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Sample records for active voltage clamp

  1. Voltage-clamp frequency domain analysis of NMDA-activated neurons.

    PubMed

    Moore, L E; Hill, R H; Grillner, S

    1993-02-01

    1. Voltage and current-clamp steps were added to a sum of sine waves to measure the tetrodotoxin-insensitive membrane properties of neurons in the intact lamprey spinal cord. A systems analysis in the frequency domain was carried out on two types of cells that have very different morphologies in order to investigate the structural dependence of their electrophysiological properties. The method explicitly takes into account the geometrical shapes of (i) nearly spherical dorsal cells with one or two processes and (ii) motoneurons and interneurons that have branched dendritic structures. Impedance functions were analysed to obtain the cable properties of these in situ neurons. These measurements show that branched neurons are not isopotential and, therefore, a conventional voltage-clamp analysis is not valid. 2. The electrophysiological data from branched neurons were curve-fitted with a lumped soma-equivalent cylinder model consisting of eight equal compartments coupled to an isopotential cell body to obtain membrane parameters for both passive and active properties. The analysis provides a quantitative description of both the passive electrical properties imposed by the geometrical structure of neurons and the voltage-dependent ionic conductances determined by ion channel kinetics. The model fitting of dorsal cells was dominated by a one-compartment resistance and capacitance in parallel (RC) corresponding to the spherical, non-branched shape of these cells. Branched neurons required a model that contained both an RC compartment and a cable that reflected the structure of the cells. At rest, the electrotonic length of the cable was about two. Uniformly distributed voltage-dependent ionic conductance sites were adequate to describe the data at different membrane potentials. 3. The frequency domain admittance method in conjunction with a step voltage clamp was used to control and measure the oscillatory behavior induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on lamprey spinal

  2. Improved Active Clamp Converter By Resonance Blanking Used For Wide Input Voltage Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strixner, E.; Godzik, S.

    2011-10-01

    The GPS line receiver as a standard product line of Astrium GmbH Ottobrunn shall operate according to customer requirements on different power busses with no or only minor modifications. Consequently there is an up coming demand to develop a power converter with a wide input voltage range. The hardware shall work with minor adaptation on all standard bus voltages of 28V, 50V and 100V. Themainfocuswas to cover the unregulated 28V bus and the regulated 50V bus without any modifications on the converter module and providing performance data being similar to low input voltage range converters.

  3. Highly selective water channel activity measured by voltage clamp: Analysis of planar lipid bilayers reconstituted with purified AqpZ

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Peter; Saparov, Sapar M.; Borgnia, Mario J.; Agre, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Aquaporins are membrane channels selectively permeated by water or water plus glycerol. Conflicting reports have described ion conductance associated with some water channels, raising the question of whether ion conductance is a general property of the aquaporin family. To clarify this question, a defined system was developed to simultaneously measure water permeability and ion conductance. The Escherichia coli water channel aquaporin-Z (AqpZ) was studied, because it is a highly stable tetramer. Planar lipid bilayers were formed from unilamellar vesicles containing purified AqpZ. The hydraulic conductivity of bilayers made from the total extract of E. coli lipids increased 3-fold if reconstituted with AqpZ, but electric conductance was unchanged. No channel activity was detected under voltage-clamp conditions, indicating that less than one in 109 transport events is electrogenic. Microelectrode measurements were simultaneously undertaken adjacent to the membrane. Changes in sodium concentration profiles accompanying transmembrane water flow permitted calculation of the activation energies: 14 kcal/mol for protein-free lipid bilayers and 4 kcal/mol for lipid bilayers containing AqpZ. Neither the water permeability nor the electric conductivity exhibited voltage dependence. This sensitive system demonstrated that AqpZ is permeated by water but not charged ions and should permit direct analyses of putative electrogenic properties of other aquaporins. PMID:11493683

  4. Control of Gastric H,K-ATPase Activity by Cations, Voltage and Intracellular pH Analyzed by Voltage Clamp Fluorometry in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dürr, Katharina L.; Tavraz, Neslihan N.; Friedrich, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Whereas electrogenic partial reactions of the Na,K-ATPase have been studied in depth, much less is known about the influence of the membrane potential on the electroneutrally operating gastric H,K-ATPase. In this work, we investigated site-specifically fluorescence-labeled H,K-ATPase expressed in Xenopus oocytes by voltage clamp fluorometry to monitor the voltage-dependent distribution between E1P and E2P states and measured Rb+ uptake under various ionic and pH conditions. The steady-state E1P/E2P distribution, as indicated by the voltage-dependent fluorescence amplitudes and the Rb+ uptake activity were highly sensitive to small changes in intracellular pH, whereas even large extracellular pH changes affected neither the E1P/E2P distribution nor transport activity. Notably, intracellular acidification by approximately 0.5 pH units shifted V0.5, the voltage, at which the E1P/E2P ratio is 50∶50, by −100 mV. This was paralleled by an approximately two-fold acceleration of the forward rate constant of the E1P→E2P transition and a similar increase in the rate of steady-state cation transport. The temperature dependence of Rb+ uptake yielded an activation energy of ∼90 kJ/mol, suggesting that ion transport is rate-limited by a major conformational transition. The pronounced sensitivity towards intracellular pH suggests that proton uptake from the cytoplasmic side controls the level of phosphoenzyme entering the E1P→E2P conformational transition, thus limiting ion transport of the gastric H,K-ATPase. These findings highlight the significance of cellular mechanisms contributing to increased proton availability in the cytoplasm of gastric parietal cells. Furthermore, we show that extracellular Na+ profoundly alters the voltage-dependent E1P/E2P distribution indicating that Na+ ions can act as surrogates for protons regarding the E2P→E1P transition. The complexity of the intra- and extracellular cation effects can be rationalized by a kinetic model suggesting

  5. Voltage clamp experiments on ventricular myocarial fibres.

    PubMed

    Beeler, G W; Reuter, H

    1970-03-01

    1. A voltage clamp method utilizing a sucrose gap and glass microelectrodes was developed and used to study dog ventricular myocardial fibre bundles. The limitations and the reliability of this method are demonstrated by a series of tests.2. A dynamic sodium current, excited at membrane potentials more positive than -65 mV, was measured. The equilibrium potential for this large, rapid inward current depends directly on [Na](o), shifting 29.0 +/- 2.3 mV (+/- S.E. of mean), as opposed to a theoretically expected value of 30.6 mV, when [Na](o) is reduced to 31% of normal.3. Sodium current is inactivated by conditioning depolarizations. Complete inactivation occurs with conditioning potentials more positive than -45 mV, and 50% inactivation occurs at about -55 mV. The location of the inactivation curve shifts along the voltage axis, when [Ca](o) is varied between 0.2 and 7.2 mM.4. A second, much smaller and slower net inward current, with a threshold around -30 mV, and an equilibrium potential above +40 mV was also observed.5. The ;steady-state' current-voltage relationship (after 300-600 msec) exhibits inward-going (anomalous) rectification with negative slope between -50 and -25 mV.6. A small, very slowly developing component of outward current was observed at inside positive potentials. The equilibrium potential for this current, although slightly dependent on [K](o), is neither identical with the potassium equilibrium potential nor with the resting potential in normal Tyrode solution.7. Anatomical limitations, primarily resistance in the extracellular space within the bundle, prevent complete characterization of the rapid, large sodium current, but do not limit the application of the clamp method to the study of other, smaller and slower currents. The evidence for this is discussed extensively in the Appendix. PMID:5503866

  6. Patch voltage clamp of squid axon membrane.

    PubMed

    Fishman, H M

    1975-12-01

    A small area (patch) of the external surface of a squid axon can be "isolated" electrically from the surrounding bath by means of a pair of concentric glass pipettes. The seawater-filled inner pipette makes contact with the axon and constitutes the external access to the patch. The outer pipette is used to direct flowing sucrose solution over the area surrounding the patch of membrane underlying the inner pipette. Typically, sucrose isolated patches remain in good condition (spike amplitude greater than 90 mV) for periods of approximately one half hour. Patches of axon membrane which had previously been exposed to sucrose solution were often excitable. Membrane survival of sucrose treatment apparently arises from an outflow of ions from the axon and perhaps satellite cells into the interstitial cell space surrounding the exolemma. Estimate of the total access resistance (electrode plus series resistance) to the patch is about 100 komega (7 omega cm2). Patch capacitance ranges from 10-100 pF, which suggests areas of 10(-4) to 10(-5) cm2 and resting patch resistances of 10-100 Momega. Shunt resistance through the interstitial space exposed to sucrose solution, which isolates the patch, is typically 1-2 Momega. These parameters indicate that good potential control and response times can be achieved on a patch. Furthermore, spatial uniformity is demonstrated by measurement of an exoplasmic isopotential during voltage clamp of an axon patch. The method may be useful for other preparations in which limited membrane area is available or in special instances such as in the measurement of membrane conduction noise. PMID:1214276

  7. Outward currents in voltage-clamped rat sympathetic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Galvan, M; Sedlmeir, C

    1984-01-01

    Outward membrane currents were studied in neurones of the isolated rat superior cervical ganglion by using a two-micro-electrode or single-micro-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Under current clamp, depolarization elicited electrotonic potentials that displayed marked outward rectification. From negative resting potentials (-70 mV) a short latency, short duration outward rectification was observed. From more positive potentials (-40 mV) a longer latency persistent outward rectification could be demonstrated. Under voltage clamp, four distinct outward currents were observed: a delayed rectifier (IK); a transient outward current (IA); a Ca2+-activated current (IC) and the M-current (IM). The maximum amplitude of IK, IA and IC was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than IM. Depolarizing from -40 mV to potentials more positive than -20 mV co-activated IK and IC, producing a characteristic N-shaped current voltage curve with a minimum at about +80 mV. Superfusion with Mn2+-containing solutions reduced outward current at all voltages and abolished the N-characteristic; the remaining current (IK) slowly inactivated (tau greater than 1 s). Raising [K+]o from 6 to 36 mmol/l reversed outward tail currents observed in normal solution. Addition of tetraethylammonium ions (1-3 mmol/l) strongly reduced the amplitude of IK and IC. IA was characterized by very rapid activation at potentials more positive than -60 mV and by fast and complete inactivation at potentials in the activation range. The amplitude of IA was dependent on [K+]o and was reduced by external 4-aminopyridine (1-3 mmol/l). The activation appeared to depend on the nature and concentration of divalent cations present in the superfusate. It is concluded that the soma membrane of rat sympathetic neurones, like many other vertebrate and invertebrate neurones, contains multiple populations of K+ channels. The possible functions of these in the control of ganglion cell excitability are discussed. PMID:6097667

  8. Patch-clamp analysis of voltage-activated and chemically activated currents in the vomeronasal organ of Sternotherus odoratus (stinkpot/musk turtle)

    PubMed Central

    Fadool, D. A.; Wachowiak, M.; Brann, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The electrophysiological basis of chemical communication in the specialized olfactory division of the vomeronasal (VN) organ is poorly understood. In total, 198 patch-clamp recordings were made from 42 animals (Sternotherus odoratus, the stinkpot/musk turtle) to study the electrically and chemically activated properties of VN neurons. The introduction of tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated dextran into the VN orifice permitted good visualization of the vomeronasal neural epithelium prior to dissociating it into single neurons. Basic electrical properties of the neurons were measured (resting potential, −54.5±2.7 mV, N=11; input resistance, 6.7±1.4GΩ, N=25; capacitance, 4.2±0.3 pF, N=22; means ± S.E.M.). The voltage-gated K+ current inactivation rate was significantly slower in VN neurons from males than in those from females, and K+ currents in males were less sensitive (greater Ki) to tetraethylammonium. Vomeronasal neurons were held at a holding potential of −60 mV and tested for their response to five natural chemicals, female urine, male urine, female musk, male musk and catfish extract. Of the 90 VN neurons tested, 33 (34 %) responded to at least one of the five compounds. The peak amplitude of chemically evoked currents ranged from 4 to 180 pA, with two-thirds of responses less than 25 pA. Urine-evoked currents were of either polarity, whereas musk and catfish extract always elicited only inward currents. Urine applied to neurons harvested from female animals evoked currents that were 2–3 times larger than those elicited from male neurons. Musk-evoked inward currents were three times the magnitude of urine-or catfish-extract-evoked inward currents. The calculated breadth of responsiveness for neurons presented with this array of five chemicals indicated that the mean response spectrum of the VN neurons is narrow (H metric 0.11). This patch-clamp study indicates that VN neurons exhibit sexual dimorphism in function and specificity in response

  9. The Xenopus Oocyte Cut-open Vaseline Gap Voltage-clamp Technique With Fluorometry

    PubMed Central

    Rudokas, Michael W.; Varga, Zoltan; Schubert, Angela R.; Asaro, Alexandra B.; Silva, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    The cut-open oocyte Vaseline gap (COVG) voltage clamp technique allows for analysis of electrophysiological and kinetic properties of heterologous ion channels in oocytes. Recordings from the cut-open setup are particularly useful for resolving low magnitude gating currents, rapid ionic current activation, and deactivation. The main benefits over the two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) technique include increased clamp speed, improved signal-to-noise ratio, and the ability to modulate the intracellular and extracellular milieu. Here, we employ the human cardiac sodium channel (hNaV1.5), expressed in Xenopus oocytes, to demonstrate the cut-open setup and protocol as well as modifications that are required to add voltage clamp fluorometry capability. The properties of fast activating ion channels, such as hNaV1.5, cannot be fully resolved near room temperature using TEVC, in which the entirety of the oocyte membrane is clamped, making voltage control difficult. However, in the cut-open technique, isolation of only a small portion of the cell membrane allows for the rapid clamping required to accurately record fast kinetics while preventing channel run-down associated with patch clamp techniques. In conjunction with the COVG technique, ion channel kinetics and electrophysiological properties can be further assayed by using voltage clamp fluorometry, where protein motion is tracked via cysteine conjugation of extracellularly applied fluorophores, insertion of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins, or the incorporation of unnatural amino acids into the region of interest1. This additional data yields kinetic information about voltage-dependent conformational rearrangements of the protein via changes in the microenvironment surrounding the fluorescent molecule. PMID:24637712

  10. A study of pace-maker potential in rabbit sino-atrial node: measurement of potassium activity under voltage-clamp conditions.

    PubMed

    Maylie, J; Morad, M; Weiss, J

    1981-02-01

    1. A single sucrose-gap voltage-clamp technique was used to control the membrane potential and to measure current in rabbit sino-atrial (SA) strips. K+ activity in the extracellular space was simultaneously measured using K+-selective micro-electrodes. 2. Using double-barrelled K+ selective micro-electrodes it was possible to measure the time course of accumulation or depletion of K+ accompanying a single action potential without complications arising from mechanical or electrical artifacts. 3. K+ activity in the extracellular space increased during the action potential and then decreased to base-line levels during the diastolic depolarization phase. Single beat accumulations of 0.1-0.4 M could be measured. 4. The magnitude of accumulation or depletion of K+ depended upon the membrane potential such that K+ accumulated at potentials positive to -50 mV (K+ efflux greater than K+ uptake) and was depleted from the extracellular space at potentials negative to -50 mV (K+ efflux less than K+ uptake). 5. The rate of K+ depletion was fairly constant during the time course of a clamp step within the range of diastolic depolarization (-55 to -75 mV) even though the accompanying membrane current showed marked time-dependent kinetics. 6. The total membrane conductance measured during the time course of the diastolic depolarization or during the time course of activation of time-dependent 'pace-maker' current remained fairly constant or increased. 7. No reversal potential for the time-dependent 'pace-maker' current could be measured at EK in solutions containing 2.7, 5.4 and 8.1 mM-K+. 8. These results do not support the turn-off a K+ conductance as the primary mechanisms for the generation of the pace-maker potential in SA nodal tissue; rather the results are more consistent with the idea that activation of an inward current, with large positive equilibrium potential, is responsible for pace-making activity. PMID:7264968

  11. Modeling CICR in rat ventricular myocytes: voltage clamp studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The past thirty-five years have seen an intense search for the molecular mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcium-release (CICR) in cardiac myocytes, with voltage clamp (VC) studies being the leading tool employed. Several VC protocols including lowering of extracellular calcium to affect Ca2+ loading of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and administration of blockers caffeine and thapsigargin have been utilized to probe the phenomena surrounding SR Ca2+ release. Here, we develop a deterministic mathematical model of a rat ventricular myocyte under VC conditions, to better understand mechanisms underlying the response of an isolated cell to calcium perturbation. Motivation for the study was to pinpoint key control variables influencing CICR and examine the role of CICR in the context of a physiological control system regulating cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]myo). Methods The cell model consists of an electrical-equivalent model for the cell membrane and a fluid-compartment model describing the flux of ionic species between the extracellular and several intracellular compartments (cell cytosol, SR and the dyadic coupling unit (DCU), in which resides the mechanistic basis of CICR). The DCU is described as a controller-actuator mechanism, internally stabilized by negative feedback control of the unit's two diametrically-opposed Ca2+ channels (trigger-channel and release-channel). It releases Ca2+ flux into the cyto-plasm and is in turn enclosed within a negative feedback loop involving the SERCA pump, regulating[Ca2+]myo. Results Our model reproduces measured VC data published by several laboratories, and generates graded Ca2+ release at high Ca2+ gain in a homeostatically-controlled environment where [Ca2+]myo is precisely regulated. We elucidate the importance of the DCU elements in this process, particularly the role of the ryanodine receptor in controlling SR Ca2+ release, its activation by trigger Ca2+, and its refractory characteristics

  12. Voltage clamping single cells in intact malpighian tubules of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Masia, R; Aneshansley, D; Nagel, W; Nachman, R J; Beyenbach, K W

    2000-10-01

    Principal cells of the Malpighian tubule of the yellow fever mosquito were studied with the methods of two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). Intracellular voltage (V(pc)) was -86.7 mV, and input resistance (R(pc)) was 388.5 kOmega (n = 49 cells). In six cells, Ba(2+) (15 mM) had negligible effects on V(pc), but it increased R(pc) from 325.3 to 684.5 kOmega (P < 0.001). In the presence of Ba(2+), leucokinin-VIII (1 microM) increased V(pc) to -101.8 mV (P < 0.001) and reduced R(pc) to 340.2 kOmega (P < 0.002). Circuit analysis yields the following: basolateral membrane resistance, 652. 0 kOmega; apical membrane resistance, 340.2 kOmega; shunt resistance (R(sh)), 344.3 kOmega; transcellular resistance, 992.2 kOmega. The fractional resistance of the apical membrane (0.35) and the ratio of transcellular resistance and R(sh) (3.53) agree closely with values obtained by cable analysis in isolated perfused tubules and confirm the usefulness of TEVC methods in single principal cells of the intact Malpighian tubule. Dinitrophenol (0.1 mM) reversibly depolarized V(pc) from -94.3 to -10.7 mV (P < 0.001) and reversibly increased R(pc) from 412 to 2,879 kOmega (P < 0.001), effects that were duplicated by cyanide (0.3 mM). Significant effects of metabolic inhibition on voltage and resistance suggest a role of ATP in electrogenesis and the maintenance of conductive transport pathways. PMID:10997925

  13. Voltage clamp measurements of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current I(f) in single cells from rabbit sino-atrial node.

    PubMed Central

    van Ginneken, A C; Giles, W

    1991-01-01

    1. The kinetics and ion transfer characteristics of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current, I(f), have been studied in single cells obtained by enzymatic dispersion from the rabbit sino-atrial (S-A) node. These experiments were done to assess the role of I(f) in the generation of the pacemaker depolarization in the S-A node. 2. The activation and the deactivation of I(f) in these single cells are accompanied by significant conductance increases and decreases respectively, confirming earlier findings from multicellular man-made strips of rabbit S-A node, and from mammalian Purkinje fibres. 3. The steady-state activation of I(f) lies between -40 and -120 mV, and its voltage dependence can be described by a Boltzmann relation with the half-activation point at approximately -70 mV. 4. The delay or sigmoidicity in both the onset of I(f) and the deactivation of the tail currents can be accounted for semi-quantitatively by using a second-order Hodgkin-Huxley kinetic scheme. 5. The reversal potential for I(f) is -24 +/- 2 mV (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 6). It does not change significantly as a function of the amount of I(f) which is activated, indicating that ion accumulation or depletion phenomena are not important variables controlling the time course of I(f), or its selectivity. 6. The fully-activated current-voltage relationship for I(f) is approximately linear with a slope conductance of 12.0 +/- 0.88 nS per cell (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 6). 7. A simple mathematical model based on the measured values of maximum conductance, reversal potential, and kinetics of I(f) has been developed to simulate the size and time course of I(f) during typical spontaneous pacemaker activity in rabbit sino-atrial node cells. The calculations show that I(f) can change significantly during pacing and suggest that this current change is, at least in part, responsible for the pacemaker depolarization. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1708824

  14. Membrane tether formation from voltage-clamped outer hair cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Murdock, David R.; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-06-01

    Outer hair cells contribute an active mechanical feedback to the vibrations of the cochlear structures resulting in the high sensitivity and frequency selectivity of normal hearing. We have designed and implemented a novel experimental setup that combines optical tweezers with patch-clamp apparatus to investigate the electromechanical properties of cellular plasma membranes. A micron-size bead trapped by the optical tweezers is brought in contact with the membrane of a voltage-clamped cell, and subsequently moved away to form a plasma membrane tether. Bead displacement during tether elongation is monitored by a quadrant photodetector to obtain time-resolved measurements of the tethering force. Salient information associated with the mechanical properties of the membrane tether can thus be obtained. Tethers can be pulled from the cell membrane at different holding potentials, and the tether force response can be measured while changing transmembrane potential. Experimental results from outer hair cells and human embryonic kidney cells are presented.

  15. Solutions for transients in arbitrarily branching cables: III. Voltage clamp problems.

    PubMed Central

    Major, G

    1993-01-01

    Branched cable voltage recording and voltage clamp analytical solutions derived in two previous papers are used to explore practical issues concerning voltage clamp. Single exponentials can be fitted reasonably well to the decay phase of clamped synaptic currents, although they contain many underlying components. The effective time constant depends on the fit interval. The smoothing effects on synaptic clamp currents of dendritic cables and series resistance are explored with a single cylinder + soma model, for inputs with different time courses. "Soma" and "cable" charging currents cannot be separated easily when the soma is much smaller than the dendrites. Subtractive soma capacitance compensation and series resistance compensation are discussed. In a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurone model, voltage control at most dendritic sites is extremely poor. Parameter dependencies are illustrated. The effects of series resistance compound those of dendritic cables and depend on the "effective capacitance" of the cell. Plausible combinations of parameters can cause order-of-magnitude distortions to clamp current waveform measures of simulated Schaeffer collateral inputs. These voltage clamp problems are unlikely to be solved by the use of switch clamp methods. PMID:8369450

  16. Bactridine's effects on DUM cricket neurons under voltage clamp conditions.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, P; Sevcik, C; Martínez, R; Castillo, C; D'Suze, G

    2012-12-01

    We describe the effects of six bactridines (150 nM) on cricket dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons. The addition of bactridine 2 to DUM neurons induced a large current component with a reversal potential more negative than -30 mV, most evident at the end of the pulses. This current was completely suppressed when 1 μM amiloride was applied before adding the bactridines. Since the amiloride sensitive current is able to distort the aim of our study, i.e. the effect of bactridines on sodium channels, all experiments were done in the presence of 1 μM amiloride. Most bactridines induced voltage shifts of V(1/2) of the Boltzmann inactivation voltage dependency curves in the hyperpolarizing direction. Bactridines 1, 4 and 6 reduced Na current peak by 65, 80 and 24% of the control, respectively. The sodium conductance blockage by bactridines was voltage independent at potentials >20 mV. Bactridines effect on cricket DUM neurons does not correspond to neither α- nor β-toxins. Most bactridines shifted the inactivation curves in the hyperpolarizing direction without any effects on the activation m(∞)-like curves. Also bactridines differ from other NaScpTx in that they increased an amiloride-sensitive conductance in DUM neurons. Our result suggest that the α/β classification of sodium scorpion toxins is not all encompassing. The present work shows that bactridines target more than one site: insect voltage dependent Na channels and an amiloride-sensitive ionic pathway which is under study. PMID:23085555

  17. Measurement of transmembrane potential and current in cardiac muscle: a new voltage clamp method.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Y; Morad, M

    1977-01-01

    1. A single sucrose gap voltage clamp technique was developed to correct for artifacts of 'leakage' corrent and extracellular resistance making possible improved measurement of membrane current and membrane potential in cardiac muscle. 2. A fourth compartment termed 'guard gap' was added to the sucrose gap. The guard gap is maintained at the same potential as the Reinger pool, so that no extracellular leakage current can flow into the Ringer pool. Comparison of experimental results with the predictions of an idealized cable model indicates that the guard gap is effective in trapping leakage current. 3. The slow charging of membrane capacitance due to extracellular series resistance was accelerated by applying a 'pre-pulse' of the command potential past the final voltage clamp value. 4. A second technique, termed 'chopped current pulse clamp', was used to compensate for the extracellular resistance throughout the voltage clamp step. The applied current was turned on and off at a frequency of 0-5-2 kHz. The membrane potential sampled during the zero current phase was fed back through the clamp loop. 5. With either of these compensation techniques, the voltage and current traces settle to effectively constant values within 2-4 msec after initiation of a hyperpolarizing voltage clamp step from rest. 6. The membrane conductance measured by the prepulse and chopped current-pulse technique are equal and confirm a higher conductance at rest than during the plateau of the action potential. 7. The 'instantaneous' current-voltage relation of the membrane is linear during the plateau of the frog ventricular action potential. PMID:301933

  18. A voltage-clamp study of the light response in solitary rods of the tiger salamander.

    PubMed Central

    Bader, C R; Macleish, P R; Schwartz, E A

    1979-01-01

    1. Single, isolated, rod photoreceptors were obtained by enzymatic dissociation of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) retina. These solitary cells retained the morphological features of rods of the intact retina and could be maintained in culture for several days. Solitary cells were penetrated with one or two micropipettes and their electrophysiology was studied by the voltage-clamp technique. 2. Intracellular recording with two micropipettes demonstrated that the inner segment of a solitary rod was effectively isopotential with the outer segment. 3. The time course of the voltage response to a flash resembled that of responses observed in rods in the intact retina. At low light intensities the response reached a peak in approximately 0.7 sec and then slowly declined. At high light intensities the time to peak response decreased and an initial transient arose as the response, after reaching the peak, quickly decreased to a less polarized plateau. 4. The normal voltage response could be compared with the current observed during a voltage clamp. At low light intensities the time course of the current response resembled the time course of the voltage response. When light intensity was increased the time course of the current response differed from the voltage response in that the time to peak amplitude remained relatively constant and an initial transient did not occur. It was possible to predict the current response produced by any intensity of light by using (i) an empirical equation which reproduced the time course of a dim response and (ii) the Michaelis-Menten equation. 5. The time course of the voltage-clamp current produced by a flash was the same at different values of maintained voltage. 6. The maximum amplitude of the voltage-clamp current produced by a flash or step of light was a non-linear function of membrane potential. It was relatively constant within the physiological range, decreased as the membrane potential was moved toward 0 mV, reversed

  19. Studies of calcium channels in rat clonal pituitary cells with patch electrode voltage clamp

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Susumu; Ohmori, Harunori

    1982-01-01

    1. The properties of the Ca channel in tissue cultured clonal cells (GH3) isolated from a rat anterior pituitary tumour were studied with the patch electrode voltage-clamp technique. 2. To isolate the current through the Ca channel, the currents through the Na channel, the delayed K channel and the Ca2+ induced K channel were minimized by replacing the external Na+ with TEA+ and adding EGTA to the K-free solution inside the patch electrode. 3. The selectivity ratios through the Ca channel with different cations were 2·7 (Ba2+):1·6 (Sr2+):1·0 (Ca2+) and the m2 form of the activation kinetics and the relationships between the time constant and the membrane potential were common to the three divalent cations. 4. The amplitude of the Ba2+ current increased linearly with [Ba2+]o up to 25 mM and thereafter tended to show saturation. 5. The current—voltage relation showed a positive shift along the voltage axis as [Ba2+]o increased, probably due to the screening effect of Ba2+ on the negative surface charges. 6. The time constant of activation as a function of the membrane potential showed a parallel shift as [Ba2+]o was increased, suggesting that the activation kinetics were independent of the permeant ion concentration. 7. The time constant of the tail current was consistent with m2 kinetics for opening and closing of the Ca channel. 8. The extrapolated `instantaneous' tail current rapidly increased as the activating membrane potential became more positive and reached an apparent saturation at membrane potentials substantially more positive than the potential that gave the maximum peak inward current, and suggested that the single channel has a sigmoidal current—voltage relationship. 9. The power density spectrum obtained during the steady-state inward Ba2+ current had a cut-off frequency which was nearly voltage independent; this is expected if the fluctuation of the current originates from m2 activation kinetics. 10. The results of noise analysis suggest that

  20. The ventral photoreceptor cells of Limulus. 3. A voltage-clamp study.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, R; Mauro, A

    1969-09-01

    In the dark, the ventral photoreceptor of Limulus exhibits time-variant currents under voltage-clamp conditions; that is, if the membrane potential of the cell is clamped to a depolarized value there is an initial large outward current which slowly declines to a steady level. The current-voltage relation of the cell in the dark is nonlinear. The only ion tested which has any effect on the current-voltage relation is potassium; high potassium shifts the reversal potential towards zero and introduces a negative slope-conductance region. When the cell is illuminated under voltage-clamp conditions, an additional current, the light-induced current, flows across the cell membrane. The time course of this current mimics the time course of the light response (receptor potential) in the unclamped cell; namely, an initial transient phase is followed by a steady-state phase. The amplitude of the peak transient current can be as large as 60 times the amplitude of the steady-state current, while in the unclamped cell the amplitude of the peak transient voltage never exceeds 4 times the amplitude of the steady-state voltage. The current-voltage relations of the additional light-induced current obtained for different instants of time are also nonlinear, but differ from the current-voltage relations of the dark current. The ions tested which have the greatest effect on the light-induced current are sodium and calcium; low sodium decreases the current, while low calcium increases the current. The data strongly support the hypothesis that two systems of electric current exist in the membrane. Thus the total ionic current which flows in the membrane is accounted for as the sum of a dark current and a light-induced current. PMID:5806593

  1. The Anion Paradox in Sodium Taste Reception: Resolution by Voltage-Clamp Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qing; Heck, Gerard L.; Desimone, John A.

    1991-11-01

    Sodium salts are potent taste stimuli, but their effectiveness is markedly dependent on the anion, with chloride yielding the greatest response. The cellular mechanisms that mediate this phenomenon are not known. This "anion paradox" has been resolved by considering the field potential that is generated by restricted electrodiffusion of the anion through paracellular shunts between taste-bud cells. Neural responses to sodium chloride, sodium acetate, and sodium gluconate were studied while the field potential was voltage-clamped. Clamping at electronegative values eliminated the anion effect, whereas clamping at electropositive potentials exaggerated it. Thus, field potentials across the lingual epithelium modulate taste reception, indicating that the functional unit of taste reception includes the taste cell and its paracellular microenvironment.

  2. Single Cell Measurement of Dopamine Release with Simultaneous Voltage-clamp and Amperometry

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Kaustuv; Swant, Jarod; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2012-01-01

    After its release into the synaptic cleft, dopamine exerts its biological properties via its pre- and post-synaptic targets1. The dopamine signal is terminated by diffusion2-3, extracellular enzymes4, and membrane transporters5. The dopamine transporter, located in the peri-synaptic cleft of dopamine neurons clears the released amines through an inward dopamine flux (uptake). The dopamine transporter can also work in reverse direction to release amines from inside to outside in a process called outward transport or efflux of dopamine5. More than 20 years ago Sulzer et al. reported the dopamine transporter can operate in two modes of activity: forward (uptake) and reverse (efflux)5. The neurotransmitter released via efflux through the transporter can move a large amount of dopamine to the extracellular space, and has been shown to play a major regulatory role in extracellular dopamine homeostasis6. Here we describe how simultaneous patch clamp and amperometry recording can be used to measure released dopamine via the efflux mechanism with millisecond time resolution when the membrane potential is controlled. For this, whole-cell current and oxidative (amperometric) signals are measured simultaneously using an Axopatch 200B amplifier (Molecular Devices, with a low-pass Bessel filter set at 1,000 Hz for whole-cell current recording). For amperometry recording a carbon fiber electrode is connected to a second amplifier (Axopatch 200B) and is placed adjacent to the plasma membrane and held at +700 mV. The whole-cell and oxidative (amperometric) currents can be recorded and the current-voltage relationship can be generated using a voltage step protocol. Unlike the usual amperometric calibration, which requires conversion to concentration, the current is reported directly without considering the effective volume7. Thus, the resulting data represent a lower limit to dopamine efflux because some transmitter is lost to the bulk solution. PMID:23207721

  3. Crayfish stretch receptor: an investigation with voltage-clamp and ion-sensitive electrodes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H M; Ottoson, D; Rydqvist, B

    1978-01-01

    1. The membrane characteristics of the slowly adapting stretch receptor from the crayfish, Astacus fluviatilis, were examined with electrophysiological techniques consisting of membrane potential recording, voltage clamp and ion-sensitive microelectrodes. 2. The passive membrane current (Ip) following step changes of the membrane potential to levels above 0 mV required more than a minute to decay to a steady-state level. 3. The stretch-induced current (SIC, where SIC = Itotal--Ipassive) was not fully developed until the Ip had decayed to a steady state. 4. With Ip at the steady state and the stretch-induced current at the O-current potential, a slow stretch-induced inward current was isolated. The latter reaches a maximum after 1 sec of stretch and declines even more slowly after stretch. The I-V relation of the slow current had a negative slope and reversed sign near the resting potential. It is suggested that this current is due to a Cl- conductance change. 5. The stretch-induced current, consisting of a rapid transient phase and a steady component can be isolated from the slow stretch-induced current at a holding potential corresponding to the resting potential. 6. The SIC-Em relation is non-linear and reverses sign at about +15 mV. 7. In a given cell, the reversal potential of the stretch-induced potential change obtained with current clamp coincided with the 0-current potential of the stretch-induced current obtained by voltage clamp. The average value from twenty-six cells was +13 +/- 6.5 mV; cell to cell variability seemed to be correlated with dendrite length. 8. Tris (mol. wt. 121) or arginine (mol. wt. 174) susbstituted for Na+ reduces but does not abolish the stretch-induced current. 9. The permeability ratios of Tris:Na and arginine:Na were estimated from changes in the 0-current potential as these cations replaced Na+ in the external medium. The PTris:PNa was somewhat higher (0.31) than the Parginine:PNa ratio (0.25). 10. Changes in the external Ca2

  4. Numerical analysis of the voltage-clamp technique applied to frog neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, M E; Sevcik, C; Parthe, V

    1982-01-01

    The nonlinear cable equation was solved numerically by means of an implicit procedure. The correlation between end-plate length and fiber diameter was determined in frog (Rana pipiens) sartorius muscles stained with gold chloride (Löwit, 1875). The diameter of the fibers stained by the Löwit method was 80 (74-85) micron (median and its 95% confidence interval for 52 fibers), the length of the end plates in the same fibers was 382 (353-417) micron. The fibers simulated were 80 micron in diameter. To solve the equation the muscle fibers were represented by 500 segments 20 micron long, and the equation was solved in steps of 10 microseconds; a double exponential function was incorporated to the first seven segments to represent the neuromuscular junction. The potential of the first segment of the cable was set to the clamping level and the membrane potential of the remaining segments calculated. The current needed to hold the first segment was estimated by adding the current flowing through the first segment to the current flowing from it to the second segment. Our results indicate that the lack of space clamp in the point voltage-clamp studies of the frog neuromuscular junction introduces serious errors in the estimates of the end-plate conductance value, the kinetics of the conductance changes, and the reversal potential of the end-plate currents. The possibility of an efficient voltage-clamp technique is also explored. Our calculations suggest that the study of end-plate current and conductance is possible with little error if the end-plate potential is controlled at both ends of the synaptic area simultaneously. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:6981435

  5. Serotonin increases intracellular Ca2+ transients in voltage-clamped sensory neurons of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, M B; Klein, M; Smith, S J; Kandel, E R

    1984-01-01

    Noxious stimulation of the tail of Aplysia californica produces behavioral sensitization; it enhances several related defensive reflexes. This reflex enhancement involves heterosynaptic facilitation of transmitter release from sensory neurons of the reflex. The facilitation is stimulated by serotonin (5-HT) and involves suppression of a 5-HT-sensitive K+ current (the S current). Suppression of the S current broadens the action potential of the sensory neurons and is thought to enhance transmitter release by prolonging entry of Ca2+ in the presynaptic terminals. We now report a component of enhanced Ca2+ accumulation that is independent of changes in spike shape. We have measured intracellular free Ca2+ transients during long depolarizing steps in voltage-clamped sensory neuron cell bodies injected with the Ca2+-sensitive dye arsenazo III. The free Ca2+ transients elicited by a range of depolarizing voltage-clamp steps increase in amplitude by 75% following application of 5-HT. Since it is observed under voltage-clamp conditions, this increase in the free Ca2+ transients is not merely secondary to the changes in K+ current but must reflect an additional mechanism, an intrinsic change in the handling of Ca2+ by the cell. We have not yet determined whether this change in Ca2+ handling reflects an increase in Ca2+ influx, a reduction in intracellular Ca2+ uptake, or a release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Regardless of the underlying mechanism, however, it seems possible that the enhancement of Ca2+ accumulation and the reduction in K+ current act synergistically in producing short-term presynaptic facilitation. Alternatively, this additional modulation of Ca2+ by 5-HT might contribute to processes such as classical conditioning or long-term sensitization that may depend on Ca2+. PMID:6594707

  6. Sodium influxes in internally perfused squid giant axon during voltage clamp.

    PubMed

    Atwater, I; Bezanilla, F; Rojas, E

    1969-05-01

    1. An experimental method for measuring ionic influxes during voltage clamp in the giant axon of Dosidicus is described; the technique combines intracellular perfusion with a method for controlling membrane potential.2. Sodium influx determinations were carried out while applying rectangular pulses of membrane depolarization. The ratio ;measured sodium influx/computed ionic flux during the early current' is 0.92 +/- 0.12.3. Plots of measured sodium influx and computed ionic flux during the early current against membrane potential are very similar. There was evidence that the membrane potential at which the sodium influx vanishes is the potential at which the early current reverses. PMID:5767887

  7. Multiphysics model of a rat ventricular myocyte: A voltage-clamp study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to develop a comprehensive model of the electromechanical behavior of the rat ventricular myocyte to investigate the various factors influencing its contractile response. Methods Here, we couple a model of Ca2 + dynamics described in our previous work, with a well-known model of contractile mechanics developed by Rice, Wang, Bers and de Tombe to develop a composite multiphysics model of excitation-contraction coupling. This comprehensive cell model is studied under voltage clamp (VC) conditions, since it allows to focus our study on the elaborate Ca2 + signaling system that controls the contractile mechanism. Results We examine the role of various factors influencing cellular contractile response. In particular, direct factors such as the amount of activator Ca2 + available to trigger contraction and the type of mechanical load applied (resulting in isosarcometric, isometric or unloaded contraction) are investigated. We also study the impact of temperature (22 to 38°C) on myofilament contractile response. The critical role of myofilament Ca2 + sensitivity in modulating developed force is likewise studied, as is the indirect coupling of intracellular contractile mechanism with the plasma membrane via the Na + /Ca2 + exchanger (NCX). Finally, we demonstrate a key linear relationship between the rate of contraction and relaxation, which is shown here to be intrinsically coupled over the full range of physiological perturbations. Conclusions Extensive testing of the composite model elucidates the importance of various direct and indirect modulatory influences on cellular twitch response with wide agreement with measured data on all accounts. Thus, the model provides mechanistic insights into whole-cell responses to a wide variety of testing approaches used in studies of cardiac myofilament contractility that have appeared in the literature over the past several decades. PMID:23171697

  8. Voltage clamp measurements of sodium channel properties in rabbit cardiac Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed

    Colatsky, T J

    1980-08-01

    1. Voltage clamp studies of the excitatory sodium current, INa, were carried out in rabbit cardiac Purkinje fibres using th two-micro-electrode technique. Previous work has shown the rabbit Purkinje fibre to have relatively simple morphology (Sommer & Johnson, 1968) and electrical structure (Colatsky & Tsien, 1979a) compared to other cardiac preparations. 2. Non-uniformities in membrane potential were kept small by reducing the size of INa to less than 50 microA/cm2 of total membrane surface area through prepulse inactivation or removal of external sodium, Nao. Temporal resolution was improved by cooling to 10-26 degrees C. These adjustments did not greatly alter the measured properties of the sodium channel. 3. Under these conditions, sodium currents were recorded satisfying a number of criteria for adequate voltage control. Direct measurement of longitudinal non-uniformity using a second voltage electrode showed only small deviations at the time of peak current. 4. The properties of the sodium channel were examined using conventional protocols. Both peak sodium permeability, PNa, and steady-state sodium inactivation, h infinity, showed a sigmoidal dependence on membrane potential. PNa rose steeply with small depolarizations, increasing roughly e-fold per 3.2 mV, and reaching half-maximal activation at -30 +/- 2 mV. The h infinity -V curve had a midpoint of -74.9 +/- 2 mV and a reciprocal slope of 4.56 +/- 0.13 mV at temperatures of 10-19.5 degrees C, and showed a dependence on temperature, shifting to more negative potentials with cooling (approximately 3 mV/10 degrees C). Recovery of INa from inactivation in double pulse experiments followed a single exponential time course with time constants of 108-200 msec at 19 degrees C for holding potentials near -80 mV. No attempt was made to describe the activation kinetics because of uncertainties about the early time course of the current. 5. These data predict a maximum duration for INa of less than 1-2 msec and a

  9. Voltage-dependent clamp of intracellular pH of identified leech glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deitmer, J W; Schneider, H P

    1995-01-01

    1. The intracellular pH (pHi) was measured in voltage-clamped, giant neuropile glial cells in isolated segmental ganglia of the leech Hirudo medicinalis, using double-barrelled, pH-sensitive microelectrodes and a slow, two-electrode voltage-clamp system. The potential sensitivity of the pHi regulation in these glial cells was found to be due to an electrogenic Na(+)-HCO3- cotransporter (Deitmer & Szatkowski, 1990). 2. In the presence of 5% CO2 and 24 mM HCO3- (pH 7.4), pHi shifted by 1 pH unit per 110 mV, corresponding to a stoichiometry of 2HCO3-: 1 Na+ of the cotransporter, while in Hepes-buffered CO2-HCO3(-)-free saline (pH 7.4), pHi changed by 1 pH unit per 274 mV. The potential sensitivity of pHi decreased at lower pHo, being 1 pH unit per 216 mV at external pH (pHo) 7.0. 3. Changing pHo between 7.8 and 6.6 induced pHi shifts with a slope of 0.72 pHi units per pHo unit in non-clamped, and of 0.80 pHi units per pHo unit in voltage-clamped cells, indicating that pHi largely followed pHo. The electrochemical gradient of H(+)-HCO3- across the glial membrane was around 56 mV, and remained almost constant over this pHo range. 4. The membrane potential-dependent and pHo-sensitive shifts of pHi were unaffected by amiloride, an inhibitor of Na(+)-H+ exchange. 5. The intracellular acidification upon lowering pHo could be reversed by depolarizing the membrane as predicted from a cotransporter, whose equilibrium follows the membrane potential by resetting pHi. 6. The results indicate that the pHi of leech glial cells is dominated by the electrogenic Na(+)-HCO3- cotransporter, and is hence a function of the membrane potential, and the Na+ and H(+)-HCO3- gradients, across the cell membrane. PMID:7658370

  10. Intracellular calcium and its sodium-independent regulation in voltage-clamped snail neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, H J; Thomas, R C

    1995-01-01

    1. We have used both Ca(2+)-sensitive microelectrodes and fura-2 to measure the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i or its negative log, pCai) of snail neurones voltage clamped to -50 or -60 mV. Using Ca(2+)-sensitive microelectrodes, [Ca2+]i was found to be approximately 174 nM and pCai, 6.76 +/- 0.09 (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 11); using fura-2, [Ca2+]i was approximately 40 nM and pCai, 7.44 +/- 0.06 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 10). 2. Depolarizations (1-20 s) caused an increase in [Ca2+]i which was abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+, indicating that the rise in [Ca2+]i was due to Ca2+ influx through voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Caffeine (10-20 mM) caused an increase in [Ca2+]i in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+. The effects of caffeine on [Ca2+]i could be prevented by ryanodine. 4. Thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, caused a small increase in resting [Ca2+]i and slowed the rate of recovery from Ca2+ loads following 20 s depolarizations. 5. Neither replacement of extracellular sodium with N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG), nor loading the cells with intracellular sodium, had any effect on resting [Ca2+]i or the rate of recovery of [Ca2+]i following depolarizations. 6. The mitochondrial uncoupling agent carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCmP) caused a small gradual rise in resting [Ca2+]i. Removal of extracellular sodium during exposure to CCmP had no further effect on [Ca2+]i. 7. Intracellular orthovanadate caused an increase in resting [Ca2+]i and prevented the full recovery of [Ca2+]i following small Ca2+ loads, but removal of extracellular sodium did not cause a rise in [Ca2+]i. We conclude that there is no Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger present in the cell body of these neurones and that [Ca2+]i is maintained by an ATP-dependent Ca2+ pump. Images Figure 1 PMID:7623274

  11. A Numerical Approach to Ion Channel Modelling Using Whole-Cell Voltage-Clamp Recordings and a Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gurkiewicz, Meron; Korngreen, Alon

    2007-01-01

    The activity of trans-membrane proteins such as ion channels is the essence of neuronal transmission. The currently most accurate method for determining ion channel kinetic mechanisms is single-channel recording and analysis. Yet, the limitations and complexities in interpreting single-channel recordings discourage many physiologists from using them. Here we show that a genetic search algorithm in combination with a gradient descent algorithm can be used to fit whole-cell voltage-clamp data to kinetic models with a high degree of accuracy. Previously, ion channel stimulation traces were analyzed one at a time, the results of these analyses being combined to produce a picture of channel kinetics. Here the entire set of traces from all stimulation protocols are analysed simultaneously. The algorithm was initially tested on simulated current traces produced by several Hodgkin-Huxley–like and Markov chain models of voltage-gated potassium and sodium channels. Currents were also produced by simulating levels of noise expected from actual patch recordings. Finally, the algorithm was used for finding the kinetic parameters of several voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels models by matching its results to data recorded from layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the rat cortex in the nucleated outside-out patch configuration. The minimization scheme gives electrophysiologists a tool for reproducing and simulating voltage-gated ion channel kinetics at the cellular level. PMID:17784781

  12. X-ray microanalysis of single cardiac myocytes frozen under voltage-clamp conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt-Gallitelli, M.F.; Isenberg, G.

    1989-02-01

    By means of a patch pipette, an isolated ventricular myocyte was transferred into the taper of a silver holder covered by pioloform film. Once the cell was on the film, the cell was voltage clamped (pulses from -45 to +5 mV at 0.5 Hz). The amount of Ca entry was estimated from the Ca current. When contractility (cell shortening) was potentiated with either five pulses of 0.2 s or four pulses of 1 s, shock freezing was timed 116 or 816 ms after start of the clamp pulse. Electron micrographs from freeze-substituted cells revealed the good preservation of the intracellular compartments. The myocytes were cut at -150 degrees C, and the cryosections were freeze dried. In representative examples, the amount of Ca entry is compared with the subcellular Ca distribution as it is analyzed with energy dispersive X-ray microprobe analysis in cytoplasm, junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), mitochondria, and the subsarcolemmal space (sarcolemma, peripheral SR, fringe of cytosol).

  13. Effects of stimulating the acetylcholine receptor on the current-voltage relationships of the smooth muscle membrane studied by voltage clamp of potential recorded by micro-electrode.

    PubMed

    Bolton, T B

    1975-08-01

    1. A double sucrose-gap voltage-clamp technique is described for use on smooth muscle strips longer than about 2 mm. It involves intracellular recording by microelectrode of the membrane potential of a narrow region of the strip ("node") sandwiched between two streams of deionized sucrose solution. Current was passed into the node across one or both sucrose streams. 2. Preliminary experiments in which potential was recorded intracellularly at two points during polarization of a "short cable" preparation, formed by folding over a strip of smooth muscle, suggested that a node width of less than 0-15 mm was needed to achieve uniform potential during inward current flow. However, when node width between sucrose-gaps was reduced to 0-5 mm, spontaneous electrical activity was lost, and below 0-5 mm spike threshold was raised and the regenerative spike became graded. The currents flowing during the application of rectangular voltage-clamp command potentials were described. 3. Using taenia smooth muscle it was shown by recording with a second, independent micro-electrode that potential was not uniform for up to 200 ms or more following a step change in potential under voltage-clamp in nodes 0-4-0-5 mm wide where current was passed across both sucrose gaps. However, reasonably uniform nodal potentials were obtained using ramps with relatively slow rates of rise (25 mV/s). 4. Using such slow ramp commands under voltage clamp, the effects of carbachol on the current-voltage relationship of longitudinal muscle of ileum and taenia were studied in hypertonic solution. 5. In the presence of carbachol (10(-6) to 10(-5) g/ml.) additional inward current flowed across the membrane (in some experiments an equilibrium potential was observed at which this current reversed direction). The magnitude of this additional current was linearly related to potential at potentials negative to the resting potential. At potentials positive to the resting membrane potential, this additional current

  14. A Novel Method for the Description of Voltage-Gated Ionic Currents Based on Action Potential Clamp Results—Application to Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Boutons

    PubMed Central

    Clay, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Action potential clamp (AP-clamp) recordings of the delayed rectifier K+ current IK and the fast-activated Na+ current INa in rat hippocampal mossy fiber boutons (MFBs) are analyzed using a computational technique recently reported. The method is implemented using a digitized AP from an MFB and computationally applying that data set to published models of IK and INa. These numerical results are compared with experimental AP-clamp recordings. The INa result is consistent with experiment; the IK result is not. The difficulty with the IK model concerns the fully activated current-voltage relation, which is described here by the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz dependence on the driving force (V-EK) rather than (V-EK) itself, the standard model for this aspect of ion permeation. That revision leads to the second—a much steeper voltage dependent activation curve for IK than the one obtained from normalization of a family of IK records by (V-EK). The revised model provides an improved description of the AP-clamp measurement of IK in MFBs compared with the standard approach. The method described here is general. It can be used to test models of ionic currents in any excitable cell. In this way it provides a novel approach to the relationship between ionic current and membrane excitability in neurons. PMID:26793065

  15. Single cardiac Purkinje cells: general electrophysiology and voltage-clamp analysis of the pace-maker current.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, G; Carmeliet, E; Vereecke, J

    1984-04-01

    Single Purkinje cells from dog, sheep and cow hearts were isolated by injecting a Ca-free collagenase containing Tyrode solution in the space between the connective tissue sheath and the Purkinje cells. A small proportion of these cells survived the isolation procedure and these cells were used for further investigation. The cells showed electrophysiological properties similar to intact Purkinje fibres as indicated by the following results. Maximum diastolic potentials between -70 and -85 mV and specific membrane resistances of 21-32 k omega cm2 indicated that the single cells were not leaky or hyperpermeable . The action potential showed a rapid upstroke, with a maximum rate of rise, Vmax' between 150 and 750 V/s, and two phases of fast repolarization separated by a plateau phase with a duration of about 200 ms. Each action potential was followed by a spontaneous depolarization with an amplitude between 1 and 10 mV. The upstroke of the action potential could be blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX) in a dose-dependent manner. The rate of depolarization of the action potential was sensitive to changes in membrane potential; the resulting S-shaped curve showed a half-maximum potential of -65 mV and a steepness of 0.46 mV-1. The duration of the action potential was sensitive to external K concentrations, catecholamines and TTX in a way similar to intact Purkinje fibres. Both application of catecholamines and lowering the external K concentration induced spontaneous activity. The cells were used to study the ionic nature of the pace-maker current under voltage-clamp conditions using the two-micro-electrode technique. This pace-maker current was blocked in a voltage-dependent manner by 1 mM-Cs, and was not affected by 1 mM-Ba. The steady-state activation curve was shifted in the depolarizing direction by application of adrenaline. In contrast to voltage-clamp data obtained on the pace-maker current of intact Purkinje fibres, the pace-maker current in a single cell did not

  16. Voltage clamp of bull-frog cardiac pace-maker cells: a quantitative analysis of potassium currents.

    PubMed Central

    Giles, W R; Shibata, E F

    1985-01-01

    Spontaneously active single cells have been obtained from the sinus venosus region of the bull-frog, Rana catesbeiana, using an enzymic dispersion procedure involving serial applications of trypsin, collagenase and elastase in nominally 0 Ca2+ Ringer solution. These cells have normal action potentials and fire spontaneously at a rate very similar to the intact sinus venosus. A single suction micro-electrode technique (Hamill, Marty, Neher, Sakmann & Sigworth, 1981; Hume & Giles, 1983) has been used to record the spontaneous diastolic depolarizations or pace-maker activity as well as the regenerative action potentials in these cells. This electrophysiological activity is completely insensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX; 3 X 10(-6) M) and is very similar to that recorded from an in vitro sinus venosus preparation. The present experiments were aimed at identifying the transmembrane potassium currents, and analysing their role(s) in the development of the pace-maker potential and the repolarization of the action potential. Depolarizing voltage-clamp steps from the normal maximum diastolic potential (-75 mV) elicit a time- and voltage-dependent activation of an outward current. The reversal potential of this current in normal Ringer solution [( K+]0 2.5 mM) is near -95 mV; and it shifts by 51 mV per tenfold increase in [K+]0, which strongly suggests that this current is carried by K+. We therefore labelled it IK. The reversal potential of IK did not shift in the positive direction following very long (20 s) depolarizing clamp steps to +20 mV, indicating that 'extracellular' accumulation of [K+]0 does not produce any significant artifacts. The fully activated instantaneous current-voltage (I-V) relationship for IK is approximately linear over the range of potentials -130 to -30 mV. Thus, the ion transfer mechanism of IK may be described as a simple ohmic conductance in this range of potentials. Positive relative to -30 mV, however, the I-V exhibits significant inward

  17. An accurate online calibration system based on combined clamp-shape coil for high voltage electronic current transformers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-hua; Li, Hong-bin; Zhang, Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Electronic transformers are widely used in power systems because of their wide bandwidth and good transient performance. However, as an emerging technology, the failure rate of electronic transformers is higher than that of traditional transformers. As a result, the calibration period needs to be shortened. Traditional calibration methods require the power of transmission line be cut off, which results in complicated operation and power off loss. This paper proposes an online calibration system which can calibrate electronic current transformers without power off. In this work, the high accuracy standard current transformer and online operation method are the key techniques. Based on the clamp-shape iron-core coil and clamp-shape air-core coil, a combined clamp-shape coil is designed as the standard current transformer. By analyzing the output characteristics of the two coils, the combined clamp-shape coil can achieve verification of the accuracy. So the accuracy of the online calibration system can be guaranteed. Moreover, by employing the earth potential working method and using two insulating rods to connect the combined clamp-shape coil to the high voltage bus, the operation becomes simple and safe. Tests in China National Center for High Voltage Measurement and field experiments show that the proposed system has a high accuracy of up to 0.05 class. PMID:23902112

  18. An accurate online calibration system based on combined clamp-shape coil for high voltage electronic current transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhen-hua; Li, Hong-bin; Zhang, Zhi

    2013-07-15

    Electronic transformers are widely used in power systems because of their wide bandwidth and good transient performance. However, as an emerging technology, the failure rate of electronic transformers is higher than that of traditional transformers. As a result, the calibration period needs to be shortened. Traditional calibration methods require the power of transmission line be cut off, which results in complicated operation and power off loss. This paper proposes an online calibration system which can calibrate electronic current transformers without power off. In this work, the high accuracy standard current transformer and online operation method are the key techniques. Based on the clamp-shape iron-core coil and clamp-shape air-core coil, a combined clamp-shape coil is designed as the standard current transformer. By analyzing the output characteristics of the two coils, the combined clamp-shape coil can achieve verification of the accuracy. So the accuracy of the online calibration system can be guaranteed. Moreover, by employing the earth potential working method and using two insulating rods to connect the combined clamp-shape coil to the high voltage bus, the operation becomes simple and safe. Tests in China National Center for High Voltage Measurement and field experiments show that the proposed system has a high accuracy of up to 0.05 class.

  19. Effects of Na+ and Ca2+ gradients on intracellular free Ca2+ in voltage-clamped Aplysia neurons.

    PubMed

    Levy, S; Tillotson, D

    1988-12-01

    Selected neurons of the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica were voltage-clamped and intracellular free Ca [( Ca2+]i) and Na [( Na+]i) concentrations were monitored with ion selective microelectrodes. Reducing [Na+]o from 500 mM (normal seawater, NSW) to 5 mM resulted in a decrease of the potential measured by the Ca electrode (VCa). Increasing [Ca2+]o from 10 to 50 mM increased [Ca2+]i two-fold, keeping [Ca2+]o at 50 mM and decreasing [Na+]o to 5 mM still led to a decrease in VCa. With 100 mM [Ca2+]o, which also increased [Ca2+]i, decreasing [Na+]o increased VCa in two of the eight cells tested. This indicates that in normal or moderately high resting [Ca2+]i, Ca2+ extrusion by Na/Ca exchange (forward mode) is not essential for [Ca2+]i buffering. [Na+]i was 12.9 +/- 3.6 mM (S.E.M., n = 7) in NSW; reducing [Na+]o to 5 mM decreased [Na+]i to 2.0 +/- 1.1 mM (S.E.M.). Keeping [Na+]o at 5 mM and increasing [Ca2+]o from 10 to 20 mM further decreased [Na+]i to about 1.0 mM, evidence of Na/Ca exchange operating in the reverse mode. Attempts to increase [Ca2+]i by bath application of the Ca ionophores A23187, X537A, ionomycin or ETH 1001 resulted in no measurable change of the resting [Ca2+]i. Application of Ouabain caused an apparent increase in [Ca2+]i in two of the six cells tested. In cells injected with the metallochromic indicator arsenazo III (AIII), the rate of the falling phase of the AIII absorbance increase, following a voltage-clamp pulse, was significantly slower in 5 mM [Na+]o. This indicates that in its forward mode Na-Ca exchange is active in clearing large submembrane increases in [Ca2+]i. PMID:3208137

  20. Curvature-driven pore growth in charged membranes during charge-pulse and voltage-clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Jens H; Vernon, Dan; Grant, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We find that curvature-driven growth of pores in electrically charged membranes correctly reproduces charge-pulse experiments. Our model, consisting of a Langevin equation for the time dependence of the pore radius coupled to an ordinary differential equation for the number of pores, captures the statistics of the pore population and its effect on the membrane conductance. The calculated pore radius is a linear, and not an exponential, function of time, as observed experimentally. Two other important features of charge-pulse experiments are recovered: pores reseal for low and high voltages but grow irreversibly for intermediate values of the voltage. Our set of coupled ordinary differential equations is equivalent to the partial differential equation used previously to study pore dynamics, but permits the study of longer timescales necessary for the simulations of voltage-clamp experiments. An effective phase diagram for such experiments is obtained. PMID:19186129

  1. A DC-Voltage-Balancing Circuit for a Five-Level Diode-Clamped PWM Inverter Intended for Motor Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Kazunori; Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper proposes a new dc-voltage-balancing circuit for a five-level diode-clamped inverter intended for a medium-voltage motor drive. This circuit consists of two unidirectional choppers and a single coupled inductor with two galvanically-isolated windings. The dc magnetic fluxes in the magnetic core, which are generated by the two windings, cancel out each other. Therefore, the inductor does not generate any dc-magnetic flux in the magnetic core. This makes the inductor compact by a factor of six compared to previously used balancing circuits containing two non-coupled inductors. Experimental results obtained from a 200-V 5.5-kW downscaled model verify that the dc mean voltages of the four split dc capacitors are balanced well under all operating conditions.

  2. Curvature-Driven Pore Growth in Charged Membranes during Charge-Pulse and Voltage-Clamp Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Jens H.; Vernon, Dan; Grant, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We find that curvature-driven growth of pores in electrically charged membranes correctly reproduces charge-pulse experiments. Our model, consisting of a Langevin equation for the time dependence of the pore radius coupled to an ordinary differential equation for the number of pores, captures the statistics of the pore population and its effect on the membrane conductance. The calculated pore radius is a linear, and not an exponential, function of time, as observed experimentally. Two other important features of charge-pulse experiments are recovered: pores reseal for low and high voltages but grow irreversibly for intermediate values of the voltage. Our set of coupled ordinary differential equations is equivalent to the partial differential equation used previously to study pore dynamics, but permits the study of longer timescales necessary for the simulations of voltage-clamp experiments. An effective phase diagram for such experiments is obtained. PMID:19186129

  3. Sperm Patch-Clamp

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Polina; Clapham, David E.; Navarro, Betsy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    Sperm intracellular pH and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) are two central factors that control sperm activity within the female reproductive tract. As such, the ion channels of the sperm plasma membrane that alter intracellular sperm [Ca2+] and pH play important roles in sperm physiology and the process of fertilization. Indeed, sperm ion channels regulate sperm motility, control sperm chemotaxis toward the egg in some species, and may trigger the acrosome reaction. Until recently, our understanding of these important molecules was rudimentary due to the inability to patch-clamp spermatozoa and directly record the activity of these ion channels under voltage clamp. Recently, we overcame this technical barrier and developed a method for reproducible application of the patch-clamp technique to mouse and human spermatozoa. This chapter covers important aspects of application of the patch-clamp technique to spermatozoa, such as selection of the electrophysiological equipment, isolation of spermatozoa for patch-clamp experiments, formation of the gigaohm seal with spermatozoa, and transition into the whole-cell mode of recording. We also discuss potential pitfalls in application of the patch-clamp technique to flagellar ion channels. PMID:23522465

  4. Mechanism of action of ketamine in the current and voltage clamped myelinated nerve fibre of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, E.; Carratù, M. R.; Dubois, J. M.; Mitolo-Chieppa, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the general anaesthetic ketamine, on the frog isolated node of Ranvier, were studied under current and voltage clamp conditions. Ketamine (0.5 and 1 mM) reversibly decreased the amplitude of the action potential and increased both the duration of the action potential and the threshold potential. When the K current was blocked, spontaneous action potentials appeared after washout of the drug. Ketamine rapidly blocked the Na current and more slowly modified a fraction of Na channels (about 10%) to give rise to a non-inactivatable (late) Na current. After washout of the drug, the block reversed more rapidly than the ketamine-induced late Na current disappeared. Steady-state outward, peak Na and ketamine-induced late Na currents were rapidly and reversibly blocked by ketamine with an apparent dissociation constant of 0.7 mM. Both peak Na and ketamine-induced late Na currents were reversibly blocked by procaine. PMID:2420405

  5. Electrophysiological Characterization of Na,K-ATPases Expressed in Xenopus laevis Oocytes Using Two-Electrode Voltage Clamping.

    PubMed

    Hilbers, Florian; Poulsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The transport of three Na(+) per two K(+) means that the Na,K-ATPase is electrogenic, and though the currents generated by the ion pump are small compared to ion channel currents, they can be measured using electrophysiology, both steady-state pumping and individual steps in the transport cycle. Various electrophysiological techniques have been used to study the endogenous pumps of the squid giant axon and of cardiac myocytes from for example rabbits. Here, we describe the characterization of heterologously expressed Na,K-ATPases using two-electrode voltage clamping (TEVC) and oocytes from the Xenopus laevis frog as the model cell. With this system, the effects of particular mutations can be studied, including the numerous mutations that in later years have been found to cause human diseases. PMID:26695042

  6. The checkpoint clamp activates Mec1 kinase during initiation of the DNA damage checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Majka, Jerzy; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Burgers, Peter M. J.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Yeast Mec1/Ddc2 protein kinase, the ortholog of human ATR/ATRIP, plays a central role in the DNA-damage checkpoint. The PCNA-like clamp Rad17/Mec3/Ddc1 (the 9-1-1 complex in human) and its loader Rad24-RFC are also essential components of this signal transduction pathway. Here we have studied the role of the clamp in regulating Mec1, and delineate how the signal generated by DNA lesions is transduced to the Rad53 effector kinase. The checkpoint clamp greatly activates the kinase activity of Mec1, but only if the clamp is appropriately loaded upon partial duplex DNA. Activated Mec1 phosphorylates the Ddc1 and Mec3 subunits of the clamp, the Rad24 subunit of the loader, and the Rpa1 and Rpa2 subunits of RPA. Phosphorylation of Rad53, and of human PHAS-1, a non-specific target, also requires a properly loaded clamp. Phosphorylation and binding studies with individual clamp subunits indicate that the Ddc1 subunit mediates the functional interactions with Mec1. PMID:17189191

  7. The checkpoint clamp activates Mec1 kinase during initiation of the DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Majka, Jerzy; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Burgers, Peter M J

    2006-12-28

    Yeast Mec1/Ddc2 protein kinase, the ortholog of human ATR/ATRIP, plays a central role in the DNA damage checkpoint. The PCNA-like clamp Rad17/Mec3/Ddc1 (the 9-1-1 complex in human) and its loader Rad24-RFC are also essential components of this signal transduction pathway. Here we have studied the role of the clamp in regulating Mec1, and we delineate how the signal generated by DNA lesions is transduced to the Rad53 effector kinase. The checkpoint clamp greatly activates the kinase activity of Mec1, but only if the clamp is appropriately loaded upon partial duplex DNA. Activated Mec1 phosphorylates the Ddc1 and Mec3 subunits of the clamp, the Rad24 subunit of the loader, and the Rpa1 and Rpa2 subunits of RPA. Phosphorylation of Rad53, and of human PHAS-1, a nonspecific target, also requires a properly loaded clamp. Phosphorylation and binding studies with individual clamp subunits indicate that the Ddc1 subunit mediates the functional interactions with Mec1. PMID:17189191

  8. Correlation of 125I-LSD autoradiographic labeling with serotonin voltage clamp responses in Aplysia neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.; Kadan, M.J.; Hartig, P.R.; Carpenter, D.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Autoradiographic receptor binding studies using 125I-LSD (2-(125I)lysergic acid diethyamide) revealed intense labelling on the soma of a symmetrically located pair of cells in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. This binding was blocked by micromolar concentrations of serotonin and lower concentrations of the serotonergic antagonists, cyproheptadine and mianserin. Electrophysiological investigation of responses to serotonin of neurons in the left upper quadrant, where one of the labeled neurons is located, revealed a range of serotonin responses. Cells L3 and L6 have a K+ conductance increase in response to serotonin that is not blocked by cyproheptadine or mianserin. Cells L2 and L4 have a biphasic response to serotonin: a Na+ conductance increase, which can be blocked by cyproheptadine and mianserin, followed by a voltage dependent Ca2+ conductance which is blocked by Co2+ but not the serotonergic antagonists. Cell L1, and its symmetrical pair, R1, have in addition to the Na+ and Ca2+ responses observed in L2 and L4, a Cl- conductance increase blocked by LSD, cyproheptadine and mianserin. LSD had little effect on the other responses. The authors conclude that the symmetrically located cells L1 and R1 have a Cl- channel linked to a cyproheptadine- and mianserin-sensitive serotonin receptor that is selectively labelled by 125I-LSD. This receptor has many properties in common with the mammalian serotonin 1C receptor.

