups. At 15 and 20 cm below the sea floor, the prokaryotic communities were highly similar, hosting AOM-specific Archaea and Bacteria. Our study revealed different dominant phyla in proximate sediment layers. PMID:20370830

  14. BrO/SO2 ratios at Popocatepetl volcano during increased activity in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fickel, M.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2012-12-01

    Since its reactivation in 1994 after many decades of inactivity, Popocatepetl volcano has been showing long periods of quiescent degassing and some events of intensified activity in connection with dome building and destruction processes. During a period of increased activity of the volcano, which began in April 2012, mobile ultraviolet DOAS measurements and stationary DOAS scans were performed to quantify SO2 fluxes and BrO/SO2 ratios within the volcanic plume. The results of these measurements are presented in the context of the volcanic activity, which consisted of increased emission of gas and ash and Vulcanian type explosions. In general, SO2 emissions were high during the period April-June 2012 and so the BrO emissions, however, the BrO/SO2 ratios did not change strongly before, during and after the increased activity.

  15. Explosive Activity at Tungurahua Volcano: Analysis of Seismic and Infrasonic Data from 2006 - 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, A. L.; Ruiz, M. C.; Lyons, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    propagated through the atmosphere and into the earth (η = acoustic energy/seismic energy), calculated from discrete explosions, is used to infer temporal changes in shallow conduit conditions across and between phases of activity. Typically, values in explosion VASR during the 5 years display relatively high acoustic partitioning (η ~ 1-1000), which we relate to a moderately open vent system. However, we attribute lower VASR during the early stages of May-July 2010 to an initially, partially choked conduit, an alteration in volcanic conditions that is reflected within the anomalous results of other statistical tests applied to this period of activity. Through continuous explosive degassing, we envision that the plug is eventually cleared, as an increase in explosion VASR is observed towards the latter stages of the active phase. Several statistical techniques applied to the 2006-2011 explosion dataset at Tungurahua were useful for revealing patterns in eruptive behavior, with statistical differences between periods of activity identifying a temporal evolution in eruption mechanism. Continued monitoring and a comparison of Tungurahua data with similar explosive records at other volcanoes, will lead to improved tools for analyzing sequences of explosive eruptions and more robust forecasting methods.

  16. Active Volcanoes of the Kurile Islands: A Reference Guide for Aviation Users

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Rybin, Alexander; Chibisova, Marina; Miller, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The many volcanoes of the remote and mostly uninhabited Kurile Island arc (fig. 1; table 1) pose a serious hazard for air traffic in the North Pacific. Ash clouds from Kurile eruptions can impact some of the busiest air travel routes in the world and drift quickly into airspace managed by three countries: Russia, Japan, and the United States. Prevailing westerly winds throughout the region will most commonly send ash from any Kurile eruption directly across the parallel North Pacific airways between North America and Asia (Kristine A. Nelson, National Weather Service, oral commun., 2006; fig. 1). This report presents maps showing locations of the 36 most active Kurile volcanoes plotted on Operational Navigational Charts published by the Defense Mapping Agency (map sheets ONC F-10, F-11, and E-10; figs. 1, 2, 3, 4). These maps are intended to assist aviation and other users in the identification of restless Kurile volcanoes. A regional map is followed by three subsections of the Kurile volcanic arc (North, Central, South). Volcanoes and selected primary geographic features are labeled. All maps contain schematic versions of the principal air routes and selected air navigational fixes in this region.

  17. Magnetic precursors to the 2013 eruptive activity at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J.; Flores, A.

    2013-12-01

    Popocateptl volcano, 60km from Mexico City, has been erupting since 1994 with periods of more intense activity. Volcanomagnetic signals at Popocatepetl have been correlated with different volcanic phenomena especially ascent of several magma batches in pulses lasting several hours that precede increasing seismicity at the volcano. Data from the TL magnetic station on the northern flank of the volcano at 4000masl and from the CPX station at the same altitude on the southwestern flank are processed with the data from the TEO base station (weighted differences) in order to remove signals not associated with the volcano. Short term negative volcanic anomalies around 10nT preceded sharp increases in seismicity and copious ash emission during April and May 2013. They were correlated with periods of harmonic tremor and interpreted as new ascending magma batches, below the Curie point. A longer term descending magnetic trend from February on, is of thermomagnetic origen and is associated with the more mafic andesite compositions of the ash which contain higher MgO and are consistent with influx of deeper magma at higher magmatic temperatures. Sharp positive magnetic peaks are related both with explosions and seismic events, while sustained steps of positive anomalies are related with dome growth and cooling

  18. Characterization of volcanic activity using observations of infrasound, volcanic emissions, and thermal imagery at Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, T.; Fee, D.; Prata, F.

    2012-04-01

    Karymsky Volcano is one of the most active and dynamic volcanoes in Kamchatka, with activity ranging from vigorous degassing, frequent ash emissions, and apparent vent sealing, all punctuated by daily to weekly explosive magmatic eruptions. Recent studies have highlighted the strengths in using complementary infrasound measurements and remote volcanic emission measurements to characterize volcanic activity, with the potential to discriminate emission-type, approximate ash-cloud height, and estimate SO2 emission mass. Here we use coincident measurements of infrasound, SO2, ash, and thermal radiation collected over a ten day period at Karymsky Volcano in August 2011 to characterize the observed activity and elucidate vent processes. The ultimate goal of this project is to enable different types of volcanic activity to be identified using only infrasound data, which would significantly improve our ability to continuously monitor remote volcanoes. Four types of activity were observed. Type 1 activity is characterized by discrete ash emissions occurring every 1 - 5 minutes that either jet or roil out of the vent, by plumes from 500 - 1500 m (above vent) altitudes, and by impulsive infrasonic onsets. Type 2 activity is characterized by periodic pulses of gas emission, little or no ash, low altitude (100 - 200 m) plumes, and strong audible jetting or roaring. Type 3 activity is characterized by sustained emissions of ash and gas, with multiple pulses lasting from ~1 - 3 minutes, and by plumes from 300 - 1500 m. Type 4 activity is characterized by periods of relatively long duration (~30 minutes to >1 hour) quiescence, no visible plume and weak SO2 emissions at or near the detection limit, followed by an explosive, magmatic eruption, producing ash-rich plumes to >2000 m, and centimeter to meter (or greater) sized pyroclastic bombs that roll down the flanks of the edifice. Eruption onset is accompanied by high-amplitude infrasound and occasionally visible shock

  19. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Vogfjord, Kristin; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Oddsson, Bjorn; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2016-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a newly developed open-access web resource in English intended to serve as an official source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the effort of FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene (the time since the end of the last glaciation - approximately the last 11,500 years). In the last 50 years, over 20 eruptions have occurred in Iceland displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and the distribution lava and tephra. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in numerous scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU through the FP7 project FUTUREVOLC. The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The Catalogue is built up of chapters with texts and various

  20. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  1. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  2. 1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

  3. Monitoring Cumbre Vieja volcano (La Palma, Canary Islands) from 2001 to 2015 by means of diffuse CO2 degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón, Eleazar; Berry, Hannah; Robinson, Helen; Rodríguez, Fátima; Dionis, Samara; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    La Palma Island, the fifth longest (706 km2) and second highest (2,423 m asl) of the Canary Islands, is located at the northwestern end of the archipelago. Subaerial volcanic activity on La Palma started ˜2.0 My ago and has taken place exclusively at the southern part of the island in the last 123 ka, where Cumbre Vieja volcano, the most active basaltic volcano in the Canaries, has been constructed. Cumbre Vieja volcano, which has been likened to a Hawaiian-style rift zone, includes a main north-south rift zone 20 km long and up to 1,950 m in elevation, and covers 220 km2 with vents located also at the northwest and northeast. Nowadays, there are no visible gas emissions from fumaroles or hot springs at Cumbre Vieja, but large amounts of CO2 are released as diffuse soil emanations from the flanks of the volcano. Recent studies have shown that enhanced endogenous contributions of deep-seated CO2 might have been responsible for higher diffuse CO2 emission values (Padrón et al., 2015). We report here the latest results of the diffuse CO2 efflux survey at Cumbre Vieja volcano. The CO2 efflux measurements were taken using the accumulation chamber method in the summer period of 2015 to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area and to evaluate occasional CO2 efflux surveys as a volcanic surveillance tool for Cumbre Vieja. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 360 g m‑2 d‑1. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. The spatial distribution of diffuse CO2 emission values did not seem to be controlled by the main structural features of the volcano since the highest values were measured in the southern part. The total CO2 output released to the atmosphere in a diffuse way has been estimated at 359 t d‑1, which represents one of the lowest emission rates reported since 1997 (Padrón et al., 2015). Our results confirm the volcanic quiescence state of Cumbre Vieja, but reassert

  4. Geothermal activity and energy of the Yakedake volcano, Gifu-Nagano, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Iriyama, Jun

    1996-12-31

    The temperature of the most active solfatara in the summit crater of the Yakedake volcano (altitude 2,455 m Gifu-Nagano, Japan) was 92.2 and 129.4{degrees}C in September 1995 and in October 1994, respectively. The temperature of solfatara in the northern summit dome at an altitude of 2,240 to 2,270 m ranged from 68.2 to 92.5{degrees}C in September 1995. The water sample from a crater pond, Shoga-ike, located on the summit, showed a pH and electrical conductivity of 4.38 and 42.2 {mu}S/cm in October 1991, 4.35 and 42.4 {mu}S/cm in September 1992, 4.11 and 76.6 {mu}S/cm in October 1994, and 4.30 and 45.1 {mu}S/cm in September 1995, respectively. In 1960, the water sample from the same pond showed the pH and electrical conductivity of 3.7 and 80.8 {mu}S/cm, respectively. Although the values of pH and electrical conductivity in 1994 approached to the values at the volcano`s pre-eruption in 1960, the eruption in the summit dome did not occur in 1995. However, a large steam explosion occurred in the Nakanoyu area of the southeastern Mountainside of the volcano. The geothermal energy within the summit dome at an altitude of 2,050 to 2,455 m of the Yakedake volcano is calculated, using new data, to be about 4.8 x 10{sup 17} J, which represents a thermal power output of 5.1 x 10{sup 2} MW{sub th} averaged over 30 yrs.

  5. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  6. Intense Seismic Activity at Chiles and Cerro Negro Volcanoes on the Colombia-Ecuador Border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, R. A.; Cadena, O.; Gomez, D.; Ruiz, M. C.; Prejean, S. G.; Lyons, J. J.; White, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The region of Chiles and Cerro Negro volcanoes, located on the Colombian-Ecuadorian border, has experienced an ongoing seismic swarm beginning in Aug. 2013. Based on concern for local residents and authorities, a cooperative broadband monitoring network was installed by the Servicio Geológico Colombiano in Colombia and the Instituto Geofísico of the Escuela Politécnica Nacional in Ecuador. Since November 2013 more than 538,000 earthquakes were recorded; although since May 2015 the seismicity has decreased significantly to an average of 70 events per day. Three large earthquake swarms with increasing energy occurred in Aug.-Oct. 2013, March-May 2014, and Sept.-Dec. 2014. By the end of 2014, roughly 400 earthquakes greater than M 3 had occurred with a maximum rate of 8000 earthquakes per day. The largest earthquake was a 5.6 ML on Oct. 20, 2014. This event produced an InSAR coseismic deformation of ~23 cm (S. Ebmeier, personal communication). Most events are typical brittle failure volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes that are located in a cluster beneath the southern flank of Chiles volcano, with depths between 1.5 and 10 km. Although the great majority of earthquakes are VT, some low-frequency (LF, ~0.5 Hz) and very-low-frequency (VLF) events have occurred. Particle motion analysis suggests that the VLF source migrated with time. While a VLF on Oct. 15, 2014 was located south of Chiles volcano, near the InSAR source, the VLF registered on Feb. 14, 2015 was likely located very close to Chiles Volcano. We infer that magma intrusion and resulting fluid exsolution at depths greater than 5 km are driving seismicity in the Chiles-Cerro Negro region. However earthquakes are failing in a manner consistent with regional tectonics. Relative relocations reveal a structure consistent with mapped regional faults. Thus seismicity is likely controlled by an interaction of magmatic and tectonic processes. Because the regional stress field is highly compressional and the volcanoes

  7. Fundamental changes in the activity of the natrocarbonatite volcano Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kervyn, M.; Ernst, G.G.J.; Keller, J.; Vaughan, R. Greg; Klaudius, J.; Pradal, E.; Belton, F.; Mattsson, H.B.; Mbede, E.; Jacobs, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    On September 4, 2007, after 25 years of effusive natrocarbonatite eruptions, the eruptive activity of Oldoinyo Lengai (OL), N Tanzania, changed abruptly to episodic explosive eruptions. This transition was preceded by a voluminous lava eruption in March 2006, a year of quiescence, resumption of natrocarbonatite eruptions in June 2007, and a volcano-tectonic earthquake swarm in July 2007. Despite the lack of ground-based monitoring, the evolution in OL eruption dynamics is documented based on the available field observations, ASTER and MODIS satellite images, and almost-daily photos provided by local pilots. Satellite data enabled identification of a phase of voluminous lava effusion in the 2 weeks prior to the onset of explosive eruptions. After the onset, the activity varied from 100 m high ash jets to 2–15 km high violent, steady or unsteady, eruption columns dispersing ash to 100 km distance. The explosive eruptions built up a ∼400 m wide, ∼75 m high intra-crater pyroclastic cone. Time series data for eruption column height show distinct peaks at the end of September 2007 and February 2008, the latter being associated with the first pyroclastic flows to be documented at OL. Chemical analyses of the erupted products, presented in a companion paper (Keller et al.2010), show that the 2007–2008 explosive eruptions are associated with an undersaturated carbonated silicate melt. This new phase of explosive eruptions provides constraints on the factors causing the transition from natrocarbonatite effusive eruptions to explosive eruptions of carbonated nephelinite magma, observed repetitively in the last 100 years at OL.

  8. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Eruption of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser. Yellowstone hosts the world's largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features, which are the surface expression of magmatic heat at shallow depths in the crust. The Yellowstone system is monitored by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and the University of Utah. YVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Yellowstone and YVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo.

  9. Birds in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: summary of the 2010 inventory and monitoring program survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Camp, Richard J.; Judge, Seth W.; Hart, Patrick J.; Kudray, Greg; Gaudioso, Jacqueline M.; Hsu, Bobby H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) created the Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program in 1998 to establish baseline information and assess long-term trends in "vital signs" or key abiotic and biotic elements of National Parks (Fancy et al. 2009). The Pacific Island Network of the I&M Program developed a Landbirds Monitoring Protocol (LMP; Camp et al. 2011) to estimate species-specific status and monitor longterm trends in landbird distribution and abundance. Parks included in the LMP that harbor habitat critically important to native forest birds are Haleakala National Park (Maui Island), Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO; Hawai'i Island), and the National Park of American Samoa (American Samoa). In 2010, the LMP was implemented in HAVO to survey landbird density and abundance. This implementation was the first anywhere in the Pacific Islands by the I&M Program, and continued monitoring is planned every five years in all three parks.

  10. Diversity and activity of benthic microbial communities at the North Alex mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarow, Dorothee; Feseker, Tomas; Schmitz, Ruth; Treude, Tina

    2010-05-01

    North Alex mud volcano, located on the upper slope of the western Nile deep-sea fan, is characterized by an active seepage center transporting pore fluids, hydrocarbons and gases from deep subsurface sources to the sediment-water interface. Surface sediments feature steep temperature gradient of 8.5°C m-1. We sampled the top 40 cm of the sediments at different locations between the center and rim of the mud volcano to study the diversity, activity, and physiological characteristics of benthic microorganisms. The sediments revealed the activity of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction with a mesophilic temperature optimum. Organisms involved in the process include consortia of methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2 group) and an unknown bacterial partner. Besides methanotrophic organisms the sediments harbored a variety of other bacterial and archaeal groups - including potentially thermophilic bacteria that could be involved in sulfur cycling. This poster presentation will provide an overview of microbial activities and community compositions of North Alex mud volcano sediments.

  11. Analysis of the seismicity activity of the volcano Ceboruco, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ayala, N. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Gomez, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Ceboruco is a stratovolcano is located in the state of Nayarit,Mexico (104 ° 30'31 .25 "W, 21 ° 7'28 .35" N, 2280msnm). This is an volcano active, as part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Nelson (1986) reports that it has had activity during the last 1000 years has averaged eruptions every 125 years or so, having last erupted in 1870, currently has fumarolic activity. In the past 20 years there has been an increase in the population and socio-economic activities around the volcano (Suárez Plascencia, 2013); which reason the Ceboruco study has become a necessity in several ways. Recent investigations of seismicity (Rodríguez Uribe et al., 2013) have classified the earthquakes in four families Ceboruco considering the waveform and spectral features. We present analysis included 57 days of seismicity from March to October 2012, in the period we located 97 events with arrivals of P and S waves clear, registered in at least three seasons, three components of the temporal network Ceboruco volcano.

  12. 2006 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Manevich, Alexander; Rybin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2006. A significant explosive eruption at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet marked the first eruption within several hundred kilometers of principal population centers in Alaska since 1992. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the fall of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of volcanic gas into 2007. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  13. Chemical composition of soils in the areas of volcanic ashfalls around active volcanoes in Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharikhina, L. V.; Litvinenko, Yu. S.

    2016-03-01

    The geochemical features of volcanic soils (Andosols) in the northern soil province of Kamchatka are identified. The background regional concentrations ( Cb r ) of most of chemical elements in the studied soils are lower than their average concentrations in soils of the world and in the European volcanic soils. Only Na, Ca, and Mg are present in elevated concentrations in all the studied soils in the north of Kamchatka. Regional background concentrations of elements are exceeded by 1.6 times in the area of active ashfalls of the Tolbachik volcano and by 1.3 times in the area of active ashfalls of the Shiveluch volcano. The concentrations of mobile forms of elements in these areas exceed their regional background concentrations by 2.1 and 2.6 times, respectively.

