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Sample records for active voltage clamp

  1. Application of active electrode compensation to perform continuous voltage-clamp recordings with sharp microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-González, J. F.; Destexhe, A.; Bal, T.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Electrophysiological recordings of single neurons in brain tissues are very common in neuroscience. Glass microelectrodes filled with an electrolyte are used to impale the cell membrane in order to record the membrane potential or to inject current. Their high resistance induces a high voltage drop when passing current and it is essential to correct the voltage measurements. In particular, for voltage clamping, the traditional alternatives are two-electrode voltage-clamp technique or discontinuous single electrode voltage-clamp (dSEVC). Nevertheless, it is generally difficult to impale two electrodes in a same neuron and the switching frequency is limited to low frequencies in the case of dSEVC. We present a novel fully computer-implemented alternative to perform continuous voltage-clamp recordings with a single sharp-electrode. Approach. To reach such voltage-clamp recordings, we combine an active electrode compensation algorithm (AEC) with a digital controller (AECVC). Main results. We applied two types of control-systems: a linear controller (proportional plus integrative controller) and a model-based controller (optimal control). We compared the performance of the two methods to dSEVC using a dynamic model cell and experiments in brain slices. Significance. The AECVC method provides an entirely digital method to perform continuous recording and smooth switching between voltage-clamp, current clamp or dynamic-clamp configurations without introducing artifacts.

  2. Inner Voltage Clamping

    PubMed Central

    Feldberg, Stephen W.; Delgado, Alicia B.

    1978-01-01

    Ketterer, et al. (1971) have suggested that a combination of electrostatic and chemical interactions may cause hydrophobic ions absorbed within a bilayer lipid membrane to reside in two potential wells, each close to a membrane surface. The resulting two planes of charges would define three regions of membrane dielectric: two identical outer regions each between a plane of absorbed charges and the plane of closest approach of ions in the aqueous phase; and the inner region between the two planes of adsorbed charges. The theory describing charge translocation across the inner region is based on a simple three-capacitor model. A significant theoretical conclusion is that the difference between the voltage across the inner region, Vi, and the voltage across the entire membrane, Vm, is directly proportional to the amount of charge that has flowed in a voltage clamp experiment. We demonstrate that we can construct an “inner voltage clamp” that can maintain, with positive feedback, a constant inner voltage, Vi. The manifestation of proper feedback is that the clamp current (after a voltage step) will exhibit pure (i.e., single time-constant) exponential decay, because the voltage dependent rate constants governing translocation will be independent of time. The “pureness” of the exponential is maximized when the standard deviation of the least-square fit of the appropriate exponential equation to the experimental data is minimized. The concomitant feedback is directly related to the capacitances of the inner and outer membrane regions, Ci and Co. Experimental results with tetraphenylborate ion adsorbed in bacterial phosphatidylethanolamine/n-decane bilayers indicate Ci ∼ 5 · 10-7F/cm2 and Co ≈ 5 · 10-5F/cm2. PMID:620078

  3. Voltage-clamp frequency domain analysis of NMDA-activated neurons.

    PubMed

    Moore, L E; Hill, R H; Grillner, S

    1993-02-01

    1. Voltage and current-clamp steps were added to a sum of sine waves to measure the tetrodotoxin-insensitive membrane properties of neurons in the intact lamprey spinal cord. A systems analysis in the frequency domain was carried out on two types of cells that have very different morphologies in order to investigate the structural dependence of their electrophysiological properties. The method explicitly takes into account the geometrical shapes of (i) nearly spherical dorsal cells with one or two processes and (ii) motoneurons and interneurons that have branched dendritic structures. Impedance functions were analysed to obtain the cable properties of these in situ neurons. These measurements show that branched neurons are not isopotential and, therefore, a conventional voltage-clamp analysis is not valid. 2. The electrophysiological data from branched neurons were curve-fitted with a lumped soma-equivalent cylinder model consisting of eight equal compartments coupled to an isopotential cell body to obtain membrane parameters for both passive and active properties. The analysis provides a quantitative description of both the passive electrical properties imposed by the geometrical structure of neurons and the voltage-dependent ionic conductances determined by ion channel kinetics. The model fitting of dorsal cells was dominated by a one-compartment resistance and capacitance in parallel (RC) corresponding to the spherical, non-branched shape of these cells. Branched neurons required a model that contained both an RC compartment and a cable that reflected the structure of the cells. At rest, the electrotonic length of the cable was about two. Uniformly distributed voltage-dependent ionic conductance sites were adequate to describe the data at different membrane potentials. 3. The frequency domain admittance method in conjunction with a step voltage clamp was used to control and measure the oscillatory behavior induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on lamprey spinal

  4. High spatial resolution single multiwalled carbon nanotube electrode for stimulation, recording, and whole cell voltage clamping of electrically active cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Asis, Edward D.; Leung, Joseph; Wood, Sally; Nguyen, Cattien V.

    2009-10-01

    We report the stimulation, recording, and voltage clamp of muscle fibers using a 30 nm diameter single multiwalled carbon nanotube electrode (sMWNT electrode) tip. Because of the lower access resistance, the sMWNT electrode conducts extracellular and intracellular stimulation more efficiently compared to glass micropipettes. The sMWNT electrode records field potentials and action potentials and performs whole cell voltage clamping of single fibers.

  5. Fast activating voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium (BK) conductance promotes bursting in pituitary cells: a dynamic clamp study

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, Joël; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Gonzalez-Iglesias, Arturo E.; Milescu, Lorin S.; Bertram, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The electrical activity pattern of endocrine pituitary cells regulates their basal secretion level. Rat somatotrophs and lactotrophs exhibit spontaneous bursting and have high basal levels of hormone secretion, while gonadotrophs exhibit spontaneous spiking and have low basal hormone secretion. It has been proposed that the difference in electrical activity between bursting somatotrophs and spiking gonadotrophs is due to the presence of large conductance potassium (BK) channels on somatotrophs but not on gonadotrophs. This is one example where the role of an ion channel type may be clearly established. We demonstrate here that BK channels indeed promote bursting activity in pituitary cells. Blocking BK channels in bursting lacto-somatotroph GH4C1 cells changes their firing activity to spiking, while further adding an artificial BK conductance via dynamic clamp restores bursting. Importantly, this burst-promoting effect requires a relatively fast BK activation/deactivation, as predicted by computational models. We also show that adding a fast activating BK conductance to spiking gonadotrophs converts the activity of these cells to bursting. Together, our results suggest that differences in BK channel expression may underlie the differences in electrical activity and basal hormone secretion levels among pituitary cell types and that the rapid rate of BK channel activation is key to its role in burst promotion. PMID:22090511

  6. Extracellular potassium accumulation in voltage-clamped frog ventricular muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cleemann, L; Morad, M

    1979-01-01

    1. Application of voltage clamp pulses (1--10 sec) to frog ventricular strips causes temporary changes in the extracellular K concentration. 2. The changes in the extracellular K concentration can be estimated from (a) slowly decaying post-clamp after-potentials, (b) changes in the action potential duration, and (c) measurements with a K-selective micro-electrode. 3. The depolarization of the resting potential and the shortening of the action potential are present in approximately the same proportions during voltage-clamp induced extracellular K accumulation and during perfusion with a K-ricn Ringer solution but small consistent differences are noticed. 4. The measurements of the after-potential, the action potential shortening, and the K-electrode response were analysed as indicators of extracellular K+ activity and it was concluded that the after-potential provides the most convenient and reliable estimate of the absolute magnitude of the voltage-clamp induced extracellular K accumulation. 5. The depolarizing after-potentials decay more slowly than the hyperpolarizing after-potentials but it is found that this reflects the selectivity of the membrane to K+ concentrations as predicted by the Nernst or the Goldman equations. 6. Analysis of the redistribution of accumulated K+ from the decay of the after-potential suggests that the major part of the redistribution process can be described by a single time constant (2--4 sec). A much longer time constant is required for a smaller component of the 'tail' in order to bring [K]o to the normal resting state. 7. N-shaped relations similar to the 'steady state' current-voltage relation are obtained when the post-clamp after-potential, the action potential shortening, and the K-electrode response are plotted versus the clamped membrane potential. The maxima of these curves are located around -40 mV and the minima around -20 mV. 8. In spite of a significant outward membrane current (1--1.5 microamperemeter) in the minimum

  7. Potassium Chloride Versus Voltage Clamp Contractures in Ventricular Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morad, M.; Reeck, S.; Rao, M.

    1981-01-01

    In frog ventricle, developed tension was markedly larger in response to depolarization caused by a voltage clamp step than to depolarization induced by high concentrations of potassium chloride. Measurement of extracellular potassium activity at the surface and at the depth of muscle during the development of contractures showed that the diffusion of potassium is much slower than the spread of depolarization through the cross section of muscle. These two observations suggest that competition between the depolarizing and the negative inotropic effects of an increase in the extracellular potassium ion concentration may determine the time course and magnitude of contractile tension in heart muscle.

  8. Axon voltage-clamp simulations. I. Methods and tests.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J W; Ramón, F; Joyner, R W

    1975-01-01

    This is the first in a series of four papers in which we present the numerical simulation of the application of the voltage clamp technique to excitable cells. In this paper we describe the application of the Crank-Nicolson (1947) method for the solution of the parabolic partial differential equations that describe a cylindrical cell in which the ionic conductances are functions of voltage and time (Hodgkin and Huxley, 1952). This method is compared with other methods in terms of accuracy and speed of solution for a propagated action potential. In addition, differential equations representing a simple voltage-clamp electronic circuit are presented. Using the voltage clamp circuit equations, we simulate the voltage clamp of a single isopotential membrane patch and show how the parameters of the circuit affect the transient response of the patch to a step change in the control potential.The stimulation methods presented in this series of papers allow the evaluation of voltage clamp control of an excitable cell or a syncytium of excitable cells. To the extent that membrane parameters and geometrical factors can be determined, the methods presented here provide solutions for the voltage profile as a function of time. PMID:1174640

  9. Sources of errors in different single-electrode voltage-clamp techniques: a computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sala, F; Sala, S

    1994-08-01

    The use of voltage clamp with a single electrode has been useful in estimating kinetic parameters for a number of ionic whole-cell currents. There are two main types of such a technique: discontinuous voltage clamp (dSEVC) (Brennecke and Lindemann, 1974), and continuous voltage clamp (cSEVC) (Hamill et al., 1981). We have studied, by means of computer simulations, the performance of both types of clamp on estimating activation kinetics parameters of a typical neuronal Ca2+ current. Deviations from the theoretical values are shown to be sensitive on both set-up and cell properties. Both types of clamp are shown to lose voltage control when either access resistance or absolute membrane conductance are increased. In contrast, changes in membrane capacitance affect differently to the estimates obtained by the two types of clamp. Cell size is also shown to affect cSEVC performance but not that of dSEVC. The nature and magnitude of errors obtained by using both types of clamp in different situations are discussed.