  9. Phosphatase activity of the voltage-sensing phosphatase, VSP, shows graded dependence on the extent of activation of the voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Souhei; Okamura, Yasushi

    2014-03-01

    The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) consists of a voltage sensor and a cytoplasmic phosphatase region, and the movement of the voltage sensor is coupled to the phosphatase activity. However, its coupling mechanisms still remain unclear. One possible scenario is that the phosphatase is activated only when the voltage sensor is in a fully activated state. Alternatively, the enzymatic activity of single VSP proteins could be graded in distinct activated states of the voltage sensor, and partial activation of the voltage sensor could lead to partial activation of the phosphatase. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we studied a voltage sensor mutant of zebrafish VSP, where the voltage sensor moves in two steps as evidenced by analyses of charge movements of the voltage sensor and voltage clamp fluorometry. Measurements of the phosphatase activity toward phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate revealed that both steps of voltage sensor activation are coupled to the tuning of phosphatase activities, consistent with the idea that the phosphatase activity is graded by the magnitude of the movement of the voltage sensor. PMID:24277865

  10. Charlie's Clamp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarino, Janet Z.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a version of the crush-the-can demonstration which is a hands-on activity in which students use an inexpensive, easily made holder for the can called Charlie's clamp. Includes some suggestions for the follow-up discussion. (DDR)

  11. Post clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K. (Inventor); Meyn, Erwin H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A pair of spaced collars are mounted at right angles on a clamp body by retaining rings which enable the collars to rotate with respect to the clamp body. Mounting posts extend through aligned holes in the collars and clamp body. Each collar can be clamped onto the inserted post while the clamp body remains free to rotate about the post and collar. The clamp body is selectively clamped onto each post.

  12. Analysis of the effects of calcium or magnesium on voltage-clamp currents in perfused squid axons bathed in solutions of high potassium.

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Taylor, R E; Atwater, I; Bezanilla, F

    1969-10-01

    Isolated axons from the squid, Dosidicus gigas, were internally perfused with potassium fluoride solutions. Membrane currents were measured following step changes of membrane potential in a voltage-clamp arrangement with external isosmotic solution changes in the order: potassium-free artificial seawater; potassium chloride; potassium chloride containing 10, 25, 40 or 50, mM calcium or magnesium; and potassium-free artificial seawater. The following results suggest that the currents measured under voltage clamp with potassium outside and inside can be separated into two components and that one of them, the predominant one, is carried through the potassium system. (a) Outward currents in isosmotic potassium were strongly and reversibly reduced by tetraethylammonium chloride. (b) Without calcium or magnesium a progressive increase in the nontime-dependent component of the currents (leakage) occurred. (c) The restoration of calcium or magnesium within 15-30 min decreases this leakage. (d) With 50 mM divalent ions the steady-state current-voltage curve was nonlinear with negative resistance as observed in intact axons in isosmotic potassium. (e) The time-dependent components of the membrane currents were not clearly affected by calcium or magnesium. These results show a strong dependence of the leakage currents on external calcium or magnesium concentration but provide no support for the involvement of calcium or magnesium in the kinetics of the potassium system. PMID:5823216

  13. A voltage-activated proton current in human cardiac fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    El Chemaly, Antoun; Guinamard, Romain; Demion, Marie; Fares, Nassim; Jebara, Victor; Faivre, Jean-Francois; Bois, Patrick . E-mail: patrick.bois@univ-poitiers.fr

    2006-02-10

    A voltage-activated proton current in human cardiac fibroblasts, measured using the whole-cell recording configuration of the patch-clamp technique, is reported. Increasing the pH of the bathing solution shifted the current activation threshold to more negative potentials and increased both the current amplitude and its rate of activation. Changing the pH gradient by one unit caused a 51 mV shift in the reversal potential of the current, demonstrating a high selectivity for protons of the channel carrying the current. Extracellularly applied Zn{sup 2+} reversibly inhibited the current. Activation of the current contributes to the resting membrane conductance under conditions of intracellular acidosis. It is proposed that this current in cardiac fibroblasts is involved in the regulation of the intracellular pH and the membrane potential under physiological conditions as well as in response to pathological conditions such as ischemia.

  14. A voltage-clamp study of the permeability change induced by quanta of transmitter at the mouse end-plate.

    PubMed Central

    Linder, T M; Quastel, D M

    1978-01-01

    1. Miniature end-plate currents (m.e.p.c.s) were recorded from mouse diaphragm using a point voltage-clamp. The relation between m.e.p.c. amplitude and membrane potential was determined in bathing solutions of varied composition. 2. In solution containing normal sodium the relation between m.e.p.c. height and membrane potential (Im.e.p.c./Vm relation) was always linear, at least in the range +30 to -100 mV; the reversal potential (Vr) at which Im.e.p.c. was zero was close to 0. The slope of the Im.e.p.c./Vm line varied little between junctions (coefficient of variation about 20%) and was about 50 nS, or 1nA per 20 mV. The Im.e.p.c./Vm relation was not altered by withdrawal of Ca2+, addition of ethanol, or substitution of NO-3 or SO2-(4) for Cl-. 3. Alteration of K+ concentration in the bathing medium, in the range 10 to 1 mM, had no apparent effect on the Im.e.p.c./Vm relation. 4. Reduction of Na+ concentration, with isosmotic substitution of sucrose, caused rapid alteration of the Im.e.p.c./Vm relation, which became rectifying, with a slope at negative Vm less than at positive Vm. Vr was shifted in the negative direction. Quantitatively these changes were close to those predicted by the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz formulation for permeation of monovalent ions through a membrane with constant field. 5. In solution with low Na+ (2 mM) and partial substitution of K+ for Na+, the Im.e.p.c./Vm relation was indistinguishable from that in solutions with Na" as the predominant extracellular cation. With complete substitution of K+ for Na+ the Im.e.p.c./Vm relation was a little less steep (at negative Vm) than in Na+ solution and Vr was shifted slightly in the negative direction. 6. With substitution of NH+4 for Na+, the Im.e.p.c./Vm relation was little changed (about 10% steeper at negative Vm). With substitution of Li+ for Na+, the Im.e.p.c./Vm relation remained linear, but was made less steep, at positive as well as negative Vm, and Vr was shifted slightly in the positive

  15. Characterization of active hair-bundle motility by a mechanical-load clamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Joshua D.; Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid Ó.; Fabella, Brian A.; Tobin, Mélanie; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Active hair-bundle motility endows hair cells with several traits that augment auditory stimuli. The activity of a hair bundle might be controlled by adjusting its mechanical properties. Indeed, the mechanical properties of bundles vary between different organisms and along the tonotopic axis of a single auditory organ. Motivated by these biological differences and a dynamical model of hair-bundle motility, we explore how adjusting the mass, drag, stiffness, and offset force applied to a bundle control its dynamics and response to external perturbations. Utilizing a mechanical-load clamp, we systematically mapped the two-dimensional state diagram of a hair bundle. The clamp system used a real-time processor to tightly control each of the virtual mechanical elements. Increasing the stiffness of a hair bundle advances its operating point from a spontaneously oscillating regime into a quiescent regime. As predicted by a dynamical model of hair-bundle mechanics, this boundary constitutes a Hopf bifurcation.

  16. Suppression of the Work-Piece Vibrations in Milling Using Active Clamp System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parus, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Okulik, T.

    The machining is always accompanied by vibration. In certain cases the level of vibration is very high and may cause shortening of the tool life, poor quality of machined surface. Operational speed and machined surface depend on dynamic stability of three components of the machine tool-cutting system: the cutting tool, the machine tool structure, the work-piece and the clamping system. To assure stable machining, parameters of the cutting process have to be tuned and frequently the machining productivity is decreased. For this reasons different types of systems are developed for suppressing the work-piece vibration. In some cases an additional modification of the work-piece is allowed and mounting the vibration absorber is possible. The paper describes a modification of the work-piece dynamic properties using active clamp system. In comparison to the vibration absorbers this solution has a great advantageous - adaptation of the work-piece is not necessary. In the paper the simulation results of different variants of milling process with work-piece mounted using the active clamp are presented. Piezo actuators are used in order to assure active influence on the work-piece. The aim of the state space feedback control system is to minimize the amplitude of the vibration during machining process.

  17. Rigid clamp

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, G.L.; Burt, J.D.

    1994-07-12

    The invention relates to a clamp mechanism that can be used to attach or temporarily support objects inside of tubular goods. The clamp mechanism can also be modified so that it grips objects. The clamp has a self-centering feature to accommodate out-of-roundness or other internal defections in tubular objects such as pipe. A plurality of clamping shoes are expanded by a linkage which is preferably powered by a motor to contact the inside of a pipe. The motion can be reversed and jaw elements can be connected to the linkage so as to bring the jaws together to grab an object. 12 figs.

  18. Rigid clamp

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, Gilbert L.; Burt, Jack D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a clamp mechanism that can be used to attach or temporarily support objects inside of tubular goods. The clamp mechanism can also be modified so that it grips objects. The clamp has a self-centering feature to accommodate out-of-roundness or other internal defections in tubular objects such as pipe. A plurality of clamping shoes are expanded by a linkage which is preferably powered by a motor to contact the inside of a pipe. The motion can be reversed and jaw elements can be connected to the linkage so as to bring the jaws together to grab an object.

  19. Adhesive curing through low-voltage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jianfeng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Jian Lin; Webster, Richard D.; Steele, Terry W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Instant curing adhesives typically fall within three categories, being activated by either light (photocuring), heat (thermocuring) or chemical means. These curing strategies limit applications to specific substrates and can only be activated under certain conditions. Here we present the development of an instant curing adhesive through low-voltage activation. The electrocuring adhesive is synthesized by grafting carbene precursors on polyamidoamine dendrimers and dissolving in aqueous solvents to form viscous gels. The electrocuring adhesives are activated at −2 V versus Ag/AgCl, allowing tunable crosslinking within the dendrimer matrix and on both electrode surfaces. As the applied voltage discontinued, crosslinking immediately terminated. Thus, crosslinking initiation and propagation are observed to be voltage and time dependent, enabling tuning of both material properties and adhesive strength. The electrocuring adhesive has immediate implications in manufacturing and development of implantable bioadhesives. PMID:26282730

  20. Fast and slow activation kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Gilly, W F; Gillette, R; McFarlane, M

    1997-05-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Na current (I(Na)) were made under identical experimental conditions from isolated neurons from cephalopod (Loligo, Octopus) and gastropod (Aplysia, Pleurobranchaea, Doriopsilla) species to compare properties of activation gating. Voltage dependence of peak Na conductance (gNa) is very similar in all cases, but activation kinetics in the gastropod neurons studied are markedly slower. Kinetic differences are very pronounced only over the voltage range spanned by the gNa-voltage relation. At positive and negative extremes of voltage, activation and deactivation kinetics of I(Na) are practically indistinguishable in all species studied. Voltage-dependent rate constants underlying activation of the slow type of Na channel found in gastropods thus appear to be much more voltage dependent than are the equivalent rates in the universally fast type of channel that predominates in cephalopods. Voltage dependence of inactivation kinetics shows a similar pattern and is representative of activation kinetics for the two types of Na channels. Neurons with fast Na channels can thus make much more rapid adjustments in the number of open Na channels at physiologically relevant voltages than would be possible with only slow Na channels. This capability appears to be an adaptation that is highly evolved in cephalopods, which are well known for their high-speed swimming behaviors. Similarities in slow and fast Na channel subtypes in molluscan and mammalian neurons are discussed. PMID:9163364

  1. Microchip amplifier for in vitro, in vivo, and automated whole cell patch-clamp recording.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Reid R; Kolb, Ilya; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Chubykin, Alexander A; Yang, Aimei; Bear, Mark F; Boyden, Edward S; Forest, Craig R

    2015-02-15

    Patch clamping is a gold-standard electrophysiology technique that has the temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio capable of reporting single ion channel currents, as well as electrical activity of excitable single cells. Despite its usefulness and decades of development, the amplifiers required for patch clamping are expensive and bulky. This has limited the scalability and throughput of patch clamping for single-ion channel and single-cell analyses. In this work, we have developed a custom patch-clamp amplifier microchip that can be fabricated using standard commercial silicon processes capable of performing both voltage- and current-clamp measurements. A key innovation is the use of nonlinear feedback elements in the voltage-clamp amplifier circuit to convert measured currents into logarithmically encoded voltages, thereby eliminating the need for large high-valued resistors, a factor that has limited previous attempts at integration. Benchtop characterization of the chip shows low levels of current noise [1.1 pA root mean square (rms) over 5 kHz] during voltage-clamp measurements and low levels of voltage noise (8.2 μV rms over 10 kHz) during current-clamp measurements. We demonstrate the ability of the chip to perform both current- and voltage-clamp measurement in vitro in HEK293FT cells and cultured neurons. We also demonstrate its ability to perform in vivo recordings as part of a robotic patch-clamping system. The performance of the patch-clamp amplifier microchip compares favorably with much larger commercial instrumentation, enabling benchtop commoditization, miniaturization, and scalable patch-clamp instrumentation. PMID:25429119

  2. Hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor activation enhances voltage-dependent Ca2+ conductances: relevance to brain aging.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, D S; Campbell, L W; Thibault, O; Landfield, P W

    1992-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) activate several biochemical/molecular processes in the hippocampus through two receptor types. In addition, GCs influence cognitive behaviors and hippocampal neural activity and can also increase the rate of aging-dependent cell loss in the hippocampus. However, the ionic mechanisms through which GCs modulate hippocampal neuronal function are not well understood. We report here direct evidence that activation of cytosolic steroid receptors, specifically of the type II GC receptor, can enhance voltage-dependent Ca2+ conductances in brain neurons. Ca2+ current was assessed by current-clamp measures of Ca2+ action potentials and by sharp electrode voltage-clamp analyses of voltage-sensitive currents in cesium-, tetrodotoxin-, and tetraethylammonium-treated CA1 neurons in hippocampal slices. Both Ca2+ action potentials and voltage-activated Ca2+ currents (N- and L-like) were increased by 2-hr exposure to the synthetic GC receptor agonist, RU 28362. This effect of RU 28362 was blocked by coincubation with cycloheximide, indicating that the GC receptor-Ca2+ channel interaction depends on de novo protein synthesis. Dysregulated calcium homeostasis is also viewed as a candidate mechanism in brain aging. Thus, present results are consistent with the hypothesis that excessive GC-receptor activation and resultant increased Ca2+ influx may be two sequential phases of a brain-aging process that results initially in impairment of function and eventually in neuronal loss. PMID:1528857

  3. Energy harvesting under excitation of clamped-clamped beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Ashok; Alomari, Almuatasim; Aggarwal, Mohan; Bandyopadhyay, Alak

    2016-04-01

    In this article, a piezoelectric energy harvesting has been developed experimentally and theoretically based on Euler- Bernoulli Theory. A PVDF piezoelectric thick film has attached along of clamped-clamped beam under sinusoidal base excitation of shaker. The results showed a good agreement between the experimental and simulation of suggested model. The voltage output frequency response function (FRF), current FRF, and output power has been studied under short and open circuit conditions at first vibration mode. The mode shape of the clamped-clamped beam for first three resonance frequency has been modeled and investigated using COMSOL Multiphysics and MATLAB.

  4. Metal Work: Making an Adjustable C-Clamp. Kit No. 23. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jim

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on making an adjustable C-clamp are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (metal work). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings:…

  5. Voltage-induced membrane displacement in patch pipettes activates mechanosensitive channels

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Ziv; Silberberg, Shai D.; Magleby, Karl L.

    1999-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique allows currents to be recorded through single ion channels in patches of cell membrane in the tips of glass pipettes. When recording, voltage is typically applied across the membrane patch to drive ions through open channels and to probe the voltage-sensitivity of channel activity. In this study, we used video microscopy and single-channel recording to show that prolonged depolarization of a membrane patch in borosilicate pipettes results in delayed slow displacement of the membrane into the pipette and that this displacement is associated with the activation of mechanosensitive (MS) channels in the same patch. The membrane displacement, ≈1 μm with each prolonged depolarization, occurs after variable delays ranging from tens of milliseconds to many seconds and is correlated in time with activation of MS channels. Increasing the voltage step shortens both the delay to membrane displacement and the delay to activation. Preventing depolarization-induced membrane displacement by applying positive pressure to the shank of the pipette or by coating the tips of the borosilicate pipettes with soft glass prevents the depolarization-induced activation of MS channels. The correlation between depolarization-induced membrane displacement and activation of MS channels indicates that the membrane displacement is associated with sufficient membrane tension to activate MS channels. Because membrane tension can modulate the activity of various ligand and voltage-activated ion channels as well as some transporters, an apparent voltage dependence of a channel or transporter in a membrane patch in a borosilicate pipette may result from voltage-induced tension rather than from direct modulation by voltage. PMID:10588750

  6. Xanthine derivatives without PDE effect stimulate voltage-activated chloride conductance of toad skin.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Wolfram; Katz, Uri

    2003-02-01

    The effect of xanthine derivatives on the voltage-activated Cl(-) conductance (G(Cl)) of amphibian skin was analyzed. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and the recently synthesized xanthine derivatives 3,7-dimethyl-1-propyl xanthine (X-32) and 3,7-dimethyl-1-isobutyl xanthine (X-33), which lack inhibitory effects on phosphodiesterases in CHO and Calu-3 cells, increased voltage-activated G(Cl) without effect on baseline conductance at inactivating voltage. Half-maximal stimulation of G(Cl) occurred at 108 +/- 9 microM for X-32 and X-33 after apical or basolateral application. The stimulation of G(Cl), which occurs only in the presence of Cl(-) in the mucosal solution, is caused by a shift of the voltage sensitivity to lower clamp potentials and an increase of the maximally activated level. Furosemide reversed both the shift of sensitivity and the increase in magnitude. These patterns are fundamentally different from those seen after application of membrane-permeant, nonmetabolized analogs of cAMP, and they indicate that the xanthines stimulate G(Cl) directly. This notion is strengthened by the lack of influence on intracellular cAMP content, which is consistent with the observations in CHO and Calu-3 cells. We propose that the xanthine derivatives increase the voltage sensitivity of a regulative component in the conductive Cl(-) pathway across amphibian skin. PMID:12397028

  7. Na(+)-activated K+ channels and voltage-evoked ionic currents in brain stem and parasympathetic neurones of the chick.

    PubMed Central

    Dryer, S E

    1991-01-01

    1. Patch-clamp and computer-modelling techniques were used to study the activation of Na(+)-activated K+ channels (IK(Na] in dissociated neurones from the embryonic chick ciliary ganglion and the embryonic chick brain stem. 2. Numerical solutions of diffusion equations suggested that Na+ accumulation as a result of Na+ influx through voltage-sensitive Na+ channels (INa) is insufficient to allow for alteration in the gating of IK(Na) channels. 3. Whole-cell recordings using two independent micropipettes were made from chick ciliary-ganglion neurones. These showed that transient outward currents were present only when there were clear indications of incomplete voltage clamp. 4. Single-electrode whole-cell recordings from ciliary-ganglion neurones showed that transient tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive outward currents were present, but only when partial TTX blockade produced significant alterations in the kinetics of INa. In cells that were properly voltage clamped, there was no effect of TTX on the kinetics of INa or on voltage-evoked outward currents. 5. Examination of the relationship between peak INa and the command potential showed that transient outward currents were only present in neurones that showed sharp deviations from the behaviour expected of a cell that is adequately voltage clamped. Transient outward currents were not present in cells that were adequately voltage clamped. 6. Application of TTX to isolated outside-out patches obtained from ciliary ganglion neurones eliminated voltage-evoked inward currents but had no effect on outward currents. 7. Isolated inside-out patches obtained from ciliary-ganglion neurones did not contain IK(Na) channels. These patches usually contained Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels (IK(Ca] with a unitary conductance of around 200 pS when [K+]o = 150 mM and [K+]i = 75 mM. 8. Two-electrode whole-cell recordings from cultured brain stem neurones showed that transient outward currents were present only when there were clear indications

  8. GABAB receptors inhibit low-voltage activated and high-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels in sensory neurons via distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2015-09-18

    Growing evidence suggests that mammalian peripheral somatosensory neurons express functional receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid, GABAA and GABAB. Moreover, local release of GABA by pain-sensing (nociceptive) nerve fibres has also been suggested. Yet, the functional significance of GABA receptor triggering in nociceptive neurons is not fully understood. Here we used patch-clamp recordings from small-diameter cultured DRG neurons to investigate effects of GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents. We found that baclofen inhibited both low-voltage activated (LVA, T-type) and high-voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) currents in a proportion of DRG neurons by 22% and 32% respectively; both effects were sensitive to Gi/o inhibitor pertussis toxin. Inhibitory effect of baclofen on both current types was about twice less efficacious as compared to that of the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO. Surprisingly, only HVA but not LVA current modulation by baclofen was partially prevented by G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S. In contrast, only LVA but not HVA current modulation was reversed by the application of a reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT). Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) current by baclofen and the recovery of such inhibition by DTT were successfully reconstituted in the expression system. Our data suggest that inhibition of LVA current in DRG neurons by baclofen is partially mediated by an unconventional signaling pathway that involves a redox mechanism. These findings reinforce the idea of targeting peripheral GABA receptors for pain relief. PMID:26239659

  9. Voltage-activated currents recorded from rabbit pigmented ciliary body epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Fain, G L; Farahbakhsh, N A

    1989-01-01

    1. The whole-cell recording mode of the patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the presence of voltage-activated currents in the isolated pigmented cells from the rabbit ciliary body epithelium grown in culture. 2. In Ringer solution with composition similar to that of the rabbit aqueous humour, depolarizing voltage steps activated a transient inward current and a delayed outward current, while hyperpolarization elicited an inwardly rectified current. 3. The depolarization-activated inward current was mainly carried by Na+ and was blocked by submicromolar concentrations of tetrodotoxin. This current in many cells was sufficiently large to produce a regenerative Na+ spike. 4. The depolarization-activated outward current was carried by K+ and blocked by external TEA and Ba2+. Its activation appeared to be Ca2(+)-independent. 5. The hyperpolarization-activated inward current was almost exclusively carried by K+ and was blocked by Ba2+ and Cs+. For large hyperpolarizations below -120 mV, this current exhibited a biphasic activation with a fast transient peak followed by a slower sag, that appeared to be due to K+ depletion. 6. The voltage-dependent K+ conductances probably act to stabilize the cell membrane resting potential and may also play a role in ion transport. The function of the Na(+)-dependent inward current is unclear, but it may permit the electrically coupled epithelial cells of the ciliary body to conduct propagated action potentials. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2621623

  10. Photocontrol of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Azobenzene Trimethylammonium Bromide in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Frolova, Sheyda R; Gaiko, Olga; Tsvelaya, Valeriya A; Pimenov, Oleg Y; Agladze, Konstantin I

    2016-01-01

    The ability of azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB) to sensitize cardiac tissue excitability to light was recently reported. The dark, thermally relaxed trans- isomer of azoTAB suppressed spontaneous activity and excitation propagation speed, whereas the cis- isomer had no detectable effect on the electrical properties of cardiomyocyte monolayers. As the membrane potential of cardiac cells is mainly controlled by activity of voltage-gated ion channels, this study examined whether the sensitization effect of azoTAB was exerted primarily via the modulation of voltage-gated ion channel activity. The effects of trans- and cis- isomers of azoTAB on voltage-dependent sodium (INav), calcium (ICav), and potassium (IKv) currents in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The experiments showed that azoTAB modulated ion currents, causing suppression of sodium (Na+) and calcium (Ca2+) currents and potentiation of net potassium (K+) currents. This finding confirms that azoTAB-effect on cardiac tissue excitability do indeed result from modulation of voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential. PMID:27015602

  11. Photocontrol of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Azobenzene Trimethylammonium Bromide in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Frolova, Sheyda R.; Gaiko, Olga; Tsvelaya, Valeriya A.; Pimenov, Oleg Y.; Agladze, Konstantin I.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB) to sensitize cardiac tissue excitability to light was recently reported. The dark, thermally relaxed trans- isomer of azoTAB suppressed spontaneous activity and excitation propagation speed, whereas the cis- isomer had no detectable effect on the electrical properties of cardiomyocyte monolayers. As the membrane potential of cardiac cells is mainly controlled by activity of voltage-gated ion channels, this study examined whether the sensitization effect of azoTAB was exerted primarily via the modulation of voltage-gated ion channel activity. The effects of trans- and cis- isomers of azoTAB on voltage-dependent sodium (INav), calcium (ICav), and potassium (IKv) currents in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The experiments showed that azoTAB modulated ion currents, causing suppression of sodium (Na+) and calcium (Ca2+) currents and potentiation of net potassium (K+) currents. This finding confirms that azoTAB-effect on cardiac tissue excitability do indeed result from modulation of voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential. PMID:27015602

  12. The mechanism of transcriptional activation by the topologically DNA-linked sliding clamp of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Kolesky, Scott E; Ouhammouch, Mohamed; Geiduschek, E Peter

    2002-08-30

    Three viral proteins participate directly in transcription of bacteriophage T4 late genes: the sigma-family protein gp55 provides promoter recognition, gp33 is the co-activator, and gp45 is the activator of transcription; gp33 also represses transcription in the absence of gp45. Transcriptional activation by gp45, the toroidal sliding clamp of the T4 DNA polymerase holoenzyme, requires assembly at primer-template junctions by its clamp loader. The mechanism of transcriptional activation has been analyzed by examining rates of formation of open promoter complexes. The basal gp55-RNA polymerase holoenzyme is only weakly held in its initially formed closed promoter complex, which subsequently opens very slowly. Activation ( approximately 320-fold in this work) increases affinity in the closed complex and accelerates promoter opening. Promoter opening by gp55 is also thermo-irreversible: the T4 late promoter does not open at 0 degrees C, but once opened at 30 degrees C remains open upon shift to the lower temperature. At a hybrid promoter for sigma(70) and gp55-holoenzymes, only gp55 confers thermo-irreversibility of promoter opening. Interaction of gp45 with a C-terminal epitope of gp33 is essential for the co-activator function of gp33. PMID:12206760

  13. Voltage Dependence of a Neuromodulator-Activated Ionic Current123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neuromodulatory inward current (IMI) generated by crab Cancer borealis stomatogastric ganglion neurons is an inward current whose voltage dependence has been shown to be crucial in the activation of oscillatory activity of the pyloric network of this system. It has been previously shown that IMI loses its voltage dependence in conditions of low extracellular calcium, but that this effect appears to be regulated by intracellular calmodulin. Voltage dependence is only rarely regulated by intracellular signaling mechanisms. Here we address the hypothesis that the voltage dependence of IMI is mediated by intracellular signaling pathways activated by extracellular calcium. We demonstrate that calmodulin inhibitors and a ryanodine antagonist can reduce IMI voltage dependence in normal Ca2+, but that, in conditions of low Ca2+, calmodulin activators do not restore IMI voltage dependence. Further, we show evidence that CaMKII alters IMI voltage dependence. These results suggest that calmodulin is necessary but not sufficient for IMI voltage dependence. We therefore hypothesize that the Ca2+/calmodulin requirement for IMI voltage dependence is due to an active sensing of extracellular calcium by a GPCR family calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and that the reduction in IMI voltage dependence by a calmodulin inhibitor is due to CaSR endocytosis. Supporting this, preincubation with an endocytosis inhibitor prevented W7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride)-induced loss of IMI voltage dependence, and a CaSR antagonist reduced IMI voltage dependence. Additionally, myosin light chain kinase, which is known to act downstream of the CaSR, seems to play a role in regulating IMI voltage dependence. Finally, a Gβγ-subunit inhibitor also affects IMI voltage dependence, in support of the hypothesis that this process is regulated by a G-protein-coupled CaSR. PMID:27257619

  14. Voltage is a partial activator of rat thermosensitive TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Matta, José A; Ahern, Gerard P

    2007-01-01

    TRPV1 and TRPM8 are sensory nerve ion channels activated by heating and cooling, respectively. A variety of physical and chemical stimuli activate these receptors in a synergistic manner but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Both channels are voltage sensitive, and temperature and ligands modulate this voltage dependence. Thus, a voltage-sensing mechanism has become an attractive model to explain the generalized gating of these and other thermo-sensitive TRP channels. We show here using whole-cell and single channel measurements that voltage produces only a partial activation of TRPV1 and TRPM8. At room temperature (20–25°C) membrane depolarization evokes responses that saturate at ∼50–60% of the maximum open probability. Furthermore, high concentrations of capsaicin (10 μm), resiniferatoxin (5 μm) and menthol (6 mm) reveal voltage-independent gating. Similarly, other modes of TRPV1 regulation including heat, protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation, and protons enhance both the efficacy and sensitivity of voltage activation. In contrast, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine produces the opposite effects. These data can be explained by an allosteric model in which voltage, temperature, agonists and inverse agonists are independently coupled, either positively or negatively, to channel gating. Thus, voltage acts separately but in concert with other stimuli to regulate channel activation, and, therefore, a voltage-sensitive mechanism is unlikely to represent a final, gating mechanism for these channels. PMID:17932142

  15. Clamp usable as jig and lifting clamp

    DOEpatents

    Tsuyama, Yoshizo

    1976-01-01

    There is provided a clamp which is well suited for use as a lifting clamp for lifting and moving materials of assembly in a shipyard, etc. and as a pulling jig in welding and other operations. The clamp comprises a clamp body including a shackle for engagement with a pulling device and a slot for receiving an article, and a pair of jaws provided on the leg portions of the clamp body on the opposite sides of the slot to grip the article in the slot, one of said jaws consisting of a screw rod and the other jaw consisting of a swivel jaw with a spherical surface, whereby when the article clamped in the slot by the pair of jaws tends to slide in any direction with respect to the clamp body, the article is more positively gripped by the pair of jaws.

  16. Voltage and Current Unbalance Compensation Using a Parallel Active Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Tolbert, Leon M; Kueck, John D; Rizy, D Tom

    2007-01-01

    A three-phase insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT)-based parallel active filter is used for current and/or voltage unbalance compensation. An instantaneous power theory is adopted for real-time calculation and control. Three control schemes, current control, voltage control, and integrated control are proposed to compensate the unbalance of current, voltage, or both. The compensation results of the different control schemes in unbalance cases (load unbalance or voltage source unbalance) are compared and analyzed. The simulation and experimental results show that the control schemes can compensate the unbalance in load current or in the voltage source. Different compensation objectives can be achieved, i.e., balanced and unity power factor source current, balanced and regulated voltage, or both, by choosing appropriate control schemes.

  17. Voltage-activated ion channels and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release shape Ca2+ signaling in Merkel cells

    PubMed Central

    Piskorowski, Rebecca; Haeberle, Henry; Panditrao, Mayuri V.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling and neurotransmission modulate touch-evoked responses in Merkel cell–neurite complexes. To identify mechanisms governing these processes, we analyzed voltage-activated ion channels and Ca2+ signaling in purified Merkel cells. Merkel cells in the intact skin were specifically labeled by antibodies against voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (CaV2.1) and voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed small Ca2+ currents, which produced Ca2+ transients that were amplified sevenfold by Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. Merkel cells' voltage-activated K+ currents were carried predominantly by BKCa channels with inactivating and noninactivating components. Thus, Merkel cells, like hair cells, have functionally diverse BKCa channels. Finally, blocking K+ channels increased response magnitude and dramatically shortened Ca2+ transients evoked by mechanical stimulation. Together, these results demonstrate that Ca2+ signaling in Merkel cells is governed by the interplay of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels, store release and K+ channels, and they identify specific signaling mechanisms that may control touch sensitivity. PMID:18415122

  18. Optogenetic Monitoring of Synaptic Activity with Genetically Encoded Voltage Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Ryuichi; Jung, Arong; Yoon, Bong-June; Baker, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    The age of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) has matured to the point that changes in membrane potential can now be observed optically in vivo. Improving the signal size and speed of these voltage sensors has been the primary driving forces during this maturation process. As a result, there is a wide range of probes using different voltage detecting mechanisms and fluorescent reporters. As the use of these probes transitions from optically reporting membrane potential in single, cultured cells to imaging populations of cells in slice and/or in vivo, a new challenge emerges—optically resolving the different types of neuronal activity. While improvements in speed and signal size are still needed, optimizing the voltage range and the subcellular expression (i.e., soma only) of the probe are becoming more important. In this review, we will examine the ability of recently developed probes to report synaptic activity in slice and in vivo. The voltage-sensing fluorescent protein (VSFP) family of voltage sensors, ArcLight, ASAP-1, and the rhodopsin family of probes are all good at reporting changes in membrane potential, but all have difficulty distinguishing subthreshold depolarizations from action potentials and detecting neuronal inhibition when imaging populations of cells. Finally, we will offer a few possible ways to improve the optical resolution of the various types of neuronal activities. PMID:27547183

  19. MATLAB implementation of a dynamic clamp with bandwidth >125 KHz capable of generating INa at 37°C

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Chris; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R.; Cohen, Ira S.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the construction of a dynamic clamp with bandwidth >125 KHz that utilizes a high performance, yet low cost, standard home/office PC interfaced with a high-speed (16 bit) data acquisition module. High bandwidth is achieved by exploiting recently available software advances (code-generation technology, optimized real-time kernel). Dynamic-clamp programs are constructed using Simulink, a visual programming language. Blocks for computation of membrane currents are written in the high-level matlab language; no programming in C is required. The instrument can be used in single- or dual-cell configurations, with the capability to modify programs while experiments are in progress. We describe an algorithm for computing the fast transient Na+ current (INa) in real time, and test its accuracy and stability using rate constants appropriate for 37°C. We then construct a program capable of supplying three currents to a cell preparation: INa, the hyperpolarizing-activated inward pacemaker current (If), and an inward-rectifier K+ current (IK1). The program corrects for the IR drop due to electrode current flow, and also records all voltages and currents. We tested this program on dual patch-clamped HEK293 cells where the dynamic clamp controls a current-clamp amplifier and a voltage-clamp amplifier controls membrane potential, and current-clamped HEK293 cells where the dynamic clamp produces spontaneous pacing behavior exhibiting Na+ spikes in otherwise passive cells. PMID:23224681

  20. Making an Adjustable C-Clamp. Kit No. 603. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Manual. [Revised.] T & I--Metalwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jim; Alexander, Larry

    This student activity kit consists of a programmed, self-instructional learning guide and an accompanying instructor's manual for use in teaching trade and industrial education students how to make an adjustable C-clamp. The student guide contains step-by-step instructions in the following areas: basic layout principles; use of a hack saw, file,…

  1. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  2. A shared mechanism for lipid- and beta-subunit-coordinated stabilization of the activated K+ channel voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun; Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2010-05-01

    The low-dielectric plasma membrane provides an energy barrier hindering transmembrane movement of charged particles. The positively charged, voltage-sensing fourth transmembrane domain (S4) of voltage-gated ion channels must surmount this energy barrier to initiate channel activation, typically necessitating both membrane depolarization and interaction with membrane lipid phospho-head groups (MLPHGs). In contrast, and despite containing S4, the KCNQ1 K(+) channel alpha subunit exhibits predominantly constitutive activation when in complexes with transmembrane beta subunits, MinK-related peptide (MiRP) 1 (KCNE2) or MiRP2 (KCNE3). Here, using a 2-electrode voltage clamp and scanning mutagenesis of channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we discovered that 2 of the 8 MiRP2 extracellular domain acidic residues (D54 and D55) are important for KCNQ1-MiRP2 constitutive activation. Double-mutant thermodynamic cycle analysis revealed energetic coupling of D54 and D55 to R237 in KCNQ1 S4 but not to 10 other native or introduced polar residues in KCNQ1 S4 and surrounding linkers. MiRP2-D54 and KCNQ1-R237 also similarly dictated susceptibility to the inhibitory effects of MLPHG hydrolysis, whereas other closely situated polar residues did not. Thus, by providing negative charge near the plasma membrane extracellular face, MiRP2 uses a lipomimetic mechanism to constitutively stabilize the activated KCNQ1 voltage sensor. PMID:20040519

  3. A new balancing three level three dimensional space vector modulation strategy for three level neutral point clamped four leg inverter based shunt active power filter controlling by nonlinear back stepping controllers.

    PubMed

    Chebabhi, Ali; Fellah, Mohammed Karim; Kessal, Abdelhalim; Benkhoris, Mohamed F

    2016-07-01

    In this paper is proposed a new balancing three-level three dimensional space vector modulation (B3L-3DSVM) strategy which uses a redundant voltage vectors to realize precise control and high-performance for a three phase three-level four-leg neutral point clamped (NPC) inverter based Shunt Active Power Filter (SAPF) for eliminate the source currents harmonics, reduce the magnitude of neutral wire current (eliminate the zero-sequence current produced by single-phase nonlinear loads), and to compensate the reactive power in the three-phase four-wire electrical networks. This strategy is proposed in order to gate switching pulses generation, dc bus voltage capacitors balancing (conserve equal voltage of the two dc bus capacitors), and to switching frequency reduced and fixed of inverter switches in same times. A Nonlinear Back Stepping Controllers (NBSC) are used for regulated the dc bus voltage capacitors and the SAPF injected currents to robustness, stabilizing the system and to improve the response and to eliminate the overshoot and undershoot of traditional PI (Proportional-Integral). Conventional three-level three dimensional space vector modulation (C3L-3DSVM) and B3L-3DSVM are calculated and compared in terms of error between the two dc bus voltage capacitors, SAPF output voltages and THDv, THDi of source currents, magnitude of source neutral wire current, and the reactive power compensation under unbalanced single phase nonlinear loads. The success, robustness, and the effectiveness of the proposed control strategies are demonstrated through simulation using Sim Power Systems and S-Function of MATLAB/SIMULINK. PMID:27018144

  4. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    DOEpatents

    Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Brown, Malcolm P.; Stancel, Robert

    2012-06-05

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  5. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Malcolm P.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Stancel, Robert

    2013-03-19

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  6. Effect on the indo-1 transient of applying Ca2+ channel blocker for a single beat in voltage-clamped guinea-pig cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Levi, A J; Li, J; Spitzer, K W; Bridge, J H

    1996-01-01

    1. We used rapid solution changes to investigate the mechanisms which trigger Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes. We patch-clamped myocytes at 36 degrees C and used indo-1 to monitor intracellular Ca2+. Before each test pulse, we established a standard level of SR Ca2+ load by applying a train of conditioning pulses. 2. We switched rapidly to 32 microM nifedipine (an L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) blocker) 8 s before a test pulse, and just after applying nifedipine we applied a ramp depolarization to pre-block Ca2+ channels. We found that ICa,L elicited by the following test pulse was inhibited almost completely (98-99% inhibition). 3. The indo-1 transient elicited by an 800 ms depolarizing pulse showed a rapid initial rise which was inhibited by ryanodine-thapsigargin. This indicated that the rapid rise was due to Ca2+ release from the SR, and therefore provides an index of SR Ca2+ release. 4. In cells dialysed internally with 10 mM Na(+)-containing solution, nifedipine application before a +10 mV test pulse blocked 62% of the rapid initial phase of the indo-1 transient. Calibration curves of indo-1 for intracellular Ca2+ (using a KD of indo-1 for Ca2+ of either 250 or 850 nM, the reported range) indicated that between 67 and 76% of the Ca2+i transient was inhibited by nifedipine. Thus, in cells dialysed with 10 mM Na+ and depolarized to +10 mV, and in the absence of ICa,L, this suggests that another trigger mechanism for SR release is able to trigger between 33 and 24% of the Ca2+i transient. 5. For a given dialysing Na+ concentration, the fraction of indo-1 transient which was inhibited by nifedipine decreased as test potential became more positive. In cells dialysed with 10 mM Na+ and pulsed to +110 mV, 24% of the rapid phase of the indo-1 transient was inhibited by nifedipine (equivalent to between 27 and 37% of the Ca2+i transient). 6. For a given test potential, the fraction of the indo-1 transient which was

  7. Compact, Stiff, Remotely-Actuable Quick-Release Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Ted W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a clamp that is compact and lightweight, yet provides high holding strength and stiffness or rigidity. The clamp uses a unique double slant interface design which provides mechanical advantages to resist forces applied to the clamp member as the load increases. The clamp allows for rapid and remote-activated release of the clamp jaws by applying only a small operating force to an over-center lock/release mechanism, such as by pulling a manual tether.

  8. A novel, voltage-dependent nonselective cation current activated by insulin in guinea pig isolated ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin Hua; Hancox, Jules C

    2003-04-18

    Insulin regulates cardiac metabolism and function by targeting metabolic proteins or voltage-gated ion channels. This study provides evidence for a novel, voltage-dependent, nonselective cation channel (NSCC) in the heart. Under voltage clamp at 37 degrees C and with major known conductances blocked, insulin (1 nmol/L to 1 micromol/L) activated an outwardly rectifying current (Iinsulin) in guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Iinsulin could be carried by Cs+, K+, Li+, and Na+ ions but not by NMDG+. It was inhibited by the NSCC blockers gadolinium and SKF96365 but not flufenamic acid. Iinsulin was largely blocked by the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor HNMPA-(AM)3 and by the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 but not by its inactive analogue U73433. Staurosporine, a potent blocker of protein kinase C, did not prevent the activation of Iinsulin. Application of an analogue of diacylglycerol, 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol, mimicked the effect of insulin. This activated an outwardly rectifying NSCC that could be carried by Cs+, K+, Li+, or Na+ and that was blocked by gadolinium but not by flufenamic acid or staurosporine. We conclude that the intracellular pathway leading to activation of this novel cardiac NSCC involves phospholipase C, is protein kinase C-independent, and may depend on direct channel activation by diacylglycerol. PMID:12637365

  9. Construction of a low-frequency high-power piezoelectric transformer with a specified step-up voltage transformation ratio using two identical bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kazunari; Konno, Takuma; Kosugi, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    We propose a low-frequency piezoelectric transformer comprising two identical bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducers (BLTs) and a stepped horn with a half-wavelength straight extension. The transformer can realize a specified step-up voltage transformation ratio as determined by the cross-sectional area ratio of the horn whose both ends the two BLTs are connected to, and the driving frequency at which the specified transformation ratio is realized can be set near its mechanical resonance. Thus, it can be mechanically held firmly at its vibratory node without affecting the mechanical vibration mode or resulting in a loss of energy. After relevant finite-element simulations, experiments were conducted for a trial-fabricated transformer of the above type. As a result, the experimental results predicted by the simulations were obtained in step-up operation. The influence of the load resistance on the deviation of the driving frequency from its total mechanical resonance of 53.1 kHz was found to be less than 130 Hz (0.24% of the resonance frequency) only. High-power performance of the piezoelectric transformer was also demonstrated.

  10. Novel KCNQ2 channel activators discovered using fluorescence-based and automated patch-clamp-based high-throughput screening techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jin-feng; Qiao, Guan-hua; Liu, Ni; Nan, Fa-jun; Gao, Zhao-bing

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To establish an improved, high-throughput screening techniques for identifying novel KCNQ2 channel activators. Methods: KCNQ2 channels were stably expressed in CHO cells (KCNQ2 cells). Thallium flux assay was used for primary screening, and 384-well automated patch-clamp IonWorks Barracuda was used for hit validation. Two validated activators were characterized using a conventional patch-clamp recording technique. Results: From a collection of 80 000 compounds, the primary screening revealed a total of 565 compounds that potentiated the fluorescence signals in thallium flux assay by more than 150%. When the 565 hits were examined in IonWorks Barracuda, 38 compounds significantly enhanced the outward currents recorded in KCNQ2 cells, and were confirmed as KCNQ2 activators. In the conventional patch-clamp recordings, two validated activators ZG1732 and ZG2083 enhanced KCNQ2 currents with EC50 values of 1.04±0.18 μmol/L and 1.37±0.06 μmol/L, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of thallium flux assay and IonWorks Barracuda assay is an efficient high-throughput screening (HTS) route for discovering KCNQ2 activators. PMID:26725738

  11. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  12. Novel Activation of Voltage-gated K+ Channels by Sevoflurane*

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Annika F.; Liang, Qiansheng; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are modulated by halogenated inhaled general anesthetics, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Alkanols and halogenated inhaled anesthetics such as halothane and isoflurane inhibit the archetypical voltage-gated Kv3 channel homolog K-Shaw2 by stabilizing the resting/closed states. By contrast, sevoflurane, a more heavily fluorinated ether commonly used in general anesthesia, specifically activates K-Shaw2 currents at relevant concentrations (0.05–1 mm) in a rapid and reversible manner. The concentration dependence of this modulation is consistent with the presence of high and low affinity interactions (KD = 0.06 and 4 mm, respectively). Sevoflurane (<1 mm) induces a negative shift in the conductance-voltage relation and increases the maximum conductance. Furthermore, suggesting possible roles in general anesthesia, mammalian Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 channels display similar changes. Quantitative description of the observations by an economical allosteric model indicates that sevoflurane binding favors activation gating and eliminates an unstable inactivated state outside the activation pathway. This study casts light on the mechanism of the novel sevoflurane-dependent activation of Kv channels, which helps explain how closely related inhaled anesthetics achieve specific actions and suggests strategies to develop novel Kv channel activators. PMID:23038249

  13. Patch-Clamp Fluorometry: Electrophysiology meets Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Kusch, Jana; Zifarelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters are membrane proteins whose functions are driven by conformational changes. Classical biophysical techniques provide insight into either the structure or the function of these proteins, but a full understanding of their behavior requires a correlation of both these aspects in time. Patch-clamp and voltage-clamp fluorometry combine spectroscopic and electrophysiological techniques to simultaneously detect conformational changes and ionic currents across the membrane. Since its introduction, patch-clamp fluorometry has been responsible for invaluable advances in our knowledge of ion channel biophysics. Over the years, the technique has been applied to many different ion channel families to address several biophysical questions with a variety of spectroscopic approaches and electrophysiological configurations. This review illustrates the strength and the flexibility of patch-clamp fluorometry, demonstrating its potential as a tool for future research. PMID:24655500

  14. A shared mechanism for lipid- and β-subunit-coordinated stabilization of the activated K+ channel voltage sensor

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    The low-dielectric plasma membrane provides an energy barrier hindering transmembrane movement of charged particles. The positively charged, voltage-sensing fourth transmembrane domain (S4) of voltage-gated ion channels must surmount this energy barrier to initiate channel activation, typically necessitating both membrane depolarization and interaction with membrane lipid phospho-head groups (MLPHGs). In contrast, and despite containing S4, the KCNQ1 K+ channel α subunit exhibits predominantly constitutive activation when in complexes with transmembrane β subunits, MinK-related peptide (MiRP) 1 (KCNE2) or MiRP2 (KCNE3). Here, using a 2-electrode voltage clamp and scanning mutagenesis of channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we discovered that 2 of the 8 MiRP2 extracellular domain acidic residues (D54 and D55) are important for KCNQ1-MiRP2 constitutive activation. Double-mutant thermodynamic cycle analysis revealed energetic coupling of D54 and D55 to R237 in KCNQ1 S4 but not to 10 other native or introduced polar residues in KCNQ1 S4 and surrounding linkers. MiRP2-D54 and KCNQ1-R237 also similarly dictated susceptibility to the inhibitory effects of MLPHG hydrolysis, whereas other closely situated polar residues did not. Thus, by providing negative charge near the plasma membrane extracellular face, MiRP2 uses a lipomimetic mechanism to constitutively stabilize the activated KCNQ1 voltage sensor.—Choi, E., Abbott, G. W. A shared mechanism for lipid- and β-subunit-coordinated stabilization of the activated K+ channel voltage sensor. PMID:20040519

  15. KCNE3 acts by promoting voltage sensor activation in KCNQ1

    PubMed Central

    Barro-Soria, Rene; Perez, Marta E.; Larsson, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    KCNE β-subunits assemble with and modulate the properties of voltage-gated K+ channels. In the colon, stomach, and kidney, KCNE3 coassembles with the α-subunit KCNQ1 to form K+ channels important for K+ and Cl− secretion that appear to be voltage-independent. How KCNE3 subunits turn voltage-gated KCNQ1 channels into apparent voltage-independent KCNQ1/KCNE3 channels is not completely understood. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the effect of KCNE3 on KCNQ1 channels. Here, we use voltage clamp fluorometry to determine how KCNE3 affects the voltage sensor S4 and the gate of KCNQ1. We find that S4 moves in KCNQ1/KCNE3 channels, and that inward S4 movement closes the channel gate. However, KCNE3 shifts the voltage dependence of S4 movement to extreme hyperpolarized potentials, such that in the physiological voltage range, the channel is constitutively conducting. By separating S4 movement and gate opening, either by a mutation or PIP2 depletion, we show that KCNE3 directly affects the S4 movement in KCNQ1. Two negatively charged residues of KCNE3 (D54 and D55) are found essential for the effect of KCNE3 on KCNQ1 channels, mainly exerting their effects by an electrostatic interaction with R228 in S4. Our results suggest that KCNE3 primarily affects the voltage-sensing domain and only indirectly affects the gate. PMID:26668384

  16. A Transformerless Hybrid Active Filter Capable of Complying with Harmonic Guidelines for Medium-Voltage Motor Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Ryota; Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper presents a transformerless hybrid active filter that is integrated into medium-voltage adjustable-speed motor drives for fans, pumps, and compressors without regenerative braking. The authors have designed and constructed a three-phase experimental system rated at 400V and 15kW, which is a downscaled model from a feasible 6.6-kV 1-MW motor drive system. This system consists of the hybrid filter connecting a passive filter tuned to the 7th harmonic filter in series with an active filter that is based on a three-level diode-clamped PWM converter, as well as an adjustable-speed motor drive in which a diode rectifier is used as the front end. The hybrid filter is installed on the ac side of the diode rectifier with no line-frequency transformer. The downscaled system has been exclusively tested so as to confirm the overall compensating performance of the hybrid filter and the filtering performance of a switching-ripple filter for mitigating switching-ripple voltages produced by the active filter. Experimental results verify that the hybrid filter achieves harmonic compensation of the source current in all the operating regions from no-load to the rated-load conditions, and that the switching-ripple filter reduces the switching-ripple voltages as expected.

  17. Cumulative Activation of Voltage-Dependent KVS-1 Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Patricio; Garst-Orozco, Jonathan; Baban, Beravan; de Santiago-Castillo, Jose Antonio; Covarrubias, Manuel; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we reveal the existence of a novel use-dependent phenomenon in potassium channels, which we refer to as cumulative activation (CA). CA consists of an increase in current amplitude in response to repetitive depolarizing step pulses to the same potential. CA persists for up to 20 s and is similar to a phenomenon called “voltage-dependent facilitation” observed in some calcium channels. The KVS-1 K+ channel, which exhibits CA, is a rapidly activating and inactivating voltage-dependent potassium channel expressed in chemosensory and other neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. It is unusual in being most closely related to the Shab (Kv2) family of potassium channels, which typically behave like delayed rectifier K+ channels in other species. The magnitude of CA depends on the frequency, voltage, and duration of the depolarizing step pulse. CA also radically changes the activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel, suggesting that the channel may undergo a physical modification in a use-dependent manner; thus, a model that closely simulates the behavior of the channel postulates the existence of two populations of channels, unmodified and modified. Use-dependent changes in the behavior of potassium channels, such as CA observed in KVS-1, could be involved in functional mechanisms of cellular plasticity such as synaptic depression that represent the cellular basis of learning and memory. PMID:18199775

  18. Reusable thermal cycling clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Fripp, A. L.; Crouch, R. K. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A reusable metal clamp for retaining a fused quartz ampoule during temperature cycling in the range of 20 deg C to 1000 deg C is described. A compressible graphite foil having a high radial coefficient of thermal expansion is interposed between the fused quartz ampoule and metal clamp to maintain a snug fit between these components at all temperature levels in the cycle.

  19. Quick action clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calco, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A quick release toggle clamp that utilizes a spring that requires a deliberate positive action for disengagement is presented. The clamp has a sliding bolt that provides a latching mechanism. The bolt is moved by a handle that tends to remain in an engaged position while under tension.

  20. Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Neocortical Activity.

    PubMed

    Grinvald, Amiram; Omer, David B; Sharon, Dahlia; Vanzetta, Ivo; Hildesheim, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Neural computations underlying sensory perception, cognition, and motor control are performed by populations of neurons at different anatomical and temporal scales. Few techniques are currently available for exploring the dynamics of local and large range populations. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI), based on organic voltage probes, reveals neural population activity in areas ranging from a few tens of micrometers to a couple of centimeters, or two areas up to ~10 cm apart. VSDI provides a submillisecond temporal resolution and a spatial resolution of ~50 µm. The dye signal emphasizes subthreshold synaptic potentials. VSDI has been applied in the mouse, rat, gerbil, ferret, tree shrew, cat, and monkey cortices to explore the lateral spread of retinotopic or somatotopic activation; the dynamic spatiotemporal pattern resulting from sensory activation, including the somatosensory, olfactory, auditory, and visual modalities; and motor preparation and the properties of spontaneously occurring population activity. In this introduction, we focus on VSDI in vivo and review results obtained mostly in the visual system in our laboratory. PMID:26729915

  1. Laser beam guard clamps

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, Richard K.

    2010-09-07

    A quick insert and release laser beam guard panel clamping apparatus having a base plate mountable on an optical table, a first jaw affixed to the base plate, and a spring-loaded second jaw slidably carried by the base plate to exert a clamping force. The first and second jaws each having a face acutely angled relative to the other face to form a V-shaped, open channel mouth, which enables wedge-action jaw separation by and subsequent clamping of a laser beam guard panel inserted through the open channel mouth. Preferably, the clamping apparatus also includes a support structure having an open slot aperture which is positioned over and parallel with the open channel mouth.

  2. A monogenean without clamps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ectoparasites face a daily challenge: to remain attached to their host. Polyopisthocotylean monogeneans attach to the surface of fish gills by highly specialized structures, the sclerotized clamps. In the original description of the protomicrocotylid species Lethacotyle fijiensis, described 50 years...

  3. Improved Active Harmonic Current Elimination Based on Voltage Detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tianyuan; Dong, Shuan; Huang, Yingwei; Liu, Jian; Le, Jian; Liu, Kaipei

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing penetration of power electronic equipment in modern residential distribution systems, harmonics mitigation through the distributed generation (DG) interfacing converters has received significant attention. Among recently proposed methods, the so-called active resonance damper (ARD) and harmonic voltage compensator (HVC) based on voltage detection can effectively reduce the harmonic distortions in selected areas of distribution systems. However, it is found out that when traditional ARD algorithm is used to eliminate harmonic current injected by non-linear loads, its performance is constrained by stability problems and can at most eliminate half of the load harmonic currents. Thus, inspired by the duality between ARD and HVC, this paper presents a novel improved resistive active power filter (R-APF) algorithm based on integral-decoupling control. The design guideline for its parameters is then investigated through carefully analyzing the closed-loop poles' trajectory. Computer studies demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively mitigate the load harmonic currents and its performance is much better than traditional ARD based on proportional control. PMID:27295213

  4. Improved Active Harmonic Current Elimination Based on Voltage Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tianyuan; Dong, Shuan; Huang, Yingwei; Liu, Jian; Le, Jian; Liu, Kaipei

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing penetration of power electronic equipment in modern residential distribution systems, harmonics mitigation through the distributed generation (DG) interfacing converters has received significant attention. Among recently proposed methods, the so-called active resonance damper (ARD) and harmonic voltage compensator (HVC) based on voltage detection can effectively reduce the harmonic distortions in selected areas of distribution systems. However, it is found out that when traditional ARD algorithm is used to eliminate harmonic current injected by non-linear loads, its performance is constrained by stability problems and can at most eliminate half of the load harmonic currents. Thus, inspired by the duality between ARD and HVC, this paper presents a novel improved resistive active power filter (R-APF) algorithm based on integral-decoupling control. The design guideline for its parameters is then investigated through carefully analyzing the closed-loop poles’ trajectory. Computer studies demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively mitigate the load harmonic currents and its performance is much better than traditional ARD based on proportional control. PMID:27295213

  5. Preliminary characterization of voltage-activated whole-cell currents in developing human vestibular hair cells and calyx afferent terminals.

    PubMed

    Lim, Rebecca; Drury, Hannah R; Camp, Aaron J; Tadros, Melissa A; Callister, Robert J; Brichta, Alan M

    2014-10-01

    We present preliminary functional data from human vestibular hair cells and primary afferent calyx terminals during fetal development. Whole-cell recordings were obtained from hair cells or calyx terminals in semi-intact cristae prepared from human fetuses aged between 11 and 18 weeks gestation (WG). During early fetal development (11-14 WG), hair cells expressed whole-cell conductances that were qualitatively similar but quantitatively smaller than those observed previously in mature rodent type II hair cells. As development progressed (15-18 WG), peak outward conductances increased in putative type II hair cells but did not reach amplitudes observed in adult human hair cells. Type I hair cells express a specific low-voltage activating conductance, G K,L. A similar current was first observed at 15 WG but remained relatively small, even at 18 WG. The presence of a "collapsing" tail current indicates a maturing type I hair cell phenotype and suggests the presence of a surrounding calyx afferent terminal. We were also able to record from calyx afferent terminals in 15-18 WG cristae. In voltage clamp, these terminals exhibited fast inactivating inward as well as slower outward conductances, and in current clamp, discharged a single action potential during depolarizing steps. Together, these data suggest the major functional characteristics of type I and type II hair cells and calyx terminals are present by 18 WG. Our study also describes a new preparation for the functional investigation of key events that occur during maturation of human vestibular organs. PMID:24942706

  6. Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate/polyphosphate complexes form voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in the plasma membranes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reusch, R N; Huang, R; Bramble, L L

    1995-09-01

    The lipidic polymer, poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), is found in the plasma membranes of Escherichia col complexed to calcium polyphosphate (CaPPi). The composition, location, and putative structure of the polymer salt complexes led Reusch and Sadoff (1988) to propose that the complexes function as Ca2+ channels. Here we use bilayer patch-clamp techniques to demonstrate that voltage-activated Ca2+ channels composed of PHB and CaPPi are in the plasma membranes of E. coli. Single channel calcium currents were observed in vesicles of plasma membranes incorporated into planar bilayers of synthetic 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine. The channels were extracted from cells and incorporated into bilayers, where they displayed many of the signal characteristics of protein Ca2+ channels: voltage-activated selective for divalent over monovalent cations, permeant to Ca2+, manner by La3+, Co2+, Cd2+, and Mg2+, in that order. The channel-active extract, purified by size exclusion chromatography, was found to contain only PHB and CaPPi. This composition was confirmed by the observation of comparable single channel currents with complexes reconstituted from synthetic CaPPi and PHB, isolated from E. coli. This is the first report of a biological non-proteinaceous calcium channel. We suggest that poly-3-hydroxybutyrate/calcium polyphosphate complexes are evolutionary antecedents of protein Ca2+ channels. PMID:8519976

  7. Clamp for arctic pipeline support

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, A.W.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a ring clamp for supporting and anchoring a large diameter metallic arctic pipeline comprising substantially rigid, curved clamp portions adapted to completely encircle the pipeline and fastening means connecting the clamp portions, the clamp portions having inner and outer layers of fiber reinforced rigid polymer material and an intermediate core layer of honeycomb-form aramid paper.

  8. The β2 clamp in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA polymerase III αβ2ε replicase promotes polymerization and reduces exonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shoujin; Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Hongtai; Fleming, Joy; Yang, Weiqiang; Wang, Shihua; Wei, Wenjing; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Guofeng; Deng, Jiaoyu; Hou, Jian; Zhou, Ying; Lin, Shiqiang; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase III (DNA pol III) is a multi-subunit replication machine responsible for the accurate and rapid replication of bacterial genomes, however, how it functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires further investigation. We have reconstituted the leading-strand replication process of the Mtb DNA pol III holoenzyme in vitro, and investigated the physical and functional relationships between its key components. We verify the presence of an αβ2ε polymerase-clamp-exonuclease replicase complex by biochemical methods and protein-protein interaction assays in vitro and in vivo and confirm that, in addition to the polymerase activity of its α subunit, Mtb DNA pol III has two potential proofreading subunits; the α and ε subunits. During DNA replication, the presence of the β2 clamp strongly promotes the polymerization of the αβ2ε replicase and reduces its exonuclease activity. Our work provides a foundation for further research on the mechanism by which the replication machinery switches between replication and proofreading and provides an experimental platform for the selection of antimicrobials targeting DNA replication in Mtb. PMID:26822057

  9. Clamping characteristics study on different types of clamping unit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhiwei; Liu, Haichao; Xie, Pengcheng; Yang, Weimin

    2015-05-22

    Plastic products are becoming more and more widely used in aerospace, IT, digital electronics and many other fields. With the development of technology, the requirement of product precision is getting higher and higher. However, type and working performance of clamping unit play a decisive role in product precision. Clamping characteristics of different types of clamping unit are discussed in this article, which use finite element numerical analysis method through the software ABAQUS to study the clamping uniformity, and detect the clamping force repeatability precision. The result shows that compared with toggled three-platen clamping unit, clamping characteristics of internal circulation two-platen clamping unit are better, for instance, its mold cavity deformation and force that bars and mold parting surface suffered are more uniform, and its clamping uniformity and repeatability precision is also better.

  10. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  11. Clamp for detonating fuze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holderman, E. J.

    1968-01-01

    Quick acting clamp provides physical support for a closely confined detonating fuse in an application requiring removal and replacement at frequent intervals during test. It can be designed with a base of any required strength and configuration to permit the insertion of an object.

  12. Steric inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 Tat-dependent trans-activation in vitro and in cells by oligonucleotides containing 2′-O-methyl G-clamp ribonucleoside analogues

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Stephen C.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the synthesis of a novel 2′-O-methyl (OMe) riboside phosphoramidite derivative of the G-clamp tricyclic base and incorporation into a series of small steric blocking OMe oligonucleotides targeting the apical stem–loop region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) trans- activation-responsive (TAR) RNA. Binding to TAR RNA is substantially enhanced for certain single site substitutions in the centre of the oligonucleotide, and doubly substituted anti-TAR OMe 9mers or 12mers exhibit remarkably low binding constants of <0.1 nM. G-clamp-containing oligomers achieved 50% inhibition of Tat-dependent in vitro transcription at ∼25 nM, 4-fold lower than for a TAR 12mer OMe oligonucleotide and better than found for any other oligonucleotide tested to date. Addition of one or two OMe G-clamps did not impart cellular trans-activation inhibition activity to cellularly inactive OMe oligonucleotides. Addition of an OMe G-clamp to a 12mer OMe–locked nucleic acid chimera maintained, but did not enhance, inhibition of Tat-dependent in vitro transcription and cellular trans-activation in HeLa cells. The results demonstrate clearly that an OMe G-clamp has remarkable RNA-binding enhancement ability, but that oligonucleotide effectiveness in steric block inhibition of Tat-dependent trans-activation both in vitro and in cells is governed by factors more complex than RNA-binding strength alone. PMID:12771202

  13. Hair cells use active zones with different voltage dependence of Ca2+ influx to decompose sounds into complementary neural codes.

    PubMed

    Ohn, Tzu-Lun; Rutherford, Mark A; Jing, Zhizi; Jung, Sangyong; Duque-Afonso, Carlos J; Hoch, Gerhard; Picher, Maria Magdalena; Scharinger, Anja; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    For sounds of a given frequency, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) with different thresholds and dynamic ranges collectively encode the wide range of audible sound pressures. Heterogeneity of synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and SGNs is an attractive candidate mechanism for generating complementary neural codes covering the entire dynamic range. Here, we quantified active zone (AZ) properties as a function of AZ position within mouse IHCs by combining patch clamp and imaging of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx and by immunohistochemistry. We report substantial AZ heterogeneity whereby the voltage of half-maximal activation of Ca(2+) influx ranged over ∼20 mV. Ca(2+) influx at AZs facing away from the ganglion activated at weaker depolarizations. Estimates of AZ size and Ca(2+) channel number were correlated and larger when AZs faced the ganglion. Disruption of the deafness gene GIPC3 in mice shifted the activation of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx to more hyperpolarized potentials and increased the spontaneous SGN discharge. Moreover, Gipc3 disruption enhanced Ca(2+) influx and exocytosis in IHCs, reversed the spatial gradient of maximal Ca(2+) influx in IHCs, and increased the maximal firing rate of SGNs at sound onset. We propose that IHCs diversify Ca(2+) channel properties among AZs and thereby contribute to decomposing auditory information into complementary representations in SGNs. PMID:27462107

  14. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Goodman, Miriam B.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or “clamps” the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of μN force and nm up to tens of μm displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode. PMID:21529009

  15. Reconstruction of Cell Surface Densities of Ion Pumps, Exchangers, and Channels from mRNA Expression, Conductance Kinetics, Whole-Cell Calcium, and Current-Clamp Voltage Recordings, with an Application to Human Uterine Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Atia, Jolene; McCloskey, Conor; Shmygol, Anatoly S; Rand, David A; van den Berg, Hugo A; Blanks, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    Uterine smooth muscle cells remain quiescent throughout most of gestation, only generating spontaneous action potentials immediately prior to, and during, labor. This study presents a method that combines transcriptomics with biophysical recordings to characterise the conductance repertoire of these cells, the 'conductance repertoire' being the total complement of ion channels and transporters expressed by an electrically active cell. Transcriptomic analysis provides a set of potential electrogenic entities, of which the conductance repertoire is a subset. Each entity within the conductance repertoire was modeled independently and its gating parameter values were fixed using the available biophysical data. The only remaining free parameters were the surface densities for each entity. We characterise the space of combinations of surface densities (density vectors) consistent with experimentally observed membrane potential and calcium waveforms. This yields insights on the functional redundancy of the system as well as its behavioral versatility. Our approach couples high-throughput transcriptomic data with physiological behaviors in health and disease, and provides a formal method to link genotype to phenotype in excitable systems. We accurately predict current densities and chart functional redundancy. For example, we find that to evoke the observed voltage waveform, the BK channel is functionally redundant whereas hERG is essential. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that activation of calcium-activated chloride conductances by intracellular calcium release is the key factor underlying spontaneous depolarisations. PMID:27105427

  16. Reconstruction of Cell Surface Densities of Ion Pumps, Exchangers, and Channels from mRNA Expression, Conductance Kinetics, Whole-Cell Calcium, and Current-Clamp Voltage Recordings, with an Application to Human Uterine Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Atia, Jolene; McCloskey, Conor; Shmygol, Anatoly S.; Rand, David A.; van den Berg, Hugo A.; Blanks, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine smooth muscle cells remain quiescent throughout most of gestation, only generating spontaneous action potentials immediately prior to, and during, labor. This study presents a method that combines transcriptomics with biophysical recordings to characterise the conductance repertoire of these cells, the ‘conductance repertoire’ being the total complement of ion channels and transporters expressed by an electrically active cell. Transcriptomic analysis provides a set of potential electrogenic entities, of which the conductance repertoire is a subset. Each entity within the conductance repertoire was modeled independently and its gating parameter values were fixed using the available biophysical data. The only remaining free parameters were the surface densities for each entity. We characterise the space of combinations of surface densities (density vectors) consistent with experimentally observed membrane potential and calcium waveforms. This yields insights on the functional redundancy of the system as well as its behavioral versatility. Our approach couples high-throughput transcriptomic data with physiological behaviors in health and disease, and provides a formal method to link genotype to phenotype in excitable systems. We accurately predict current densities and chart functional redundancy. For example, we find that to evoke the observed voltage waveform, the BK channel is functionally redundant whereas hERG is essential. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that activation of calcium-activated chloride conductances by intracellular calcium release is the key factor underlying spontaneous depolarisations. PMID:27105427

  17. Multiple types of voltage-dependent Ca2+-activated K+ channels of large conductance in rat brain synaptosomal membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Farley, J.; Rudy, B.