  14. Long-term explosive degassing and debris flow activity at West Mata submarine volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Matsumoto, H.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Embley, R. W.; Merle, S. G.; Walker, S. L.; Lau, T.-K.; Chadwick, W. W.

    2015-03-01

    West Mata is a 1200 m deep submarine volcano where explosive boninite eruptions were observed in 2009. The acoustic signatures from the volcano's summit eruptive vents Hades and Prometheus were recorded with an in situ (~25 m range) hydrophone during ROV dives in May 2009 and with local (~5 km range) moored hydrophones between December 2009 and August 2011. The sensors recorded low frequency (1-40 Hz), short duration explosions consistent with magma bubble bursts from Hades, and broadband, 1-5 min duration signals associated with episodes of fragmentation degassing from Prometheus. Long-term eruptive degassing signals, recorded through May 2010, preceded a several month period of declining activity. Degassing episodes were not recorded acoustically after early 2011, although quieter effusive eruption activity may have continued. Synchronous optical measurements of turbidity made between December 2009 and April 2010 indicate that turbidity maxima resulted from occasional south flank slope failures triggered by the collapse of accumulated debris during eruption intervals.

  15. Seismicity at Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia: Volcano-Tectonic Earthquake Swarms Triggered by the 2010 Maule, Chile Earthquake and Non-Triggered Background Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, D. H.; Chartrand, Z. A.; Jay, J.; Pritchard, M. E.; West, M. E.; McNutt, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    We find that the 270 ky dormant Uturuncu Volcano in SW Bolivia exhibits relatively high rates of shallow, volcano-tectonic seismicity that is dominated by swarm-like activity. We also document that the 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake triggered an exceptionally high rate of seismicity in the seconds to days following the main event. Although dormant, Uturuncu is currently being studied due to its large-scale deformation rate of 1-2 cm/yr uplift as revealed by InSAR. As part of the NASA-funded Andivolc project to investigate seismicity of volcanoes in the central Andes, a seismic network of 15 stations (9 Mark Products L22 short period and 6 Guralp CMG40T intermediate period sensors) with an average spacing of about 10 km was installed at Uturuncu from April 2009 to April 2010. Volcano-tectonic earthquakes occur at an average rate of about 3-4 per day, and swarms of 5-60 events within a span of minutes to hours occur a few times per month. Most of these earthquakes are located close to the summit at depths near and above sea level. The largest swarm occurred on 28 September 2009 and consisted of 60 locatable events over a time span of 28 hours. The locations of volcano-tectonic earthquakes at Uturuncu are oriented in a NW-SE trend, which matches the dominant orientation of regional faults and suggests a relationship between the fault system at Uturuncu and the regional tectonics of the area; a NW-SE trending fault beneath Uturuncu may serve to localize stresses that are accumulating over the broad area of uplift. Based on automated locations, the maximum local magnitude of these events is approximately M = 4 and the average magnitude is approximately M = 2. An initial estimate of the b-value is about b = 1.2. The Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake on 27 February 2010 triggered hundreds of local volcano-tectonic events at Uturuncu. High-pass filtering of the long period surface waves reveals that the first triggered events occurred with the onset of the Rayleigh

  16. Cellular immune responses and phagocytic activity of fishes exposed to pollution of volcano mud.

    PubMed

    Risjani, Yenny; Yunianta; Couteau, Jerome; Minier, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Since May 29, 2006, a mud volcano in the Brantas Delta of the Sidoarjo district has emitted mud that has inundated nearby villages. Pollution in this area has been implicated in detrimental effects on fish health. In fishes, leukocyte and phagocytic cells play a vital role in body defenses. We report for the first time the effect of "LUSI" volcano mud on the immune systems of fish in the Brantas Delta. The aim of this study was to find biomarkers to allow the evaluation of the effects of volcanic mud and anthropogenic pollution on fish health in the Brantas Delta. The study took places at the Brantas Delta, which was polluted by volcano mud, and at reference sites in Karangkates and Pasuruan. Leukocyte numbers were determined using a Neubauer hemocytometer and a light microscope. Differential leukocyte counts were determined using blood smears stained with May Grunwald-Giemsa, providing neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. Macrophages were taken from fish kidney, and their phagocytic activity was measured. In vitro analyses revealed that leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts (DLC) were higher in Channa striata and Chanos chanos caught from the polluted area. Macrophage numbers were higher in Oreochromis mossambicus than in the other species, indicating that this species is more sensitive to pollution. In areas close to volcanic mud eruption, all specimens had lower phagocytic activity. Our results show that immune cells were changed and phagocytic activity was reduced in the polluted area indicating cytotoxicity and alteration of the innate immune system in fishes exposed to LUSI volcano mud and anthropogenic pollution. PMID:24631200

  17. Observations of Io's Active Volcanoes from IRTF: Imaging and Occultation Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have been observing Ionian volcanism from NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) for more than two decades. The frequency of our observations increases dramatically when spacecraft are observing Io in order to complement the data returned by the spacecraft. The Japanese Space Agency's (JAXA) Hisaki (Sprint-A) mission recently observd the Jupiter system from earth orbit, monitoring the Io Plasma Torus and Jovian aurora. In order to investigate the possible influence of Io volcanism on the torus, we observed Io's volcanoes from the IRTF in Hawaii between September 2013 and May 2014. We imaged Io at 2.2, 3.5, and 4.8 microns in eclipse and reflected sunlight. We also observed Io during occultation by Jupiter, which allows us to locate and characterize individual volcanic eruptions, with greater spatial accuracy, on the Jupiter-facing hemisphere. The 2013 3.5 micron images of a sunlit Io showed no obvious bright volcanic features. However, further increases in spatial resolution is possible with shift-and-add processing of short exposure images. Preliminary occultation lightcurves from 2013 show moderate levels of activity at Kaneheliki/Janus and Loki, the two volcanic centers most often observed in occultation lightcurves. Loki was much brighter in 2013 than during the New Horizons flyby in 2007, but not as bright as during the Galileo era (see figure). From February 2014 through May 2014, due to a planned upgrade on the SPEX instrument and an unplanned required repair on the NSFCam2 instrument (both of which we have used previously), we exclusively used the CSHELL instrument as an imager. Unfortunately, CSHELL was not designed for imaging and has limited spatial resolution and photometric precision, complicating image analysis.

  18. Infrasonic monitoring of the eruption at a remote island volcano, Nishino-shima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Mie; Kikuchi, Junji; Nishida, Kiwamu; Sugioka, Hiroko; Hamano, Yozo

    2016-04-01

    Nishino-shima volcano in some 1000 km south of Tokyo is active since November, 2013. The new island has grown to almost swallow the original Nishino-shima island. We installed infrasonic stations to Chichi-jima, which is the closest inhabited island in 130 km to the east of Nishino-shima, and have been detecting clear infrasonic signals from the direction of Nishino-shima since May 2014. We also conducted infrasonic and visual observation in the research cruise close to Nishino-shima on 26th and 27th of February, 2015. The data was compared with the infrasonic data recorded at Chichi-jima to confirm that infrasound associated with the Strombolian activity of Nishino-shima was recorded at the distance of 130 km. The detection of infrasound at such a distance obviously depends on the atmospheric structure. Here we present a simple method to evaluate the atmospheric effect, which is crucial for interpreting the infrasonic observation to the change of volcanic activity. The method is similar to the Monte Carlo phonon method proposed by Shearer and Earle (2004) to investigate seismic scattering wave fields. A million phonon particles were transmitted from the ground to the atmosphere in random angles in 45 degrees from the horizontal direction. Ray-tracing calculation (Tahira, 1982) was performed for each particles assuming one dimensional atmospheric structure with the effect of wind advection in the plane. We counted the number of the particles that reached Chichi-jima in the area of the infrasound stations spanning about 1 km, and regarded that the number represented the infrasound energy that reached the stations. Perfect reflection was assumed on the sea surface, but the particles that were trapped in the bottom layer thinner than the scale of the infrasonic wave length were eliminated. The calculation was performed for atmospheric structures from May 2014 to December 2015, using the data from radiosonde measurements twice a day by the Japan Meteorology Agency. The

  19. Monitoring the Dynamic of a Fluvial Channel after Lahar Disturbance: Huiloac Gorge (Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, N.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Tanarro, L. M.; Renschler, C.; Sanjosé, J. J.; Atkinson, A.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions generate disturbances that affect hydrological systems (Major, 2003) by depositing large volumes of sediments in watersheds that exceed amounts common to non-volcanic river systems (Montgomery, 2005). If the eruption releases abundant melt water, the river system may respond immediately by forming hazardous flows called lahars. River system recovery following eruptive and laharic impact is an important process, but it has received little attention (Gran and Montgomery, 2005) despite the fact that Major et al. (2000) and Hayes et al. (2002) have shown that these disruptions cause long term instability and their effects persist for decades. Lahar deposits resulting from interaction between volcanic activity and the glacier located above the Huiloac Gorge on the northern slope of Popocatepetl volcano (19°02´ N, 98°62´ W, 5,424 m), have infilled the gorge (Palacios, 1995; Palacios et al., 1998 and 2001; Capra et al., 2004; Muñoz, 2007). All of the major lahars that occurred on the volcano in 1995 (4 km), 1997 (21 km), and 2001 (14 km) have channelled through Huiloac Gorge, and have dramatically altered its morphology and dynamics through erosion and deposition. The present study traces these changes in the aftermath of the laharic events that occurred from 1997-2001. A sector of the channel, located at 3200m-3240m altitude, of 500 m long and 15 to 20 m wide, in the mid-section of the gorge, was chosen as the control site. Precipitation is heaviest there and is most apt to trigger secondary post-eruptive lahars. ArcGis software was used to draw 6 geomorphic maps of the site showing spatial variations in the landforms for the period February 2002 - February 2008. In addition, 29 cross-profiles were made of the gorge for the same time interval, excluding February 2004. The volume of sediment eroded and deposited was calculated for each date by comparing variations in the height of the floor and banks of the gorge depicted in the cross-profile, and

  20. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Ashley G.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 μm) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale.

  1. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, A.G.; Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 ??m) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-11-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 μm) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale.

  3. Continuous, Long-term, Cyclic, Varied Eruptive Activity Observed at NW Rota-1 Submarine Volcano, Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, B.; Dziak, R. P.; Baker, E. T.; Cashman, K. V.; Embley, R. W.; Ferrini, V.; de Ronde, C. E.; Butterfield, D. A.; Deardorff, N.; Haxel, J. H.; Matsumoto, H.; Fowler, M. J.; Walker, S. L.; Bobbitt, A. M.; Merle, S. G.

    2009-12-01

    NW Rota-1 is a conical, basaltic-andesite submarine volcano in the Mariana arc with a summit depth of 520 m. Eruptive activity was first witnessed here during remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives in 2004, and was also observed during all four subsequent ROV expeditions in 2005, 2006, and 2009. Cyclic explosive bursts were documented by a portable hydrophone during the 2006 ROV dives. More recently, a year of instrumental monitoring data from a moored hydrophone and plume sensor show that the volcano was continuously active from February 2008 to February 2009, and that the cyclic character of the eruptions occurred with variable intensity and periodicity. The 2008-2009 hydrophone record includes explosive bursts every 1-2 minutes, with high acoustic amplitudes in the first half of the year and lower more variable amplitudes in the second half. In contrast, the moored turbidity sensor recorded major eruptive plumes on a time scale of every few days to weeks, and at approximately the same frequency throughout the year. This apparent disparity may be explained by the most recent ROV and portable hydrophone observations at NW Rota-1 in April 2009, which confirmed continuous and diverse eruptive activity with cyclicity over several time scales, from minutes to days. Visual observations at the eruptive vent provided new insight into the process of very slow lava extrusion on the seafloor. During slow extrusion (at rates of 1-2 m3/hr), lava spines rose in the eruptive vent, then gradually disintegrated into angular blocks as they cooled and were shoved aside by the next lava to emerge. Freshly erupted lava blocks periodically tumbled down the sides of a growing cone (40-m high and 300-m wide) that had been constructed by this process since the last visit in 2006. Thus auto-brecciation during slow lava extrusion underwater produces primary deposits that could easily be mistaken as secondary, and can construct substantial landforms on submarine arc volcanoes. Even during

  4. Temporal change of the mode of eruptive activity and the magma plumbing system of Sakurajima Volcano since 20th century : Implications for forecast future eruptive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Matsumoto, A.; Amma-Miyasaka, M.; Togashi, Y.; Iguchi, M.

    2011-12-01

    basaltic magma was relatively larger than that of other periods. Thus, the effect of the injection would correlate with the scale of eruption. According to geophysical monitoring, voluminous magma has accumulated beneath the Aira caldera, and part of the magma has moved beneath Sakurajima volcano to erupt. Our petrological analysis suggests that monitored voluminous magma beneath Aira caldera would be dacitic magma, in which andesitic magma has repeatedly injected. Before 20th century, the mixed magma had moved toward the volcano to accumulate for large plinian eruptions. In contrast, injection of basaltic magma has repeated to mix with the pre-existed mixed magma since 20th century. This injection would occur beneath the volcano, because timing of the injection must not be so long before eruption. In other words, frequent eruptions had been triggered by the injection. In addition, large scale of the injection would cause larger eruptions. Temporal change of mode of eruptive activity since 20th must be related with frequent injection of basaltic magma. In order to forecast future eruptive activity, detecting of movement of the basaltic magma should be important.

  5. Zonation of North Alex Mud Volcano Highlighted by 3-D Active and Passive Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, J.; Lefeldt, M. R.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Brueckmann, W.

    2010-12-01

    The West Nile Delta forms part of the source of the large turbiditic Nile Deep Sea Fan. Since the late Miocene sediments have formed an up to 10 km thick pile, which includes about 1 - 3 km of Messinian evaporates. The sediment load of the overburden implies strong overpressures and salt-related tectonic deformation. Both are favourable for fluid migration towards the seafloor guided by the fractured margin. The western deltaic system, Rosetta branch, has formed an 80 km wide continental shelf. Here at 700 m water depth the mud volcano North Alex (NA) developed his circular bathymetric feature, which proved to be an active gas and mud-expelling structure. A 3-D high-resolution multichannel seismic survey (IFM-GEOMAR P-Cable system) was completed across the mud volcano. 3-D time migration provided a 3-D data cube with a 6.25 m grid. Vertical seismic sections did reveal a large set of faults located within the main mud volcano as well as surrounding the structure. Internal faults are mainly related to episodic mud expulsion processes and continuous gas and fluid production. Deep cutting external faults surround the structure in a half circle shape. Horizontal amplitude maps (time slices) of indicate recent activity of these faults even up to the seafloor. High gas saturation of the sediments is indicated by inverted reflection events. In the centre the gas front cuts into the seafloor reflection while it dips down with increasing radius. Only with the small grid resolution inward dipping reflections become visible, which form an upward opened concave reflector plane underlying the top gas front. The interpretation assumes an oval lens shaped body (conduit) saturated with gas at the top of the mud volcano. It provides the upper termination of the mud chimney. This separation is further supported by passive seismic observations. Distant earthquakes can stimulate long-period harmonic oscillations in mud volcanoes. Such oscillations are detectable with three

  6. Carbon-14 ages of the past 20 ka of eruptive activity of Teide volcano, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carracedo, J. C.; Guillou, H.; Paterne, M.; Pérez Torrado, F. J.; Paris, R.; Badiola, E. R.

    2003-04-01

    Teide volcano, the highest volcano on earth (3718 m a.s.l., >7 Km high) after Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea in the Hawaiian Islands, forms a volcanic complex in the centre of the Island of Tenerife. Its most recent eruptive activity (last 20 Ka) is associated with the very active NW branch of the 120º triple rift system of the island. Most of the eruptions of Tenerife during the past 20 ka have occurred along this volcanic feature, frequently in the production of extensive mafic and felsic lava flows, many of which reached the coast, crossing what is now one of the most densely populated areas of Tenerife and of any oceanic island in the world. However, despite numerous previous studies, very important basic geological information is still lacking, in particular dating of these flows to construct a geochronological framework for the evolution of the Teide-NW rift system, and a scientifically based, much needed volcanic hazard assessment. New carbon-14 ages, obtained via coupled mass spectrometer, and others in process, provide important time constraints on the evolution of Teide's volcanic system, the frequency and distribution of its eruptions, and the associated volcanic hazards. Most of the eruptions are not related to the Teide stratovolcano, which apparently had only one eruption in the last 20 Ka about 1240 ± 60 years BP, but to the Pico Viejo volcano (17570 ± 150 years BP), flank parasitic vents (Mña. Abejera upper vent, 5170 ± 110 years BP; Mña. Abejera lower vent, 4790 ± 70 years BP; Mancha Ruana, 2420 ± 70 years BP; Mña. La Angostura, 2010 ± 60 years BP and Roques Blancos, 1790 ± 60 years BP) and the NW rift (Mña. Chío, 3620 ± 70 years BP). Although the volcanic activity during the past 20 ka included the involvement of at least 7 voluminous phonolitic flank vents in the northern, more unstable slopes of the Teide, it took place without any apparent response of the volcano; on the contrary, these eruptions seemed to progressively buttress and

  7. Geodetic Observations and Numerical Models of Magmatic Activity at Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, M. W.; Galgana, G. A.; Newman, A. V.; Solidum, R. U.; Bacolcol, T.