  10. An improved vaseline gap voltage clamp for skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    A Vaseline gap potentiometric recording and voltage clamp method is developed for frog skeletal muscle fibers. The method is based on the Frankenhaeuser-Dodge voltage clamp for myelinated nerve with modifications to improve the frequency response, to compensate for external series resistance, and to compensate for the complex impedance of the current-passing pathway. Fragments of single muscle fibers are plucked from the semitendinosus muscle and mounted while depolarized by a solution like CsF. After Vaseline seals are formed between fluid pools, the fiber ends are cut once again, the central region is rinsed with Ringer solution, and the feedback amplifiers are turned on. Errors in the potential and current records are assessed by direct measurements with microelectrodes. The passive properties of the preparation are simulated by the "disk" equivalent circuit for the transverse tubular system and the derived parameters are similar to previous measurements with microelectrodes. Action potentials at 5 degrees C are long because of the absence of delayed rectification. Their shape is approximately simulated by solving the disk model with sodium permeability in the surface and tubular membranes. Voltage clamp currents consist primarily of capacity currents and sodium currents. The peak inward sodium current density at 5 degrees C is 3.7 mA/cm2. At 5 degrees C the sodium currents are smoothly graded with increasing depolarization and free of notches suggesting good control of the surface membrane. At higher temperatures a small, late extra inward current appears for small depolarizations that has the properties expected for excitation in the transverse tubular system. Comparison of recorded currents with simulations shows that while the transverse tubular system has regenerative sodium currents, they are too small to make important errors in the total current recorded at the surface under voltage clamp at low temperature. The tubules are definitely not under voltage

  11. Cell-attached voltage-clamp and current-clamp recording and stimulation techniques in brain slices.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Katherine L

    2006-06-30

    Cell-attached recording provides a way to record the activity of - and to stimulate - neurons in brain slices without rupturing the cell membrane. This review uses theory and experimental data to address the proper application of this technique and the correct interpretation of the data. Voltage-clamp mode is best-suited for recording cell firing activity, and current-clamp mode is best-suited for recording resting membrane potential and synaptic potentials. The magnitude of the seal resistance determines what types of experiments can be accomplished with a cell-attached recording: a loose seal is adequate for recording action potential currents, and a tight seal is required for evoking action potentials in the attached cell and for recording resting and synaptic potentials. When recording action potential currents, if the researcher does not want to change the firing activity of the cell, then it is important that no current passes from the amplifier through the patch resistance. In order to accomplish this condition, the recording pipette should be held at the potential that gives a holding current of 0. An advantage of cell-attached current-clamp over whole-cell recording is that it accurately depicts whether a synaptic potential is hyperpolarizing or depolarizing without the risk of changing its polarity.

  12. VOLTAGE CLAMP BEHAVIOR OF IRON-NITRIC ACID SYSTEM AS COMPARED WITH THAT OF NERVE MEMBRANE

    PubMed Central

    Tasaki, I.; Bak, A. F.

    1959-01-01

    The current-voltage relation for the surface layer of an iron wire immersed in nitric acid was investigated by the voltage clamp technique. Comparing the phase of nitric acid to the axoplasm and the metallic phase to the external fluid medium for the nerve fiber, a striking analogy was found between the voltage clamp behavior of the iron-nitric acid system and that of the nerve membrane. The current voltage curve was found to consist of three parts: (a) a straight line representing the behavior of the resting (passive) membrane, (b) a straight line representing the fully excited (active) state, and (c) an intermediate zone connecting (a) and (b). It was shown that in the intermediate zone, the surface of iron consisted of a fully active patch (or patches) surrounded by a remaining resting area. The phenomenon corresponding to "repetitive firing of responses under voltage clamp" in the nerve membrane was demonstrated in the intermediate zone. The behavior of the cobalt electrode system was also investigated by the same technique. An attempt was made to interpret the phenomenon of initiation and abolition of an active potential on the basis of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. PMID:13654740

  13. Modeling CICR in rat ventricular myocytes: voltage clamp studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The past thirty-five years have seen an intense search for the molecular mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcium-release (CICR) in cardiac myocytes, with voltage clamp (VC) studies being the leading tool employed. Several VC protocols including lowering of extracellular calcium to affect Ca2+ loading of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and administration of blockers caffeine and thapsigargin have been utilized to probe the phenomena surrounding SR Ca2+ release. Here, we develop a deterministic mathematical model of a rat ventricular myocyte under VC conditions, to better understand mechanisms underlying the response of an isolated cell to calcium perturbation. Motivation for the study was to pinpoint key control variables influencing CICR and examine the role of CICR in the context of a physiological control system regulating cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]myo). Methods The cell model consists of an electrical-equivalent model for the cell membrane and a fluid-compartment model describing the flux of ionic species between the extracellular and several intracellular compartments (cell cytosol, SR and the dyadic coupling unit (DCU), in which resides the mechanistic basis of CICR). The DCU is described as a controller-actuator mechanism, internally stabilized by negative feedback control of the unit's two diametrically-opposed Ca2+ channels (trigger-channel and release-channel). It releases Ca2+ flux into the cyto-plasm and is in turn enclosed within a negative feedback loop involving the SERCA pump, regulating[Ca2+]myo. Results Our model reproduces measured VC data published by several laboratories, and generates graded Ca2+ release at high Ca2+ gain in a homeostatically-controlled environment where [Ca2+]myo is precisely regulated. We elucidate the importance of the DCU elements in this process, particularly the role of the ryanodine receptor in controlling SR Ca2+ release, its activation by trigger Ca2+, and its refractory characteristics

  14. Stoichiometry and voltage dependence of the sodium pump in voltage- clamped, internally dialyzed squid giant axon

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The stoichiometry and voltage dependence of the Na/K pump were studied in internally dialyzed, voltage-clamped squid giant axons by simultaneously measuring, at various membrane potentials, the changes in Na efflux (delta phi Na) and holding current (delta I) induced by dihydrodigitoxigenin (H2DTG). H2DTG stops the Na/K pump without directly affecting other current pathways: (a) it causes no delta I when the pump lacks Na, K, Mg, or ATP, and (b) ouabain causes no delta I or delta phi Na in the presence of saturating H2DTG. External K (Ko) activates Na efflux with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 0.45 +/- 0.06 mM [SEM]) in Na-free seawater (SW), but with sigmoid kinetics in approximately 400 mM Na SW (Hill coefficient = 1.53 +/- 0.08, K1/2 = 3.92 +/- 0.29 mM). H2DTG inhibits less strongly (Ki = 6.1 +/- 0.3 microM) in 1 or 10 mM K Na-free SW than in 10 mM K, 390 mM Na SW (1.8 +/- 0.2 microM). Dialysis with 5 mM each ATP, phosphoenolpyruvate, and phosphoarginine reduced Na/Na exchange to at most 2% of the H2DTG- sensitive Na efflux. H2DTG sensitive but nonpump current caused by periaxonal K accumulation upon stopping the pump, was minimized by the K channel blockers 3,4-diaminopyridine (1 mM), tetraethylammonium (approximately 200 mM), and phenylpropyltriethylammonium (20-25 mM) whose adequacy was tested by varying [K]o (0-10 mM) with H2DTG present. Two ancillary clamp circuits suppressed stray current from the axon ends. Current and flux measured from the center pool derive from the same membrane area since, over the voltage range -60 to +20 mV, tetrodotoxin-sensitive current and Na efflux into Na-free SW, under K- free conditions, were equal. The stoichiometry and voltage dependence of pump Na/K exchange were examined at near-saturating [ATP], [K]o and [Na]i in both Na-free and 390 mM Na SW. The H2DTG-sensitive F delta phi Na/delta I ratio (F is Faraday's constant) of paired measurements corrected for membrane area match, was 2.86 +/- 0.09 (n = 8) at 0 mV and 3

  15. An analysis of the dose-response relationship at voltage-clamped frog neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, V E; Steinbach, J H; Stevens, C F

    1978-01-01

    1. Frog neuromuscular junctions were viewed with Nomarski optics and voltage clamped. Agonist was applied ionophoretically and agonist concentrations were measured using a micro-electrode sensitive to quaternary amines. 2. The dose-response relationship was studied using the agonists carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine and hydroxyphenyl-propyltrimethylammonium. 3. With all of these agonists, it appeared that the ACh receptor could be active when either one or two agonist binding sites were occupied. The receptor was much more likely to be active when both sites were occupied. Agonist dissociation constants and receptor activation probabilities were estimated by non-linear regression techniques for several possible receptor activation schemes. PMID:309004

  16. Voltage clamp methods for the study of membrane currents and SR Ca2+ release in adult skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Schneider, Martin F.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (E-C)1 coupling is a process composed of multiple sequential stages, by which an action potential triggers sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)2 Ca2+ release and subsequent contractile activation. The various steps in the E-C coupling process in skeletal muscle can be studied using different techniques. The simultaneous recordings of sarcolemmal electrical signals and the accompanying elevation in myoplasmic Ca2+, due to depolarization-initiated SR Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle fibres, have been useful to obtain a better understanding of muscle function. In studying the origin and mechanism of voltage dependency of E-C coupling a variety of different techniques have been used to control the voltage in adult skeletal fibres. Pioneering work in muscles isolated from amphibians or crustaceans used microelectrodes or ‘high resistance gap’ techniques to manipulate the voltage in the muscle fibres. The development of the patch clamp technique and its variant, the whole-cell clamp configuration that facilitates the manipulation of the intracellular environment, allowed the use of the voltage clamp techniques in different cell types, including skeletal muscle fibres. The aim of this article is to present an historical perspective of the voltage clamp methods used to study skeletal muscle E-C coupling as well as to describe the current status of using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in studies in which the electrical and Ca2+ signalling properties of mouse skeletal muscle membranes are being investigated. PMID:22306655

  17. Voltage clamp measurements of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current I(f) in single cells from rabbit sino-atrial node.