    1988-01-01

    K+-selective ion channels from a mammalian brain synaptosomal membrane preparation were inserted into planar phospholipid bilayers on the tips of patch-clamp pipettes, and single-channel currents were measured. Multiple distinct classes of K+ channels were observed. We have characterized and described the properties of several types of voltage-dependent, Ca2+-activated K+ channels of large single-channel conductance (greater than 50 pS in symmetrical KCl solutions). One class of channels (Type I) has a 200-250-pS single-channel conductance. It is activated by internal calcium concentrations greater than 10(-7) M, and its probability of opening is increased by membrane depolarization. This channel is blocked by 1-3 mM internal concentrations of tetraethylammonium (TEA). These channels are similar to the BK channel described in a variety of tissues. A second novel group of voltage-dependent, Ca2+-activated K+ channels was also studied. These channels were more sensitive to internal calcium, but less sensitive to voltage than the large (Type I) channel. These channels were minimally affected by internal TEA concentrations of 10 mM, but were blocked by a 50 mM concentration. In this class of channels we found a wide range of relatively large unitary channel conductances (65-140 pS). Within this group we have characterized two types (75-80 pS and 120-125 pS) that also differ in gating kinetics. The various types of voltage-dependent, Ca2+-activated K+ channels described here were blocked by charybdotoxin added to the external side of the channel. The activity of these channels was increased by exposure to nanomolar concentrations of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These results indicate that voltage-dependent, charybdotoxin-sensitive Ca2+-activated K+ channels comprise a class of related, but distinguishable channel types. Although the Ca2+-activated (Type I and II) K+ channels can be distinguished by their single-channel properties, both could

  18. NS1643 Interacts around L529 of hERG to Alter Voltage Sensor Movement on the Path to Activation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiqing; Cheng, Yen May; Lees-Miller, James P.; Perissinotti, Laura L.; Claydon, Tom W.; Hull, Christina M.; Thouta, Samrat; Roach, Daniel E.; Durdagi, Serdar; Noskov, Sergei Y.; Duff, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    Activators of hERG1 such as NS1643 are being developed for congenital/acquired long QT syndrome. Previous studies identify the neighborhood of L529 around the voltage-sensor as a putative interacting site for NS1643. With NS1643, the V1/2 of activation of L529I (−34 ± 4 mV) is similar to wild-type (WT) (−37 ± 3 mV; P > 0.05). WT and L529I showed no difference in the slope factor in the absence of NS1643 (8 ± 0 vs. 9 ± 0) but showed a difference in the presence of NS1643 (9 ± 0.3 vs. 22 ± 1; P < 0.01). Voltage-clamp-fluorimetry studies also indicated that in L529I, NS1643 reduces the voltage-sensitivity of S4 movement. To further assess mechanism of NS1643 action, mutations were made in this neighborhood. NS1643 shifts the V1/2 of activation of both K525C and K525C/L529I to hyperpolarized potentials (−131 ± 4 mV for K525C and −120 ± 21 mV for K525C/L529I). Both K525C and K525C/K529I had similar slope factors in the absence of NS1643 (18 ± 2 vs. 34 ± 5, respectively) but with NS1643, the slope factor of K525C/L529I increased from 34 ± 5 to 71 ± 10 (P < 0.01) whereas for K525C the slope factor did not change (18 ± 2 at baseline and 16 ± 2 for NS1643). At baseline, K525R had a slope factor similar to WT (9 vs. 8) but in the presence of NS1643, the slope factor of K525R was increased to 24 ± 4 vs. 9 ± 0 mV for WT (P < 0.01). Molecular modeling indicates that L529I induces a kink in the S4 voltage-sensor helix, altering a salt-bridge involving K525. Moreover, docking studies indicate that NS1643 binds to the kinked structure induced by the mutation with a higher affinity. Combining biophysical, computational, and electrophysiological evidence, a mechanistic principle governing the action of some activators of hERG1 channels is proposed. PMID:25809253

  19. Characterization of inhibition by haloperidol and chlorpromazine of a voltage-activated K+ current in rat phaeochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, K.; Ito, K.; Koizumi, S.; Ohno, Y.; Inoue, K.

    1995-01-01

    1. Inhibition by haloperidol and chlorpromazine of a voltage-activated K+ current was characterized in rat phaeochromocytoma PC12 cells by use of whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. 2. Haloperidol or chlorpromazine (1 and 10 microM) inhibited a K+ current activated by a test potential of +20 mV applied from a holding potential of -60 mV. The K+ current inhibition did not exhibit voltage-dependence when test potentials were changed between -10 and +40 mV or when holding potentials were changed between -120 and -60 mV. 3. Effects of compounds that are related to haloperidol and chlorpromazine in their pharmacological actions were examined. Fluspirilene (1 and 10 microM), an antipsychotic drug, inhibited the K+ current, but pimozide (1 and 10 microM), another antipsychotic drug did not significantly inhibit the K+ current. Sulpiride (1 or 10 microM), an antagonist of dopamine D2 receptors, did not affect the K+ current whereas (+)-SCH-23390 (10 microM), an antagonist of dopamine D1 receptors, reduced the K+ current. As for calmodulin antagonists, W-7 (100 microM), but not calmidazolium (1 microM), reduced the K+ current. 4. The inhibition by haloperidol or chlorpromazine of the K+ current was abolished when GTP in intracellular solution was replaced with GDP beta S. Similarly, the inhibition by pimozide, fluspirilene, (+)-SCH-23390 or W-7 was abolished or attenuated in the presence of intracellular GDP beta S. The inhibition by haloperidol or chlorpromazine was not prevented when cells were pretreated with pertussis toxin or when K-252a, an inhibitor of a variety of protein kinases, was included in the intracellular solution. 5. Haloperidol and chlorpromazine reduced a Ba2+ current permeating through Ca2+ channels. Inhibition by haloperidol or chlorpromazine of the Ba2+ current was not affected by GDP beta S included in the intracellular solution. 6. It is concluded that haloperidol and chlorpromazine inhibit voltage-gated K+ channels in PC12 cells by a mechanism

  20. Diverless pipeline repair clamp, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a system suitable for repairing small leaks in deep water pipelines. It is assumed that leak repair operations at the water depths in question will be performed by Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV`s). This report summarizes the results of the third and final phase of this project. Phase 3 work included design, manufacture, and dry testing of (1) a one-half scale model of a 12 inch repair clamp, (2) a full-scale bolt test fixture to demonstrate bolt containment and startup under realistic misalignment of the clamp halves, and (3) a full-scale one-way cylinder for end seal activation. Phase 3 also included a study commissioned from Oceaneering directed at defining the interfaces of the clamp package and the ROV, including suggested procedures for deployment and positioning of the clamp package on the pipeline. Issues regarding bolt make-up by the ROV were also studied in detail and limitations in bolting capability were outlined. The conclusion of this work is that the clamping system described herein may be implemented in a direct manner. The design issues causing the most concern have been resolved through laboratory tests. Note however that all testing performed was mechanical in nature and performed in a dry environment. The recommended next development step, prior to declaring the system operational, is to manufacture a fully outfitted clamp package and to perform installation tests in a controlled underwater environment using a typical deepwater ROV. Wet tests are required in order to demonstrate ROV interfaces and installation procedures, however, the major mechanical features represented by the clamp design as well as its operation have been proven.

  1. Long-Term Spatiotemporal Reconfiguration of Neuronal Activity Revealed by Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging in the Cerebellar Granular Layer.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Daniela; Mapelli, Jonathan; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal organization of long-term synaptic plasticity in neuronal networks demands techniques capable of monitoring changes in synaptic responsiveness over extended multineuronal structures. Among these techniques, voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD imaging) is of particular interest due to its good spatial resolution. However, improvements of the technique are needed in order to overcome limits imposed by its low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we show that VSD imaging can detect long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in acute cerebellar slices. Combined VSD imaging and patch-clamp recordings revealed that the most excited regions were predominantly associated with granule cells (GrCs) generating EPSP-spike complexes, while poorly responding regions were associated with GrCs generating EPSPs only. The correspondence with cellular changes occurring during LTP and LTD was highlighted by a vector representation obtained by combining amplitude with time-to-peak of VSD signals. This showed that LTP occurred in the most excited regions lying in the core of activated areas and increased the number of EPSP-spike complexes, while LTD occurred in the less excited regions lying in the surround. VSD imaging appears to be an efficient tool for investigating how synaptic plasticity contributes to the reorganization of multineuronal activity in neuronal circuits. PMID:26294979

  2. Low-voltage cathodeluminescence of europium-activated yttrium orthovanadate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark L. F.

    1995-04-01

    Emissive flat panel display systems operating in full color demand higher performance at low voltages (ca. 50 - 1000 V) from cathodoluminescent (CL) phosphors than cathode ray tubes require. Hydrothermal synthesis has been suggested as a route to phosphors with improved efficiencies, lower voltage thresholds, and increased saturation power. This hypothesis was tested in europium-doped yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4:Eu), an efficient, red emitting CL phosphor. The CL efficiency of YVO4:Eu crystallized from aqueous solution at 200 degree(s)C is relatively low until it is annealed. The distribution of particle sizes in the low- temperature phosphor is similar to that in material made via a solid-state route, but crystallites remain much smaller (ca. 400 angstrom) until they are annealed. These observations, along with the anomalously strong dependence of CL intensity on europium concentration, support a model in which efficiency principally depends on crystallite size. CL efficiency of both solid state and hydrothermal YVO4:Eu increases with voltage at constant power. Surface-bound electrons are likely the dominant influence on efficiency at voltages near threshold. Saturation power is independent of synthetic route. It is apparent that the CL properties of hydrothermally synthesized YVO4:Eu are essentially the same as those of YVO4:Eu produced via conventional, high-temperature routes.

  3. High voltage-activated Ca2+ currents in rat supraoptic neurones: biophysical properties and expression of the various channel alpha1 subunits.

    PubMed

    Joux, N; Chevaleyre, V; Alonso, G; Boissin-Agasse, L; Moos, F C; Desarménien, M G; Hussy, N

    2001-07-01

    The diversity of Ca2+ currents was studied in voltage-clamped acutely dissociated neurones from the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON), and the expression of the various corresponding pore-forming alpha1 subunits determined by immunohistochemistry. We observed the presence of all high voltage-activated L-, N-, P/Q- and R-type currents. We did not observe low-voltage-activated T-type current. The multimodal current/voltage relationships of L- and R-type currents indicated further heterogeneity within these current types, each exhibiting two components that differed by a high (-20 mV) and a lower (-40 mV) threshold potential of activation. L- and R-type currents were fast activating and showed time-dependent inactivation, conversely to N- and P/Q-type currents, which activated more slowly and did not inactivate. The immunocytochemical staining indicated that the soma and proximal dendrites of SON neurones were immunoreactive for Cav1.2, Cav1.3 (forming L-type channels), Cav2.1 (P/Q-type), Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.3 subunits (R-type). Each subunit exhibited further specificity in its distribution throughout the nucleus, and we particularly observed strong immunostaining of Cav1.3 and Cav2.3 subunits within the dendritic zone of the SON. These data show a high heterogeneity of Ca2+ channels in SON. neurones, both in their functional properties and cellular distribution. The lower threshold and rapidly activating L- and R-type currents should underlie major Ca2+ entry during action potentials, while the slower and higher threshold N- and P/Q-type currents should be preferentially recruited during burst activity. It will be of key interest to determine their respective role in the numerous Ca2+-dependent events that control the activity and physiology of SON neurones PMID:11442778

  4. Cantilever clamp fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A device is disclosed for sealing and clamping a cylindrical element which is to be attached to an object such as a wall, a pressurized vessel or another cylindrical element. The device includes a gland having an inner cylindrical wall, which is threaded at one end and is attached at a bendable end to a deformable portion, which in turn is attached to one end of a conical cantilever structure. The other end of the cantilever structure connects at a bendable area to one end of an outer cylindrical wall. The opposite end of cylindrical wall terminates in a thickened portion, the radially outer surface of which is adapted to accommodate a tool for rotating the gland. The terminal end of cylindrical wall also includes an abutment surface, which is adapted to engage a seal, which in turn engages a surface of a receiver. The receiver further includes a threaded portion for engagement with the threaded portion of gland whereby a tightening rotation of gland relative to receiver will cause relative movement between cylindrical walls and of gland. This movement causes a rotation of the conical structure and thus a bending action at bending area and at the bending end of the upper end of inner cylindrical wall. These rotational and bending actions result in a forcing of the deformable portion radially inwardly so as to contact and deform a pipe. This forcible contact creates a seal between gland and pipe, and simultaneously clamps the pipe in position.

  5. Discrete Waves and Phototransduction in Voltage-damped Ventral Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Behbehani, Michael; Srebro, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Discrete waves in the voltage-clamped photoreceptor of Limulus are remarkably similar in all essential properties to those found in an unclamped cell. The latency distribution of discrete waves is not affected by considerable changes in the holding potential in a voltage-clamped cell. Both large and small waves occur in voltage-clamped and unclamped cells and in approximately the same proportion. Large and small waves also share the same latency distributions and spectral sensitivity. We suggest that small waves may result from the activation of damaged membrane areas. Large waves have an average amplitude of approximately 5 nA in voltage-clamped photoreceptors. It probably requires several square microns of cell membrane to support this much photo-current. Thus the amplification inherent in the discrete wave process may involve spatial spread of activation from unimolecular dimensions to several square microns of cell membrane surface. Neither local current flow, nor pre-packaging of any transmitter substance appears to be involved in the amplification process. The possible mechanisms of the amplification are evaluated with relationship to the properties of discrete waves. PMID:4846766

  6. MATLAB implementation of a dynamic clamp with bandwidth of >125 kHz capable of generating I Na at 37 °C.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Chris; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R; Cohen, Ira S

    2013-04-01

    We describe the construction of a dynamic clamp with a bandwidth of >125 kHz that utilizes a high-performance, yet low-cost, standard home/office PC interfaced with a high-speed (16 bit) data acquisition module. High bandwidth is achieved by exploiting recently available software advances (code-generation technology and optimized real-time kernel). Dynamic-clamp programs are constructed using Simulink, a visual programming language. Blocks for computation of membrane currents are written in the high-level MATLAB language; no programming in C is required. The instrument can be used in single- or dual-cell configurations, with the capability to modify programs while experiments are in progress. We describe an algorithm for computing the fast transient Na(+) current (I Na) in real time and test its accuracy and stability using rate constants appropriate for 37 °C. We then construct a program capable of supplying three currents to a cell preparation: I Na, the hyperpolarizing-activated inward pacemaker current (I f) and an inward-rectifier K(+) current (I K1). The program corrects for the IR drop due to electrode current flow and also records all voltages and currents. We tested this program on dual patch-clamped HEK293 cells where the dynamic clamp controls a current-clamp amplifier and a voltage-clamp amplifier controls membrane potential, and current-clamped HEK293 cells where the dynamic clamp produces spontaneous pacing behavior exhibiting Na(+) spikes in otherwise passive cells. PMID:23224681

  7. Hand-Held Power Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Tool furnishes large pushing or pulling forces. Device includes two clamping blocks, two clamping plates, and a motor-driven linear actuator with selflocking screw shaft. Power clamp exerts opening or closing force at push of switch. Tool approximately 1 m long. Originally designed to secure payload aboard Space Shuttle, operated with one hand to apply opening or closing force of up to 1,000 lb (4,400 N). Clamp has potential applications as end effector for industrial robots and in rescue work to push or pull wreckage with great force.

  8. Reduced low-voltage activated K+ conductances and enhanced central excitability in a congenitally deaf (dn/dn) mouse

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Richardson N; Berntson, Amy; Forsythe, Ian D; Walmsley, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated changes in the neuronal excitability of the auditory brainstem in a congenitally deaf mouse (deafness dn/dn). Whole cell patch recordings from principal neurones of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) showed strikingly enhanced excitability in the deaf mice when compared to control CBA mice at 12–14 days postnatal. MNTB neurones in normal CBA mice showed the phenotypic single action potential response on depolarization in current clamp; however, recordings from CBA mice carrying the homozygous deafness mutation fired trains of action potentials on depolarization. We show here that these changes are associated with reduced functional expression of dendrotoxin-sensitive Kv1 potassium channels. In contrast, no differences were found in voltage-gated calcium currents between control and deaf mice. These results reveal that loss of hair cell function in the cochlea leads to changes in ion channel expression in the central nervous system and suggests that this deafness model will be an important tool in understanding central changes occurring in human congenital deafness and in exploring activity-dependent regulation of ion channel expression. PMID:15235085

  9. Cell swelling activates ATP-dependent voltage-gated chloride channels in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K; Korbmacher, C

    1996-09-01

    In the present study we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to investigate swelling-activated Cl-currents (ICl-swell) in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. Hypotonic cell swelling reversibly increased the whole-cell Cl- conductance by about 30-fold. The I-V relationship was outwardly-rectifying and ICl-swell displayed a characteristic voltage-dependence with relatively fast inactivation upon large depolarizing and slow activation upon hyperpolarizing voltage steps. Reversal potential measurements revealed a selectivity sequence SCN- > I- > Br- > Cl- > > gluconate. ICl-swell was inhibited by tamoxifen, NPPB (5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate), DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid), flufenamic acid, niflumic acid, and glibenclamide, in descending order of potency. Extracellular cAMP had no significant effect. ICl-swell was Ca2+ independent, but current activation depended on the presence of a high-energy gamma-phosphate group from intracellular ATP or ATP gamma S. Moreover, it depended on the presence of intracellular Mg2+ and was inhibited by staurosporine, which indicates that a phosphorylation step is involved in channel activation. Increasing the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration by using ionomycin stimulated Cl- currents with a voltage dependence different from that of ICl-swell. Analysis of whole-cell current records during early onset of ICl-swell and during final recovery revealed discontinuous step-like changes of the whole-cell current level which were not observed under nonswelling conditions. A single-channel I-V curve constructed using the smallest resolvable current transitions detected at various holding potentials and revealed a slope conductance of 55, 15, and 8 pS at +120, 0, and -120 mV, respectively. The larger current steps observed in these recordings had about 2, 3, or 4 times the size of the putative single-channel current amplitude, suggesting a coordinated gating of several individual channels or channel

  10. Effect of trimebutine on voltage-activated calcium current in rabbit ileal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Komori, S; Ohashi, H

    1993-09-01

    1. The effect of trimebutine on the voltage-dependent inward Ca2+ current was investigated by the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique in single smooth muscle cells from rabbit ileum. 2. Trimebutine (3-100 microM) reduced the Ca2+ current in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect on the Ca2+ current was also dependent on the holding potential. The Ca2+ current after a low holding potential was inhibited to a greater extent than that after a high membrane potential: the IC50 values were 7 microM and 36 microM at holding potentials of -40 mV and -60 mV, respectively. The Ca2+ current elicited from a holding potential of -80 mV could not be reduced by as much as 50% of the control by trimebutine at concentrations as high as 100 microM. 3. Trimebutine (30 microM) shifted the voltage-dependent inactivation curve for the Ca2+ current by 18 mV in the negative direction. The affinity of the drug for Ca2+ channels was calculated to be 36 times higher in the inactivated state than in the closed-available state. 4. Blockade of the Ca2+ current by trimebutine, unlike verapamil, was not use-dependent. 5. The results suggest that trimebutine inhibits the voltage-dependent inward Ca2+ current through a preferential binding to Ca2+ channels in the inactivated state in the smooth muscle cell from rabbit ileum. The inhibitory effect of trimebutine on gastrointestinal motility is discussed in the light of the present findings. PMID:8220900

  11. How shunting inhibition affects the discharge of lumbar motoneurones: a dynamic clamp study in anaesthetized cats

    PubMed Central

    Brizzi, L; Meunier, C; Zytnicki, D; Donnet, M; Hansel, D; d'Incamps, B Lamotte; van Vreeswijk, C

    2004-01-01

    In the present work, dynamic clamp was used to inject a current that mimicked tonic synaptic activity in the soma of cat lumbar motoneurones with a microelectrode. The reversal potential of this current could be set at the resting potential so as to prevent membrane depolarization or hyperpolarization. The only effect of the dynamic clamp was then to elicit a constant and calibrated increase of the motoneurone input conductance. The effect of the resulting shunt was investigated on repetitive discharges elicited by current pulses. Shunting inhibition reduced very substantially the firing frequency in the primary range without changing the slope of the current–frequency curves. The shift of the I–f curve was proportional to the conductance increase imposed by the dynamic clamp and depended on an intrinsic property of the motoneurone that we called the shunt potential. The shunt potential ranged between 11 and 37 mV above the resting potential, indicating that the sensitivity of motoneurones to shunting inhibition was quite variable. The shunt potential was always near or above the action potential voltage threshold. A theoretical model allowed us to interpret these experimental results. The shunt potential was shown to be a weighted time average of membrane voltage. The weighting factor is the phase response function of the neurone that peaks at the end of the interspike interval. The shunt potential indicates whether mixed synaptic inputs have an excitatory or inhibitory effect on the ongoing discharge of the motoneurone. PMID:15169842

  12. Blockade by sigma site ligands of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J.; Fletcher, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of a series of structurally-dissimilar sigma site ligands were examined on high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel activity in two preparations of cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones. 2. In mouse hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp, voltage-activated Ca2+ channel currents carried by barium ions (IBa) were reduced with the rank order (IC50 values in microM): 1S,2R-(-)-cis-N-methyl-N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]- 2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexylamine (7.8) > rimcazole (13) > haloperidol (16) > ifenprodil (18) > opipramol (32) > carbetapentane (40) = 1-benzylspiro[1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-1,4-piperidine] (42) > caramiphen (47) > dextromethorphan (73). At the highest concentrations tested, the compounds almost abolished IBa in the absence of any other pharmacological agent. 3. The current-voltage characteristics of the whole-cell IBa were unaffected by the test compounds. The drug-induced block was rapid in onset and offset, with the exceptions of carbetapentane and caramiphen where full block was achieved only after two to three voltage-activated currents and was associated with an apparent increase in the rate of inactivation of IBa. 4. In rat hippocampal neurones loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye Fura-2, rises in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration evoked by transient exposure to 50 mM K(+)-containing medium, either in the absence or in the presence of 10 microM nifedipine (to block L-type high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels), were also reversibly attenuated by the sigma ligands. The rank order potencies for the compounds in these experimental paradigms were similar to that observed for blockade of IBa in the electrophysiological studies. 5. These results indicate that, at micromolar concentrations, the compounds tested block multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. These actions, which do not appear to be mediated by high-affinity sigma binding sites, may play a role in some of the functional effects

  13. Advanced Control Strategy for Single-Phase Voltage-Source Active Rectifier with Low Harmonic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blahník, Vojtĕch; Peroutka, Zdenĕk; Talla, Jakub

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces the advanced control of single-phase voltage-source active rectifier. This control provide direct control of trolley-wire current and active damping of low-frequency disturbances at the converter ac side. Our proposed control strategy combines PR controller with feed-forward model and low-frequency harmonic compensator based on resonant controllers. Achieved experimental results show excellent converter behavior, where converter is fed by strongly distorted supply voltage.

  14. Formation, Characterization, and O-O Bond Activation of a Peroxomanganese(III) Complex Supported by a Cross-Clamped Cyclam Ligand.

    PubMed

    Colmer, Hannah E; Howcroft, Anthony W; Jackson, Timothy A

    2016-03-01

    Although there have been reports describing the nucleophilic reactivity of peroxomanganese(III) intermediates, as well as their conversion to high-valent oxo-bridged dimers, it remains a challenge to activate peroxomanganese(III) species for conversion to high-valent, mononuclear manganese complexes. Herein, we report the generation, characterization, and activation of a peroxomanganese(III) adduct supported by the cross-clamped, macrocyclic Me2EBC ligand (4,11-dimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazabicyclo[6.6.2]hexadecane). This ligand is known to support high-valent, mononuclear Mn(IV) species with well-defined spectroscopic properties, which provides an opportunity to identify mononuclear Mn(IV) products from O-O bond activation of the corresponding Mn(III)-peroxo adduct. The peroxomanganese(III) intermediate, [Mn(III)(O2)(Me2EBC)](+), was prepared at low-temperature by the addition of KO2 to [Mn(II)(Cl)2(Me2EBC)] in CH2Cl2, and this complex was characterized by electronic absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies. The electronic structure of the [Mn(III)(O2)(Me2EBC)](+) intermediate was examined by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations. Detailed spectroscopic investigations of the decay products of [Mn(III)(O2)(Me2EBC)](+) revealed the presence of mononuclear Mn(III)-hydroxo species or a mixture of mononuclear Mn(IV) and Mn(III)-hydroxo species. The nature of the observed decay products depended on the amount of KO2 used to generate [Mn(III)(O2)(Me2EBC)](+). The Mn(III)-hydroxo product was characterized by Mn K-edge XAS, and shifts in the pre-edge transition energies and intensities relative to [Mn(III)(O2)(Me2EBC)](+) provide a marker for differences in covalency between peroxo and nonperoxo ligands. To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first observation of a mononuclear Mn(IV) center upon decay of a nonporphyrinoid Mn(III)-peroxo center. PMID:26908013

  15. Internal V-Band Clamp

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Hafenrichter, Everett S.; Chapa, Agapito C.; Harris, Steven M.; Martinez, Marcus J.; Baty, Roy S.

    2006-02-28

    A system for clamping two tubular members together in an end-to-end relationship uses a split ring with a V-shaped outer rim that can engage a clamping surface on each member. The split ring has a relaxed closed state where the ends of the ring are adjacent and the outside diameter of the split ring is less than the minimum inside diameter of the members at their ends. The members are clamped when the split ring is spread into an elastically stretched position where the ring rim is pressed tightly against the interior surfaces of the members. Mechanisms are provided for removing the spreader so the split ring will return to the relaxed state, releasing the clamped members.

  16. Estimation of neuronal activity based on voltage-sensitive dye imaging in a moving preparation.

    PubMed

    Fathiazar, Elham; Kretzberg, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive dye imaging allows simultaneous recording of graded voltage changes of multiple neurons. While this experimental technique is a great tool to study neuronal network activity in neuroscience, the optical recording suffers from artifacts. In particular, bleaching of the dye and cell movement impede the analysis and interpretation of imaging results. In this paper, we present methods to tackle these two main artifacts. Cell movement during the experiment is corrected by an optical flow method. Bleaching decay is estimated based on a line fit of recordings without stimulus, which is subtracted from the rest of the recordings in the same experiment. Here, we use a leech ganglion as an example tissue to evaluate these processing procedures. This preparation allows simultaneous voltage-sensitive dye imaging of the entire neuronal network and intracellular recording of one cell's membrane voltage. Using the intracellularly recorded voltage as the ground truth reference, we show that our processing methods for the VSD imaging signal clearly improve the correlation between the real and the estimated voltage. Since other imaging techniques (e.g., calcium imaging) suffer from the same type of artifacts as voltage-sensitive dye imaging, our processing method might be useful for a wide range of biomedical imaging studies. PMID:26737729

  17. An Active Substrate Driver for Enabling Mixed-Voltage SOI Systems-On-A-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, S. A.; Blalock, B. J.; Mojarradi, M. M.; Li, H. W.

    2001-01-01

    The current trend for space application systems is towards fully integrated systems-on-a-chip. To facilitate this drive, high-voltage transistors must reside on the same substrate as low-voltage transistors. These systems must also be radiation tolerant, particularly for space missions such as the Europa Lander and Titan Explorer. SOI CMOS technology offers high levels of radiation hardness. As a result, a high-voltage lateral MOSFET has been developed in a partially-depleted (PD) SOI technology. Utilizing high voltages causes a parasitic transistor to have non-negligible effects on a circuit. Several circuit architectures have been used to compensate for the radiation induced threshold voltage shift of the parasitic back-channel transistor. However, a new architecture for high-voltage systems must be employed to bias the substrate to voltage levels insuring all parasitic transistors remain off. An active substrate driver has been developed to accomplish task. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Removal of phenol by activated alumina bed in pulsed high-voltage electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-nan; Ma, Jun; Yang, Shi-dong

    2007-01-01

    A new process for removing the pollutants in aqueous solution-activated alumina bed in pulsed high-voltage electric field was investigated for the removal of phenol under different conditions. The experimental results indicated the increase in removal rate with increasing applied voltage, increasing pH value of the solution, aeration, and adding Fe2+. The removal rate of phenol could reach 72.1% when air aeration flow rate was 1200 ml/min, and 88.2% when 0.05 mmol/L Fe2+ was added into the solution under the conditions of applied voltage 25 kV, initial phenol concentration of 5 mg/L, and initial pH value 5.5. The addition of sodium carbonate reduced the phenol removal rate. In the pulsed high-voltage electric field, local discharge occurred at the surface of activated alumina, which promoted phenol degradation in the thin water film. At the same time, the space-time distribution of gas-liquid phases was more uniform and the contact areas of the activated species generated from the discharge and the pollutant molecules were much wider due to the effect of the activated alumina bed. The synthetical effects of the pulsed high-voltage electric field and the activated alumina particles accelerated phenol degradation. PMID:17915702

  19. Interneuron Activity Leads to Initiation of Low-Voltage Fast-Onset Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Shiri, Zahra; Manseau, Frédéric; Lévesque, Maxime; Williams, Sylvain; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy can be classified as hypersynchronous and low-voltage fast according to their onset patterns. Experimental evidence suggests that low-voltage fast-onset seizures mainly result from the synchronous activity of γ-aminobutyric acid–releasing cells. In this study, we tested this hypothesis using the optogenetic control of parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the entorhinal cortex, in the in vitro 4-aminopyridine model. We found that both spontaneous and optogenetically induced seizures had similar low-voltage fast-onset patterns. In addition, both types of seizures presented with higher ripple than fast ripple rates. Our data demonstrate the involvement of interneuronal networks in the initiation of low-voltage fast-onset seizures. PMID:25546300

  20. Identification of both GABAA receptors and voltage-activated Na+ channels as molecular targets of anticonvulsant α-asarone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Jun; Levinson, Simon R.; Sun, Liqin; Heinbockel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Alpha (α)-asarone, a major effective component isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Acorus tatarinowii, is clinically used as medication for treating epilepsy, cough, bronchitis, and asthma. In the present study, we demonstrated that α-asarone targets central nervous system GABAA receptor as well as voltage-gated Na+ channels. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, α-asarone inhibited spontaneous firing of output neurons, mitral cells (MCs), in mouse olfactory bulb brain slice preparation and hyperpolarized the membrane potential of MCs. The inhibitory effect of α-asarone persisted in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor blockers but was eliminated after adding a GABAA receptor blocker, suggesting that GABAA receptors mediated the inhibition of MCs by α-asarone. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that α-asarone evoked an outward current, but did not influence inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). In addition to inhibiting spontaneous firing, α-asarone also inhibited the Nav1.2 channel, a dominant rat brain Na+ channel subtype. The effects of α-asarone on a defined Nav1.2 were characterized using transfected cells that stably expressed the Nav1.2 channel isoform. α-Asarone displayed strong tonic inhibition of Nav1.2 currents in a concentration- and membrane potential-dependent fashion. α-Asarone reduced channel availability in steady-state inactivation protocols by enhancing or stabilizing Na+ channel inactivation. Both Na+ channel blockade and activation of GABAA receptors provide a possible mechanism for the known anti-epileptic effects of α-asarone. It also suggests that α-asarone could benefit patients with cough possibly through inhibiting a Na+ channel subtype to inhibit peripheral and/or central sensitization of cough reflexes. PMID:24653701

  1. Review: The lord of the rings: Structure and mechanism of the sliding clamp loader.

    PubMed

    Kelch, Brian A

    2016-08-01

    Sliding clamps are ring-shaped polymerase processivity factors that act as master regulators of cellular replication by coordinating multiple functions on DNA to ensure faithful transmission of genetic and epigenetic information. Dedicated AAA+ ATPase machines called clamp loaders actively place clamps on DNA, thereby governing clamp function by controlling when and where clamps are used. Clamp loaders are also important model systems for understanding the basic principles of AAA+ mechanism and function. After nearly 30 years of study, the ATP-dependent mechanism of opening and loading of clamps is now becoming clear. Here I review the structural and mechanistic aspects of the clamp loading process, as well as comment on questions that will be addressed by future studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 532-546, 2016. PMID:26918303

  2. Chemoselective tarantula toxins report voltage activation of wild-type ion channels in live cells.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Drew C; Eum, Kenneth S; Fletcher-Taylor, Sebastian; Austin, Daniel C; Dupré, Christophe; Patrón, Lilian A; Garcia, Rita L; Lam, Kit; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Cohen, Bruce E; Sack, Jon T

    2014-11-01

    Electrically excitable cells, such as neurons, exhibit tremendous diversity in their firing patterns, a consequence of the complex collection of ion channels present in any specific cell. Although numerous methods are capable of measuring cellular electrical signals, understanding which types of ion channels give rise to these signals remains a significant challenge. Here, we describe exogenous probes which use a novel mechanism to report activity of voltage-gated channels. We have synthesized chemoselective derivatives of the tarantula toxin guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX), an inhibitory cystine knot peptide that binds selectively to Kv2-type voltage gated potassium channels. We find that voltage activation of Kv2.1 channels triggers GxTX dissociation, and thus GxTX binding dynamically marks Kv2 activation. We identify GxTX residues that can be replaced by thiol- or alkyne-bearing amino acids, without disrupting toxin folding or activity, and chemoselectively ligate fluorophores or affinity probes to these sites. We find that GxTX-fluorophore conjugates colocalize with Kv2.1 clusters in live cells and are released from channels activated by voltage stimuli. Kv2.1 activation can be detected with concentrations of probe that have a trivial impact on cellular currents. Chemoselective GxTX mutants conjugated to dendrimeric beads likewise bind live cells expressing Kv2.1, and the beads are released by channel activation. These optical sensors of conformational change are prototype probes that can indicate when ion channels contribute to electrical signaling. PMID:25331865

  3. Lifting clamp positively grips structural shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, E. C.

    1966-01-01

    Welded steel clamps securely grip structural shapes of various sizes for crane operations. The clamp has adjustable clamping jaws and screw-operated internal v-jaws and provides greater safety than hoisting slings presently used. The structural member can be rotated in any manner, angle, or direction without being released by the clamp.

  4. Allosteric interactions and the modular nature of the voltage- and Ca2+-activated (BK) channel

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Ramon; Morera, Francisco J; Zaelzer, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    The high conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel is one of the most broadly expressed channels in mammals. This channel is named BK for ‘big K’ because of its single-channel conductance that can be as large as 250 pS in 100 mm symmetrical K+. BK channels increase their activity by membrane depolarization or an increase in cytosolic Ca2+. One of the key features that defines the behaviour of BK channels is that neither Ca2+ nor voltage is strictly necessary for channel activation. This and several other observations led to the idea that both Ca2+ and voltage increase the open probability by an allosteric mechanism. In this type of mechanism, the processes of voltage sensor displacement, Ca2+ binding and pore opening are independent equilibria that interact allosterically with each other. These allosteric interactions in BK channels reside in the structural characteristics of the BK channel in the sense that voltage and Ca2+ sensors and the pore need to be contained in different structures or ‘modules’. Through electrophysiological, mutagenesis, biochemical and fluorescence studies these modules have been identified and, more important, some of the interactions between them have been unveiled. In this review, we have covered the main advances achieved during the last few years in the elucidation of the structure of the BK channel and how this is related with its function as an allosteric protein. PMID:20603335

  5. Molecular Interactions between Tarantula Toxins and Low-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Autoosa; Vega, Benjamin S.; Milescu, Lorin S.; Milescu, Mirela

    2016-01-01

    Few gating-modifier toxins have been reported to target low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channels, and the structural basis of toxin sensitivity remains incompletely understood. Studies of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels have identified the S3b–S4 “paddle motif,” which moves at the protein-lipid interface to drive channel opening, as the target for these amphipathic neurotoxins. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels contain four homologous voltage sensor domains, suggesting multiple toxin binding sites. We show here that the S3–S4 segments within Cav3.1 can be transplanted into Kv2.1 to examine their individual contributions to voltage sensing and pharmacology. With these results, we now have a more complete picture of the conserved nature of the paddle motif in all three major voltage-gated ion channel types (Kv, Nav, and Cav). When screened with tarantula toxins, the four paddle sequences display distinct toxin binding properties, demonstrating that gating-modifier toxins can bind to Cav channels in a domain specific fashion. Domain III was the most commonly and strongly targeted, and mutagenesis revealed an acidic residue that is important for toxin binding. We also measured the lipid partitioning strength of all toxins tested and observed a positive correlation with their inhibition of Cav3.1, suggesting a key role for membrane partitioning. PMID:27045173

  6. Molecular Interactions between Tarantula Toxins and Low-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Salari, Autoosa; Vega, Benjamin S; Milescu, Lorin S; Milescu, Mirela

    2016-01-01

    Few gating-modifier toxins have been reported to target low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channels, and the structural basis of toxin sensitivity remains incompletely understood. Studies of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels have identified the S3b-S4 "paddle motif," which moves at the protein-lipid interface to drive channel opening, as the target for these amphipathic neurotoxins. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels contain four homologous voltage sensor domains, suggesting multiple toxin binding sites. We show here that the S3-S4 segments within Cav3.1 can be transplanted into Kv2.1 to examine their individual contributions to voltage sensing and pharmacology. With these results, we now have a more complete picture of the conserved nature of the paddle motif in all three major voltage-gated ion channel types (Kv, Nav, and Cav). When screened with tarantula toxins, the four paddle sequences display distinct toxin binding properties, demonstrating that gating-modifier toxins can bind to Cav channels in a domain specific fashion. Domain III was the most commonly and strongly targeted, and mutagenesis revealed an acidic residue that is important for toxin binding. We also measured the lipid partitioning strength of all toxins tested and observed a positive correlation with their inhibition of Cav3.1, suggesting a key role for membrane partitioning. PMID:27045173

  7. The venom of the fishing spider Dolomedes sulfurous contains various neurotoxins acting on voltage-activated ion channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hengyun; Zhang, Fan; Li, Dan; Xu, Shiyan; He, Juan; Yu, Hai; Li, Jiayan; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2013-04-01

    Dolomedes sulfurous is a venomous spider distributed in the south of China and characterized with feeding on fish. The venom exhibits great diversity and contains hundreds of peptides as revealed by off-line RP-HPLC/MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. The venom peptides followed a triple-modal distribution, with 40.7% of peptides falling in the mass range of 1000-3000 Da, 25.6% peptides in the 7000-9000 Da range and 23.5% peptides in the 3000-5000 Da range. This distribution modal is rather different from these of peptides from other spider venoms analyzed. The venom could inhibit voltage-activated Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) channels in rat DRG neurons as revealed by voltage-clamp analysis. Significantly, the venom exhibited inhibitory effects on TTX-R Na(+) and T-type Ca(2+) currents, suggesting that there exist both channel antagonists which might be valuable tools for investigation of both channels and drug development. Additionally, intrathoracically injection of venom could cause serve neurotoxic effects on zebrafish and death at higher concentrations. The LD50 value was calculated to be 28.8 μg/g body weight. Our results indicated that the venom of D. sulfurous contain diverse neurotoxins which serve to capture prey. Intensive studies will be necessary to investigate the structures and functions of specific peptides of the venom in the future. PMID:23391637

  8. Split-tapered joint clamping device

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, Max J.; Schwartz, Jr., John F.

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to a clamping device for removably attaching a tool element to a bracket element wherein a bracket element is disposed in a groove in the tool and a clamping member is disposed in said groove and in engagement with a clamping face of the bracket and a wall of the groove and with the clamping member having pivot means engaging the bracket and about which the clamping member rotates.

  9. Calcium-Activated SK Channels Influence Voltage-Gated Ion Channels to Determine the Precision of Firing in Globus Pallidus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Deister, Christopher A.; Chan, C. Savio; Surmeier, D. James; Wilson, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Globus pallidus (GP) neurons fire rhythmically in the absence of synaptic input, suggesting that they may encode their inputs as changes in the phase of their rhythmic firing. Action potential afterhyperpolarization (AHP) enhances precision of firing by ensuring that the ion channels recover from inactivation by the same amount on each cycle. Voltage-clamp experiments in slices showed that the longest component of the GP neuron’s AHP is blocked by apamin, a selective antagonist of calcium-activated SK channels. Application of 100 nm apamin also disrupted the precision of firing in perforated-patch and cell-attached recordings. SK channel blockade caused a small depolarization in spike threshold and made it more variable, but there was no reduction in the maximal rate of rise during an action potential. Thus, the firing irregularity was not caused solely by a reduction in voltage-gated Na+ channel availability. Subthreshold voltage ramps triggered a large outward current that was sensitive to the initial holding potential and had properties similar to the A-type K+ current in GP neurons. In numerical simulations, the availability of both Na+ and A-type K+ channels during autonomous firing were reduced when SK channels were removed, and a nearly equal reduction in Na+ and K+ subthreshold-activated ion channel availability produced a large decrease in the neuron’s slope conductance near threshold. This change made the neuron more sensitive to intrinsically generated noise. In vivo, this change would also enhance the sensitivity of GP neurons to small synaptic inputs. PMID:19571136

  10. How to Assess the Quality of Glucose Clamps? Evaluation of Clamps Performed With ClampArt, a Novel Automated Clamp Device

    PubMed Central

    Benesch, Carsten; Heise, Tim; Klein, Oliver; Heinemann, Lutz; Arnolds, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are no widely accepted parameters to assess the quality of glucose clamps. Thus, we selected different parameters describing clamp quality. These parameters were then evaluated in glucose clamps carried out with ClampArt, a novel CE-marked, state-of-the-art fully automated glucose clamp device employing continuous blood glucose (BG) measurements and minute-by-minute adaptations of glucose infusion rate (GIR). Methods: Thirty-nine glucose clamps were performed in 10 healthy and 29 subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) (total duration 583 h). ClampArt-based BG measurements were compared with those obtained with a laboratory reference method. Clamp quality was assessed by 5 parameters: (1) difference (mg/dl) of all paired BG measurements of ClampArt versus reference method (“trueness”), (2) coefficient of variation (CV, %) of ClampArt’s BG measurements at target clamp level (“precision”), (3) mean absolute relative difference (MARD, %) at target clamp level (“accuracy”), (4) difference (mg/dl) between ClampArt and target BG (“control deviation”), and (5) percentage operational time (“utility”). Results: ClampArt-based BG measurements showed a trueness of 1.2 ± 2.5 mg/dl. CV and MARD at target BG were 5.5 ± 2.1% and 5.3 ± 2.3%, respectively. There were only small deviations from target level (1.2 ± 1.6 mg/dl). Operational time was as high as 95.4% ± 4.1% (means ± SD). Conclusions: The selected parameters seem to be adequate to characterize clamp quality. The novel, fully automated clamp device ClampArt achieves high clamp quality, which in future trials should be compared with other (automated and manual) clamp methods. PMID:25852075

  11. Voltage-activated Ca2+ channels and their role in the endocrine function of the pituitary gland in newborn and adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Sedej, Simon; Tsujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Zorec, Robert; Rupnik, Marjan

    2004-01-01

    We have prepared fresh pituitary gland slices from adult and, for the first time, from newborn mice to assess modulation of secretory activity via voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (VACCs). Currents through VACCs and membrane capacitance have been measured with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Melanotrophs in newborns were significantly larger than in adults. In both newborn and adult melanotrophs activation of VACCs triggered exocytosis. All pharmacologically isolated VACC types contributed equally to the secretory activity. However, the relative proportion of VACCs differed between newborns and adults. In newborn cells L-type channels dominated and, in addition, an exclusive expression of a toxin-resistant R-type-like current was found. The expression of L-type VACCs was up-regulated by the increased oestrogen levels observed in females, and was even more emphasized in the cells of pregnant females and oestrogen-treated adult male mice. We suggest a general mechanism modulating endocrine secretion in the presence of oestrogen and particularly higher sensitivity to treatments with L-type channel blockers during high oestrogen physiological states. PMID:14724188

  12. Induced Voltage Linear Extraction Method Using an Active Kelvin Bridge for Disturbing Force Self-Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an induced voltage linear extraction method for disturbing force self-sensing in the application of giant magnetostrictive actuators (GMAs). In this method, a Kelvin bridge combined with an active device is constructed instead of a conventional Wheatstone bridge for extraction of the induced voltage, and an additional GMA is adopted as a reference actuator in the self-sensing circuit in order to balance the circuit bridge. The linear fitting of the measurement data is done according to the linear relationship between the disturbing forces and the integral of the induced voltage. The experimental results confirm the good performance of the proposed method, and the self-sensitivity of the disturbing forces is better than 2.0 (mV·s)/N. PMID:27213399

  13. Expression and functional analysis of voltage-activated Na+ channels in human prostate cancer cell lines and their contribution to invasion in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Laniado, M. E.; Lalani, E. N.; Fraser, S. P.; Grimes, J. A.; Bhangal, G.; Djamgoz, M. B.; Abel, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Ion channels are important for many cellular functions and disease states including cystic fibrosis and multidrug resistance. Previous work in the Dunning rat model of prostate cancer has suggested a relationship between voltage-activated Na+ channels (VASCs) and the invasive phenotype in vitro. The objectives of this study were to 1) evaluate the expression of VASCs in the LNCaP and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines by Western blotting, flow cytometry, and whole-cell patch clamping, 2) determine their role in invasion in vitro using modified Boyden chambers with and without a specific blocker of VASCs (tetrodotoxin). A 260-kd protein representing VASCs was found only in the PC-3 cell line, and these were shown to be membrane expressed on flow cytometry. Patch clamping studies indicated that functional VASCs were present in 10% of PC-3 cells and blocking these by tetrodotoxin (600 nmol/L) reduced their invasiveness by 31% (P = 0.02) without affecting the invasiveness of the LNCaP cells. These results indicate that the reduction of invasion is a direct result of VASC blockade and not a nonspecific action of the drug. This is the first report of VASCs in a human prostatic cell line. VASCs are present in PC-3 but not LNCaP cells as determined by both protein and functional studies. Tetrodotoxin reduced the invasiveness of PC-3 but not LNCaP cells, and these data suggest that ion channels may play an important functional role in tumor invasion. Images Figure 1 PMID:9094978

  14. Local postsynaptic voltage-gated sodium channel activation in dendritic spines of olfactory bulb granule cells.

    PubMed

    Bywalez, Wolfgang G; Patirniche, Dinu; Rupprecht, Vanessa; Stemmler, Martin; Herz, Andreas V M; Pálfi, Dénes; Rózsa, Balázs; Egger, Veronica

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal dendritic spines have been speculated to function as independent computational units, yet evidence for active electrical computation in spines is scarce. Here we show that strictly local voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) activation can occur during excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the spines of olfactory bulb granule cells, which we mimic and detect via combined two-photon uncaging of glutamate and calcium imaging in conjunction with whole-cell recordings. We find that local Nav activation boosts calcium entry into spines through high-voltage-activated calcium channels and accelerates postsynaptic somatic depolarization, without affecting NMDA receptor-mediated signaling. Hence, Nav-mediated boosting promotes rapid output from the reciprocal granule cell spine onto the lateral mitral cell dendrite and thus can speed up recurrent inhibition. This striking example of electrical compartmentalization both adds to the understanding of olfactory network processing and broadens the general view of spine function. PMID:25619656

  15. Modulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels by Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 and Receptor-2 in Small DRG Neurons of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Leo, M.; Argalski, S.; Schäfers, M.; Hagenacker, T.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the development and maintenance of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Its effects are mediated by two receptors, TNF receptor-1 (TNFR-1) and TNF receptor-2 (TNFR-2). These receptors play a crucial role in the sensitization of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), a key mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic pain. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we examined the influence of TNFR-1 and TNFR-2 on VGSCs and TTX-resistant NaV1.8 channels in isolated rat dorsal root ganglion neurons by using selective TNFR agonists. The TNFR-1 agonist R32W (10 pg/mL) caused an increase in the VGSC current (INa(V)) by 27.2 ± 5.1%, while the TNFR-2 agonist D145 (10 pg/mL) increased the current by 44.9 ± 2.6%. This effect was dose dependent. Treating isolated NaV1.8 with R32W (100 pg/mL) resulted in an increase in INaV(1.8) by 18.9 ± 1.6%, while treatment with D145 (100 pg/mL) increased the current by 14.5 ± 3.7%. Based on the current-voltage relationship, 10 pg of R32W or D145 led to an increase in INa(V) in a bell-shaped, voltage-dependent manner with a maximum effect at −30 mV. The effects of TNFR activation on VGSCs promote excitation in primary afferent neurons and this might explain the sensitization mechanisms associated with neuropathic and inflammatory pain. PMID:26504355

  16. Limit analysis of pipe clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Service Level D (faulted) load capacity of a conventional three-bolt pipe-clamp based upon the limit analysis method is presented. The load distribution, plastic hinge locations, and collapse load are developed for the lower bound limit load method. The results of the limit analysis are compared with the manufacturer's rated loads. 3 refs.

  17. Voltage-dependent motion of the catalytic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase monitored by a fluorescent amino acid.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Souhei; Jinno, Yuka; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    The cytoplasmic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) derives the voltage dependence of its catalytic activity from coupling to a voltage sensor homologous to that of voltage-gated ion channels. To assess the conformational changes in the cytoplasmic region upon activation of the voltage sensor, we genetically incorporated a fluorescent unnatural amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), into the catalytic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). Measurements of Anap fluorescence under voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the catalytic region assumes distinct conformations dependent on the degree of voltage-sensor activation. FRET analysis showed that the catalytic region remains situated beneath the plasma membrane, irrespective of the voltage level. Moreover, Anap fluorescence from a membrane-facing loop in the C2 domain showed a pattern reflecting substrate turnover. These results indicate that the voltage sensor regulates Ci-VSP catalytic activity by causing conformational changes in the entire catalytic region, without changing their distance from the plasma membrane. PMID:27330112

  18. Voltage-dependent motion of the catalytic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase monitored by a fluorescent amino acid

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Souhei; Jinno, Yuka; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) derives the voltage dependence of its catalytic activity from coupling to a voltage sensor homologous to that of voltage-gated ion channels. To assess the conformational changes in the cytoplasmic region upon activation of the voltage sensor, we genetically incorporated a fluorescent unnatural amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), into the catalytic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). Measurements of Anap fluorescence under voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the catalytic region assumes distinct conformations dependent on the degree of voltage-sensor activation. FRET analysis showed that the catalytic region remains situated beneath the plasma membrane, irrespective of the voltage level. Moreover, Anap fluorescence from a membrane-facing loop in the C2 domain showed a pattern reflecting substrate turnover. These results indicate that the voltage sensor regulates Ci-VSP catalytic activity by causing conformational changes in the entire catalytic region, without changing their distance from the plasma membrane. PMID:27330112

  19. A clamp-like biohybrid catalyst for DNA oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dongen, Stijn F. M.; Clerx, Joost; Nørgaard, Kasper; Bloemberg, Tom G.; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.; Trakselis, Michael A.; Nelson, Scott W.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Rowan, Alan E.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.

    2013-11-01

    In processive catalysis, a catalyst binds to a substrate and remains bound as it performs several consecutive reactions, as exemplified by DNA polymerases. Processivity is essential in nature and is often mediated by a clamp-like structure that physically tethers the catalyst to its (polymeric) template. In the case of the bacteriophage T4 replisome, a dedicated clamp protein acts as a processivity mediator by encircling DNA and subsequently recruiting its polymerase. Here we use this DNA-binding protein to construct a biohybrid catalyst. Conjugation of the clamp protein to a chemical catalyst with sequence-specific oxidation behaviour formed a catalytic clamp that can be loaded onto a DNA plasmid. The catalytic activity of the biohybrid catalyst was visualized using a procedure based on an atomic force microscopy method that detects and spatially locates oxidized sites in DNA. Varying the experimental conditions enabled switching between processive and distributive catalysis and influencing the sliding direction of this rotaxane-like catalyst.

  20. Heterogeneity of Voltage- and Chemosignal-Activated Response Profiles in Vomeronasal Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Labra, Antonieta; Brann, Jessica H.; Fadool, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Liolaemus lizards were explored to ascertain whether they would make an amenable model to study single-cell electrophysiology of neurons in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Despite a rich array of chemosensory-related behaviors chronicled for this genus, no anatomical or functional data exist for the VNO, the organ mediating these types of behaviors. Two Liolaemus species (L. bellii and L. nigroviridis) were collected in Central Chile in the Farellones Mountains and transported to the United States. Lizards were subjected to hypothermia and then a lethal injection of sodium pentabarbitol prior to all experiments described in the following text. Retrograde dye perfusion combined with histological techniques demonstrated a compartmentalization of the proportionally large VNO from the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) in cryosections of L. bellii. SDS-PAGE analysis of the VNO of both species demonstrated the expression of three G protein subunits, namely, Gαo, Gαi2, and Gβ, and the absence of Gαolf, Gα11, and Gq, the latter of which are traditionally found in the MOE. Vomeronasal (VN) neurons were enzymatically isolated for whole cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology of single neurons. Both species demonstrated a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, rapidly inactivating sodium current and a tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive potassium current that had a transient and sustained component. VN neurons were classified into two types dependent on the ratio of sodium over sustained potassium current. VN neurons exhibited outward and inward chemosignal-evoked currents when stimulated with pheromone-containing secretions taken from the feces, skin, and precloacal pores. Fifty-nine percent of the neurons were responsive to at least one compound when presented with a battery of five different secretions. The breadth of responsiveness (H metric) demonstrated a heterogeneous population of tuning with a mean of 0.29. PMID:15972830

  1. Tuning voltage-gated channel activity and cellular excitability with a sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Combs, David J.; Shin, Hyeon-Gyu; Xu, Yanping; Ramu, Yajamana

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels generate action potentials in excitable cells and help set the resting membrane potential in nonexcitable cells like lymphocytes. It has been difficult to investigate what kinds of phospholipids interact with these membrane proteins in their native environments and what functional impacts such interactions create. This problem might be circumvented if we could modify specific lipid types in situ. Using certain voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes as a model, our group has shown previously that sphingomyelinase (SMase) D may serve this purpose. SMase D is known to remove the choline group from sphingomyelin, a phospholipid primarily present in the outer leaflet of plasma membranes. This SMase D action lowers the energy required for voltage sensors of a KV channel to enter the activated state, causing a hyperpolarizing shift of the Q-V and G-V curves and thus activating them at more hyperpolarized potentials. Here, we find that this SMase D effect vanishes after removing most of the voltage-sensor paddle sequence, a finding supporting the notion that SMase D modification of sphingomyelin molecules alters these lipids’ interactions with voltage sensors. Then, using SMase D to probe lipid–channel interactions, we find that SMase D not only similarly stimulates voltage-gated Na+ (NaV) and Ca2+ channels but also markedly slows NaV channel inactivation. However, the latter effect is not observed in tested mammalian cells, an observation highlighting the profound impact of the membrane environment on channel function. Finally, we directly demonstrate that SMase D stimulates both native KV1.3 in nonexcitable human T lymphocytes at their typical resting membrane potential and native NaV channels in excitable cells, such that it shifts the action potential threshold in the hyperpolarized direction. These proof-of-concept studies illustrate that the voltage-gated channel activity in both excitable and

  2. Note: High-efficiency energy harvester using double-clamped piezoelectric beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yingmei; Wu, Xuan; Parmar, Mitesh; Lee, Dong-weon

    2014-02-15

    In this study, an improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been reported, which is realized by using a double-clamped piezoelectric beam, based on uniaxial stretching strain. The buckling mechanism is applied to maximize axial stress in the double-clamped beam. The voltage generated by using the double-clamped piezoelectric beam is higher than that generated by using other conventional structures, such as bending cantilevers coated/sandwiched with piezoelectric film, which is proven both theoretically and experimentally. The power generation efficiency is enhanced by further optimizing the double-clamped structure. The optimized high-efficiency energy harvester utilizing double-clamped piezoelectric beams generates a peak output power of 80 μW, under an acceleration of 0.1g.

  3. Yeast Rad17/Mec3/Ddc1: A sliding clamp for the DNA damage checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Majka, Jerzy; Burgers, Peter M. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad24 and Rad17 checkpoint proteins are part of an early response to DNA damage in a signal transduction pathway leading to cell cycle arrest. Rad24 interacts with the four small subunits of replication factor C (RFC) to form the RFC-Rad24 complex. Rad17 forms a complex with Mec3 and Ddc1 (Rad17/3/1) and shows structural similarities with the replication clamp PCNA. This parallelism with a clamp-clamp loader system that functions in DNA replication has led to the hypothesis that a similar clamp-clamp loader relationship exists for the DNA damage response system. We have purified the putative checkpoint clamp loader RFC-Rad24 and the putative clamp Rad17/3/1 from a yeast overexpression system. Here, we provide experimental evidence that, indeed, the RFC-Rad24 clamp loader loads the Rad17/3/1 clamp around partial duplex DNA in an ATP-dependent process. Furthermore, upon ATP hydrolysis, the Rad17/3/1 clamp is released from the clamp loader and can slide across more than 1 kb of duplex DNA, a process which may be well suited for a search for damage. Rad17/3/1 showed no detectable exonuclease activity. PMID:12604797

  4. Finite element analysis on factors influencing the clamping force in an electrostatic chuck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xingkuo, Wang; Jia, Cheng; Kesheng, Wang; Yiyong, Yang; Yuchun, Sun; Minglu, Cao; Linhong, Ji

    2014-09-01

    As one of the core components of IC manufacturing equipment, the electrostatic chuck (ESC) has been widely applied in semiconductor processing such as etching, PVD and CVD. The clamping force of the ESC is one of the most important technical indicators. A multi-physics simulation software COMSOL is used to analyze the factors influencing the clamping force. The curves between the clamping force and the main parameters such as DC voltage, electrode thickness, electrode radius, dielectric thickness and helium gap are obtained. Moreover, the effects of these factors on the clamping force are investigated by means of orthogonal experiments. The results show that the factors can be ranked in order of voltage, electrode radius, helium gap and dielectric thickness according to their importance, which may offer certain reference for the design of ESCs.

  5. The influence of 8-prenylnaringenin on the activity of voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channels in human Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    Gąsiorowska, Justyna; Teisseyre, Andrzej; Uryga, Anna; Michalak, Krystyna

    2012-12-01

    Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the influence of 8-prenylnaringenin on the activity of the voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channels in the human leukemic T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat. 8-prenylnaringenin is a potent plant-derived phytoestrogen that has been found to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. The results show that it inhibited the Kv1.3 channels in a concentration-dependent manner. Complete inhibition occurred at concentrations higher than 10 μM. The inhibitory effect of 8-prenylnaringenin was reversible. It was accompanied by a significant acceleration of channel inactivation without any pronounced change in the activation rate. Of the naringenin derivatives tested to date, 8-prenylnaringenin is the most potent inhibitor of the Kv1.3 channels. The potency of the inhibition may be due to the presence of a prenyl group in the molecule of this flavonoid. The inhibition of the Kv1.3 channels might be involved in the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of 8-prenylnaringenin that have been observed in cancer cell lines expressing these channels. PMID:22933043

  6. A clamped rectangular plate containing a crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    The general problem of a rectangular plate clamped along two parallel sides and containing a crack parallel to the clamps is considered. The problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations and the asymptotic behavior of the stress state near the corners is investigated. Numerical examples are considered for a clamped plate without a crack and with a centrally located crack, and the stress intensity factors and the stresses along the clamps are calculated.

  7. Interfacial gating triad is crucial for electromechanical transduction in voltage-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sandipan; Haehnel, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium channels play a crucial role in electrical excitability and cellular signaling by regulating potassium ion flux across membranes. Movement of charged residues in the voltage-sensing domain leads to a series of conformational changes that culminate in channel opening in response to changes in membrane potential. However, the molecular machinery that relays these conformational changes from voltage sensor to the pore is not well understood. Here we use generalized interaction-energy analysis (GIA) to estimate the strength of site-specific interactions between amino acid residues putatively involved in the electromechanical coupling of the voltage sensor and pore in the outwardly rectifying KV channel. We identified candidate interactors at the interface between the S4–S5 linker and the pore domain using a structure-guided graph theoretical approach that revealed clusters of conserved and closely packed residues. One such cluster, located at the intracellular intersubunit interface, comprises three residues (arginine 394, glutamate 395, and tyrosine 485) that interact with each other. The calculated interaction energies were 3–5 kcal, which is especially notable given that the net free-energy change during activation of the Shaker KV channel is ∼14 kcal. We find that this triad is delicately maintained by balance of interactions that are responsible for structural integrity of the intersubunit interface while maintaining sufficient flexibility at a critical gating hinge for optimal transmission of force to the pore gate. PMID:25311635

  8. Molecular and functional differences in voltage-activated sodium currents between GABA projection neurons and dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shengyuan; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2011-12-01

    GABA projection neurons (GABA neurons) in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) and dopamine projection neurons (DA neurons) in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) have strikingly different firing properties. SNc DA neurons fire low-frequency, long-duration spikes, whereas SNr GABA neurons fire high-frequency, short-duration spikes. Since voltage-activated sodium (Na(V)) channels are critical to spike generation, the different firing properties raise the possibility that, compared with DA neurons, Na(V) channels in SNr GABA neurons have higher density, faster kinetics, and less cumulative inactivation. Our quantitative RT-PCR analysis on immunohistochemically identified nigral neurons indicated that mRNAs for pore-forming Na(V)1.1 and Na(V)1.6 subunits and regulatory Na(V)β1 and Na(v)β4 subunits are more abundant in SNr GABA neurons than SNc DA neurons. These α-subunits and β-subunits are key subunits for forming Na(V) channels conducting the transient Na(V) current (I(NaT)), persistent Na current (I(NaP)), and resurgent Na current (I(NaR)). Nucleated patch-clamp recordings showed that I(NaT) had a higher density, a steeper voltage-dependent activation, and a faster deactivation in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. I(NaT) also recovered more quickly from inactivation and had less cumulative inactivation in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. Furthermore, compared with nigral DA neurons, SNr GABA neurons had a larger I(NaR) and I(NaP). Blockade of I(NaP) induced a larger hyperpolarization in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. Taken together, these results indicate that Na(V) channels expressed in fast-spiking SNr GABA neurons and slow-spiking SNc DA neurons are tailored to support their different spiking capabilities. PMID:21880943

  9. Whole-Cell Patch-Clamp Recording of Mouse and Rat Inner Hair Cells in the Intact Organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Goutman, Juan D; Pyott, Sonja J

    2016-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamping is a widely applied method to record currents across the entire membrane of a cell. This protocol describes application of this method to record currents from the sensory inner hair cells in the intact auditory sensory epithelium, the organ of Corti, isolated from rats or mice. This protocol particularly outlines the basic equipment required, provides instructions for the preparation of solutions and small equipment items, and methodology for recording voltage-activated and evoked synaptic currents from the inner hair cells. PMID:27259943

  10. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P.; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation. PMID:25825713

  11. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-04-14

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation. PMID:25825713

  12. Solution structure of an "open" E. coli Pol III clamp loader sliding clamp complex.

    PubMed

    Tondnevis, Farzaneh; Weiss, Thomas M; Matsui, Tsutomu; Bloom, Linda B; McKenna, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Sliding clamps are opened and loaded onto primer template junctions by clamp loaders, and once loaded on DNA, confer processivity to replicative polymerases. Previously determined crystal structures of eukaryotic and T4 clamp loader-clamp complexes have captured the sliding clamps in either closed or only partially open interface conformations. In these solution structure studies, we have captured for the first time the clamp loader-sliding clamp complex from Escherichia coli using size exclusion chromatography coupled to small angle X-ray scattering (SEC-SAXS). The data suggests the sliding clamp is in an open conformation which is wide enough to permit duplex DNA binding. The data also provides information about spatial arrangement of the sliding clamp with respect to the clamp loader subunits and is compared to complex crystal structures determined from other organisms. PMID:26968362

  13. Sequential formation of ion pairs during activation of a sodium channel voltage sensor

    PubMed Central

    DeCaen, Paul G.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Sharp, Elizabeth M.; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Electrical signaling in biology depends upon a unique electromechanical transduction process mediated by the S4 segments of voltage-gated ion channels. These transmembrane segments are driven outward by the force of the electric field on positively charged amino acid residues termed “gating charges,” which are positioned at three-residue intervals in the S4 transmembrane segment, and this movement is coupled to opening of the pore. Here, we use the disulfide-locking method to demonstrate sequential ion pair formation between the fourth gating charge in the S4 segment (R4) and two acidic residues in the S2 segment during activation. R4 interacts first with E70 at the intracellular end of the S2 segment and then with D60 near the extracellular end. Analysis with the Rosetta Membrane method reveals the 3-D structures of the gating pore as these ion pairs are formed sequentially to catalyze the S4 transmembrane movement required for voltage-dependent activation. Our results directly demonstrate sequential ion pair formation that is an essential feature of the sliding helix model of voltage sensor function but is not compatible with the other widely discussed gating models. PMID:20007787

  14. High-fidelity optical reporting of neuronal electrical activity with an ultrafast fluorescent voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, François; Marshall, Jesse D; Yang, Ying; Gong, Yiyang; Schnitzer, Mark J; Lin, Michael Z

    2014-06-01

    Accurate optical reporting of electrical activity in genetically defined neuronal populations is a long-standing goal in neuroscience. We developed Accelerated Sensor of Action Potentials 1 (ASAP1), a voltage sensor design in which a circularly permuted green fluorescent protein is inserted in an extracellular loop of a voltage-sensing domain, rendering fluorescence responsive to membrane potential. ASAP1 demonstrated on and off kinetics of ∼ 2 ms, reliably detected single action potentials and subthreshold potential changes, and tracked trains of action potential waveforms up to 200 Hz in single trials. With a favorable combination of brightness, dynamic range and speed, ASAP1 enables continuous monitoring of membrane potential in neurons at kilohertz frame rates using standard epifluorescence microscopy. PMID:24755780

  15. Dynamics of Open DNA Sliding Clamps.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Aaron J

    2016-01-01

    A range of enzymes in DNA replication and repair bind to DNA-clamps: torus-shaped proteins that encircle double-stranded DNA and act as mobile tethers. Clamps from viruses (such as gp45 from the T4 bacteriophage) and eukaryotes (PCNAs) are homotrimers, each protomer containing two repeats of the DNA-clamp motif, while bacterial clamps (pol III β) are homodimers, each protomer containing three DNA-clamp motifs. Clamps need to be flexible enough to allow opening and loading onto primed DNA by clamp loader complexes. Equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study DNA-clamp conformation in open and closed forms. The E. coli and PCNA clamps appear to prefer closed, planar conformations. Remarkably, gp45 appears to prefer an open right-handed spiral conformation in solution, in agreement with previously reported biophysical data. The structural preferences of DNA clamps in solution have implications for understanding the duty cycle of clamp-loaders. PMID:27148748

  16. Dynamics of Open DNA Sliding Clamps

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    A range of enzymes in DNA replication and repair bind to DNA-clamps: torus-shaped proteins that encircle double-stranded DNA and act as mobile tethers. Clamps from viruses (such as gp45 from the T4 bacteriophage) and eukaryotes (PCNAs) are homotrimers, each protomer containing two repeats of the DNA-clamp motif, while bacterial clamps (pol III β) are homodimers, each protomer containing three DNA-clamp motifs. Clamps need to be flexible enough to allow opening and loading onto primed DNA by clamp loader complexes. Equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study DNA-clamp conformation in open and closed forms. The E. coli and PCNA clamps appear to prefer closed, planar conformations. Remarkably, gp45 appears to prefer an open right-handed spiral conformation in solution, in agreement with previously reported biophysical data. The structural preferences of DNA clamps in solution have implications for understanding the duty cycle of clamp-loaders. PMID:27148748

  17. Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels as Functional Markers of Mature Neurons in Human Olfactory Neuroepithelial Cells: Implications for the Study of Neurodevelopment in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Reyes-García, Jorge; Valdés-Tovar, Marcela; Calixto, Eduardo; Montaño, Luis M.; Benítez-King, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    In adulthood, differentiation of precursor cells into neurons continues in several brain structures as well as in the olfactory neuroepithelium. Isolated precursors allow the study of the neurodevelopmental process in vitro. The aim of this work was to determine whether the expression of functional Voltage-Activated Ca2+ Channels (VACC) is dependent on the neurodevelopmental stage in neuronal cells obtained from the human olfactory epithelium of a single healthy donor. The presence of channel-forming proteins in Olfactory Sensory Neurons (OSN) was demonstrated by immunofluorescent labeling, and VACC functioning was assessed by microfluorometry and the patch-clamp technique. VACC were immunodetected only in OSN. Mature neurons responded to forskolin with a five-fold increase in Ca2+. By contrast, in precursor cells, a subtle response was observed. The involvement of VACC in the precursors’ response was discarded for the absence of transmembrane inward Ca2+ movement evoked by step depolarizations. Data suggest differential expression of VACC in neuronal cells depending on their developmental stage and also that the expression of these channels is acquired by OSN during maturation, to enable specialized functions such as ion movement triggered by membrane depolarization. The results support that VACC in OSN could be considered as a functional marker to study neurodevelopment. PMID:27314332

  18. Relaxation of Isolated Ventricular Cardiomyocytes by a Voltage-Dependent Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, John H. B.; Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Ershler, Philip R.