    2009-12-01

    We present modeling results based on geodetic observations at Taal Volcano, an active, tholeiitic volcano situated in southwestern Luzon, Philippines. The ~25 km2 multi-vent stratovolcano is located inside a 30-km wide caldera lake, situated within a volcanic region affected by transtensional tectonics. Continuous dual- and single-frequency (L1) GPS observations from 1998-2005 of sites situated around the volcano reveal deformation pulses averaging 3-9 months in length, with inflationary phases producing > 200 mm/yr of surface extension accompanied by 120 mm uplift (in 2000), and about 73 mm/yr extension with 50 mm uplift in early 2005. We use a two-step modeling procedure to seek the sources for this rapid volcanic deformation: first, we use analytical models to determine the Mogi (small spherical) source of deformation, using inversions at selected periods when there are significant inflationary/deflationary changes observed by surface deformation measurements. We determine the best-fit Mogi source to be near the center of Volcano Island, at ~5 km below the surface, similar to that determined for all of the major deformation events. Then, based on the best-fit source locations, axisymmetric finite element models are constructed to represent crustal geometry at the vicinity of Taal volcano. The continuous GPS time series is then used to constrain forward models by estimating the pressurization history at the source, represented by a 1-kilometer radius spherical reservoir with annuli of concentric shells (modeled initially as elastic, then viscoelastic), embedded within a multi-layered elastic lithosphere. The deformation estimates are then statistically compared, with the best-fit forward models showing active patterns of pressure variations. Results show that purely elastic approximation of the volcanic lithosphere produces significantly higher pressure (or volume) change estimates of magma chamber inflation/deflation, as compared to models incorporating a time

  8. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals

  9. Observations of the Electrical Activity of the Redoubt Volcano in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, P. R.; Behnke, S. A.; Thomas, R. J.; Edens, H. E.; Rison, W.; McNutt, S. R.; Higman, B.; Holzworth, R. H.; Thomas, J. N.

    2009-12-01

    The Mt. Redoubt volcano in Alaska underwent a series of 22 major explosive eruptions over a 2.5 week period between 23 March and 4 April 2009. We were able to deploy a 4-station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) in advance of the eruptions along a 60 km stretch of the Kenai coastline, 70-80 km east of Redoubt on the opposite side of Cook Inlet, and to monitor and control the station operations remotely via internet connections. The LMA data show that the eruptions produced spectacular lightning, both over and downwind of the volcano, lasting between 20 to 80 minutes depending on the eruption strength. The discharging was essentially continuous during the initial stages of the eruptions and gradually evolved into more discrete and spatially structured discharges displaced from 10 km up to 80 or 90 km away from Redoubt. The discharge rates and VHF radiation signals were comparable to or greater than observed in Great Plains thunderstorms, with discernible but complex 'flashes' occurring at a rate of 2-3 per second in the active stages of eruptions, decaying to about 10-15 per minute of horizontally extensive discrete discharges in later stages. Individual eruptions produced literally thousands of discharges. The approximately linear array of the mapping stations, coupled with their distance from Redoubt and the inability to have a station at a closer distance, has precluded obtaining useful altitude information from the time-of-arrival data. The exception has been lightning at the end of the March 28 eruption as the plume cloud drifted over the northern end of the LMA network; which showed negative charge at 6 km altitude and positive charge between 8 and 9 km altitude, exactly the same as seen in normally electrified thunderstorms. Three of the four stations had been deployed on 50-100m high bluffs overlooking Cook Inlet in an attempt to use sea-surface interference effects to determine altitude, as in our study of the 2006 Augustine eruptions. But only partial

  10. SO2 degassing at Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador) between 2007 and 2013: Transition from continuous to episodic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Silvana; Battaglia, Jean; Arellano, Santiago; Steele, Alexander; Bernard, Benjamin; Bourquin, Julie; Galle, Bo; Arrais, Santiago; Vásconez, Freddy

    2015-06-01

    We present continuous SO2 measurements performed at Tungurahua volcano with a permanent network of 4 scanning DOAS instruments between 2007 and 2013. The volcano has been erupting since September 1999, but on the contrary to the first years of eruption when the activity was quasi-continuous, the activity transitioned in late 2008 towards the occurrence of distinct eruptive phases separated by periods of quiescence. During our study period we distinguish 11 phases lasting from 17 to 527 days separated by quiescence periods of 26 to 184 days. We propose a new routine to quantify the SO2 emissions when data from a dense DOAS monitoring network are available. This routine consists in summing all the highest validated SO2 measurements among all stations during the 10 h of daily working-time to obtain a daily observed SO2 mass. Since measurement time is constant at Tungurahua the "observed" amounts can be expressed in tons per 10 h and can easily be converted to a daily average flux or mass per day. Our results provide time series having an improved correlation on a long time scale with the eruptive phases and with quiescence periods. A total of 1.25 Mt (1.25 × 109 kg) of SO2 has been released by Tungurahua during the study period, with 95% of these emissions occurring during phases of activity and only 5% during quiescence. This shows a contrast with previous volcanic behaviour when passive degassing dominated the total SO2 emissions. SO2 average daily mass emission rates are of 73 ± 56 t/d during quiescent periods, 735 ± 969 t/d during long-lasting phases and 1424 ± 1224 t/d during short-lasting phases. Degassing during the different eruptive phases displays variable patterns. However, two contrasting behaviours can be distinguished for the onset of eruptive phases with both sudden and progressive onsets being observed. The first is characterised by violent opening of the conduit by high energy Vulcanian explosions; and the second by a progressive, in crescendo

  11. Holocene eruptive activity of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, R. I.; Rubin, M.; Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Duffield, W. A.; Rose, W. I.

    1984-05-01

    Geologic and radiometric-age data indicate that El Chichon was frequently and violently active during the Holocene, including eruptive episodes about 600, 1250, and 1700 years ago and several undated, older eruptions. These episodes, involving explosive eruptions of sulfur-rich magma and associated domegrowth processes, were apparently separated by intervals of approximately 350 to 650 years. Some of El Chichon's eruptions may correlate with unusual atmospheric phenomena around A.D. 1300 and possibly A.D. 623.

  12. Holocene eruptive activity of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilling, R. I.; Rubin, M.; Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Duffield, W. A.; Rose, W. I.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and radiometric-age data indicate that El Chichon was frequently and violently active during the Holocene, including eruptive episodes about 600, 1250, and 1700 years ago and several undated, older eruptions. These episodes, involving explosive eruptions of sulfur-rich magma and associated domegrowth processes, were apparently separated by intervals of approximately 350 to 650 years. Some of El Chichon's eruptions may correlate with unusual atmospheric phenomena around A.D. 1300 and possibly A.D. 623.

  13. Long- and Short-Term Magmatic Behavior of Piton De La Fournaise Volcano Inferred from Noise-Based Seismic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, F.; Rivet, D. N.; Kowalski, P.; Larose, E. F.; Lecocq, T.; Chaput, J. A.; Rambaud, S.; Shapiro, N.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Ferrazzini, V.; Villeneuve, N.

    2014-12-01

    Probing the long-term preparation of eruptions as well as the short-term initiation and transport of magma to surface remains extremely difficult. One reason is that it is hardly possible to directly monitor at depth the magma storage area. One way to overcome this issue is to use seismic waves that, through their propagation, sample the targets of interest. Here we use ambient seismic waves to infer temporal mechanical property changes of Piton de la Fournaise volcano (PdF, La Réunion island). We find both 1) a long-term behavior that might reflect processes of deep magma replenishment as well as 2) short-term variations that are controlled by both environmental (rainfall) and pre-eruptive perturbations that are or not associated with edifice deformation. We will discuss the possible origins for such pre-eruptive perturbations (effects of magma pressure buildup or fluid pore pressure increase by heat transfer). In order to improve the depth resolution of our observations we deployed 3 seismic arrays for a total of 300 seismometers on PdF volcano in the framework of VolcArray project. We will present first results discussing how dense seismic arrays can be useful for noise-based seismic imaging and monitoring.

  14. Temporal changes in thermal waters related to volcanic activity of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan: implications for forecasting future eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ryo; Shibata, Tomo; Murayama, Yasuji; Ogino, Tagiru; Okazaki, Noritoshi

    2015-01-01

    In order to detect changes in volcanic activity of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan, we have continuously monitored thermal waters discharging at the western to southwestern flank of the volcano since 1986. The steam-heated waters in the Nukkakushi crater discharged with boiling temperature until 2002. Thermal waters at the Tokachidake spa area have similar compositions to fumarolic gas emitted from the summit craters, indicating that the waters formed by absorption of volcanic gas into shallow aquifers. Thermal waters at the Fukiage spa area were derived from the same aquifer as the Tokachidake spa area until early 1986. However, after that time, NaCl-type thermal water entered the Fukiage spa area during the increase in volcanic activity associated with the 1988-1989 eruption, thus leading to a clear increase in Cl concentrations and temperature. After the eruption, the supply of the NaCl-type thermal water was halted, and the Cl concentrations of the thermal waters decreased. In contrast, SO4 concentrations gradually increased in the Fukiage spa area after 1989, and the temperature has been maintained. These observations indicate that SO4-rich thermal water with a relatively high temperature entered the system instead of the NaCl-type thermal water. As was the case for the 1988-1989 eruption, the Cl concentrations at the Fukiage spa area increased in 2012 during an increase in volcanic activity, implying that the supply of the NaCl-type thermal water had resumed. However, the chemical changes in the thermal waters since 2012 are small compared with those before the 1988-1989 eruption, with oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions remaining nearly the same as those of meteoric waters.

  15. 4D volcano gravimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the

  16. Long-term autonomous volcanic gas monitoring with Multi-GAS at Mount St. Helens, Washington, and Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. J.; Ketner, D. M.; Kern, C.; Lahusen, R. G.; Lockett, C.; Parker, T.; Paskievitch, J.; Pauk, B.; Rinehart, A.; Werner, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the USGS Volcano Hazards Program has worked to implement continuous real-time in situ volcanic gas monitoring at volcanoes in the Cascade Range and Alaska. The main goal of this ongoing effort is to better link the compositions of volcanic gases to other real-time monitoring data, such as seismicity and deformation, in order to improve baseline monitoring and early detection of volcanic unrest. Due to the remote and difficult-to-access nature of volcanic-gas monitoring sites in the Cascades and Alaska, we developed Multi-GAS instruments that can operate unattended for long periods of time with minimal direct maintenance from field personnel. Our Multi-GAS stations measure H2O, CO2, SO2, and H2S gas concentrations, are comprised entirely of commercial off-the-shelf components, and are powered by small solar energy systems. One notable feature of our Multi-GAS stations is that they include a unique capability to perform automated CO2, SO2, and H2S sensor verifications using portable gas standards while deployed in the field, thereby allowing for rigorous tracking of sensor performances. In addition, we have developed novel onboard data-processing routines that allow diagnostic and monitoring data - including gas ratios (e.g. CO2/SO2) - to be streamed in real time to internal observatory and public web pages without user input. Here we present over one year of continuous data from a permanent Multi-GAS station installed in August 2014 in the crater of Mount St. Helens, Washington, and several months of data from a station installed near the summit of Augustine Volcano, Alaska in June 2015. Data from the Mount St. Helens Multi-GAS station has been streaming to a public USGS site since early 2015, a first for a permanent Multi-GAS site. Neither station has detected significant changes in gas concentrations or compositions since they were installed, consistent with low levels of seismicity and deformation.

  17. Biological Studies on a Live Volcano.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipko, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes scientific research on an Earthwatch expedition to study Arenal, one of the world's most active volcanoes, in north central Costa Rica. The purpose of the two-week project was to monitor and understand the past and ongoing development of a small, geologically young, highly active stratovolcano in a tropical, high-rainfall environment.…

  18. Methanogenic diversity and activity in hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. The Napoli mud volcano, situated in the brine-impacted Olimpi Area of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, emits mainly biogenic methane particularly at the centre of the mud volcano. Temperature gradients support the suggestion that Napoli is a cold mud volcano with moderate fluid flow rates. Biogeochemical and molecular genetic analyses were carried out to assess the methanogenic activity rates, pathways and diversity in the hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was the only significant methanogenic pathway in the shallow sediments (0-40 cm) but was also measured throughout the sediment core, confirming that methylotrophic methanogens could be well adapted to hypersaline environments. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway below 50 cm; however, low rates of acetoclastic methanogenesis were also present, even in sediment layers with the highest salinity, showing that these methanogens can thrive in this extreme environment. PCR-DGGE and methyl coenzyme M reductase gene libraries detected sequences affiliated with anaerobic methanotrophs (mainly ANME-1) as well as Methanococcoides methanogens. Results show that the hypersaline conditions in the centre of the Napoli mud volcano influence active biogenic methane fluxes and methanogenic/methylotrophic diversity. PMID:21382146

  19. Interpretation and utility of infrasonic records from erupting volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. B.; Aster, R. C.; Ruiz, M. C.; Malone, S. D.; McChesney, P. J.; Lees, J. M.; Kyle, P. R.

    2003-02-01

    In the most basic seismo-acoustic studies at volcanoes, infrasound monitoring enables differentiation between sub-surface seismicity and the seismicity associated with gas release. Under optimal conditions, complicated degassing signals can be understood, relative explosion size can be assessed, and variable seismo-acoustic energy partitioning can be interpreted. The extent to which these points may be investigated depends upon the quality of the infrasonic records (a function of background wind noise, microphone sensitivity, and microphone array geometry) and the type of activity generated by the volcano (frequency of explosions, bandwidth of the signals, and coupling efficiency of the explosion to elastic energy). To illustrate the features, benefits, and limitations of infrasonic recordings at volcanoes, we showcase acoustic and seismic records from five volcanoes characterized by explosive degassing. These five volcanoes (Erebus in Antarctica, Karymsky in Russia, and Sangay, Tungurahua, and Pichincha in Ecuador) were the focus of seismo-acoustic experiments between 1997 and 2000. Each case study provides background information about the volcanic activity, an overview of visual observations during the period of monitoring, and examples of seismo-acoustic data. We discuss the benefits and utility of the infrasound study at each respective volcano. Finally, we compare the infrasound records and eruptive activity from these volcanoes with other volcanoes that have been the focus of previous seismo-acoustic experiments.

  20. Volcano Observations Using an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter : seismic and GPS observations near the active summit area of Sakurajima and Kirishima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.; Koyama, T.; Watanabe, A.; Takeo, M.; Iguchi, M.; Honda, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Observations in the vicinity of summit area of active volcanoes are very important from various viewpoints such as understanding physical processes in the volcanic conduit. It is, however, highly difficult to install observation sensors near active vents because of the risk of sudden eruptions. We have been developing a safe volcano observation system based on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). As an UAV, we adopted an unmanned autonomous helicopter manufactured by Yamaha-Motor Co., Ltd. We have also developed earthquake observation modules and GPS receiver modules that are exclusively designed for UAV installation at summit areas of active volcanoes. These modules are light weight, compact size, and solar powered. For data transmission, a commercial cellular-phone network is used. Our first application of the sensor installation by the UAV is Sakurajima, one of the most active volcanos in Japan. In November 2009, 2010, and 2011, we installed up to four seismic sensors within 2km from the active summit crater. In the 2010 and 2011 operations, we succeeded in pulling up and collecting the sensor modules by using the UAV. In the 2011 experiment, we installed two GPS receivers near the summit area of Sakurajima volcano. We also applied the UAV installation to another active volcano, Shinmoedake in Kirishima volcano group. Since the sub-plinian eruption in February 2011, entering the area 3km from the summit of Shinmoe-dake has been prohibited. In May and November 2011, we installed seismic sensors and GPS receivers in the off-limit zone. Although the ground coupling of the seismic modules is not perfect due to the way they are installed, the signal-to-noise ratio of the seismic signals recorded by these modules is fairly good. Despite the low antenna height of 50 cm from the ground surface, the location errors in horizontal and vertical GPS components are 1cm and 3cm, respectively. For seismic signals associated with eruptions at Sakurajima from November 2010 to

  1. Photogrammetric monitoring of lava dome growth during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefenbach, Angela K.; Bull, Katharine F.; Wessels, Rick L.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2013-06-01

    The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, began with a phreatic explosion on 15 March followed by a series of at least 19 explosive events and growth and destruction of at least two, and likely three, lava domes between 22 March and 4 April. On 4 April explosive activity gave way to continuous lava effusion within the summit crater. We present an analysis of post-4 April lava dome growth using an oblique photogrammetry approach that provides a safe, rapid, and accurate means of measuring dome growth. Photogrammetric analyses of oblique digital images acquired during helicopter observation flights and fixed-wing volcanic gas surveys produced a series of digital elevation models (DEMs) of the lava dome from 16 April to 23 September. The DEMs were used to calculate estimates of volume and time-averaged extrusion rates and to quantify morphological changes during dome growth. Effusion rates ranged from a maximum of 35 m3 s- 1 during the initial two weeks to a low of 2.2 m3 s- 1 in early summer 2009. The average effusion rate from April to July was 9.5 m3 s- 1. Early, rapid dome growth was characterized by extrusion of blocky lava that spread laterally within the summit crater. In mid-to-late April the volume of the dome had reached 36 × 106 m3, roughly half of the total volume, and dome growth within the summit crater began to be limited by confining crater walls to the south, east, and west. Once the dome reached the steep, north-sloping gorge that breaches the crater, growth decreased to the south, but the dome continued to inflate and extend northward down the gorge. Effusion slowed during 16 April-1 May, but in early May the rate increased again. This rate increase was accompanied by a transition to exogenous dome growth. From mid-May to July the effusion rate consistently declined. The decrease is consistent with observations of reduced seismicity, gas emission, and thermal anomalies, as well as declining rates of geodetic deflation or inflation. These trends