    PubMed Central

    van Ginneken, A C; Giles, W

    1991-01-01

    1. The kinetics and ion transfer characteristics of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current, I(f), have been studied in single cells obtained by enzymatic dispersion from the rabbit sino-atrial (S-A) node. These experiments were done to assess the role of I(f) in the generation of the pacemaker depolarization in the S-A node. 2. The activation and the deactivation of I(f) in these single cells are accompanied by significant conductance increases and decreases respectively, confirming earlier findings from multicellular man-made strips of rabbit S-A node, and from mammalian Purkinje fibres. 3. The steady-state activation of I(f) lies between -40 and -120 mV, and its voltage dependence can be described by a Boltzmann relation with the half-activation point at approximately -70 mV. 4. The delay or sigmoidicity in both the onset of I(f) and the deactivation of the tail currents can be accounted for semi-quantitatively by using a second-order Hodgkin-Huxley kinetic scheme. 5. The reversal potential for I(f) is -24 +/- 2 mV (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 6). It does not change significantly as a function of the amount of I(f) which is activated, indicating that ion accumulation or depletion phenomena are not important variables controlling the time course of I(f), or its selectivity. 6. The fully-activated current-voltage relationship for I(f) is approximately linear with a slope conductance of 12.0 +/- 0.88 nS per cell (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 6). 7. A simple mathematical model based on the measured values of maximum conductance, reversal potential, and kinetics of I(f) has been developed to simulate the size and time course of I(f) during typical spontaneous pacemaker activity in rabbit sino-atrial node cells. The calculations show that I(f) can change significantly during pacing and suggest that this current change is, at least in part, responsible for the pacemaker depolarization. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1708824

  18. Solutions for transients in arbitrarily branching cables: III. Voltage clamp problems.

    PubMed Central

    Major, G

    1993-01-01

    Branched cable voltage recording and voltage clamp analytical solutions derived in two previous papers are used to explore practical issues concerning voltage clamp. Single exponentials can be fitted reasonably well to the decay phase of clamped synaptic currents, although they contain many underlying components. The effective time constant depends on the fit interval. The smoothing effects on synaptic clamp currents of dendritic cables and series resistance are explored with a single cylinder + soma model, for inputs with different time courses. "Soma" and "cable" charging currents cannot be separated easily when the soma is much smaller than the dendrites. Subtractive soma capacitance compensation and series resistance compensation are discussed. In a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurone model, voltage control at most dendritic sites is extremely poor. Parameter dependencies are illustrated. The effects of series resistance compound those of dendritic cables and depend on the "effective capacitance" of the cell. Plausible combinations of parameters can cause order-of-magnitude distortions to clamp current waveform measures of simulated Schaeffer collateral inputs. These voltage clamp problems are unlikely to be solved by the use of switch clamp methods. PMID:8369450

  19. A fast transient outward current in the rat sympathetic neurone studied under voltage-clamp conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Belluzzi, O; Sacchi, O; Wanke, E

    1985-01-01

    Post-ganglionic neurones of the isolated rat superior cervical ganglion were voltage clamped at 37 degrees C using separate intracellular voltage and current micro-electrodes. Control experiments in current clamp suggested that the neurone is electrotonically compact, the soma and the proximal dendritic membranes being under good spatial voltage uniformity. Depolarizing voltage steps from membrane potentials near -50 mV evoked: (i) a voltage-dependent inward Na+ current, (ii) an inward Ca2+ current, (iii) a voltage-dependent outward K+ current, (iv) a Ca2+-activated K+ outward current. Depolarizations from holding potentials more negative than -60 mV elicited, besides the currents mentioned above, a fast transient outward current IA which peaked in 1-2.5 ms and then decayed to zero following an exponential time course. The IA current was shown to be primarily, if not exclusively, carried by K+. It was unaffected by removal of external Ca2+ or addition of Cd2+ and was weakly blocked by tetraethylammonium ions and partially by 4-aminopyridine. The IA current showed a linear instantaneous current-voltage relationship. Its activation ranged from -60 to 0 mV with a mid-point at -30 mV. The A conductance could be described in terms of a simple Boltzmann distribution for a single gating particle with a valency of +3. Both the development and removal of inactivation followed a single exponential time course with a voltage-dependent time constant which was large near the resting potential (42 ms at -70 mV) and small (11 ms) near -100 and -40 mV. Steady-state inactivation h infinity ranged from -100 to -50 mV, with a mid-point at -78 mV, suggesting that approximately 50% of the IA channels are available at the physiological resting potential. Action potentials elicited from various holding potentials showed maximal repolarization rates dependent on the holding potential itself. This voltage dependence was found to be in reasonably good agreement with that of h infinity curve

  20. Barbiturates block sodium and potassium conductance increases in voltage-clamped lobster axons.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, M P

    1968-03-01

    Sodium pentobarbital and sodium thiopental decrease both the peak initial (Na) and late steady-state (K) currents and reduce the maximum sodium and potassium conductance increases in voltage-clamped lobster giant axons. These barbiturates also slow the rate at which the sodium conductance turns on, and shift the normalized sodium conductance vs. voltage curves in the direction of depolarization along the voltage axis. Since pentobarbital (pK(a) = 8.0) blocks the action potential more effectively at pH 8.5 than at pH 6.7, the anionic form of the drug appears to be active. The data suggest that these drugs affect the axon membrane directly, rather than secondarily through effects on intermediary metabolism. It is suggested that penetration of the lipid layer of the membrane by the nonpolar portion of the barbiturate molecules may cause the decrease in membrane conductances, while electrostatic interactions involving the anionic group on the barbiturate, divalent cations, and "fixed charges" in the membrane could account for the slowing of the rate of sodium conductance turn-on and the shift of the normalized conductance curves along the voltage axis.

  1. Ultraviolet photoalteration of ion channels in voltage-clamped lobster giant axons.

    PubMed

    Oxford, G S; Pooler, J P

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of the ultraviolet light-induced changes in ionic conductances of lobster giant axon membranes has been carried out using the double sucrose gap voltage-clamp technique. The predominant effect of monochromatic light from a xenon arc source in the 255 to 305 nm region is an irreversible reduction in the magnitude of sodium conductance, without change in sodium channel activation or inactivation kinetics. A considerably smaller reduction in the magnitude of potassium conductance occurs, with some slowing of potassium channel activation kinetics. Leakage conductance is essentially not altered. The fall in sodium conductance follows an exponential time course toward a zero asymptote. The rate constant for conductance decrease was used as an assay for the wavelength dependence. The sodium conductance was maximally sensitive at 290 nm. It is suggested that individual sodium channels are closed upon absorption of single photons by aromatic amino acid residues in membrane proteins.

  2. Voltage-clamp studies of transient inward current and mechanical oscillations induced by ouabain in ferret papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Karagueuzian, H S; Katzung, B G

    1982-06-01

    1. We studied the effects of a toxic concentration of ouabain on transmembrane electrical activity and on mechanical behaviour of right ventricular papillary muscles from ferrets in a single sucrose-gap using current clamp and voltage clamp.2. Ouabain (1.4-1.8 muM) induced oscillatory after-potentials and after-concentrations in current-clamp experiments. Voltage clamp showed that the oscillatory after-potential was caused by a transient inward current, similar to that in Purkinje fibres.3. The transient current had a sigmoidal dependence on the preceding (activating) voltage step V1, with a treshold around -13 mV and a plateau between +10 and 20 mV. There was a decline in current amplitude for more positive clamps. When activated by a fixed V1 voltage step, and measured at different repolarization levels V2, the transient current manifested an inverse dependence on V2 between -50 and -10 mV. No outward transient current could be detected. Total replacement of Na in the bathing medium by Tris or by sucrose abolished the transient current.4. Ouabain caused an increase of phasic (twitch) tension responses to voltage steps at all potentials without shifting the curve relating these variables on the voltage axis. The drug evoked an even greater increase in the tonic tension responses.5. After prolonged exposure, oscillatory mechanical responses were frequently recorded during positive voltage steps. Unlike the after-contraction, these mechanical fluctuations were not consistently damped and were not accompanied by detectable synchronous current fluctuations. Catecholamines and dibutyryl cyclic AMP markedly reduced the amplitude of the tonic contraction and the mechanical oscillations but increased their frequency. Caffeine had no effect on the tonic contraction amplitude but abolished the fluctuations.6. These results support the proposal that Ca is transiently released from the overloaded sarcoplasmic reticulum in ouabain-intoxicated muscle and may evoke oscillatory

  3. Characterization of heterologously expressed transporter genes by patch- and voltage-clamp methods: application to cyclic nucleotide-dependent responses.

    PubMed

    Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad; Ali, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    The application of patch- and voltage-clamp methods to study ion transport can be limited by many -hurdles: the size of the cells to be patched and/or stabbed, the subcellular localization of the molecule of interest, and its density of expression that could be too low even in their own native environment. Functional expression of genes using recombinant DNA technology not only overcomes those hurdles but also affords additional and elegant investigations such as single-point mutation studies and subunit -associations/regulations. In this chapter, we give a step-by-step description of two electrophysiological methods, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC), that are routinely used in combination with heterologous gene expression to assist researchers interested in the identification and characterization of ion transporters. We describe how to (1) obtain and maintain the cells suitable for the use with each of the above-mentioned methods (i.e., HEK-293 cells and yeast spheroplasts to use with the patch-clamp methodology and Xenopus laevis oocytes with TEVC), (2) transfect/inject them with the gene of interest, and (3) record ion transport activities.