    1988-08-01

    Cell contraction and relaxation were measured in single voltage-clamped guinea pig cardiomyocytes to investigate the contribution of sarcolemmal Na+-Ca2+ exchange to mechanical relaxation. Cells clamped from -80 to 0 millivolts displayed initial phasic and subsequent tonic contractions; caffeine reduced or abolished the phasic and enlarged the tonic contraction. The rate of relaxation from tonic contractions was steeply voltage-dependent and was significantly slowed in the absence of a sarcolemmal Na+ gradient. Tonic contractions elicited in the absence of a Na+ gradient promptly relaxed when external Na+ was applied, reflecting activation of Na+-Ca2+ exchange. It appears that a voltage-dependent Na+-Ca2+ exchange can rapidly mechanically relax mammalian heart muscle.

  19. Free-energy landscape of ion-channel voltage-sensor–domain activation

    PubMed Central

    Delemotte, Lucie; Kasimova, Marina A.; Klein, Michael L.; Tarek, Mounir; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) are membrane-bound protein modules that confer voltage sensitivity to membrane proteins. VSDs sense changes in the transmembrane voltage and convert the electrical signal into a conformational change called activation. Activation involves a reorganization of the membrane protein charges that is detected experimentally as transient currents. These so-called gating currents have been investigated extensively within the theoretical framework of so-called discrete-state Markov models (DMMs), whereby activation is conceptualized as a series of transitions across a discrete set of states. Historically, the interpretation of DMM transition rates in terms of transition state theory has been instrumental in shaping our view of the activation process, whose free-energy profile is currently envisioned as composed of a few local minima separated by steep barriers. Here we use atomistic level modeling and well-tempered metadynamics to calculate the configurational free energy along a single transition from first principles. We show that this transition is intrinsically multidimensional and described by a rough free-energy landscape. Remarkably, a coarse-grained description of the system, based on the use of the gating charge as reaction coordinate, reveals a smooth profile with a single barrier, consistent with phenomenological models. Our results bridge the gap between microscopic and macroscopic descriptions of activation dynamics and show that choosing the gating charge as reaction coordinate masks the topological complexity of the network of microstates participating in the transition. Importantly, full characterization of the latter is a prerequisite to rationalize modulation of this process by lipids, toxins, drugs, and genetic mutations. PMID:25535341

  20. Noradrenaline activates a calcium-activated chloride conductance and increases the voltage-dependent calcium current in cultured single cells of rat portal vein.

    PubMed

    Pacaud, P; Loirand, G; Mironneau, C; Mironneau, J

    1989-05-01

    1. Membrane responses were recorded by a patch pipette technique in cultured cells isolated from rat portal vein. Using the whole-cell mode, pressure ejections of noradrenaline evoked depolarization (current clamp) and inward current (voltage clamp) at membrane potentials of -60 to -70 mV. The noradrenaline-induced response was reversibly blocked by prazosin indicating that the response was mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors. 2. The ionic mechanism of the noradrenaline-induced inward current was investigated in potassium-free caesium-containing solutions. Alteration of the chloride equilibrium potential produced similar changes in the reversal potential of the noradrenaline-induced current, indicating that noradrenaline opened chloride-selective channels. There was no evidence implicating sodium or calcium as the charge-carrying ion. 3. Caffeine applied in the bathing solution also induced a transient increase in chloride conductance but the noradrenaline-induced response was lost after application of caffeine. This is interpreted to mean that the increase in chloride conductance induced by noradrenaline and caffeine can occur as a consequence of a rise in intracellular calcium concentration depending on release of calcium from the same intracellular stores. 4. In the presence of caffeine, noradrenaline increased both the voltage-dependent calcium and chloride membrane conductances during application of repetitive depolarizing pulses. It is concluded that in isolated cells of the rat portal vein the depolarization in response to noradrenaline is mediated by an increase in chloride conductance depending on both the calcium release from intracellular stores and the increase of the voltage-dependent calcium current. PMID:2470458

  1. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E.; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27164140

  2. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27164140

  3. From Squid to Mammals with the HH Model through the Nav Channels’ Half-Activation-Voltage Parameter

    PubMed Central

    Krouchev, Nedialko I.; Rattay, Frank; Sawan, Mohamad; Vinet, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The model family analyzed in this work stems from the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model (HHM). for a single-compartment (space-clamp) and continuous variation of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) half-activation-voltage parameter ΔV1/2, which controls the window of sodium-influx currents. Unlike the baseline HHM, its parametric extension exhibits a richer multitude of dynamic regimes, such as multiple fixed points (FP’s), bi- and multi-stability (coexistence of FP’s and/or periodic orbits). Such diversity correlates with a number of functional properties of excitable neural tissue, such as the capacity or not to evoke an action potential (AP) from the resting state, by applying a minimal absolute rheobase current amplitude. The utility of the HHM rooted in the giant squid for the descriptions of the mammalian nervous system is of topical interest. We conclude that the model’s fundamental principles are still valid (up to using appropriate parameter values) for warmer-blooded species, without a pressing need for a substantial revision of the mathematical formulation. We demonstrate clearly that the continuous variation of the ΔV1/2 parameter comes close to being equivalent with recent HHM ‘optimizations’. The neural dynamics phenomena described here are nontrivial. The model family analyzed in this work contains the classical HHM as a special case. The validity and applicability of the HHM to mammalian neurons can be achieved by picking the appropriate ΔV1/2 parameter in a significantly broad range of values. For such large variations, in contrast to the classical HHM, the h and n gates’ dynamics may be uncoupled - i.e. the n gates may no longer be considered in mere linear correspondence to the h gates. ΔV1/2 variation leads to a multitude of dynamic regimes—e.g. models with either 1 fixed point (FP) or with 3 FP’s. These may also coexist with stable and/or unstable periodic orbits. Hence, depending on the initial conditions, the system may

  4. Unfolding of a Temperature-Sensitive Domain Controls Voltage-Gated Channel Activation.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Cristina; Rohaim, Ahmed; Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Stein, Richard A; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Mishra, Smriti; Mchaourab, Hassane S; Minor, Daniel L

    2016-02-25

    Voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) are outfitted with diverse cytoplasmic domains that impact function. To examine how such elements may affect VGIC behavior, we addressed how the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (BacNa(V)) C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (CTD) affects function. Our studies show that the BacNa(V) CTD exerts a profound influence on gating through a temperature-dependent unfolding transition in a discrete cytoplasmic domain, the neck domain, proximal to the pore. Structural and functional studies establish that the BacNa(V) CTD comprises a bi-partite four-helix bundle that bears an unusual hydrophilic core whose integrity is central to the unfolding mechanism and that couples directly to the channel activation gate. Together, our findings define a general principle for how the widespread four-helix bundle cytoplasmic domain architecture can control VGIC responses, uncover a mechanism underlying the diverse BacNa(V) voltage dependencies, and demonstrate that a discrete domain can encode the temperature-dependent response of a channel. PMID:26919429

  5. A high frequency active voltage doubler in standard CMOS using offset-controlled comparators for inductive power transmission.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std . CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm(2) of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages. PMID:23853321

  6. A High Frequency Active Voltage Doubler in Standard CMOS Using Offset-Controlled Comparators for Inductive Power Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std. CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm2 of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages. PMID:23853321

  7. High-speed pressure clamp.

    PubMed

    Besch, Stephen R; Suchyna, Thomas; Sachs, Frederick

    2002-10-01

    We built a high-speed, pneumatic pressure clamp to stimulate patch-clamped membranes mechanically. The key control element is a newly designed differential valve that uses a single, nickel-plated piezoelectric bending element to control both pressure and vacuum. To minimize response time, the valve body was designed with minimum dead volume. The result is improved response time and stability with a threefold decrease in actuation latency. Tight valve clearances minimize the steady-state air flow, permitting us to use small resonant-piston pumps to supply pressure and vacuum. To protect the valve from water contamination in the event of a broken pipette, an optical sensor detects water entering the valve and increases pressure rapidly to clear the system. The open-loop time constant for pressure is 2.5 ms for a 100-mmHg step, and the closed-loop settling time is 500-600 micros. Valve actuation latency is 120 micros. The system performance is illustrated for mechanically induced changes in patch capacitance. PMID:12397401

  8. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging of primary motor cortex activity produced by ventral tegmental area stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kunori, Nobuo; Kajiwara, Riichi; Takashima, Ichiro

    2014-06-25

    The primary motor cortex (M1) receives dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) through the mesocortical dopamine pathway. However, few studies have focused on changes in M1 neuronal activity caused by VTA activation. To address this issue, we used voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD) to reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of M1 activity induced by single-pulse stimulation of VTA in anesthetized rats. VSD imaging showed that brief electrical stimulation of unilateral VTA elicited a short-latency excitatory-inhibitory sequence of neuronal activity not only in the ipsilateral but also in the contralateral M1. The contralateral M1 response was not affected by pharmacological blockade of ipsilateral M1 activity, but it was completely abolished by corpus callosum transection. Although the VTA-evoked neuronal activity extended throughout the entire M1, we found the most prominent activity in the forelimb area of M1. The 6-OHDA-lesioned VTA failed to evoke M1 activity. Furthermore, both excitatory and inhibitory intact VTA-induced activity was entirely extinguished by blocking glutamate receptors in the target M1. When intracortical microstimulation of M1 was paired with VTA stimulation, the evoked forelimb muscle activity was facilitated or inhibited, depending on the interval between the two stimuli. These findings suggest that VTA neurons directly modulate the excitability of M1 neurons via fast glutamate signaling and, consequently, may control the last cortical stage of motor command processing. PMID:24966388

  9. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, Bruce P.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Striker, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  10. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

    1993-02-23

    A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  11. Modulation and pharmacology of low voltage-activated ("T-Type") calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Yunker, Anne Marie R

    2003-12-01

    Although T-type calcium channel currents were observed almost 30 years ago, the genes that encode the pore-forming subunits have only been recently reported. When expressed in heterologous systems, three distinct alpha1 subunits (alpha1G (Cav3.1), alpha1H (Car3.2), and alpha1I (Cav3.3)) conduct T-type currents with insert similar but not identical electrophysiological characteristics that. Alpha 1G, alpha 1H, and alpha 1I transcripts are found throughout neural and nonneural tissues, suggesting multiple types of T-type channels (also called low voltage-activated calcium channels (LVAs)) are coexpressed by many tissues. The study of endogenous LVAs has been hampered by a lack of highly selective antagonists that differentiate between LVA subtypes. Furthermore, many pharmacological agents attenuate currents conducted by LVA and high voltage-activated calcium channels (HVAs). At least 15 classes of pharmacological agents affect T-type currents, and the therapeutic use of many of these drugs has implicated LVAs in the etiology of a variety of diseases. Comparison of the responses of recombinant and native LVAs to pharmacological agents and endogenous modulatory molecules will lead to a better understanding of LVAs in normal and diseased cells. PMID:15000521

  12. Electronics drivers for high voltage dielectric electro active polymer (DEAP) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric electro active polymer (DEAP) can be used in actuation, sensing and energy harvesting applications, but driving the DEAP based actuators and generators has three main challenges from a power electronics standpoint, i.e. high voltage (around 2.5 kV), nonlinearity, and capacitive behavior. In this paper, electronics divers for heating valves, loud speakers, incremental motors, and energy harvesting are reviewed, studied and developed in accordance with their corresponding specifications. Due to the simplicity and low power capacity (below 10W), the reversible Fly-back converters with both magnetic and piezoelectric transformers are employed for the heating valve and incremental motor application, where only ON/OFF regulation is adopted for energy saving; as for DEAP based energy harvesting, the noisolated Buck/Boost converter is used, due to the system high power capacity (above 100W), but the voltage balancing across the series-connected high voltage IGBTs is a critical issue and accordingly a novel gate driver circuitry is proposed and equipped; due to the requirements of the audio products, such as low distortion and noise, the multi-level Buck converter based Class-D amplifier, because of its high control linearity, is implemented for the loud speaker applications. A synthesis among those converter topologies and control techniques is given; therefore, for those DEAP based applications, their diversity and similarity of electronics drivers, as well as the key technologies employed are analyzed. Therefore a whole picture of how to choose the proper topologies can be revealed. Finally, the design guidelines in order to achieve high efficiency and reliability are discussed.

  13. Diverless pipeline repair clamp: Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Lane, B. )

    1992-04-01

    The objective of this project sponsored by the Pipeline Research Committee of the American Gas Association, is to develop a system suitable for repairing small leaks on deepwater pipelines. Phase I of the project, completed in 1990 by Stress Engineering Services, Inc. investigated the types of problems that would have to be overcome to effect a diverless clamp-type repair. Several repair systems were investigated and ten mechanisms were proposed that could be used to secure two clamp halves together. This current Phase 11 effort, is to take two most promising clamp concepts from Phase 1, further evaluate hardware and installation issues, develop conceptual designs, and determine which concept should be carried forward to detailed design. The two concepts evaluated were (1) a bolted split-sleeve clamp suited for ROV installation, and (2) a hydraulically self-actuating clamp requiring only placement on the pipe and actuation by ROV hydraulic hot stabs. Both concepts were evaluated for a 12-inch (324 mm) nominal pipe diameter with an ANSI 900 (15.3 mPa) pressure rating, presuming either system could be adapted to a wider range of pipe sizes and design pressures. Based on the results of this investigation a modified bolted split-sleeve clamp was recommended over the hydraulically self-actuating clamp. The main reasons are (1) the bolted split-sleeve clamp can be adapted to installation by a ROV, (2) sealing and clamping mechanisms borrow from available proven technology, (3) it would require less development effort than the hydraulically self-actuating clamp, and (4) the bolted split-sleeve clamp would probably result in a simpler, less costly design.

  14. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-06-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  15. NO Hyperpolarizes Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Decreases the Intracellular Ca2+ Concentration by Activating Voltage-Gated K+ Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Jian; Tod, Mary L.; Rubin, Lewis J.; Blaustein, Mordecai P.

    1996-09-01

    NO causes pulmonary vasodilation in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, the activity of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels controls resting membrane potential. In turn, membrane potential is an important regulator of the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and pulmonary vascular tone. We used patch clamp methods to determine whether the NO-induced pulmonary vasodilation is mediated by activation of KV channels. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy was employed to test the effect of NO on the depolarization-induced rise in [Ca2+]i. Blockade of KV channels by 4-aminopyridine (5 mM) depolarized pulmonary artery myocytes to threshold for initiation of Ca2+ action potentials, and thereby increased [Ca2+]i. NO (≈ 3 μ M) and the NO-generating compound sodium nitroprusside (5-10 μ M) opened KV channels in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. The enhanced K+ currents then hyperpolarized the cells, and blocked Ca2+-dependent action potentials, thereby preventing the evoked increases in [Ca2+]i. Nitroprusside also increased the probability of KV channel opening in excised, outside-out membrane patches. This raises the possibility that NO may act either directly on the channel protein or on a closely associated molecule rather than via soluble guanylate cyclase. In isolated pulmonary arteries, 4-aminopyridine significantly inhibited NO-induced relaxation. We conclude that NO promotes the opening of KV channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. The resulting membrane hyperpolarization, which lowers [Ca2+]i, is apparently one of the mechanisms by which NO induces pulmonary vasodilation.

  16. Protein folding in a force clamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Szymczak, P.

    2006-05-01

    Kinetics of folding of a protein held in a force clamp are compared to an unconstrained folding. The comparison is made within a simple topology-based dynamical model of ubiquitin. We demonstrate that the experimentally observed variations in the end-to-end distance reflect microscopic events during folding. However, the folding scenarios in and out of the force clamp are distinct.

  17. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage-sensing lipid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sasha S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-04-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We found that the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), has not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Using fast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage-clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we found that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage-sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This two-step allosteric control over a dual-specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility, endocytosis and exocytosis. PMID:26878552

  18. Optical electrophysiology for probing function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Reichert, Elaine; Cohen, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels mediate electrical dynamics in excitable tissues and are an important class of drug targets. Channels can gate in sub-millisecond timescales, show complex manifolds of conformational states, and often show state-dependent pharmacology. Mechanistic studies of ion channels typically involve sophisticated voltage-clamp protocols applied through manual or automated electrophysiology. Here, we develop all-optical electrophysiology techniques to study activity-dependent modulation of ion channels, in a format compatible with high-throughput screening. Using optical electrophysiology, we recapitulate many voltage-clamp protocols and apply to Nav1.7, a channel implicated in pain. Optical measurements reveal that a sustained depolarization strongly potentiates the inhibitory effect of PF-04856264, a Nav1.7-specific blocker. In a pilot screen, we stratify a library of 320 FDA-approved compounds by binding mechanism and kinetics, and find close concordance with patch clamp measurements. Optical electrophysiology provides a favorable tradeoff between throughput and information content for studies of NaV channels, and possibly other voltage-gated channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15202.001 PMID:27215841

  19. A Bright and Fast Red Fluorescent Protein Voltage Indicator That Reports Neuronal Activity in Organotypic Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed S.; Farhi, Samouil L.; Zhao, Yongxin; Brinks, Daan; Zou, Peng; Ruangkittisakul, Araya; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.; Ballanyi, Klaus; Cohen, Adam E.

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging of voltage indicators based on green fluorescent proteins (FPs) or archaerhodopsin has emerged as a powerful approach for detecting the activity of many individual neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution. Relative to green FP-based voltage indicators, a bright red-shifted FP-based voltage indicator has the intrinsic advantages of lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescent background, and compatibility with blue-light-excitable channelrhodopsins. Here, we report a bright red fluorescent voltage indicator (fluorescent indicator for voltage imaging red; FlicR1) with properties that are comparable to the best available green indicators. To develop FlicR1, we used directed protein evolution and rational engineering to screen libraries of thousands of variants. FlicR1 faithfully reports single action potentials (∼3% ΔF/F) and tracks electrically driven voltage oscillations at 100 Hz in dissociated Sprague Dawley rat hippocampal neurons in single trial recordings. Furthermore, FlicR1 can be easily imaged with wide-field fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that FlicR1 can be used in conjunction with a blue-shifted channelrhodopsin for all-optical electrophysiology, although blue light photoactivation of the FlicR1 chromophore presents a challenge for applications that require spatially overlapping yellow and blue excitation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Fluorescent-protein-based voltage indicators enable imaging of the electrical activity of many genetically targeted neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we describe the engineering of a bright red fluorescent protein-based voltage indicator designated as FlicR1 (fluorescent indicator for voltage imaging red). FlicR1 has sufficient speed and sensitivity to report single action potentials and voltage fluctuations at frequencies up to 100 Hz in single-trial recordings with wide-field microscopy. Because it is excitable with yellow light, FlicR1 can be used in conjunction with blue-light-activated

  20. Zero Voltage Soft Switching Duty Cycle Pulse Modulated High Frequency Inverter-Fed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitobi, Manabu; Matsushige, Takayuki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo; Bessyo, Daisuke; Omori, Hideki; Terai, Haruo

    The utility grid voltage of commercial AC power source in Japan and USA is 100V, but in other Asian and European countries, it is 220V. In recent years, in Japan 200V outputted single-phase three-wire system begins to be used for high power applications. In 100V utility AC power applications and systems, an active voltage clamped quasi-resonant inverter circuit topology sing IGBTs has been effectively used so far for the consumer microwave oven. In this paper, presented is a half bridge type voltage-clamped asymmetrical soft switching PWM high-frequency inverter type AC-DC converter using IGBTs which is designed for consumer magnetron drive used as the consumer microwave oven in 200V utility AC power system. The zero voltage soft switching inverter treated here can use the same power rated switching semiconductor devices and three-winding high frequency transformer as those of the active voltage clamped quasi-resonant inverter using the IGBTs that has already been used for 100V utility AC power source. The operating performances of the voltage source single ended push pull (SEPP) type soft switching PWM inverter are evaluated and discussed for 100V and 200V common use consumer microwave oven. The harmonic line current components in the utility AC power side of the AC-DC power converter with ZVS-PWM SEPP inverter are reduced and improved on the basis of sine wave like pulse frequency modulation and sine wave like pulse width modulation for the utility AC voltage source.

  1. Low-voltage, low-power, organic light-emitting transistors for active matrix displays.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M A; Liu, B; Donoghue, E P; Kravchenko, I; Kim, D Y; So, F; Rinzler, A G

    2011-04-29

    Intrinsic nonuniformity in the polycrystalline-silicon backplane transistors of active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays severely limits display size. Organic semiconductors might provide an alternative, but their mobility remains too low to be useful in the conventional thin-film transistor design. Here we demonstrate an organic channel light-emitting transistor operating at low voltage, with low power dissipation, and high aperture ratio, in the three primary colors. The high level of performance is enabled by a single-wall carbon nanotube network source electrode that permits integration of the drive transistor and the light emitter into an efficient single stacked device. The performance demonstrated is comparable to that of polycrystalline-silicon backplane transistor-driven display pixels. PMID:21527708

  2. Tamoxifen inhibits BK channels in chick cochlea without alterations in voltage-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mingjie; Duncan, R Keith

    2009-07-01

    Large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated, and voltage-gated potassium channels (BK, BK(Ca), or Maxi-K) play an important role in electrical tuning in nonmammalian vertebrate hair cells. Systematic changes in tuning frequency along the tonotopic axis largely result from variations in BK channel kinetics, but the molecular changes underpinning these functional variations remain unknown. Auxiliary beta(1) have been implicated in low-frequency tuning at the cochlear apex because these subunits dramatically slow channel kinetics. Tamoxifen (Tx), a (xeno)estrogen compound known to activate BK channels through the beta-subunit, was used to test for the functional presence of beta(1). The hypotheses were that Tx would activate the majority of BK channels in hair cells from the cochlear apex due to the presence of beta(1) and that the level of activation would exhibit a tonotopic gradient following the expression profile of beta(1). Outside-out patches of BK channels were excised from tall hair cells along the apical half of the chicken basilar papilla. In low-density patches, single-channel conductance was reduced and the averaged open probability was unaffected by Tx. In high-density patches, the amplitude of ensemble-averaged BK current was inhibited, whereas half-activation potential and activation kinetics were unaffected by Tx. In both cases, no tonotopic Tx-dependent activation of channel activity was observed. Therefore, contrary to the hypotheses, electrophysiological assessment suggests that molecular mechanisms other than auxiliary beta-subunits are involved in generating a tonotopic distribution of BK channel kinetics and electric tuning in chick basilar papilla. PMID:19439526

  3. Forced-exercise delays neuropathic pain in experimental diabetes: effects on voltage-activated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Shankarappa, Sahadev A; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S; Stubbs, Evan B

    2011-07-01

    Physical exercise produces a variety of psychophysical effects, including altered pain perception. Elevated levels of centrally produced endorphins or endocannabinoids are implicated as mediators of exercise-induced analgesia. The effect of exercise on the development and persistence of disease-associated acute/chronic pain remains unclear. In this study, we quantified the physiological consequence of forced-exercise on the development of diabetes-associated neuropathic pain. Euglycemic control or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic adult male rats were subdivided into sedentary or forced-exercised (2-10 weeks, treadmill) subgroups and assessed for changes in tactile responsiveness. Two weeks following STZ-treatment, sedentary rats developed a marked and sustained hypersensitivity to von Frey tactile stimulation. By comparison, STZ-treated diabetic rats undergoing forced-exercise exhibited a 4-week delay in the onset of tactile hypersensitivity that was independent of glucose control. Exercise-facilitated analgesia in diabetic rats was reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, by naloxone. Small-diameter (< 30 μm) DRG neurons harvested from STZ-treated tactile hypersensitive diabetic rats exhibited an enhanced (2.5-fold) rightward (depolarizing) shift in peak high-voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) current density with a concomitant appearance of a low-voltage activated (LVA) Ca(2+) current component. LVA Ca(2+) currents present in DRG neurons from hypersensitive diabetic rats exhibited a marked depolarizing shift in steady-state inactivation. Forced-exercise attenuated diabetes-associated changes in HVA Ca(2+) current density while preventing the depolarizing shift in steady-state inactivation of LVA Ca(2+) currents. Forced-exercise markedly delays the onset of diabetes-associated neuropathic pain, in part, by attenuating associated changes in HVA and LVA Ca(2+) channel function within small-diameter DRG neurons possibly by altering opioidergic tone. PMID:21554321

  4. Actions of arginine polyamine on voltage and ligand-activated whole cell currents recorded from cultured neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, R. H.; Sweeney, M. I.; Kobrinsky, E. M.; Pearson, H. A.; Timms, G. H.; Pullar, I. A.; Wedley, S.; Dolphin, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    1. Toxins from invertebrates have proved useful tools for investigation of the properties of ion channels. In this study we describe the actions of arginine polyamine which is believed to be a close analogue of FTX, a polyamine isolated from the American funnel web spider, Agelenopsis aperta. 2. Voltage-activated Ca2+ currents and Ca(2+)-dependent Cl- currents recorded from rat cultured dorsal root ganglion neurones were reversibly inhibited by arginine polyamine (AP; 0.001 to 100 microM). Low voltage-activated T-type Ca2+ currents were significantly more sensitive to AP than high voltage-activated Ca2+ currents. The IC50 values for the actions of AP on low and high voltage-activated Ca2+ currents were 10 nM and 3 microM respectively. AP was equally effective in inhibiting high voltage-activated currents carried by Ba2+, Sr2+ or Ca2+. However, AP-induced inhibition of Ca2+ currents was attenuated by increasing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration from 2 mM to 10 mM. 3. The actions of AP on a Ca(2+)-independent K+ current were more complex, 1 microM AP enhanced this current but 10 microM AP had a dual action, initially enhancing but then inhibiting the K+ current. 4. gamma-Aminobutyric acid-activated Cl- currents were also reversibly inhibited by 1 to 10 microM AP. In contrast N-methyl-D-aspartate currents recorded from rat cultured cerebellar neurones were greatly enhanced by 10 microM AP. 5. We conclude that at a concentration of 10 nM, AP is a selective inhibitor of low threshold T-type voltage-activated Ca2+ currents.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1380382

  5. Control method for peak power delivery with limited DC-bus voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, John; Xu, Longya; Bhargava, Brij B.

    2006-09-05

    A method for driving a neutral point-clamped multi-level voltage source inverter supplying a synchronous motor is provided. A DC current is received at a neutral point-clamped multi-level voltage source inverter. The inverter has first, second, and third output nodes. The inverter also has a plurality of switches. A desired speed of a synchronous motor connected to the inverter by the first second and third nodes is received by the inverter. The synchronous motor has a rotor and the speed of the motor is defined by the rotational rate of the rotor. A position of the rotor is sensed, current flowing to the motor out of at least two of the first, second, and third output nodes is sensed, and predetermined switches are automatically activated by the inverter responsive to the sensed rotor position, the sensed current, and the desired speed.

  6. Regulation of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels by S-palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Shipston, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    BK (large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium) channels are important determinants of physiological control in the nervous, endocrine and vascular systems with channel dysfunction associated with major disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. Thus the mechanisms that control channel surface expression and/or activity are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. BK channels are S-acylated (palmitoylated) at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus of the pore-forming α-subunit. Palmitoylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas palmitoylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. Recent studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic insights into how palmitoylation controls channel trafficking and cross-talk with phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways. Intriguingly, each site of palmitoylation is regulated by distinct zDHHCs (palmitoyl acyltransferases) and APTs (acyl thioesterases). This supports that different mechanisms may control substrate specificity by zDHHCs and APTs even within the same target protein. As palmitoylation is dynamically regulated, this fundamental post-translational modification represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:23356260

  7. Graded boosting of synaptic signals by low-threshold voltage-activated calcium conductance.

    PubMed

    Carbó Tano, Martín; Vilarchao, María Eugenia; Szczupak, Lidia

    2015-07-01

    Low-threshold voltage-activated calcium conductances (LT-VACCs) play a substantial role in shaping the electrophysiological attributes of neurites. We have investigated how these conductances affect synaptic integration in a premotor nonspiking (NS) neuron of the leech nervous system. These cells exhibit an extensive neuritic tree, do not fire Na(+)-dependent spikes, but express an LT-VACC that was sensitive to 250 μM Ni(2+) and 100 μM NNC 55-0396 (NNC). NS neurons responded to excitation of mechanosensory pressure neurons with depolarizing responses for which amplitude was a linear function of the presynaptic firing frequency. NNC decreased these synaptic responses and abolished the concomitant widespread Ca(2+) signals. Coherent with the interpretation that the LT-VACC amplified signals at the postsynaptic level, this conductance also amplified the responses of NS neurons to direct injection of sinusoidal current. Synaptic amplification thus is achieved via a positive feedback in which depolarizing signals activate an LT-VACC that, in turn, boosts these signals. The wide distribution of LT-VACC could support the active propagation of depolarizing signals, turning the complex NS neuritic tree into a relatively compact electrical compartment. PMID:25972583

  8. Membrane Tension Accelerates Rate-limiting Voltage-dependent Activation and Slow Inactivation Steps in a Shaker Channel

    PubMed Central

    Laitko, Ulrike; Morris, Catherine E.

    2004-01-01

    A classical voltage-sensitive channel is tension sensitive—the kinetics of Shaker and S3–S4 linker deletion mutants change with membrane stretch (Tabarean, I.V., and C.E. Morris. 2002. Biophys. J. 82:2982–2994.). Does stretch distort the channel protein, producing novel channel states, or, more interestingly, are existing transitions inherently tension sensitive? We examined stretch and voltage dependence of mutant 5aa, whose ultra-simple activation (Gonzalez, C., E. Rosenman, F. Bezanilla, O. Alvarez, and R. Latorre. 2000. J. Gen. Physiol. 115:193–208.) and temporally matched activation and slow inactivation were ideal for these studies. We focused on macroscopic patch current parameters related to elementary channel transitions: maximum slope and delay of current rise, and time constant of current decline. Stretch altered the magnitude of these parameters, but not, or minimally, their voltage dependence. Maximum slope and delay versus voltage with and without stretch as well as current rising phases were well described by expressions derived for an irreversible four-step activation model, indicating there is no separate stretch-activated opening pathway. This model, with slow inactivation added, explains most of our data. From this we infer that the voltage-dependent activation path is inherently stretch sensitive. Simulated currents for schemes with additional activation steps were compared against datasets; this showed that generally, additional complexity was not called for. Because the voltage sensitivities of activation and inactivation differ, it was not possible to substitute depolarization for stretch so as to produce the same overall PO time course. What we found, however, was that at a given voltage, stretch-accelerated current rise and decline almost identically—normalized current traces with and without stretch could be matched by a rescaling of time. Rate-limitation of the current falling phase by activation was ruled out. We hypothesize

  9. Membrane tension accelerates rate-limiting voltage-dependent activation and slow inactivation steps in a Shaker channel.

    PubMed

    Laitko, Ulrike; Morris, Catherine E

    2004-02-01

    A classical voltage-sensitive channel is tension sensitive--the kinetics of Shaker and S3-S4 linker deletion mutants change with membrane stretch (Tabarean, I.V., and C.E. Morris. 2002. Biophys. J. 82:2982-2994.). Does stretch distort the channel protein, producing novel channel states, or, more interestingly, are existing transitions inherently tension sensitive? We examined stretch and voltage dependence of mutant 5aa, whose ultra-simple activation (Gonzalez, C., E. Rosenman, F. Bezanilla, O. Alvarez, and R. Latorre. 2000. J. Gen. Physiol. 115:193-208.) and temporally matched activation and slow inactivation were ideal for these studies. We focused on macroscopic patch current parameters related to elementary channel transitions: maximum slope and delay of current rise, and time constant of current decline. Stretch altered the magnitude of these parameters, but not, or minimally, their voltage dependence. Maximum slope and delay versus voltage with and without stretch as well as current rising phases were well described by expressions derived for an irreversible four-step activation model, indicating there is no separate stretch-activated opening pathway. This model, with slow inactivation added, explains most of our data. From this we infer that the voltage-dependent activation path is inherently stretch sensitive. Simulated currents for schemes with additional activation steps were compared against datasets; this showed that generally, additional complexity was not called for. Because the voltage sensitivities of activation and inactivation differ, it was not possible to substitute depolarization for stretch so as to produce the same overall PO time course. What we found, however, was that at a given voltage, stretch-accelerated current rise and decline almost identically--normalized current traces with and without stretch could be matched by a rescaling of time. Rate-limitation of the current falling phase by activation was ruled out. We hypothesize, therefore

  10. The Monogenean Which Lost Its Clamps

    PubMed Central

    Justine, Jean-Lou; Rahmouni, Chahrazed; Gey, Delphine; Schoelinck, Charlotte; Hoberg, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Ectoparasites face a daily challenge: to remain attached to their hosts. Polyopisthocotylean monogeneans usually attach to the surface of fish gills using highly specialized structures, the sclerotized clamps. In the original description of the protomicrocotylid species Lethacotyle fijiensis, described 60 years ago, the clamps were considered to be absent but few specimens were available and this observation was later questioned. In addition, genera within the family Protomicrocotylidae have either clamps of the “gastrocotylid” or the “microcotylid” types; this puzzled systematists because these clamp types are characteristic of distinct, major groups. Discovery of another, new, species of the genus Lethacotyle, has allowed us to explore the nature of the attachment structures in protomicrocotylids. Lethacotyle vera n. sp. is described from the gills of the carangid Caranx papuensis off New Caledonia. It is distinguished from Lethacotyle fijiensis, the only other species of the genus, by the length of the male copulatory spines. Sequences of 28S rDNA were used to build a tree, in which Lethacotyle vera grouped with other protomicrocotylids. The identity of the host fish was confirmed with COI barcodes. We observed that protomicrocotylids have specialized structures associated with their attachment organ, such as lateral flaps and transverse striations, which are not known in other monogeneans. We thus hypothesized that the clamps in protomicrocotylids were sequentially lost during evolution, coinciding with the development of other attachment structures. To test the hypothesis, we calculated the surfaces of clamps and body in 120 species of gastrocotylinean monogeneans, based on published descriptions. The ratio of clamp surface: body surface was the lowest in protomicrocotylids. We conclude that clamps in protomicrocotylids are vestigial organs, and that occurrence of “gastrocotylid” and simpler “microcotylid” clamps within the same family are

  11. Effects of pinaverium on voltage-activated calcium channel currents of single smooth muscle cells isolated from the longitudinal muscle of the rabbit jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Beech, D. J.; MacKenzie, I.; Bolton, T. B.; Christen, M. O.

    1990-01-01

    1. Smooth muscle cells of the longitudinal muscle of the rabbit jejunum were dispersed by enzyme treatment and recordings of membrane current were made in the whole-cell mode by patch clamp technique. The action of pinaverium bromide on the voltage-dependent inward current of single isolated smooth muscle cells was studied in solutions containing normal concentrations of calcium or high concentrations of barium at room temperature. 2. Pinaverium reduced the voltage-dependent inward current with an IC50 of 1.5 microM. This IC50 is similar to those of verapamil, diltiazem and flunarizine on these cells as described by others. Occasionally evidence of a potentiating action of pinaverium on the inward current was seen. 3. Repetitive stimulation of the cells did not increase blockade of inward current by pinaverium unlike the use-dependent blockade seen with verapamil, methoxyverapamil, and diltiazem in these and in other smooth muscle cells. 4. The inactivation of inward current was studied by holding at various potentials for 2 or 10 s before evoking inward current. The voltage at which current was 50% available was changed very little by pinaverium although other calcium entry blockers, for example the dihydropyridines, have been reported to produce appreciable negative shifts which indicate considerable voltage-dependence of their blockade. This may indicate that pinaverium has similar affinities for the closed available and inactivated calcium channel states so that blockade is not appreciably voltage-dependent. PMID:1691676

  12. Effects of pinaverium on voltage-activated calcium channel currents of single smooth muscle cells isolated from the longitudinal muscle of the rabbit jejunum.

    PubMed

    Beech, D J; MacKenzie, I; Bolton, T B; Christen, M O

    1990-02-01

    1. Smooth muscle cells of the longitudinal muscle of the rabbit jejunum were dispersed by enzyme treatment and recordings of membrane current were made in the whole-cell mode by patch clamp technique. The action of pinaverium bromide on the voltage-dependent inward current of single isolated smooth muscle cells was studied in solutions containing normal concentrations of calcium or high concentrations of barium at room temperature. 2. Pinaverium reduced the voltage-dependent inward current with an IC50 of 1.5 microM. This IC50 is similar to those of verapamil, diltiazem and flunarizine on these cells as described by others. Occasionally evidence of a potentiating action of pinaverium on the inward current was seen. 3. Repetitive stimulation of the cells did not increase blockade of inward current by pinaverium unlike the use-dependent blockade seen with verapamil, methoxyverapamil, and diltiazem in these and in other smooth muscle cells. 4. The inactivation of inward current was studied by holding at various potentials for 2 or 10 s before evoking inward current. The voltage at which current was 50% available was changed very little by pinaverium although other calcium entry blockers, for example the dihydropyridines, have been reported to produce appreciable negative shifts which indicate considerable voltage-dependence of their blockade. This may indicate that pinaverium has similar affinities for the closed available and inactivated calcium channel states so that blockade is not appreciably voltage-dependent. PMID:1691676

  13. 33 CFR 183.560 - Hose clamps: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Hose clamps: Installation. Each hose clamp on a hose from the fuel tank to the fuel inlet connection on..., pipe, or hose fitting; and (d) Not depend solely on the spring tension of the clamp for...

  14. Surface characterization of selected LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromer, T. F.; Grammer, H. L.; Wightman, J. P.; Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.

    1993-01-01

    The surface characterization of chromic acid anodized 6061-T6 aluminum alloy tray clamps has shown differences in surface chemistry depending upon the position on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Water contact angle results showed no changes in wettability of the tray clamps. The overall surface topography of the control, trailing edge(E3) and leading edge(D9) samples was similar. The thickness of the aluminum oxide layer for all samples determined by Auger depth profiling was less than one micron. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the tray clamps showed significant differences in the surface composition. Carbon and silicon containing compounds were the primary contaminants detected.

  15. A Bright and Fast Red Fluorescent Protein Voltage Indicator That Reports Neuronal Activity in Organotypic Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed S; Farhi, Samouil L; Zhao, Yongxin; Brinks, Daan; Zou, Peng; Ruangkittisakul, Araya; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A; Ballanyi, Klaus; Cohen, Adam E; Campbell, Robert E

    2016-02-24

    Optical imaging of voltage indicators based on green fluorescent proteins (FPs) or archaerhodopsin has emerged as a powerful approach for detecting the activity of many individual neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution. Relative to green FP-based voltage indicators, a bright red-shifted FP-based voltage indicator has the intrinsic advantages of lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescent background, and compatibility with blue-light-excitable channelrhodopsins. Here, we report a bright red fluorescent voltage indicator (fluorescent indicator for voltage imaging red; FlicR1) with properties that are comparable to the best available green indicators. To develop FlicR1, we used directed protein evolution and rational engineering to screen libraries of thousands of variants. FlicR1 faithfully reports single action potentials (∼3% ΔF/F) and tracks electrically driven voltage oscillations at 100 Hz in dissociated Sprague Dawley rat hippocampal neurons in single trial recordings. Furthermore, FlicR1 can be easily imaged with wide-field fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that FlicR1 can be used in conjunction with a blue-shifted channelrhodopsin for all-optical electrophysiology, although blue light photoactivation of the FlicR1 chromophore presents a challenge for applications that require spatially overlapping yellow and blue excitation. PMID:26911693

  16. L-type voltage-operated calcium channels contribute to astrocyte activation In vitro.

    PubMed

    Cheli, Veronica T; Santiago González, Diara A; Smith, Jessica; Spreuer, Vilma; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Paez, Pablo M

    2016-08-01

    We have found a significant upregulation of L-type voltage-operated Ca(++) channels (VOCCs) in reactive astrocytes. To test if VOCCs are centrally involved in triggering astrocyte reactivity, we used in vitro models of astrocyte activation in combination with pharmacological inhibitors, siRNAs and the Cre/lox system to reduce the activity of L-type VOCCs in primary cortical astrocytes. The endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as high extracellular K(+) , glutamate, and ATP promote astrogliosis in vitro. L-type VOCC inhibitors drastically reduce the number of reactive cells, astrocyte hypertrophy, and cell proliferation after these treatments. Astrocytes transfected with siRNAs for the Cav1.2 subunit that conducts L-type Ca(++) currents as well as Cav1.2 knockout astrocytes showed reduce Ca(++) influx by ∼80% after plasma membrane depolarization. Importantly, Cav1.2 knock-down/out prevents astrocyte activation and proliferation induced by LPS. Similar results were found using the scratch wound assay. After injuring the astrocyte monolayer, cells extend processes toward the cell-free scratch region and subsequently migrate and populate the scratch. We found a significant increase in the activity of L-type VOCCs in reactive astrocytes located in the growing line in comparison to quiescent astrocytes situated away from the scratch. Moreover, the migration of astrocytes from the scratching line as well as the number of proliferating astrocytes was reduced in Cav1.2 knock-down/out cultures. In summary, our results suggest that Cav1.2 L-type VOCCs play a fundamental role in the induction and/or proliferation of reactive astrocytes, and indicate that the inhibition of these Ca(++) channels may be an effective way to prevent astrocyte activation. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1396-1415. PMID:27247164

  17. Dual Functions, Clamp Opening and Primer-Template Recognition, Define a Key Clamp Loader Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Maria Magdalena; Jin, Mi; Ceapa, Razvan; Finkelstein, Jeff; O'Donnell, Michael; Chait, Brian T.; Hingorani, Manju M.

    2010-01-01

    Clamp loader proteins catalyze assembly of circular sliding clamps on DNA to enable processive DNA replication. During the reaction, the clamp loader binds primer-template DNA and positions it in the center of a clamp to form a topological link between the two. Clamp loaders are multi-protein complexes, such as the five protein Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and human clamp loaders, and the two protein Pyrococcus furiosus and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum clamp loaders, and thus far the site(s) responsible for binding and selecting primer-template DNA as the target for clamp assembly remain unknown. To address this issue, we analyzed the interaction between the E. coli γ complex clamp loader and DNA using UV-induced protein–DNA cross-linking and mass spectrometry. The results show that the δ subunit in the γ complex makes close contact with the primer-template junction. Tryptophan 279 in the δ C-terminal domain lies near the 3′-OH primer end and may play a key role in primer-template recognition. Previous studies have shown that δ also binds and opens the β clamp (hydrophobic residues in the N-terminal domain of δ contact β. The clamp-binding and DNA-binding sites on δ appear positioned for facile entry of primer-template into the center of the clamp and exit of the template strand from the complex. A similar analysis of the S. cerevisiae RFC complex suggests that the dual functionality observed for δ in the γ complex may be true also for clamp loaders from other organisms. PMID:15364574

  18. A comparison of the performance and application differences between manual and automated patch-clamp techniques.

    PubMed

    Yajuan, Xiao; Xin, Liang; Zhiyuan, Li

    2012-01-01

    The patch clamp technique is commonly used in electrophysiological experiments and offers direct insight into ion channel properties through the characterization of ion channel activity. This technique can be used to elucidate the interaction between a drug and a specific ion channel at different conformational states to understand the ion channel modulators' mechanisms. The patch clamp technique is regarded as a gold standard for ion channel research; however, it suffers from low throughput and high personnel costs. In the last decade, the development of several automated electrophysiology platforms has greatly increased the screen throughput of whole cell electrophysiological recordings. New advancements in the automated patch clamp systems have aimed to provide high data quality, high content, and high throughput. However, due to the limitations noted above, automated patch clamp systems are not capable of replacing manual patch clamp systems in ion channel research. While automated patch clamp systems are useful for screening large amounts of compounds in cell lines that stably express high levels of ion channels, the manual patch clamp technique is still necessary for studying ion channel properties in some research areas and for specific cell types, including primary cells that have mixed cell types and differentiated cells that derive from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Therefore, further improvements in flexibility with regard to cell types and data quality will broaden the applications of the automated patch clamp systems in both academia and industry. PMID:23346269

  19. Vibration control of a flexible clamped-clamped plate based on an improved FULMS algorithm and laser displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lingbo; Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Xian-min

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a novel active resonant vibration control experiment of a flexible clamped-clamped plate using an improved filtered-U least mean square (FULMS) algorithm and laser displacement measurement. Different from the widely used PZT sensors or acceleration transducers, the vibration of the flexible clamped-clamped plate is measured by a non-contact laser displacement measurement sensor with higher measurement accuracy and without additional load to the plate. The conventional FULMS algorithm often uses fixed step size and needs reference signal related to the external disturbance signal. However, the fixed step size method cannot obtain a fast convergence speed and it will result in a low residual error. Thus, a variable step size method is investigated. In addition, it is difficult to extract reference signal related to the vibration source directly in the practical application. Therefore, it is practically useful that a reference signal is constructed by both the controller parameters and the vibration residual signal. The experimental results demonstrate that the improved FULMS algorithm has better vibration control effect than the proportional derivative (PD) feedback control algorithm and the fixed step-size control algorithm.

  20. Development and testing of an active high voltage saturation probe for characterization of ultra-high voltage silicon carbide semiconductor devices.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Argenis V; Schrock, James A; Ray, William B; Kelley, Mitchell D; Holt, Shad L; Giesselmann, Michael G; Bayne, Stephen B

    2015-08-01

    Obtaining accurate collector to emitter voltage measurements when characterizing high voltage silicon carbide (SiC) devices requires the ability to measure voltages in the range of zero to 10 V while the device is in the on-state and the ability to withstand ultra-high voltages while the device is in the off-state. This paper presents a specialized voltage probe capable of accurately measuring the aforementioned range. A comparison is made between the proposed probe and other commonly used high voltage probe alternatives in relation to high voltage SiC device testing. Testing of the probe was performed to ensure linearity, high accuracy, and high bandwidth. PMID:26329230

  1. Systemic dexmedetomidine augments inhibitory synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn through activation of descending noradrenergic control: an in vivo patch-clamp analysis of analgesic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Funai, Yusuke; Pickering, Anthony Edward; Uta, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kiyonobu; Mori, Takashi; Asada, Akira; Imoto, Keiji; Furue, Hidemasa

    2014-03-01

    α2-Adrenoceptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and the systemic administration of α2-agonists such as dexmedetomidine produces clinically useful, centrally mediated sedation and analgesia; however, these same actions also limit the utility of these agents (ie, unwanted sedative actions). Despite a wealth of data on cellular and synaptic actions of α2-agonists in vitro, it is not known which neuronal circuits are modulated in vivo to produce the analgesic effect. To address this issue, we made in vivo recordings of membrane currents and synaptic activities in superficial spinal dorsal horn neurons and examined their responses to systemic dexmedetomidine. We found that dexmedetomidine at doses that produce analgesia (<10 μg/kg) enhanced inhibitory postsynaptic transmission within the superficial dorsal horn without altering excitatory synaptic transmission or evoking direct postsynaptic membrane currents. In contrast, higher doses of dexmedetomidine (>10 μg/kg) induced outward currents by a direct postsynaptic action. The dexmedetomidine-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic current facilitation was not mimicked by spinal application of dexmedetomidine and was absent in spinalized rats, suggesting that it acts at a supraspinal site. Furthermore, it was inhibited by spinal application of the α1-antagonist prazosin. In the brainstem, low doses of systemic dexmedetomidine produced an excitation of locus coeruleus neurons. These results suggest that systemic α2-adrenoceptor stimulation may facilitate inhibitory synaptic responses in the superficial dorsal horn to produce analgesia mediated by activation of the pontospinal noradrenergic inhibitory system. This novel mechanism may provide new targets for intervention, perhaps allowing analgesic actions to be dissociated from excessive sedation. PMID:24355412

  2. Systemic dexmedetomidine augments inhibitory synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn through activation of descending noradrenergic control: an in vivo patch-clamp analysis of analgesic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Funai, Yusuke; Pickering, Anthony Edward; Uta, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kiyonobu; Mori, Takashi; Asada, Akira; Imoto, Keiji; Furue, Hidemasa

    2014-01-01

    α2-adrenoceptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and the systemic administration of α2-agonists such as dexmedetomidine produces clinically useful, centrally-mediated sedation and analgesia; however, these same actions also limit the utility of these agents (ie unwanted sedative actions). Despite a wealth of data on cellular and synaptic actions of α2-agonists in vitro, it is not known which neuronal circuits are modulated in vivo to produce the analgesic effect. To address this issue, we made in vivo recordings of membrane currents and synaptic activities in superficial spinal dorsal horn neurons and examined their responses to systemic dexmedetomidine. We found that dexmedetomidine at doses that produce analgesia (<10 μg/kg) enhanced inhibitory postsynaptic transmission within the superficial dorsal horn without altering excitatory synaptic transmission or evoking direct postsynaptic membrane currents. In contrast, higher doses of dexmedetomidine (>10 μg/kg) induced outward currents by a direct postsynaptic action. The dexmedetomidine-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) facilitation was not mimicked by spinal application of dexmedetomidine and was absent in spinalized rats, suggesting it acts at a supraspinal site. Further it was inhibited by spinal application of the α1-antagonist prazosin. In the brain stem, low doses of systemic dexmedetomidine produced an excitation of locus coeruleus neurons. These results suggest that systemic α2-adrenoceptor stimulation may facilitate inhibitory synaptic responses in the superficial dorsal horn to produce analgesia mediated by activation of the pontospinal noradrenergic inhibitory system. This novel mechanism may provide new targets for intervention perhaps allowing analgesic actions to be dissociated from excessive sedation. PMID:24355412

  3. Dynamic clamp with StdpC software

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic clamp is a powerful method that allows the introduction of artificial electrical components into target cells to simulate ionic conductances and synaptic inputs. This method is based on a fast cycle of measuring the membrane potential of a cell, calculating the current of a desired simulated component using an appropriate model and injecting this current into the cell. Here, we present a dynamic clamp protocol using free, fully integrated, open-source software (StdpC, Spike timing dependent plasticity Clamp). Use of this protocol does not require specialist hardware, costly commercial software, experience in real time operating systems or a strong programming background. The software enables the configuration and operation of a wide range of complex and fully automated dynamic clamp experiments via an intuitive and powerful interface with a minimal initial lead-time of a few hours. After initial configuration, experimental results can be generated within minutes of cell impalement. PMID:21372819

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  5. Structural analysis of a eukaryotic sliding DNA clamp-clamp loadercomplex.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Gregory D.; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    2006-06-17

    Sliding clamps are ring-shaped proteins that encircle DNA and confer high processivity on DNA polymerases. Here we report the crystal structure of the five-protein clamp loader complex (replication factor-C, RFC) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bound to the sliding clamp (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA). Tight interfacial coordination of the ATP analogue ATP-?-S by RFC results in a spiral arrangement of the ATPase domains of the clamp loader above the PCNA ring. Placement of a model for primed DNA within the central hole of PCNA reveals a striking correspondence between the RFC spiral and the grooves of the DNA double helix. This model, in which the clamp loader complex locks onto primed DNA in a screw-cap-like arrangement, provides a simple explanation for the process by which the engagement of primer-template junctions by the RFC:PCNA complex results in ATP hydrolysis and release of the sliding clamp on DNA.

  6. Protein folding in a force-clamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Szymczak, Piotr

    2006-03-01

    Kinetics of folding of a protein held in a force-clamp are compared to an unconstrained folding. The comparison is made within a simple topology-based dynamical model of ubiquitin. We demonstrate that the experimentally observed rapid changes in the end-to-end distance mirror microscopic events during folding. However, the folding scenarios in and out of the force-clamp are distinct.

  7. The Role of S4 Charges in Voltage-dependent and Voltage-independent KCNQ1 Potassium Channel Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Panaghie, Gianina; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels extend their functional repertoire by coassembling with MinK-related peptides (MiRPs). MinK slows the activation of channels formed with KCNQ1 α subunits to generate the voltage-dependent IKs channel in human heart; MiRP1 and MiRP2 remove the voltage dependence of KCNQ1 to generate potassium “leak” currents in gastrointestinal epithelia. Other Kv α subunits interact with MiRP1 and MiRP2 but without loss of voltage dependence; the mechanism for this disparity is unknown. Here, sequence alignments revealed that the voltage-sensing S4 domain of KCNQ1 bears lower net charge (+3) than that of any other eukaryotic voltage-gated ion channel. We therefore examined the role of KCNQ1 S4 charges in channel activation using alanine-scanning mutagenesis and two-electrode voltage clamp. Alanine replacement of R231, at the N-terminal side of S4, produced constitutive activation in homomeric KCNQ1 channels, a phenomenon not observed with previous single amino acid substitutions in S4 of other channels. Homomeric KCNQ4 channels were also made constitutively active by mutagenesis to mimic the S4 charge balance of R231A-KCNQ1. Loss of single S4 charges at positions R231 or R237 produced constitutively active MinK-KCNQ1 channels and increased the constitutively active component of MiRP2-KCNQ1 currents. Charge addition to the CO2H-terminal half of S4 eliminated constitutive activation in MiRP2-KCNQ1 channels, whereas removal of homologous charges from KCNQ4 S4 produced constitutively active MiRP2-KCNQ4 channels. The results demonstrate that the unique S4 charge paucity of KCNQ1 facilitates its unique conversion to a leak channel by ancillary subunits such as MiRP2. PMID:17227916

  8. Characterization of K+ currents using an in situ patch clamp technique in body wall muscle cells from Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Jospin, Maëlle; Mariol, Marie-Christine; Ségalat, Laurent; Allard, Bruno

    2002-01-01

    The properties of K+ channels in body wall muscle cells acutely dissected from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans were investigated at the macroscopic and unitary level using an in situ patch clamp technique. In the whole-cell configuration, depolarizations to potentials positive to −40 mV gave rise to outward currents resulting from the activation of two kinetically distinct voltage-dependent K+ currents: a fast activating and inactivating 4-aminopyridine-sensitive component and a slowly activating and maintained tetraethylammonium-sensitive component. In cell-attached patches, voltage-dependent K+ channels, with unitary conductances of 34 and 80 pS in the presence of 5 and 140 mm external K+, respectively, activated at membrane potentials positive to −40 mV. Excision revealed that these channels corresponded to Ca2+-activated K+ channels exhibiting an unusual sensitivity to internal Cl− and whose activity progressively decreased in inside-out conditions. After complete run-down of these channels, one third of inside-out patches displayed activity of another Ca2+-activated K+ channel of smaller unitary conductance (6 pS at 0 mV in the presence of 5 mm external K+). In providing a detailed description of native K+ currents in body wall muscle cells of C. elegans, this work lays the basis for further comparisons with mutants to assess the function of K+ channels in this model organism that is highly amenable to molecular and classical genetics. PMID:12381812

  9. Active Power Rescheduling for Avoiding Voltage Collapse Using Modified Bare Bones Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Rajesh; Purey, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    MW-generation rescheduling is being considered for voltage stability improvement under stressed operating condition. At times it can avoid voltage collapse. This paper describes an algorithm for determination of optimum MW-generation participation pattern for static voltage stability margin enhancement. The optimum search direction has been obtained by employing modified bare born particle swarm optimization technique. Optimum search direction is based on maximization of distance to point of collapse in generation space. Developed algorithm has been implemented on a standard 25 bus test system. Results obtained have been compared with those obtained using standard particle swarm optimization.

  10. Active Power Rescheduling for Avoiding Voltage Collapse Using Modified Bare Bones Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Rajesh; Purey, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    MW-generation rescheduling is being considered for voltage stability improvement under stressed operating condition. At times it can avoid voltage collapse. This paper describes an algorithm for determination of optimum MW-generation participation pattern for static voltage stability margin enhancement. The optimum search direction has been obtained by employing modified bare born particle swarm optimization technique. Optimum search direction is based on maximization of distance to point of collapse in generation space. Developed algorithm has been implemented on a standard 25 bus test system. Results obtained have been compared with those obtained using standard particle swarm optimization.

  11. Monitoring Integrated Activity of Individual Neurons Using FRET-Based Voltage-Sensitive Dyes.

    PubMed

    Briggman, Kevin L; Kristan, William B; González, Jesús E; Kleinfeld, David; Tsien, Roger Y

    2015-01-01

    Pairs of membrane-associated molecules exhibiting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) provide a sensitive technique to measure changes in a cell's membrane potential. One of the FRET pair binds to one surface of the membrane and the other is a mobile ion that dissolves in the lipid bilayer. The voltage-related signal can be measured as a change in the fluorescence of either the donor or acceptor molecules, but measuring their ratio provides the largest and most noise-free signal. This technology has been used in a variety of ways; three are documented in this chapter: (1) high throughput drug screening, (2) monitoring the activity of many neurons simultaneously during a behavior, and (3) finding synaptic targets of a stimulated neuron. In addition, we provide protocols for using the dyes on both cultured neurons and leech ganglia. We also give an updated description of the mathematical basis for measuring the coherence between electrical and optical signals. Future improvements of this technique include faster and more sensitive dyes that bleach more slowly, and the expression of one of the FRET pair genetically. PMID:26238052

  12. Voltage- and calcium-dependent motility of saccular hair bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, Patricia M.; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-12-01

    Active bundle motility, which is hypothesized to supply feedback for mechanical amplification of signals, is thought to enhance sensitivity and sharpen tuning in vestibular and auditory organs. To study active hair bundle motility, we combined high-speed camera recordings of bullfrog sacculi, which were mounted in a two-compartment chamber, and voltage-clamp of the hair cell membrane potential. Using this paradigm, we measured three types of bundle motions: 1) spontaneous oscillations which can be analyzed to measure the physiological operating range of the transduction channel; 2) a sustained quasi-static movement of the bundle that depends on membrane potential; and 3) a fast, transient and asymmetric movement that resets the bundle position and depends on changes in the membrane potential. These data support a role for both calcium and voltage in the transduction-channel function.

  13. Active voltage contrast imaging of cross-sectional surface of multilayer ceramic capacitor using helium ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, C.; Ishida, N.; Masuda, H.; Nagano, S.; Kitahara, M.; Ogata, Y.; Fujita, D.

    2016-08-01

    We studied active voltage contrast (AVC) imaging using helium ion microscopy (HIM). We observed secondary electron (SE) images of the cross-sectional surface of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) with and without a voltage applied to the internal electrodes. When no voltage was applied, we obtained an image reflecting the material contrast between the Ni internal electrode region and the BaTiO3 dielectric region of the cross-sectional surface of the MLCC. When a voltage was applied, the electrical potential difference between the grounded and the positively biased internal electrodes affected the contrast (voltage contrast). Moreover, attenuation of the SE intensity from the grounded to the positively biased internal electrodes was observed in the dielectric region. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements of the contact potential difference (CPD) were performed on the same sample. By using the AVC image from the HIM observation and the CPD image from the KPFM measurement, we could quantitatively evaluate the electrical potential. We think that the results of this study will lead to an expansion in the number of applications of HIM.

  14. Ventricular Activation And Repolarization Viewed By Images Of Voltage-Sensitive Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Anthony; Lombardi, Richard; Salama, Guy

    1989-08-01

    Patterns of activation (A) and perhaps repolarization (R) depend on myocardial fiber structure and intercellular resistance, parallel and perpendicular to fiber orientation. Gray scale maps of A and R were measured from Langendorff preparations of left guinea pig ventricles stained with a voltage-sensitive dye (di-4-ANEPPS). Action potentials (124) were recorded from syncytia (6x6 and 12x12 mm) under SA node control, or stimulated at the edges (4) of a patch viewed with a photodiode array. At the end of the runs, muscles were marked with ink, fixed, sectioned every 5 pm as a function of depth, up to 1 mm. Fiber axis rotated less than 15 degrees in depth for the first 0.5 mm of epicardium and was aligned with respect to optical maps of A and R. Fast and slow A pathways matched respectively the parallel and perpendicular orientations of the fiber axis. R did not follow the fast axis of fiber orientation, but appears to travel either transverse or 45 degrees to it. R typically occurred at the apex of the ventricle suggesting that these cells have intrinsically shorter action potential durations (APD's). Under SA node control, Purkinje fibers accelerated the conduction velocity of the A process 4 fold over electrical pacing. The average velocity of R, however, remained the same whether SA node or electrically paced, demonstrating that Purkinje fibers do not drive the R process. During hypoxia, A patterns and conduction velocity remained stable, but APD's decreased dramatically within 10 minutes and the pattern of R become random and its velocity decreased. Thus R is also an active process, dependent on cell-to-cell coupling and highly susceptible to hypoxia.

  15. Ion channelopathies in human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes: a dynamic clamp study with virtual IK1

    PubMed Central

    Meijer van Putten, Rosalie M. E.; Mengarelli, Isabella; Guan, Kaomei; Zegers, Jan G.; van Ginneken, Antoni C. G.; Verkerk, Arie O.; Wilders, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) are widely used in studying basic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias that are caused by ion channelopathies. Unfortunately, the action potential profile of hiPSC-CMs—and consequently the profile of individual membrane currents active during that action potential—differs substantially from that of native human cardiomyocytes, largely due to almost negligible expression of the inward rectifier potassium current (IK1). In the present study, we attempted to “normalize” the action potential profile of our hiPSC-CMs by inserting a voltage dependent in silico IK1 into our hiPSC-CMs, using the dynamic clamp configuration of the patch clamp technique. Recordings were made from single hiPSC-CMs, using the perforated patch clamp technique at physiological temperature. We assessed three different models of IK1, with different degrees of inward rectification, and systematically varied the magnitude of the inserted IK1. Also, we modified the inserted IK1 in order to assess the effects of loss- and gain-of-function mutations in the KCNJ2 gene, which encodes the Kir2.1 protein that is primarily responsible for the IK1 channel in human ventricle. For our experiments, we selected spontaneously beating hiPSC-CMs, with negligible IK1 as demonstrated in separate voltage clamp experiments, which were paced at 1 Hz. Upon addition of in silico IK1 with a peak outward density of 4–6 pA/pF, these hiPSC-CMs showed a ventricular-like action potential morphology with a stable resting membrane potential near −80 mV and a maximum upstroke velocity >150 V/s (n = 9). Proarrhythmic action potential changes were observed upon injection of both loss-of-function and gain-of-function IK1, as associated with Andersen–Tawil syndrome type 1 and short QT syndrome type 3, respectively (n = 6). We conclude that injection of in silico IK1 makes the hiPSC-CM a more reliable model for investigating mechanisms underlying cardiac

  16. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  17. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  18. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  19. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  20. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  1. Patch-clamp analysis of the effects of the insecticide deltamethrin on insect neurones.