  2. Insights from geophysical monitoring into the volcano structure and magma supply systems at three very different oceanic islands in the Cape Verde archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, B. V.; Day, S.; Fonseca, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Three oceanic volcano islands in the west of the Cape Verde archipelago are considered to have the highest levels of volcanic hazard in the archipelago: Fogo, Brava, and Santo Antao. Fogo has had frequent mainly effusive eruptions in historic time, the most recent in 1995, whilst Brava and Santo Antao have ongoing geothermal activity and felt earthquakes, and have experienced geologically recent violent explosive eruptions. Therefore, these three islands have been the focus of recent efforts to set up seismic networks to monitor their activity. Here we present the first results from these networks, and propose interpretations of the monitored seismic activity in terms of subsurface volcano structures, near-surface intrusive activity and seasonal controls on geothermal activity. In Fogo, most recorded seismic events are hydrothermal events. These show a strong seasonal variation, increasing during the summer rain season and decreasing afterwards. Rare volcano-tectonic (VT) events (0.1activity, are located mainly in and below the Monte Amarelo lateral collapse scar. They are interpreted as shear failures between unconsolidated material at the base of the collapse scar fill and underlying more rigid pre-collapse rocks with abundant dikes, occuring as a result of long-term gravitational re-adjustment of the collapse scar fill after inflation of the island due to the 1995 eruption. Brava experiences frequent swarms of VT events. These are located mostly offshore, with a small proportion of on-shore events. The positions of offshore events are strongly correlated with seamounts and hence are interpreted as due to submarine volcanic processes. Onshore events (0.7

  3. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sánchez, John; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.; Paskievitch, John

    2003-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001; Dixon and others, 2002). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the basic seismic data and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. Appendix G contains a list of publications pertaining to seismicity of Alaskan volcanoes based on these and previously recorded data. The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-four volcanoes in real time in 2002. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). Monitoring highlights in 2002 include an earthquake swarm at Great Sitkin Volcano in May-June; an earthquake swarm near Snowy Mountain in July-September; low frequency (1-3 Hz) tremor and long-period events at Mount Veniaminof in September-October and in December; and continuing volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2002 were the installation of a subnetwork on Okmok Volcano, the establishment of telemetry for the Mount Veniaminof subnetwork, and the change in the data acquisition system to

  4. The model of the Uzon-Geizernaya volcano-tectonic depression and Kikhpinych volcano, Kamchatka, from the joint analysis of microseismic sounding data and local geodynamic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaenko, Yu. A.; Saltykov, V. A.; Gorbatikov, A. V.; Stepanova, M. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    The model of the magmatic system beneath the Uzon-Geizernaya volcano-tectonic depression and adjacent Kikhpinych volcano in Kamchatka is constructed to a depth of 30 km based on the microseismic sounding data. For doing this, measurements of the natural microseismic field by the Guralp CMG-6TD portable broadband seismometer were carried out at 60 points along three profiles with a total length of about 28 km. The revealed structural heterogeneities were interpreted in the common context with the previous geological, geological-morphological, and petrological results. The area of a shallow crystallized magmatic reservoir is identified and spatially localized below the depression. The zones of the presumed concentration of the basaltic melts probably responsible for the local geodynamic activation of the region during the past 15 years are revealed as the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Kikhpinych volcano at a depth of 5-12 km and a deeper (15-20 km) magma storage. The geometry of the identified deep structures is consistent with the local microseismicity and the model of the contemporary magmatic intrusion into the upper crustal layers, which is based on the data of satellite interferometry.

  5. Geodetic and Seismic Monitoring of Yellowstone: A Living, Breathing, Shaking Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, J.; Smith, R. B.; Chang, W.; Puskas, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Yellowstone volcano has shown a remarkable modern history of ground deformation since measurement began ~80 years ago. When the Yellowstone National Park road system was first built in 1923, leveling benchmarks were installed and surveyed at the same time. Precise leveling surveys by the University of Utah and USGS in the mid ‘70s and ‘80s re-measured the benchmarks revealing ~1 m of net uplift centered along the NE-SW axis of the 0.64 Ma Yellowstone caldera. Subsequent GPS surveys initiated in 1987 by the University of Utah recorded multiple uplift and subsidence episodes at decadal scales both in the caldera as well as near the Norris Geyser Basin, north of the caldera. Most recently, campaign and permanent GPS measurements, as well as InSAR, have recorded an episode of accelerated caldera uplift at rates up to ~7 cm/yr starting in mid-2004 and continuing today at lower rates of up to ~3.7 cm/yr. This most recent uplift episode has been numerically modeled as the surface manifestation of an inflating volcanic sill at ~10 km depth beneath the caldera. In addition to ground deformation monitoring, the USGS and the University of Utah have been recording seismicity in Yellowstone since 1973. More than 34,000 earthquakes have been located in the Yellowstone area of 0>MC>6.0 from 1973 to August 2009. The largest historic earthquake in the Intermountain West, the 1959 Hebgen Lake, MT MW7.3 event occurred just west of the Yellowstone caldera. Forty percent of earthquakes in Yellowstone occur in definitive earthquake swarms. The swarms last from 1 day to many months and contain tens to thousands of earthquakes. The unusual 2008-2009 Yellowstone Lake swarm was the second largest swarm recorded at Yellowstone and contained >1,000 earthquakes in a ten-day period. The swarm produced 21 earthquakes of MC≥3, including one MW4.0 event. In comparison, only 5 events had magnitudes of 3 or greater prior to the swarm in 2008. Moreover, hypocenters of the swarm migrated

  6. Morphometric, acoustic and lithofacies characterization of mud volcanoes in the Eastern Mediterranean: Toward a new approach and classification to constrain the regional distribution and activity of mud volcanoes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flore, Mary; Sébastien, Migeon; Elia, d'Acremont; Alain, Rabaute; Silvia, Ceramicola; Daniel, Praeg; Christian, Blanpied

    2015-04-01

    On continental margins, several types of seabed features recording fluid circulation within the sediment column have already been recognized, including mud volcanoes, pockmarks, carbonates pavements and/or mounds and brine lakes. They can be associated to (a) thermogenic or biogenic fluids migrating along tectonic conduits, (b) dissociation of gas hydrates, or (c) dewatering of turbidite channels and mass-transport deposits. Although fluid-escape structures have been analyzed for the last two decades using diverse and complementary data, many questions are still debated about their morphologies/architectures, origin and formation, their temporal dynamic and the impact of the geodynamical context on their location/formation. In the Eastern Mediterranean, fluid seepages and in particular mud volcanoes, were identified in three geodynamical contexts including active margins (Calabrian accretionary prism and Mediterranean ridge) and highly-sedimented passive margin (Nil deep-sea fan). In this study, we follow a new approach allowing to (1) better quantify a broad set of morphological parameters that characterize the seabed fluid-escape structures, (2) propose an advance classification of these structures, the final goal being to test whether one or several morphological types of fluid-escape structures can be characteristic of one tectonic and sedimentological setting in the Eastern Mediterranean basin. To achieve this classification based on geophysical and geological analysis (morphometry, reflectivity, seismic r and lithofacies features), we used a broad homogenous dataset at the scale of the Eastern Mediterranean, including multibeam bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, 2D/3D seismic reflection, and sediment cores description and analysis. More than 500 mud volcano-like structures were identified based on one criterion or on the association of several criteria, while 40 of them were clearly proved to be mud volcanoes by coring. These structures exhibit different

  7. Deformation monitoring of the 2014 dyke intrusion and eruption within the Bárðarbunga volcanic system, and associated stress triggering at neighbouring volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Michelle; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Dumont, Stéphanie; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hooper, Andrew; Drouin, Vincent; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; María Friðriksdóttir, Hildur; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Rafn Heimisson, Elías; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hensch, Martin; Guðmundsson, Gunnar; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Einarsson, Páll; Rut Hjartardóttir, Ásta; Pedersen, Rikke

    2015-04-01

    The recent unrest and activity within the Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland was initially identified by the onset of an intense earthquake swarm on the 16th August 2014 and concurrent movement registered at several nearby continuous GPS (cGPS) sites. Over the following weeks additional cGPS stations were installed, campaign sites were reoccupied and interferograms formed using X-band satellite images. Data were analysed in near real-time and used to map ground displacements associated with the initial dyke emplacement and propagation (NE of Bárðarbunga), responsible for the sudden unrest. On the 29th August 2014, a small fissure opened up just a few kilometers to the north of the Vatnajökull ice cap, at Holuhraun. The eruption lasted only a few hours, but was followed on 31st August by the onset of a fissure eruption, characterised by lava fountaining and the extrusion of extensive lava flows. The eruption continues at the time of writing (January 2015). We demonstrate how Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) analysis, in conjunction with GPS measurements and earthquake seismicity, has been instrumental in the continued monitoring of Bárðarbunga volcanic system since the onset of unrest. We also investigate how changes in the local stress field induced by the dyke intrusion and concurrent magma withdrawal may trigger seismicity and potentially renewed activity at neighbouring volcanoes. InSAR analysis has systematically been used throughout the eruption to monitor co-eruptive displacement in the vicinity of both the dyke and the eruption site, along with major co-eruptive subsidence occurring beneath the Bárðarbunga caldera - the latter is believed to have commenced shortly after the onset of the unrest and is associated with magma withdrawal beneath the central volcano, feeding the dyke and the ongoing eruption. We use Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PS-InSAR) techniques to generate a time series of

  8. SAR4Volcanoes: an international ASI funded research project on volcano deformation through new generation SAR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansosti, E.; Pepe, S.; Solaro, G.; Casu, F.; Tizzani, P.; Acocella, V.; Ruch, J.; Nobile, A.; Puglisi, G.; Guglielmino, F.; Zoffoli, S.

    2012-04-01

    Volcano deformation monitoring is crucial to understand how magma emplaces, propagates and erupts. Therefore, volcano deformation research projects are particularly important opportunities to improve our understanding of volcano dynamics. SAR4Volcanoes is a 2-year research project funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) within the framework of a cooperation agreement with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). It focuses on volcano deformation analysis through Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques by means of COSMO-SkyMed and ALOS data, through the joint use of L-band and X-band SAR data. It also aims to the identification of methods and techniques to support decision making in emergency cases. Main target volcanoes in the projects are Etna, Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei and Stromboli (Italy) and Sakurajima and Kirishima (Japan). Secondary target volcanoes include recently or currently erupting volcanoes, as El Hierro (Spain), Nabro (Ethiopia) and Galapagos volcanoes (Ecuador). Since the project kickoff (July 2011) a large number of COSMO-SkyMed data has been acquired at these volcanoes; in some cases, the acquisitions are available almost at every satellite orbit, with an average interval down to 4 days. On these premises, the project represents an important opportunity to: (1) collect a significant amount of X-band data on active and erupting volcanoes and (2) study surface deformation to understand magma dynamics in different volcanic settings. We will present preliminary results on the ground deformation analysis of the main and secondary target volcanoes. In particular, target volcanoes without a pre-project archive are analyzed using single deformation maps, while those with archives are analysed through a time series approach, based on the SBAS technique.

  9. Monitoring the Dynamic of a Fluvial Channel after Lahar Disturbance: Huiloac Gorge (Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, N.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Tanarro, L. M.; Renschler, C.; Sanjosé, J. J.; Atkinson, A.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions generate disturbances that affect hydrological systems (Major, 2003) by depositing large volumes of sediments in watersheds that exceed amounts common to non-volcanic river systems (Montgomery, 2005). If the eruption releases abundant melt water, the river system may respond immediately by forming hazardous flows called lahars. River system recovery following eruptive and laharic impact is an important process, but it has received little attention (Gran and Montgomery, 2005) despite the fact that Major et al. (2000) and Hayes et al. (2002) have shown that these disruptions cause long term instability and their effects persist for decades. Lahar deposits resulting from interaction between volcanic activity and the glacier located above the Huiloac Gorge on the northern slope of Popocatepetl volcano (19°02´ N, 98°62´ W, 5,424 m), have infilled the gorge (Palacios, 1995; Palacios et al., 1998 and 2001; Capra et al., 2004; Muñoz, 2007). All of the major lahars that occurred on the volcano in 1995 (4 km), 1997 (21 km), and 2001 (14 km) have channelled through Huiloac Gorge, and have dramatically altered its morphology and dynamics through erosion and deposition. The present study traces these changes in the aftermath of the laharic events that occurred from 1997-2001. A sector of the channel, located at 3200m-3240m altitude, of 500 m long and 15 to 20 m wide, in the mid-section of the gorge, was chosen as the control site. Precipitation is heaviest there and is most apt to trigger secondary post-eruptive lahars. ArcGis software was used to draw 6 geomorphic maps of the site showing spatial variations in the landforms for the period February 2002 - February 2008. In addition, 29 cross-profiles were made of the gorge for the same time interval, excluding February 2004. The volume of sediment eroded and deposited was calculated for each date by comparing variations in the height of the floor and banks of the gorge depicted in the cross-profile, and

  10. What drives centuries-long polygenetic scoria cone activity at Barren Island volcano?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu

    2014-12-01

    Barren Island in the Andaman Sea is an active mafic stratovolcano, which had explosive and effusive eruptions, followed by caldera formation, in prehistoric time (poorly dated). A scoria cone within the caldera, marking volcanic resurgence, was active periodically from 1787 to 1832 (the historic eruptions). Since 1991, the same scoria cone has produced six eruptions, commonly including lava flows. Links between Barren Island's eruptions and giant earthquakes (such as the 26 December 2004 Great Sumatra megathrust earthquake) have been suggested, though there is no general correlation between them. The ≥ 227-year-long activity of the scoria cone, named here Shanku ("cone"), is normally driven by purely magmatic processes. I present a "source to surface" model for Barren Island and Shanku, including the source region, deeper and shallow magma chambers, volcanotectonics, dyking from magma chambers, and eruptions and eruptive style as controlled by crustal stresses, composition and volatile content. Calculations show that dykes ~ 0.5 m thick and a few hundred meters long, originating from shallow-level magma chambers (~ 5 km deep), are suitable feeders of the Shanku eruptions. Shanku, a polygenetic scoria cone (at least 13 eruptions since 1787), has three excellent analogues, namely Anak Krakatau (40 eruptions since 1927), Cerro Negro (23 eruptions since 1850), and Yasur (persistent activity for the past hundreds of years). This is an important category of volcanoes, gradational between small "monogenetic" scoria cones and larger "polygenetic" volcanoes.

  11. Source mechanism of very-long-period signals accompanying dome growth activity at Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hidayat, D.; Chouet, B.; Voight, B.; Dawson, P.; Ratdomopurbo, A.

    2002-01-01

    Very-long-period (VLP) pulses with period of 6-7s, displaying similar waveforms, were identified in 1998 from broadband seismographs around the summit crater. These pulses accompanied most of multiphase (MP) earthquakes, a type of long-period event locally defined at Merapi Volcano. Source mechanisms for several VLP pulses were examined by applying moment tensor inversion to the waveform data. Solutions were consistent with a crack striking ???70?? and dipping ???50?? SW, 100m under the active dome, suggest pressurized gas transport involving accumulation and sudden release of 10-60 m3 of gas in the crack over a 6s interval.

  12. Source mechanism of very-long-period signals accompanying dome growth activity at Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, D.; Chouet, B.; Voight, B.; Dawson, P.; Ratdomopurbo, A.

    2002-12-01

    Very-long-period (VLP) pulses with period of 6-7s, displaying similar waveforms, were identified in 1998 from broadband seismographs around the summit crater. These pulses accompanied most of multiphase (MP) earthquakes, a type of long-period event locally defined at Merapi Volcano. Source mechanisms for several VLP pulses were examined by applying moment tensor inversion to the waveform data. Solutions were consistent with a crack striking ~70° and dipping ~50° SW, 100m under the active dome, suggest pressurized gas transport involving accumulation and sudden release of 10-60 m3 of gas in the crack over a 6s interval.

  13. 1995 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    1996-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity (SVA) at 6 volcanic centers in 1995: Mount Martin (Katmai Group), Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Kliuchef/Korovin, and Kanaga. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) on the 1995 eruptions of 2 Russian volcanoes: Bezymianny and Karymsky. This report summarizes volcanic activity in Alaska during 1995 and the AVO response, as well as information on the 2 Kamchatkan eruptions. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a "significant" investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of phone calls throughout the year reporting steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1995 response record.

  14. Active Source Tomography of Stromboli Volcano (Italy): Results From the 2006 Seismic Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, L.; Patanè, D.; Cocina, O.; Castellano, M.; Sgroi, T.; Favali, P.; de Gori, P.

    2008-12-01

    Stromboli island, located in the Southern Tyrrhenian sea, is the emerged part (about 900 m a.s.l.) of a 3km-high strato-volcano. Its persistent Strombolian activity, documented for over 2000 years, is sometimes interrupted by lava effusions or major explosions. Despite the amount of recent published geophysical studies aimed to clarifying eruption dynamics, the spatial extend and geometrical characteristics of the plumbing system remain poorly understood. In fact, the knowledge of the inner structure and the zones of magma storage is limited to the upper few hundreds meters of the volcanic edifice and P- and S-waves velocity models are available only in restricted areas. In order to obtain a more suitable internal structural and velocity models of the volcano, from 25 November to 2 December 2006, a seismic tomography experiment through active seismics using air-gun sources was carried out and the final Vp model is here presented. The data has been inverted for the Vp structure by using the code Simulps13q, considering a 3D grid of nodes spaced 0.5 km down to 2 km depth, beneath the central part of volcano. The results show a relatively high velocity zones located both in the inner part of the volcanic structure, at about 1km b.s.l. and in the last 200-300 m a.s.l. in correspondence with the volcanic conduit. Slower zones were located around the summit craters in agreement with volcanological and petrological informations for the area. The relatively high velocity zones could suggest the presence of intrusive bodies related to the plumbing system.