  4. Excitation-contraction coupling in voltage clamped uterine smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mironneau, Jean

    1973-01-01

    1. The relationship between ionic currents and contraction has been investigated in uterine strips of pregnant rat by means of a double sucrose gap apparatus combined with an optical method which permits the measurement of the contraction of the small muscular bundle where potential and current are recorded. 2. Effects of duration, size and frequency of imposed potentials upon contraction have been studied. The uterine muscle shows summation and tetanus phenomena. Tension elicited by depolarizing pulses of different durations and amplitudes can be considered as made of two components. 3. The first component of the contraction evoked by short depolarizing steps (about 50 ms) depends on the slow inward current. This contraction is abolished by manganese and lanthanum ions and by compound D 600. The amplitude of the tension can be related to the external calcium concentration and consequently to the calcium influx. The slow inward current is supposed to release a part of the bound calcium without excluding, however, a direct activation of myofibrils. 4. The second component of the contraction is observed in manganese containing solution with depolarizations longer than 200 ms and without inward current. Such a component of tension suggests the possibility of release of calcium from intracellular stores which could be located in the sarcoplasmic membrane of the uterine smooth muscle. PMID:4796671

  5. The Anion Paradox in Sodium Taste Reception: Resolution by Voltage-Clamp Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qing; Heck, Gerard L.; Desimone, John A.

    1991-11-01

    Sodium salts are potent taste stimuli, but their effectiveness is markedly dependent on the anion, with chloride yielding the greatest response. The cellular mechanisms that mediate this phenomenon are not known. This "anion paradox" has been resolved by considering the field potential that is generated by restricted electrodiffusion of the anion through paracellular shunts between taste-bud cells. Neural responses to sodium chloride, sodium acetate, and sodium gluconate were studied while the field potential was voltage-clamped. Clamping at electronegative values eliminated the anion effect, whereas clamping at electropositive potentials exaggerated it. Thus, field potentials across the lingual epithelium modulate taste reception, indicating that the functional unit of taste reception includes the taste cell and its paracellular microenvironment.

  6. Voltage- and space-clamp errors associated with the measurement of electrotonically remote synaptic events.

    PubMed

    Spruston, N; Jaffe, D B; Williams, S H; Johnston, D

    1993-08-01

    1. The voltage- and space-clamp errors associated with the use of a somatic electrode to measure current from dendritic synapses are evaluated using both equivalent-cylinder and morphologically realistic models of neuronal dendritic trees. 2. As a first step toward understanding the properties of synaptic current distortion under voltage-clamp conditions, the attenuation of step and sinusoidal voltage changes are evaluated in equivalent cylinder models. Demonstration of the frequency-dependent attenuation of voltage in the cable is then used as a framework for understanding the distortion of synaptic currents generated at sites remote from the somatic recording electrode and measured in the voltage-clamp recording configuration. 3. Increases in specific membrane resistivity (Rm) are shown to reduce steady-state voltage attenuation, while producing only minimal reduction in attenuation of transient voltage changes. Experimental manipulations that increase Rm therefore improve the accuracy of estimates of reversal potential for electrotonically remote synapses, but do not significantly reduce the attenuation of peak current. In addition, increases in Rm have the effect of slowing the kinetics of poorly clamped synaptic currents. 4. The effects of the magnitude of the synaptic conductance and its kinetics on the measured synaptic currents are also examined and discussed. The error in estimating parameters from measured synaptic currents is greatest for synapses with fast kinetics and large conductances. 5. A morphologically realistic model of a CA3 pyramidal neuron is used to demonstrate the generality of the conclusions derived from equivalent cylinder models. The realistic model is also used to fit synaptic currents generated by stimulation of mossy fiber (MF) and commissural/associational (C/A) inputs to CA3 neurons and to estimate the amount of distortion of these measured currents. 6. Anatomic data from the CA3 pyramidal neuron model are used to construct a

  7. Action of certain tropine esters on voltage-clamped lobster axon.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, M P

    1968-03-01

    Tropine p-tolylacetate (TPTA) and its quaternary analogue, tropine p-tolylacetate methiodide (TPTA MeI) decrease the early transient (Na) and late (K) currents in the voltage-clamped lobster giant axon. These agents, which block the nerve action potential, reduce the maximum Na and K conductance increases associated with membrane depolarization. They also slow the rate at which the sodium conductance is increased and shift the (normalized) membrane conductance vs. voltage curves in the direction of depolarization along the voltage axis. All these effects are qualitatively similar to those resulting from the action of procaine on the voltage-clamped axon. One unusual effect of the tropine esters, noticeable particularly at large depolarization steps, is that they cause the late, K current to reach a peak and then fall off with increasing pulse duration. This effect has not been reported to occur as a result of procaine action. Tropine p-chlorophenyl acetate (TPClphiA), which differs from TPTA only by the substitution of a p-Cl for a p-CH(3) group on the benzene ring, had a negligible effect on axonal excitability.

  8. Voltage-clamp predictions by gompertz kinetics model relating squid-axon Na+-gating and ionic currents.

    PubMed

    Easton, Dexter M

    2005-10-01

    Gompertz kinetics is a simple, realistic, accurate, and computationally parsimonious alternative for prediction of macroscopic changes in Na+ conductance during voltage clamp. Conductance delay and time course depend on initial amplitudes and decay rates of surrogates for the macroscopic gating currents. The model is tested by the fit to published data of other authors. The proposed physical basis for the model is that membrane potential perturbation triggers motion of charged "gating" components of the axon membrane at rapid (activating) and at slow (inactivating) rates. The resulting distortion increases and more slowly diminishes the probability that conduction channels will be open.

  9. Measurement of Outer Hair Cell Electromotility Using a Fast Voltage Clamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Michael G.; Fettiplace, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Isolated outer hair cells from rat pups (P9-P16) were voltage clamped using the whole-cell recording technique, and changes in cell length in response to step voltage changes were measured using a photodiode pair. Cell length changes were rapid and could be reasonably well fitted by single exponential functions with time constants around 0.1-0.2 ms, although particularly with larger steps double exponentials gave a better fit. Replacement of intracellular chloride by sulphate shifted the voltage-dependence of the motility to more depolarised potentials but did not alter the time course of the length changes. Exposure to low calcium (0.1 mM) solution, with or without 0.2 mM dihydrostreptomycin, also had no obvious effect on the time course of motility.

  10. Numerical analysis of the voltage-clamp technique applied to frog neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, M E; Sevcik, C; Parthe, V

    1982-01-01

    The nonlinear cable equation was solved numerically by means of an implicit procedure. The correlation between end-plate length and fiber diameter was determined in frog (Rana pipiens) sartorius muscles stained with gold chloride (Löwit, 1875). The diameter of the fibers stained by the Löwit method was 80 (74-85) micron (median and its 95% confidence interval for 52 fibers), the length of the end plates in the same fibers was 382 (353-417) micron. The fibers simulated were 80 micron in diameter. To solve the equation the muscle fibers were represented by 500 segments 20 micron long, and the equation was solved in steps of 10 microseconds; a double exponential function was incorporated to the first seven segments to represent the neuromuscular junction. The potential of the first segment of the cable was set to the clamping level and the membrane potential of the remaining segments calculated. The current needed to hold the first segment was estimated by adding the current flowing through the first segment to the current flowing from it to the second segment. Our results indicate that the lack of space clamp in the point voltage-clamp studies of the frog neuromuscular junction introduces serious errors in the estimates of the end-plate conductance value, the kinetics of the conductance changes, and the reversal potential of the end-plate currents. The possibility of an efficient voltage-clamp technique is also explored. Our calculations suggest that the study of end-plate current and conductance is possible with little error if the end-plate potential is controlled at both ends of the synaptic area simultaneously. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:6981435

  11. Simultaneous measurement of changes in current and tracer flux in voltage-clamped squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, R F

    1989-04-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous measurement of changes in membrane current and unidirectional radiotracer flux in internally dialyzed voltage-clamped squid giant axons. The small currents that are produced by electrogenic transport processes or steady-state ionic currents can be resolved using this method. Because the use of grounded guard electrodes in the end pools is not, by itself, an adequate means of eliminating end-effects, two ancillary end pool clamp circuits are described to eliminate extraneous current flow from the ends of the axon. The end pool voltage-clamp circuits serve to minimize net current flow between the end pools and center pool, and employ stable, low-impedance calomel electrodes to monitor the potentials of the end and center pools. The adequacy of the method is demonstrated by experiments in which unidirectional 22Na efflux and current, flowing through tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na channels into Na-free seawater, under K-free conditions, are shown to be equal. The equality of unidirectional TTX-sensitive flux and current is maintained over the entire range of membrane potentials examined (-60 to +20 mV). The method has been applied to a series of experiments in which the voltage dependence and stoichiometry of the Na/K pump have been measured (Rakowski et al., 1989), and can be applied in general to the simultaneous measurement of changes in current and flux of other electrogenic transport processes, and of currents through ionic channels that open under steady-state conditions.