    PubMed

    Amar, M; Pichon, Y; Inoue, I

    1992-02-01

    1. The mode of action of the pyrethroid insecticide deltamethrin on inexcitable embryonic cultured cockroach neurones has been investigated using the patch-clamp technique. 2. Whole-cell recordings of the current induced by step depolarizations of the cell membrane showed that concentrations of deltamethrin ranging from 10(-8) to 5 x 10(-6) mol l-1 induced a small tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive inward current that peaked at around +10 mV and reversed at around +60 mV. The activation and inactivation kinetics of this current were much slower than those of the axonal sodium current in this same species and were relatively insensitive to membrane potential. Steady-state inactivation was almost absent. 3. Single-channel activity associated with the action of the insecticide was analyzed using the cell-attached configuration. Three distinct patterns of activity were found: (1) discrete single-channel events of relatively short duration, (2) long events of comparatively small amplitude and (3) complex bursts made up of a succession of openings and closings to several levels. These three patterns were analyzed quantitatively using specially designed programs. 4. The first pattern of activity could be seen in most patches. It consisted of short (1-10 ms) rectangular events of comparatively small amplitude (1.5 pA at rest) and very low open time probability (around 0.001). The current-voltage relationship of these small events was linear over the voltage range studied and the (extrapolated) reversal potential approximated ENa. 5. The second pattern of activity was observed less frequently. The channels could stay open for very long periods (up to several seconds) and occasionally flickered between two or more levels. 6. The third pattern of activity was observed in many patches. During the burst, which could last from a few milliseconds to a few hundred milliseconds, the single-channel current jumped almost continuously between several levels (up to 7 or 8). PMID:1372926

  2. Endothelin activates voltage-dependent Ca2+ current by a G protein-dependent mechanism in rabbit cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, M R; Gunn, M D; Clusin, W T

    1992-01-01

    1. Endothelin is a vasoactive peptide released from vascular endothelial cells which has potent cardiac inotropic effects. We examined the effect of endothelin on the verapamil-sensitive Ca2+ current (ICa) in enzymatically dispersed rabbit ventricular myocytes. 2. Using the whole-cell voltage clamp technique with a standard dialysing pipette solution, the application of extracellular endothelin (20 nM) did not increase the peak ICa, but in fact caused a small reversible decline (903 +/- 109 pA without endothelin, 727 +/- 95 pA with endothelin (means +/- S.E.M., n = 14, P less than 0.05)). 3. If GTP (100 microM) was added to the pipette solution, the extracellular application of endothelin (0.2 or 20 nM) caused a large, reproducible increase in peak ICa (871 +/- 85 pA without endothelin, 1230 +/- 110 pA with 20 nM-endothelin (n = 10, P less than 0.05). The endothelin enhancement of ICa occurred after a delay of approximately 3-4 min at room temperature. 4. The GTP requirement for the endothelin effect on ICa suggests that its effect may be mediated through a G protein-dependent pathway. To investigate this further, experiments were performed with pipette solutions containing guanosine-5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S), a GDP analogue which inhibits G protein cycling. With the addition of GDP beta S (0.5-5.0 mM) to the pipette solution (along with 100 microM-GTP), the effect of endothelin on peak ICa was blocked (1062 +/- 86 pA without endothelin, 1170 +/- 134 pA with endothelin (n = 11, P greater than 0.05)). 5. Incubation of myocytes with pertussis toxin (500 ng/ml) prevented the partial ACh-induced reversal of the isoprenolol enhancement of ICa. However, this identical treatment failed to block the endothelin enhancement of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ current (n = 4). 6. Taken together, these results confirm that while the effect of endothelin in rabbit cardiac ventricular myocytes is mediated through a G protein-dependent pathway, the G protein involved is

  3. An Ultrasonic Clamp for Bloodless Partial Nephrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril; Bouchoux, Guillaume; Murat, François Joseph; Birer, Alain; Theillère, Yves; Chapelon, Jean Yves; Cathignol, Dominique

    2007-05-01

    Maximum conservation of the kidney is preferable through partial nephrectomy for patients at risk of disease recurrence of renal cancers. Haemostatic tools are needed in order to achieve bloodless surgery and reduce post surgery morbidity. Two piezo-ceramic transducers operating at a frequency of 4 MHz were mounted on each arm of a clamp. When used for coagulation purposes, two transducers situated on opposite arms of the clamp were driven simultaneously. Heat delivery was optimized as each transducers mirrored back to targeted tissues the wave generated by the opposite transducer. Real-time treatment monitoring with an echo-based technique was also envisaged with this clamp. Therapy was periodically interrupted so one transducer could generate a pulse. The echo returning from the opposite transducer was treated. Coagulation necroses were obtained in vitro on substantial thicknesses (23-38mm) of pig liver over exposure durations ranging from 30s to 130s, and with acoustic intensities of less than 15W/cm2 per transducer. Both kidneys of two pigs were treated in vivo with the clamp (14.5W/cm2 for 90s), and the partial nephrectomies performed proved to be bloodless. In vitro and in vivo, wide transfixing lesions corresponded to an echo energy decrease superior to -10dB and parabolic form of the time of flight versus treatment time. In conclusion, this ultrasound clamp has proven to be an excellent mean for achieving monitored haemostasis in kidney.

  4. Force-clamp laser trapping of rapidly interacting molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Monico, Carina; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-06-01

    Forces play a fundamental role in a wide array of biological processes, regulating enzymatic activity, kinetics of molecular bonds, and molecular motors mechanics. Single molecule force spectroscopy techniques have enabled the investigation of such processes, but they are inadequate to probe short-lived (millisecond and sub-millisecond) molecular complexes. We developed an ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy technique that uses a dual trap configuration to apply constant loads to a single intermittently interacting biological polymer and a binding protein. Our system displays a delay of only ˜10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. The force-clamp configuration in which our assay operates allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds. Moreover, conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors can be recorded with sub-nanometer accuracy and few tens of microseconds of temporal resolution. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  5. Insulin and IGF-1 activate Kir4.1/5.1 channels in cortical collecting duct principal cells to control basolateral membrane voltage.

    PubMed

    Zaika, Oleg; Palygin, Oleg; Tomilin, Viktor; Mamenko, Mykola; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2016-02-15

    Potassium Kir4.1/5.1 channels are abundantly expressed at the basolateral membrane of principal cells in the cortical collecting duct (CCD), where they are thought to modulate transport rates by controlling transepithelial voltage. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulate apically localized epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) to augment sodium reabsorption in the CCD. However, little is known about their actions on potassium channels localized at the basolateral membrane. In this study, we implemented patch-clamp analysis in freshly isolated murine CCD to assess the effect of these hormones on Kir4.1/5.1 at both single channel and cellular levels. We demonstrated that K(+)-selective conductance via Kir4.1/5.1 is the major contributor to the macroscopic current recorded from the basolateral side in principal cells. Acute treatment with 10 μM amiloride (ENaC blocker), 100 nM tertiapin-Q (TPNQ; ROMK inhibitor), and 100 μM ouabain (Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blocker) failed to produce a measurable effect on the macroscopic current. In contrast, Kir4.1 inhibitor nortriptyline (100 μM), but not fluoxetine (100 μM), virtually abolished whole cell K(+)-selective conductance. Insulin (100 nM) markedly increased the open probability of Kir4.1/5.1 and nortriptyline-sensitive whole cell current, leading to significant hyperpolarization of the basolateral membrane. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase cascade with LY294002 (20 μM) abolished action of insulin on Kir4.1/5.1. IGF-1 had similar stimulatory actions on Kir4.1/5.1-mediated conductance only when applied at a higher (500 nM) concentration and was ineffective at 100 nM. We concluded that both insulin and, to a lesser extent, IGF-1 activate Kir4.1/5.1 channel activity and open probability to hyperpolarize the basolateral membrane, thereby facilitating Na(+) reabsorption in the CCD. PMID:26632606

  6. Multiple pore conformations driven by asynchronous movements of voltage sensors in a eukaryotic sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel P.; Capes, Deborah L.; Oelstrom, Kevin M.; Chanda, Baron

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent Na+ channels are crucial for electrical signalling in excitable cells. Membrane depolarization initiates asynchronous movements in four non-identical voltage-sensing domains of the Na+ channel. It remains unclear to what extent this structural asymmetry influences pore gating as compared with outwardly rectifying K+ channels, where channel opening results from a final concerted transition of symmetric pore gates. Here we combine single channel recordings, cysteine accessibility and voltage clamp fluorimetry to probe the relationships between voltage sensors and pore conformations in an inactivation deficient Nav1.4 channel. We observe three distinct conductance levels such that DI-III voltage sensor activation is kinetically correlated with formation of a fully open pore, whereas DIV voltage sensor movement underlies formation of a distinct subconducting pore conformation preceding inactivation in wild-type channels. Our experiments reveal that pore gating in sodium channels involves multiple transitions driven by asynchronous movements of voltage sensors. These findings shed new light on the mechanism of coupling between activation and fast inactivation in voltage-gated sodium channels. PMID:23322038

  7. Novel description of ionic currents recorded with the action potential clamp technique: application to excitatory currents in suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The traditional method of recording ionic currents in neurons has been with voltage-clamp steps. Other waveforms such as action potentials (APs) can be used. The AP clamp method reveals contributions of ionic currents that underlie excitability during an AP (Bean BP. Nat Rev Neurosci 8: 451–465, 2007). A novel usage of the method is described in this report. An experimental recording of an AP from the literature is digitized and applied computationally to models of ionic currents. These results are compared with experimental AP-clamp recordings for model verification or, if need be, alterations to the model. The method is applied to the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium ion current, INa, and the calcium ion current, ICa, from suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons (Jackson AC, Yao GL, Bean BP. J Neurosci 24: 7985–7998, 2004). The latter group reported voltage-step and AP-clamp results for both components. A model of INa is constructed from their voltage-step results. The AP clamp computational methodology applied to that model compares favorably with experiment, other than a modest discrepancy close to the peak of the AP that has not yet been resolved. A model of ICa was constructed from both voltage-step and AP-clamp results of this component. The model employs the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for the current-voltage relation rather than the traditional linear dependence of this aspect of the model on the Ca2+ driving force. The long-term goal of this work is a mathematical model of the SCN AP. The method is general. It can be applied to any excitable cell. PMID:26041831

  8. Wide-field and two-photon imaging of brain activity with voltage- and calcium-sensitive dyes

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Ryota; Baker, Bradley J.; Jin, Lei; Garaschuk, Olga; Konnerth, Arthur; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Zecevic, Dejan

    2009-01-01

    This review presents three examples of using voltage- or calcium-sensitive dyes to image the activity of the brain. Our aim is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method with particular reference to its application to the study of the brainstem. Two of the examples use wide-field (one-photon) imaging; the third uses two-photon scanning microscopy. Because the measurements have limited signal-to-noise ratio, the paper also discusses the methodological aspects that are critical for optimizing the signal. The three examples are the following. (i) An intracellularly injected voltage-sensitive dye was used to monitor membrane potential in the dendrites of neurons in in vitro preparations. These experiments were directed at understanding how individual neurons convert complex synaptic inputs into the output spike train. (ii) An extracellular, bath application of a voltage-sensitive dye was used to monitor population signals from different parts of the dorsal brainstem. We describe recordings made during respiratory activity. The population signals indicated four different regions with distinct activity correlated with inspiration. (iii) Calcium-sensitive dyes can be used to label many individual cells in the mammalian brain. This approach, combined with two-photon microscopy, made it possible to follow the spike activity in an in vitro brainstem preparation during fictive respiratory rhythms. The organic voltage- and ion-sensitive dyes used today indiscriminatively stain all of the cell types in the preparation. A major effort is underway to develop fluorescent protein sensors of activity for selectively staining individual cell types. PMID:19651647

  9. Blockade by ifenprodil of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones: comparison with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist actions.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J; Fletcher, E J; Baxter, K; MacDonald, J F

    1994-01-01

    1. The block by ifenprodil of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels was investigated in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by 50 mM K+ (high-[K+]o) in Fura-2-loaded rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones in culture and on currents carried by Ba2+ ions (IBa) through Ca2+ channels in mouse cultured hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp. The effects of ifenprodil on voltage-activated Ca2+ channels were compared with its antagonist actions on N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) evoked responses in the same neuronal preparations. 2. Rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by transient exposure to high-[K+]o in our preparation of rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones are mediated predominantly by Ca2+ flux through nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels, with smaller contributions from nifedipine-resistant, omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ channels sensitive to crude funnel-web spider venom (Church et al., 1994). Ifenprodil (0.1-200 microM) reversibly attenuated high-[K+]o-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 17 +/- 3 microM, compared with an IC50 value of 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM for the reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by 20 microM NMDA. Tested in the presence of nifedipine 10 microM, ifenprodil (1-50 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the dihydropyridine-resistant high-[K+]o-evoked rise in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 13 +/- 4 microM. The results suggest that ifenprodil blocks Ca2+ flux through multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Application of the polyamine, spermine (0.25-5 mM), produced a concentration-dependent reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by high-[K+]o.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834201

  10. Kinetic analysis of PCNA clamp binding and release in the clamp loading reaction catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C

    PubMed Central

    Marzahn, Melissa R.; Hayner, Jaclyn N.; Meyer, Jennifer A.; Bloom, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases require a sliding clamp to achieve processive DNA synthesis. The toroidal clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders, members of the AAA+ family of ATPases. These enzymes utilize the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform a variety of cellular functions. In this study, a clamp loader-clamp binding assay was developed to measure the rates of ATP-dependent clamp binding and ATP-hydrolysis-dependent clamp release for the S. cerevisiae clamp loader (RFC) and clamp (PCNA). Pre-steady-state kinetics of PCNA binding showed that although ATP binding to RFC increases affinity for PCNA, ATP binding rates and ATP-dependent conformational changes in RFC are fast relative to PCNA binding rates. Interestingly, RFC binds PCNA faster than the Escherichia coli γ complex clamp loader binds the β-clamp. In the process of loading clamps on DNA, RFC maintains contact with PCNA while PCNA closes, as the observed rate of PCNA closing is faster than the rate of PCNA release, precluding the possibility of an open clamp dissociating from DNA. Rates of clamp closing and release are not dependent on the rate of the DNA binding step and are also slower than reported rates of ATP hydrolysis, showing that these rates reflect unique intramolecular reaction steps in the clamp loading pathway. PMID:25450506

  11. The sliding clamp tethers the endonuclease domain of MutL to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Monica C.; Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Randall, Justin R.; Cai, Jiudou; Simmons, Lyle A.; Sutton, Mark D.; Guarné, Alba

    2015-01-01

    The sliding clamp enhances polymerase processivity and coordinates DNA replication with other critical DNA processing events including translesion synthesis, Okazaki fragment maturation and DNA repair. The relative binding affinity of the sliding clamp for its partners determines how these processes are orchestrated and is essential to ensure the correct processing of newly replicated DNA. However, while stable clamp interactions have been extensively studied; dynamic interactions mediated by the sliding clamp remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize the interaction between the bacterial sliding clamp (β-clamp) and one of its weak-binding partners, the DNA mismatch repair protein MutL. Disruption of this interaction causes a mild mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli, but completely abrogates mismatch repair activity in Bacillus subtilis. We stabilize the MutL-β interaction by engineering two cysteine residues at variable positions of the interface. Using disulfide bridge crosslinking, we have stabilized the E. coli and B. subtilis MutL-β complexes and have characterized their structures using small angle X-ray scattering. We find that the MutL-β interaction greatly stimulates the endonuclease activity of B. subtilis MutL and supports this activity even in the absence of the N-terminal region of the protein. PMID:26384423

  12. The sliding clamp tethers the endonuclease domain of MutL to DNA.

    PubMed

    Pillon, Monica C; Babu, Vignesh M P; Randall, Justin R; Cai, Jiudou; Simmons, Lyle A; Sutton, Mark D; Guarné, Alba

    2015-12-15

    The sliding clamp enhances polymerase processivity and coordinates DNA replication with other critical DNA processing events including translesion synthesis, Okazaki fragment maturation and DNA repair. The relative binding affinity of the sliding clamp for its partners determines how these processes are orchestrated and is essential to ensure the correct processing of newly replicated DNA. However, while stable clamp interactions have been extensively studied; dynamic interactions mediated by the sliding clamp remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize the interaction between the bacterial sliding clamp (β-clamp) and one of its weak-binding partners, the DNA mismatch repair protein MutL. Disruption of this interaction causes a mild mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli, but completely abrogates mismatch repair activity in Bacillus subtilis. We stabilize the MutL-β interaction by engineering two cysteine residues at variable positions of the interface. Using disulfide bridge crosslinking, we have stabilized the E. coli and B. subtilis MutL-β complexes and have characterized their structures using small angle X-ray scattering. We find that the MutL-β interaction greatly stimulates the endonuclease activity of B. subtilis MutL and supports this activity even in the absence of the N-terminal region of the protein. PMID:26384423

  13. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, Daniel W.; Lange, Arnold C.

    1997-01-01

    A high power, solid state power supply is described for producing a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads suitable for powering an electron beam gun or other ion source. The present power supply is most useful for outputs in a range of about 100-400 kW or more. The power supply is comprised of a plurality of discrete switching type dc-dc converter modules, each comprising a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, and an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module. The inputs to the converter modules are fed from a common dc rectifier/filter and are linked together in parallel through decoupling networks to suppress high frequency input interactions. The outputs of the converter modules are linked together in series and connected to the input of the transmission line to the load through a decoupling and line matching network. The dc-dc converter modules are phase activated such that for n modules, each module is activated equally 360.degree./n out of phase with respect to a successive module. The phased activation of the converter modules, combined with the square current waveforms out of the step up transformers, allows the power supply to operate with greatly reduced output capacitance values which minimizes the stored energy available for discharge into an electron beam gun or the like during arcing. The present power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle using simulated voltage feedback signals and voltage feedback loops. Circuitry is also provided for sensing incipient arc currents reflected at the output of the power supply and for simultaneously decoupling the power supply circuitry from the arcing load.

  14. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

    1997-03-11

    A high power, solid state power supply is described for producing a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads suitable for powering an electron beam gun or other ion source. The present power supply is most useful for outputs in a range of about 100-400 kW or more. The power supply is comprised of a plurality of discrete switching type dc-dc converter modules, each comprising a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, and an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module. The inputs to the converter modules are fed from a common dc rectifier/filter and are linked together in parallel through decoupling networks to suppress high frequency input interactions. The outputs of the converter modules are linked together in series and connected to the input of the transmission line to the load through a decoupling and line matching network. The dc-dc converter modules are phase activated such that for n modules, each module is activated equally 360{degree}/n out of phase with respect to a successive module. The phased activation of the converter modules, combined with the square current waveforms out of the step up transformers, allows the power supply to operate with greatly reduced output capacitance values which minimizes the stored energy available for discharge into an electron beam gun or the like during arcing. The present power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle using simulated voltage feedback signals and voltage feedback loops. Circuitry is also provided for sensing incipient arc currents reflected at the output of the power supply and for simultaneously decoupling the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. 7 figs.

  15. Voltage-sensitive potassium channels in Limulus ventral photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The steady-state slope conductance of Limulus ventral photoreceptors increases markedly when the membrane is depolarized from rest. The ionic basis of this rectification has been examined with a voltage- clamp technique. Tail currents that occur when membrane potential is repolarized after having been depolarized have been identified. The tail currents reverse direction at a voltage that becomes more positive when Ko is increased. Rectification is reduced by extracellular 4- aminopyridine and by intracellular injection of tetra-ethyl-ammonium (TEA). These results indicate that the membrane rectification around resting potential is due primarily to voltage-sensitive K+ channels. The increase in gK caused by depolarization is not mediated by a voltage-dependent rise in in Cai++, since intracellular injection of Ca++ causes a decrease rather than an increase in slope conductance. TEA can be used to examine the functional role of the K+ channels because it blocks them without substantially affecting the light- activated Na+ conductance. The effect of TEA on response-intensity curves shows that the K+ channels serve to compress the voltage range of receptor potentials. PMID:621492

  16. Limit analysis of pipe clamps. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1990-12-31

    The Service Level D (faulted) load capacity of a conventional three-bolt pipe-clamp based upon the limit analysis method is presented. The load distribution, plastic hinge locations, and collapse load are developed for the lower bound limit load method. The results of the limit analysis are compared with the manufacturer`s rated loads. 3 refs.

  17. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  18. Self-tuning behavior of a clamped-clamped beam with sliding proof mass for broadband energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillatsch, P.; Miller, L. M.; Halvorsen, E.; Wright, P. K.; Yeatman, E. M.; Holmes, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    Real world systems rarely vibrate at a single resonance frequency and the frequencies drift over time. Tunable devices exist, but generally need additional energy to achieve frequency adaptation. This means that the benefits in power output from this tuning need to be large enough to power the mechanism itself. Passively self-tuning systems go into resonance without requiring active control. This paper focuses on a passively self-tuning system with a proof mass that can slide freely along a clamped-clamped beam. Under external vibration, the slider moves along the beam until the system goes into resonance. A proof-of-concept design is introduced using either a copper or a steel beam and a 3D-printed ABS thermoplastic proof mass. Successful self-tuning is demonstrated in both cases. The frequencies range from 80 - 140 Hz at accelerations as low as 0.007 g rms. Results show the resonance of the beam and the position of the slider along the beam with time. Furthermore, the dynamic magnification and the proof mass position at resonance are discussed, together with the inherent non-linearities of double-clamped beam resonators. The findings support the hypothesis that the effect of the ratio between proof mass and beam mass outweighs the Duffing spring stiffening effects.

  19. Gating Kinetics of the Cyclic-GMP-Activated Channel of Retinal Rods: Flash Photolysis and Voltage-Jump Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Jeffrey W.; Zimmerman, Anita L.; Stryer, Lubert; Baylor, Denis A.

    1988-02-01

    The gating kinetics of the cGMP-activated cation channel of salamander retinal rods have been studied in excised membrane patches. Relaxations in patch current were observed after two kinds of perturbation: (i) fast jumps of cGMP concentration, generated by laser flash photolysis of a cGMP ester (``caged'' cGMP), and (ii) membrane voltage jumps, which perturb activation of the channel by cGMP. In both methods the speed of activation increased with the final cGMP concentration. The results are explained by a simple kinetic model in which activation involves three sequential cGMP binding steps with bimolecular rate constants close to the diffusion-controlled limit; fully liganded channels undergo rapid open-closed transitions. Voltage perturbs activation by changing the rate constant for channel closing, which increases with hyperpolarization. Intramolecular transitions of the fully liganded channel limit the kinetics of activation at high cGMP concentrations (>50 μ M), whereas at physiological cGMP concentrations (<5 μ M), the kinetics of activation are limited by the third cGMP binding step. The channel appears to be optimized for rapid responses to changes in cytoplasmic cGMP concentration.

  20. Artificial phosphorylation sites modulate the activity of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The KvAP potassium channel is representative of a family of voltage-gated ion channels where the membrane potential is sensed by a transmembrane helix containing several positively charged arginines. Previous work by Wang and Zocchi [A. Wang and G. Zocchi, PLoS ONE 6, e18598 (2011), 10.1371/journal.pone.0018598] showed how a negatively charged polyelectrolyte attached in proximity to the voltage sensing element can bias the opening probability of the channel. Here we introduce three phosphorylation sites at the same location and show that the response curve of the channel shifts by about 20 mV upon phosphorylation, while other characteristics such as the single-channel conductance are unaffected. In summary, we construct an artificial phosphorylation site which confers allosteric regulation to the channel.

  1. The TCF C-clamp DNA binding domain expands the Wnt transcriptome via alternative target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hoverter, Nate P.; Zeller, Michael D.; McQuade, Miriam M.; Garibaldi, Angela; Busch, Anke; Selwan, Elizabeth M.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Baldi, Pierre; Waterman, Marian L.

    2014-01-01

    LEF/TCFs direct the final step in Wnt/β-catenin signalling by recruiting β-catenin to genes for activation of transcription. Ancient, non-vertebrate TCFs contain two DNA binding domains, a High Mobility Group box for recognition of the Wnt Response Element (WRE; 5′-CTTTGWWS-3′) and the C-clamp domain for recognition of the GC-rich Helper motif (5′-RCCGCC-3′). Two vertebrate TCFs (TCF-1/TCF7 and TCF-4/TCF7L2) use the C-clamp as an alternatively spliced domain to regulate cell-cycle progression, but how the C-clamp influences TCF binding and activity genome-wide is not known. Here, we used a doxycycline inducible system with ChIP-seq to assess how the C-clamp influences human TCF1 binding genome-wide. Metabolic pulse-labeling of nascent RNA with 4′Thiouridine was used with RNA-seq to connect binding to the Wnt transcriptome. We find that the C-clamp enables targeting to a greater number of gene loci for stronger occupancy and transcription regulation. The C-clamp uses Helper sites concurrently with WREs for gene targeting, but it also targets TCF1 to sites that do not have readily identifiable canonical WREs. The coupled ChIP-seq/4′Thiouridine-seq analysis identified new Wnt target genes, including additional regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, C-clamp containing isoforms of TCFs are potent transcriptional regulators with an expanded transcriptome directed by C-clamp-Helper site interactions. PMID:25414359

  2. Voltage regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rossetti, N.

    1986-12-09

    This patent describes a prior art integrated circuit voltage regulator having an unregulated voltage input terminal and a regulated voltage output terminal, and further comprising: a first transistor having an emitter, a collector and a base, the first transistor having a first base-emitter voltage characteristic, the collector of the first transistor being connected through a first resistor to a current source. The current source is derived from the unregulated voltage, the emitter of the first transistor being connected through a second resistor to a reference voltage; and a second transistor having an emitter, a collector and a base, the second transistor having a second base-emitter voltage characteristic, the base of the second transistor being connected to the collector of the first transistor. The collector of the second transistor is connected to the current source, the emitter of the second transistor being connected to the reference voltage. The regulated output of the voltage regulator is provided at the collector of the second transistor and the regulated voltage output is a function of the first base-emitter voltage characteristic of the first transistor plus the quantity comprising the difference between the first base-emitter voltage characteristic of the first transistor and the second base-emitter voltage characteristic of the second transistor, times the ratio of the value of resistance of the first resistor and the value of resistance of the second resistor. The improvement described here comprises: a third transistor having a collector, an emitter and a base.

  3. Ion channels activated by light in Limulus ventral photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The light-activated conductance of Limulus ventral photoreceptors was studied using the patch-clamp technique. Channels (40 pS) were observed whose probability of opening was greatly increased by light. In some cells the latency of channel activation was nearly the same as that of the macroscopic response, while in other cells the channel latency was much greater. Like the macroscopic conductance, channel activity was reduced by light adaptation but enhanced by the intracellular injection of the calcium chelator EGTA. The latter observation indicates that channel activation was not a secondary result of the light-induced rise in intracellular calcium. A two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method was used to measure the voltage dependence of the light-activated macroscopic conductance. It was found that this conductance is constant over a wide voltage range more negative than zero, but it increases markedly at positive voltages. The single channel currents measured over this same voltage range show that the single channel conductance is independent of voltage, but that channel gating properties are dependent on voltage. Both the mean channel open time and the opening rate increase at positive voltages. These properties change in a manner consistent with the voltage dependence of the macroscopic conductance. The broad range of similarities between the macroscopic and single channel currents supports the conclusion that the 40-pS channel that we have observed is the principal channel underlying the response to light in these photoreceptors. PMID:2419481

  4. Multiphosphine-Oxide Hosts for Ultralow-Voltage-Driven True-Blue Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Diodes with External Quantum Efficiency beyond 20.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ding, Dongxue; Wei, Ying; Han, Fuquan; Xu, Hui; Huang, Wei

    2016-01-20

    Highly efficient low-voltage-driven -true-blue thermally activated -delayed fluorescence diodes are realized through employing a tri-phosphine oxide host (2,2',4-tris(di(phenyl) -phosphoryl)-diphenylether (DPETPO)) with a record external quantum efficiency of 23.0% and the lowest onset voltage of 2.8 V to date. PMID:26588189

  5. A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

    1987-10-01

    A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Active Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs, and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Functional heterogeneity of the four voltage sensors of a human L-type calcium channel

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Antonios; Savalli, Nicoletta; Sigg, Daniel; Neely, Alan; Olcese, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Excitation-evoked Ca2+ influx is the fastest and most ubiquitous chemical trigger for cellular processes, including neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction, and gene expression. The voltage dependence and timing of Ca2+ entry are thought to be functions of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels composed of a central pore regulated by four nonidentical voltage-sensing domains (VSDs I–IV). Currently, the individual voltage dependence and the contribution to pore opening of each VSD remain largely unknown. Using an optical approach (voltage-clamp fluorometry) to track the movement of the individual voltage sensors, we discovered that the four VSDs of CaV1.2 channels undergo voltage-evoked conformational rearrangements, each exhibiting distinct voltage- and time-dependent properties over a wide range of potentials and kinetics. The voltage dependence and fast kinetic components in the activation of VSDs II and III were compatible with the ionic current properties, suggesting that these voltage sensors are involved in CaV1.2 activation. This view is supported by an obligatory model, in which activation of VSDs II and III is necessary to open the pore. When these data were interpreted in view of an allosteric model, where pore opening is intrinsically independent but biased by VSD activation, VSDs II and III were each found to supply ∼50 meV (∼2 kT), amounting to ∼85% of the total energy, toward stabilizing the open state, with a smaller contribution from VSD I (∼16 meV). VSD IV did not appear to participate in channel opening. PMID:25489110

  7. Electrical cable connector-clamp has smooth exterior surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Electrical cable connector-clamp fitted with a collet has a smooth exterior surface that can be easily gripped. The collet clamps a portion of the cable and provides for connecting it to a standard electrical connector.

  8. Voltage-dependent potassium currents in cochlear hair cells of the embryonic chick.

    PubMed

    Griguer, C; Fuchs, P A

    1996-01-01

    1. Hair cells were isolated from apical and basal regions of the embryonic chick's cochlea. Outward potassium currents were recorded using whole cell tight-seal voltage clamp. 2. Outward currents in basal hair cells activated and inactivated rapidly. The average time to half-maximum at 0 mV was 2.9 ms. The time constant of inactivation at 0 mV was 71 ms. Boltzmann fits to conductance-voltage curves gave an average half-activation voltage of -36 mV, and steady-state inactivation was half-maximal at -62 mV. 3. Potassium currents in apical hair cells had slower kinetics, with a time to half-maximum of 6.7 ms and an inactivation time constant of 242 ms at + 10 mV. The half-activation voltage derived from Boltzmann fits was -16 mV and that for inactivation was -43 mV. 4. With respect to kinetic and voltage-dependent properties, the rapidly and slowly activating potassium currents of embryonic cells were similar to the rapidly inactivating "A" current of mature short hair cells and to the delayed rectifier of mature tall hair cells. However, unlike the adult currents, the embryonic currents did not show differential sensitivities to tetraethylammonium chloride and 4-aminopyridine. As early as the tenth day of embryogenesis, hair cells at the apical and basal extremes of the cochlea produced functionally distinct voltage-gated potassium currents. PMID:8822574

  9. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins—protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor—translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  10. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes.

    PubMed

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A

    2016-08-23

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor-translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  11. β1-subunit-induced structural rearrangements of the Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Juan P; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E; Hyde, H Clark; Zaelzer, Cristian A; Aguayo, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Romina V; Luk, Louis Y P; Kent, Stephen B H; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D; Bezanilla, Francisco; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-06-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels are involved in a large variety of physiological processes. Regulatory β-subunits are one of the mechanisms responsible for creating BK channel diversity fundamental to the adequate function of many tissues. However, little is known about the structure of its voltage sensor domain. Here, we present the external architectural details of BK channels using lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET). We used a genetically encoded lanthanide-binding tag (LBT) to bind terbium as a LRET donor and a fluorophore-labeled iberiotoxin as the LRET acceptor for measurements of distances within the BK channel structure in a living cell. By introducing LBTs in the extracellular region of the α- or β1-subunit, we determined (i) a basic extracellular map of the BK channel, (ii) β1-subunit-induced rearrangements of the voltage sensor in α-subunits, and (iii) the relative position of the β1-subunit within the α/β1-subunit complex. PMID:27217576

  12. Voltage equaliser for Li-Fe battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinn-Chang; Jou, Hurng-Liahng; Chuang, Ping-Hao

    2013-10-01

    In this article, a voltage equaliser is proposed for a battery string with four Li-Fe batteries. The proposed voltage equaliser is developed from a flyback converter, which comprises a transformer, a power electronic switch and a resonant clamped circuit. The transformer contains a primary winding and four secondary windings with the same number of turns connected to each battery. The resonant clamped circuit is for recycling the energy of leakage inductance of the transformer and for performing zero-voltage switching (ZVS) of the power electronic switch. When the power electronic switch is switched on, the energy is stored in the transformer; and when the power electronic switch is switched off, the energy stored in the transformer will automatically charge the battery whose voltage is the lowest. In this way, the voltage of individual batteries in the battery string is balanced. The salient features of the proposed voltage equaliser are that only one switch is used, the energy stored in the leakage inductance of the transformer can be recycled and ZVS is obtained. A prototype is developed and tested to verify the performance of the proposed voltage equaliser. The experimental results show that the proposed voltage equaliser achieves the expected performance.

  13. Mechanical and metallurgical properties of carotid artery clamps.

    PubMed

    Dujovny, M; Kossovsky, N; Kossowsky, R; Segal, R; Diaz, F G; Kaufman, H; Perlin, A; Cook, E E

    1985-11-01

    The mechanical and metallurgical properties of carotid artery clamps were evaluated. The pressure plate retreat propensity, metallurgical composition, surface morphology, magnetic properties, and corrosion resistance of the Crutchfield, Selverstone, Salibi, and Kindt clamps were tested. None of the clamps showed evidence of pressure plate retreat. The clamps differed significantly in their composition, surface cleanliness, magnetic properties, and corrosion resistance. The Crutchfield clamp was the only one manufactured from an ASTM-ANSI-approved implantable stainless steel (AISI 316) and the only clamp in which the surfaces were clean and free of debris. The Selverstone clamp was made principally from AISI 304 stainless steel, as was one Salibi clamp. The pressure plate on another Salibi clamp was made from a 1% chromium and 1% manganese steel. Machining and surface debris consisting principally of aluminum, silicon, and sulfur was abundant on the Selverstone and Salibi clamps. The Kindt clamp was manufactured from AISI 301 stainless steel with a silicate-aluminized outer coating. The Crutchfield and Selverstone clamps were essentially nonferromagnetic, whereas the Salibi and Kindt clamps were sensitive to magnetic flux. In the pitting potential corrosion test, the Crutchfield clamp demonstrated good corrosion resistance with a pitting potential of 310 mV and no surface corrosion or pitting by scanning electron microscopy examination. The Selverstone clamp had lower pitting potentials and showed various degrees of corrosion and surface pitting by scanning electron microscopy. The Salibi pressure plate had a very low pitting potential of -525 mV and showed severe corrosion. By metallurgical criteria, only the Crutchfield clamp is suitable for long term implantation. PMID:4069328

  14. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable (trailing) cables to prevent strain on the cable terminals of a machine. Also insulated clamps shall be provided to... mounted component. Cable grips anchored to the cable may be used in lieu of insulated strain...

  15. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable (trailing) cables to prevent strain on the cable terminals of a machine. Also insulated clamps shall be provided to... mounted component. Cable grips anchored to the cable may be used in lieu of insulated strain...

  16. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable (trailing) cables to prevent strain on the cable terminals of a machine. Also insulated clamps shall be provided to... mounted component. Cable grips anchored to the cable may be used in lieu of insulated strain...

  17. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable (trailing) cables to prevent strain on the cable terminals of a machine. Also insulated clamps shall be provided to... mounted component. Cable grips anchored to the cable may be used in lieu of insulated strain...

  18. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  19. π-Clamp Mediated Cysteine Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is a grand challenge in chemistry. Protecting groups or catalysts must be used to selectively modify one site among many that are similarly reactive. General strategies are rare such the local chemical environment around the target site is tuned for selective transformation. Here we show a four amino acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the “π-clamp”, tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for the site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We used the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues (e.g. antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes), which was impossible with prior cysteine modification methods. The modified π-clamp antibodies retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach for site-selective chemistry and provides opportunities to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics. PMID:26791894

  20. Temperature-Controlled Clamping and Releasing Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosing, David; Ford, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    A report describes the development of a mechanism that automatically clamps upon warming and releases upon cooling between temperature limits of approx. =180 K and approx. =293 K. The mechanism satisfied a need specific to a program that involved repeated excursions of a spectrometer between a room-temperature atmospheric environment and a cryogenic vacuum testing environment. The mechanism was also to be utilized in the intended application of the spectrometer, in which the spectrometer would be clamped for protection during launch of a spacecraft and released in the cold of outer space to allow it to assume its nominal configuration for scientific observations. The mechanism is passive in the sense that its operation does not depend on a control system and does not require any power other than that incidental to heating and cooling. The clamping and releasing action is effected by bolt-preloaded stacks of shape-memory-alloy (SMA) cylinders. In designing this mechanism, as in designing other, similar SMA mechanisms, it was necessary to account for the complex interplay among thermal expansion, elastic and inelastic deformation under load, and SMA thermomechanical properties.

  1. Carbon nanotube-clamped metal atomic chain

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Yin, Li-Chang; Li, Feng; Liu, Chang; Yu, Wan-Jing; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Wu, Bo; Lee, Young-Hee; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Metal atomic chain (MAC) is an ultimate one-dimensional structure with unique physical properties, such as quantized conductance, colossal magnetic anisotropy, and quantized magnetoresistance. Therefore, MACs show great potential as possible components of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices. However, MACs are usually suspended between two macroscale metallic electrodes; hence obvious technical barriers exist in the interconnection and integration of MACs. Here we report a carbon nanotube (CNT)-clamped MAC, where CNTs play the roles of both nanoconnector and electrodes. This nanostructure is prepared by in situ machining a metal-filled CNT, including peeling off carbon shells by spatially and elementally selective electron beam irradiation and further elongating the exposed metal nanorod. The microstructure and formation process of this CNT-clamped MAC are explored by both transmission electron microscopy observations and theoretical simulations. First-principles calculations indicate that strong covalent bonds are formed between the CNT and MAC. The electrical transport property of the CNT-clamped MAC was experimentally measured, and quantized conductance was observed. PMID:20427743

  2. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  3. A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

    1988-02-01

    A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Acxtive Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed.

  4. Benzonatate inhibition of voltage-gated sodium currents.

    PubMed

    Evans, M Steven; Maglinger, G Benton; Fletcher, Anita M; Johnson, Stephen R

    2016-02-01

    Benzonatate was FDA-approved in 1958 as an antitussive. Its mechanism of action is thought to be anesthesia of vagal sensory nerve fibers that mediate cough. Vagal sensory neurons highly express the Nav1.7 subtype of voltage-gated sodium channels, and inhibition of this channel inhibits the cough reflex. Local anesthetics inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels, but there are no reports of whether benzonatate affects these channels. Our hypothesis is that benzonatate inhibits Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channels. We used whole cell voltage clamp recording to test the effects of benzonatate on voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) currents in two murine cell lines, catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells, which express primarily Nav1.7, and N1E-115, which express primarily Nav1.3. We found that, like local anesthetics, benzonatate strongly and reversibly inhibits voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Benzonatate causes both tonic and phasic inhibition. It has greater effects on channel inactivation than on activation, and its potency is much greater at depolarized potentials, indicating inactivated-state-specific effects. Na(+) currents in CAD cells and N1E-115 cells are similarly affected, indicating that benzonatate is not Na(+) channel subtype-specific. Benzonatate is a mixture of polyethoxy esters of 4-(butylamino) benzoic acid having varying degrees of hydrophobicity. We found that Na(+) currents are inhibited most potently by a benzonatate fraction containing the 9-ethoxy component. Detectable effects of benzonatate occur at concentrations as low as 0.3 μM, which has been reported in humans. We conclude that benzonatate has local anesthetic-like effects on voltage-gated sodium channels, including Nav1.7, which is a possible mechanism for cough suppression by the drug. PMID:26386152

  5. Intermittent selective clamping improves rat liver regeneration by attenuating oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Ben Mosbah, I; Duval, H; Mbatchi, S-F; Ribault, C; Grandadam, S; Pajaud, J; Morel, F; Boudjema, K; Compagnon, P; Corlu, A

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent clamping of the portal trial is an effective method to avoid excessive blood loss during hepatic resection, but this procedure may cause ischemic damage to liver. Intermittent selective clamping of the lobes to be resected may represent a good alternative as it exposes the remnant liver only to the reperfusion stress. We compared the effect of intermittent total or selective clamping on hepatocellular injury and liver regeneration. Entire hepatic lobes or only lobes to be resected were subjected twice to 10 min of ischemia followed by 5 min of reperfusion before hepatectomy. We provided evidence that the effect of intermittent clamping can be damaging or beneficial depending to its mode of application. Although transaminase levels were similar in all groups, intermittent total clamping impaired liver regeneration and increased apoptosis. In contrast, intermittent selective clamping improved liver protein secretion and hepatocyte proliferation when compared with standard hepatectomy. This beneficial effect was linked to better adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) recovery, nitric oxide production, antioxidant activities and endoplasmic reticulum adaptation leading to limit mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Interestingly, transient and early chaperone inductions resulted in a controlled activation of the unfolded protein response concomitantly to endothelial nitric oxide synthase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 MAPK activation that favors liver regeneration. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is a central target through which intermittent selective clamping exerts its cytoprotective effect and improves liver regeneration. This procedure could be applied as a powerful protective modality in the field of living donor liver transplantation and liver surgery. PMID:24603335

  6. Intermittent selective clamping improves rat liver regeneration by attenuating oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Ben Mosbah, I; Duval, H; Mbatchi, S-F; Ribault, C; Grandadam, S; Pajaud, J; Morel, F; Boudjema, K; Compagnon, P; Corlu, A

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent clamping of the portal trial is an effective method to avoid excessive blood loss during hepatic resection, but this procedure may cause ischemic damage to liver. Intermittent selective clamping of the lobes to be resected may represent a good alternative as it exposes the remnant liver only to the reperfusion stress. We compared the effect of intermittent total or selective clamping on hepatocellular injury and liver regeneration. Entire hepatic lobes or only lobes to be resected were subjected twice to 10 min of ischemia followed by 5 min of reperfusion before hepatectomy. We provided evidence that the effect of intermittent clamping can be damaging or beneficial depending to its mode of application. Although transaminase levels were similar in all groups, intermittent total clamping impaired liver regeneration and increased apoptosis. In contrast, intermittent selective clamping improved liver protein secretion and hepatocyte proliferation when compared with standard hepatectomy. This beneficial effect was linked to better adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) recovery, nitric oxide production, antioxidant activities and endoplasmic reticulum adaptation leading to limit mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Interestingly, transient and early chaperone inductions resulted in a controlled activation of the unfolded protein response concomitantly to endothelial nitric oxide synthase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 MAPK activation that favors liver regeneration. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is a central target through which intermittent selective clamping exerts its cytoprotective effect and improves liver regeneration. This procedure could be applied as a powerful protective modality in the field of living donor liver transplantation and liver surgery. PMID:24603335

  7. Voltage-dependent potassium currents in developing neurones from quail mesencephalic neural crest.

    PubMed Central

    Bader, C R; Bertrand, D; Dupin, E

    1985-01-01

    Neurones in explants cultured from quail mesencephalic neural crest were studied at different stages of their development using the voltage-clamp technique. A voltage-dependent outward current activated by membrane depolarization was identified as a potassium current by the sensitivity of its reversal potential to extracellular potassium. The voltage-dependent potassium current is made up of two components which differ in their sensitivity to 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and tetraethylammonium (TEA). The component most sensitive to 4-AP has fast activation kinetics and inactivates quickly at sustained depolarized voltages. By analogy with a current described in other preparations, this current was called IA. The component most sensitive to TEA has slower activation kinetics and inactivates more slowly at sustained depolarized voltages. This current was called IK. IA and IK were already present in neurones cultured for 24 h. The ratio between the peak of IK and that of IA increased significantly between 24 h and 4 days in culture. This means that the two components of the voltage-dependent potassium current follow a different time course during development. Images Plate 1 PMID:2414432

  8. Voltage-dependent sodium channels in an invertebrate striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, L M; Stühmer, W

    1984-08-01

    Striated skeletal muscles from the planktonic arrowworm Sagitta elegans (phylum Chaetognatha) were voltage-clamped. The muscles displayed classical voltage-dependent sodium channels that (i) showed peak transient currents when the membrane was depolarized 90 millivolts from rest, (ii) opened rapidly with peak currents flowing within 0.4 milliseconds at 4 degrees C, (iii) showed voltage-dependent inactivation with 50 percent inactivation at +25 millivolts from rest, and (iv) were blocked by 500 nanomolar tetrodotoxin. PMID:6330898

  9. Improved PeT molecules for optically sensing voltage in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Woodford, Clifford R.; Frady, E. Paxon; Smith, Richard S.; Morey, Benjamin; Canzi, Gabriele; Palida, Sakina F.; Araneda, Ricardo C.; Kristan, William B.; Kubiak, Clifford P.; Miller, Evan W.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2015-01-01

    VoltageFluor (VF) dyes have the potential to optically measure voltage in excitable membranes with the combination of high spatial and temporal resolution essential to better characterize the voltage dynamics of large groups of excitable cells. VF dyes sense voltage with high speed and sensitivity using photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) through a conjugated molecular wire. We show that tuning the driving force for PeT (ΔGPeT + w) through systematic chemical substitution modulates voltage sensitivity, estimate (ΔGPeT + w) values from experimentally measured redox potentials, and validate the voltage sensitivities in patch-clamped HEK cells for 10 new VF dyes. VF2.1(OMe).H, with a 48% ΔF/F per 100 mV, shows approximately 2-fold improvement over previous dyes in HEK cells, dissociated rat cortical neurons, and medicinal leech ganglia. Additionally, VF2.1(OMe).H faithfully reports pharmacological effects and circuit activity in mouse olfactory bulb slices, thus opening a wide range of previously inaccessible applications for voltage sensitive dyes. PMID:25584688

  10. Condition of chromic acid anodized aluminum clamps flown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plagemann, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of the condition of the chromic acid anodized (CAA) coating on selected LDEF tray clamps was carried out. Measurements of solar absorptance and thermal emittance were carried out at multiple locations on both the space exposed and spacecraft facing sides of the clamps. Multiple clamps from each available angle relative to the ram direction were examined. The diffuse component of the reflectance spectrum was measured for a selected subset of the clamps. The thickness of the CAA was determined for a small set of clamps. Examples of variation in integrity of the coatings from leading to trailing edge will be shown.

  11. Resurgent current of voltage-gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda H; Raman, Indira M

    2014-01-01

    Resurgent Na+ current results from a distinctive form of Na+ channel gating, originally identified in cerebellar Purkinje neurons. In these neurons, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels responsible for action potential firing have specialized mechanisms that reduce the likelihood that they accumulate in fast inactivated states, thereby shortening refractory periods and permitting rapid, repetitive, and/or burst firing. Under voltage clamp, step depolarizations evoke transient Na+ currents that rapidly activate and quickly decay, and step repolarizations elicit slower channel reopening, or a ‘resurgent’ current. The generation of resurgent current depends on a factor in the Na+ channel complex, probably a subunit such as NaVβ4 (Scn4b), which blocks open Na+ channels at positive voltages, competing with the fast inactivation gate, and unblocks at negative voltages, permitting recovery from an open channel block along with a flow of current. Following its initial discovery, resurgent Na+ current has been found in nearly 20 types of neurons. Emerging research suggests that resurgent current is preferentially increased in a variety of clinical conditions associated with altered cellular excitability. Here we review the biophysical, molecular and structural mechanisms of resurgent current and their relation to the normal functions of excitable cells as well as pathophysiology. PMID:25172941

  12. VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Von Eschen, R.L.; Scheele, P.F.

    1962-04-24

    A transistorized voltage regulator which provides very close voitage regulation up to about 180 deg F is described. A diode in the positive line provides a constant voltage drop from the input to a regulating transistor emitter. An amplifier is coupled to the positive line through a resistor and is connected between a difference circuit and the regulating transistor base which is negative due to the difference in voltage drop across thc diode and the resistor so that a change in the regulator output causes the amplifier to increase or decrease the base voltage and current and incrcase or decrease the transistor impedance to return the regulator output to normal. (AEC)

  13. Direct Effect of Remifentanil and Glycine Contained in Ultiva® on Nociceptive Transmission in the Spinal Cord: In Vivo and Slice Patch Clamp Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sumie, Makoto; Shiokawa, Hiroaki; Yamaura, Ken; Karashima, Yuji; Hoka, Sumio; Yoshimura, Megumu

    2016-01-01

    Background Ultiva® is commonly administered intravenously for analgesia during general anaesthesia and its main constituent remifentanil is an ultra-short-acting μ-opioid receptor agonist. Ultiva® is not approved for epidural or intrathecal use in clinical practice. Previous studies have reported that Ultiva® provokes opioid-induced hyperalgesia by interacting with spinal dorsal horn neurons. Ultiva® contains glycine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter but also an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor co-activator. The presence of glycine in the formulation of Ultiva® potentially complicates its effects. We examined how Ultiva® directly affects nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. Methods We made patch-clamp recordings from substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in the adult rat spinal dorsal horn in vivo and in spinal cord slices. We perfused Ultiva® onto the SG neurons and analysed its effects on the membrane potentials and synaptic responses activated by noxious mechanical stimuli. Results Bath application of Ultiva® hyperpolarized membrane potentials under current-clamp conditions and produced an outward current under voltage-clamp conditions. A barrage of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by the stimuli was suppressed by Ultiva®. Miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) were depressed in frequency but not amplitude. Ultiva®-induced outward currents and suppression of mEPSCs were not inhibited by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, but were inhibited by the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine. The Ultiva®-induced currents demonstrated a specific equilibrium potential similar to glycine. Conclusions We found that intrathecal administration of Ultiva® to SG neurons hyperpolarized membrane potentials and depressed presynaptic glutamate release predominantly through the activation of glycine receptors. No Ultiva®-induced excitatory effects were observed in SG neurons. Our results suggest different analgesic mechanisms of Ultiva® between intrathecal

  14. High-field actively detuneable transverse electromagnetic (TEM) coil with low-bias voltage for high-power RF transmission.

    PubMed

    Avdievich, Nikolai I; Bradshaw, Ken; Kuznetsov, Andrey M; Hetherington, Hoby P

    2007-06-01

    The design and construction of a 4T (170 MHz) transverse electromagnetic (TEM) actively detuneable quadrature head coil is described. Conventional schemes for active detuning require high negative bias voltages (>300 V) to prevent leakage of RF pulses with amplitudes of 1-2 kW. To extend the power handling capacity and avoid the use of high DC bias voltages, we developed an alternate method of detuning the volume coil. In this method the PIN diodes in the detuning circuits are shorted when the RF volume coil is tuned, and negatively biased with -12 V when the coil is detuned. To preserve the high Q(U)/Q(L) ratio of the TEM coil, we modified the method of Nabetani and Watkins (Proceedings of the 13th Annual Meeting of ISMRM, Kyoto, Japan, 2004, abstract 1574) by utilizing a high-impedance (approximately 200 Omega), lumped-element, quarter-wavelength transformer. A Q(U) of 500 was achieved for the detuneable TEM, such that incorporation of the detuning network had minimal effect (<1 dB) on the performance of the coil in vivo. PMID:17534919

  15. A Highly Active Low Voltage Redox Mediator for Enhanced Rechargeability of Lithium–Oxygen Batteries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its high theoretical specific energy, the Li-oxygen battery is one of the fundamentally most promising energy storage systems, but also one of the most challenging. Poor rechargeability, involving the oxidation of insoluble and insulating lithium peroxide (Li2O2), has remained the “Achilles’ heel” of this electrochemical energy storage system. We report here on a new redox mediator tris[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]amine (TDPA), that—at 3.1 V—exhibits the lowest and closest potential redox couple compared to the equilibrium voltage of the Li-oxygen cell of those reported to date, with a second couple also at a low potential of 3.5 V. We show it is a soluble “catalyst” capable of lowering the Li2O2 charging potential by >0.8 V without requiring direct electrical contact of the peroxide and that it also facilitates high discharge capacities. Its chemical and electrochemical stability, fast diffusion kinetics, and two dynamic redox potentials represent a significant advance in oxygen-evolution catalysis. It enables Li–O2 cells that can be recharged more than 100 cycles with average round-trip efficiencies >80%, opening a new avenue for practical Li-oxygen batteries. PMID:27163015

  16. A Highly Active Low Voltage Redox Mediator for Enhanced Rechargeability of Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Dipan; Black, Robert; Adams, Brian; Nazar, Linda F

    2015-12-23

    Owing to its high theoretical specific energy, the Li-oxygen battery is one of the fundamentally most promising energy storage systems, but also one of the most challenging. Poor rechargeability, involving the oxidation of insoluble and insulating lithium peroxide (Li2O2), has remained the "Achilles' heel" of this electrochemical energy storage system. We report here on a new redox mediator tris[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]amine (TDPA), that-at 3.1 V-exhibits the lowest and closest potential redox couple compared to the equilibrium voltage of the Li-oxygen cell of those reported to date, with a second couple also at a low potential of 3.5 V. We show it is a soluble "catalyst" capable of lowering the Li2O2 charging potential by >0.8 V without requiring direct electrical contact of the peroxide and that it also facilitates high discharge capacities. Its chemical and electrochemical stability, fast diffusion kinetics, and two dynamic redox potentials represent a significant advance in oxygen-evolution catalysis. It enables Li-O2 cells that can be recharged more than 100 cycles with average round-trip efficiencies >80%, opening a new avenue for practical Li-oxygen batteries. PMID:27163015

  17. Neuronal modulation of calcium channel activity in cultured rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Corvalan, V.; Cole, R.; De Vellis, J.; Hagiwara, Susumu )

    1990-06-01

    The patch-clamp technique was used to study whether cocultivation of neurons and astrocytes modulates the expression of calcium channel activity in astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat brain astrocytes cocultured with rat embryonic neurons revealed two types of voltage-dependent inward currents carried by Ca{sup 2+} and blocked by either Cd{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+} that otherwise were not detected in purified astrocytes. This expression of calcium channel activity in astrocytes was neuron dependent and was not observed when astrocytes were cocultured with purified oligodendrocytes.

  18. Airway Hydration, Apical K(+) Secretion, and the Large-Conductance, Ca(2+)-activated and Voltage-dependent Potassium (BK) Channel.

    PubMed

    Kis, Adrian; Krick, Stefanie; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Large-conductance, calcium-activated, and voltage-gated K(+) (BK) channels are expressed in many tissues of the human body, where they play important roles in signaling not only in excitable but also in nonexcitable cells. Because BK channel properties are rendered in part by their association with four β and four γ subunits, their channel function can differ drastically, depending on in which cellular system they are expressed. Recent studies verify the importance of apically expressed BK channels for airway surface liquid homeostasis and therefore of their significant role in mucociliary clearance. Here, we review evidence that inflammatory cytokines, which contribute to airway diseases, can lead to reduced BK activity via a functional down-regulation of the γ regulatory subunit LRRC26. Therefore, manipulation of LRRC26 and pharmacological opening of BK channels represent two novel concepts of targeting epithelial dysfunction in inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:27115952

  19. Asymmetric synthesis of crambescin A-C carboxylic acids and their inhibitory activity on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Nakazaki, Atsuo; Nakane, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Yuki; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Nishikawa, Toshio

    2016-06-21

    Synthesis of both enantiomers of crambescin B carboxylic acid is described. A cis-enyne starting material was epoxidized under the conditions of Katsuki asymmetric epoxidation to give 95% ee of the epoxide, which was transformed to crambescin B carboxylic acid via bromocation-triggered cascade cyclization as the key step. Enantiomerically pure crambescin A and C carboxylic acids were also synthesized from the product of the cascade reaction. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies against voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) inhibition using those synthetic compounds revealed that the natural enantiomer of crambescin B carboxylic acid was most active and comparable to tetrodotoxin, and the unalkylated cyclic guanidinium structure is indispensible, while the carboxylate moiety is not important. The absolute stereochemistry of crambescin A was determined by a comparison of the methyl ester derived from natural crambescin A with that derived from the stereochemically defined crambescin A carboxylic acid synthesized in this study. PMID:27215973

  20. A bacterial toxin inhibits DNA replication elongation through a direct interaction with the β sliding clamp.

    PubMed

    Aakre, Christopher D; Phung, Tuyen N; Huang, David; Laub, Michael T

    2013-12-12

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are ubiquitous on bacterial chromosomes, yet the mechanisms regulating their activity and the molecular targets of toxins remain incompletely defined. Here, we identify SocAB, an atypical TA system in Caulobacter crescentus. Unlike canonical TA systems, the toxin SocB is unstable and constitutively degraded by the protease ClpXP; this degradation requires the antitoxin, SocA, as a proteolytic adaptor. We find that the toxin, SocB, blocks replication elongation through an interaction with the sliding clamp, driving replication fork collapse. Mutations that suppress SocB toxicity map to either the hydrophobic cleft on the clamp that binds DNA polymerase III or a clamp-binding motif in SocB. Our findings suggest that SocB disrupts replication by outcompeting other clamp-binding proteins. Collectively, our results expand the diversity of mechanisms employed by TA systems to regulate toxin activity and inhibit bacterial growth, and they suggest that inhibiting clamp function may be a generalizable antibacterial strategy. PMID:24239291

  1. Biological cell controllable patch-clamp microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penmetsa, Siva; Nagrajan, Krithika; Gong, Zhongcheng; Mills, David; Que, Long

    2010-12-01

    A patch-clamp (PC) microchip with cell sorting and positioning functions is reported, which can avoid drawbacks of random cell selection or positioning for a PC microchip. The cell sorting and positioning are enabled by air bubble (AB) actuators. AB actuators are pneumatic actuators, in which air pressure is generated by microheaters within sealed microchambers. The sorting, positioning, and capturing of 3T3 cells by this type of microchip have been demonstrated. Using human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 as the model, experiments have been demonstrated by this microchip as a label-free technical platform for real-time monitoring of the cell viability.

  2. Current advances in invertebrate vision: insights from patch-clamp studies of photoreceptors in apposition eyes.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Roman V

    2016-08-01

    Traditional electrophysiological research on invertebrate photoreceptors has been conducted in vivo, using intracellular recordings from intact compound eyes. The only exception used to be Drosophila melanogaster, which was exhaustively studied by both intracellular recording and patch-clamp methods. Recently, several patch-clamp studies have provided new information on the biophysical properties of photoreceptors of diverse insect species, having both apposition and neural superposition eyes, in the contexts of visual ecology, behavior, and ontogenesis. Here, I discuss these and other relevant results, emphasizing differences between fruit flies and other species, between photoreceptors of diurnal and nocturnal insects, properties of distinct functional types of photoreceptors, postembryonic developmental changes, and relationships between voltage-gated potassium channels and visual ecology. PMID:27250910

  3. Stretch-activation and stretch-inactivation of Shaker-IR, a voltage-gated K+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, C X; Juranka, P F; Morris, C E

    2001-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cell types but baffling because of their contentious physiologies and diverse molecular identities. In some cellular contexts mechanically responsive ion channels are undoubtedly mechanosensory transducers, but it does not follow that all MS channels are mechanotransducers. Here we demonstrate, for an archetypical voltage-gated channel (Shaker-IR; inactivation-removed), robust MS channel behavior. In oocyte patches subjected to stretch, Shaker-IR exhibits both stretch-activation (SA) and stretch-inactivation (SI). SA is seen when prestretch P(open) (set by voltage) is low, and SI is seen when it is high. The stretch effects occur in cell-attached and excised patches at both macroscopic and single-channel levels. Were one ignorant of this particular MS channel's identity, one might propose it had been designed as a sophisticated reporter of bilayer tension. Knowing Shaker-IR's provenance and biology, however, such a suggestion would be absurd. We argue that the MS responses of Shaker-IR reflect not overlooked "mechano-gating" specializations of Shaker, but a common property of multiconformation membrane proteins: inherent susceptibility to bilayer tension. The molecular diversity of MS channels indicates that susceptibility to bilayer tension is hard to design out of dynamic membrane proteins. Presumably the cost of being insusceptible to bilayer tension often outweighs the benefits, especially where the in situ milieu of channels can provide mechanoprotection. PMID:11371444

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis class II apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III exhibits DNA regulated modes of interaction with the sliding DNA β-clamp.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Taran; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-10-01

    The class-II AP-endonuclease (XthA) acts on abasic sites of damaged DNA in bacterial base excision repair. We identified that the sliding DNA β-clamp forms in vivo and in vitro complexes with XthA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel 239 QLRFPKK245 motif in the DNA-binding domain of XthA was found to be important for the interactions. Likewise, the peptide binding-groove (PBG) and the C-terminal of β-clamp located on different domains interact with XthA. The β-clamp-XthA complex can be disrupted by clamp binding peptides and also by a specific bacterial clamp inhibitor that binds at the PBG. We also identified that β-clamp stimulates the activities of XthA primarily by increasing its affinity for the substrate and its processivity. Additionally, loading of the β-clamp onto DNA is required for activity stimulation. A reduction in XthA activity stimulation was observed in the presence of β-clamp binding peptides supporting that direct interactions between the proteins are necessary to cause stimulation. Finally, we found that in the absence of DNA, the PBG located on the second domain of the β-clamp is important for interactions with XthA, while the C-terminal domain predominantly mediates functional interactions in the substrate's presence. PMID:26103519

  5. Negligible substrate clamping effect on piezoelectric response in (111)-epitaxial tetragonal Pb(Zr, Ti)O{sub 3} films

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tomoaki; Yasumoto, Jun; Ito, Daisuke; Yoshino, Masahito; Nagasaki, Takanori; Sakata, Osami; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kiguchi, Takanori; Shiraishi, Takahisa; Shimizu, Takao; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2015-08-21

    The converse piezoelectric responses of (111)- and (001)-epitaxial tetragonal Pb(Zr{sub 0.35}Ti{sub 0.65})O{sub 3} [PZT] films were compared to investigate the orientation dependence of the substrate clamping effect. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and piezoelectric force microscopy revealed that the as-grown (111)-PZT film has a polydomain structure with normal twin boundaries that are changed by the poling process to inclined boundaries, as predicted by Romanov et al. [Phys. Status Solidi A 172, 225 (1999)]. Time-resolved synchrotron XRD under bias voltage showed the negligible impact of substrate clamping on the piezoelectric response in the (111)-PZT film, unlike the case for (001)-PZT film. The origin of the negligible clamping effect in the (111)-PZT film is discussed from the viewpoint of the elastic properties and the compensation of lattice distortion between neighboring domains.

  6. Functional segregation of voltage-activated calcium channels in motoneurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Garry; Lasser-Katz, Efrat; Simchovitz, Alon; Sharon, Ronit; Soreq, Hermona; Surmeier, D. James

    2015-01-01

    Calcium influx elevates mitochondrial oxidant stress (mOS) in dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurons that are prone to Lewy body pathologies in presymptomatic Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. In experimental PD models, treatment with isradipine, the dihydropyridine with the highest affinity to Cav1.3 channels, prevents subthreshold calcium influx via Cav1.3 channels into midbrain dopamine neurons and protects them from mOS. In DMV neurons, isradipine is also effective in reducing mOS despite overwhelming evidence that subthreshold calcium influx is negligible compared with spike-triggered influx. To solve this conundrum we combined slice electrophysiology, two-photon laser scanning microscopy, mRNA profiling, and computational modeling. We find that the unusually depolarized subthreshold voltage trajectory of DMV neurons is positioned between the relatively hyperpolarized activation curve of Cav1.3 channels and that of other high-voltage activated (HVA) calcium channels, thus creating a functional segregation between Cav1.3 and HVA calcium channels. The HVA channels flux the bulk of calcium during spikes but can only influence pacemaking through their coupling to calcium-activated potassium currents. In contrast, Cav1.3 currents, which we show to be more than an order-of-magnitude smaller than the HVA calcium currents, are able to introduce sufficient inward current to speed up firing. However, Kv4 channels that are constitutively open in the subthreshold range guarantee slow pacemaking, despite the depolarizing action of Cav1.3 and other pacemaking currents. We propose that the efficacy of isradipine in preventing mOS in DMV neurons arises from its mixed effect on Cav1.3 channels and on HVA Cav1.2 channels. PMID:26156385

  7. Laser-assisted patch clamping: a methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Laser microsurgery can be used to perform both cell biological manipulations, such as targeted cell ablation, and molecular genetic manipulations, such as genetic transformation and chromosome dissection. In this report, we describe a laser microsurgical method that can be used either to ablate single cells or to ablate a small area (1-3 microns diameter) of the extracellular matrix. In plants and microorganisms, the extracellular matrix consists of the cell wall. While conventional patch clamping of these cells, as well as of many animal cells, requires enzymatic digestion of the extracellular matrix, we illustrate that laser microsurgery of a portion of the wall enables patch clamp access to the plasma membrane of higher plant cells remaining situated in their tissue environment. What follows is a detailed description of the construction and use of an economical laser microsurgery system, including procedures for single cell and targeted cell wall ablation. This methodology will be of interest to scientists wishing to perform cellular or subcellular ablation with a high degree of accuracy, or wishing to study how the extracellular matrix affects ion channel function.

  8. ClampOn acoustic solid fuel monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Vesterhus, T.

    1999-07-01

    The general idea of the project is to develop a ClampOn Solid Fuel Monitor, enabling optimization of the combustion process in pulverized coal fired boilers. The development will be based on adapting existing technology for measuring the content of sand particles in a flow of natural gas. The Norwegian firm ClampOn AS develops equipment for such measurements, and has already a proven track record as a result of its work with major oil companies throughout the world. The industry wants some sort of fuel indicator, e.g. a piece of equipment that enables the operator to measure and control the amounts of the fuel to each individual burner. The best techniques available today--as far as the author knows--can only offer samples of the fuel stream at discrete points of time. To truly optimize the combustion process, it is vital to continuously monitor the mass of fuel to each burner, and optimize the combustion process through continuous and infinitesimal adjustments of the fuel flow. This will minimize the NO{sub x} created by uneven temperature-distribution in the combustion chamber. In this way maximum power generation can be obtained at minimal emission of pollutants for a given amount of coal burned.

  9. Coarse-grained simulations of the gating current in the voltage-activated Kv1.2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative structure-based modeling of voltage activation of ion channels is very challenging. For example, it is very hard to reach converging results, by microscopic simulations while macroscopic treatments involve major uncertainties regarding key features. The current work overcomes some of the above challenges by using our recently developed coarse-grained (CG) model in simulating the activation of the Kv1.2 channel. The CG model has allowed us to explore problems that cannot be fully addressed at present by microscopic simulations, while providing insights on some features that are not usually considered in continuum models, including the distribution of the electrolytes between the membrane and the electrodes during the activation process and thus the physical nature of the gating current. Here, we demonstrate that the CG model yields realistic gating charges and free energy landscapes that allow us to simulate the fluctuating gating current in the activation processes. Our ability to simulate the time dependence of the fast gating current allows us to reproduce the observed trend and provides a clear description of its relationship to the landscape involved in the activation process. PMID:24464485

  10. Unpinning the Open-Circuit Voltage in Organic Solar Cells through Tuning Ternary Blend Active Layer Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlyabich, Petr; Thompson, Barry; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2015-03-01

    The use of ternary, as opposed to binary, blends having complementary absorption in active layers of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells is a simple approach to increase overall light absorption. While the open-circuit voltage (Voc) of such solar cells have generally been shown to be pinned by the smallest energy level difference between the donor and acceptor constituents, there have been materials systems, that when incorporated into active layers of solar cells, exhibit composition dependent and tunable Voc. Herein, we demonstrate that this Voc tunability in ternary blend solar cells is correlated with the morphology of the active layer. Chemical compatibility between the constituents in the blend, as probed by grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) measurements, affords Voc tuning. The constituents need not ``co-crystallize'' limited miscibility between the constituents in the active layers of solar cells affords Voc tunability. Poor physical interactions between the constituent domains within the active layers, on the other hand, result in devices that exhibit an invariant Voc that is pinned by the smallest energy level difference between the donor(s) and the acceptor(s). Our morphological studies thus support the proposed alloying model that was put forth originally.