  15. Gas flux measurements of episodic bimodal eruptive activity at Karymsky volcano (Kamchatka, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Melnikov, D.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanoes of intermediate magmatic composition commonly exhibit episodes of intermittent gas and ash emission of variable duration. Due to the multiple conditions present at each system, different mechanisms have been proposed to account for the observed activity, and without key measurements at hand, a definite understanding of the situation might not be singled out. Karymsky, the most active volcano of Central Kamchatka, has presented a remarkably stable pattern of bimodal eruption since a few weeks after its violent reactivation in 1996. Periods of quasi-periodic explosive emissions with typical recurrence intervals of 3-10 min are alternated with episodes of semi-continuous discharge which intensity has a typical modulation at a frequency of 1 Hz. Geophysical studies at Karymsky have identified the main visual, seismic and acoustic features of these two eruption modalities. From these observations, the time scales of the processes have been defined and relevant models have been formulated, according to which the two modes are controlled by the rheological properties of an intruding gas-saturated magma batch and a shallow gas-depleted magma plug. Explosions are explained as the consequence of the formation of temporary sealing, overpressure buildup and vent clearance. Clearly, direct measurements of the gas emission rate are the key parameter to test such models. In this work, we report on the results of a field campaign for SO2 gas measurements carried out at Karymsky during 10-14 September 2011. We deployed 2 NOVAC-type, scanning DOAS systems as well as 1 rapid wide-Field of View mini-DOAS plume tracker. With this setup, we derived time-resolved SO2 flux, plume height, direction and speed, and detected pulses of increasing emission with high temporal resolution. We observed phases of explosive and quiescent degassing with variable amounts of ash emission and detected intensity changes of the associated acoustic signals. The repose time intervals between these

  16. Volcano hazards program in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.; Bailey, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Volcano monitoring and volcanic-hazards studies have received greatly increased attention in the United States in the past few years. Before 1980, the Volcanic Hazards Program was primarily focused on the active volcanoes of Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii, which have been monitored continuously since 1912 by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. After the reawakening and catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980, the program was substantially expanded as the government and general public became aware of the potential for eruptions and associated hazards within the conterminous United States. Integrated components of the expanded program include: volcanic-hazards assessment; volcano monitoring; fundamental research; and, in concert with federal, state, and local authorities, emergency-response planning. In 1980 the David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory was established in Vancouver, Washington, to systematically monitor the continuing activity of Mount St. Helens, and to acquire baseline data for monitoring the other, presently quiescent, but potentially dangerous Cascade volcanoes in the Pacific Northwest. Since June 1980, all of the eruptions of Mount St. Helens have been predicted successfully on the basis of seismic and geodetic monitoring. The largest volcanic eruptions, but the least probable statistically, that pose a threat to western conterminous United States are those from the large Pleistocene-Holocene volcanic systems, such as Long Valley caldera (California) and Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming), which are underlain by large magma chambers still potentially capable of producing catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions. In order to become better prepared for possible future hazards associated with such historically unpecedented events, detailed studies of these, and similar, large volcanic systems should be intensified to gain better insight into caldera-forming processes and to recognize, if possible, the precursors of caldera-forming eruptions

  17. Long Term Geochemical Monitoring of Stromboli Volcano (Italy): Clues On 2002-2003 Eruption From Gas Chemistry, Helium And Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, G.; Carapezza, M. L.; Federico, C.; Inguaggiato, S.; Rizzo, A.

    2003-12-01

    recalculated δ 13C values showed more homogeneous isotope data around -2‰ , suggesting an increased magmatic contribution of CO2 in the hydrothermal system. After 5th April, the absence of new input of undegassed magma determined a progressive trend towards more negative isotope values in the thermal waters. The long term monitoring of Stromboli volcano allowed us to recognise signals of magma degassing before and during the main episodes of volcanic unrest, thus representing an important tool in forecasting volcanic activity. Inguaggiato S., G. Pecoraino, and F. D'Amore. Chemical and isotopical characterization of fluid manifestations of Ischia Island (Italy). J.Volcanol.Geoth.Res. 99:151-178, 2000. Inguaggiato S. & A.Rizzo. Dissolved helium isotope ratio in ground-waters: A new technique based on gas-water re-equilibration and an application to a volcanic area" Appl. Geochem. Accepted. 2003

  18. Monitoring unrest in a subglacial volcano by combining thermal, meltwater conductivity and seismic signals: The Katla caldera, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Hognadóttir, Þórdís; Vogfjord, Kristín; Magnusson, Eyjólfur; Reynolds, Hanna I.; Roberts, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Highly active ice-covered volcanoes pose problems for some of the methods used for monitoring unrest associated with magma movements in the crust. Glacier surfaces are subjected to meteorological and seasonal fluctuations in elevation at time scales ranging from hours/days to years. Such fluctuations limit the applicability of inSAR and GPS, and in general the detection of crustal deformation signals. Nunataks provide sites for GPS bench marks but the seasonal fluctuations in ice cover elevation and subglacial water pressure generate associated fluctuations in observed ground deformation. The Katla caldera in south Iceland is filled with 400-700 m thick ice, has seasonal variations in surface elevation of ~10 m and basal water pressure variations suspected to be of the order of 1 MPa. Geothermal activity within the caldera is manifested as 15-20 depressions in the ice surface, typically 500-1000 m wide and 15-50 m deep. The depressions, also called ice cauldrons, are formed by geothermal melting at the base of the glacier. At some of these cauldrons meltwater collects at the glacier base and stored for some weeks or months before being drained in small outburst floods. At other cauldrons the meltwater at the base is drained away continuously, releasing geothermal waters into the rivers draining the glacier. The size and depth of the ice cauldrons in Katla has been monitored by regular overflights with a radar that measures surface elveation profiles along the flight lines. A time series of cauldron variations has been obtained since 1999. Over the same period semi-continuous records of electrical conductivity in rivers draining from the outlet glaciers from the caldera have been obtained. The data show variations in geothermal output and conductivity that broadly correlate with seismic activity. Most of the seismicity occurs at less than 2-3 km depth, in swarms consisting mostly of earthquakes of sizes <2.5-3. On a time scale of months- to-years, increases in

  19. A warning model based on temporal changes of coda Q for volcanic activity at Nevado Del Ruiz Volcano, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londoño, John M.; Sudo, Yasuaki

    2002-07-01

    The coda Q has been calculated for Nevado del Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (NRV) from 1985 to 1999 by using a single scattering model. During this period, the inverse of Q (Q-1 proportional to attenuation) exhibited a long-term decrease with time, as well as shorter-term variations related to the volcanic activity. Q-1 increased prior to volcanic crises and decreased afterward. Based on these observations, a seismic warning criterion has been developed. The parameters (frequency band, size of moving average window, and threshold levels) necessary to evidence clear and significant short-term changes in Q-1 have been investigated and appropriated values are proposed. We suggest a phenomenological model with three stages for the short-term temporal changes in Q-1 at NRV. Firstly, Q-1 increases before a volcanic crises because of accumulation of gas and/or liquid, which decreases the aspect ratio of fluid pockets and increases the fractional volume of fluid in the rocks and the pore aspect ratio. Secondly, Q-1 starts to decrease during the crises by the discharging of fluids such as gas, water, etc. from the volcano. Finally, Q-1 becomes more stable after the crisis at a lower value because of the degassing and/or increasing of rigidity of the medium because of the long-term crystallization and cooling processes. Q-1 seems to be a promising monitoring tool at NRV. It is possible that the observed temporal changes of Q-1, combined with other parameters, may help to predict with greater accuracy a volcanic crisis at NRV.

  20. Monitoring the State of the Magmatic Structures of Elbrus Volcano Based on Observation of Lithosphere Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Milyukov, Vadim; Myasnikov, Andrey; Mironov, Alexey

    2008-06-24

    An analysis of crustal strain recorded by the Baksan laser interferometer revealed a shallow magma chamber in the structure of Elbrus Volcano (The Northern Caucasus, Russia). The analysis is based on estimation of parameters of magmatic structures resonant modes excited by teleseismic signals. The resonance parameters we have found were interpreted in the framework of contemporary models of magma resonators. The depth and dimension of the magma chamber, as well as the properties of the magma fluid were estimated. It was suggested the changing the magma state due to rising the intrachamber pressure.

  1. Monitoring of the volcanic rock compositions during the 2012-2013 fissure eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynets, Anna O.; Edwards, Benjamin R.; Melnikov, Dmitry; Yakushev, Anton; Griboedova, Irina

    2015-12-01

    Here we present the results from monitoring of the composition of rocks produced during the 2012-2013 fissure eruption at Tolbachik volcano (FTE). Major and trace element concentrations in 75 samples are reported. Products of this eruption are represented by high alumina basaltic trachyandesites with higher alkalis and titanium contents than in all previously studied rocks of the Tolbachik monogenetic volcanic field. Rocks erupted during the first three days (27-30 November) from the northern (also called Menyailov) group of vents are the most silica- and alkali-rich (SiO2 concentrations up to 55.35 wt.% and K2O up to 2.67 wt.%). From December onwards, when the eruptive activity switched from the Menyailov vents to the southern (Naboko) group of vents, silica content dropped by 2 wt.%, concentrations of MgO, FeO, TiO2 and Mg# increased, and K2O and Na2O concentrations and K2O/MgO ratio decreased. For the rest of the eruption the compositions of rocks remained constant and homogeneous; no systematic compositional differences between lava, bombs and scoria samples are evident. Trace element distributions in the rocks of the Menyailov and Naboko vent lavas are relatively uniform; Menyailov lavas have slightly higher Th, Nb, Hf, Y, and HREE concentrations than the Naboko vent lavas at more or less constant element ratios. We explain the initial change in geochemistry by tapping of a slightly cooler and fractionated (~ 3% Mt and 8% Cpx) upper part of the magma storage zone before the main storage area began to feed the eruption. Thermodynamic constraints show that apparent liquidus temperatures varied from 1142 °C to 1151 °C, and thermodynamic modeling shows that variations in compositions are consistent with a high degree of low pressure (100-300 MPa), nominally anhydrous fractionation of a parent melt compositionally similar to the 1975 Northern Breakthrough high-Mg basalt. Geochemistry, petrological observations and modeling are in agreement with the newly erupted

  2. Submarine explosive activity and ocean noise generation at Monowai Volcano, Kermadec Arc: constraints from hydroacoustic T-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Metz, Dirk; Watts, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    activity at Monowai volcano. Source-receiver distances were in the order of 70 km to 250 km. However, several events recorded on the local network were also detected at distances of several thousands of kilometres (up to ~ 16.000 km away) from the source, clearly indicating T-waves. We used the local network to automatically detect and locate T-wave bursts. Detecting and triggering was most effective when correcting the time of each OBS for a predicted travel time defined by the source-receiver distance. Using this approach we obtained appropriate data for automatic onset detection using long-term/short-term averages (LTA/STA). Out of the ~3500 events we could clearly associate more than 2000 events with Monowai. Eruptive activity at Monowai, however, was not evenly distributed in time but was highly clustered, indicating 13 to 15 major eruptive sequences. The sequences lasted from several hours to about 2 days. Periods of no detectable activity range from ~1 day to 70 days. The same approach was used to search the global database for the same time interval. Two Global Seismic Network (GSN) seismic stations and two hydroacoustic monitoring stations of the CTBTO provided T-waves from Monowai. We were able to record the same sequences, but the number of detected events was several times lower.

  3. Vailulu’u Seamount, Samoa: Life and death on an active submarine volcano

    PubMed Central

    Staudigel, Hubert; Hart, Stanley R.; Pile, Adele; Bailey, Bradley E.; Baker, Edward T.; Brooke, Sandra; Connelly, Douglas P.; Haucke, Lisa; German, Christopher R.; Hudson, Ian; Jones, Daniel; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Konter, Jasper; Lee, Ray; Pietsch, Theodore W.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Templeton, Alexis S.; Zierenberg, Robert; Young, Craig M.

    2006-01-01

    Submersible exploration of the Samoan hotspot revealed a new, 300-m-tall, volcanic cone, named Nafanua, in the summit crater of Vailulu’u seamount. Nafanua grew from the 1,000-m-deep crater floor in <4 years and could reach the sea surface within decades. Vents fill Vailulu’u crater with a thick suspension of particulates and apparently toxic fluids that mix with seawater entering from the crater breaches. Low-temperature vents form Fe oxide chimneys in many locations and up to 1-m-thick layers of hydrothermal Fe floc on Nafanua. High-temperature (81°C) hydrothermal vents in the northern moat (945-m water depth) produce acidic fluids (pH 2.7) with rising droplets of (probably) liquid CO2. The Nafanua summit vent area is inhabited by a thriving population of eels (Dysommina rugosa) that feed on midwater shrimp probably concentrated by anticyclonic currents at the volcano summit and rim. The moat and crater floor around the new volcano are littered with dead metazoans that apparently died from exposure to hydrothermal emissions. Acid-tolerant polychaetes (Polynoidae) live in this environment, apparently feeding on bacteria from decaying fish carcasses. Vailulu’u is an unpredictable and very active underwater volcano presenting a potential long-term volcanic hazard. Although eels thrive in hydrothermal vents at the summit of Nafanua, venting elsewhere in the crater causes mass mortality. Paradoxically, the same anticyclonic currents that deliver food to the eels may also concentrate a wide variety of nektonic animals in a death trap of toxic hydrothermal fluids. PMID:16614067

  4. Remote observations of eruptive clouds and surface thermal activity during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webley, P. W.; Lopez, T. M.; Ekstrand, A. L.; Dean, K. G.; Rinkleff, P.; Dehn, J.; Cahill, C. F.; Wessels, R. L.; Bailey, J. E.; Izbekov, P.; Worden, A.

    2013-06-01

    Volcanoes often erupt explosively and generate a variety of hazards including volcanic ash clouds and gaseous plumes. These clouds and plumes are a significant hazard to the aviation industry and the ground features can be a major hazard to local communities. Here, we provide a chronology of the 2009 Redoubt Volcano eruption using frequent, low spatial resolution thermal infrared (TIR), mid-infrared (MIR) and ultraviolet (UV) satellite remote sensing data. The first explosion of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano occurred on March 15, 2009 (UTC) and was followed by a series of magmatic explosive events starting on March 23 (UTC). From March 23-April 4 2009, satellites imaged at least 19 separate explosive events that sent ash clouds up to 18 km above sea level (ASL) that dispersed ash across the Cook Inlet region. In this manuscript, we provide an overview of the ash clouds and plumes from the 19 explosive events, detailing their cloud-top heights and discussing the variations in infrared absorption signals. We show that the timing of the TIR data relative to the event end time was critical for inferring the TIR derived height and true cloud top height. The ash clouds were high in water content, likely in the form of ice, which masked the negative TIR brightness temperature difference (BTD) signal typically used for volcanic ash detection. The analysis shown here illustrates the utility of remote sensing data during volcanic crises to measure critical real-time parameters, such as cloud-top heights, changes in ground-based thermal activity, and plume/cloud location.

  5. Relationship between fumarole gas composition and eruptive activity at Galeras Volcano, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, T.P.; Williams, S.N.; Arehart, G.B.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1996-06-01

    Forecasting volcanic eruptions is critical to the mitigation of hazards for the millions of people living dangerously close to active volcanoes. Volcanic gases collected over five years from Galeras Volcano, Colombia, and analyzed for chemical and isotopic composition show the effects of long-term degassing of the magma body and a gradual decline in sulfur content of the gases. In contrast, short-term (weeks), sharp variations are the precursors to explosive eruptions. Selective absorption of magmatic SO{sub 2} and HCl due to interaction with low-temperature geothermal waters allows the gas emissions to become dominated by CO{sub 2}. Absorption appears to precede an eruption because magmatic volatiles are slowed or retained by a sealing carapace, reducing the total flux of volatiles and allowing the hydrothermal volatiles to dominate gas emissions. Temporal changes in gas compositions were correlated with eruptive activity and provide new evidence bearing on the mechanism of this type of `pneumatic` explosive eruptions. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  6. How caldera collapse shapes the shallow emplacement and transfer of magma in active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbi, F.; Rivalta, E.; Pinel, V.; Maccaferri, F.; Bagnardi, M.; Acocella, V.

    2015-12-01

    Calderas are topographic depressions formed by the collapse of a partly drained magma reservoir. At volcanic edifices with calderas, eruptive fissures can circumscribe the outer caldera rim, be oriented radially and/or align with the regional tectonic stress field. Constraining the mechanisms that govern this spatial arrangement is fundamental to understand the dynamics of shallow magma storage and transport and evaluate volcanic hazard. Here we show with numerical models that the previously unappreciated unloading effect of caldera formation may contribute significantly to the stress budget of a volcano. We first test this hypothesis against the ideal case of Fernandina, Galápagos, where previous models only partly explained the peculiar pattern of circumferential and radial eruptive fissures and the geometry of the intrusions determined by inverting the deformation data. We show that by taking into account the decompression due to the caldera formation, the modeled edifice stress field is consistent with all the observations. We then develop a general model for the stress state at volcanic edifices with calderas based on the competition of caldera decompression, magma buoyancy forces and tectonic stresses. These factors control: 1) the shallow accumulation of magma in stacked sills, consistently with observations; 2) the conditions for the development of circumferential and/or radial eruptive fissures, as observed on active volcanoes. This top-down control exerted by changes in the distribution of mass at the surface allows better understanding of how shallow magma is transferred at active calderas, contributing to forecasting the location and type of opening fissures.

  7. SO2 Emissions at Semeru Volcano, Indonesia: Characterization and Quantification of Persistent and Periodic Explosive Activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, J. F.; Clarke, A. B.; Burton, M. R.; Harijoko, A.; Wibowo, H.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first measurements of SO2 emissions at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, using an SO2 camera. Activity at Semeru is characterized by quiescent degassing interspersed with short-lived explosive events with low ash burden. The interval between explosions was measured at 32.1±15.7 minutes in a webcam survey of the volcano between the months of June and December 2013. We distinguish between two types of events: shorter events (type I: ~5 mins duration) with emissions returning quickly to baseline levels, and longer events (type II: ~15 mins duration) often showing multiple pulses and a longer period of increased emissions before a return to quiescent levels. Type I events represent >90% of the activity and release an average of 200-450 kg of SO2 per event. The single type II event we documented with the SO2 camera released a total of 1300 kg of SO2. We estimate the daily average emissions of Semeru to be 21-60 t d-1 of SO2, amounting to a yearly output of 7.5-22 Gg (7,500 - 22,000 metric tons), with 35-60% released during explosive events. The time series patterns of degassing are consistent with the existence of a viscous plug at the top of the conduit, causing accumulation and pressurization of the magma to produce the explosive events.