  12. Nile blue fluorescence signals from cut single muscle fibers under voltage or current clamp conditions

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    A method is presented for recording extrinsic optical signals from segments of single skeletal muscle fibers under current or voltage clamp conditions. Such segments, which are cut from intact fibers, are maintained in a relaxed state, while exhbiting otherwise normal physiological properties, including healthy delayed rectifier currents. Extrinsic fluorescence changes are demonstrated, using the permeant potentiometric probe, Nile Blue A. These changes vary nonlinearly with the controlled surface membrane potential, in a manner which suggests that they arise from potential changes in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. According to this interpretation, a simple model based on the gating charge movement implicated in excitation-contraction coupling, provides a self-consistent description of the voltage dependence of the signal that requires no additional parameters. PMID:310445

  13. Voltage-dependent facilitation of Ca2+ entry in voltage-clamped, aequorin-injected molluscan neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, R; Tillotson, D; Ridgway, E B

    1977-01-01

    Voltage-clamp experiments were performed on giant neurons of the nudibranch Anisodoris nobilis injected with the Ca-sensitive photoprotein, aequorin. Depolarization beyond -10 to +5 m V produced an aequorin signal, the amplitude of which depended on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration, the amplitude of the depolarization, and its duration. In paired pulse experiments, the amplitude of the aequorin signal produced in response to the second of two identical depolarizing pulses was larger than that produced during the first, resulting from an increased entry of Ca2+ during the second pulse. The increment in Ca conductance inferred from the augmented signal during the second pulse was independent of Ca2+ influx during the first pulse but, instead, was related to the amplitude and duration of the first pulse. PMID:266215

  14. Supercharging accelerates T-tubule membrane potential changes in voltage clamped frog skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Kim, A M; Vergara, J L

    1998-10-01

    In voltage-clamp studies of single frog skeletal muscle fibers stained with the potentiometric indicator 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[beta[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl] vinyl]pyridinium betaine (di-8 ANEPPS), fluorescence transients were recorded in response to both supercharging and step command pulses. Several illumination paradigms were utilized to study global and localized regions of the transverse tubule system (T-system). The rising phases of transients obtained from global illumination regions showed distinct accelerations when supercharging pulses were applied (95% of steady-state fluorescence achieved in 1.5 ms with supercharging pulses versus 14.6 ms with step pulses). When local transients were recorded at the edge of the muscle fiber, their kinetics resembled those of the applied waveform, but a similar relationship was not observed in transients from regions near the edge chosen to minimize the surface membrane contribution. We developed a model of the T-system capable of simulating membrane potential changes as a function of time and distance along the T-system cable and the associated fluorescence changes in regions corresponding to the experimental illumination strategies. A critical parameter was the access resistance term, for which values of 110-150 Omega.cm2 were adequate to fit the data. The results suggest that the primary mechanism through which supercharging pulses boost the kinetics of T-system voltage changes most likely involves their compensating the voltage attenuation across the access resistance at the mouth of the T-tubule.

  15. How the early voltage clamp studies of José del Castillo inform "modern" neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Zottoli, Steven J

    2012-10-01

    The description of ionic currents that flow across the membrane of the squid giant axon during an action potential sparked an interest in determining whether there were similar currents in vertebrates. The preparation of choice was the node of Ranvier in single myelinated fibers in frog. José del Castillo spent 3 years on the United States mainland from 1956 to 1959. During that time, he collaborated with Jerome Y. Lettvin and John W. Moore. I discuss how these individuals met one another and some of their scientific discoveries using the voltage clamp to study squid giant axons and frog nodes. Much of this work was conducted at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA, and I attempt to convey a sense of the unique scientific "melting pot" that existed at the Marine Biological Laboratory and the broader effect that del Castillo had on "modern" neuroscience.

  16. Supercharging accelerates T-tubule membrane potential changes in voltage clamped frog skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, A M; Vergara, J L

    1998-01-01

    In voltage-clamp studies of single frog skeletal muscle fibers stained with the potentiometric indicator 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[beta[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl] vinyl]pyridinium betaine (di-8 ANEPPS), fluorescence transients were recorded in response to both supercharging and step command pulses. Several illumination paradigms were utilized to study global and localized regions of the transverse tubule system (T-system). The rising phases of transients obtained from global illumination regions showed distinct accelerations when supercharging pulses were applied (95% of steady-state fluorescence achieved in 1.5 ms with supercharging pulses versus 14.6 ms with step pulses). When local transients were recorded at the edge of the muscle fiber, their kinetics resembled those of the applied waveform, but a similar relationship was not observed in transients from regions near the edge chosen to minimize the surface membrane contribution. We developed a model of the T-system capable of simulating membrane potential changes as a function of time and distance along the T-system cable and the associated fluorescence changes in regions corresponding to the experimental illumination strategies. A critical parameter was the access resistance term, for which values of 110-150 Omega.cm2 were adequate to fit the data. The results suggest that the primary mechanism through which supercharging pulses boost the kinetics of T-system voltage changes most likely involves their compensating the voltage attenuation across the access resistance at the mouth of the T-tubule. PMID:9746552

  17. An accurate online calibration system based on combined clamp-shape coil for high voltage electronic current transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhen-hua; Li, Hong-bin; Zhang, Zhi

    2013-07-15

    Electronic transformers are widely used in power systems because of their wide bandwidth and good transient performance. However, as an emerging technology, the failure rate of electronic transformers is higher than that of traditional transformers. As a result, the calibration period needs to be shortened. Traditional calibration methods require the power of transmission line be cut off, which results in complicated operation and power off loss. This paper proposes an online calibration system which can calibrate electronic current transformers without power off. In this work, the high accuracy standard current transformer and online operation method are the key techniques. Based on the clamp-shape iron-core coil and clamp-shape air-core coil, a combined clamp-shape coil is designed as the standard current transformer. By analyzing the output characteristics of the two coils, the combined clamp-shape coil can achieve verification of the accuracy. So the accuracy of the online calibration system can be guaranteed. Moreover, by employing the earth potential working method and using two insulating rods to connect the combined clamp-shape coil to the high voltage bus, the operation becomes simple and safe. Tests in China National Center for High Voltage Measurement and field experiments show that the proposed system has a high accuracy of up to 0.05 class.

  18. An accurate online calibration system based on combined clamp-shape coil for high voltage electronic current transformers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-hua; Li, Hong-bin; Zhang, Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Electronic transformers are widely used in power systems because of their wide bandwidth and good transient performance. However, as an emerging technology, the failure rate of electronic transformers is higher than that of traditional transformers. As a result, the calibration period needs to be shortened. Traditional calibration methods require the power of transmission line be cut off, which results in complicated operation and power off loss. This paper proposes an online calibration system which can calibrate electronic current transformers without power off. In this work, the high accuracy standard current transformer and online operation method are the key techniques. Based on the clamp-shape iron-core coil and clamp-shape air-core coil, a combined clamp-shape coil is designed as the standard current transformer. By analyzing the output characteristics of the two coils, the combined clamp-shape coil can achieve verification of the accuracy. So the accuracy of the online calibration system can be guaranteed. Moreover, by employing the earth potential working method and using two insulating rods to connect the combined clamp-shape coil to the high voltage bus, the operation becomes simple and safe. Tests in China National Center for High Voltage Measurement and field experiments show that the proposed system has a high accuracy of up to 0.05 class.

  19. An accurate online calibration system based on combined clamp-shape coil for high voltage electronic current transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-hua; Li, Hong-bin; Zhang, Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Electronic transformers are widely used in power systems because of their wide bandwidth and good transient performance. However, as an emerging technology, the failure rate of electronic transformers is higher than that of traditional transformers. As a result, the calibration period needs to be shortened. Traditional calibration methods require the power of transmission line be cut off, which results in complicated operation and power off loss. This paper proposes an online calibration system which can calibrate electronic current transformers without power off. In this work, the high accuracy standard current transformer and online operation method are the key techniques. Based on the clamp-shape iron-core coil and clamp-shape air-core coil, a combined clamp-shape coil is designed as the standard current transformer. By analyzing the output characteristics of the two coils, the combined clamp-shape coil can achieve verification of the accuracy. So the accuracy of the online calibration system can be guaranteed. Moreover, by employing the earth potential working method and using two insulating rods to connect the combined clamp-shape coil to the high voltage bus, the operation becomes simple and safe. Tests in China National Center for High Voltage Measurement and field experiments show that the proposed system has a high accuracy of up to 0.05 class.

  20. Two-suction-electrode voltage-clamp analysis of the sustained calcium current in cat sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W R

    1988-01-01

    1. The kinetics of the sustained calcium current were examined in cat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones, using a two-suction-electrode voltage clamp. It was shown that this current could be examined with minimal contamination from other ionic currents. Experiments were performed at 20 degrees C, with a concentration of 10 mM-calcium externally. 2. The transient calcium current was eliminated by using a holding potential of -50 mV. The sustained calcium current showed no evidence of steady-state inactivation at potentials between -90 and -30 mV. 3. The activation and deactivation time course of the calcium current was described by a double-exponential function. The activation process was examined without interference from significant inactivation under the conditions used. 4. The steady-state activation of the calcium channels was approximated by a two-step activation process. Both reactions were voltage sensitive, the first having an equivalent valency of 3.4 +/- 0.1 electronic charges (e-), and the second with an equivalent valency of 1.0 +/- 0.2 e-. On average, half-maximal channel activation occurred at +10 mV. 5. The fast and the slow time constants of the exponential relaxations differed by a factor of 4-10 and both showed significant voltage dependence. Both the fast and slow time constants were greatest at potentials where approximately half the available channels were activated in the steady state. The slow time constant measured from activation and deactivation appeared to be independent of the starting potential. 6. The fractional amplitude of the slow exponential component of the tail currents was 0.09 +/- 0.01 at -70 mV and increased steadily at more positive potentials passing through a clear maximum of 0.59 +/- 0.03 at -10 mV. 7. Reducing the temperature decreased the magnitude of the peak inward current, with an apparent activation energy (Ea) of 67 kJ/mol. The slow time constants measured from activation and deactivation were also reduced at lower

  1. Calcium-activated conductance in skate electroreceptors: current clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Clusin, W T; Bennett, M V

    1977-02-01

    When current clamped, skate electroreceptor epithelium produces large action potentials in response to stimuli that depolarize the lumenal faces of the receptor cells. With increasing stimulus strength these action potentials become prolonged. When the peak voltage exceeds about 140 mV the repolarizing phase is blocked until the end of the stimulus. Perfusion experiments show that the rising phase of the action potential results from an increase in calcium permeability in the lumenal membranes. Perfusion of the lumen with cobalt or with a zero calcium solution containing EGTA blocks the action potential. Perfusion of the lumen with a solution containing 10 mM Ca and 20 mM EGTA initially slows the repolarizing process at all voltages and lowers the potential at which it is blocked. With prolonged perfusion, repolarization is blocked at all voltages. When excitability is abolished by perfusion with cobalt, or with a zero calcium solution containing EGTA, no delayed rectification occurs. We suggest that repolarization during the action potential depends on an influx of calcium into the cytoplasm, and that the rate of repolarization depends on the magnitude of the inward calcium current. Increasingly large stimuli reduce the rate of repolarization by reducing the driving force for calcium, and then block repolarization by causing the lumenal membrane potential to exceed ECa. Changes in extracellular calcium affect repolarization in a manner consistent with the resulting change in ECa.