  11. Voltage Sensitive Dye Imaging Reveals Improved Topographic Activation of Cortex in Response to Manipulation of Thalamic Microstimulation Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Millard, Daniel C.; Zheng, He J.V.; Stanley, Garrett B.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage sensitive dye (VSD) imaging was used to quantify in-vivo, network level spatiotemporal cortical activation in response to electrical microstimulation of the thalamus in the rat vibrissa pathway. Thalamic microstimulation evoked a distinctly different cortical response than natural sensory stimulation, with the response to microstimulation spreading over a larger area of cortex and being topographically misaligned with the cortical column to which the stimulated thalamic region projects. Electrical stimulation with cathode-leading asymmetric waveforms reduced this topographic misalignment while simultaneously increasing the spatial specificity of the cortical activation. Systematically increasing the asymmetry of the microstimulation pulses revealed a continuum between symmetric and asymmetric stimulation that gradually reduced the topographic bias. These data strongly support the hypothesis that manipulation of the electrical stimulation waveform can be used to selectively activate specific neural elements. Specifically, our results are consistent with the prediction that cathode-leading asymmetric waveforms preferentially stimulating cell bodies over axons, while symmetric waveforms preferentially activate axons over cell bodies. The findings here provide some initial steps toward the design and optimization of microstimulation of neural circuitry, and open the door to more sophisticated engineering tools, such as nonlinear system identification techniques, to develop technologies for more effective control of activity in the nervous system. PMID:22327024

  12. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging reveals improved topographic activation of cortex in response to manipulation of thalamic microstimulation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Millard, Daniel C.; Zheng, He J. V.; Stanley, Garrett B.

    2012-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive dye imaging was used to quantify in vivo, network level spatiotemporal cortical activation in response to electrical microstimulation of the thalamus in the rat vibrissa pathway. Thalamic microstimulation evoked a distinctly different cortical response than natural sensory stimulation, with response to microstimulation spreading over a larger area of cortex and being topographically misaligned with the cortical column to which the stimulated thalamic region projects. Electrical stimulation with cathode-leading asymmetric waveforms reduced this topographic misalignment while simultaneously increasing the spatial specificity of the cortical activation. Systematically increasing the asymmetry of the microstimulation pulses revealed a continuum between symmetric and asymmetric stimulation that gradually reduced the topographic bias. These data strongly support the hypothesis that manipulation of the electrical stimulation waveform can be used to selectively activate specific neural elements. Specifically, our results are consistent with the prediction that cathode-leading asymmetric waveforms preferentially stimulate cell bodies over axons, while symmetric waveforms preferentially activate axons over cell bodies. The findings here provide some initial steps toward the design and optimization of microstimulation of neural circuitry, and open the door to more sophisticated engineering tools, such as nonlinear system identification techniques, to develop technologies for more effective control of activity in the nervous system.

  13. Patch-Clamp Study of Hepatitis C p7 Channels Reveals Genotype-Specific Sensitivity to Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Breitinger, Ulrike; Farag, Noha S; Ali, Nourhan K M; Breitinger, Hans-Georg A

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis C is a major worldwide disease and health hazard, affecting ∼3% of the world population. The p7 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an intracellular ion channel and pH regulator that is involved in the viral replication cycle. It is targeted by various classical ion channel blockers. Here, we generated p7 constructs corresponding to HCV genotypes 1a, 2a, 3a, and 4a for recombinant expression in HEK293 cells, and studied p7 channels using patch-clamp recording techniques. The pH50 values for recombinant p7 channels were between 6.0 and 6.5, as expected for proton-activated channels, and current-voltage dependence did not show any differences between genotypes. Inhibition of p7-mediated currents by amantadine, however, exhibited significant, genotype-specific variation. The IC50 values of p7-1a and p7-4a were 0.7 ± 0.1 nM and 3.2 ± 1.2 nM, whereas p7-2a and p7-3a had 50- to 1000-fold lower sensitivity, with IC50 values of 2402 ± 334 nM and 344 ± 64 nM, respectively. The IC50 values for rimantadine were low across all genotypes, ranging from 0.7 ± 0.1 nM, 1.6 ± 0.6 nM, and 3.0 ± 0.8 nM for p7-1a, p7-3a, and p7-4a, respectively, to 24 ± 4 nM for p7-2a. Results from patch-clamp recordings agreed well with cellular assays of p7 activity, namely, measurements of intracellular pH and hemadsorption assays, which confirmed the much reduced amantadine sensitivity of genotypes 2a and 3a. Thus, our results establish patch-clamp studies of recombinant viroporins as a valid analytical tool that can provide quantitative information about viroporin channel properties, complementing established techniques. PMID:27276260

  14. Influence of a voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter on the transient stability of power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Tang, Y. J.; Shi, J.; Chen, N.; Song, M.; Cheng, S. J.; Hu, Y.; Chen, X. S.

    2009-10-01

    We have proposed a voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL). In this paper, the influence of the SFCL on the transient stability of power system is investigated. For the typical one-machine infinite-bus system, the power-angle characteristics of generator with SFCL are studied in different working conditions, and the transient physical process is analyzed. Using MATLAB SIMULINK, the power-angle swing curves are simulated under different current-limiting modes, fault types and fault clearance times. The results show that the proposed SFCL can effectively reduce the transient swing amplitude of rotor and extend the critical clearance time under mode 1, compared with mode 2 and mode 3 having few effects on enhancing the transient stability.

  15. Synthesis of a CNT-grafted TiO(2) nanocatalyst and its activity triggered by a DC voltage.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chien-Sheng; Tseng, Yao-Hsuan; Lin, Hong-Ying; Huang, Chia-Hung; Shen, Chih-Yen; Li, Yuan-Yao; Ismat Shah, S; Huang, Chin-Pao

    2007-11-21

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted TiO(2) (CNT/TiO(2)) was synthesized as an electrically conductive catalyst that exhibits redox ability under electrical excitation besides ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The CNT/TiO(2) material was synthesized by a two-step process. Ni nanoparticles were photodeposited onto TiO(2) first. The Ni nanoparticles then served as seeds for the growth of CNTs using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of C(2)H(2). The CNT/TiO(2) nanocomposite exhibits strong oxidation activity toward NO gas molecules via both photocatalysis under UV irradiation and electrocatalysis under a DC voltage of 500 V in dark conditions. PMID:21730487

  16. Attachment ability of a clamp-bearing fish parasite, Diplozoon paradoxum (Monogenea), on gills of the common bream, Abramis brama.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wey-Lim; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-08-15

    Monogeneans, which are mainly fish ectoparasites, use various types of haptoral (posterior) attachment apparatus to secure their attachment onto their hosts. However, it remains unclear how strongly a monogenean can attach onto its host. In the present study, we aimed for the first time to (1) measure pull-off forces required to detach a pair of clamp-bearing monogeneans, Diplozoon paradoxum, from gills of Abramis brama and (2) determine the contribution of muscles to the clamp movements. A mean force of 6.1±2.7 mN (~246 times the animals' weight) was required to dislodge a paired D. paradoxum vertically from the gills. There were significant differences (P<0.05, Tukey test) between the widths of clamp openings in D. paradoxum treated in three different solutions: the widest clamp openings were observed in the monogeneans treated in 100 mmol l(-1) potassium chloride solution (58.26±13.44 μm), followed by those treated in 20 mmol l(-1) magnesium chloride solution (37.91±7.58 μm), and finally those treated in filtered lake water (20.16±8.63 μm). This suggests that the closing of the clamps is probably not due to the continuous contraction of extrinsic muscles but is caused by the elasticity of the clamp material and that muscle activity is required for clamp opening. PMID:23580722

  17. Testing of Diode-Clamping in an Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Martin, Adam K.; Hudgins, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Testing of a 5.5 kV silicon (Si) diode and 5.8 kV prototype silicon carbide (SiC) diode in an inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT) circuit was performed to obtain a comparison of the resulting circuit recapture efficiency,eta(sub r), defined as the percentage of the initial charge energy remaining on the capacitor bank after the diode interrupts the current. The diode was placed in a pulsed circuit in series with a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) switch, and the voltages across different components and current waveforms were collected over a range of capacitor charge voltages. Reverse recovery parameters, including turn-off time and peak reverse recovery current, were measured and capacitor voltage waveforms were used to determine the recapture efficiency for each case. The Si fast recovery diode in the circuit was shown to yield a recapture efficiency of up to 20% for the conditions tested, while the SiC diode further increased recapture efficiency to nearly 30%. The data presented show that fast recovery diodes operate on a timescale that permits them to clamp the discharge quickly after the first half cycle, supporting the idea that diode-clamping in IPPT circuit reduces energy dissipation that occurs after the first half cycle

  18. In Vivo Mesoscopic Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Brain Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Frank, Aaron; Wu, Yalun; Chen, Chao-Wei; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Functional mapping of brain activity is important in elucidating how neural networks operate in the living brain. The whisker sensory system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the central nervous system. Each facial whisker is represented by discrete modules of neurons all along the pathway leading to the neocortex. These modules are called “barrels” in layer 4 of the primary somatosensory cortex. Their location (approximately 300–500 μm below cortical surface) allows for convenient imaging of whisker-evoked neural activity in vivo. Fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) provides depth-resolved fluorescence molecular information with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Angled illumination and detection configurations can improve both resolution and penetration depth. We applied angled FLOT (aFLOT) to record 3D neural activities evoked in the whisker system of mice by deflection of a single whisker in vivo. A 100 μm capillary and a pair of microelectrodes were inserted to the mouse brain to test the capability of the imaging system. The results show that it is possible to obtain 3D functional maps of the sensory periphery in the brain. This approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other brain structures.

  19. In Vivo Mesoscopic Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Frank, Aaron; Wu, Yalun; Chen, Chao-wei; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Functional mapping of brain activity is important in elucidating how neural networks operate in the living brain. The whisker sensory system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the central nervous system. Each facial whisker is represented by discrete modules of neurons all along the pathway leading to the neocortex. These modules are called “barrels” in layer 4 of the primary somatosensory cortex. Their location (approximately 300–500 μm below cortical surface) allows for convenient imaging of whisker-evoked neural activity in vivo. Fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) provides depth-resolved fluorescence molecular information with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Angled illumination and detection configurations can improve both resolution and penetration depth. We applied angled FLOT (aFLOT) to record 3D neural activities evoked in the whisker system of mice by deflection of a single whisker in vivo. A 100 μm capillary and a pair of microelectrodes were inserted to the mouse brain to test the capability of the imaging system. The results show that it is possible to obtain 3D functional maps of the sensory periphery in the brain. This approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other brain structures. PMID:27125318

  20. Characterization of the clamp pressure of electrostatic chucks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, M.; Voss, S.; Baldus, O.; Schmidt, V.

    2010-04-01

    Berliner Glas KGaA is specialized on the manufacturing of high performance wafer and reticle chucks. Electrostatic chucks (ESC) are especially used in vacuum environments e.g. during lithographic processing, coating and etching. The main task of the chuck is to provide a well defined positioning and thermal stabilization of the wafer or reticle. Typical wafer materials are semiconductors like silicon and in some special cases dielectrics like magnesia, alumina or glass. For a functional characterization of the ESC clamps Berliner Glas has developed a measurement method to determine the clamp pressure with a Fizeau interferometer. The setup utilizes the local bending of clamped wafers to determine the effective clamp pressure. The clamp pressure is measured in the range of 20...500 mbar. This new method allows for a lateral resolution of the clamp pressure measurement. It can be calibrated by various methods. Direct computation of the clamp pressure based on the bending height or comparative measurements with vacuum chucking by the same chuck gives evidence for the quantitative results. Transient clamp pressure variation can be measured with a resolution of 2 mbar. The results can be used to qualify and optimize ESĆs and even for a local correction of the clamp force.

  1. An Optimal Cell Detection Technique for Automated Patch Clamping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    While there are several hardware techniques for the automated patch clamping of cells that describe the equipment apparatus used for patch clamping, very few explain the science behind the actual technique of locating the ideal cell for a patch clamping procedure. We present a machine vision approach to patch clamping cell selection by developing an intelligent algorithm technique that gives the user the ability to determine the good cell to patch clamp in an image within one second. This technique will aid the user in determining the best candidates for patch clamping and will ultimately save time, increase efficiency and reduce cost. The ultimate goal is to combine intelligent processing with instrumentation and controls in order to produce a complete turnkey automated patch clamping system capable of accurately and reliably patch clamping cells with a minimum amount of human intervention. We present a unique technique that identifies good patch clamping cell candidates based on feature metrics of a cell's (x, y) position, major axis length, minor axis length, area, elongation, roundness, smoothness, angle of orientation, thinness and whether or not the cell is only particularly in the field of view. A patent is pending for this research.

  2. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, B. K.; Shepherd, S. D.; Pender, C. W.; Wood, B. E.

    1993-01-01

    Infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps from LDEF are described. The measurements were made using a hemiellipsoidal mirror reflectometer with interferometer for wavelengths between 2-15 microns. The tray clamps investigated were from locations about the entire spacecraft and provided the opportunity for comparing the effects of atomic oxygen at each location. Results indicate there was essentially no dependence on atomic oxygen fluence for the surfaces studied, but there did appear to be a slight dependence on solar radiation exposure. The reflectances of the front sides of the tray clamps consistently were slightly higher than for the protected rear tray clamp surfaces.

  3. Re-visiting the trans insertion model for complexin clamping.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Shyam S; Li, Feng; Coleman, Jeff; Schauder, Curtis M; Kümmel, Daniel; Pincet, Frederic; Rothman, James E; Reinisch, Karin M

    2015-01-01

    We have previously proposed that complexin cross-links multiple pre-fusion SNARE complexes via a trans interaction to function as a clamp on SNARE-mediated neurotransmitter release. A recent NMR study was unable to detect the trans clamping interaction of complexin and therefore questioned the previous interpretation of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer and isothermal titration calorimetry data on which the trans clamping model was originally based. Here we present new biochemical data that underscore the validity of our previous interpretation and the continued relevancy of the trans insertion model for complexin clamping. PMID:25831964

  4. Effects of intermittent 60-Hz high voltage electric fields on metabolism, activity, and temperature in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbergy, R.S; Duffy, P.H.; Sacher, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Transient effects of 100-kV/m extremely low frequency electric fields were studied in the white footed deermouse, Peromyscus leucopus. Gross motor activity, carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption, and core body temperature were monitored before, during, and after intermittent field exposures (four hour-long exposures, at one-hour intervals). Thirty-four mice were exposed in cages with plastic floors floating above ground potential, and 21 mice were exposed in cages with grounded metal floor plates. The first field exposure produced an immediate, transient increase of activity and gas measures during the inactive phase of the circadian cycle. All measures returned to baseline levels before the second exposure and were not significantly changed throughout the remainder of the exposures. The rapid habituation of field-induced arousal suggests that significant metabolic changes will not be measured in experiments in which the interval between exposure and measurement is greater than two hours.

  5. Mucosal inherent activity patterns in the rat: evidence from voltage-sensitive dyes.

    PubMed

    Youngentob, S L; Kent, P F; Sheehe, P R; Schwob, J E; Tzoumaka, E

    1995-01-01

    1. Fluorescence changes in the dye di-4-ANEPPS were monitored on the rat's nasal septum and medial surface of the turbinates in response to odorant stimuli. For each mucosal surface a 6.0 x 6.0-mm area was sampled at 100 contiguous sites with a 10 x 10 photodiode array. The odorants were propyl acetate, 2-propanol, citral, L-carvone and ethylacetoacetate, each presented at a low and high concentration. 2. Like previous work using optical recording techniques and potential-sensitive dyes on the amphibian epithelium, the fluorescence signals elicited by odorant stimuli in the rat preparation were nearly identical in shape, time course, and response characteristics as the electroolfactogram (EOG). As with the EOG, a response could only be recorded in the presence of odorant stimuli (that is, no response was detected when nonodorized, humidified air was presented as the stimulus); the amplitude depended on odorant concentration, and the response was abolished both by ether and Triton X-100. 3. Although the entire expanse of each sampled tissue (i.e., septum and medial surface of the turbinates) responded to stimulation with each odorant, each stimulus induced a distinct spatial pattern of activity that was independent of odorant concentration and consistent from animal to animal. Furthermore, the spatial activity patterns recorded for the septum were mirror images of those recorded from the medial surface of the turbinates. 4. Formal statistical analysis of the loci of maximal activity or "hot spot" indicated highly significant effects of the odorants for both the septum and medial surface of the turbinates. 5. The results of these studies give further support to the hypothesis that odorant quality is encoded by differential spatial activity patterns in the olfactory epithelium that are characteristic of different odorants. PMID:7714580

  6. Rab3-interacting molecules 2α and 2β promote the abundance of voltage-gated CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels at hair cell active zones

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sangyong; Oshima-Takago, Tomoko; Chakrabarti, Rituparna; Wong, Aaron B.; Jing, Zhizi; Yamanbaeva, Gulnara; Picher, Maria Magdalena; Wojcik, Sonja M.; Göttfert, Fabian; Predoehl, Friederike; Michel, Katrin; Hell, Stefan W.; Schoch, Susanne; Strenzke, Nicola; Wichmann, Carolin; Moser, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ influx triggers the fusion of synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic active zone (AZ). Here we demonstrate a role of Ras-related in brain 3 (Rab3)–interacting molecules 2α and β (RIM2α and RIM2β) in clustering voltage-gated CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels at the AZs of sensory inner hair cells (IHCs). We show that IHCs of hearing mice express mainly RIM2α, but also RIM2β and RIM3γ, which all localize to the AZs, as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunohistochemistry, patch-clamp, fluctuation analysis, and confocal Ca2+ imaging demonstrate that AZs of RIM2α-deficient IHCs cluster fewer synaptic CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels, resulting in reduced synaptic Ca2+ influx. Using superresolution microscopy, we found that Ca2+ channels remained clustered in stripes underneath anchored ribbons. Electron tomography of high-pressure frozen synapses revealed a reduced fraction of membrane-tethered vesicles, whereas the total number of membrane-proximal vesicles was unaltered. Membrane capacitance measurements revealed a reduction of exocytosis largely in proportion with the Ca2+ current, whereas the apparent Ca2+ dependence of exocytosis was unchanged. Hair cell-specific deletion of all RIM2 isoforms caused a stronger reduction of Ca2+ influx and exocytosis and significantly impaired the encoding of sound onset in the postsynaptic spiral ganglion neurons. Auditory brainstem responses indicated a mild hearing impairment on hair cell-specific deletion of all RIM2 isoforms or global inactivation of RIM2α. We conclude that RIM2α and RIM2β promote a large complement of synaptic Ca2+ channels at IHC AZs and are required for normal hearing. PMID:26034270

  7. Voltage-sensing phosphatase modulation by a C2 domain

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Paul M.; Zolman, Kevin D.; Kohout, Susy C.

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) is the first example of an enzyme controlled by changes in membrane potential. VSP has four distinct regions: the transmembrane voltage-sensing domain (VSD), the inter-domain linker, the cytosolic catalytic domain, and the C2 domain. The VSD transmits the changes in membrane potential through the inter-domain linker activating the catalytic domain which then dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids. The role of the C2, however, has not been established. In this study, we explore two possible roles for the C2: catalysis and membrane-binding. The Ci-VSP crystal structures show that the C2 residue Y522 lines the active site suggesting a contribution to catalysis. When we mutated Y522 to phenylalanine, we found a shift in the voltage dependence of activity. This suggests hydrogen bonding as a mechanism of action. Going one step further, when we deleted the entire C2 domain, we found voltage-dependent enzyme activity was no longer detectable. This result clearly indicates the entire C2 is necessary for catalysis as well as for modulating activity. As C2s are known membrane-binding domains, we tested whether the VSP C2 interacts with the membrane. We probed a cluster of four positively charged residues lining the top of the C2 and suggested by previous studies to interact with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] (Kalli et al., 2014). Neutralizing those positive charges significantly shifted the voltage dependence of activity to higher voltages. We tested membrane binding by depleting PI(4,5)P2 from the membrane using the 5HT2C receptor and found that the VSD motions as measured by voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) were not changed. These results suggest that if the C2 domain interacts with the membrane to influence VSP function it may not occur exclusively through PI(4,5)P2. Together, this data advances our understanding of the VSP C2 by demonstrating a necessary and critical role for the C2 domain in

  8. Structural Features and Functional Dependency on β-Clamp Define Distinct Subfamilies of Bacterial Mismatch Repair Endonuclease MutL.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Kenji; Baba, Seiki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Yano, Takato

    2016-08-12

    In early reactions of DNA mismatch repair, MutS recognizes mismatched bases and activates MutL endonuclease to incise the error-containing strand of the duplex. DNA sliding clamp is responsible for directing the MutL-dependent nicking to the newly synthesized/error-containing strand. In Bacillus subtilis MutL, the β-clamp-interacting motif (β motif) of the C-terminal domain (CTD) is essential for both in vitro direct interaction with β-clamp and in vivo repair activity. A large cluster of negatively charged residues on the B. subtilis MutL CTD prevents nonspecific DNA binding until β clamp interaction neutralizes the negative charge. We found that there are some bacterial phyla whose MutL endonucleases lack the β motif. For example, the region corresponding to the β motif is completely missing in Aquifex aeolicus MutL, and critical amino acid residues in the β motif are not conserved in Thermus thermophilus MutL. We then revealed the 1.35 Å-resolution crystal structure of A. aeolicus MutL CTD, which lacks the β motif but retains the metal-binding site for the endonuclease activity. Importantly, there was no negatively charged cluster on its surface. It was confirmed that CTDs of β motif-lacking MutLs, A. aeolicus MutL and T. thermophilus MutL, efficiently incise DNA even in the absence of β-clamp and that β-clamp shows no detectable enhancing effect on their activity. In contrast, CTD of Streptococcus mutans, a β motif-containing MutL, required β-clamp for the digestion of DNA. We propose that MutL endonucleases are divided into three subfamilies on the basis of their structural features and dependence on β-clamp. PMID:27369079

  9. Structure-Function Analysis of the C-clamp of TCF/Pangolin in Wnt/ß-catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Aditi; Cadigan, Ken M.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Wnt/ß-catenin (Wnt/ß-cat) pathway plays an important role in animal development in metazoans. Many Wnt targets are regulated by members of the TCF/LEF1 (TCF) family of transcription factors. All TCFs contain a High Mobility Group (HMG) domain that bind specific DNA sequences. Invertebrate TCFs and some vertebrate TCF isoforms also contain another domain, called the C-clamp, which allows TCFs to recognize an additional DNA motif known as the Helper site. While the C-clamp has been shown to be important for regulating several Wnt reporter genes in cell culture, its physiological role in regulating Wnt targets is less clear. In addition, little is known about this domain, except that two of the four conserved cysteines are functionally important. Here, we carried out a systematic mutagenesis and functional analysis of the C-clamp from the Drosophila TCF/Pangolin (TCF/Pan) protein. We found that the C-clamp is a zinc-binding domain that is sufficient for binding to the Helper site. In addition to this DNA-binding activity, the C-clamp also inhibits the HMG domain from binding its cognate DNA site. Point mutations were identified that specifically affected DNA-binding or reduced the inhibitory effect. These mutants were characterized in TCF/Pan rescue assays. The specific DNA-binding activity of the C-clamp was essential for TCF/Pan function in cell culture and in patterning the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila, demonstrating the importance of this C-clamp activity in regulating Wnt target gene expression. In contrast, the inhibitory mutation had a subtle effect in cell culture and no effect on TCF/Pan activity in embryos. These results provide important information about the functional domains of the C-clamp, and highlight its importance for Wnt/ß-cat signaling in Drosophila. PMID:24465946

  10. Structure-function analysis of the C-clamp of TCF/Pangolin in Wnt/ß-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Aditi J; Ravindranath, Aditi; Cadigan, Ken M

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Wnt/ß-catenin (Wnt/ß-cat) pathway plays an important role in animal development in metazoans. Many Wnt targets are regulated by members of the TCF/LEF1 (TCF) family of transcription factors. All TCFs contain a High Mobility Group (HMG) domain that bind specific DNA sequences. Invertebrate TCFs and some vertebrate TCF isoforms also contain another domain, called the C-clamp, which allows TCFs to recognize an additional DNA motif known as the Helper site. While the C-clamp has been shown to be important for regulating several Wnt reporter genes in cell culture, its physiological role in regulating Wnt targets is less clear. In addition, little is known about this domain, except that two of the four conserved cysteines are functionally important. Here, we carried out a systematic mutagenesis and functional analysis of the C-clamp from the Drosophila TCF/Pangolin (TCF/Pan) protein. We found that the C-clamp is a zinc-binding domain that is sufficient for binding to the Helper site. In addition to this DNA-binding activity, the C-clamp also inhibits the HMG domain from binding its cognate DNA site. Point mutations were identified that specifically affected DNA-binding or reduced the inhibitory effect. These mutants were characterized in TCF/Pan rescue assays. The specific DNA-binding activity of the C-clamp was essential for TCF/Pan function in cell culture and in patterning the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila, demonstrating the importance of this C-clamp activity in regulating Wnt target gene expression. In contrast, the inhibitory mutation had a subtle effect in cell culture and no effect on TCF/Pan activity in embryos. These results provide important information about the functional domains of the C-clamp, and highlight its importance for Wnt/ß-cat signaling in Drosophila. PMID:24465946

  11. CK2 activity is required for the interaction of FGF14 with voltage-gated sodium channels and neuronal excitability.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Chun J; Scala, Federico; Nenov, Miroslav N; Wildburger, Norelle C; Elferink, Hannah; Singh, Aditya K; Chesson, Charles B; Buzhdygan, Tetyana; Sohail, Maveen; Shavkunov, Alexander S; Panova, Neli I; Nilsson, Carol L; Rudra, Jai S; Lichti, Cheryl F; Laezza, Fernanda

    2016-06-01

    Recent data shows that fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14) binds to and controls the function of the voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel with phenotypic outcomes on neuronal excitability. Mutations in the FGF14 gene in humans have been associated with brain disorders that are partially recapitulated in Fgf14(-/-) mice. Thus, signaling pathways that modulate the FGF14:Nav channel interaction may be important therapeutic targets. Bioluminescence-based screening of small molecule modulators of the FGF14:Nav1.6 complex identified 4,5,6,7 -: tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBB), a potent casein kinase 2 (CK2) inhibitor, as a strong suppressor of FGF14:Nav1.6 interaction. Inhibition of CK2 through TBB reduces the interaction of FGF14 with Nav1.6 and Nav1.2 channels. Mass spectrometry confirmed direct phosphorylation of FGF14 by CK2 at S228 and S230, and mutation to alanine at these sites modified FGF14 modulation of Nav1.6-mediated currents. In 1 d in vitro hippocampal neurons, TBB induced a reduction in FGF14 expression, a decrease in transient Na(+) current amplitude, and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of Nav channel steady-state inactivation. In mature neurons, TBB reduces the axodendritic polarity of FGF14. In cornu ammonis area 1 hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, TBB impairs neuronal excitability by increasing action potential threshold and lowering firing frequency. Importantly, these changes in excitability are recapitulated in Fgf14(-/-) mice, and deletion of Fgf14 occludes TBB-dependent phenotypes observed in wild-type mice. These results suggest that a CK2-FGF14 axis may regulate Nav channels and neuronal excitability.-Hsu, W.-C. J., Scala, F., Nenov, M. N., Wildburger, N. C., Elferink, H., Singh, A. K., Chesson, C. B., Buzhdygan, T., Sohail, M., Shavkunov, A. S., Panova, N. I., Nilsson, C. L., Rudra, J. S., Lichti, C. F., Laezza, F. CK2 activity is required for the interaction of FGF14 with voltage-gated sodium channels and neuronal

  12. Low-Voltage-Activated CaV3.1 Calcium Channels Shape T Helper Cell Cytokine Profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyun; Zhang, Xuexin; Xue, Li; Xing, Juan; Jouvin, Marie-Hélène; Putney, James W; Anderson, Matthew P; Trebak, Mohamed; Kinet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-19

    Activation of T cells is mediated by the engagement of T cell receptors (TCRs) followed by calcium entry via store-operated calcium channels. Here we have shown an additional route for calcium entry into T cells-through the low-voltage-activated T-type CaV3.1 calcium channel. CaV3.1 mediated a substantial current at resting membrane potentials, and its deficiency had no effect on TCR-initiated calcium entry. Mice deficient for CaV3.1 were resistant to the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and had reduced productions of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by central nervous system (CNS)-infiltrating T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells. CaV3.1 deficiency led to decreased secretion of GM-CSF from in vitro polarized Th1 and Th17 cells. Nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) was also reduced in CaV3.1-deficient T cells. These data provide evidence for T-type channels in immune cells and their potential role in shaping the autoimmune response. PMID:27037192

  13. Response reliability observed with voltage-sensitive dye imaging of cortical layer 2/3: the probability of activation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Gollnick, Clare A; Millard, Daniel C; Ortiz, Alexander D; Bellamkonda, Ravi V; Stanley, Garrett B

    2016-06-01

    A central assertion in the study of neural processing is that our perception of the environment directly reflects the activity of our sensory neurons. This assertion reinforces the intuition that the strength of a sensory input directly modulates the amount of neural activity observed in response to that sensory feature: an increase in the strength of the input yields a graded increase in the amount of neural activity. However, cortical activity across a range of sensory pathways can be sparse, with individual neurons having remarkably low firing rates, often exhibiting suprathreshold activity on only a fraction of experimental trials. To compensate for this observed apparent unreliability, it is assumed that instead the local population of neurons, although not explicitly measured, does reliably represent the strength of the sensory input. This assumption, however, is largely untested. In this study, using wide-field voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging of the somatosensory cortex in the anesthetized rat, we show that whisker deflection velocity, or stimulus strength, is not encoded by the magnitude of the population response at the level of cortex. Instead, modulation of whisker deflection velocity affects the likelihood of the cortical response, impacting the magnitude, rate of change, and spatial extent of the cortical response. An ideal observer analysis of the cortical response points to a probabilistic code based on repeated sampling across cortical columns and/or time, which we refer to as the probability of activation hypothesis. This hypothesis motivates a range of testable predictions for both future electrophysiological and future behavioral studies. PMID:26864758

  14. The recording of odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns with a voltage-sensitive dye.

    PubMed

    Kent, P F; Mozell, M M

    1992-11-01

    1. Fluorescence changes in the dye (WW 781) were monitored at 100 contiguous sites in a 10 x 10-pixel array on the bullfrog and salamander olfactory mucosas every 10 ms in response to odorous stimuli. The odorants were d-limonene, butanol, and amyl acetate, each presented at two concentrations with a 3:1 ratio. 2. The fluorescence signals elicited by these odorous stimuli were nearly identical in shape and time course to the electro-olfactograms (EOGs) recorded from the same animal under identical conditions. Like the EOGs, the fluorescence signals exhibited adaptation and were abolished by both Triton X-100 and ether. There was no measurable fluorescence when the tissue was not stained with the dye, and there was no change in fluorescence when, for stained tissue, nonodorized, humidified air was presented as the stimulus. 3. This technique presumably monitors the same events as the EOG, but has the advantage of simultaneously recording the odorant-induced activity from multiple sites across most of the mucosa. Thus this technique preserves subtle differences heretofore lost by other techniques both in the coarseness of their matrices and in the variability generated by trying to piece together, into one collage, results from numerous presentations given at different times. 4. In all preparations, there was a larger difference in the inherent activity patterns (derived from response magnitudes) between different odorants than between different concentrations of the same odorant. These differences were largest on the mucosa lining the floor of salamander's olfactory sac. d-limonene and butanol gave their largest responses near the internal and external nares, respectively, whereas the responses for amyl acetate were more uniform across the mucosal sheet. In contrast to the salamander, smaller differences were observed for both the roof and the floor of the bullfrog's olfactory sac. For the floor, both amyl acetate and d-limonene elicited similar patterns of response

  15. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion.

    PubMed

    Zarkesh, Ryan A; Ichimura, Andrew S; Monson, Todd C; Tomson, Neil C; Anstey, Mitchell R

    2016-06-14

    The redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand was used to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events. PMID:26998892

  16. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; Tomson, Neil C.; Anstey, Mitchell R.

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  17. Visualization of the spread of electrical activity in rat hippocampal slices by voltage-sensitive optical probes

    PubMed Central

    Grinvald, A.; Manker, A.; Segal, M.

    1982-01-01

    1. Voltage-sensitive membrane-bound dyes and a matrix of 100 photodetectors were used to detect the spread of evoked electrical activity at the CA1 region of rat hippocampus slices. A display processor was designed in order to visualize the spread of electrical activity in slow motion. 2. The stimulation of the Schaffer collateral-commissural path in the stratum radiatum evoked short latency (2-4 msec) fast optical signals, followed by longer latency (4-15 msec) slow signals which decayed within 20-50 msec. Multiple fast signals were frequently detected at the stratum pyramidale; they propagated toward the stratum oriens with an approximate conduction velocity of 0.1 m/sec. 3. The fast signals were unaltered in a low Ca2+ high Mg2+ medium but were blocked by tetrodotoxin. These signals probably represent action potentials in the Schaffer collateral axons. Their conduction velocity was about 0.2 m/sec and their refractory period about 3-4 msec. 4. The slow signals were absent in a low Ca2+ medium and probably represent excitatory post-synaptic potentials (e.p.s.p.s) generated in the apical dendrites of the pyramidal cells. They were generated in the stratum radiatum, where the presynaptic signals were seen, and spread into somata and basal dendrites (the stratum pyramidale and oriens, respectively). 5. The timing of the signals with fast rise-time, which were detected at the statum pyramidale, approximately coincided with the timing of the extracellularly recorded field potentials. These multiple discharges probably represent action potentials of the pyramidal cells. They spread back into the apical dendrites but with significant attenuation of the amplitudes of the high frequency components of the pyramidal action potentials. 6. Hyperpolarizing potentials could be detected when strong stimuli were applied to the stratum radiatum or alveus. The net hyperpolarizations were detected only in the stratum pyramidale and the border region between the stratum pyramidale

  18. Transcainide causes two modes of open-channel block with different voltage sensitivities in batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, G W; French, R J

    1994-01-01

    Transcainide, a complex derivative of lidocaine, blocks the open state of BTX-activated sodium channels from bovine heart and rat skeletal muscle in two distinct ways. When applied to either side of the membrane, transcainide caused discrete blocking events a few hundred milliseconds in duration (slow block), and a concomitant reduction in apparent single-channel amplitude, presumably because of rapid block beyond the temporal resolution of our recordings (fast block). We quantitatively analyzed block from the cytoplasmic side. Both modes of block occurred via binding of the drug to the open channel, approximately followed 1:1 stoichiometry, and were similar for both channel subtypes. For slow block, the blocking rate increased, and the unblocking rate decreased with depolarization, yielding an overall enhancement of block at positive potentials, and suggesting a blocking site at an apparent electrical distance about 45% of the way from the cytoplasmic end of the channel (z delta approximately 0.45). In contrast, the fast blocking mode was only slightly enhanced by depolarization (z delta approximately 0.15). Phenomenologically, the bulky and complex transcainide molecule combines the almost voltage-insensitive blocking action of phenylhydrazine (Zamponi and French, 1994a (companion paper)) with a slow open-channel blocking action that shows a voltage dependence typical of simpler amines. Only the slower blocking mode was sensitive to the removal of external sodium ions, suggesting that the two types of block occur at distinct sites. Dose-response relations were also consistent with independent binding of transcainide to two separate sites on the channel. PMID:7811913

  19. Voltage dependence of Hodgkin-Huxley rate functions for a multistage K+ channel voltage sensor within a membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, S. R.

    2014-11-01

    The activation of a K+channel sensor in two sequential stages during a voltage clamp may be described as the translocation of a Brownian particle in an energy landscape with two large barriers between states. A solution of the Smoluchowski equation for a square-well approximation to the potential function of the S4 voltage sensor satisfies a master equation and has two frequencies that may be determined from the forward and backward rate functions. When the higher-frequency terms have small amplitude, the solution reduces to the relaxation of a rate equation, where the derived two-state rate functions are dependent on the relative magnitude of the forward rates (α and γ ) and the backward rates (β and δ ) for each stage. In particular, the voltage dependence of the Hodgkin-Huxley rate functions for a K+channel may be derived by assuming that the rate functions of the first stage are large relative to those of the second stage—α ≫γ and β ≫δ . For a Shaker IR K+ channel, the first forward and backward transitions are rate limiting (α <γ and δ ≪β ), and for an activation process with either two or three stages, the derived two-state rate functions also have a voltage dependence that is of a similar form to that determined for the squid axon. The potential variation generated by the interaction between a two-stage K+ ion channel and a noninactivating Na+ ion channel is determined by the master equation for K+channel activation and the ionic current equation when the Na+channel activation time is small, and if β ≪δ and α ≪γ , the system may exhibit a small amplitude oscillation between spikes, or mixed-mode oscillation, in which the slow closed state modulates the K+ ion channel conductance in the membrane.

  20. Integrated carboxylic carbon nanotube pathways with membranes for voltage-activated humidity detection and microclimate regulation.

    PubMed

    Pingitore, V; Miriello, D; Drioli, E; Gugliuzza, A

    2015-06-14

    This work describes some single walled carboxylic carbon nanotubes with outstanding transport properties when assembled in a 3D microarray working like a humidity membrane-sensor and an adjustable moisture regulator. Combined nano-assembly approaches are used to build up a better quality pathway through which assisted-charge and mass transport synchronically takes place. The structure-electrical response relationship is found, while controllable and tunable donor-acceptor interactions established at material interfaces are regarded as key factors for the accomplishment of charge transportation, enhanced electrical responses and adjustable moisture exchange. Raman and infrared spectroscopy provides indications about the fine structural and chemical features of the hybrid-composite membranes, resulting in perfect agreement with related morphology and electrical properties. Enhanced and modular electrical response to changes in the surrounding atmosphere is concerned with doping events, while assisted moisture regulation is discussed in relation to swelling and hopping actions. The electro-activated hybrid-composite membrane proposed in this work can be regarded as an attractive 'sense-to-act' precursor for smart long-distance monitoring systems with capability to adapt itself and provide local comfortable microenvironments. PMID:25939404

  1. Analysis of screw pitch effects on the performance of bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kazunari; Takahashi, Toru; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    Bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducers (BLTs) are common vibration sources in high-power ultrasonic applications such as ultrasonic plastic joining. In this paper, the authors propose a low-aspect-ratio BLT shape based on numerical solutions of a complex elastic contact problem concerning the bearing stress (prestress) imposed on the interfaces between the parts by clamping with the screw bolt. The prestress distribution at the interface has significant influence on the mechanical quality factor (Q) of the BLT. It is found that the screw pitch of the clamping bolt heavily affects the prestress distribution in the simulation using the finite element method. The newly developed BLTs with a high resonance frequency of approximately 80 kHz has a relatively wide radiating face and sufficient volume ratio of the piezoelectric elements that convert electrical energy into mechanical energy. The average of their measured Q values exceeds 1000 despite their high resonance frequency when they are driven at a voltage higher than 17 V rms.

  2. Electrodic voltages in the presence of dissolved sulfide: Implications for monitoring natural microbial activity

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, L.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Yee, N.; O'Brien, M.; Zhang, C.; Williams, K. H.

    2008-10-01

    There is growing interest in the development of new monitoring strategies for obtaining spatially extensive data diagnostic of microbial processes occurring in the earth. Open-circuit potentials arising from variable redox conditions in the fluid local-to-electrode surfaces (electrodic potentials) were recorded for a pair of silver-silver chloride electrodes in a column experiment, whereby a natural wetland soil containing a known community of sulfate reducers was continuously fed with a sulfate-rich nutrient medium. Measurements were made between five electrodes equally spaced along the column and a reference electrode placed on the column inflow. The presence of a sulfate reducing microbial population, coupled with observations of decreasing sulfate levels, formation of black precipitate (likely iron sulfide),elevated solid phase sulfide, and a characteristic sulfurous smell, suggest microbial-driven sulfate reduction (sulfide generation) in our column. Based on the known sensitivity of a silver electrode to dissolved sulfide concentration, we interpret the electrodic potentials approaching 700 mV recorded in this experiment as an indicator of the bisulfide (HS-) concentration gradients in the column. The measurement of the spatial and temporal variation in these electrodic potentials provides a simple and rapid method for monitoring patterns of relative HS- concentration that are indicative of the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Our measurements have implications both for the autonomous monitoring of anaerobic microbial processes in the subsurface and the performance of self-potential electrodes, where it is critical to isolate, and perhaps quantify, electrochemical interfaces contributing to observed potentials.

  3. Combination Space Station Handrail Clamp and Pointing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A device for attaching an experiment carrier to a space station handrail is provided. The device has two major components, a clamping mechanism for attachment to a space station handrail, and a pointing carrier on which an experiment package can be mounted and oriented. The handrail clamp uses an overcenter mechanism and the carrier mechanism uses an adjustable preload ball and socket for carrier positioning. The handrail clamp uses a stack of disk springs to provide a spring loaded button. This configuration provides consistent clamping force over a range of possible handrail thicknesses. Three load points are incorporated in the clamping mechanism thereby spreading the clamping load onto three separate points on the handrail. A four bar linkage is used to provide for a single actuation lever for all three load points. For additional safety, a secondary lock consisting of a capture plate and push lock keeps the clamp attached to the handrail in the event of main clamp failure. For the carrier positioning mechanism, a ball in a spring loaded socket uses friction to provide locking torque; however. the ball and socket are torque limited so that the ball ran slip under kick loads (125 pounds or greater). A lead screw attached to disk spring stacks is used to provide an adjustable spring force on the socket. A locking knob is attached to the lead screw to allow for hand manipulation of the lead screw.

  4. OPTIMAL TIMING FOR CLAMPING THE UMBILICAL CORD AFTER BIRTH

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Tonse N. K.; Singal, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis This paper provides a brief overview of pros and cons of clamping the cord too early (within seconds) after birth. It also highlights evolving data that suggests that delaying cord clamping for 30–60 seconds after birth is beneficial to the baby and the mother, with no measurable negative effects. PMID:23164185

  5. 21 CFR 876.5160 - Urological clamp for males.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urological clamp for males. 876.5160 Section 876.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5160 Urological clamp for males. (a) Identification. A urological...

  6. Off-clamp robotic partial nephrectomy: Technique and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lamoshi, Abdulraouf Y.; Salkini, Mohamad W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) is a technically challenging procedure. Advanced skills are needed to accomplish tumor resection, hemostasis, and renorrhaphy within short ischemia time in RPN. Off-clamp RPN with zero ischemia may decrease the risk of ischemic reperfusion injury to the kidney. However, the off-clamp technique has been associated with an increased risk of blood loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of our modified off-clamp technique utilized in certain RPN cases. Patients and Methods: A total of 81 patients underwent RPN between September 2009 and July 2013 for renal masses. We studied a subgroup of patients who underwent off-clamp RPN with zero ischemia time. The off-clamp technique was utilized for exophytic, nonhilar tumors that have a base of 2 cm or less. We developed a novel technique to avoid ischemia reperfusion renal injury while minimizing blood loss in certain cases of RPN. Results: Of the 81 cases of RPN, we reviewed and adopted the off-clamp technique in 34 patients (41.98%). Utilizing off-clamp RPN resulted in an average blood loss of 96.29 ml and 1.56 days (range: 1-3 days) of hospital stay and minimal change in serum creatinine. Conclusions: Off-clamp RPN is safe and feasible approach to excise certain kidney tumors. It carries the benefits of RPN and prevents ischemia reperfusion renal injury. PMID:25835489

  7. 21 CFR 876.5160 - Urological clamp for males.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urological clamp for males. 876.5160 Section 876.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5160 Urological clamp for...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5160 - Urological clamp for males.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urological clamp for males. 876.5160 Section 876.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5160 Urological clamp for males. (a) Identification. A urological...

  9. Suppression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and neuronal excitability by imperatorin.

    PubMed

    Wu, King-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Hung; Cheng, Ka-Shun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yang, Chin-Tsang; Wong, Kar-Lok; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Chan, Paul; Leung, Yuk-Man

    2013-12-01

    Imperatorin is a naturally occurring furocoumarin compound isolated from plants such as Angelica archangelica and Cnidium monnieri. It has multiple pharmacological effects including anticonvulsant effects. Here we determined the effects of imperatorin on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSC) using whole-cell patch clamp techniques in differentiated neuronal NG108-15 cells. We showed that imperatorin inhibited VGSC; such inhibition did not show state-dependence. Imperatorin caused a left shift in the steady-state inactivation curve without affecting activation gating. The inhibition of VGSC by imperatorin displayed a mild frequency-dependence. Imperatorin was also shown to inhibit VGSC and action potential amplitude without affecting voltage-gated K(+) channels in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that imperatorin dampens neuronal excitability by inhibiting VGSC. PMID:24113522

  10. Circumferential hoof clamp method of lameness induction in the horse.

    PubMed

    Swaab, M E; Mendez-Angulo, J L; Groschen, D M; Ernst, N S; Brown, M P; Trumble, T N

    2015-07-01

    A circumferential hoof clamp method to induce controlled and reversible lameness in the forelimbs of eight horses was assessed. Peak vertical forces and vertical impulses were recorded using a force plate to verify induced lameness. Video recordings were used by blinded observers to determine subjective lameness using a 0-5 scale and any residual lameness following clamp loosening. Tightening of clamps resulted in consistent, visible lameness in the selected limbs in all horses. Lameness was confirmed by significant decreases from baseline in the peak vertical force (P <0.01). Lameness was also confirmed subjectively by elevated median scores (0 at baseline and 2 during lameness). Lameness was not immediately reversible after clamp loosening (median score 1.5), but horses were not obviously lame after clamp removal and were no different from initial baseline (median score 0.5) approximately 3 days later. PMID:26045357

  11. Catch and Patch: A Pipette-Based Approach for Automating Patch Clamp That Enables Cell Selection and Fast Compound Application.

    PubMed

    Danker, Timm; Braun, Franziska; Silbernagl, Nikole; Guenther, Elke

    2016-03-01

    Manual patch clamp, the gold standard of electrophysiology, represents a powerful and versatile toolbox to stimulate, modulate, and record ion channel activity from membrane fragments and whole cells. The electrophysiological readout can be combined with fluorescent or optogenetic methods and allows for ultrafast solution exchanges using specialized microfluidic tools. A hallmark of manual patch clamp is the intentional selection of individual cells for recording, often an essential prerequisite to generate meaningful data. So far, available automation solutions rely on random cell usage in the closed environment of a chip and thus sacrifice much of this versatility by design. To parallelize and automate the traditional patch clamp technique while perpetuating the full versatility of the method, we developed an approach to automation, which is based on active cell handling and targeted electrode placement rather than on random processes. This is achieved through an automated pipette positioning system, which guides the tips of recording pipettes with micrometer precision to a microfluidic cell handling device. Using a patch pipette array mounted on a conventional micromanipulator, our automated patch clamp process mimics the original manual patch clamp as closely as possible, yet achieving a configuration where recordings are obtained from many patch electrodes in parallel. In addition, our implementation is extensible by design to allow the easy integration of specialized equipment such as ultrafast compound application tools. The resulting system offers fully automated patch clamp on purposely selected cells and combines high-quality gigaseal recordings with solution switching in the millisecond timescale. PMID:26991363

  12. Clamping the Mec1/ATR checkpoint kinase into action.

    PubMed

    Majka, Jerzy; Burgers, Peter M J

    2007-05-15

    The yeast checkpoint protein kinase Mec1, the ortholog of human ATR, is the essential upstream regulator of the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage and to stalling of DNA replication forks. The activity of Mec1/ATR is not directly regulated by the DNA substrates that signal checkpoint activation. Rather the signal appears to be transduced to Mec1 by factors that interact with the signaling DNA substrates. One of these factors, the DNA damage checkpoint clamp Rad17-Mec3-Ddc1 (human 9-1-1) is loaded onto gapped DNA resulting from the partial repair of DNA damage, and the Ddc1 subunit of this complex activates Mec1. In vertebrate cells, the TopBP1 protein (Cut5 in S. pombe and Dpb11 in S. cervisiae) that is also required for establishment of the replication fork, functions during replication fork dysfunction to activate ATR. Both mechanisms of activation generally upregulate the kinase activity towards all downstream targets. PMID:17495536

  13. Voltage oscillations and ionic conductances in hair cells isolated from the alligator cochlea.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, P A; Evans, M G

    1988-12-01

    Tall hair cells were isolated by enzymatic and mechanical dissociation from selected regions of the apical half of the alligator (A. mississippiensis) cochlea. Single cells were subjected to voltage-clamp and current-clamp using the tight-seal whole-cell recording technique. Most hair cells isolated from the apex of the cochlea produced slowly regenerative depolarizations or Na action potentials during current injection, whereas hair cells isolated from more basal regions usually produced voltage oscillations (ringing) in response to depolarizing current injection, an indication of electrical resonance. Resonant frequencies ranged from 50 to 157 Hz in different cells. The higher-frequency cells tended to have larger and more rapidly activating outward currents than did the lower-frequency cells. An inward Ca current and an outward Ca-activated K current were present in all hair cells. In addition, an inwardly rectifying current and a small, transient outward current were often seen. Thus, we conclude that an electrical tuning mechanism is present in alligator hair cells. The role of the ionic conductances in shaping hair cell responses to current injection, and the possible contributions of these electrical responses to cochlear function are discussed. PMID:3244125

  14. Imaging voltage in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Takahashi, Hiroto; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, imaging membrane potential has become a fruitful approach to study neural circuits, especially in invertebrate preparations with large, resilient neurons. At the same time, particularly in mammalian preparations, voltage imaging methods suffer from poor signal to noise and secondary side effects, and they fall short of providing single-cell resolution when imaging of the activity of neuronal populations. As an introduction to these techniques, we briefly review different voltage imaging methods (including organic fluorophores, SHG chromophores, genetic indicators, hybrid, nanoparticles and intrinsic approaches), and illustrate some of their applications to neuronal biophysics and mammalian circuit analysis. We discuss their mechanisms of voltage sensitivity, from reorientation, electrochromic or electro-optical phenomena, to interaction among chromophores or membrane scattering, and highlight their advantages and shortcomings, commenting on the outlook for development of novel voltage imaging methods. PMID:21220095

  15. Sensing voltage across lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Kenton J.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of electrical potentials across lipid bilayers by specialized membrane proteins is required for many fundamental cellular processes such as the generation and propagation of nerve impulses. These membrane proteins possess modular voltage-sensing domains, a notable example being the S1-S4 domains of voltage-activated ion channels. Ground-breaking structural studies on these domains explain how voltage sensors are designed and reveal important interactions with the surrounding lipid membrane. Although further structures are needed to fully understand the conformational changes that occur during voltage sensing, the available data help to frame several key concepts that are fundamental to the mechanism of voltage sensing. PMID:19092925

  16. Whole-cell Patch-clamp Recordings in Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Segev, Amir; Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Kourrich, Saïd

    2016-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp recording is an electrophysiological technique that allows the study of the electrical properties of a substantial part of the neuron. In this configuration, the micropipette is in tight contact with the cell membrane, which prevents current leakage and thereby provides more accurate ionic current measurements than the previously used intracellular sharp electrode recording method. Classically, whole-cell recording can be performed on neurons in various types of preparations, including cell culture models, dissociated neurons, neurons in brain slices, and in intact anesthetized or awake animals. In summary, this technique has immensely contributed to the understanding of passive and active biophysical properties of excitable cells. A major advantage of this technique is that it provides information on how specific manipulations (e.g., pharmacological, experimenter-induced plasticity) may alter specific neuronal functions or channels in real-time. Additionally, significant opening of the plasma membrane allows the internal pipette solution to freely diffuse into the cytoplasm, providing means for introducing drugs, e.g., agonists or antagonists of specific intracellular proteins, and manipulating these targets without altering their functions in neighboring cells. This article will focus on whole-cell recording performed on neurons in brain slices, a preparation that has the advantage of recording neurons in relatively well preserved brain circuits, i.e., in a physiologically relevant context. In particular, when combined with appropriate pharmacology, this technique is a powerful tool allowing identification of specific neuroadaptations that occurred following any type of experiences, such as learning, exposure to drugs of abuse, and stress. In summary, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in brain slices provide means to measure in ex vivo preparation long-lasting changes in neuronal functions that have developed in intact awake animals

  17. A novel measuring method of clamping force for electrostatic chuck in semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesheng, Wang; Jia, Cheng; Yin, Zhong; Linhong, Ji

    2016-04-01

    Electrostatic chucks are one of the core components of semiconductor devices. As a key index of electrostatic chucks, the clamping force must be controlled within a reasonable range. Therefore, it is essential to accurately measure the clamping force. To reduce the negative factors influencing measurement precision and repeatability, this article presents a novel method to measure the clamping force and we elaborate both the principle and the key procedure. A micro-force probe component is introduced to monitor, adjust, and eliminate the gap between the wafer and the electrostatic chuck. The contact force between the ruby probe and the wafer is selected as an important parameter to characterize de-chucking, and we have found that the moment of de-chucking can be exactly judged. Moreover, this article derives the formula calibrating equivalent action area of backside gas pressure under real working conditions, which can effectively connect the backside gas pressure at the moment of de-chucking and the clamping force. The experiments were then performed on a self-designed measuring platform. The de-chucking mechanism is discussed in light of our analysis of the experimental data. Determination criteria for de-chucking point are summed up. It is found that the relationship between de-chucking pressure and applied voltage conforms well to quadratic equation. Meanwhile, the result reveals that actual de-chucking behavior is much more complicated than the description given in the classical empirical formula. Project supported by No. 02 National Science and Technology Major Project of China (No. 2011ZX02403-004).

  18. Mild Alkalization Acutely Triggers the Warburg Effect by Enhancing Hexokinase Activity via Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Won; Moon, Seung Hwan; Cho, Young Seok; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2016-01-01

    To fully understand the glycolytic behavior of cancer cells, it is important to recognize how it is linked to pH dynamics. Here, we evaluated the acute effects of mild acidification and alkalization on cancer cell glucose uptake and glycolytic flux and investigated the role of hexokinase (HK). Cancer cells exposed to buffers with graded pH were measured for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, lactate production and HK activity. Subcellular localization of HK protein was assessed by western blots and confocal microscopy. The interior of T47D breast cancer cells was mildly alkalized to pH 7.5 by a buffer pH of 7.8, and this was accompanied by rapid increases of FDG uptake and lactate extrusion. This shift toward glycolytic flux led to the prompt recovery of a reversed pH gradient. In contrast, mild acidification rapidly reduced cellular FDG uptake and lactate production. Mild acidification decreased and mild alkalization increased mitochondrial HK translocation and enzyme activity. Cells transfected with specific siRNA against HK-1, HK-2 and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)1 displayed significant attenuation of pH-induced changes in FDG uptake. Confocal microscopy showed increased co-localization of HK-1 and HK-2 with VDAC1 by alkaline treatment. In isolated mitochondria, acidic pH increased and alkaline pH decreased release of free HK-1 and HK-2 from the mitochondrial pellet into the supernatant. Furthermore, experiments using purified proteins showed that alkaline pH promoted co-immunoprecipitation of HK with VDAC protein. These findings demonstrate that mild alkalization is sufficient to acutely trigger cancer cell glycolytic flux through enhanced activity of HK by promoting its mitochondrial translocation and VDAC binding. This process might serve as a mechanism through which cancer cells trigger the Warburg effect to maintain a dysregulated pH. PMID:27479079

  19. Mild Alkalization Acutely Triggers the Warburg Effect by Enhancing Hexokinase Activity via Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Binding.

    PubMed

    Quach, Cung Hoa Thien; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Won; Moon, Seung Hwan; Cho, Young Seok; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2016-01-01

    To fully understand the glycolytic behavior of cancer cells, it is important to recognize how it is linked to pH dynamics. Here, we evaluated the acute effects of mild acidification and alkalization on cancer cell glucose uptake and glycolytic flux and investigated the role of hexokinase (HK). Cancer cells exposed to buffers with graded pH were measured for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, lactate production and HK activity. Subcellular localization of HK protein was assessed by western blots and confocal microscopy. The interior of T47D breast cancer cells was mildly alkalized to pH 7.5 by a buffer pH of 7.8, and this was accompanied by rapid increases of FDG uptake and lactate extrusion. This shift toward glycolytic flux led to the prompt recovery of a reversed pH gradient. In contrast, mild acidification rapidly reduced cellular FDG uptake and lactate production. Mild acidification decreased and mild alkalization increased mitochondrial HK translocation and enzyme activity. Cells transfected with specific siRNA against HK-1, HK-2 and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)1 displayed significant attenuation of pH-induced changes in FDG uptake. Confocal microscopy showed increased co-localization of HK-1 and HK-2 with VDAC1 by alkaline treatment. In isolated mitochondria, acidic pH increased and alkaline pH decreased release of free HK-1 and HK-2 from the mitochondrial pellet into the supernatant. Furthermore, experiments using purified proteins showed that alkaline pH promoted co-immunoprecipitation of HK with VDAC protein. These findings demonstrate that mild alkalization is sufficient to acutely trigger cancer cell glycolytic flux through enhanced activity of HK by promoting its mitochondrial translocation and VDAC binding. This process might serve as a mechanism through which cancer cells trigger the Warburg effect to maintain a dysregulated pH. PMID:27479079

  20. Ca2+ and nucleotide dependent regulation of voltage dependent anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hedrich, R; Busch, H; Raschke, K

    1990-01-01

    Using the patch-clamp technique we discovered that the voltage dependent anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells are activated by a rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ in the presence of nucleotides. Upon activation, these anion channels catalyse anion currents 10-20 times higher than in the inactivated state, thus shifting the plasma membrane from a K+ conducting state to an anion conducting state. Prolonged stimulation by depolarizing voltages results in the inactivation of the anion current (t1/2 = 10-12 s). We suggest that activation of the anion channel by Ca2+ and nucleotides is a key event in the regulation of salt efflux from guard cells during stomatal closure. PMID:1701140

  1. Space Life Sciences Directorate's Position on the Physiological Effects of Exposing the Crewmemeber to Low-Voltage Electrical Hazards During Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Kramer, Leonard; Mikatarian, Ron; Polk, James; Duncan, Michael; Koontz, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The models predict that, for low voltage exposures in the space suit, physiologically active current could be conducted across the crew member causing catastrophic hazards. Future work with Naval Health Research Center Detachment Directed Energy Bio-effects Laboratory is being proposed to analyze additional current paths across the human torso and upper limbs. These models may need to be verified with human studies.

  2. Spexin Enhances Bowel Movement through Activating L-type Voltage-dependent Calcium Channel via Galanin Receptor 2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-yuan; Zhang, Man; Huang, Tao; Yang, Li-ling; Fu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Ling; Zhong, Linda LD; Mu, Huai-xue; Shi, Xiao-ke; Leung, Christina FP; Fan, Bao-min; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Ai-ping; Zhu, Li-xin; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel neuropeptide spexin was found to be broadly expressed in various endocrine and nervous tissues while little is known about its functions. This study investigated the role of spexin in bowel movement and the underlying mechanisms. In functional constipation (FC) patients, serum spexin levels were significantly decreased. Consistently, in starved mice, the mRNA of spexin was significantly decreased in intestine and colon. Spexin injection increased the velocity of carbon powder propulsion in small intestine and decreased the glass beads expulsion time in distal colon in mice. Further, spexin dose-dependently stimulated the intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction. Galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) antagonist M871, but not Galanin receptor 3 (GALR3) antagonist SNAP37899, effectively suppressed the stimulatory effects of spexin on intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction, which could be eliminated by extracellular [Ca2+] removal and L-type voltage-dependentCa2+ channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine. Besides, spexin dramatically increased the [Ca2+]i in isolated colonic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that spexin can act on GALR2 receptor to regulate bowel motility by activating L-type VDCC. Our findings provide evidence for important physiological roles of spexin in GI functions. Selective action on spexin pathway might have therapeutic effects on GI diseases with motility disorders. PMID:26160593

  3. Cell-Detection Technique for Automated Patch Clamping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    A unique and customizable machinevision and image-data-processing technique has been developed for use in automated identification of cells that are optimal for patch clamping. [Patch clamping (in which patch electrodes are pressed against cell membranes) is an electrophysiological technique widely applied for the study of ion channels, and of membrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the membranes. Patch clamping is used in many biological research fields such as neurobiology, pharmacology, and molecular biology.] While there exist several hardware techniques for automated patch clamping of cells, very few of those techniques incorporate machine vision for locating cells that are ideal subjects for patch clamping. In contrast, the present technique is embodied in a machine-vision algorithm that, in practical application, enables the user to identify good and bad cells for patch clamping in an image captured by a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera attached to a microscope, within a processing time of one second. Hence, the present technique can save time, thereby increasing efficiency and reducing cost. The present technique involves the utilization of cell-feature metrics to accurately make decisions on the degree to which individual cells are "good" or "bad" candidates for patch clamping. These metrics include position coordinates (x,y) in the image plane, major-axis length, minor-axis length, area, elongation, roundness, smoothness, angle of orientation, and degree of inclusion in the field of view. The present technique does not require any special hardware beyond commercially available, off-the-shelf patch-clamping hardware: A standard patchclamping microscope system with an attached CCD camera, a personal computer with an imagedata- processing board, and some experience in utilizing imagedata- processing software are all that are needed. A cell image is first captured by the microscope CCD camera and image-data-processing board, then the image

  4. The α2δ-1 subunit remodels CaV1.2 voltage sensors and allows Ca2+ influx at physiological membrane potentials.

    PubMed

    Savalli, Nicoletta; Pantazis, Antonios; Sigg, Daniel; Weiss, James N; Neely, Alan; Olcese, Riccardo

    2016-08-01

    Excitation-evoked calcium influx across cellular membranes is strictly controlled by voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV), which possess four distinct voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) that direct the opening of a central pore. The energetic interactions between the VSDs and the pore are critical for tuning the channel's voltage dependence. The accessory α2δ-1 subunit is known to facilitate CaV1.2 voltage-dependent activation, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, using voltage clamp fluorometry, we track the activation of the four individual VSDs in a human L-type CaV1.2 channel consisting of α1C and β3 subunits. We find that, without α2δ-1, the channel complex displays a right-shifted voltage dependence such that currents mainly develop at nonphysiological membrane potentials because of very weak VSD-pore interactions. The presence of α2δ-1 facilitates channel activation by increasing the voltage sensitivity (i.e., the effective charge) of VSDs I-III. Moreover, the α2δ-1 subunit also makes VSDs I-III more efficient at opening the channel by increasing the coupling energy between VSDs II and III and the pore, thus allowing Ca influx within the range of physiological membrane potentials. PMID:27481713

  5. Extracellular Protons Inhibit Charge Immobilization in the Cardiac Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D.K.; Claydon, T.W.; Ruben, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Low pH depolarizes the voltage-dependence of cardiac voltage-gated sodium (NaV1.5) channel activation and fast inactivation and destabilizes the fast-inactivated state. The molecular basis for these changes in protein behavior has not been reported. We hypothesized that changes in the kinetics of voltage sensor movement may destabilize the fast-inactivated state in NaV1.5. To test this idea, we recorded NaV1.5 gating currents in Xenopus oocytes using a cut-open voltage-clamp with extracellular solution titrated to either pH 7.4 or pH 6.0. Reducing extracellular pH significantly depolarized the voltage-dependence of both the QON/V and QOFF/V curves, and reduced the total charge immobilized during depolarization. We conclude that destabilized fast-inactivation and reduced charge immobilization in NaV1.5 at low pH are functionally related effects. PMID:23823228

  6. Regionally specific expression of high-voltage-activated calcium channels in thalamic nuclei of epileptic and non-epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Ehling, Petra; Cerina, Manuela; Meuth, Patrick; Zobeiri, Mehrnoush; Meuth, Sven G; Pape, Hans-Christian; Budde, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The polygenic origin of generalized absence epilepsy results in dysfunction of ion channels that allows the switch from physiological asynchronous to pathophysiological highly synchronous network activity. Evidence from rat and mouse models of absence epilepsy indicates that altered Ca(2+) channel activity contributes to cellular and network alterations that lead to seizure activity. Under physiological circumstances, high voltage-activated (HVA) Ca(2+) channels are important in determining the thalamic firing profile. Here, we investigated a possible contribution of HVA channels to the epileptic phenotype using a rodent genetic model of absence epilepsy. In this study, HVA Ca(2+) currents were recorded from neurons of three different thalamic nuclei that are involved in both sensory signal transmission and rhythmic-synchronized activity during epileptic spike-and-wave discharges (SWD), namely the dorsal part of the lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), the ventrobasal thalamic complex (VB) and the reticular thalamic nucleus (NRT) of epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo rats from Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rats. HVA Ca(2+) current densities in dLGN neurons were significantly increased in epileptic rats compared with non-epileptic controls while other thalamic regions revealed no differences between the strains. Application of specific channel blockers revealed that the increased current was carried by L-type Ca(2+) channels. Electrophysiological evidence of increased L-type current correlated with up-regulated mRNA and protein expression of a particular L-type channel, namely Cav1.3, in dLGN of epileptic rats. No significant changes were found for other HVA Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, pharmacological inactivation of L-type Ca(2+) channels results in altered firing profiles of thalamocortical relay (TC) neurons from non-epileptic rather than from epileptic rats. While HVA Ca(2+) channels influence tonic and burst firing in ACI and WAG

  7. Dynamic clamp: a powerful tool in cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Wilders, Ronald

    2006-10-15

    Dynamic clamp is a collection of closely related techniques that have been employed in cardiac electrophysiology to provide direct answers to numerous research questions regarding basic cellular mechanisms of action potential formation, action potential transfer and action potential synchronization in health and disease. Building on traditional current clamp, dynamic clamp was initially used to create virtual gap junctions between isolated myocytes. More recent applications include the embedding of a real pacemaking myocyte in a simulated network of atrial or ventricular cells and the insertion of virtual ion channels, either simulated in real time or simultaneously recorded from an expression system, into the membrane of an isolated myocyte. These applications have proven that dynamic clamp, which is characterized by the real-time evaluation and injection of simulated membrane current, is a powerful tool in cardiac electrophysiology. Here, each of the three different experimental configurations used in cardiac electrophysiology is reviewed. Also, directions are given for the implementation of dynamic clamp in the cardiac electrophysiology laboratory. With the growing interest in the application of dynamic clamp in cardiac electrophysiology, it is anticipated that dynamic clamp will also prove to be a powerful tool in basic research on biological pacemakers and in identification of specific ion channels as targets for drug development. PMID:16873403

  8. Structure-activity and interaction effects of 14 different pyrethroids on voltage-gated chloride ion channels.

    PubMed

    Burr, Steven A; Ray, David E

    2004-02-01

    We have proposed that since the type II pyrethroids deltamethrin and cypermethrin, but not the type I pyrethroid cismethrin act on chloride channels, this could contribute to the bimodal nature of pyrethroid poisoning syndromes. We now examine a wider range of pyrethroid structures on the activity of these calcium-independent voltage-gated maxi-chloride channels. Excised inside-out membrane patches from differentiated mouse neuroblastoma cells were used, and mean channel open probabilities calculated. For single dosing at 10 microM, bioallethrin, beta-cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, and fenpropathrin were all found to significantly decrease open channel probability (p < 0.05). Bifenthrin, bioresmethrin, cispermethrin, cisresmethrin, cyfluthrin isomers 2 and 4, lambda-cyhalothrin, esfenvalerate, and tefluthrin, did not significantly alter open channel probability (p > 0.05). Since the type II pyrethroids, esfenvalerate, and lambda-cyhalothrin were ineffective, we must conclude that actions at the chloride ion channel target cannot in themselves account for the differences between the two types of poisoning syndrome. Sequential dosing with type II pyrethroids caused no further chloride ion channel closure. The type I pyrethroid cisresmethrin did however prevent a subsequent effect by the mixed type pyrethroid fenpropathrin. In contrast, the type I pyrethroid cispermethrin did not prevent a subsequent effect due to the type II pyrethroid deltamethrin. The difference in effect may be the result of differences in potency, as deltamethrin had a greater effect than fenpropathrin. It therefore appears clear that in some combinations the type I and type II pyrethroids can compete and may bind to the same chloride channel target site. PMID:14657519

  9. High-voltage integrated active quenching circuit for single photon count rate up to 80 Mcounts/s.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Giulia; Rech, Ivan; Gulinatti, Angelo; Ghioni, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been subject to a fast improvement in recent years. In particular, custom technologies specifically developed to fabricate SPAD devices give the designer the freedom to pursue the best detector performance required by applications. A significant breakthrough in this field is represented by the recent introduction of a red enhanced SPAD (RE-SPAD) technology, capable of attaining a good photon detection efficiency in the near infrared range (e.g. 40% at a wavelength of 800 nm) while maintaining a remarkable timing resolution of about 100ps full width at half maximum. Being planar, the RE-SPAD custom technology opened the way to the development of SPAD arrays particularly suited for demanding applications in the field of life sciences. However, to achieve such excellent performance custom SPAD detectors must be operated with an external active quenching circuit (AQC) designed on purpose. Next steps toward the development of compact and practical multichannel systems will require a new generation of monolithically integrated AQC arrays. In this paper we present a new, fully integrated AQC fabricated in a high-voltage 0.18 µm CMOS technology able to provide quenching pulses up to 50 Volts with fast leading and trailing edges. Although specifically designed for optimal operation of RE-SPAD devices, the new AQC is quite versatile: it can be used with any SPAD detector, regardless its fabrication technology, reaching remarkable count rates up to 80 Mcounts/s and generating a photon detection pulse with a timing jitter as low as 119 ps full width at half maximum. The compact design of our circuit has been specifically laid out to make this IC a suitable building block for monolithically integrated AQC arrays. PMID:27505749

  10. Insulin Tolerance Test and Hyperinsulinemic-Euglycemic Clamp

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Georgios K.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    The two tests are used to evaluate in vivo sensitivity to insulin in mouse. The hypoerinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp provides information about the sensitivity to insulin in liver and other metabolically relevant tissues.