  8. SO2 emissions at Semeru volcano, Indonesia: Characterization and quantification of persistent and periodic explosive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, Jean-François; Clarke, Amanda B.; Burton, Michael R.; Harijoko, Agung; Wibowo, Haryo E.

    2015-07-01

    We present the first measurements of SO2 emissions at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, using an SO2 camera. Activity at Semeru is characterized by quiescent degassing interspersed with short-lived explosive events with low ash burden. The interval between explosions was measured at 32.1 ± 15.7 min in a webcam survey of the volcano between the months of June and December 2013. We distinguish between two types of events: shorter events (type I: ~ 5 min duration) with emissions returning quickly to baseline levels, and longer events (type II: ~ 15 min duration) often showing multiple pulses and a longer period of increased emissions before a return to quiescent levels. Type I events represent > 90% of the activity and release an average of 200-500 kg of SO2 per event. The single type II event we documented with the SO2 camera released a total of 1460 kg of SO2. We estimate the daily average emissions of Semeru to be 21-71 t d- 1 of SO2, amounting to a yearly output of 8-26 Gg (8000-26,000 metric tons), with 35-65% released during explosive events. The time series patterns of degassing are consistent with the existence of a viscous plug at the top of the conduit, which seals the conduit immediately prior to explosive events, causing pressurization of the underlying magma followed by a sudden release of gas and fragmented magma.

  9. Volcanic-ash hazard to aviation during the 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Ewert, J.W.; Gallina, G.M.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Swanson, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    Within the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Anatahan is one of nine active subaerial volcanoes that pose hazards to major air-traffic routes from airborne volcanic ash. The 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano affected the region's aviation operations for 3 days in May 2003. On the first day of the eruption (10 May 2003), two international flights from Saipan to Japan were cancelled, and several flights implemented ash-avoidance procedures. On 13 May 2003, a high-altitude flight through volcanic gas was reported, with no perceptible damage to the aircraft. TOMS and MODIS analysis of satellite data strongly suggests that no significant ash and only minor amounts of SO2 were involved in the incident, consistent with crew observations. On 23 May 2003, airport operations were disrupted when tropical-cyclone winds dispersed ash to the south, dusting Saipan with light ashfall and causing flight cancellations there and at Guam 320 km south of the volcano. Operational (near-real-time) monitoring of ash clouds produced by Anatahan has been conducted since the first day of the eruption on 10 May 2003 by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The VAAC was among the first groups outside of the immediate area of the volcano to detect and report on the unexpected eruption of Anatahan. After being contacted about an unusual cloud by National Weather Service forecasters in Guam at 1235 UTC on 10 May 2003, the VAAC analyzed GOES 9 images, confirming Anatahan as the likely source of an ash cloud and estimating that the eruption began at about 0730 UTC. The VAAC issued its first Volcanic Ash Advisory for Anatahan at 1300 UTC on 10 May 2003 more than 5 h after the start of the eruption, the delay reflecting the difficulty of detecting and confirming a surprise eruption at a remote volcano with no in situ real-time geophysical monitoring. The initial eruption plume reached 10.7-13.4 km (35,000-44,000 ft), well into jet cruise altitudes

  10. Volcanic-ash hazard to aviation during the 2003 2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Ewert, John W.; Gallina, Gregory M.; Bluth, Gregg J. S.; Swanson, Grace L.

    2005-08-01

    Within the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Anatahan is one of nine active subaerial volcanoes that pose hazards to major air-traffic routes from airborne volcanic ash. The 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano affected the region's aviation operations for 3 days in May 2003. On the first day of the eruption (10 May 2003), two international flights from Saipan to Japan were cancelled, and several flights implemented ash-avoidance procedures. On 13 May 2003, a high-altitude flight through volcanic gas was reported, with no perceptible damage to the aircraft. TOMS and MODIS analysis of satellite data strongly suggests that no significant ash and only minor amounts of SO 2 were involved in the incident, consistent with crew observations. On 23 May 2003, airport operations were disrupted when tropical-cyclone winds dispersed ash to the south, dusting Saipan with light ashfall and causing flight cancellations there and at Guam 320 km south of the volcano. Operational (near-real-time) monitoring of ash clouds produced by Anatahan has been conducted since the first day of the eruption on 10 May 2003 by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The VAAC was among the first groups outside of the immediate area of the volcano to detect and report on the unexpected eruption of Anatahan. After being contacted about an unusual cloud by National Weather Service forecasters in Guam at 1235 UTC on 10 May 2003, the VAAC analyzed GOES 9 images, confirming Anatahan as the likely source of an ash cloud and estimating that the eruption began at about 0730 UTC. The VAAC issued its first Volcanic Ash Advisory for Anatahan at 1300 UTC on 10 May 2003 more than 5 h after the start of the eruption, the delay reflecting the difficulty of detecting and confirming a surprise eruption at a remote volcano with no in situ real-time geophysical monitoring. The initial eruption plume reached 10.7-13.4 km (35,000-44,000 ft), well into jet cruise altitudes

  11. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Moran, Seth C.; Paskievitch, John; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at potentially active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic surveillance of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog reflects the status and evolution of the seismic monitoring program, and presents the basic seismic data for the time period January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2001. For an interpretation of these data and previously recorded data, the reader should refer to several recent articles on volcano related seismicity on Alaskan volcanoes in Appendix G. The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-three volcanoes in real time in 2000-2001. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). AVO located 1551 and 1428 earthquakes in 2000 and 2001, respectively, on and around these volcanoes. Highlights of the catalog period (Table 1) include: volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano between January and February 2000 and between May and June 2000; an eruption at Mount Cleveland between February and May 2001; episodes of possible tremor at Makushin Volcano starting March 2001 and continuing through 2001, and two earthquake swarms at Great Sitkin Volcano in 2001. This catalog includes: (1) earthquake origin

  12. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Moran, Seth C.; Paskievitch, John; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at potentially active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic surveillance of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog reflects the status and evolution of the seismic monitoring program, and presents the basic seismic data for the time period January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2001. For an interpretation of these data and previously recorded data, the reader should refer to several recent articles on volcano related seismicity on Alaskan volcanoes in Appendix G.The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-three volcanoes in real time in 2000-2001. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). AVO located 1551 and 1428 earthquakes in 2000 and 2001, respectively, on and around these volcanoes.Highlights of the catalog period (Table 1) include: volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano between January and February 2000 and between May and June 2000; an eruption at Mount Cleveland between February and May 2001; episodes of possible tremor at Makushin Volcano starting March 2001 and continuing through 2001, and two earthquake swarms at Great Sitkin Volcano in 2001.This catalog includes: (1) earthquake origin times

  13. Precursory Activity of the 2005 Eruption of Santa Ana Volcano, El Salvador.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, A.; Patrick, M.; Rose, W. I.; Escobar, D.; Montalvo, F.; Gutierrez, E.; Olmos, R.

    2007-12-01

    After a period of unrest, Santa Ana (Illamatepec) volcano in El Salvador erupted suddenly on October 1st, 2005 at 1420 UTC (0820 local time), ejecting its acidic crater lake and generating a gas-and-ash plume ~10 km above the volcano. The short-lived eruption (~1 hr duration) deposited ballistics and ash up to 5m thick at the crater rim and depositing ash up to 40 km to the west. Underlying phreatomagmatic deposits exposed in the crater suggest that larger eruptions of this type are characteristic of recent historic activity. In this study, precursory activity to the 2005 eruption is investigated by analyzing physical and chemical parameters of the crater lake. Data has been compiled on water chemistry, temperature, and color of the lake from direct sampling and ground observations from 2004-2007. Lake water data suggests three phases of activity: (1) constant, well constrained activity from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2004 showing SO4 ~10,000 ppm, Cl ~6000 ppm, and SO4/Cl ~1.6; (2) potential precursory activity from Jan. 2005 to Oct. 2005 expressed as a ramping up of SO4 to 11,625 ppm in May with a sudden decrease to 8250 ppm one month later, increased variability in Cl, and color change from dark coffee color to green in mid-September; and (3) post- eruption activity to present showing increasing Cl to a maximum of 22340 ppm, low SO4/Cl=0.38-0.8, an increase in temperature to 65.6 degrees C, and color change to yellowish-green). Analysis of high resolution satellite imagery from the ASTER sensor (15-90m/pixel) from 2000 to 2007 provides further information on lake size, temperature, and color. ASTER images show that the lake re-established itself further to the west after the eruption, drowning the adjacent high temperature fumarole field (max. 875 degrees C) which potentially contributed to the observed post-eruption changes in the lake. The combination of synoptic satellite-based remote sensing data with ground measurements will enhance the capabilities to recognize and

  14. Including satellite data of SO2 for volcano monitoring: recent results and perspectives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campion, Robin; Theys, Nicolas; Clarisse, Lieven; Delgado-Granados, Hugo

    2015-04-01

    Measurements of SO2 emission rates have, for about 30 years, been part of the standard toolkit of volcano observatories, initially as occasional measurements with the COSPEC instruments, and, since nearly 10 years, as permanent measurements by automated scanning DOAS. In the mean time, the progress in the performances of satellite has been considerable and some space-based sensors are now able to detect and quantify relatively low emissions of volcanic SO2 by low intensity eruptions and passive degassing. We will review published and unpublished satellite data of SO2 emission over the last 10 years at various volcanoes, (Popocatépetl, Colima, Etna, Turrialba, Nyamuragira, Tungurahua, Kilauea among others), efforts to intercompare and validate these measurements, and detail the insights that we can gain from them for understanding degassing processes. We will highlight the advantages and limitations of using satellites, with an emphasis on their strong complementarity between space and ground-based data. Finally, we will present the perspectives offered by the sensors that are next in the launch pad.

  15. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  16. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Prejean, Stephanie; Sanchez, John J.; Sanches, Rebecca; McNutt, Stephen R.; Paskievitch, John

    2005-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988. The primary objectives of the seismic program are the real-time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the calculated earthquake hypocenter and phase arrival data, and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2004.These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai volcanic cluster (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Mount Peulik, Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Okmok Caldera, Great Sitkin Volcano, Kanaga Volcano, Tanaga Volcano, and Mount Gareloi. Over the past year, formal monitoring of Okmok, Tanaga and Gareloi were announced following an extended period of monitoring to determine the background seismicity at each volcanic center. The seismicity at Mount Peulik was still being studied at the end of 2004 and has yet to be added to the list of monitored volcanoes in the AVO weekly update. AVO located 6928 earthquakes in 2004.Monitoring highlights in 2004 include: (1) an earthquake swarm at Westdahl Peak in January; (2) an increase in seismicity at Mount Spurr starting in February continuing through the end of the year into 2005; (4) low-level tremor, and low-frequency events related to intermittent ash and steam emissions at Mount Veniaminof between April and October; (4) low-level tremor at Shishaldin Volcano between April and

  17. Alaska Volcano Observatory's KML Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valcic, L.; Webley, P. W.; Bailey, J. E.; Dehn, J.

    2008-12-01

    Virtual Globes are now giving the scientific community a new medium to present data, which is compatible across multiple disciplines. They also provide scientists the ability to display their data in real-time, a critical factor in hazard assessment. The Alaska Volcano Observatory remote sensing group has developed Keyhole Markup Language (KML) tools that are used to display satellite data for volcano monitoring and forecast ash cloud movement. The KML tools allow an analyst to view the satellite data in a user-friendly web based environment, without a reliance on non-transportable, proprietary software packages. Here, we show how the tools are used operationally for thermal monitoring of volcanic activity, volcanic ash cloud detection and dispersion modeling, using the Puff model. animate.images.alaska.edu/

  18. Some insights about the activity of the Ceboruco Volcano (Nayarit, Mexico) from recent seismic low-frequency activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Uribe, María Carolina; Núñez-Cornú, Francisco Javier; Nava Pichardo, Fidencio Alejandro; Suárez-Plascencia, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the western end of the Mexican volcanic belt, near several population centers and by the side of a strategic highway. During the last 1,000 years it has had, on the average, one eruption every 125 years. It last eruptive activity began in 1870, and during the following 5 years it presented superficial activity including vapor emissions, ash falls, and rhyodacitic lava flows along the southeast side. A data set consisting of 139 low-frequency volcanic-type earthquakes, recorded from March 2003 to July 2008 at the CEBN triaxial short period digital station on the southwestern side of the volcano, was classified according to waveform and spectral characteristics into four families: short duration, extended coda, bobbin, and modulated amplitude. Approximate hypocentral locations indicate that there is no particular location for events of any family, but rather that all events occur at different points within the volcano. The presence of ongoing volcanic-earthquake activity together with the ongoing vapor emissions indicate that the Ceboruco volcano continues to be active, and the higher occurrence rates of short-duration events, as compared with those for the other families, could indicate an increase in the stress in the volcanic edifice. This apparent stress increase, together with the fact that the last eruption occurred 143 years ago, tell us that the Ceboruco may be approaching a critical state, and may represent a hazard to the surrounding communities and economic activities.

  19. Analysis of the seismic activity associated with the 2010 eruption of Merapi Volcano, Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi-Santoso, Agus; Lesage, Philippe; Dwiyono, Sapari; Sumarti, Sri; Subandriyo; Surono; Jousset, Philippe; Metaxian, Jean-Philippe

    2013-07-01

    The 2010 eruption of Merapi is the first large explosive eruption of the volcano that has been instrumentally observed. The main characteristics of the seismic activity during the pre-eruptive period and the crisis are presented and interpreted in this paper. The first seismic precursors were a series of four shallow swarms during the period between 12 and 4 months before the eruption. These swarms are interpreted as the result of perturbations of the hydrothermal system by increasing heat flow. Shorter-term and more continuous precursory seismic activity started about 6 weeks before the initial explosion on 26 October 2010. During this period, the rate of seismicity increased almost constantly yielding a cumulative seismic energy release for volcano-tectonic (VT) and multiphase events (MP) of 7.5 × 1010 J. This value is 3 times the maximum energy release preceding previous effusive eruptions of Merapi. The high level reached and the accelerated behavior of both the deformation of the summit and the seismic activity are distinct features of the 2010 eruption. The hypocenters of VT events in 2010 occur in two clusters at of 2.5 to 5 km and less than 1.5 km depths below the summit. An aseismic zone was detected at 1.5-2.5 km depth, consistent with studies of previous eruptions, and indicating that this is a robust feature of Merapi's subsurface structure. Our analysis suggests that the aseismic zone is a poorly consolidated layer of altered material within the volcano. Deep VT events occurred mainly before 17 October 2010; subsequent to that time shallow activity strongly increased. The deep seismic activity is interpreted as associated with the enlargement of a narrow conduit by an unusually large volume of rapidly ascending magma. The shallow seismicity is interpreted as recording the final magma ascent and the rupture of a summit-dome plug, which triggered the eruption on 26 October 2010. Hindsight forecasting of the occurrence time of the eruption is performed

  20. Recent uplift and hydrothermal activity at Tangkuban Parahu volcano, west Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.; Matahelumual, J.; Okamura, A.T.; Said, H.; Casadevall, T.J.; Mulyadi, D.

    1990-01-01

    Tangkuban Parahu is an active stratovolcano located 17 km north of the city of Bandung in the province west Java, Indonesia. All historical eruptive activity at this volcano has been confined to a complex of explosive summit craters. About a dozen eruptions-mostly phreatic events- and 15 other periods of unrest, indicated by earthquakes or increased thermal activity, have been noted since 1829. The last magmatic eruption occurred in 1910. In late 1983, several small phreatic explosions originated from one of the summit craters. More recently, increased hydrothermal and earthquake activity occurred from late 1985 through 1986. Tilt measurements, using a spirit-level technique, have been made every few months since February 1981 in the summit region and along the south and east flanks of the volcano. Measurements made in the summit region indicated uplift since the start of these measurements through at least 1986. From 1981 to 1983, the average tilt rate at the edges of the summit craters was 40-50 microradians per year. After the 1983 phreatic activity, the tilt rate decreased by about a factor of five. Trilateration surveys across the summit craters and on the east flank of the volcano were conducted in 1983 and 1986. Most line length changes measured during this three-year period did not exceed the expected uncertainty of the technique (4 ppm). The lack of measurable horizontal strain across the summit craters seems to contradict the several years of tilt measurements. Using a point source of dilation in an elastic half-space to model tilt measurements, the pressure center at Tangkuban Parahu is located about 1.5 km beneath the southern part of the summit craters. This is beneath the epicentral area of an earthquake swarm that occurred in late 1983. The average rate in the volume of uplift from 1981 to 1983 was 3 million m3 per year; from 1983 to 1986 it averaged about 0.4 million m3 per year. Possible causes for this uplift are increased pressure within a very

  1. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  2. Tilt effects on moment tensor inversion in the near field of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, M.; Wassermann, J.; Pelties, C.; Schiemenz, A.; Igel, H.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic tilts (rotational motion around horizontal axes) change the projection of local gravity onto the horizontal components of seismometers. This causes sensitivity of these components to tilt, especially at low frequencies. We analyse the consequences of this effect onto moment tensor inversion for very long period (vlp) events in the near field of active volcanoes on the basis of synthetic examples using the station distribution of a real deployed seismic network and the topography of Mt. Merapi volcano (Java, Indonesia). The examples show that for periods in the vlp range of 10-30 s tilt can have a strong effect on the moment tensor inversion, although its effect on the horizontal seismograms is significant only for few stations. We show that tilts can be accurately computed using the spectral element method and include them in the Green's functions. The (simulated) tilts might be largely influenced by strain-tilt coupling (stc). However, due to the frequency dependence of the tilt contribution to the horizontal seismograms, only the largest tilt signals affect the source inversion in the vlp frequency range. As these are less sensitive to stc than the weaker signals, the effect of stc can likely be neglected in this application. In the converse argument, this is not necessarily true for longer periods, where the horizontal seismograms are dominated by the tilt signal and rotational sensors would be necessary to account for it. As these are not yet commercially available, this study underlines the necessity for the development of such instruments.