  2. Determination of ionic permeability coefficients of the plasma membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes under voltage clamp.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, P F; Emilio, M G; Fernandes, P L; Ferreira, H G; Ferreira, K G

    1989-01-01

    1. A method of estimating absolute ionic permeability coefficients which does not depend on the use of impermeant substitutes is reported. 2. The method is based on a pump leak model of the Xenopus laevis oocyte membrane. The procedure consists of measuring, in the same experiment, the pump current and the currents generated under voltage clamp by the partial substitution of one or two ions at a time. For each experimental condition, the measured currents are substituted in a Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz type equation with two unknowns (the permeability coefficients). The set of equations thus generated enables the computation of all the ionic permeability coefficients. 3. The Xenopus oocyte membrane (stages IV and V, Dumont, 1972) has been found to be permeable to conventional ion substitutes such as N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMG), sulphate, isethionate and gluconate. 4. The values for sodium, potassium and chloride permeability coefficients obtained from sixty-eight pooled experiments were, respectively, 5.44, 17.41 and 1.49 x 10(-8) cm s-1. 5. The diffusional currents for sodium, potassium and chloride computed from the experiments referred to above were, respectively, -1.16, 0.69 and -0.038 microA cm-2. 6. A stoichiometry of the Na+-K+ pump exchange of 3/1.8 was computed. 7. The intracellular concentrations of sodium, potassium and chloride ions, as determined by ion-selective microelectrodes, were, respectively, 10.1 +/- 0.66 mM (n = 12), 109.5 +/- 3.3 mM (n = 13) and 37.7 +/- 1.18 mM (n = 19), corresponding to equilibrium potentials of 61, -95 and -28 mV. 8. Since chloride is not at equilibrium across the membrane, we propose that there is an inward uphill Cl- transport. PMID:2600847

  3. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from rhythmically active motoneurons in the isolated spinal cord of the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Sernagor, E; O'Donovan, M J

    1991-07-22

    Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained during motor activity from electrically identified motoneurons within the spinal cord of the chick embryo maintained in vitro. Most recordings were performed on E11-E13 motoneurons although it was also possible to record from younger cells (E7-E9). Voltage clamp recordings were used to characterize the synaptic currents expressed in femoro-tibialis (extensor) motoneurons during motor activity. These motoneurons exhibited rhythmic excitatory currents with reversal potentials near 0 mV. This powerful technique enables high resolution recordings from identified motoneurons in situ and allows investigation of the membrane and synaptic mechanisms involved in the development of embryonic motility.

  4. Modeling Ca(2+) currents and buffered diffusion of Ca(2+) in human β-cells during voltage clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Félix-Martínez, Gerardo J; Godínez-Fernández, J Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Macroscopic Ca(2+) currents of the human β-cells were characterized using the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism. Expressions describing the Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation process of the L-type Ca(2+) channels in terms of the concentration of Ca(2+) were obtained. By coupling the modeled Ca(2+) currents to a three-dimensional model of buffered diffusion of Ca(2+), we simulated the Ca(2+) transients formed in the immediate vicinity of the cell membrane during voltage clamp experiments performed in high buffering conditions. Our modeling approach allowed us to consider the distribution of the Ca(2+) sources over the cell membrane. The effect of exogenous (EGTA) and endogenous Ca(2+) buffers on the temporal course of the Ca(2+) transients was evaluated. We show that despite the high Ca(2+) buffering capacity, nanodomains are formed in the submembrane space, where a peak Ca(2+) concentration between ∼76 and 143 µM was estimated from our simulations. In addition, the contribution of each Ca(2+) current to the formation of the Ca(2+) nanodomains was also addressed. Here we provide a general framework to incorporate the spatial aspects to the models of the pancreatic β-cell, such as a more detailed and realistic description of Ca(2+) dynamics in response to electrical activity in physiological conditions can be provided by future models.

  5. Verification of the windings axial clamping forces for high voltage power transformers by using passively mode-locked fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şchiopu, IonuÅ£ Romeo; ǎgulinescu, Andrei, Dr; Iordǎnescu, Raluca; Marinescu, Andrei

    2015-02-01

    The current paper describes an optoelectronic method for direct monitoring of the axial clamping forces both in static and in dynamic duty. As advantages of this method we can state that it can be applied both to new and refurbished transformers without performing constructive changes or affecting in any way the transformer safety in operation. For monitoring the axial clamping forces for high-voltage (HV) power transformers, we use an optical fiber that we integrate into the laser cavity of a passively mode-locked fiber laser (PMFL). To each axial clamp corresponds a solitonic optical spectrum that is changed at the periodical passing of the fundamental soliton pulse through the sensitive fiber inside the transformer. Moreover, as a specific characteristic, the laser stability is unique for each set of axial clamping forces. Other important advantages of using an optical fiber as compared to the classical approach in which electronic sensors are used consist in the good reliability and insulator properties of the optical fiber, avoiding any risk of fire or damage of the transformer.

  6. Local, stochastic release of Ca2+ in voltage-clamped rat heart cells: visualization with confocal microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    López-López, J R; Shacklock, P S; Balke, C W; Wier, W G

    1994-01-01

    1. Confocal microscopy and the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 (K+ salt) were used to measure cytosolic free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]) during excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in single, voltage-clamped, rat cardiac ventricular cells. 2. Local [Ca2+]i transients were measured nearly simultaneously in different, separate, subcellular volumes of approximately 2.0 microns 3. During depolarization, local [Ca2+]i transients were distinctly different from each other and from whole-cell [Ca2+]i transients. These differences were particularly apparent during small depolarizations, and were substantially reduced by ryanodine. 3. Components of the local [Ca2+]i transients, particularly those evoked by small depolarizations, were closely similar, in time course and amplitude, to spontaneous local [Ca2+]i transients, or 'sparks' (which have been shown previously to be Ca2+ released from sarcoplasmic reticulum). 4. Analysis of local [Ca2+]i transients in the spatial frequency domain (power spectrum) revealed that high power at spatial frequencies of 0.05-0.2 microns-1 was always associated with spontaneous calcium 'sparks' and with local [Ca2+]i transients evoked by small depolarizing pulses (e.g. to -31 mV). Evoked local [Ca2+]o transients in the presence of ryanodine, and those evoked by depolarization to very positive clamp-pulse potentials (+45 mV), were associated with considerably lower power at this frequency. 5. The results suggest that whole-cell [Ca2+]i transients evoked by voltage-clamp depolarization, and thus by L-type Ca2+ current, are comprised of local [Ca2+]i transients that are similar to the spontaneous calcium 'sparks'. At very positive clamp-pulse potentials, however, the electrically evoked local [Ca2+]i transients may be smaller, perhaps as a result of smaller unitary L-type Ca2+ current. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7853223

  7. Evidence by a voltage clamp study of an electrically mediated block to polyspermy in the egg of the ascidian Phallusia mammillata.

    PubMed

    Goudeau, H; Depresle, Y; Rosa, A; Goudeau, M

    1994-12-01

    Eggs of the ascidian Phallusia mammillata were voltage clamped (from -100 to +60 mV) and inseminated with a low or heavy sperm concentration. From inseminations with low sperm concentration (1 x 10(6) sp/ml), we found that fertilization currents occurred between -100 and +40 mV: they were always inward and displayed an analogous pattern whatever the clamped voltage. We established that the percentages of inseminated eggs that produced a fertilization current varied as a function of the clamped voltage. These percentages were not statistically different from 100% at clamped voltages between -100 and -30 mV, they decreased to 68 and 56% at clamped Vm of -10 and 0 mV, respectively, but were not statistically different from 0% at clamped Vm between +10 and +40 mV. We never obtained any egg electrical response at a clamped voltage of +50 mV. Almost all eggs (96%) which responded electrically were penetrated by one or several spermatozoa. These eggs were resuming meiosis (81 to 50%) at values of clamped Vm between -100 and 0 mV, respectively. At clamped Vm between +10 and +50 mV, the percentages of eggs resuming meiosis were not statistically different from 0. These results indicate that in P. mammillata eggs, the occurrence of an electrical response is voltage dependent and consequently that the initial depolarizing shift of the fertilization potential constitutes a fast block to polyspermy. However, in this species, the sperm penetration is not voltage dependent, since it occurred at clamped Vm from -100 to +40 mV. On the other hand, when eggs were clamped from -100 to +60 mV and inseminated with a heavy sperm concentration (2 x 10(7) sp/ml), the curves expressing, respectively, the percentages of eggs which responded electrically, the percentages of eggs which were penetrated by one or several spermatozoa, and the percentages of eggs resuming meiosis, as functions of the clamped Vm, were shifted by approximately 35 mV toward more positive voltages, compared to the

  8. Metal interactions with voltage- and receptor-activated ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, H P; Oortgiesen, M; Leinders, T; van Kleef, R G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of Pb and several other metal ions on various distinct types of voltage-, receptor- and Ca-activated ion channels have been investigated in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. Experiments were performed using the whole-cell voltage clamp and single-channel patch clamp techniques. External superfusion of nanomolar to submillimolar concentrations of Pb causes multiple effects on ion channels. Barium current through voltage-activated Ca channels is blocked by micromolar concentrations of Pb, whereas voltage-activated Na current appears insensitive. Neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-activated ion current is blocked by nanomolar concentrations of Pb and this block is reversed at micromolar concentrations. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-activated ion current is much less sensitive to Pb. In addition, external superfusion with micromolar concentrations of Pb as well as of Cd and aluminum induces inward current, associated with the direct activation of nonselective cation channels by these metal ions. In excised inside-out membrane patches of neuroblastoma cells, micromolar concentrations of Ca activate small (SK) and big (BK) Ca-activated K channels. Internally applied Pb activates SK and BK channels more potently than Ca, whereas Cd is approximately equipotent to Pb with respect to SK channel activation, but fails to activate BK channels. The results show that metal ions cause distinct, selective effects on the various types of ion channels and that metal ion interaction sites of ion channels may be highly selective for particular metal ions. PMID:7531139

  9. Sperm Patch-Clamp

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Polina; Clapham, David E.; Navarro, Betsy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    Sperm intracellular pH and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) are two central factors that control sperm activity within the female reproductive tract. As such, the ion channels of the sperm plasma membrane that alter intracellular sperm [Ca2+] and pH play important roles in sperm physiology and the process of fertilization. Indeed, sperm ion channels regulate sperm motility, control sperm chemotaxis toward the egg in some species, and may trigger the acrosome reaction. Until recently, our understanding of these important molecules was rudimentary due to the inability to patch-clamp spermatozoa and directly record the activity of these ion channels under voltage clamp. Recently, we overcame this technical barrier and developed a method for reproducible application of the patch-clamp technique to mouse and human spermatozoa. This chapter covers important aspects of application of the patch-clamp technique to spermatozoa, such as selection of the electrophysiological equipment, isolation of spermatozoa for patch-clamp experiments, formation of the gigaohm seal with spermatozoa, and transition into the whole-cell mode of recording. We also discuss potential pitfalls in application of the patch-clamp technique to flagellar ion channels. PMID:23522465

  10. Electrophysiological Characterization of Na,K-ATPases Expressed in Xenopus laevis Oocytes Using Two-Electrode Voltage Clamping.