  11. BK channel activation by tungstate requires the β1 subunit extracellular loop residues essential to modulate voltage sensor function and channel gating.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mariño, Ana I; Valverde, Miguel A; Fernández-Fernández, José M

    2014-07-01

    Tungstate, a compound with antidiabetic, antiobesity, and antihypertensive properties, activates the large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) (BK) channel containing either β1 or β4 subunits. The BK activation by tungstate is Mg(2+)-dependent and promotes arterial vasodilation, but only in precontracted mouse arteries expressing β1. In this study, we further explored how the β1 subunit participates in tungstate activation of BK channels. Activation of heterologously expressed human BKαβ1 channels in inside-out patches is fully dependent on the Mg(2+) sensitivity of the BK α channel subunit even at high (10 μM) cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Alanine mutagenesis of β1 extracellular residues Y74 or S104, which destabilize the active voltage sensor, greatly decreased the tungstate-induced left-shift of the BKαβ1 G-V curves in either the absence or presence of physiologically relevant cytosolic Ca(2+) levels (10 μM). The weakened tungstate activation of the BKαβ1Y74A and BKαβ1S104A mutant channels was not related to decreased Mg(2+) sensitivity. These results, together with previously published reports, support the idea that the putative binding site for tungstate-mediated BK channel activation is located in the pore-forming α channel subunit, around the Mg(2+) binding site. The role of β1 in tungstate-induced channel activation seems to rely on its interaction with the BK α subunit to modulate channel activity. Loop residues that are essential for the regulation of voltage sensor activation and gating of the BK channel are also relevant for BK activation by tungstate. PMID:24158430

  12. Ion Channels in Native Chloroplast Membranes: Challenges and Potential for Direct Patch-Clamp Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pottosin, Igor; Dobrovinskaya, Oxana

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis without any doubt depends on the activity of the chloroplast ion channels. The thylakoid ion channels participate in the fine partitioning of the light-generated proton-motive force (p.m.f.). By regulating, therefore, luminal pH, they affect the linear electron flow and non-photochemical quenching. Stromal ion homeostasis and signaling, on the other hand, depend on the activity of both thylakoid and envelope ion channels. Experimentally, intact chloroplasts and swollen thylakoids were proven to be suitable for direct measurements of the ion channels activity via conventional patch-clamp technique; yet, such studies became infrequent, although their potential is far from being exhausted. In this paper we wish to summarize existing challenges for direct patch-clamping of native chloroplast membranes as well as present available results on the activity of thylakoid Cl− (ClC?) and divalent cation-permeable channels, along with their tentative roles in the p.m.f. partitioning, volume regulation, and stromal Ca2+ and Mg2+ dynamics. Patch-clamping of the intact envelope revealed both large-conductance porin-like channels, likely located in the outer envelope membrane and smaller conductance channels, more compatible with the inner envelope location. Possible equivalent model for the sandwich-like arrangement of the two envelope membranes within the patch electrode will be discussed, along with peculiar properties of the fast-activated cation channel in the context of the stromal pH control. PMID:26733887

  13. High voltage load resistor array

    DOEpatents

    Lehmann, Monty Ray

    2005-01-18

    A high voltage resistor comprising an array of a plurality of parallel electrically connected resistor elements each containing a resistive solution, attached at each end thereof to an end plate, and about the circumference of each of the end plates, a corona reduction ring. Each of the resistor elements comprises an insulating tube having an electrode inserted into each end thereof and held in position by one or more hose clamps about the outer periphery of the insulating tube. According to a preferred embodiment, the electrode is fabricated from stainless steel and has a mushroom shape at one end, that inserted into the tube, and a flat end for engagement with the end plates that provides connection of the resistor array and with a load.

  14. Dynamic Clamp Analysis of Synaptic Integration in Sympathetic Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Horn, J. P.; Kullmann, P. H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in modern neuroscience require the identification of principles that connect different levels of experimental analysis, from molecular mechanisms to explanations of cellular functions, then to circuits, and, ultimately, to systems and behavior. Here, we examine how synaptic organization of the sympathetic ganglia may enable them to function as use-dependent amplifiers of preganglionic activity and how the gain of this amplification may be modulated by metabotropic signaling mechanisms. The approach combines a general computational model of ganglionic integration together with experimental tests of the model using the dynamic clamp method. In these experiments, we recorded intracellularly from dissociated bullfrog sympathetic neurons and then mimicked physiological synapses with virtual computer-generated synapses. It thus became possible to analyze the synaptic gain by recording cellular responses to complex patterns of synaptic activity that normally arise in vivo from convergent nicotinic and muscarinic synapses. The results of these studies are significant because they illustrate how gain generated through ganglionic integration may contribute to the feedback control of important autonomic behaviors, in particular to the control of the blood pressure. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Professor Vladimir Skok, whose rich legacy in synaptic physiology helped establish the modern paradigm for connecting multiple levels of analysis in studies of the nervous system. PMID:19756262

  15. Regional distribution of ionic currents and membrane voltage responses of type II hair cells in the vestibular neuroepithelium.

    PubMed

    Weng, T; Correia, M J

    1999-11-01

    Basolateral ionic currents and membrane voltage responses were studied in pigeon vestibular type II hair cells using a thin slice through either the semicircular canal (SCC) crista or utricular macular epithelium. Whole cell tight-seal patch-clamp recording techniques were used. Current-clamp and voltage-clamp studies were carried out on the same cell. One hundred ten cells were studied in the peripheral (Zone I) and central (Zone III) zones of the SCC crista, and 162 cells were studied in the striolar (S Zone) and extrastriolar (ES Zone) zones of the utricular macula. One of the major findings of this paper is that hair cells with fast activation kinetics of their outward currents are found primarily in one region of the SCC crista and utricular macula, whereas hair cells with slow activation kinetics are found in a different region. In Zone I of the crista, 95% of the cells have fast activation kinetics ("fast" cells) and in Zone III of the crista, 86% of the cells have slow activation kinetics ("slow" cells). In the utricular macula slice, 100% of the cells from the S Zone are slow cells, whereas 86% of the cells from the ES Zones are fast cells. Oscillation frequency (f) and quality factor (Q) of the damped oscillations of the membrane potential during extrinsic current injections were studied in hair cells in the different regions. The slow cells in Zone III and in the S Zone have a statistically significantly lower f, as a function of the amplitude of injected current, when compared with the fast cells in Zone I and the ES Zone. Although Q varied over a small range and was <2.6 for all cells tested, there was a statistically significant difference between Q for the membrane oscillations of the slow cells and fast cells in response to a range of current injections. PMID:10561418

  16. High voltage distributed amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willems, D.; Bahl, I.; Wirsing, K.

    1991-12-01

    A high-voltage distributed amplifier implemented in GaAs MMIC technology has demonstrated good circuit performance over at least two octave bandwidth. This technique allows for very broadband amplifier operation with good efficiency in satellite, active-aperture radar, and battery-powered systems. Also, by increasing the number of FETs, the amplifier can be designed to match different voltage rails. The circuit does require a small amount of additional chip size over conventional distributed amplifiers but does not require power dividers or additional matching networks. This circuit configuration should find great use in broadband power amplifier design.

  17. Trimebutine maleate has inhibitory effects on the voltage-dependent Ca2+ inward current and other membrane currents in intestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shimada, T; Kurachi, Y; Terano, A; Hamada, E; Sugimoto, T

    1990-04-01

    We examined effects of trimebutine maleate on the membrane currents of the intestinal smooth muscle cells by using the tight-seal whole cell clamp technique. Trimebutine suppressed the Ba2+ inward current through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of trimebutine on the Ba2+ inward current was not use-dependent. It shifted the steady-state inactivation curve to the left along the voltage axis. Trimebutine also had inhibitory effects on the other membrane currents of the cells, such as the voltage-dependent K+ current, the Ca2(+)-activated oscillating K+ current and the acetylcholine-induced inward current. These relatively non-specific inhibitory effects of trimebutine on the membrane currents may explain, at least in part, the dual actions of the drug on the intestinal smooth muscle contractility, i.e. inhibitory as well as excitatory. PMID:2161373

  18. Zn(2+) induces apoptosis in human highly metastatic SHG-44 glioma cells, through inhibiting activity of the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Shangrong; Li, Shu Jie

    2013-08-23

    In contrast to the voltage-gated K(+) channels, the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 contains a voltage-sensor domain but lacks a pore domain. Here, we showed that Hv1 is expressed in the highly metastatic glioma cell SHG-44, but lowly in the poorly metastatic glioma cell U-251. Inhibition of Hv1 activity by 140μM zinc chloride induces apoptosis in the human highly metastatic glioma cells. Zn(2+) ions markedly inhibit proton secretion, and reduce the gelatinase activity in the highly metastatic glioma cells. In vivo, the glioma tumor sizes of the implantation of the SHG-44 xenografts in nude mice that were injected zinc chloride solution, were dramatically smaller than that in the controlled groups. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of Hv1 activity via Zn(2+) ions can effectively retard the cancer growth and suppress the cancer metastasis by the decrease of proton extrusion and the down-regulation of gelatinase activity. Our results suggest that Zn(2+) ions may be used as a potential anti-glioma drug for glioma therapy. PMID:23891691

  19. Mapping the Interaction Site for a β-Scorpion Toxin in the Pore Module of Domain III of Voltage-gated Na+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Joel Z.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Scheuer, Todd; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Catterall, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels initiates and propagates action potentials in electrically excitable cells. β-Scorpion toxins, including toxin IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssIV), enhance activation of NaV channels. CssIV stabilizes the voltage sensor in domain II in its activated state via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. Amino acid residues required for the action of CssIV have been identified in the S1-S2 and S3-S4 extracellular loops of domain II. The extracellular loops of domain III are also involved in toxin action, but individual amino acid residues have not been identified. We used site-directed mutagenesis and voltage clamp recording to investigate amino acid residues of domain III that are involved in CssIV action. In the IIISS2-S6 loop, five substitutions at four positions altered voltage-sensor trapping by CssIVE15A. Three substitutions (E1438A, D1445A, and D1445Y) markedly decreased voltage-sensor trapping, whereas the other two substitutions (N1436G and L1439A) increased voltage-sensor trapping. These bidirectional effects suggest that residues in IIISS2-S6 make both positive and negative interactions with CssIV. N1436G enhanced voltage-sensor trapping via increased binding affinity to the resting state, whereas L1439A increased voltage-sensor trapping efficacy. Based on these results, a three-dimensional model of the toxin-channel interaction was developed using the Rosetta modeling method. These data provide additional molecular insight into the voltage-sensor trapping mechanism of toxin action and define a three-point interaction site for β-scorpion toxins on NaV channels. Binding of α- and β-scorpion toxins to two distinct, pseudo-symmetrically organized receptor sites on NaV channels acts synergistically to modify channel gating and paralyze prey. PMID:22761417

  20. Voltage Amplification using Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Farias, E. E.; Cavalcanti, G. H.; Santiago, M. A. M.

    2006-12-04

    The purpose of this work is to present experimental results about voltage amplification using plasma produced by a simple neon lamp, series connected with a signal generator and discrete circuit elements. The main advantage of employing plasma as an amplifier is due to its ability to drive larger power and potentially to operate in a larger frequency range compared with traditional amplifiers. Our results show that both, the voltage gain and the frequency range where the gain is bigger than one, are related to the plasma density which may be adjusted by a proper control of electrical discharge conditions. The plasma produced into the neon lamp exhibits a diode characteristic that is the principal responsible by the nonlinear plasma response. The amplification occurs when the plasma shows a negative conductance. In this regime the lamp works as an active amplifier and voltage gain higher than 18 was obtained.

  1. Two-Photon Lifetime Imaging of Voltage Indicating Proteins as a Probe of Absolute Membrane Voltage.

    PubMed

    Brinks, Daan; Klein, Aaron J; Cohen, Adam E

    2015-09-01

    Genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) can report cellular electrophysiology with high resolution in space and time. Two-photon (2P) fluorescence has been explored as a means to image voltage in tissue. Here, we used the 2P electronic excited-state lifetime to probe absolute membrane voltage in a manner that is insensitive to the protein expression level, illumination intensity, or photon detection efficiency. First, we tested several GEVIs for 2P brightness, response speed, and voltage sensitivity. ASAP1 and a previously described citrine-Arch electrochromic Förster resonance energy transfer sensor (dubbed CAESR) showed the best characteristics. We then characterized the voltage-dependent lifetime of ASAP1, CAESR, and ArcLight under voltage-clamp conditions. ASAP1 and CAESR showed voltage-dependent lifetimes, whereas ArcLight did not. These results establish 2P fluorescence lifetime imaging as a viable means of measuring absolute membrane voltage. We discuss the prospects and improvements necessary for applications in tissue. PMID:26331249

  2. Position clamping in a holographic counterpropagating optical trap.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Richard; Jesacher, Alexander; Thalhammer, Gregor; Gibson, Graham; Ritsch-Marte, Monika; Padgett, Miles

    2011-05-01

    Optical traps consisting of two counterpropagating, divergent beams of light allow relatively high forces to be exerted along the optical axis by turning off one beam, however the axial stiffness of the trap is generally low due to the lower numerical apertures typically used. Using a high speed spatial light modulator and CMOS camera, we demonstrate 3D servocontrol of a trapped particle, increasing the stiffness from 0.004 to 1.5 μN m(-1). This is achieved in the "macro-tweezers" geometry [Thalhammer, J. Opt. 13, 044024 (2011); Pitzek, Opt. Express 17, 19414 (2009)], which has a much larger field of view and working distance than single-beam tweezers due to its lower numerical aperture requirements. Using a 10×, 0.2 NA objective, active feedback produces a trap with similar effective stiffness to a conventional single-beam gradient trap, of order 1 μN m(-1) in 3D. Our control loop has a round-trip latency of 10 ms, leading to a resonance at 20 Hz. This is sufficient bandwidth to reduce the position fluctuations of a 10 μm bead due to Brownian motion by two orders of magnitude. This approach can be trivially extended to multiple particles, and we show three simultaneously position-clamped beads. PMID:21643247

  3. One-channel Cell-attached Patch-clamp Recording

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Bruce A.; Cummings, Kirstie A.; Paganelli, Meaghan A.; Murthy, Swetha E.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are universal devices for fast communication across biological membranes. The temporal signature of the ionic flux they generate depends on properties intrinsic to each channel protein as well as the mechanism by which it is generated and controlled and represents an important area of current research. Information about the operational dynamics of ion channel proteins can be obtained by observing long stretches of current produced by a single molecule. Described here is a protocol for obtaining one-channel cell-attached patch-clamp current recordings for a ligand gated ion channel, the NMDA receptor, expressed heterologously in HEK293 cells or natively in cortical neurons. Also provided are instructions on how to adapt the method to other ion channels of interest by presenting the example of the mechano-sensitive channel PIEZO1. This method can provide data regarding the channel’s conductance properties and the temporal sequence of open-closed conformations that make up the channel’s activation mechanism, thus helping to understand their functions in health and disease. PMID:24961614

  4. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Bobby E.; Cromwell, Brian K.; Pender, Charles W.; Shepherd, Seth D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements (2-15 microns) that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps retrieved from the LDEF spacecraft. These clamps were used for maintaining the experiments in place and were located at various locations about the spacecraft. Changes in reflectance of the tray clamps at these locations were compared with atomic oxygen fluxes at the same locations. A decrease in absorption band depth was seen for the surfaces exposed to space indicating that there was some surface layer erosion. In all of the surfaces measured, little evidence of contamination was observed and none of the samples showed evidence of the brown nicotine stain that was so prominent in other experiments. Total emissivity values were calculated for both exposed and unexposed tray clamp surfaces. Only small differences, usually less than 1 percent, were observed. The spectral reflectances were measured using a hemi-ellipsoidal mirror reflectometer matched with an interferometer spectrometer. The rapid scanning capability of the interferometer allowed the reflectance measurements to be made in a timely fashion. The ellipsoidal mirror has its two foci separated by 2 inches and located on the major axis. A blackbody source was located at one focus while the tray clamp samples were located at the conjugate focus. The blackbody radiation was modulated and then focused by the ellipsoid onto the tray clamps. Radiation reflected from the tray clamp was sampled by the interferometer by viewing through a hole in the ellipsoid. A gold mirror (reflectance approximately 98 percent) was used as the reference surface.

  5. Interpretation of current-voltage relationships for "active" ion transport systems: I. Steady-state reaction-kinetic analysis of class-I mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hansen, U P; Gradmann, D; Sanders, D; Slayman, C L

    1981-01-01

    This paper develops a simple reaction-kinetic model to describe electrogenic pumping and co- (or counter-) transport of ions. It uses the standard steady-state approach for cyclic enzyme- or carrier-mediated transport, but does not assume rate-limitation by any particular reaction step. Voltage-dependence is introduced, after the suggestion of Läuger and Stark (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 211:458-466, 1970), via a symmetric Eyring barrier, in which the charge-transit reaction constants are written as k12 = ko12 exp(zF delta psi/2RT) and k21 = ko21 exp(-zF delta psi/2RT). For interpretation of current-voltage relationships, all voltage-independent reaction steps are lumped together, so the model in its simplest form can be described as a pseudo-2-state model. It is characterized by the two voltage-dependent reaction constants, two lumped voltage-independent reaction constants (k12, k21), and two reserve factors (ri, ro) which formally take account of carrier states that are indistinguishable in the current-voltage (I-V) analysis. The model generates a wide range of I-V relationships, depending on the relative magnitudes of the four reaction constants, sufficient to describe essentially all I-V datas now available on "active" ion-transport systems. Algebraic and numerical analysis of the reserve factors, by means of expanded pseudo-3-, 4-, and 5-state models, shows them to be bounded and not large for most combinations of reaction constants in the lumped pathway. The most important exception to this rule occurs when carrier decharging immediately follows charge transit of the membrane and is very fast relative to other constituent voltage-independent reactions. Such a circumstance generates kinetic equivalence of chemical and electrical gradients, thus providing a consistent definition of ion-motive forces (e.g., proton-motive force, PMF). With appropriate restrictions, it also yields both linear and log-linear relationships between net transport velocity and either

  6. Action potential characterization of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes using automated patch-clamp technology.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Olaf; Frech, Stefanie; Amuzescu, Bogdan; Eisfeld, Jörg; Lin, Kun-Han; Knott, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Recent progress in embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research led to high-purity preparations of human cardiomyocytes (CMs) differentiated from these two sources-suitable for tissue regeneration, in vitro models of disease, and cardiac safety pharmacology screening. We performed a detailed characterization of the effects of nifedipine, cisapride, and tetrodotoxin (TTX) on Cor.4U(®) human iPSC-CM, using automated whole-cell patch-clamp recordings with the CytoPatch™ 2 equipment, within a complex assay combining multiple voltage-clamp and current-clamp protocols in a well-defined sequence, and quantitative analysis of several action potential (AP) parameters. We retrieved three electrical phenotypes based on AP shape: ventricular, atrial/nodal, and S-type (with ventricular-like depolarization and lack of plateau). To suppress spontaneous firing, present in many cells, we injected continuously faint hyperpolarizing currents of -10 or -20 pA. We defined quality criteria (both seal and membrane resistance over 1 GΩ), and focused our study on cells with ventricular-like AP. Nifedipine induced marked decreases in AP duration (APD): APD90 (49.8% and 40.8% of control values at 1 and 10 μM, respectively), APD50 (16.1% and 12%); cisapride 0.1 μM increased APD90 to 176.2%; and tetrodotoxin 10 μM decreased maximum slope of phase to 33.3% of control, peak depolarization potential to 76.3% of control, and shortened APD90 on average to 80.4%. These results prove feasibility of automated voltage- and current-clamp recordings on human iPSC-CM and their potential use for in-depth drug evaluation and proarrhythmic liability assessment, as well as for diagnosis and pharmacology tests for cardiac channelopathy patients. PMID:25353059

  7. Measuring beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in youth: Does the hyperglycemic clamp suffice?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity, disposition index (DI), calculated from two clamps (2cDI, insulin sensitivity from the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and first-phase insulin from the hyperglycemic clamp) with the DI calculated from the hyperglycemic clamp alone (hcD...

  8. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Debanne, Dominique; Alcaraz, Gisele

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  9. Donepezil is a strong antagonist of voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, Elena I; Bukanova, Julia V; Marchenko, Evgeny; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2007-01-01

    Donepezil is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in Alzheimer's disease therapy. The neuroprotective effect of donepezil has been demonstrated in a number of different models of neurodegeneration including beta-amyloid toxicity. Since the mechanisms of neurodegeneration involve the activation of both Ca(2+)- and K(+)-channels, the study of donepezil action on voltage-gated ionic currents looked advisable. In the present study, the action of donepezil on voltage-gated Ca(2+)- and K(+)-channels was investigated on isolated neurons of the edible snail (Helix pomatia) using the two-microelectrodes voltage-clamp technique. Donepezil rapidly and reversibly inhibited voltage activated Ca(2+)-current (I(Ca)) (IC(50)=7.9 microM) and three types of high threshold K(+)-current: Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-current (I(C)) (IC(50)=6.4 microM), delayed rectifier K(+)-current (I(DR)) (IC(50)=8.0 microM) and fast transient K(+)-current (I(Adepol)) (IC(50)=9.1 microM). The drug caused a dual effect on low-threshold fast transient K(+)-current (I(A)), potentiating it at low (5 microM) concentration, but inhibiting at higher (7 microM and above) concentration. Donepezil also caused a significant hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-current relationship of I(Ca) (but not of any type of K(+)-current). Results suggest the possible contribution of the blocking effect of donepezil on the voltage-gated Ca(2+)- and K(+)-channels to the neuroprotective effect of the drug. PMID:17126610

  10. Inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels by sumatriptan bioisosteres

    PubMed Central

    Carbonara, Roberta; Carocci, Alessia; Roussel, Julien; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Buonavoglia, Canio; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni; Camerino, Diana Conte; Desaphy, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to play a pivotal role in perception and transmission of pain sensations. Gain-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the peripheral neuronal sodium channels, hNav1.7–1.9, cause human painful diseases. Thus while treatment of chronic pain remains an unmet clinical need, sodium channel blockers are considered as promising druggable targets. In a previous study, we evaluated the analgesic activity of sumatriptan, an agonist of serotonin 5HT1B/D receptors, and some new chiral bioisosteres, using the hot plate test in the mouse. Interestingly, we observed that the analgesic effectiveness was not necessarily correlated to serotonin agonism. In this study, we evaluated whether sumatriptan and its congeners may inhibit heterologously expressed hNav1.7 sodium channels using the patch-clamp method. We show that sumatriptan blocks hNav1.7 channels only at very high, supratherapeutic concentrations. In contrast, its three analogs, namely 20b, (R)-31b, and (S)-22b, exert a dose and use-dependent sodium channel block. At 0.1 and 10 Hz stimulation frequencies, the most potent compound, (S)-22b, was 4.4 and 1.7 fold more potent than the well-known sodium channel blocker mexiletine. The compound induces a negative shift of voltage dependence of fast inactivation, suggesting higher affinity to the inactivated channel. Accordingly, we show that (S)-22b likely binds the conserved local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels. Combining these results with the previous ones, we hypothesize that use-dependent sodium channel blockade contributes to the analgesic activity of (R)-31b and (S)-22b. These later compounds represent promising lead compounds for the development of efficient analgesics, the mechanism of action of which may include a dual action on sodium channels and 5HT1D receptors. PMID:26257653

  11. Dynamic Clamp in Cardiac and Neuronal Systems Using RTXI

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Francis A.; Butera, Robert J.; Christini, David J.; White, John A.; Dorval, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    The injection of computer-simulated conductances through the dynamic clamp technique has allowed researchers to probe the intercellular and intracellular dynamics of cardiac and neuronal systems with great precision. By coupling computational models to biological systems, dynamic clamp has become a proven tool in electrophysiology with many applications, such as generating hybrid networks in neurons or simulating channelopathies in cardiomyocytes. While its applications are broad, the approach is straightforward: synthesizing traditional patch clamp, computational modeling, and closed-loop feedback control to simulate a cellular conductance. Here, we present two example applications: artificial blocking of the inward rectifier potassium current in a cardiomyocyte and coupling of a biological neuron to a virtual neuron through a virtual synapse. The design and implementation of the necessary software to administer these dynamic clamp experiments can be difficult. In this chapter, we provide an overview of designing and implementing a dynamic clamp experiment using the Real-Time eXperiment Interface (RTXI), an open- source software system tailored for real-time biological experiments. We present two ways to achieve this using RTXI’s modular format, through the creation of a custom user-made module and through existing modules found in RTXI’s online library. PMID:25023319

  12. Zn{sup 2+} induces apoptosis in human highly metastatic SHG-44 glioma cells, through inhibiting activity of the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Shangrong; Li, Shu Jie

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Hv1 is expressed in highly metastatic glioma cell. •Zn{sup 2+} ions induces apoptosis in highly metastatic glioma cells. •Zn{sup 2+} ions markedly inhibit proton secretion. •Zn{sup 2+} ions reduce the gelatinase activity. •Inhibition of Hv1 activity via Zn{sup 2+} ions can effectively retard the cancer growth. -- Abstract: In contrast to the voltage-gated K{sup +} channels, the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 contains a voltage-sensor domain but lacks a pore domain. Here, we showed that Hv1 is expressed in the highly metastatic glioma cell SHG-44, but lowly in the poorly metastatic glioma cell U-251. Inhibition of Hv1 activity by 140 μM zinc chloride induces apoptosis in the human highly metastatic glioma cells. Zn{sup 2+} ions markedly inhibit proton secretion, and reduce the gelatinase activity in the highly metastatic glioma cells. In vivo, the glioma tumor sizes of the implantation of the SHG-44 xenografts in nude mice that were injected zinc chloride solution, were dramatically smaller than that in the controlled groups. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of Hv1 activity via Zn{sup 2+} ions can effectively retard the cancer growth and suppress the cancer metastasis by the decrease of proton extrusion and the down-regulation of gelatinase activity. Our results suggest that Zn{sup 2+} ions may be used as a potential anti-glioma drug for glioma therapy.

  13. Molecular basis of fast inactivation in voltage and Ca2+-activated K+ channels: a transmembrane beta-subunit homolog.

    PubMed

    Wallner, M; Meera, P; Toro, L

    1999-03-30

    Voltage-dependent and calcium-sensitive K+ (MaxiK) channels are key regulators of neuronal excitability, secretion, and vascular tone because of their ability to sense transmembrane voltage and intracellular Ca2+. In most tissues, their stimulation results in a noninactivating hyperpolarizing K+ current that reduces excitability. In addition to noninactivating MaxiK currents, an inactivating MaxiK channel phenotype is found in cells like chromaffin cells and hippocampal neurons. The molecular determinants underlying inactivating MaxiK channels remain unknown. Herein, we report a transmembrane beta subunit (beta2) that yields inactivating MaxiK currents on coexpression with the pore-forming alpha subunit of MaxiK channels. Intracellular application of trypsin as well as deletion of 19 N-terminal amino acids of the beta2 subunit abolished inactivation of the alpha subunit. Conversely, fusion of these N-terminal amino acids to the noninactivating smooth muscle beta1 subunit leads to an inactivating phenotype of MaxiK channels. Furthermore, addition of a synthetic N-terminal peptide of the beta2 subunit causes inactivation of the MaxiK channel alpha subunit by occluding its K+-conducting pore resembling the inactivation caused by the "ball" peptide in voltage-dependent K+ channels. Thus, the inactivating phenotype of MaxiK channels in native tissues can result from the association with different beta subunits. PMID:10097176

  14. Molecular basis of fast inactivation in voltage and Ca2+-activated K+ channels: A transmembrane β-subunit homolog

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Martin; Meera, Pratap; Toro, Ligia

    1999-01-01

    Voltage-dependent and calcium-sensitive K+ (MaxiK) channels are key regulators of neuronal excitability, secretion, and vascular tone because of their ability to sense transmembrane voltage and intracellular Ca2+. In most tissues, their stimulation results in a noninactivating hyperpolarizing K+ current that reduces excitability. In addition to noninactivating MaxiK currents, an inactivating MaxiK channel phenotype is found in cells like chromaffin cells and hippocampal neurons. The molecular determinants underlying inactivating MaxiK channels remain unknown. Herein, we report a transmembrane β subunit (β2) that yields inactivating MaxiK currents on coexpression with the pore-forming α subunit of MaxiK channels. Intracellular application of trypsin as well as deletion of 19 N-terminal amino acids of the β2 subunit abolished inactivation of the α subunit. Conversely, fusion of these N-terminal amino acids to the noninactivating smooth muscle β1 subunit leads to an inactivating phenotype of MaxiK channels. Furthermore, addition of a synthetic N-terminal peptide of the β2 subunit causes inactivation of the MaxiK channel α subunit by occluding its K+-conducting pore resembling the inactivation caused by the “ball” peptide in voltage-dependent K+ channels. Thus, the inactivating phenotype of MaxiK channels in native tissues can result from the association with different β subunits. PMID:10097176

  15. Resonant-type Smooth Impact Drive Mechanism (SIDM) actuator using a bolt-clamped Langevin transducer.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takuma; Hosaka, Hiroshi; Morita, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    The Smooth Impact Drive Mechanism (SIDM) is a linear piezoelectric actuator that has seen practically applied to camera lens modules. Although previous SIDM actuators are easily miniaturized and enable accurate positioning, these actuators cannot actuate at high speed and cannot provide powerful driving because they are driven at an off-resonant frequency using a soft-type PZT. In the present study, we propose a resonant-type SIDM using a bolt-clamped Langevin transducer (BLT) with a hard-type PZT. The resonant-type SIDM overcomes the above-mentioned problems and high-power operation becomes possible with a very simple structure. As a result, we confirmed the operation of resonant-type SIDM by designing a bolt-clamped Langevin transducer. The properties of no-load maximum speed was 0.28m/s at driving voltages of 80V(p-p) for 44.9kHz and 48V(p-p) for 22.45kHz with a pre-load of 3.1N. PMID:21784499

  16. Ultra-fast force-clamp laser trapping of single molecular motors and DNA binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Monico, Carina; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-09-01

    Forces play a fundamental role in a wide array of biological processes, regulating enzymatic activity, kinetics of molecular bonds, and molecular motors mechanics. Single molecule force spectroscopy techniques have enabled the investigation of such processes, but they are inadequate to probe short-lived (millisecond and sub-millisecond) molecular complexes. We developed an ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy technique that uses a dual trap configuration to apply constant loads to a single intermittently interacting biological polymer and a binding protein. Our system displays a delay of only ˜10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. The force-clamp configuration in which our assay operates allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds. Moreover, conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors can be recorded with sub-nanometer accuracy and few tens of microseconds of temporal resolution. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  17. A phage-encoded inhibitor of Escherichia coli DNA replication targets the DNA polymerase clamp loader.

    PubMed

    Yano, Sho T; Rothman-Denes, Lucia B

    2011-03-01

    Coliphage N4 infection leads to shut-off of host DNA replication without inhibition of host transcription or translation. We report the identification and characterization of gp8, the N4 gene product responsible for this phenotype. N4 gp8 is an Escherichia coli bacteriostatic inhibitor that colocalizes with the E. coli replisome in a replication-dependent manner. Gp8 was purified and observed to cross-link to complexes containing the replicative DNA polymerase, DNAP III, in vivo. Purified gp8 inhibits DNA polymerization by DNA polymerase III holoenzyme in vitro by interfering with polymerase processivity. Gp8 specifically inhibits the clamp-loading activity of DNAP III by targeting the delta subunit of the DNAP III clamp loader; E. coli mutations conferring gp8 resistance were identified in the holA gene, encoding delta. Delta and gp8 interact in vitro; no interaction was detected between gp8 inactive mutants and wild-type delta or between delta gp8-resistant mutants and wild-type gp8. Therefore, this work identifies the DNAP III clamp loader as a new target for inhibition of bacterial growth. Finally, we show that gp8 is not essential in N4 development under laboratory conditions, but its activity contributes to phage yield. PMID:21205014

  18. Dendrotoxin acceptor from bovine synaptic plasma membranes. Binding properties, purification and subunit composition of a putative constituent of certain voltage-activated K+ channels.

    PubMed Central

    Parcej, D N; Dolly, J O

    1989-01-01

    Dendrotoxin is a snake polypeptide that blocks selectively and potently certain voltage-sensitive, fast-activating K+ channels in the nervous system, where it binds with high affinity to membranous acceptors. Herein, the acceptor protein for dendrotoxin in bovine synaptic membranes is solubilized in active form and its complete purification achieved by affinity chromatography, involving a novel elution procedure. This putative K+-channel constituent is shown to be a large oligomeric glycoprotein containing two major subunits, with Mr values of 75,000 and 37,000. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2930493

  19. Self-locking clamping tool with swivel jaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, Jr., John W. (Inventor); Jankowski, Fred (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A plier-like tool (11) having two plier-like members (13, 15) pivotally joined togther intermediate of their ends and having handle portions (17, 18) and swivel jaw members (29,30). An automatic locking mechanism (27) extending between the members permits an user to clamp the handle portions together so as to clamp the jaw members on an object (25) but holds the position so reached if the clamping action of the user is removed. A release device (65) is provided so that the jaw members may be opened up again. A compression spring (23) extending between the members (19, 20) assists in the opening of the jaw members. The swivel jaw members (29, 30) permit the user to rotate the plier-like members (13,15) relative to the object (25) being grasped.

  20. Hysteresis modeling of clamp band joint with macro-slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhaoye; Cui, Delin; Yan, Shaoze; Chu, Fulei

    2016-01-01

    Clamp band joints are commonly used to connect spacecrafts with launch vehicles. Due to the frictional slippage between the joint components, hysteresis behavior might occur at joint interfaces under cyclic loading. The joint hysteresis will bring friction damping into the launching systems. In this paper, a closed-form hysteresis model for the clamp band joint is developed based on theoretical and numerical analyses of the interactions of the joint components. Then, the hysteresis model is applied to investigating the dynamic response of a payload fastened by the clamp band joint, where the nonlinearity and friction damping effects of the joint is evaluated. The proposed analytical model, which is validated by both finite element analyses and quasi-static experiments, has a simple form with sound accuracy and can be incorporated into the dynamic models of launching systems conveniently.

  1. Improving the transient response of a bolt-clamped Langevin transducer using a parallel resistor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuo Tsi

    2003-08-01

    This paper suggests a parallel resistor to reduce DC time constant and DC response time of the transient response, induced immediately after an AC voltage connected to a bolt-clamped Langevin transducer (BLT) is switched off. An equivalent circuit is first expressed. Then, an open-circuit transient response at the terminals induced by initial states is derived and measured, and thus parameters for losses of the BLT device are estimated by DC and AC time constants of the transient response. Moreover, a driving and measuring system is designed to determine transient response and steady-state responses of the BLT device, and a parallel resistor is connected to the BLT device to reduce the DC time constant. Experimental results indicate that the DC time constant greatly exceeds the AC time constant without the parallel resistor, and greatly decreases from 42 to 1 ms by a 100-kOmega parallel resistor. PMID:12853079

  2. Chemical Synthesis of Tetracyclic Terpenes and Evaluation of Antagonistic Activity on Endothelin-A Receptors and Voltage-gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianyu; Aguilar, Angelo; Zou, Bende; Bao, Weier; Koldas, Serkan; Aibin, Shi; Desper, John; Wangemann, Philine; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Hua, Duy H.

    2015-01-01

    A class of tetracyclic terpenes was synthesized and evaluated for antagonistic activity of endothelin-1 (ET-1) induced vasoconstriction and inhibitory activity of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. Three repeated Robinson annulation reactions were utilized to construct the tetracyclic molecules. A stereoselective reductive Robinson annulation was discovered for the formation of optically pure tricyclic terpenes. Stereoselective addition of cyanide to the hindered α-face of tetracyclic enone (-)-18 was found and subsequent transformation into the aldehyde function was affected by the formation of bicyclic hemiiminal (-)-4. Six selected synthetic tetracyclic terpenes show inhibitory activities in ET-1 induced vasoconstriction in the gerbil spiral modiolar artery with putative affinity constants ranging between 93 and 319 nM. Moreover, one compound, (-)-3, was evaluated further and found to inhibit voltage-activated Ca2+ currents but not to affect Na+ or K+ currents in dorsal root ganglion cells under similar concentrations. These observations imply a dual mechanism of action. In conclusion, tetracyclic terpenes represent a new class of hit molecules for the discovery of new drugs for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension and vascular related diseases. PMID:26190460

  3. Chemical synthesis of tetracyclic terpenes and evaluation of antagonistic activity on endothelin-A receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianyu; Aguilar, Angelo; Zou, Bende; Bao, Weier; Koldas, Serkan; Shi, Aibin; Desper, John; Wangemann, Philine; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Hua, Duy H

    2015-09-01

    A class of tetracyclic terpenes was synthesized and evaluated for antagonistic activity of endothelin-1 (ET-1) induced vasoconstriction and inhibitory activity of voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. Three repeated Robinson annulation reactions were utilized to construct the tetracyclic molecules. A stereoselective reductive Robinson annulation was discovered for the formation of optically pure tricyclic terpenes. Stereoselective addition of cyanide to the hindered α-face of tetracyclic enone (-)-18 was found and subsequent transformation into the aldehyde function was affected by the formation of bicyclic hemiiminal (-)-4. Six selected synthetic tetracyclic terpenes show inhibitory activities in ET-1 induced vasoconstriction in the gerbil spiral modiolar artery with putative affinity constants ranging between 93 and 319 nM. Moreover, one compound, (-)-3, was evaluated further and found to inhibit voltage-activated Ca(2+) currents but not to affect Na(+) or K(+) currents in dorsal root ganglion cells under similar concentrations. These observations imply a dual mechanism of action. In conclusion, tetracyclic terpenes represent a new class of hit molecules for the discovery of new drugs for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension and vascular related diseases. PMID:26190460

  4. Structure-Activity Studies of Cysteine-Rich α-Conotoxins that Inhibit High-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels via GABA(B) Receptor Activation Reveal a Minimal Functional Motif.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Bodil B; Berecki, Géza; Daniel, James T; Lee, Han Siean; Jackson, Kathryn A V; Tae, Han-Shen; Sadeghi, Mahsa; Castro, Joel; O'Donnell, Tracy; Deiteren, Annemie; Brierley, Stuart M; Craik, David J; Adams, David J; Clark, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    α-Conotoxins are disulfide-rich peptides that target nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Recently we identified several α-conotoxins that also modulate voltage-gated calcium channels by acting as G protein-coupled GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) agonists. These α-conotoxins are promising drug leads for the treatment of chronic pain. To elucidate the diversity of α-conotoxins that act through this mechanism, we synthesized and characterized a set of peptides with homology to α-conotoxins known to inhibit high voltage-activated calcium channels via GABA(B)R activation. Remarkably, all disulfide isomers of the active α-conotoxins Pu1.2 and Pn1.2, and the previously studied Vc1.1 showed similar levels of biological activity. Structure determination by NMR spectroscopy helped us identify a simplified biologically active eight residue peptide motif containing a single disulfide bond that is an excellent lead molecule for developing a new generation of analgesic peptide drugs. PMID:26948522

  5. Current-clamp analysis of a time-dependent rectification in rat optic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, D L; Gordon, T R; Kocsis, J D; Waxman, S G

    1990-01-01

    1. Rat optic nerves were studied using intra-axonal and whole-nerve recording techniques in a sucrose-gap chamber. Constant-current pulses were applied across the outer compartments of the chamber to achieve a current clamp. 2. The nerves displayed a prominent time-dependent conductance increase elicited by a hyperpolarizing constant-current pulse, as evidenced by a relaxation or 'sag' in membrane potential towards resting potential. The inward current began at about 80 ms and reached a steady level over the next 100-200 ms. Its magnitude progressively increased with increasing levels of hyperpolarization. 3. The inward current elicited by hyperpolarization was reduced, but not abolished, when Na+ was reduced from the normal bath concentration of 151 mM to 0 mM. In Na(+)-free solutions the bath K+ concentration, [K+]o, was varied between 0 and 5 mM; the inward current was greatest when [K+]o was 5 mM and was abolished when [K+]o was zero. 4. The inward current was not abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX), tetraethylammonium (TEA) or 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) suggesting that conventional voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels do not underlie the time-dependent conductance increase. Low concentrations of Cs+ completely blocked the inward current, and Ba2+ induced a partial block. External application of divalent cations (Cd2+ and Mg2+) did not block the inward current. These properties are similar to the inwardly rectifying conductance observed in a central nervous system neurone. 5. Stimulus-response curves obtained during the hyperpolarization pulse, before and during the conductance increase, indicate that excitability is increased during the conductance increase. This along with the intra-axonal recordings demonstrates that the origin of the increased conductance is axonal and not glial. 6. It is concluded that central nervous system myelinated fibres in rat optic nerve display a prominent time-dependent conductance increase in response to hyperpolarization that

  6. High Voltage Insulation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherb, V.; Rogalla, K.; Gollor, M.

    2008-09-01

    In preparation of new Electronic Power Conditioners (EPC's) for Travelling Wave Tub Amplifiers (TWTA's) on telecom satellites a study for the development of new high voltage insulation technology is performed. The initiative is mandatory to allow compact designs and to enable higher operating voltages. In a first task a market analysis was performed, comparing different materials with respect to their properties and processes. A hierarchy of selection criteria was established and finally five material candidates (4 Epoxy resins and 1 Polyurethane resin) were selected to be further investigated in the test program. Samples for the test program were designed to represent core elements of an EPC, the high voltage transformer and Printed Circuit Boards of the high voltage section. All five materials were assessed in the practical work flow of the potting process and electrical, mechanical, thermal and lifetime testing was performed. Although the lifetime tests results were overlayed by a larges scatter, finally two candidates have been identified for use in a subsequent qualification program. This activity forms part of element 5 of the ESA ARTES Programme.

  7. Ca2+-activated Cl− current in rabbit sinoatrial node cells

    PubMed Central

    Verkerk, Arie O; Wilders, Ronald; Zegers, Jan G; van Borren, Marcel M G J; Ravesloot, Jan H; Verheijck, E Etienne

    2002-01-01

    The Ca2+-activated Cl− current (ICl(Ca)) has been identified in atrial, Purkinje and ventricular cells, where it plays a substantial role in phase-1 repolarization and delayed after-depolarizations. In sinoatrial (SA) node cells, however, the presence and functional role of ICl(Ca) is unknown. In the present study we address this issue using perforated patch-clamp methodology and computer simulations. Single SA node cells were enzymatically isolated from rabbit hearts. ICl(Ca) was measured, using the perforated patch-clamp technique, as the current sensitive to the anion blocker 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (DIDS). Voltage clamp experiments demonstrate the presence of ICl(Ca) in one third of the spontaneously active SA node cells. The current was transient outward with a bell-shaped current-voltage relationship. Adrenoceptor stimulation with 1 μm noradrenaline doubled the ICl(Ca) density. Action potential clamp measurements demonstrate that ICl(Ca) is activate late during the action potential upstroke. Current clamp experiments show, both in the absence and presence of 1 μm noradrenaline, that blockade of ICl(Ca) increases the action potential overshoot and duration, measured at 20 % repolarization. However, intrinsic interbeat interval, upstroke velocity, diastolic depolarization rate and the action potential duration measured at 50 and 90 % repolarization were not affected. Our experimental data are supported by computer simulations, which additionally demonstrate that ICl(Ca) has a limited role in pacemaker synchronization or action potential conduction. In conclusion, ICl(Ca) is present in one third of SA node cells and is activated during the pacemaker cycle. However, ICl(Ca) does not modulate intrinsic interbeat interval, pacemaker synchronization or action potential conduction. PMID:11927673

  8. [Pedicular clamping in major hepatectomies: clamping "of principle" or "of necessity"? A comparative study].

    PubMed

    Le Treut, Y P; Christophe, M; Banti, J C; Berthet, B; Bricot, R

    1995-02-01

    Fifty-two consecutive patients undergoing major hepatic resection for liver tumor were divided into two groups according to the operative procedure. Group A consisted of 34 patients in whom vascular inflow occlusion was performed "de principle" during parenchymal division and intrahepatic approach of the portal structures; the mean duration of the portal triad clamping was 43 mn (ranged 17 to 70 mn). Group B patients (18 cases) had hilar division of the structures of that portion of the liver due to be removed, prior to parenchymal division was performed without vascular arrest, except in five "de necessitate" cases during 5 to 22 mn. Groups A and B were comparable in terms of patient age or status, of king of liver tumors and extent of resection. Mean operating duration (215 vs 263 mn), volume of intraoperative blood transfusion (557 vs 1019 ml), intensive care (2.5 vs 4.2 days) and total hospital stays (19.6 vs 30.5 days) were significantly reduced in group A. A higher but transient increase of amino-transferase level was the only biochemical consequence of liver ischemia in group A, whereas postoperative disturbance in serum bilirubin, prothrombin time, fibrinogen, and total protein were significantly greater in group B, probably because of the greater volume of blood transfusion in this group. Thus, routine vascular inflow occlusion with transhepatic approach of the portal structures may be an effective and innocuous procedure for major liver resection. PMID:7751341

  9. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  10. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harilal, S S; Yeak, J; Phillips, M C

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filament channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also explain the near absence of ion emission but strong atomic neutral emission from plumes produced during fs LIBS in air. PMID:26480372

  11. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, Daniel W.; Lange, Arnold C.

    1996-01-01

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage put under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules.

  12. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

    1996-10-15

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules. 5 figs.

  13. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels by fluoxetine in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Deák, F; Lasztóczi, B; Pacher, P; Petheö, G L; Valéria Kecskeméti; Spät, A

    2000-04-01

    Fluoxetine, an antidepressant which is used world-wide, is a prominent member of the class of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. Recently, inhibition of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels by fluoxetine has also been reported. We examined the effect of fluoxetine on voltage-gated calcium channels using the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. In hippocampal pyramidal cells, fluoxetine inhibited the low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium current with an IC(50) of 6.8 microM. Fluoxetine decreased the high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium current with an IC(50) between 1 and 2 microM. Nifedipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the HVA current by 24% and 43%, respectively. Fluoxetine (3 microM), applied in addition to nifedipine or omega-conotoxin, further reduced the current. When fluoxetine (3 microM) was applied first neither nifedipine nor omega-conotoxin attenuated the remaining component of the HVA current. This observation indicates that fluoxetine inhibits both L- and N-type currents. In addition, fluoxetine inhibited the HVA calcium current in carotid body type I chemoreceptor cells and pyramidal neurons prepared from prefrontal cortex. In hippocampal pyramidal cells high K(+)-induced seizure-like activity was inhibited by 1 microM fluoxetine; the mean burst duration was shortened by an average of 44%. These results provide evidence for inhibition of T-, N- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels by fluoxetine at therapeutically relevant concentrations. PMID:10727713

  14. Novel consequences of voltage-dependence to G-protein-coupled P2Y1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, I S; Martinez-Pinna, J; Mahaut-Smith, M P

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Emerging evidence suggests that activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be directly regulated by membrane voltage. However, the physiological and pharmacological relevance of this effect remains unclear. We have further examined this phenomenon for P2Y1 receptors in the non-excitable megakaryocyte using a range of agonists and antagonists. Experimental approach: Simultaneous whole-cell patch clamp and fura-2 fluorescence recordings of rat megakaryocytes, which lack voltage-gated Ca2+ influx, were used to examine the voltage-dependence of P2Y1 receptor-evoked IP3-dependent Ca2+ mobilization. Results: Depolarization transiently and repeatedly enhanced P2Y1 receptor-evoked Ca2+ mobilization across a wide concentration range of both weak, partial and full, potent agonists. Moreover, the amplitude of the depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i increase displayed an inverse relationship with agonist concentration, such that the greatest potentiating effect of voltage was observed at near-threshold levels of agonist. Unexpectedly, depolarization also stimulated an [Ca2+]i increase in the absence of agonist during exposure to the competitive antagonists A3P5PS and MRS2179, or the allosteric enhancer 2,2′-pyridylisatogen tosylate. A further effect of some antagonists, particularly suramin, was to enhance the depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses during co-application of an agonist. Of several P2Y1 receptor inhibitors, only SCH202676, which has a proposed allosteric mechanism of action, could block ADP-induced voltage-dependent Ca2+ release. Conclusions and implications: The ability of depolarization to potentiate GPCRs at near-threshold agonist concentrations represents a novel mechanism for coincidence detection. Furthermore, the induction and enhancement of voltage-dependent GPCR responses by antagonists has implications for the design of therapeutic compounds. PMID:18414379

  15. Design of an integrated thermoelectric generator power converter for ultra-low power and low voltage body energy harvesters aimed at ExG active electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataei, Milad; Robert, Christian; Boegli, Alexis; Farine, Pierre-André

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a detailed design procedure for an efficient thermal body energy harvesting integrated power converter. The procedure is based on the examination of power loss and power transfer in a converter for a self-powered medical device. The efficiency limit for the system is derived and the converter is optimized for the worst case scenario. All optimum system parameters are calculated respecting the transducer constraints and the application form factor. Circuit blocks including pulse generators are implemented based on the system specifications and optimized converter working frequency. At this working condition, it has been demonstrated that the wide area capacitor of the voltage doubler, which provides high voltage switch gating, can be eliminated at the expense of wider switches. With this method, measurements show that 54% efficiency is achieved for just a 20 mV transducer output voltage and 30% of the chip area is saved. The entire electronic board can fit in one EEG or ECG electrode, and the electronic system can convert the electrode to an active electrode.

  16. Odorants suppress T- and L-type Ca2+ currents in olfactory receptor cells by shifting their inactivation curves to a negative voltage.

    PubMed

    Kawai, F

    1999-12-30

    Mechanisms underlying suppression of T- and L-type Ca2+ currents (I(Ca,T) and I(Ca,L)) by odorants were investigated in newt olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) using the whole-cell version of the patch-clamp technique. Under voltage clamp, odorants (amyl acetate, limonene and acetophenone) reversibly suppressed I(Ca,T) and I(Ca, L). These currents disappeared completely within 150 ms following amyl acetate puffs, and recovered in approximately 1 s after the washout. Hyperpolarization of the membrane greatly relieved the odorant block of I(Ca,T) and I(Ca,L). The activation curves of both currents were not changed significantly by odorants, while their inactivation curves were shifted to negative voltages. Half-inactivation voltages of I(Ca,T) were - 66 mV (control), - 102 mV (amyl acetate), - 101 mV (limonene) and - 105 mV (acetophenone) (all 0.3 mM); those of I(Ca,L) were -33 mV (control), - 61 mV (amyl acetate), - 59 mV (limonene), and - 63 mV (acetophenone) (all 0.3 mM). These phenomena are similar to the effects of local anesthetics on I(Ca) in various preparations and also similar to the effects of odorants on I(Na) in ORCs, suggesting that these types of suppression are caused by the same mechanism. PMID:10617316

  17. Ordered ATP hydrolysis in the gamma complex clamp loader AAA+ machine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aaron; O'Donnell, Mike

    2003-04-18

    The gamma complex couples ATP hydrolysis to the loading of beta sliding clamps onto DNA for processive replication. The gamma complex structure shows that the clamp loader subunits are arranged as a circular heteropentamer. The three gamma motor subunits bind ATP, the delta wrench opens the beta ring, and the delta' stator modulates the delta-beta interaction. Neither delta nor delta' bind ATP. This report demonstrates that the delta' stator contributes a catalytic arginine for hydrolysis of ATP bound to the adjacent gamma(1) subunit. Thus, the delta' stator contributes to the motor function of the gamma trimer. Mutation of arginine 169 of gamma, which removes the catalytic arginines from only the gamma(2) and gamma(3) ATP sites, abolishes ATPase activity even though ATP site 1 is intact and all three sites are filled. This result implies that hydrolysis of the three ATP molecules occurs in a particular order, the reverse of ATP binding, where ATP in site 1 is not hydrolyzed until ATP in sites 2 and/or 3 is hydrolyzed. Implications of these results to clamp loaders of other systems are discussed. PMID:12582167

  18. High voltage dc--dc converter with dynamic voltage regulation and decoupling during load-generated arcs

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

    1995-05-23

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules. 5 Figs.

  19. High voltage dc-dc converter with dynamic voltage regulation and decoupling during load-generated arcs

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, Daniel W.; Lange, Arnold C.

    1995-01-01

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules.

  20. Reversible, voltage-activated formation of biomimetic membranes between triblock copolymer-coated aqueous droplets in good solvents.

    PubMed

    Tamaddoni, Nima; Taylor, Graham; Hepburn, Trevor; Michael Kilbey, S; Sarles, Stephen A

    2016-06-21

    Biomimetic membranes assembled from block copolymers attract considerable interest because they exhibit greater stability and longetivity compared to lipid bilayers, and some enable the reconstitution of functional transmembrane biomolecules. Yet to-date, block copolymer membranes have not been achieved using the droplet interface bilayer (DIB) method, which uniquely allows assembling single- and multi-membrane networks between water droplets in oil. Herein, we investigate the formation of poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(dimethyl siloxane)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer-stabilized interfaces (CSIs) between polymer-coated aqueous droplets in solutions comprising combinations of decane, hexadecane and AR20 silicone oil. We demonstrate that triblock-coated droplets do not spontaneously adhere in these oils because all are thermodynamically good solvents for the hydrophobic PDMS middle block. However, thinned planar membranes are reversibly formed at the interface between droplets upon the application of a sufficient transmembrane voltage, which removes excess solvent from between droplets through electrocompression. At applied voltages above the threshold required to initiate membrane thinning, electrowetting causes the area of the CSI between droplets to increase while thickness remains constant; the CSI electrowetting response is similar to that encountered with lipid-based DIBs. In combination, these results reveal that stable membranes can be assembled in a manner that is completely reversible when an external pressure is used to overcome a barrier to adhesion caused by solvent-chain interactions, and they demonstrate new capability for connecting and disconnecting aqueous droplets via polymer-stabilized membranes. PMID:27174295

  1. Voltage-dependent conductances of solitary ganglion cells dissociated from the rat retina.

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, S A; Tauck, D L

    1987-01-01

    1. Ganglion cells were dissociated from the enzyme-treated rat retina, identified with specific fluorescent labels, and maintained in vitro. Electrophysiological properties of solitary retinal ganglion cells were investigated with both conventional intracellular and patch-clamp recordings. Although comparable results were obtained for most measurements some important differences were noted. 2. The input resistance of solitary retinal ganglion cells was considerably higher when measured with 'giga-seal' suction pipettes than with conventional intracellular electrodes. Under current-clamp conditions with both intracellular and patch pipettes, these central mammalian neurones maintained resting potentials of about -60 mV and displayed action potentials followed by an after-hyperpolarization in response to small depolarizations. The membrane currents during this activity, analysed under voltage clamp with patch pipettes, consisted of five components: Na+ current (INa), Ca2+ current (ICa), and currents with properties similar to the delayed outward, the transient (A-type), and the Ca2+-activated K+ currents (IK, IA and IK(Ca), respectively). 3. Ionic substitution, pharmacological agents, and voltage-clamp experiments revealed that the regenerative currents were carried by both Na+ and Ca2+. 100 nM-1 microM-tetradotoxin (TTX) reversibly blocked the fast spikes carried by the presumptive INa, which under voltage-clamp analysis had classical Hodgkin-Huxley-type activation and inactivation. 4. Single-channel recordings of the Na+ current (iNa) permitted comparison of these 'microscopic' events with the 'macroscopic' whole-cell current (INa). The inactivation time constant (tau h) fitted to the averaged single-channel recordings of iNa in outside-out patches was slower than the tau h obtained during whole-cell recordings of INa. 5. In the presence of 1-40 microM-TTX and 20 mM-TEA, slow action potentials appeared in intracellular recordings and were probably mediated by Ca2

  2. The tarantula toxin jingzhaotoxin-XI (κ-theraphotoxin-Cj1a) regulates the activation and inactivation of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Huang, Yin; Zhang, Yunxiao; Hu, Zhaotun; Wang, Meichi; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2014-12-15

    Specific peptide toxins interact with voltage-gated sodium channels by regulating the activation or inactivation of targeted channels. However, few toxins possessing dual effects have been identified. In the present study, we showed that jingzhaotoxin-XI/κ-theraphotoxin-Cj1a (JZTX-XI), a 34-residue peptide from the venom of the Chinese spider Chilobrachys jingzhao, inhibits the sodium conductance (IC50 = 124 ± 26 nM) and slows the fast inactivation (EC50 = 1.18 ± 0.2 μM) of Nav1.5 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. JZTX-XI significantly shifted the activation to more depolarized voltages and decreased the deactivation of Nav1.5 currents upon extreme depolarization, but only slightly affected voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation. In addition, JZTX-XI caused an approximately five-fold decrease in the rate of recovery from inactivation and an approximately 1.9-fold reduction in the closed-state inactivation rate. Our data suggest that JZTX-XI integrates the functions of site 3 toxins (α-scorpion toxins) with site 4 toxins (β-scorpion and spider toxins) by targeting multiple sites on Nav1.5. The unique properties displayed by JZTX-XI in its inhibitory activity on Nav1.5 suggest that its mechanism of action is distinct from those of site 3 and site 4 toxins, making JZTX-XI a useful probe for investigating the gating mechanism of Nav1.5 and toxin-channel interactions. PMID:25240294

  3. Cd(2+) sensitivity and permeability of a low voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel with CatSper-like selectivity filter.

    PubMed

    Garza-López, Edgar; Chávez, Julio César; Santana-Calvo, Carmen; López-González, Ignacio; Nishigaki, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    CatSper is a sperm-specific Ca(2+) channel that plays an essential role in the male fertility. However, its biophysical properties have been poorly characterized mainly due to its deficient heterologous expression. As other voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaVs), CatSper possesses a conserved Ca(2+)-selective filter motif ([T/S]x[D/E]xW) in the pore region. Interestingly, CatSper conserves four aspartic acids (DDDD) as the negatively charged residues in this motif while high voltage-activated CaVs have four glutamic acids (EEEE) and low voltage-activated CaVs possess two glutamic acids and two aspartic acids (EEDD). Previous studies based on site-directed mutagenesis of L- and T-type channels showed that the number of D seems to have a negative correlation with their cadmium (Cd(2+)) sensitivity. These results suggest that CatSper (DDDD) would have low sensitivity to Cd(2+). To explore Cd(2+)-sensitivity and -permeability of CatSper, we performed two types of experiments: 1) Electrophysiological analysis of heterologously expressed human CaV3.1 channel and three pore mutants (DEDD, EDDD and DDDD), 2) Cd(2+) imaging of human spermatozoa with FluoZin-1. Electrophysiological studies showed a significant increase in Cd(2+) and manganese (Mn(2+)) currents through the CaV3.1 mutants as well as a reduction in the inhibitory effect of Cd(2+) on the Ca(2+) current. In fluorescence imaging with human sperm, we observed an increase in Cd(2+) influx potentiated by progesterone, a potent activator of CatSper. These results support our hypothesis, namely that Cd(2+)-sensitivity and -permeability are related to the absolute number of D in the Ca(2+)-selective filter independently to the type of the Cav channels. PMID:27134080

  4. A biophysical model examining the role of low-voltage-activated potassium currents in shaping the responses of vestibular ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Hight, Ariel E; Kalluri, Radha

    2016-08-01

    The vestibular nerve is characterized by two broad groups of neurons that differ in the timing of their interspike intervals; some fire at highly regular intervals, whereas others fire at highly irregular intervals. Heterogeneity in ion channel properties has been proposed as shaping these firing patterns (Highstein SM, Politoff AL. Brain Res 150: 182-187, 1978; Smith CE, Goldberg JM. Biol Cybern 54: 41-51, 1986). Kalluri et al. (J Neurophysiol 104: 2034-2051, 2010) proposed that regularity is controlled by the density of low-voltage-activated potassium currents (IKL). To examine the impact of IKL on spike timing regularity, we implemented a single-compartment model with three conductances known to be present in the vestibular ganglion: transient sodium (gNa), low-voltage-activated potassium (gKL), and high-voltage-activated potassium (gKH). Consistent with in vitro observations, removing gKL depolarized resting potential, increased input resistance and membrane time constant, and converted current step-evoked firing patterns from transient (1 spike at current onset) to sustained (many spikes). Modeled neurons were driven with a time-varying synaptic conductance that captured the random arrival times and amplitudes of glutamate-driven synaptic events. In the presence of gKL, spiking occurred only in response to large events with fast onsets. Models without gKL exhibited greater integration by responding to the superposition of rapidly arriving events. Three synaptic conductance were modeled, each with different kinetics to represent a variety of different synaptic processes. In response to all three types of synaptic conductance, models containing gKL produced spike trains with irregular interspike intervals. Only models lacking gKL when driven by rapidly arriving small excitatory postsynaptic currents were capable of generating regular spiking. PMID:27121577

  5. Gating of the two-pore cation channel AtTPC1 in the plant vacuole is based on a single voltage-sensing domain.

    PubMed

    Jaślan, D; Mueller, T D; Becker, D; Schultz, J; Cuin, T A; Marten, I; Dreyer, I; Schönknecht, G; Hedrich, R

    2016-09-01

    The two-pore cation channel TPC1 operates as a dimeric channel in animal and plant endomembranes. Each subunit consists of two homologous Shaker-like halves, with 12 transmembrane domains in total (S1-S6, S7-S12). In plants, TPC1 channels reside in the vacuolar membrane, and upon voltage stimulation, give rise to the well-known slow-activating SV currents. Here, we combined bioinformatics, structure modelling, site-directed mutagenesis, and in planta patch clamp studies to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of voltage-dependent channel gating in TPC1 in its native plant background. Structure-function analysis of the Arabidopsis TPC1 channel in planta confirmed that helix S10 operates as the major voltage-sensing site, with Glu450 and Glu478 identified as possible ion-pair partners for voltage-sensing Arg537. The contribution of helix S4 to voltage sensing was found to be negligible. Several conserved negative residues on the luminal site contribute to calcium binding, stabilizing the closed channel. During evolution of plant TPC1s from two separate Shaker-like domains, the voltage-sensing function in the N-terminal Shaker-unit (S1-S4) vanished. PMID:27270880

  6. A study on the gate voltage dependence of the activation energy in Meyer-Neldel rule for charge mobility in pentacene OTFTs

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosino, Mario; Rubino, Alfredo; Miscioscia, Riccardo; Girolamo del Mauro, Anna de; Rega, Romina; Cerri, Valerio; Minarini, Carla

    2010-06-02

    A temperature analysis of the OTFT having pentacene as channel semiconductor and PMMA as gate dielectric has been performed. The experimental results have been studied by extracting the field-effect mobility of the TFTs and relating it to the sample's temperature. We have found the mobility to follow the Meyer-Neldel rule. This behavior can be considered imputable to the channel carrier hopping. The gate voltage effect on the thermal activation energy for the mobility and the asymptotic parameter has been also taken into account.

  7. Large Conductance Ca2+-Activated and Voltage-Activated K+ Channels Contribute to the Rise and Maintenance of Estrogen-Induced Uterine Vasodilation and Maintenance of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Uterine blood flow (UBF) increases greater than 4-fold 90 min after systemic estradiol-17β (E2β) in nonpregnant sheep and remains elevated longer than 6–8 h; mean arterial pressure (MAP) is unchanged. Large-conductance Ca+2-activated (BKCa) and voltage-activated (KV) K+ channels contribute to the acute rise in UBF; their role in maintaining UBF and MAP longer than 90 min is unknown. We examined this in five nonpregnant, ovariectomized ewes with uterine artery (UA) flow probes and catheters in a UA for infusion of K+ channel inhibitors and uterine vein to sample venous effluent. Animals received systemic E2β (1.0 μg/kg; control), E2β+UA tetraethylammonium (TEA; 0.4–0.8 mm, n = 4), and E2β+UA 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 0.01–0.08 mm, n = 4) to block BKCa and KV, respectively, while monitoring MAP, heart rate, and UBF. Uterine cGMP synthesis was measured. Ninety minutes after E2β, UBF rose 4.5-fold, uterine vascular resistance (UVR) fell greater than 5-fold and MAP was unchanged [78 ± 0.8 (sem) vs. 77 ± 1.5 mm Hg] in control studies and before UA inhibition with TEA and 4-AP. Between 90 and 120min, UBF, UVR, and MAP were unchanged after E2β alone. E2β+TEA dose dependently decreased ipsilateral UBF and increased UVR (24 ± 8.9 and 38 ± 16%, respectively, at 0.8 mm; P < 0.03); MAP was unchanged. Contralateral UBF/UVR were unaffected. E2β+4-AP also dose dependently decreased ipsilateral UBF and increased UVR (27 ± 5.3 and 76 ± 18%, respectively, at 0.08 mm; P < 0.001); however, MAP rose 27 ± 6.9% (P ≤ 0.006). E2β increased uterine cGMP synthesis greater than 3.5-fold and was unaffected by local K+ channel inhibition. BKCa and KV contribute to the rise and maintenance of E2β-induced uterine vasodilation, which is partially cGMP dependent. Systemic vascular KV also contributes to maintaining MAP after systemic E2β. PMID:23070547

  8. A band clamp with a spring toggle lever

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, M.