  3. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-01-01

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report 3He/4He measurements in CO2–dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a 3He/4He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the 3He/4He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10−6), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like 3He/4He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano. PMID:27311383

  4. Social studies of volcanology: knowledge generation and expert advice on active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Amy; Oppenheimer, Clive; Bravo, Michael

    2012-04-01

    This paper examines the philosophy and evolution of volcanological science in recent years, particularly in relation to the growth of volcanic hazard and risk science. It uses the lens of Science and Technology Studies to examine the ways in which knowledge generation is controlled and directed by social forces, particularly during eruptions, which constitute landmarks in the development of new technologies and models. It also presents data from a survey of volcanologists carried out during late 2008 and early 2009. These data concern the felt purpose of the science according to the volcanologists who participated and their impressions of the most important eruptions in historical time. It demonstrates that volcanologists are motivated both by the academic science environment and by a social concern for managing the impact of volcanic hazards on populations. Also discussed are the eruptions that have most influenced the discipline and the role of scientists in policymaking on active volcanoes. Expertise in volcanology can become the primary driver of public policy very suddenly when a volcano erupts, placing immense pressure on volcanologists. In response, the epistemological foundations of volcanology are on the move, with an increasing volume of research into risk assessment and management. This requires new, integrated methodologies for knowledge collection that transcend scientific disciplinary boundaries.

  5. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-06-01

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report 3He/4He measurements in CO2–dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a 3He/4He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the 3He/4He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10‑6), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like 3He/4He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano.

  6. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-01-01

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report (3)He/(4)He measurements in CO2-dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a (3)He/(4)He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the (3)He/(4)He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10(-6)), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like (3)He/(4)He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano. PMID:27311383

  7. Capturing the fingerprint of Etna volcano activity in gravity and satellite radar data

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Ciro Del; Currenti, Gilda; Solaro, Giuseppe; Greco, Filippo; Pepe, Antonio; Napoli, Rosalba; Pepe, Susi; Casu, Francesco; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Long-term and high temporal resolution gravity and deformation data move us toward a better understanding of the behavior of Mt Etna during the June 1995 – December 2011 period in which the volcano exhibited magma charging phases, flank eruptions and summit crater activity. Monthly repeated gravity measurements were coupled with deformation time series using the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) technique on two sequences of interferograms from ERS/ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed satellites. Combining spatiotemporal gravity and DInSAR observations provides the signature of three underlying processes at Etna: (i) magma accumulation in intermediate storage zones, (ii) magmatic intrusions at shallow depth in the South Rift area, and (iii) the seaward sliding of the volcano's eastern flank. Here we demonstrate the strength of the complementary gravity and DInSAR analysis in discerning among different processes and, thus, in detecting deep magma uprising in months to years before the onset of a new Etna eruption. PMID:24169569

  8. Potentially active volcanoes of Peru - Observations using Landsat Thematic Mapper and Space Shuttle imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Silva, S. L.; Francis, P. W.

    1990-01-01

    A synoptic study of the volcanoes of southern Peru (14-17 deg S), the northernmost part of the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ 14-28 deg S) of the Andes, was conducted on the basis of Landsat TM images and color photography. The volcanoes were classified and their relative ages determined using subtle glacial-morphological features. Eight of them were postulated as potentially active. These are located in a narrow volcanic zone which probably reflects a steep dip of the Nazca plate through the zone of magma generation. The break in the trend of the volcanic arc possibly reflects the complexity of the crustal stress field above a major segment boundary in the subducting plate. There are also fields of mafic monogenetic centers in this region. In comparison with the southern part of the CVZ, the general paucity of older volcanic edifices north of 17 deg S suggested a more recent onset of volcanism, a possible result of the oblique subduction of the Nazca ridge and the consequent northward migration of its intersection with the Peru-Chile trench. This, together with the lack of any large silicic caldera systems and youthful dacite domes, suggested that there are real differences in the volcanic evolution of the two parts of the CVZ.

  9. High-resolution seismic structure analysis of an active submarine mud volcano area off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2015-04-01

    In order to better understand the subsurface structure related to an active mud volcano MV1 and to understand their relationship with gas hydrate/cold seep formation, we conducted deep-towed side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP), multibeam echo sounding (MBES), and multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) surveys off SW Taiwan from 2009 to 2011. As shown in the high-resolution sub-bottom profiler and EK500 sonar data, the detailed structures reveal more gas seeps and gas flares in the study area. In addition, the survey profiles show several submarine landslides occurred near the thrust faults. Based on the MCS results, we can find that the MV1 is located on top of a mud diapiric structure. It indicates that the MV1 has the same source as the associated mud diapir. The blanking of the seismic signal may indicate the conduit for the upward migration of the gas (methane or CO2). Therefore, we suggest that the submarine mud volcano could be due to a deep source of mud compressed by the tectonic convergence. Fluids and argillaceous materials have thus migrated upward along structural faults and reach the seafloor. The gas-charged sediments or gas seeps in sediments thus make the seafloor instable and may trigger submarine landslides.

  10. Active Volcanic and Hydrothermal Processes at NW Rota-1 Submarine Volcano: Mariana Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Baker, E. T.; Butterfield, D. A.; Chadwick, W. W.; de Ronde, C.; Dower, J.; Evans, L.; Hein, J.; Juniper, K.; Lebon, G.; Lupton, J. E.; Merle, S.; Metaxas, A.; Nakamura, K.; Resing, J. E.; Roe, K.; Stern, R.; Tunnicliffe, V.

    2004-12-01

    Dives with the remotely operated vehicle ROPOS in March/April 2004 documented a volcanic eruption at NW Rota-1, a submarine volcano of basaltic composition located at 14\\deg 36.0'N, 144\\deg 46.5'E lying 65 km northwest of Rota Island in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The site was chosen as a dive target because of the of the high concentrations of H2S and alunite in the hydrothermal plume overlying its summit in February 2003. The summit of the volcano is composed of curvilinear volcanic ridge oriented NW-SE bounded by NE-SW trending normal faults. Lavas collected on the upper part of the edifice are primitive to moderately fractionated basalts (Mg# = 51-66). The eruptive activity is occurring within a small crater (Brimstone Pit) located on the upper south flank of the volcano at 550 m, about 30 m below the summit. The crater is approximately 15 m wide and at least 20 meters deep. The ROPOS's cameras observed billowing clouds of sulfur-rich fluid rising out of the crater, punctuated by frequent bursts of several minutes duration that entrained glassy volcanic ejecta up to at least 2 cm in diameter. ROPOS recorded a temperature of 38\\degC within the plume. The volcanic activity had substantial temporal variability on the scale of minutes. ROPOS was sometimes completely enveloped by the plume while on the rim of the crater, and its surfaces were coated with large sulfur droplets. Black glassy fragments were entrained in the plume up to least 50 m above the crater and deposits of this material were on ledges and tops of outcrops up to several hundred meters from Brimstone Pit. The pit crater fluids have an extremely high content of particulate sulfur and extremely acidic, with pH around 2.0. This strongly implicates magmatic degassing of SO2 and disproportionation into elemental S and sulfuric acid. Diffuse venting of clear fluids was also present on the summit of the volcano, with temperatures exceeding 100\\degC in volcaniclastic sands

  11. SqueeSAR™ and GPS ground deformation monitoring of Santorini Volcano (1992-2012): Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagios, E.; Sakkas, V.; Novali, F.; Bellotti, F.; Ferretti, A.; Vlachou, K.; Dietrich, V.

    2013-05-01

    The Santorini Volcanic Complex (SVC) has been in a dormant state for the last 60 years until January 2011 when upward influx of magma reawakened the volcano with intense radial ground deformation and inter-caldera seismicity that lasted until January 2012 but declined afterwards. This paper aims to study the ground deformation and the inferred tectonic implications of the SVC for the period 1992-2012 mainly based on the SqueeSAR™ technique and DGPS campaign results of our local network which incorporates available data on Internet from several continuous GPS stations established on the island. The spatial deformation of the SVC during the quiet period 1992-2010 was deduced by joint analysis of ERS1 and 2 and ENVISAT. It was found that the intra caldera Palaea Kammeni shield volcano was being uplifted (2-3 mm/yr) with increasing rate, whilst the adjacent Nea Kammeni shield volcano was being subsided (up to 6 mm/yr) with increasing rate. The rest of the SVC showed a velocity field varying from - 1 to + 2 mm/yr, indicating a rather linear deformation during that period. The results from the GPS network are in full agreement with the SqueeSAR results. Based on the results of SqueeSAR analysis of 12 ENVISAT images, and DGPS/CGPS data to end 2012, the deformation for the unrest period 2011-2012 was non-linear being characterized by strong radial deformation in the northern part of the caldera (50-120 mm/yr), and accelerating values (> 130 mm/yr2). Combined GPS/SqueeSAR Mogi modeling indicated a source located north of Nea Kammeni at a shallow depth. However, a progressively decreasing rate in deformation was noted at most GPS/CGPS station components after January 2012, indicating magma settlement consistent with the constantly decreasing rate of the inter-caldera seismicity. The faulting features seem to have a key role in the evolution of the deformation, which continues up the end 2012, but at a very low level.

  12. Active Job Monitoring in Pilots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Eileen; Fischer, Max; Giffels, Manuel; Jung, Christopher; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in high energy physics (HEP) including multi-core jobs and multi-core pilots require data centres to gain a deep understanding of the system to monitor, design, and upgrade computing clusters. Networking is a critical component. Especially the increased usage of data federations, for example in diskless computing centres or as a fallback solution, relies on WAN connectivity and availability. The specific demands of different experiments and communities, but also the need for identification of misbehaving batch jobs, requires an active monitoring. Existing monitoring tools are not capable of measuring fine-grained information at batch job level. This complicates network-aware scheduling and optimisations. In addition, pilots add another layer of abstraction. They behave like batch systems themselves by managing and executing payloads of jobs internally. The number of real jobs being executed is unknown, as the original batch system has no access to internal information about the scheduling process inside the pilots. Therefore, the comparability of jobs and pilots for predicting run-time behaviour or network performance cannot be ensured. Hence, identifying the actual payload is important. At the GridKa Tier 1 centre a specific tool is in use that allows the monitoring of network traffic information at batch job level. This contribution presents the current monitoring approach and discusses recent efforts and importance to identify pilots and their substructures inside the batch system. It will also show how to determine monitoring data of specific jobs from identified pilots. Finally, the approach is evaluated.

  13. Infrasound of basaltic effusive activity at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genco, Riccardo; Valade, Sebastien; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Peltier, Aline; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Di Muro, Andrea; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    On August 24th 2015, a 67 days long eruptive activity started at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano. During the last phases of the eruption we deployed a portable, small aperture, infrasonic array which allowed us to record unprecedented data from effusive volcanic activity. The array consisted on four, few tens of meters spaced, infrasound pressure sensors and was installed on the outer rim of the Enclos Foqué, roughly 2.5 km far from the active vent, sited on the southern flank of the central cone. The system was almost continuously operating from October, 15th to December, 7th 2015, thus recording the end of the first eruptive phase (Autust 24th - October 17th) as well as the two short-living following phases (from 22 to 24 and from 29 to 31 October, 2015). The infrasound records have been coupled with discrete high-rate (30 Hz) thermal and visible imagery acquisitions located at a short distance from the vent (100-200 m) providing detailed information on the eruptive source dynamics. The comparison with seismic and ground tilt data recorded by the permanent network operated by the Observatoire Volcanologique du Piton de la Fournaise (OVPF), shows that infrasound can be succesfully used to locate the source, detect the onset, and the end, of the effusive phases as well as accurately track the time evolution of the effusive process. We present results which allows a detailed analysis of the shallow magma dynamics during the effusive activity at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano. As far as we know these are amongst the few rare infrasound dataset reported for this style of basaltic volcanic activity.

  14. January 30, 1997 eruptive event on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, as monitored by continuous GPS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, S.; Segall, P.; Lisowski, M.; Miklius, Asta; Murray, M.; Bevis, M.; Foster, J.

    2000-01-01

    A continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) network on Kilauea Volcano captured the most recent fissure eruption in Kilauea's East Rift Zone (ERZ) in unprecedented spatial and temporal detail. The short eruption drained the lava pond at Pu'u O' o, leading to a two month long pause in its on-going eruption. Models of the GPS data indicate that the intrusion's bottom edge extended to only 2.4 km. Continuous GPS data reveal rift opening 8 hours prior to the eruption. Absence of precursory summit inflation rules out magma storage overpressurization as the eruption's cause. We infer that stresses in the shallow rift created by the continued deep rift dilation and slip on the south flank decollement caused the rift intrusion.

  15. Anomalous geomagnetic variations associated with the volcanic activity of the Mayon volcano, Philippines during 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takla, E. M.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kawano, H.; Uozumi, T.; Abe, S.

    2014-12-01

    Local anomalous geomagnetic variations preceding and accompanying the volcanic eruptions had been reported by several researchers. This paper uses continuous high-resolution geomagnetic data to examine the occurrence of any anomalous geomagnetic field variations that possibly linked with the volcanic eruption of the Mayon volcano, Philippines during 2009-2010. The nearest geomagnetic observing point from the Mayon volcano is the Legazpi (LGZ) station, Philippines; which is located about 13 km South of the Mayon volcano. The amplitude range of daily variations and the amplitude of Ultra Low Frequency emissions in the Pc3 range (Pc3; 10-45 s) were examined at the LGZ station and also were compared with those from the Davao (DAV) station, Philippines as a remote reference station. Both the LGZ and DAV stations belong to the MAGDAS Network. The result of data analysis reveals significant anomalous changes in the amplitude range of daily variations and the Pc3 amplitude at the LGZ station before and during the volcanic eruption of the Mayon volcano. From the obtained results, it appears that the observed anomalous variations are dependent on the change in the underground conductivity connected with variation in the physical properties of the Earth's crust due to the activity of the Mayon volcano. Therefore, these anomalous geomagnetic variations are considered to be of a local volcanic origin.

  16. A rapid deployment instrument network for temporarily monitoring volcanic SO2 emissions - a case study from Telica volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, V.; Nilsson, D.; Galle, B.; Cartagena, R.; Muñoz, A.

    2014-08-01

    Volcanic gas emissions play a crucial role in describing geophysical processes; hence, measurements of magmatic gases such as SO2 can be used as tracers prior to and during volcanic crises. Different measurement techniques based on optical spectroscopy have provided valuable information when assessing volcanic crises. This paper describes the design and implementation of a network of spectroscopic instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for remote sensing of volcanic SO2 emissions, which is robust, portable and can be deployed in relatively short time. The setup allows the processing of raw data in situ even in remote areas with limited accessibility, and delivers pre-processed data to end users in near real time, even during periods of volcanic crisis, via a satellite link. In addition, the hardware can be used to conduct short-term studies of volcanic plumes in remote areas. We describe here tests of the network at Telica, an active volcano located in western Nicaragua, during three different measurement periods, including an eruptive crisis. The tests produced what is so far the largest data set of continuous SO2 flux measurements at this volcano. The measurements show that, during the period 2010-2013, the flux averages approximately 100 tons per day (t day-1).

  17. A rapid deployment instrument network for temporarily monitoring volcanic SO2 emissions - a study case from Telica volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, V.; Nilsson, D.; Galle, B.; Cartagena, R.; Muñoz, A.

    2014-04-01

    Volcanic gas emissions play a crucial role in describing geophysical processes; hence measurements of magmatic gases such as SO2 can be used as tracers prior and during volcanic crises. Different measurement techniques based on optical spectroscopy have provided valuable information when assessing volcanic crises. This paper describes the design and implementation of a network of spectroscopic instruments based on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) for remote sensing of volcanic SO2 emissions, which is robust, portable and can be deployed in relative short time. The setup allows the processing of raw data in situ even in remote areas with limited accessibility, and delivers pre-processed data to end-users in near real time even during periods of volcanic crisis, via a satellite link. In addition, the hardware can be used to conduct short term studies of volcanic plumes in remotes areas. The network was tested at Telica, an active volcano located in western Nicaragua, producing what is so far the largest data set of continuous SO2 flux measurements at this volcano.

  18. Plume indications from hydrothermal activity on Kawio Barat Submarine Volcano, Sangihe Talaud Sea, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarim, S.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Wirasantosa, S.; Permana, H.; Sulistiyo, B.; Shank, T. M.; Holden, J. F.; Butterfield, D.; Ramdhan, M.; Adi, R.; Marzuki, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    Kawio Barat submarine volcano has formed in response to the active tectonic conditions in Sangihe Talaud, an area that lies in the subduction zone between the Molucca Sea Plate and Celebes Sea Plate. Submarine volcanic activity in the western Sangihe volcanic arc is controlled by the west-dipping Molucca Sea Plate as it subducts beneath the Sangihe Arc. A secondary faulting system on Kawio Barat is in a northwest - southeast direction, and creates a network of deep cracks that facilitate hydrothermal discharge in this area. Hydrothermal activity on Kawio Barat was first discovered by joint Indonesia/Australian cruises in 2003. In 2010, as part of the joint US/Indonesian INDEX-SATAL expedition, we conducted CTD casts that confirmed continuing activity. Hydrothermal plumes were detected by light -scattering (LSS) and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) sensors on the CTD package. LSS anomalies were found between 1600-1900 m, with delta NTU levels of 0.020-0.040. ORP anomalies coincident with the LSS anomalies indicate strong concentrations of reduced species such as H2S and Fe, confirming the hydrothermal origin of the plumes. Images of hydrothermal vents on Kawio Barat Submarine volcano, recorded by high- definition underwater cameras on the ROV “Little Hercules” operated from the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer, confirmed the presence and sources of the detected vent plumes in the northern and southwest part of the summit in 1800-1900 m depth. In southwest part of this summit chimney, drips of molten sulfur were observed in the proximity of microbal staining.