    PubMed

    Hilbers, Florian; Poulsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The transport of three Na(+) per two K(+) means that the Na,K-ATPase is electrogenic, and though the currents generated by the ion pump are small compared to ion channel currents, they can be measured using electrophysiology, both steady-state pumping and individual steps in the transport cycle. Various electrophysiological techniques have been used to study the endogenous pumps of the squid giant axon and of cardiac myocytes from for example rabbits. Here, we describe the characterization of heterologously expressed Na,K-ATPases using two-electrode voltage clamping (TEVC) and oocytes from the Xenopus laevis frog as the model cell. With this system, the effects of particular mutations can be studied, including the numerous mutations that in later years have been found to cause human diseases.

  11. Characterization of ryanodine receptor type 1 single channel activity using "on-nucleus" patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Larry E; Groom, Linda A; Dirksen, Robert T; Yule, David I

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we provide the first description of the biophysical and pharmacological properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) expressed in a native membrane using the on-nucleus configuration of the patch clamp technique. A stable cell line expressing rabbit RyR1 was established (HEK-RyR1) using the FLP-in 293 cell system. In contrast to untransfected cells, RyR1 expression was readily demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry in HEK-RyR1 cells. In addition, the RyR1 agonists 4-CMC and caffeine activated Ca(2+) release that was inhibited by high concentrations of ryanodine. On nucleus patch clamp was performed in nuclei prepared from HEK-RyR1 cells. Raising the [Ca(2+)] in the patch pipette resulted in the appearance of a large conductance cation channel with well resolved kinetics and the absence of prominent subconductance states. Current versus voltage relationships were ohmic and revealed a chord conductance of ∼750pS or 450pS in symmetrical 250mM KCl or CsCl, respectively. The channel activity was markedly enhanced by caffeine and exposure to ryanodine resulted in the appearance of a subconductance state with a conductance ∼40% of the full channel opening with a Po near unity. In total, these properties are entirely consistent with RyR1 channel activity. Exposure of RyR1 channels to cyclic ADP ribose (cADPr), nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) or dantrolene did not alter the single channel activity stimulated by Ca(2+), and thus, it is unlikely these molecules directly modulate RyR1 channel activity. In summary, we describe an experimental platform to monitor the single channel properties of RyR channels. We envision that this system will be influential in characterizing disease-associated RyR mutations and the molecular determinants of RyR channel modulation.

  12. Correlation of 125I-LSD autoradiographic labeling with serotonin voltage clamp responses in Aplysia neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.; Kadan, M.J.; Hartig, P.R.; Carpenter, D.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Autoradiographic receptor binding studies using 125I-LSD (2-(125I)lysergic acid diethyamide) revealed intense labelling on the soma of a symmetrically located pair of cells in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. This binding was blocked by micromolar concentrations of serotonin and lower concentrations of the serotonergic antagonists, cyproheptadine and mianserin. Electrophysiological investigation of responses to serotonin of neurons in the left upper quadrant, where one of the labeled neurons is located, revealed a range of serotonin responses. Cells L3 and L6 have a K+ conductance increase in response to serotonin that is not blocked by cyproheptadine or mianserin. Cells L2 and L4 have a biphasic response to serotonin: a Na+ conductance increase, which can be blocked by cyproheptadine and mianserin, followed by a voltage dependent Ca2+ conductance which is blocked by Co2+ but not the serotonergic antagonists. Cell L1, and its symmetrical pair, R1, have in addition to the Na+ and Ca2+ responses observed in L2 and L4, a Cl- conductance increase blocked by LSD, cyproheptadine and mianserin. LSD had little effect on the other responses. The authors conclude that the symmetrically located cells L1 and R1 have a Cl- channel linked to a cyproheptadine- and mianserin-sensitive serotonin receptor that is selectively labelled by 125I-LSD. This receptor has many properties in common with the mammalian serotonin 1C receptor.

  13. Phosphatase activity of the voltage-sensing phosphatase, VSP, shows graded dependence on the extent of activation of the voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Souhei; Okamura, Yasushi

    2014-03-01

    The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) consists of a voltage sensor and a cytoplasmic phosphatase region, and the movement of the voltage sensor is coupled to the phosphatase activity. However, its coupling mechanisms still remain unclear. One possible scenario is that the phosphatase is activated only when the voltage sensor is in a fully activated state. Alternatively, the enzymatic activity of single VSP proteins could be graded in distinct activated states of the voltage sensor, and partial activation of the voltage sensor could lead to partial activation of the phosphatase. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we studied a voltage sensor mutant of zebrafish VSP, where the voltage sensor moves in two steps as evidenced by analyses of charge movements of the voltage sensor and voltage clamp fluorometry. Measurements of the phosphatase activity toward phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate revealed that both steps of voltage sensor activation are coupled to the tuning of phosphatase activities, consistent with the idea that the phosphatase activity is graded by the magnitude of the movement of the voltage sensor.

  14. Membrane-pipette interactions underlie delayed voltage activation of mechanosensitive channels in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Z; Magleby, K L; Silberberg, S D

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism for the delayed activation by voltage of the predominant mechanosensitive (MS) channel in Xenopus oocytes, currents were recorded from on-cell and excised patches of membrane with the patch clamp technique and from intact oocytes with the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. MS channels could be activated by stretch in inside-out, on-cell, and outside-out patch configurations, using pipettes formed of either borosilicate or soft glass. In inside-out patches formed with borosilicate glass pipettes, depolarizing voltage steps activated MS channels in a cooperative manner after delays of seconds. This voltage-dependent activation was not observed for outside-out patches. Voltage-dependent activation was also not observed when the borosilicate pipettes were either replaced with soft glass pipettes or coated with soft glass. When depolarizing voltage steps were applied to the whole oocyte with a two-electrode voltage clamp, currents that could be attributed to MS channels were not observed. Yet the same depolarizing steps activated MS channels in on-cell patches formed with borosilicate pipettes on the same oocyte. These observations suggest that the delayed cooperative activation of MS channels by depolarization is not an intrinsic property of the channels, but requires interaction between the membrane and patch pipette. PMID:10354436

  15. Kinetics of calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium current in voltage-clamped neurones of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed Central

    Chad, J; Eckert, R; Ewald, D

    1984-01-01

    Ca currents flowing during voltage-clamp depolarizations were examined in axotomized Aplysia neurones under conditions that virtually eliminated other currents. Moderate to large currents exhibited a two-component time course of relaxation that can be approximated reasonably well by the sum of two exponentials. The rapid phase (tau 1 approximately equal to 70 ms at 0 mV) plus the slower phase (tau 2 approximately equal to 300 ms at 0 mV) ride upon a steady, non-inactivating current, I infinity. Conditions that diminish the peak current amplitude, such as reduced stimulus depolarization, inactivation remaining from a prior depolarization, or partial blockade of the Ca conductance by Cd, slowed both phases of inactivation, and all selectively eliminated the tau 1 phase, such that weak currents exhibited only the slower phase of decline. Injection of EGTA slowed both phases of inactivation, decreased the extent of the tau 1 phase, and increased the intensity of I infinity and of the current during the tau 2 phase. For a given voltage, the rate of inactivation increased as the peak current strength was increased, and decreased as the peak current strength was decreased. For a given peak current the rate of inactivation decreased as depolarization was increased. The relation of inactivation to prior Ca2+ entry was essentially linear for small currents, but decreased in slope with time during strong currents. The relation also became shallower with increasing depolarization, suggesting an apparent decrease in the efficacy of Ca in causing inactivation at more positive potentials. The basic kinetics of Ca current inactivation along with experimentally induced changes in those kinetics were simulated with a binding-site model in which inactivation develops during current flow as a function of the entry and accumulation of free Ca2+. This demonstrated that a single Ca-mediated process can account for the two-component time course of inactivation, and that the nearly bi

  16. Unloaded speed of shortening in voltage-clamped intact skeletal muscle fibers from wt, mdx, and transgenic minidystrophin mice using a novel high-speed acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, O; Weber, C; von Wegner, F; Chamberlain, J S; Fink, R H A

    2008-06-01

    Skeletal muscle unloaded shortening has been indirectly determined in the past. Here, we present a novel high-speed optical tracking technique that allows recording of unloaded shortening in single intact, voltage-clamped mammalian skeletal muscle fibers with 2-ms time resolution. L-type Ca(2+) currents were simultaneously recorded. The time course of shortening was biexponential: a fast initial phase, tau(1), and a slower successive phase, tau(2,) with activation energies of 59 kJ/mol and 47 kJ/mol. Maximum unloaded shortening speed, v(u,max), was faster than that derived using other techniques, e.g., approximately 14.0 L(0) s(-1) at 30 degrees C. Our technique also allowed direct determination of shortening acceleration. We applied our technique to single fibers from C57 wild-type, dystrophic mdx, and minidystrophin-expressing mice to test whether unloaded shortening was affected in the pathophysiological mechanism of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. v(u,max) and a(u,max) values were not significantly different in the three strains, whereas tau(1) and tau(2) were increased in mdx fibers. The results were complemented by myosin heavy and light chain (MLC) determinations that showed the same myosin heavy chain IIA profiles in the interossei muscles from the different strains. In mdx muscle, MLC-1f was significantly increased and MLC-2f and MLC-3f somewhat reduced. Fast initial active shortening seems almost unaffected in mdx muscle.