    1974-01-01

    Clamp could have several applications, as it provides tolerance for both expansion and contraction. It might be useful with firemen's breathing apparatus and luggage racks and other freight-carrying equipment. Also, using same piece as handle and spring reduces production costs by reducing number of parts.

  9. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design...) cables to prevent strain on the cable terminals of a machine. Also insulated clamps shall be provided to prevent strain on both ends of each cable or cord leading from a machine to a detached or...

  10. Mechanical stability of multidomain proteins and novel mechanical clamps.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-06-01

    We estimate the size of mechanostability for 318 multidomain proteins which are single-chain and contain up to 1021 amino acids. We predict existence of novel types of mechanical clamps in which interdomain contacts play an essential role. Mechanical clamps are structural regions which are the primary source of a protein's resistance to pulling. Among these clamps there is one that opposes tensile stress due to two domains swinging apart. This movement strains and then ruptures the contacts that hold the two domains together. Another clamp also involves tensile stress but it originates from an immobilization of a structural region by a surrounding knot-loop (without involving any disulfide bonds). Still another mechanism involves shear between helical regions belonging to two domains. We also consider the amyloid-prone cystatin C which provides an example of a two-chain 3D domain-swapped protein. We predict that this protein should withstand remarkably large stress, perhaps of order 800 pN, when inducing a shearing strain. The survey is generated through molecular dynamics simulations performed within a structure-based coarse grained model. PMID:21465555

  11. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  16. Partial discharge testing under direct voltage conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bever, R. S.; Westrom, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    DC partial discharge (PD) (corona) testing is performed using a multichannel analyzer for pulse storing, and data is collected during increase of voltage and at quiescent voltage levels. Thus high voltage ceramic disk capacitors were evaluated by obtaining PD data interspersed during an accelerated life test. Increased PD activity was found early in samples that later failed catastrophically. By this technique, trends of insulation behavior are revealed sensitively and nondestructively in high voltage dc components.

  17. Optimizing planar lipid bilayer single-channel recordings for high resolution with rapid voltage steps.

    PubMed Central

    Wonderlin, W F; Finkel, A; French, R J

    1990-01-01

    We describe two enhancements of the planar bilayer recording method which enable low-noise recordings of single-channel currents activated by voltage steps in planar bilayers formed on apertures in partitions separating two open chambers. First, we have refined a simple and effective procedure for making small bilayer apertures (25-80 micrograms diam) in plastic cups. These apertures combine the favorable properties of very thin edges, good mechanical strength, and low stray capacitance. In addition to enabling formation of small, low-capacitance bilayers, this aperture design also minimizes the access resistance to the bilayer, thereby improving the low-noise performance. Second, we have used a patch-clamp headstage modified to provide logic-controlled switching between a high-gain (50 G omega) feedback resistor for high-resolution recording and a low-gain (50 M omega) feedback resistor for rapid charging of the bilayer capacitance. The gain is switched from high to low before a voltage step and then back to high gain 25 microseconds after the step. With digital subtraction of the residual currents produced by the gain switching and electrostrictive changes in bilayer capacitance, we can achieve a steady current baseline within 1 ms after the voltage step. These enhancements broaden the range of experimental applications for the planar bilayer method by combining the high resolution previously attained only with small bilayers formed on pipette tips with the flexibility of experimental design possible with planar bilayers in open chambers. We illustrate application of these methods with recordings of the voltage-step activation of a voltage-gated potassium channel. PMID:1698470

  18. Management of Senile Ptosis with Levator Muscle Resection Using the Putterman Clamp

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Putterman clamp, a muscle clamp, is commonly used in conjunctival müllerectomies. We report 3 cases of senile ptosis repaired with levator muscle resection using the Putterman clamp. The redundant levator aponeurosis was removed with electrocautery after clamping with the Putterman clamp. The levator muscle was refixed to the tarsus with three 4-0 Vicryl stitches after adjusting the height of the eyelid fissure. No intraoperative difficulties were encountered. Ecchymosis and edema were limited in the immediate postoperative period. No complications were noted during the follow-up. The benefits of using the Putterman clamp in levator muscle resection are illustrated in these cases. PMID:27482474

  19. Management of Senile Ptosis with Levator Muscle Resection Using the Putterman Clamp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ju-Wen

    2016-06-01

    Putterman clamp, a muscle clamp, is commonly used in conjunctival müllerectomies. We report 3 cases of senile ptosis repaired with levator muscle resection using the Putterman clamp. The redundant levator aponeurosis was removed with electrocautery after clamping with the Putterman clamp. The levator muscle was refixed to the tarsus with three 4-0 Vicryl stitches after adjusting the height of the eyelid fissure. No intraoperative difficulties were encountered. Ecchymosis and edema were limited in the immediate postoperative period. No complications were noted during the follow-up. The benefits of using the Putterman clamp in levator muscle resection are illustrated in these cases. PMID:27482474

  20. Identification and functional characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weifeng; Lu, Chunjing; Wu, Yong; Ouyang, Shou; Chen, Yuanzhong

    2015-03-01

    A variety of ion channels has been discovered in lymphocytes. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analysis revealed that ALL (acute lymphocytic leukemia) cell lines and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells mainly expressed TTX (tetrodotoxin)-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Expression of VGSC protein was confirmed by western blots and Immunofluorescence. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings showed that a sub-population (20%) of MOLT-4 cells expressed functional VGSCs, which were TTX-sensitive. Importantly, 2 μM TTX decreased the invasion of Jurkat and MOLT-4 cells ∼90%. These results indicate that the activity of VGSCs could represent a novel mechanism potentiating the invasive capacity of these cells. PMID:25645019

  1. Static DC to DC Power Conditioning-Active Ripple Filter, 1 MHZ DC to DC Conversion, and Nonlinear Analysis. Ph.D. Thesis; [voltage regulation and conversion circuitry for spacecraft power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, W. A., III

    1973-01-01

    Dc to dc static power conditioning systems on unmanned spacecraft have as their inputs highly fluctuating dc voltages which they condition to regulated dc voltages. These input voltages may be less than or greater than the desired regulated voltages. The design of two circuits which address specific problems in the design of these power conditioning systems and a nonlinear analysis of one of the circuits are discussed. The first circuit design is for a nondissipative active ripple filter which uses an operational amplifier to amplify and cancel the sensed ripple voltage. A dc to dc converter operating at a switching frequency of 1 MHz is the second circuit discussed. A nonlinear analysis of the type of dc to dc converter utilized in designing the 1 MHz converter is included.

  2. Russia clamps downs on data release

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-30

    This paper reports that Russia is stepping up enforcement of laws banning unauthorized release of detailed geological and geophysical data to foreign companies. But companies authorized to sell or license information about Russian minerals say the stricter oversight isn't affecting their activities. That's because the effort is intended to curb illegal sales of data by Russian regional organizations and federal agencies. In addition, Russia's state tax department and ministries of finance and justice are considering sanctions to be imposed for violations of lawful procedures. The added vigilance by Russian officials likely will help clear up confusion among foreign companies, resulting from vague laws and regulations, about how and from whom data may be obtained obtained legally.

  3. Ion Channels in the Xylem Parenchyma of Barley Roots (A Procedure to Isolate Protoplasts from This Tissue and a Patch-Clamp Exploration of Salt Passageways into Xylem Vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, L. H.; Raschke, K.

    1994-01-01

    To identify mechanisms for the simultaneous release of anions and cations into the xylem sap in roots, we investigated voltage-dependent ion conductances in the plasmalemma of xylem parenchyma cells. We applied the patch-clamp technique to protoplasts isolated from the xylem parenchyma by differential enzymic digestion of steles of barley roots (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Apex). In the whole-cell configuration, three types of cation-selective rectifiers could be identified: (a) one activated at membrane potentials above about -50 mV; (b) a second type of outward current appeared at membrane potentials above +20 to +40 mV; (c) below a membrane potential of approximately -110 mV, an inward rectifier could be distinguished. In addition, an anion-specific conductance manifested itself in single-channel activity in a voltage range extending from about -100 to +30 mV, with remarkably slow gating. In excised patches, K+ channels activated at hyperpolarization as well as at depolarization. We suggest that salt is released from the xylem parenchyma into the xylem apoplast by simultaneous flow of cations and anions through channels, following electrochemical gradients set up by the ion uptake processes in the cortex and, possibly, the release and reabsorption of ions on their way to the xylem. PMID:12232243

  4. KCNQ1 channel modulation by KCNE proteins via the voltage-sensing domain

    PubMed Central

    Nakajo, Koichi; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The gating of the KCNQ1 potassium channel is drastically regulated by auxiliary subunit KCNE proteins. KCNE1, for example, slows the activation kinetics of KCNQ1 by two orders of magnitude. Like other voltage-gated ion channels, the opening of KCNQ1 is regulated by the voltage-sensing domain (VSD; S1–S4 segments). Although it has been known that KCNE proteins interact with KCNQ1 via the pore domain, some recent reports suggest that the VSD movement may be altered by KCNE. The altered VSD movement of KCNQ1 by KCNE proteins has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis, the scanning cysteine accessibility method (SCAM), voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) and gating charge measurements. These accumulated data support the idea that KCNE proteins interact with the VSDs of KCNQ1 and modulate the gating of the KCNQ1 channel. In this review, we will summarize recent findings and current views of the KCNQ1 modulation by KCNE via the VSD. In this context, we discuss our recent findings that KCNE1 may alter physical interactions between the S4 segment (VSD) and the S5 segment (pore domain) of KCNQ1. Based on these findings from ourselves and others, we propose a hypothetical mechanism for how KCNE1 binding alters the VSD movement and the gating of the channel. PMID:25603957

  5. A Large, Voltage-Dependent Channel, Isolated from Mitochondria by Water-Free Chloroform Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Evgeny; Zakharian, Eleonora; Bladen, Christopher; Diao, Catherine T. M.; Grimbly, Chelsey; Reusch, Rosetta N.; French, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    We examined ion channels derived from a chloroform extract of isolated, dehydrated rat liver mitochondria. The extraction method was previously used to isolate a channel-forming complex containing poly-3-hydroxybutyrate and calcium polyphosphate from Escherichia coli. This complex is also present in eukaryotic membranes, and is located primarily in mitochondria. Reconstituted channels showed multiple subconductance levels and were voltage-dependent, showing an increased probability of higher conductance states at voltages near zero. In symmetric 150 mM KCl, the maximal conductance of the channel ranged from 350 pS to 750 pS. For voltages >±60 mV, conductance fluctuated in the range of ∼50–∼200 pS. In the presence of a 1:3 gradient of KCl, at pH = 7.4, selectivity periodically switched between different states ranging from weakly anion-selective (Vrev ∼ −15 mV) to ideally cation-selective (Vrev ∼ +29 mV), without a significant change in its conductance. Overall, the diverse, but highly reproducible, channel activity most closely resembled the behavior of the permeability transition pore channel seen in patch-clamp experiments on native mitoplasts. We suggest that the isolated complex may represent the ion-conducting module from the permeability transition pore. PMID:15695627

  6. KCNQ1 channel modulation by KCNE proteins via the voltage-sensing domain.

    PubMed

    Nakajo, Koichi; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2015-06-15

    The gating of the KCNQ1 potassium channel is drastically regulated by auxiliary subunit KCNE proteins. KCNE1, for example, slows the activation kinetics of KCNQ1 by two orders of magnitude. Like other voltage-gated ion channels, the opening of KCNQ1 is regulated by the voltage-sensing domain (VSD; S1-S4 segments). Although it has been known that KCNE proteins interact with KCNQ1 via the pore domain, some recent reports suggest that the VSD movement may be altered by KCNE. The altered VSD movement of KCNQ1 by KCNE proteins has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis, the scanning cysteine accessibility method (SCAM), voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) and gating charge measurements. These accumulated data support the idea that KCNE proteins interact with the VSDs of KCNQ1 and modulate the gating of the KCNQ1 channel. In this review, we will summarize recent findings and current views of the KCNQ1 modulation by KCNE via the VSD. In this context, we discuss our recent findings that KCNE1 may alter physical interactions between the S4 segment (VSD) and the S5 segment (pore domain) of KCNQ1. Based on these findings from ourselves and others, we propose a hypothetical mechanism for how KCNE1 binding alters the VSD movement and the gating of the channel. PMID:25603957

  7. Room temperature, very sensitive thermometer using a doubly clamped microelectromechanical beam resonator for bolometer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Hosono, S.; Nagai, N.; Hirakawa, K.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a room temperature, all electrical driving and detecting, very sensitive thermometer structure using a microelectromechanical (MEMS) resonator for bolometer applications. We have fabricated a GaAs doubly clamped MEMS beam resonator whose oscillation can be excited and detected by the piezoelectric effect. When a heating power is applied to a NiCr film deposited on the MEMS beam surface, internal thermal stress is generated in the beam, leading to a reduction in the resonance frequency. The present device detects the shift in the resonance frequency caused by heating and works as a very sensitive thermometer. When the resonator was driven by a voltage slightly below the threshold for the nonlinear, hysteretic oscillation, the thermometer showed a voltage responsivity of about 3300 V/W, while keeping a low noise spectral density of about 60 nV/Hz1/2, demonstrating a noise equivalent power of <20 pW/Hz1/2 even at room temperature. The observed effect can be used for realizing high-sensitivity terahertz bolometers for room-temperature operation.

  8. Voltage-gated divalent currents in descending vasa recta pericytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong; Lin, Hai; Cao, Chunhua; Khurana, Sandeep; Pallone, Thomas L

    2010-10-01

    Multiple voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (Ca(V)) subtypes have been reported to participate in control of the juxtamedullary glomerular arterioles of the kidney. Using the patch-clamp technique, we examined whole cell Ca(V) currents of pericytes that contract descending vasa recta (DVR). The dihydropyridine Ca(V) agonist FPL64176 (FPL) stimulated inward Ca(2+) and Ba(2+) currents that activated with threshold depolarizations to -40 mV and maximized between -20 and -10 mV. These currents were blocked by nifedipine (1 μM) and Ni(2+) (100 and 1,000 μM), exhibited slow inactivation, and conducted Ba(2+) > Ca(2+) at a ratio of 2.3:1, consistent with "long-lasting" L-type Ca(V). In FPL, with 1 mM Ca(2+) as charge carrier, Boltzmann fits yielded half-maximal activation potential (V(1/2)) and slope factors of -57.9 mV and 11.0 for inactivation and -33.3 mV and 4.4 for activation. In the absence of FPL stimulation, higher concentrations of divalent charge carriers were needed to measure basal currents. In 10 mM Ba(2+), pericyte Ca(V) currents activated with threshold depolarizations to -30 mV, were blocked by nifedipine, exhibited voltage-dependent block by diltiazem (10 μM), and conducted Ba(2+) > Ca(2+) at a ratio of ∼2:1. In Ca(2+), Boltzmann fits to the data yielded V(1/2) and slope factors of -39.6 mV and 10.0 for inactivation and 2.8 mV and 7.7 for activation. In Ba(2+), V(1/2) and slope factors were -29.2 mV and 9.2 for inactivation and -5.6 mV and 6.1 for activation. Neither calciseptine (10 nM), mibefradil (1 μM), nor ω-agatoxin IVA (20 and 100 nM) blocked basal Ba(2+) currents. Calciseptine (10 nM) and mibefradil (1 μM) also failed to reverse ANG II-induced DVR vasoconstriction, although raising mibefradil concentration to 10 μM was partially effective. We conclude that DVR pericytes predominantly express voltage-gated divalent currents that are carried by L-type channels. PMID:20630935

  9. Methods for voltage-sensitive dye imaging of rat cortical activity with high signal-to-noise ratio

    PubMed Central

    Lippert, Michael; Takagaki, Kentaroh; Xu, Weifeng; Huang, Xiaoying; Wu, Jian-Young

    2010-01-01

    We describe methods to achieve high sensitivity in voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging from rat barrel and visual cortices in vivo with the use of a blue dye RH1691 and a high dynamic range imaging device (photodiode array). With an improved staining protocol and an off-line procedure to remove pulsation artifact, the sensitivity of VSD recording is comparable to that of local field potential recording from the same location. With this sensitivity, one can record from ~500 individual detectors, each covering an area of cortical tissue 160 μm in diameter (total imaging field ~4 mm in diameter) and a temporal resolution of 1,600 frames/s, without multiple-trial averaging. We can record 80 to 100 trials of intermittent 10 s trials from each imaging field before the VSD signal reduces to one half of its initial amplitude due to bleaching and wash-out. Taken together, the methods described in this report provide a useful tool for visualizing evoked and spontaneous waves from rodent cortex. PMID:17493915

  10. Complex regulation of voltage-dependent activation and inactivation properties of retinal voltage-gated Cav1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels by Ca2+-binding protein 4 (CaBP4).

    PubMed

    Shaltiel, Lior; Paparizos, Christos; Fenske, Stefanie; Hassan, Sami; Gruner, Christian; Rötzer, Katrin; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A

    2012-10-19

    Cav1.4 L-type Ca(2+) channels are crucial for synaptic transmission in retinal photoreceptors and bipolar neurons. Recent studies suggest that the activity of this channel is regulated by the Ca(2+)-binding protein 4 (CaBP4). In the present study, we explored this issue by examining functional effects of CaBP4 on heterologously expressed Cav1.4. We show that CaBP4 dramatically increases Cav1.4 channel availability. This effect crucially depends on the presence of the C-terminal ICDI (inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation) domain of Cav1.4 and is absent in a Cav1.4 mutant lacking the ICDI. Using FRET experiments, we demonstrate that CaBP4 interacts with the IQ motif of Cav1.4 and that it interferes with the binding of the ICDI domain. Based on these findings, we suggest that CaBP4 increases Cav1.4 channel availability by relieving the inhibitory effects of the ICDI domain on voltage-dependent Cav1.4 channel gating. We also functionally characterized two CaBP4 mutants that are associated with a congenital variant of human night blindness and other closely related nonstationary retinal diseases. Although both mutants interact with Cav1.4 channels, the functional effects of CaBP4 mutants are only partially preserved, leading to a reduction of Cav1.4 channel availability and loss of function. In conclusion, our study sheds new light on the functional interaction between CaBP4 and Cav1.4. Moreover, it provides insights into the mechanism by which CaBP4 mutants lead to loss of Cav1.4 function and to retinal disease. PMID:22936811

  11. CaBP1 regulates voltage-dependent inactivation and activation of Ca(V)1.2 (L-type) calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Oz, Shimrit; Tsemakhovich, Vladimir; Christel, Carl J; Lee, Amy; Dascal, Nathan

    2011-04-22

    CaBP1 is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that regulates the gating of voltage-gated (Ca(V)) Ca(2+) channels. In the Ca(V)1.2 channel α(1)-subunit (α(1C)), CaBP1 interacts with cytosolic N- and C-terminal domains and blunts Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. To clarify the role of the α(1C) N-terminal domain in CaBP1 regulation, we compared the effects of CaBP1 on two alternatively spliced variants of α(1C) containing a long or short N-terminal domain. In both isoforms, CaBP1 inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation but also caused a depolarizing shift in voltage-dependent activation and enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). In binding assays, CaBP1 interacted with the distal third of the N-terminal domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This segment is distinct from the previously identified calmodulin-binding site in the N terminus. However, deletion of a segment in the proximal N-terminal domain of both α(1C) isoforms, which spared the CaBP1-binding site, inhibited the effect of CaBP1 on VDI. This result suggests a modular organization of the α(1C) N-terminal domain, with separate determinants for CaBP1 binding and transduction of the effect on VDI. Our findings expand the diversity and mechanisms of Ca(V) channel regulation by CaBP1 and define a novel modulatory function for the initial segment of the N terminus of α(1C). PMID:21383011

  12. NIMBY, CLAMP, and the location of new nuclear-related facilities: U.S. national and 11 site-specific surveys.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael R

    2009-09-01

    Public and political opposition have made finding locations for new nuclear power plants, waste management, and nuclear research and development facilities a challenge for the U.S. government and the nuclear industry. U.S. government-owned properties that already have nuclear-related activities and commercial nuclear power generating stations are logical locations. Several studies and utility applications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission suggest that concentrating locations at major plants (CLAMP) has become an implicit siting policy. We surveyed 2,101 people who lived within 50 miles of 11 existing major nuclear sites and 600 who lived elsewhere in the United States. Thirty-four percent favored CLAMP for new nuclear power plants, 52% for waste management facilities, and 50% for new nuclear laboratories. College educated, relatively affluent male whites were the strongest CLAMP supporters. They disproportionately trusted those responsible for the facilities and were not worried about existing nuclear facilities or other local environmental issues. Notably, they were concerned about continuing coal use. Not surprisingly, CLAMP proponents tended to be familiar with their existing local nuclear site. In short, likely CLAMP sites have a large and politically powerful core group to support a CLAMP policy. The challenge to proponents of nuclear technologies will be to sustain this support and expand the base among those who clearly are less connected and receptive to new nearby sites. PMID:19572962

  13. Screening Fluorescent Voltage Indicators with Spontaneously Spiking HEK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Veena; Kralj, Joel M.; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Cohen, Adam E.

    2013-01-01

    Development of improved fluorescent voltage indicators is a key challenge in neuroscience, but progress has been hampered by the low throughput of patch-clamp characterization. We introduce a line of non-fluorescent HEK cells that stably express NaV 1.3 and KIR 2.1 and generate spontaneous electrical action potentials. These cells enable rapid, electrode-free screening of speed and sensitivity of voltage sensitive dyes or fluorescent proteins on a standard fluorescence microscope. We screened a small library of mutants of archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch) in spiking HEK cells and identified two mutants with greater voltage-sensitivity than found in previously published Arch voltage indicators. PMID:24391999

  14. Screening fluorescent voltage indicators with spontaneously spiking HEK cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeehae; Werley, Christopher A; Venkatachalam, Veena; Kralj, Joel M; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Cohen, Adam E

    2013-01-01

    Development of improved fluorescent voltage indicators is a key challenge in neuroscience, but progress has been hampered by the low throughput of patch-clamp characterization. We introduce a line of non-fluorescent HEK cells that stably express NaV 1.3 and KIR 2.1 and generate spontaneous electrical action potentials. These cells enable rapid, electrode-free screening of speed and sensitivity of voltage sensitive dyes or fluorescent proteins on a standard fluorescence microscope. We screened a small library of mutants of archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch) in spiking HEK cells and identified two mutants with greater voltage-sensitivity than found in previously published Arch voltage indicators. PMID:24391999

  15. DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET FRAME, SHOWING CLAMPING MECHANISM,WITHOUT ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET FRAME, SHOWING CLAMPING MECHANISM,WITHOUT ORE BUCKET AND WHEELS. THE FRAME IS LYING ON ITS SIDE. THE ORE BUCKET WAS ATTACHED TO THE LEFT SIDE, AND TWO WHEELS WERE ATTACHED TO THE SPINDLE ON THE RIGHT. THE FRAME AND BUCKET ARE SUSPENDED FROM THE STATIONARY CABLE BY THE TWO WHEELS, WITH THE ORE BUCKET HANGING BELOW. THE WHEEL AND LEVER AT CENTER WERE ACTIVATED BY THE OPENING AND CLOSING MECHANISMS ON THE TRAM TERMINALS TO LOCK OR RELEASE THE BUCKET ONTO THE MOVING CABLE THAT RAN THROUGH THE SQUARE BLOCK AT CENTER. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  16. Patch Clamp Experiments under Conditions of Variable Graviy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, F. P. M.; Meissner, K.

    2013-02-01

    The cellular membrane is an intrinsic part of any cell. It has a complex composition of lipid molecules and proteins. The membrane is, among others, involved in excitation and signal transduction. Ion channels, as integral membrane proteins, play an important role. For the question of gravity sensitivity of biological systems, especially neuronal cells, ion channels are of high interest. Gravity might directly interact with the ion channel protein or it might change the thermodynamic membrane parameters, influencing the incorporated proteins indirectly. Detailed information about the effects of gravity on the function of single ion-channels can up to now only be acquired by electrophysiological approaches like the patch clamp technique. Today this technique is the preferentially used technique for single ion-channel studies. Consequently, experiments have been developed in recent years to investigate the interaction of gravity with single ion channel molecules utilizing the patch-clamp technology on different macro- and micro-gravity platforms.

  17. Patch Clamp Recording of Ion Channels Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    L Brown, Austin; E. Johnson, Brandon; B. Goodman, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    Since its development by Sakmann and Neher 1, 2, the patch clamp has become established as an extremely useful technique for electrophysiological measurement of single or multiple ion channels in cells. This technique can be applied to ion channels in both their native environment and expressed in heterologous cells, such as oocytes harvested from the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. Here, we describe the well-established technique of patch clamp recording from Xenopus oocytes. This technique is used to measure the properties of expressed ion channels either in populations (macropatch) or individually (single-channel recording). We focus on techniques to maximize the quality of oocyte preparation and seal generation. With all factors optimized, this technique gives a probability of successful seal generation over 90 percent. The process may be optimized differently by every researcher based on the factors he or she finds most important, and we present the approach that have lead to the greatest success in our hands. PMID:19078941

  18. The cation selectivity and voltage dependence of the light-activated potassium conductance in scallop distal photoreceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Cornwall, M C; Gorman, A L

    1983-01-01

    Light-dependent voltage and current responses were measured from the distal hyperpolarizing photoreceptors of the scallop (Pecten irradians) retina. In normal external solution, the hyperpolarizing receptor potential was caused by a light-dependent K+ outward current. The magnitude of the hyperpolarizing receptor potential and the light-dependent outward current, measured at the resting potential, was graded with light intensity. In normal external solution, during prolonged illumination the light-dependent K+ outward current was characterized by an early peak and a subsequent plateau. Current responses to brief light flashes were reduced progressively during background illumination. In the absence of external Na+ ions, the reversal potential for the receptor potential changed 58 mV per 10-fold change in the extracellular K+ concentration. The estimated internal K+ concentration was 385 mM. The hyperpolarizing receptor potential produced by prolonged bright illumination consists of an early peak which decays to a plateau. This decay was determined by a decrease in the light-dependent K+ conductance during maintained illumination. The light-dependent conductance pathway passed outward currents better than inward K+ currents. The light-dependent K+ conductance was estimated to increase e-fold per 23-34 mV depolarization at the peak and during the plateau of the light response. The light-dependent conductance pathway was highly selective for K+ ions. The selectivity sequence for monovalent cations was T1+, K+ greater than Rb+ greater than NH4 greater than Cs+, Li+, Na+. External caesium and tetraethylammonium blocked inward but not outward K+ currents through the light-dependent K+ conductance pathway. The data suggest that K+ ions move through an aqueous pore which is controlled by light. PMID:6887051

  19. DNA Sliding Clamps: Just the Right Twist to Load onto DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Barsky, D; Venclovas, C

    2005-10-24

    Two recent papers illuminate a long sought step in DNA sliding clamp loading. One paper reveals the structure of the PCNA clamp wrapped around DNA--still open from being loaded--while a second paper discovers that the clamp may assist this process by forming a right-handed helix upon opening.

  20. Oscillations and latency in the clamped pupil light reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, John G.; Ohira, Toru; Steck, Jeff; Crate, John; Longtin, Andre

    1993-11-01

    It is shown that the pupil latency can be estimated from pupil cycling measurements when the pupil light reflex is clamped with piecewise constant negative feedback. The solution of the mathematical model previously shown to describe these oscillations is utilized to develop a variety of strategies to estimate latency and to evaluate the effects of noise on these estimates. The results demonstrate that the pupil latency shows considerable variation.

  1. Acute aortic dissection from cross-clamp injury.

    PubMed

    Litchford, B; Okies, J E; Sugimura, S; Starr, A

    1976-11-01

    Acute dissection of the ascending aorta secondary to cross-clamp injury can be successfully managed if the problem is recognized immediately. Bypass must be instituted after recannulation at a point distal to the innominate artery so that proper exposure of the site of injury can be obtained. Systemic as well as local hypothermia for myocardial preservation are both necessary. Direct suture closure of all layers at the site of dissection over Teflon felt can terminate this process. PMID:979312

  2. From Galvani to patch clamp: the development of electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Krishtal, O A; Petersen, Ole H

    2006-12-01

    The development of electrophysiology is traced from the early beginnings represented by the work of the Dutch microscopist, Jan Swammerdam, in the 17th century through the first notion of an aqueous transmembrane pore as a substrate of excitability made by Luigi Galvani in late 18th century to the invention late in the 20th century of the patch-clamp technique by Erwin Neher and Bert Sakmann. PMID:17072639

  3. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the α1 pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Alan; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Openings of high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, HVA calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1) associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ, and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of HVA calcium channels. PMID:24917826

  4. Basal activity of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels controls the IP3-mediated contraction by α(1)-adrenoceptor stimulation of mouse aorta segments.

    PubMed

    Leloup, Arthur J; Van Hove, Cor E; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Schrijvers, Dorien M; Fransen, Paul

    2015-08-01

    α1-Adrenoceptor stimulation of mouse aorta causes intracellular Ca(2+) release from sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores via stimulation of inositoltriphosphate (IP3) receptors. It is hypothesized that this Ca(2+) release from the contractile and IP3-sensitive Ca(2+) store is under the continuous dynamic control of time-independent basal Ca(2+) influx via L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (LCC) residing in their window voltage range. Mouse aortic segments were α1-adrenoceptor stimulated with phenylephrine in the absence of external Ca(2+) (0Ca) to measure phasic isometric contractions. They gradually decreased with time in 0Ca, were inhibited with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, and declined with previous membrane potential hyperpolarization (levcromakalim) or with previous inhibition of LCC (diltiazem). Former basal stimulation of LCC with depolarization (15 mM K(+)) or with BAY K8644 increased the subsequent phasic contractions by phenylephrine in 0Ca. Although exogenous NO (diethylamine NONOate) reduced the phasic contractions by phenylephrine, stimulation of endothelial cells with acetylcholine in 0Ca failed to attenuate these phasic contractions. Finally, inhibition of the basal release of NO with N(Ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester also attenuated the phasic contractions by phenylephrine. Results indicated that α1-adrenoceptor stimulation with phenylephrine causes phasic contractions, which are controlled by basal LCC and endothelial NO synthase activity. Endothelial NO release by acetylcholine was absent in 0Ca. Given the growing interest in the active regulation of arterial compliance, the dependence of contractile SR Ca(2+) store-refilling in basal conditions on the activity of LCC and basal eNOS may contribute to a more thorough understanding of physiological mechanisms leading to arterial stiffness. PMID:25913240

  5. Spatio-temporal activity patterns of odor-induced synchronized potentials revealed by voltage-sensitive dye imaging and intracellular recording in the antennal lobe of the cockroach.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Ai, Hiroyuki; Yokohari, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    In animals, odor qualities are represented as both spatial activity patterns of glomeruli and temporal patterns of synchronized oscillatory signals in the primary olfactory centers. By optical imaging of a voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) and intracellular recording from secondary olfactory interneurons, we examined possible neural correlates of the spatial and temporal odor representations in the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), of the cockroach Periplaneta americana. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging revealed that all used odorants induced odor-specific temporal patterns of depolarizing potentials in specific combinations of anterior glomeruli of the AL. The depolarizing potentials evoked by different odorants were temporally synchronized across glomeruli and were termed "synchronized potentials." These observations suggest that odor qualities are represented by spatio-temporal activity patterns of the synchronized potentials across glomeruli. We also performed intracellular recordings and stainings from secondary olfactory interneurons, namely projection neurons and local interneurons. We analyzed the temporal structures of enanthic acid-induced action potentials of secondary olfactory interneurons using simultaneous paired intracellular recording from two given neurons. Our results indicated that the multiple local interneurons synchronously fired in response to the olfactory stimulus. In addition, all stained enanthic acid-responsive projection neurons exhibited dendritic arborizations within the glomeruli where the synchronized potentials were evoked. Since multiple local interneurons are known to synapse to a projection neuron in each glomerulus in the cockroach AL, converging inputs from local interneurons to the projection neurons appear to contribute the odorant specific spatio-temporal activity patterns of the synchronized potentials. PMID:22848191

  6. Stress-stimulated current of dry rocks with constant clamping stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, R. P.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Johnston, M. J. S.

    2014-12-01

    A set of nominally dry rocks (gabbro, granite, limestone, marble, and sandstone) were subjected to asymmetric loading with a large hydraulic press. A pair of precision platens made from 1018 low carbon steel were used to apply uniaxial compressive stress (σ) to the sample, via a thin electrical insulator made from ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene. Self-adhesive copper electrodes were applied and burnished on the end faces and the stress-stimulated current (SSC) was monitored using a Keithley 617 instrument. A preload stress level of 5.5 MPa was applied to firmly clamp the assembly throughout the experiment. From this baseline, σ was increased to 22.25 MPa and held for 100 seconds before returning to the clamping stress level. This loading profile was repeated for four or more cycles, with a stress rate on the order of 5MPa/sec. After the first load cycle, the SSC transients (and SSV offsets) are reversible when σ returned to its baseline level. All samples showed alternating unipolar SSC transients at the beginning and end of each load cycle. SSC from limestone, Westerly granite and marble were at, or below, the measurement limit (±1 pA). All other samples except sandstone showed a negative SSC with increasing stress. For stress-stimulated voltage (SSV) there was a richer variety of transients observed such as unipolar, bipolar and more complex transient dynamics. Limestone was the only sample tested with no SSV transients although this particular rock had a major calcite inclusion in the sample. White granite tended to have the least stable SSC and SSV values. Of the six different rock samples tested under identical conditions, the SSC and SSV observed were not greater than -15 pA, presumably due to improved experimental procedures. The response for rocks with semiconductor properties (gabbro, granite) is the same as those without semiconductor properties (limestone, marble), although the values for marble were below the noise. For repetitive

  7. Functional Interaction between the Scaffold Protein Kidins220/ARMS and Neuronal Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Cesca, Fabrizia; Satapathy, Annyesha; Ferrea, Enrico; Nieus, Thierry; Benfenati, Fabio; Scholz-Starke, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Kidins220 (kinase D-interacting substrate of 220 kDa)/ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning (ARMS) acts as a signaling platform at the plasma membrane and is implicated in a multitude of neuronal functions, including the control of neuronal activity. Here, we used the Kidins220−/− mouse model to study the effects of Kidins220 ablation on neuronal excitability. Multielectrode array recordings showed reduced evoked spiking activity in Kidins220−/− hippocampal networks, which was compatible with the increased excitability of GABAergic neurons determined by current-clamp recordings. Spike waveform analysis further indicated an increased sodium conductance in this neuronal subpopulation. Kidins220 association with brain voltage-gated sodium channels was shown by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and Na+ current recordings in transfected HEK293 cells, which revealed dramatic alterations of kinetics and voltage dependence. Finally, an in silico interneuronal model incorporating the Kidins220-induced Na+ current alterations reproduced the firing phenotype observed in Kidins220−/− neurons. These results identify Kidins220 as a novel modulator of Nav channel activity, broadening our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating network excitability. PMID:26037926

  8. Regulation of neuronal high-voltage activated Ca(V)2 Ca(2+) channels by the small GTPase RhoA.

    PubMed

    Rousset, Matthieu; Cens, Thierry; Menard, Claudine; Bowerman, Melissa; Bellis, Michel; Brusés, Juan; Raoul, Cedric; Scamps, Frédérique; Charnet, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    High-Voltage-Activated (HVA) Ca(2+) channels are known regulators of synapse formation and transmission and play fundamental roles in neuronal pathophysiology. Small GTPases of Rho and RGK families, via their action on both cytoskeleton and Ca(2+) channels are key molecules for these processes. While the effects of RGK GTPases on neuronal HVA Ca(2+) channels have been widely studied, the effects of RhoA on the HVA channels remains however elusive. Using heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we show that RhoA activity reduces Ba(2+) currents through CaV2.1, CaV2.2 and CaV2.3 Ca(2+) channels independently of CaVβ subunit. This inhibition occurs independently of RGKs activity and without modification of biophysical properties and global level of expression of the channel subunit. Instead, we observed a marked decrease in the number of active channels at the plasma membrane. Pharmacological and expression studies suggest that channel expression at the plasma membrane is impaired via a ROCK-sensitive pathway. Expression of constitutively active RhoA in primary culture of spinal motoneurons also drastically reduced HVA Ca(2+) current amplitude. Altogether our data revealed that HVA Ca(2+) channels regulation by RhoA might govern synaptic transmission during development and potentially contribute to pathophysiological processes when axon regeneration and growth cone kinetics are impaired. PMID:26044639

  9. Calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channel activators in the 5β-cholanic acid-3α-ol analogue series with modifications in the lateral chain.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Patil, Shivaputra A; Li, Wei; Miller, Duane D; Dopico, Alex M

    2012-10-01

    Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels regulate various physiological processes and represent an attractive target for drug discovery. Numerous BK channel activators are available. However, these agents usually interact with the ubiquitously distributed channel-forming subunit and thus cannot selectively target a particular tissue. We performed a structure-activity relationship study of lithocholic acid (LCA), a cholane that activates BK channels via the accessory BK β1 subunit. The latter protein is highly abundant in smooth muscle but scarce in most other tissues. Modifications to the LCA lateral chain length and functional group yielded two novel smooth muscle BK channel activators in which the substituent at C24 has a small volume and a net negative charge. Our data provide detailed structural information that will be useful to advance a pharmacophore in search of β1 subunit-selective BK channel activators. These compounds are expected to evoke smooth muscle relaxation, which would be beneficial in the pharmacotherapy of prevalent human disorders associated with increased smooth muscle contraction, such as systemic hypertension, cerebral or coronary vasospasm, bronchial asthma, bladder hyperactivity, and erectile dysfunction. PMID:22945504

  10. AKAP150 participates in calcineurin/NFAT activation during the down-regulation of voltage-gated K(+) currents in ventricular myocytes following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cintrón, Madeline; Hirenallur-Shanthappa, Dinesh; Nygren, Patrick J; Hinke, Simon A; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Langeberg, Lorene K; Navedo, Manuel; Santana, Luis F; Scott, John D

    2016-07-01

    The Ca(2+)-responsive phosphatase calcineurin/protein phosphatase 2B dephosphorylates the transcription factor NFATc3. In the myocardium activation of NFATc3 down-regulates the expression of voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels after myocardial infarction (MI). This prolongs action potential duration and increases the probability of arrhythmias. Although recent studies infer that calcineurin is activated by local and transient Ca(2+) signals the molecular mechanism that underlies the process is unclear in ventricular myocytes. Here we test the hypothesis that sequestering of calcineurin to the sarcolemma of ventricular myocytes by the anchoring protein AKAP150 is required for acute activation of NFATc3 and the concomitant down-regulation of Kv channels following MI. Biochemical and cell based measurements resolve that approximately 0.2% of the total calcineurin activity in cardiomyocytes is associated with AKAP150. Electrophysiological analyses establish that formation of this AKAP150-calcineurin signaling dyad is essential for the activation of the phosphatase and the subsequent down-regulation of Kv channel currents following MI. Thus AKAP150-mediated targeting of calcineurin to sarcolemmal micro-domains in ventricular myocytes contributes to the local and acute gene remodeling events that lead to the down-regulation of Kv currents. PMID:26724383

  11. EGFR Mutation Analysis of Circulating Tumor DNA Using an Improved PNA-LNA PCR Clamp Method

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kana; Fukuhara, Tatsuro; Tsukita, Yoko; Morita, Mami; Suzuki, Aya; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Terasaki, Hiroshi; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Rebiopsies have become more crucial in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Instead of invasive biopsies, development of collecting biological data of the tumor from blood samples is expected. We conducted a prospective study to assess the feasibility of detection of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in plasma samples. Method. NSCLC patients harboring EGFR activating mutations, who were going to receive EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) as first-line treatment, were enrolled in this study. Plasma EGFR activating mutations and the T790M resistance mutation were analyzed by an improved PNA-LNA PCR clamp method, characterized by a 10-fold or more sensitivity compared with the original methods. Result. Six patients with wild-type EGFR and 24 patients with EGFR mutations were enrolled in this study. Pretreatment plasma samples achieved sensitivity of 79%. The 6 patients with wild-type EGFR were all negative for plasma EGFR mutations. At the time of disease progression, plasma T790M mutation was detected in 8 of 16 cases. Absence of T790M before and during TKI treatment and disappearance of activating mutations during TKI treatment were considered as predictors of EGFR-TKIs efficacy. Conclusion. We were able to detect EGFR mutations in plasma samples by using an improved PNA-LNA PCR clamp method. PMID:27478396

  12. HIGH VOLTAGE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Zito, G.V.

    1959-04-21

    This patent relates to high voltage supply circuits adapted for providing operating voltages for GeigerMueller counter tubes, and is especially directed to an arrangement for maintaining uniform voltage under changing conditions of operation. In the usual power supply arrangement for counter tubes the counter voltage is taken from across the power supply output capacitor. If the count rate exceeds the current delivering capaciiy of the capacitor, the capacitor voltage will drop, decreasing the counter voltage. The present invention provides a multivibrator which has its output voltage controlled by a signal proportional to the counting rate. As the counting rate increases beyond the current delivering capacity of the capacitor, the rectified voltage output from the multivibrator is increased to maintain uniform counter voltage.

  13. Mechanism of voltage-sensitive fluorescence in a microbial rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Maclaurin, Dougal; Venkatachalam, Veena; Lee, Hohjai; Cohen, Adam E.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins were recently introduced as genetically encoded fluorescent indicators of membrane voltage. An understanding of the mechanism underlying this function would aid in the design of improved voltage indicators. We asked, what states can the protein adopt, and which states are fluorescent? How does membrane voltage affect the photostationary distribution of states? Here, we present a detailed spectroscopic characterization of Archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch). We performed fluorescence spectroscopy on Arch and its photogenerated intermediates in Escherichia coli and in single HEK293 cells under voltage-clamp conditions. These experiments probed the effects of time-dependent illumination and membrane voltage on absorption, fluorescence, membrane current, and membrane capacitance. The fluorescence of Arch arises through a sequential three-photon process. Membrane voltage modulates protonation of the Schiff base in a 13-cis photocycle intermediate (M ⇌ N equilibrium), not in the ground state as previously hypothesized. We present experimental protocols for optimized voltage imaging with Arch, and we discuss strategies for engineering improved rhodopsin-based voltage indicators. PMID:23530193

  14. Interactions between dendrotoxin, a blocker of voltage-dependent potassium channels, and charybdotoxin, a blocker of calcium-activated potassium channels, at binding sites on neuronal membranes.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A L; Marshall, D L; De-Allie, F A; Strong, P N

    1989-08-30

    Dendrotoxin I (DpI) from black mamba venom (Dendroaspis polylepis) has high affinity binding sites on rat brain synaptic membranes. Native DpI displaced [125I]-DpI binding with a Ki of 1 x 10(-10) M, and over 90% of specific binding was displaceable. Charybdotoxin isolated from the Israeli scorpion venom (Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus), also displaced [125I]-DpI binding, with a Ki of approximately 3 x 10(-9) M, although the displacement curve was shallower than with native DpI. Both toxins are thought to be high affinity blockers of specific K+ currents. Charybdotoxin selectively blocks some types of Ca2+-activated K+ channels, whereas dendrotoxins only block certain voltage-dependent K+ channels. The interaction between the two types of toxin at the DpI binding site is unexpected and may suggest the presence of related binding sites on different K+ channel proteins. PMID:2476127

  15. Inhibition of voltage-gated potassium channels mediates uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingying; Zhong, Xiangqin; Ding, Yaqin; Bai, Tao; Wang, Hui; Wu, Hongbin; Liu, Yunfeng; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is important to maintain glucose homeostasis and is regulated by electrical activities. Uncarboxylated osteocalcin, a bone-derived protein, has been reported to regulate glucose metabolism by increasing insulin secretion, stimulating β cell proliferation and improving insulin sensitivity. But the underlying mechanisms of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the relationship of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion and voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels, voltage-gated calcium channels in rat β cells. Insulin secretion was measured by radioimmunoassay. Channel currents and membrane action potentials were recorded using the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Calcium imaging system was used to analyze intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). The data show that under 16.7mmol/l glucose conditions uncarboxylated osteocalcin alone increased insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i, but with no such effects on insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i in the presence of a KV channel blocker, tetraethylammonium chloride. In the patch-clamp experiments, uncarboxylated osteocalcin lengthened action potential duration and significantly inhibited KV currents, but had no influence on the characteristics of voltage-gated calcium channels. These results indicate that KV channels are involved in uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells. By inhibiting KV channels, uncarboxylated osteocalcin prolongs action potential duration, increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and finally promotes insulin secretion. This finding provides new insight into the mechanisms of osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion. PMID:26927753

  16. Linalool suppresses voltage-gated currents in sensory neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Narusuye, K; Kawai, F; Matsuzaki, K; Miyachi, E

    2005-02-01

    Linalool is a major component of essential oils and possesses various biological effects in sensory or central nervous systems. To investigate the pharmacological and biophysical effects of linalool on voltage-gated currents in sensory neurons, we used the whole-cell patch clamp and the Ca(2+) imaging techniques. Under the voltage clamp, membrane depolarization generated time- and voltage-dependent current responses in newt olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). Linalool significantly and reversibly suppressed the voltage-gated currents in ORCs. The dose-suppression relation of linalool for the voltage-gated Na(+) current could be fitted by the Hill equation with a half-blocking concentration of 0.56 mM and a Hill coefficient of 1.2. To test whether linalool suppresses voltage-gated currents in ORCs specifically or suppresses currents in other neurons generally, we next examined the effects of linalool on voltage-gated currents in newt retinal neurons and rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. Linalool suppressed the voltage-gated currents not only in retinal horizontal cells and ganglion cells but also in Purkinje cells. Furthermore, bath application of linalool inhibited the KCl-induced [Ca(2+)](i) response of ORCs, suggesting that linalool suppresses Ca(2+) currents in ORCs. These results suggest that linalool non-selectively suppresses the voltage-gated currents in newt sensory neurons and rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:15365786

  17. High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Murty, B.V.

    2000-03-21

    A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

  18. High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Murty, Balarama Vempaty

    2000-01-01

    A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

  19. Two-Photon Compatibility and Single-Voxel, Single-Trial Detection of Subthreshold Neuronal Activity by a Two-Component Optical Voltage Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Ann E.; Bender, Kevin J.; Trussell, Laurence O.; Otis, Thomas S.; DiGregorio, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive measurements of neuronal activity are essential for understanding how signal processing is performed by neuronal networks. While optical strategies for making such measurements hold great promise, optical sensors generally lack the speed and sensitivity necessary to record neuronal activity on a single-trial, single-neuron basis. Here we present additional biophysical characterization and practical improvements of a two-component optical voltage sensor (2cVoS), comprised of the neuronal tracer dye, DiO, and dipicrylamine (DiO/DPA). Using laser spot illumination we demonstrate that membrane potential-dependent fluorescence changes can be obtained in a wide variety of cell types within brain slices. We show a correlation between membrane labeling and the sensitivity of the magnitude of fluorescence signal, such that neurons with the brightest membrane labeling yield the largest ΔF/F values per action potential (AP; ∼40%). By substituting a blue-shifted donor for DiO we confirm that DiO/DPA works, at least in part, via a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism. We also describe a straightforward iontophoretic method for labeling multiple neurons with DiO and show that DiO/DPA is compatible with two-photon (2P) imaging. Finally, exploiting the high sensitivity of DiO/DPA, we demonstrate AP-induced fluorescence transients (fAPs) recorded from single spines of hippocampal pyramidal neurons and single-trial measurements of subthreshold synaptic inputs to granule cell dendrites. Our findings suggest that the 2cVoS, DiO/DPA, enables optical measurements of trial-to-trial voltage fluctuations with very high spatial and temporal resolution, properties well suited for monitoring electrical signals from multiple neurons within intact neuronal networks. PMID:22870221

  20. Voltage-Dependent Gating in a “Voltage Sensor-Less” Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Harley T.; Rapedius, Markus; Kleinman, Marc J.; Baukrowitz, Thomas .; Nichols, Colin G.

    2010-01-01

    The voltage sensitivity of voltage-gated cation channels is primarily attributed to conformational changes of a four transmembrane segment voltage-sensing domain, conserved across many levels of biological complexity. We have identified a remarkable point mutation that confers significant voltage dependence to Kir6.2, a ligand-gated channel that lacks any canonical voltage-sensing domain. Similar to voltage-dependent Kv channels, the Kir6.2[L157E] mutant exhibits time-dependent activation upon membrane depolarization, resulting in an outwardly rectifying current-voltage relationship. This voltage dependence is convergent with the intrinsic ligand-dependent gating mechanisms of Kir6.2, since increasing the membrane PIP2 content saturates Po and eliminates voltage dependence, whereas voltage activation is more dramatic when channel Po is reduced by application of ATP or poly-lysine. These experiments thus demonstrate an inherent voltage dependence of gating in a “ligand-gated” K+ channel, and thereby provide a new view of voltage-dependent gating mechanisms in ion channels. Most interestingly, the voltage- and ligand-dependent gating of Kir6.2[L157E] is highly sensitive to intracellular [K+], indicating an interaction between ion permeation and gating. While these two key features of channel function are classically dealt with separately, the results provide a framework for understanding their interaction, which is likely to be a general, if latent, feature of the superfamily of cation channels. PMID:20208975

  1. Forgetting of long-term memory requires activation of NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, and calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Sachser, Ricardo Marcelo; Santana, Fabiana; Crestani, Ana Paula; Lunardi, Paula; Pedraza, Lizeth Katherine; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto; Hardt, Oliver; de Oliveira Alvares, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying memory consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction have been well characterized. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of forgetting processes remain to be elucidated. Here we used behavioral, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches to explore mechanisms controlling forgetting. We found that post-acquisition chronic inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (LVDCC), and protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), maintains long-term object location memory that otherwise would have been forgotten. We further show that NMDAR activation is necessary to induce forgetting of object recognition memory. Studying the role of NMDAR activation in the decay of the early phase of long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in the hippocampus, we found that ifenprodil infused 30 min after LTP induction in vivo blocks the decay of CA1-evoked postsynaptic plasticity, suggesting that GluN2B-containing NMDARs activation are critical to promote LTP decay. Taken together, these findings indicate that a well-regulated forgetting process, initiated by Ca2+ influx through LVDCCs and GluN2B-NMDARs followed by CaN activation, controls the maintenance of hippocampal LTP and long-term memories over time. PMID:26947131

  2. Forgetting of long-term memory requires activation of NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, and calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Sachser, Ricardo Marcelo; Santana, Fabiana; Crestani, Ana Paula; Lunardi, Paula; Pedraza, Lizeth Katherine; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto; Hardt, Oliver; Alvares, Lucas de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying memory consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction have been well characterized. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of forgetting processes remain to be elucidated. Here we used behavioral, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches to explore mechanisms controlling forgetting. We found that post-acquisition chronic inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (LVDCC), and protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), maintains long-term object location memory that otherwise would have been forgotten. We further show that NMDAR activation is necessary to induce forgetting of object recognition memory. Studying the role of NMDAR activation in the decay of the early phase of long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in the hippocampus, we found that ifenprodil infused 30 min after LTP induction in vivo blocks the decay of CA1-evoked postsynaptic plasticity, suggesting that GluN2B-containing NMDARs activation are critical to promote LTP decay. Taken together, these findings indicate that a well-regulated forgetting process, initiated by Ca(2+) influx through LVDCCs and GluN2B-NMDARs followed by CaN activation, controls the maintenance of hippocampal LTP and long-term memories over time. PMID:26947131

  3. Studies examining the relationship between the chemical structure of protoxin II and its activity on voltage gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae H; Carlin, Kevin P; Wu, Gang; Ilyin, Victor I; Musza, Laszlo L; Blake, Paul R; Kyle, Donald J

    2014-08-14

    The aqueous solution structure of protoxin II (ProTx II) indicated that the toxin comprises a well-defined inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) backbone region and a flexible C-terminal tail region, similar to previously described NaSpTx III tarantula toxins. In the present study we sought to explore the structure-activity relationship of the two regions of the ProTx II molecule. As a first step, chimeric toxins of ProTx II and PaTx I were synthesized and their biological activities on Nav1.7 and Nav1.2 channels were investigated. Other tail region modifications to this chimera explored the effects of tail length and tertiary structure on sodium channel activity. In addition, the activity of various C-terminal modifications of the native ProTx II was assayed and resulted in the identification of protoxin II-NHCH3, a molecule with greater potency against Nav1.7 channels (IC50=42 pM) than the original ProTx II. PMID:25026046

  4. Inorganic polyphosphate regulates neuronal excitability through modulation of voltage-gated channels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a highly charged polyanion capable of interacting with a number of molecular targets. This signaling molecule is released into the extracellular matrix by central astrocytes and by peripheral platelets during inflammation. While the release of polyP is associated with both induction of blood coagulation and astrocyte extracellular signaling, the role of secreted polyP in regulation of neuronal activity remains undefined. Here we test the hypothesis that polyP is an important participant in neuronal signaling. Specifically, we investigate the ability of neurons to release polyP and to induce neuronal firing, and clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms of this process by studying the action of polyP on voltage gated channels. Results Using patch clamp techniques, and primary hippocampal and dorsal root ganglion cell cultures, we demonstrate that polyP directly influences neuronal activity, inducing action potential generation in both PNS and CNS neurons. Mechanistically, this is accomplished by shifting the voltage sensitivity of NaV channel activation toward the neuronal resting membrane potential, the block KV channels, and the activation of CaV channels. Next, using calcium imaging we found that polyP stimulates an increase in neuronal network activity and induces calcium influx in glial cells. Using in situ DAPI localization and live imaging, we demonstrate that polyP is naturally present in synaptic regions and is released from the neurons upon depolarization. Finally, using a biochemical assay we demonstrate that polyP is present in synaptosomes and can be released upon their membrane depolarization by the addition of potassium chloride. Conclusions We conclude that polyP release leads to increased excitability of the neuronal membrane through the modulation of voltage gated ion channels. Together, our data establishes that polyP could function as excitatory neuromodulator in both the PNS and CNS. PMID:24886461

  5. Effect of various irrigant and autoclaving regimes on the fracture resistance of rubber dam clamps.

    PubMed

    Sutton, J; Saunders, W P

    1996-09-01

    Rubber dam clamps are known to break during clinical use in endodontics. This in-vitro study examined some of the variables which may contribute to the fracture. Stainless steel rubber dam clamps were subjected to various cleaning and autoclaving regimes and exposure to various solutions of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Each clamp was examined after four cycles of cleaning and exposure to NaOCl. During environmental exposure to NaOCl, the clamp was stressed over a perspex rod to simulate placement onto the crown of a tooth. Clamps were examined after each test cycle visually and microscopically, or immediately after breakage. Results suggested that the fractures were because of a stress corrosion cracking phenomenon. There was evidence of intergranular and transgranular cracking of the metal. Corrosion spots were seen on the surface of the clamps and fracture occurred mainly through these spots. A number of recommendations to reduce breakage of clamps have been suggested. PMID:9206417

  6. Differentiation of voltage-gated potassium current and modulation of excitability in cultured amphibian spinal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Barish, M E

    1986-01-01

    Gigaohm-seal whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques were used to study the development of ionic currents in the membrane of embryonic amphibian (Ambystoma) spinal neurones during in vitro differentiation. Dissociated neural plate cells, some of which are neuronal precursor cells, were placed into culture. Cells became excitable at the time of neurite outgrowth, 2-3 days later, and over the next 2-10 days the duration of the action potential shortened from about 100 ms to about 1 ms. Voltage-clamp recordings demonstrated that at the time of appearance of neurites, activatable Na, Ca and voltage-gated K channels were present in the membrane (Ca-dependent K channels were not studied). Over succeeding days in culture, records of total membrane current indicated that the amplitudes of peak inward and steady-state outward currents both increased. As a result of these increases, the pattern of total membrane current came to be increasingly dominated by outward currents. With inward Na and Ca currents blocked, a voltage-gated K current (IK(V] could be studied in isolation. The reversal potential of this current varied in good agreement with the equilibrium potential for K ions predicted by the Nernst relation. The wave form of IK(V) activation was sigmoidal. Activation was more rapid at more positive voltages (relative to the usual holding potential of -70 mV), and deactivation was more rapid at more negative voltages. The amplitude of IK(V) increased during neural development, while cell size remained approximately constant. Increases in rates of activation and deactivation were observed in parallel with the increase in current density. When measured at 0 mV, cells studied on day 4 of culture or earlier showed steady-state chord conductances (gK(V] of less than 20 nS, and one-half activation times (t1/2) of 2 X 5-10 ms. Older cells showed gK(V)s of 10-80 nS, and t1/2s of 0 X 8-2 X 5 ms. As Na, and to a lesser extent Ca, current amplitudes were also increasing during

  7. Enhanced brain release of erythropoietin, cytokines and NO during carotid clamping.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Stephana; Ghilardi, Giorgio; Bianciardi, Paola; Latorre, Elisa; Rubino, Federico; Bissi, Marina; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Samaja, Michele; Gorio, Alfredo

    2016-02-01

    Although effective and safe, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) implies a reduced blood flow to the brain and likely an ischemia/reperfusion event. The high rate of uneventful outcomes associated with CEA suggests the activation of brain endogenous protection mechanisms aimed at limiting the possible ischemia/reperfusion damage. This study aims at assessing whether CEA triggers protective mechanisms such as brain release of erythropoietin and nitric oxide. CEA was performed in 12 patients; blood samples were withdrawn simultaneously from the surgically exposed ipsilateral jugular and leg veins before, during (2 and 40 min) and after clamp removal (2 min). Plasma antioxidant capacity, carbonylated proteins, erythropoietin, nitrates and nitrites (NOx) were determined. No changes in intraoperative EEG, peripheral and transcranial blood oxygen saturation were detectable, and no patients showed any neurologic sign after the intervention. Antioxidant capacity and protein carbonylation in plasma were unaffected. Differently, erythropoietin, VEGF, TNF-α and NOx increased during clamping in the jugular blood (2 and 40 min), while no changes were observed in the peripheral circulation. These results show that blood erythropoietin, VEGF, TNF-α, and NOx increased in the brain during uncomplicated CEA. This may represent an endogenous self-activated neuroprotective mechanism aimed at the prevention of ischemia/reperfusion damage. PMID:26494654

  8. LRRK2 Regulates Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Cade; Sears, Catherine; Perez-Carrion, Maria; Piccoli, Giovanni; Condliffe, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels enable Ca2+ influx in response to membrane depolarization. CaV2.1 channels are localized to the presynaptic membrane of many types of neurons where they are involved in triggering neurotransmitter release. Several signaling proteins have been identified as important CaV2.1 regulators including protein kinases, G-proteins and Ca2+ binding proteins. Recently, we discovered that leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a protein associated with inherited Parkinson’s disease, interacts with specific synaptic proteins and influences synaptic transmission. Since synaptic proteins functionally interact with CaV2.1 channels and synaptic transmission is triggered by Ca2+ entry via CaV2.1, we investigated whether LRRK2 could impact CaV2.1 channel function. CaV2.1 channel properties were measured using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology in HEK293 cells transfected with CaV2.1 subunits and various LRRK2 constructs. Our results demonstrate that both wild type (wt) LRRK2 and the G2019S LRRK2 mutant caused a significant increase in whole cell Ca2+ current density compared to cells expressing only the CaV2.1 channel complex. In addition, LRRK2 expression caused a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage-dependent activation while having no significant effect on inactivation properties. These functional changes in CaV2.1 activity are likely due to a direct action of LRRK2 as we detected a physical interaction between LRRK2 and the β3 CaV channel subunit via coimmunoprecipitation. Furthermore, effects on CaV2.1 channel function are dependent on LRRK2 kinase activity as these could be reversed via treatment with a LRRK2 inhibitor. Interestingly, LRRK2 also augmented endogenous voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in PC12 cells suggesting other CaV channels could also be regulated by LRRK2. Overall, our findings support a novel physiological role for LRRK2 in regulating CaV2.1 function that could have implications for how mutations in LRRK2

  9. Voltage-gated sodium channels and cancer: is excitability their primary role?

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Sébastien; Gillet, Ludovic; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Besson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are molecular characteristics of excitable cells. Their activation, triggered by membrane depolarization, generates transient sodium currents that initiate action potentials in neurons and muscle cells. Sodium currents were discovered by Hodgkin and Huxley using the voltage clamp technique and reported in their landmark series of papers in 1952. It was only in the 1980's that sodium channel proteins from excitable membranes were molecularly characterized by Catterall and his collaborators. Non-excitable cells can also express NaV channels in physiological conditions as well as in pathological conditions. These NaV channels can sustain biological roles that are not related to the generation of action potentials. Interestingly, it is likely that the abnormal expression of NaV in pathological tissues can reflect the re-expression of a fetal phenotype. This is especially true in epithelial cancer cells for which these channels have been identified and sodium currents recorded, while it was not the case for cells from the cognate normal tissues. In cancers, the functional activity of NaV appeared to be involved in regulating the proliferative, migrative, and invasive properties of cells. This review is aimed at addressing the non-excitable roles of NaV channels with a specific emphasis in the regulation of cancer cell biology. PMID:26283962

  10. Imaging Membrane Potential with Two Types of Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungmoo; Piao, Hong Hua; Sepheri-Rad, Masoud; Jung, Arong; Sung, Uhna; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Baker, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) have improved to the point where they are beginning to be useful for in vivo recordings. While the ultimate goal is to image neuronal activity in vivo, one must be able to image activity of a single cell to ensure successful in vivo preparations. This procedure will describe how to image membrane potential in a single cell to provide a foundation to eventually image in vivo. Here we describe methods for imaging GEVIs consisting of a voltage-sensing domain fused to either a single fluorescent protein (FP) or two fluorescent proteins capable of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in vitro. Using an image splitter enables the projection of images created by two different wavelengths onto the same charge-coupled device (CCD) camera simultaneously. The image splitter positions a second filter cube in the light path. This second filter cube consists of a dichroic and two emission filters to separate the donor and acceptor fluorescent wavelengths depending on the FPs of the GEVI. This setup enables the simultaneous recording of both the acceptor and donor fluorescent partners while the membrane potential is manipulated via whole cell patch clamp configuration. When using a GEVI consisting of a single FP, the second filter cube can be removed allowing the mirrors in the image splitter to project a single image onto the CCD camera. PMID:26890551

  11. Automatic voltage imbalance detector

    DOEpatents

    Bobbett, Ronald E.; McCormick, J. Byron; Kerwin, William J.

    1984-01-01

    A device for indicating and preventing damage to voltage cells such as galvanic cells and fuel cells connected in series by detecting sequential voltages and comparing these voltages to adjacent voltage cells. The device is implemented by using operational amplifiers and switching circuitry is provided by transistors. The device can be utilized in battery powered electric vehicles to prevent galvanic cell damage and also in series connected fuel cells to prevent fuel cell damage.

  12. Determination of active doping in highly resistive boron doped silicon nanocrystals embedded in SiO2 by capacitance voltage measurement on inverted metal oxide semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tian; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; Wu, Lingfeng; Jia, Xuguang; Lin, Ziyun; Yang, Terry Chien-Jen; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the Capacitance-Voltage (CV) measurement to study the electrically active boron doping in Si nanocrystals (ncSi) embedded in SiO2. The ncSi thin films with high resistivity (200-400 Ω cm) can be measured by using an inverted metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) structure (Al/ncSi (B)/SiO2/Si). This device structure eliminates the complications from the effects of lateral current flow and the high sheet resistance in standard lateral MOS structures. The characteristic MOS CV curves observed are consistent with the effective p-type doping. The CV modeling method is presented and used to evaluate the electrically active doping concentration. We find that the highly boron doped ncSi films have electrically active doping of 1018-1019 cm-3 despite their high resistivity. The saturation of doping at about 1.4 × 1019 cm-3 and the low doping efficiency less than 5% are observed and discussed. The calculated effective mobility is in the order of 10-3 cm2/V s, indicating strong impurity/defect scattering effect that hinders carriers transport.

  13. Distinct roles of L- and T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in regulation of lymphatic vessel contractile activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stewart; Roizes, Simon; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Lymph drainage maintains tissue fluid homeostasis and facilitates immune response. It is promoted by phasic contractions of collecting lymphatic vessels through which lymph is propelled back into the blood circulation. This rhythmic contractile activity (i.e. lymphatic pumping) increases in rate with increase in luminal pressure and relies on activation of nifedipine-sensitive voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs). Despite their importance, these channels have not been characterized in lymphatic vessels. We used pressure- and wire-myography as well as intracellular microelectrode electrophysiology to characterize the pharmacological and electrophysiological properties of L-type and T-type VDCCs in rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels and evaluated their particular role in the regulation of lymphatic pumping by stretch. We complemented our study with PCR and confocal immunofluorescence imaging to investigate the expression and localization of these channels in lymphatic vessels. Our data suggest a delineating role of VDCCs in stretch-induced lymphatic vessel contractions, as the stretch-induced increase in force of lymphatic vessel contractions was significantly attenuated in the presence of L-type VDCC blockers nifedipine and diltiazem, while the stretch-induced increase in contraction frequency was significantly decreased by the T-type VDCC blockers mibefradil and nickel. The latter effect was correlated with a hyperpolarization. We propose that activation of T-type VDCCs depolarizes membrane potential, regulating the frequency of lymphatic contractions via opening of L-type VDCCs, which drive the strength of contractions. PMID:25326448

  14. Triphenylamine-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as Cathode Materials in Lithium-Ion Batteries with Coexistence of Redox Active Sites, High Working Voltage, and High Rate Stability.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhe; Yi, Xiaohui; Liu, Zixuan; Shang, Jie; Wang, Deyu

    2016-06-15

    Through rational organization of two redox active building block, a triphenylamine-based metal-organic framework (MOF) material, Cu-TCA (H3TCA = tricarboxytriphenyl amine), was synthesized and applied as a cathode active material for the first time in lithium batteries. Cu-TCA exhibited redox activity both in the metal clusters (Cu(+)/Cu(2+)) and organic ligand radicals (N/N(+)) with separated voltage plateaus and a high working potential vs Li/Li(+) up to 4.3 V, comparing with the current commercial LiCoO2 cathode materials. The electrochemical behaviors of this MOF electrode material at different states of charge were carefully studied by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photoluminescence techniques. Long cycling stability of this MOF was achieved with an average Coulombic efficiency of 96.5% for 200 cycles at a 2 C rate. Discussing the electrochemical performances on the basis of capacity contributions from the metal clusters (Cu(+)/Cu(2+)) and organic ligands (N/N(+)) proposes an alternative mechanism of capacity loss for the MOF materials used in lithium batteries. This improved understanding will shed light on the designing principle of MOF-based cathode materials for their practical application in battery sciences. PMID:27225327

  15. Stud