  19. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  20. Recent Eruptive Activity at Etna Volcano Inferred by Borehole Strainmeters : Source Modeling and Magma Volume Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorso, Alessandro; Calvari, Sonia; Currenti, Gilda; Linde, Alan; Sacks, Selwyn

    2015-04-01

    After the end of the last effusive flank 2008-2009 eruption, in January 2011 the eruptive activity resumed at Etna producing a new phase with 44 lava fountain episodes through December 2013. Almost all the lava fountains had similar characteristics. The intensity of the initial strombolian explosions increased rapidly and the activity soon shifted to lava fountains. The paroxysmal phase was accompanied by increasing tephra emission with lava fountain reaching up to ~0.5-0.8 km above the crater and an eruption column rising several kilometers above the volcano summit before being dispersed by wind to the distal volcano flanks and by lava flow output. The paroxysmal episodes lasted a few hours and fed lava flows that expanded in the Valle del Bove depression with maximum lengths of 4-6 km. These eruptive episodes emitted much more magma than in the phases occurred in the previous decades. In November 2011, the first two borehole strainmeters, dilatometers type with nominal precision of ~ 10^10 - 10^11, were installed at Etna at ~180 m depth below the ground surface with distances from the summit central crater of 6 (DEGI) and 10 km (DRUV), respectively. During the paroxysmal events these high precision instruments detected negative strain changes indicating medium expansion at both sites. For each fountain episode the amplitude of the stain changes were almost similar with ~0.2 and ~1 μstrain at DRUV and DEGI, respectively. A Finite Element Model was set up to estimate accurately the tilt and volumetric strain, taking into account the real profile of the volcano and the elastic medium heterogeneity. The numerical computations indicated an elongated depressurizing source located at 0 km b.s.l., which underwent a volume change of ~2 × 106 m3 which is the most of the magma volume erupted, while a smaller remaining part (~0.5 × 106 m^3) is accommodated by the magma compressibility. This allowed to infer a representative average erupted volume of ~2.5 × 106 m3 for

  1. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit.

    This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is

  2. Morpho-structural criteria for the identification of volcano deformation processes from analogue modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, Marta; Marquez, Alvaro; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Herrera, Raquel; Granja Bruña, Jose Luis; Llanes, Pilar

    2014-05-01

    The morphology of volcanoes provides important information about edifice evolution. Volcanoes can deform by gravitational instability and intrusions. This deformation can compromise volcano structural stability, promoting flank collapse even at dormant edifices. Identification of past/active deformation processes is therefore important not only for the understanding of volcano evolution but also for volcanic hazards. Both deformation due to the flank spreading of a volcano over its weak core and due to the intrusion of a cryptodome in the volcano edifice can produce faulting and changes in the morphology of volcano flanks. These morpho-structural changes in the volcano open the possibility to identify potential deformed and unstable volcanoes using remote sensing techniques and DEMs. We have used analogue models of flank spreading and intrusion processes to make progress in the morpho-structural identification of deformation features which can provide criteria for distinguishing processes. We have geometrically and mechanically scaled two different sets of experiments using a sand-plaster mixture for volcano materials, silicone putty for weak core rocks and Golden Syrup for magma intrusions. For monitoring changes in the volcano morphology we have used a Kinect sensor (Microsoft), which provides us vertical displacements of volcano flanks several times per second with a 1 mm precision. We have synchronized the Kinect sensor with a digital camera for monitoring the spatio-temporal evolution of tectonic structures together with morphology. All experiments produce asymmetrical changes in volcano morphology, developing convex-concave geometries in the deformed flank. However, the spatial relationships of structures with changes in volcano flank curvature are different for the two processes, as noted by previous authors. The morphometric tools developed for analyzing volcano topography allow us to identify intrusion processes due to volcano volume increase. We have

  3. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sanchez, John J.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Estes, Steve; Paskievitch, John

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988. The primary objectives of this program are the near real time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the calculated earthquake hypocenter and phase arrival data, and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2003.The AVO seismograph network was used to monitor the seismic activity at twenty-seven volcanoes within Alaska in 2003. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai volcanic cluster (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Okmok Caldera, Great Sitkin Volcano, Kanaga Volcano, Tanaga Volcano, and Mount Gareloi. Monitoring highlights in 2003 include: continuing elevated seismicity at Mount Veniaminof in January-April (volcanic unrest began in August 2002), volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year, and low-level tremor at Okmok Caldera throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2003 were the installation of subnetworks on Tanaga and Gareloi Islands, the installation of broadband installations on Akutan Volcano and Okmok Caldera, and the establishment of telemetry for the Okmok Caldera subnetwork. AVO located 3911 earthquakes in 2003.This catalog includes: (1) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (2) a

  4. Sulfur dioxide emissions related to volcanic activity at Asama volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohwada, Michiko; Kazahaya, Kohei; Mori, Toshiya; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke; Hirabayashi, Jun-ichi; Miyashita, Makoto; Onizawa, Shin'ya; Mori, Takehiko

    2013-12-01

    A 40-year-long record of the sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rate of Asama volcano, Japan, is presented including high-temporal-resolution data since the 2004 eruption. The 2004 and 2008-2009 eruptive activities were associated with high SO2 emission, and SO2 emission rates markedly fluctuated. In contrast, stable and weak SO2 emissions have been observed for the rest of the investigated interval. The fluctuation of the SO2 emission rates is correlated with the number of shallow low-frequency B-type earthquakes, implying that increased flows of gas and/or magma induced the B-type earthquakes along the shallow conduit. The total volumes of outgassed magma during the 2004 and 2008-2009 eruptive activities are estimated to be 1.9 × 108 and 1.5 × 108 m3, respectively. These volumes are about 100-200 times larger than those of the erupted magma, indicating that the large volumes of the magma were outgassed without being erupted (i.e., excess degassing/outgassing). Degassing and outgassing driven by magma convection rather than by permeable gas flow in the conduit is concluded as the probable degassing/outgassing process of Asama volcano based on model examinations, and is thought to occur regardless of the outgassing intensity. Production rates of outgassed magma related to the 2004 and 2008-2009 eruptive periods are estimated to have been 7.4 × 103 and 6.7 × 103 kg/s, respectively. These values are one order of magnitude higher than the average production rate of 0.92 × 103 kg/s for the inactive periods. Increased supply of fresh magma is thought to activate magma convection in the conduit and to thereby increase magma degassing/outgassing.

  5. The Pulse of the Volcano: Discovery of Episodic Activity at Prometheus on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    The temporal behaviour of thermal output from a volcano yields valuable clues to the processes taking place at and beneath the surface. Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data show that the ionian volcanoes Prometheus and Amirani have significant thermal emission in excess of nonvolcanic background emission in every geometrically appropriate NIMS observation. The 5 micron brightness of these volcanoes shows considerable variation from orbit to orbit. Prometheus in particular exhibits an episodicity that yields valuable constraints to the mechanisms of magma supply and eruption. This work is part of an on-going study to chart and quantify the thermal emission of Io's volcanoes, determine mass eruption rates, and note eruption style.

  6. A multidisciplinary monitoring network at Mayon volcano, Philippines: A collaborative effort between PHIVOLCS and EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Hidayat, D.; Laguerta, E. P.; Baloloy, A. V.; Valerio, R.; Vaquilar, R.; Arpa, M. C.; Marcial, S. S.; Novianti, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    Mount Mayon in Albay province (Philippines) is an openly-degassing basaltic-andesitic stratovolcano, located on the northern edge of the northwest-trending OAS graben. Its latest eruptions were in Aug-Sept 2006 and Dec 2009. Mayon's current status is PHIVOLCS' level 1 with low seismicity dominated mostly local and regional tectonic earthquakes and continuous emission of SO2 from its summit crater. A research collaboration between the Earth Observatory of Singapore-NTU and the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) was initiated in 2009, aimed at developing a multi-disciplinary monitoring network around Mayon. The network design comprises a network of co-located geophysical, geochemical, hydrological and meteorological sensors, in both radial and circular arrangements. Radially arranged stations are intended to capture and distinguish vertical conduit processes, while the circular station design (including existing PHIVOLCS stations in cooperation with JICA, Japan) is meant to distinguish locations and sector activity of subsurface events. Geophysical instrumentation from EOS currently includes 4 broadband seismographs (in addition to 3 existing broadbands and 3 short period instruments from PHIVOLCS & JICA), and 5 tiltmeters. Four continuous cGPS stations will be installed in 2012, complementing 5 existing PHIVOLCS stations. Stations are also designed to house a multi-sensor package of static subsurface soil CO2 monitoring stations, the first of which was installed in early 2012, and which include subsoil sensors for heat flux, temperature, and moisture, as well as meteorological stations (with sonic anemometers and contact rain gages). These latter sensors are all controlled from one control box per station. Meteorological stations will help us to validate tilt, gas permeability, and also know lahar initiation potential. Since early 2011, separate stations downwind of the two prevailing wind directions from the summit continuously monitor

  7. Attaining high-resolution eruptive histories for active arc volcanoes with argon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2012-04-01

    Geochronology of active arc volcanoes commonly illuminates eruptive behavior over tens to hundreds of thousands of years, lengthy periods of repose punctuated by short eruptive episodes, and spatial and compositional changes with time. Despite the >1 Gyr half-life of 40K, argon geochronology is an exceptional tool for characterizing Pleistocene to Holocene eruptive histories and for placing constraints on models of eruptive behavior. Reliable 40Ar/39Ar ages of calc-alkaline arc rocks with rigorously derived errors small enough (± 500 to 3,000 years) to constrain eruptive histories are attainable using careful procedures. Sample selection and analytical work in concert with geologic mapping and stratigraphic studies are essential for determining reliable eruptive histories. Preparation, irradiation and spectrometric techniques have all been optimized to produce reliable, high-precision results. Examples of Cascade and Alaska/Aleutian eruptive histories illustrating duration of activity from single centers, eruptive episodicity, and spatial and compositional changes with time will be presented: (1) Mt. Shasta, the largest Cascade stratovolcano, has a 700,000-year history (Calvert and Christiansen, 2011 Fall AGU). A similar sized and composition volcano (Rainbow Mountain) on the Cascade axis was active 1200-950 ka. The eruptive center then jumped west 15 km to the south flank of the present Mt. Shasta and produced a stratovolcano from 700-450 ka likely rivaling today's Mt. Shasta. The NW portion of that edifice failed in an enormous (>30 km3) debris avalanche. Vents near today's active summit erupted 300-135 ka, then 60-15 ka. A voluminous, but short-lived eruptive sequence occurred at 11 ka, including a summit explosion producing a subplinian plume, followed by >60 km3 andesite-dacite Shastina domes and flows, then by the flank dacite Black Butte dome. Holocene domes and flows subsequently rebuilt the summit and flowed to the north and east. (2) Mt. Veniaminof on

  8. Active mud volcanoes on the continental slope of the Canadian Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Caress, D. W.; Gwiazda, R.; Melling, H.; Riedel, M.; Jin, Y. K.; Hong, J. K.; Kim, Y.-G.; Graves, D.; Sherman, A.; Lundsten, E.; Anderson, K.; Lundsten, L.; Villinger, H.; Kopf, A.; Johnson, S. B.; Hughes Clarke, J.; Blasco, S.; Conway, K.; Neelands, P.; Thomas, H.; Côté, M.

    2015-09-01

    Morphologic features, 600-1100 m across and elevated up to 30 m above the surrounding seafloor, interpreted to be mud volcanoes were investigated on the continental slope in the Beaufort Sea in the Canadian Arctic. Sediment cores, detailed mapping with an autonomous underwater vehicle, and exploration with a remotely operated vehicle show that these are young and actively forming features experiencing ongoing eruptions. Biogenic methane and low-chloride, sodium-bicarbonate-rich waters are extruded with warm sediment that accumulates to form cones and low-relief circular plateaus. The chemical and isotopic compositions of the ascending water indicate that a mixture of meteoric water, seawater, and water from clay dehydration has played a significant role in the evolution of these fluids. The venting methane supports extensive siboglinid tubeworms communities and forms some gas hydrates within the near seafloor. We believe that these are the first documented living chemosynthetic biological communities in the continental slope of the western Arctic Ocean.

  9. Lightning and electrical activity during the Shiveluch volcano eruption on 16 November 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsov, Boris M.; Firstov, Pavel P.; Cherneva, Nina V.; Holzworth, Robert H.; Akbashev, Renat R.

    2016-03-01

    According to World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) data, a sequence of lightning discharges was detected which occurred in the area of the explosive eruption of Shiveluch volcano on 16 November 2014 in Kamchatka. Information on the ash cloud motion was confirmed by the measurements of atmospheric electricity, satellite observations and meteorological and seismic data. It was concluded that WWLLN resolution is enough to detect the earlier stage of volcanic explosive eruption when electrification processes develop the most intensively. The lightning method has the undeniable advantage for the fast remote sensing of volcanic electric activity anywhere in the world. There is a good opportunity for the development of WWLLN technology to observe explosive volcanic eruptions.

  10. Monitoring super-volcanoes: Geophysical and geochemical signals at Yellowstone and other large caldera systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Smith, R.B.; Hill, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Earth's largest calderas form as the ground collapses during immense volcanic eruptions, when hundreds to thousands of cubic kilometres of magma are explosively withdrawn from the Earth's crust over a period of days to weeks. Continuing long after such great eruptions, the resulting calderas often exhibit pronounced unrest, with frequent earthquakes, alternating uplift and subsidence of the ground, and considerable heat and mass flux. Because many active and extinct calderas show evidence for repetition of large eruptions, such systems demand detailed scientific study and monitoring. Two calderas in North America, Yellowstone (Wyoming) and Long Valley (California), are in areas of youthful tectonic complexity. Scientists strive to understand the signals generated when tectonic, volcanic and hydrothermal (hot ground water) processes intersect. One obstacle to accurate forecasting of large volcanic events is humanity's lack of familiarity with the signals leading up to the largest class of volcanic eruptions. Accordingly, it may be difficult to recognize the difference between smaller and larger eruptions. To prepare ourselves and society, scientists must scrutinize a spectrum of volcanic signals and assess the many factors contributing to unrest and toward diverse modes of eruption. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  11. Monitoring super-volcanoes: geophysical and geochemical signals at Yellowstone and other large caldera systems.

    PubMed

    Lowenstern, Jacob B; Smith, Robert B; Hill, David P

    2006-08-15

    Earth's largest calderas form as the ground collapses during immense volcanic eruptions, when hundreds to thousands of cubic kilometres of magma are explosively withdrawn from the Earth's crust over a period of days to weeks. Continuing long after such great eruptions, the resulting calderas often exhibit pronounced unrest, with frequent earthquakes, alternating uplift and subsidence of the ground, and considerable heat and mass flux. Because many active and extinct calderas show evidence for repetition of large eruptions, such systems demand detailed scientific study and monitoring. Two calderas in North America, Yellowstone (Wyoming) and Long Valley (California), are in areas of youthful tectonic complexity. Scientists strive to understand the signals generated when tectonic, volcanic and hydrothermal (hot ground water) processes intersect. One obstacle to accurate forecasting of large volcanic events is humanity's lack of familiarity with the signals leading up to the largest class of volcanic eruptions. Accordingly, it may be difficult to recognize the difference between smaller and larger eruptions. To prepare ourselves and society, scientists must scrutinize a spectrum of volcanic signals and assess the many factors contributing to unrest and toward diverse modes of eruption. PMID:16844648

  12. Long term volcano monitoring by using advanced Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry technique: A case study at Unimak Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F. J.; Freymueller, J. T.; Lu, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Unimak Island, the largest island in the eastern Aleutians of Alaska, is home to three major active volcanoes: Shishaldin, Fisher, and Westdahl. Shishaldin and Westdahl erupted within the past 2 decades and Fisher has shown persistent hydrothermal activity (Mann and Freymueller, 2003). Therefore, Unimak Island is of particular interest to geoscientists. Surface deformation on Unimak Island has been studied in several previous efforts. Lu et al. (2000, 2003) applied conventional InSAR techniques to study surface inflation at Westdahl during 1991 and 2000. Mann and Freymueller (2003) used GPS measurements to analyze inflation at Westdahl and subsidence at Fisher during 1998-2001. Moran et al., ( 2006) reported that Shishaldin, the most active volcano in the island , experienced no significant deformation during the 1993 to 2003 period bracketing two eruptions. In this paper, we present deformation measurements at Unimak Islank during 2003-2010 using advanced persistent scatterer InSAR (PSI). Due to the non-urban setting in a subarctic environment and the limited data acquisition, the number of images usable for PSI processing is limited to about 1-3 acquisitions per year. The relatively smaller image stack and the irregular acquisition distribution in time pose challenges in the PSI time-series processing. Therefore, we have developed a modified PSI technique that integrates external atmospheric information from numerical weather predication models to assist in the removal of atmospheric artifacts [1]. Deformation modeling based on PSI results will be also presented. Our new results will be combined with previous findings to address the magma plumbing system at Unimak Island. 1) W. Gong, F. J. Meyer (2012): Optimized filter design for irregular acquired data stack in Persistent Scatterers Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry, Proceeding of Geosciences and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2012 IEEE International, Munich, Germany.

  13. Insights on Volcanic Activity - Self-Potential and Gravity surveys of Masaya volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Jones, G.; Mauri, G.; Saracco, G.

    2006-12-01

    For more than ten years, the activity of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, has been surveyed annually in ord