  17. High-resolution measurement and calibration of Ca(2+)-transients using Indo-1 in guinea-pig atrial myocytes under voltage clamp.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, G; Lipp, P; Pott, L; Carmeliet, E

    1991-04-01

    Spherical atrial myocytes obtained by enzymatic dispersion of hearts from adult guinea-pigs were loaded with the fluorescent Ca(2+)-indicator Indo-1 via patch-clamp pipettes. The dialysing solution additionally contained citrate (60 mM) as low-affinity ('linear') Ca(2+)-chelating compound in order to slow intracellular Ca(2+)-transients. Changes in Indo-1 fluorescence under voltage-clamp due to Ca(2+)-entry and/or release from the SR were calibrated using an in vivo procedure to determine the limiting fluorescence ratios. Sample recordings will be presented to demonstrate that components of a [Ca2+]i-transient due to entry via L-type Ca(2+)-channels and due to Ca(2+)-release from the SR can be directly visualized.

  18. Analysis of the effects of calcium or magnesium on voltage-clamp currents in perfused squid axons bathed in solutions of high potassium.

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Taylor, R E; Atwater, I; Bezanilla, F

    1969-10-01

    Isolated axons from the squid, Dosidicus gigas, were internally perfused with potassium fluoride solutions. Membrane currents were measured following step changes of membrane potential in a voltage-clamp arrangement with external isosmotic solution changes in the order: potassium-free artificial seawater; potassium chloride; potassium chloride containing 10, 25, 40 or 50, mM calcium or magnesium; and potassium-free artificial seawater. The following results suggest that the currents measured under voltage clamp with potassium outside and inside can be separated into two components and that one of them, the predominant one, is carried through the potassium system. (a) Outward currents in isosmotic potassium were strongly and reversibly reduced by tetraethylammonium chloride. (b) Without calcium or magnesium a progressive increase in the nontime-dependent component of the currents (leakage) occurred. (c) The restoration of calcium or magnesium within 15-30 min decreases this leakage. (d) With 50 mM divalent ions the steady-state current-voltage curve was nonlinear with negative resistance as observed in intact axons in isosmotic potassium. (e) The time-dependent components of the membrane currents were not clearly affected by calcium or magnesium. These results show a strong dependence of the leakage currents on external calcium or magnesium concentration but provide no support for the involvement of calcium or magnesium in the kinetics of the potassium system.

  19. Voltage-activated proton current in eosinophils from human blood.

    PubMed Central

    Gordienko, D V; Tare, M; Parveen, S; Fenech, C J; Robinson, C; Bolton, T B

    1996-01-01

    1. The resting membrane potential of freshly purified normodense human eosinophils bathed in and dialysed with quasi-physiological solutions was -63 +/- 2 mV (n = 100). 2. In voltage-clamp mode with quasi-physiological internal and external solutions, voltage steps from the holding potential of -60 mV to levels positive to +20 mV resulted in development of a quasi-instantaneous outward current and a slowly developing outward current. The instantaneous current was absent when the cells were bathed in and dialysed with K(+)-free solution. 3. The slow outward current persisted following simultaneous replacement of K+, Na+ and most of the Cl- with largely impermeant ions (tetraethylammonium, N-methyl-D-glucamine and methanesulphonate) and was augmented when the cell was dialysed with a solution of increased buffering capacity for protons. The observed reversal potential of the current closely followed the hydrogen equilibrium potential over a wide range of internal-external pH combinations, indicating that the conductance underlying the slow outward current was highly selective for H+ ions. 4. Acidification of the pipette solution (increasing [H+]i) augmented the outward H+ current and shifted its activation range negatively, whilst acidification of the external solution had the opposite effect. The voltage dependence of the current is modulated by the transmembrane pH gradient so the only outward current could be activated. However, when the outward current was activated by a voltage step, rapid acidification of external solution produced an inward H+ current which rapidly deactivated. 5. The proton current was reversibly inhibited in a voltage-dependent manner by extracellular application of Zn2+. The apparent dissociation constants were 8 nM (at +40 mV), 36 nM (at +70 mV) and 200 nM (at +100 mV). 6. The proton current was augmented by exposure to 10 microM arachidonic acid. This augmentation consisted of a shift of the voltage dependence of activation to more

  20. A combined patch-clamp and electrorotation study of the voltage- and frequency-dependent membrane capacitance caused by structurally dissimilar lipophilic anions.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, D; Kiesel, M; Terpitz, U; Zhou, A; Reuss, R; Kraus, J; Schenk, W A; Bamberg, E; Sukhorukov, V L

    2008-01-01

    Interactions of structurally dissimilar anionic compounds with the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells were analyzed by patch clamp and electrorotation. The combined approach provides complementary information on the lipophilicity, preferential affinity of the anions to the inner/outer membrane leaflet, adsorption depth and transmembrane mobility. The anionic species studied here included the well-known lipophilic anions dipicrylamine (DPA(-)), tetraphenylborate (TPB(-)) and [W(2)(CO)(10)(S(2)CH)](-), the putative lipophilic anion B(CF(3))(4)(-) and three new heterocyclic W(CO)(5) derivatives. All tested anions partitioned strongly into the cell membrane, as indicated by the capacitance increase in patch-clamped cells. The capacitance increment exhibited a bell-shaped dependence on membrane voltage. The midpoint potentials of the maximum capacitance increment were negative, indicating the exclusion of lipophilic anions from the outer membrane leaflet. The adsorption depth of the large organic anions DPA(-), TPB(-) and B(CF(3))(4)(-) increased and that of W(CO)(5) derivatives decreased with increasing concentration of mobile charges. In agreement with the patch-clamp data, electrorotation of cells treated with DPA(-) and W(CO)(5) derivatives revealed a large dispersion of membrane capacitance in the kilohertz to megahertz range due to the translocation of mobile charges. In contrast, in the presence of TPB(-) and B(CF(3))(4)(-) no mobile charges could be detected by electrorotation, despite their strong membrane adsorption. Our data suggest that the presence of oxygen atoms in the outer molecular shell is an important factor for the fast translocation ability of lipophilic anions.

  1. Modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels hyperpolarizes the voltage threshold for activation in spinal motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Power, Kevin E; Carlin, Kevin P; Fedirchuk, Brent

    2012-03-01

    Previous work has shown that motoneurone excitability is enhanced by a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential at which an action potential is initiated (V(th)) at the onset, and throughout brainstem-evoked fictive locomotion in the adult decerebrate cat and neonatal rat. Modeling work has suggested the modulation of Na(+) conductance as a putative mechanism underlying this state-dependent change in excitability. This study sought to determine whether modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels could induce V(th) hyperpolarization. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from antidromically identified lumbar spinal motoneurones in an isolated neonatal rat spinal cord preparation. Recordings were made with and without the bath application of veratridine, a plant alkaloid neurotoxin that acts as a sodium channel modulator. As seen in HEK 293 cells expressing Nav1.2 channels, veratridine-modified channels demonstrated a hyperpolarizing shift in their voltage-dependence of activation and a slowing of inactivation that resulted in an enhanced inward current in response to voltage ramp stimulations. In the native rat motoneurones, veratridine-modified sodium channels induced a hyperpolarization of V(th) in all 29 neonatal rat motoneurones examined (mean hyperpolarization: -6.6 ± 4.3 mV). V(th) hyperpolarization was not due to the effects on Ca(2+) and/or K(+) channels as blockade of these currents did not alter V(th). Veratridine also significantly increased the amplitude of persistent inward currents (PICs; mean increase: 72.5 ± 98.5 pA) evoked in response to slow depolarizing current ramps. However, the enhancement of the PIC amplitude had a slower time course than the hyperpolarization of V(th), and the PIC onset voltage could be either depolarized or hyperpolarized, suggesting that PIC facilitation did not mediate the V(th) hyperpolarization. We therefore suggest that central neuronal circuitry in mammals could affect V(th) in a mechanism similar to that of

  2. Simultaneous multi-patch-clamp and extracellular-array recordings: Single neuron reflects network activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Sardi, Shira; Sheinin, Anton; Kanter, Ido

    2016-11-01

    The increasing number of recording electrodes enhances the capability of capturing the network’s cooperative activity, however, using too many monitors might alter the properties of the measured neural network and induce noise. Using a technique that merges simultaneous multi-patch-clamp and multi-electrode array recordings of neural networks in-vitro, we show that the membrane potential of a single neuron is a reliable and super-sensitive probe for monitoring such cooperative activities and their detailed rhythms. Specifically, the membrane potential and the spiking activity of a single neuron are either highly correlated or highly anti-correlated with the time-dependent macroscopic activity of the entire network. This surprising observation also sheds light on the cooperative origin of neuronal burst in cultured networks. Our findings present an alternative flexible approach to the technique based on a massive tiling of networks by large-scale arrays of electrodes to monitor their activity.

  3. Simultaneous multi-patch-clamp and extracellular-array recordings: Single neuron reflects network activity

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Sardi, Shira; Sheinin, Anton; Kanter, Ido

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of recording electrodes enhances the capability of capturing the network’s cooperative activity, however, using too many monitors might alter the properties of the measured neural network and induce noise. Using a technique that merges simultaneous multi-patch-clamp and multi-electrode array recordings of neural networks in-vitro, we show that the membrane potential of a single neuron is a reliable and super-sensitive probe for monitoring such cooperative activities and their detailed rhythms. Specifically, the membrane potential and the spiking activity of a single neuron are either highly correlated or highly anti-correlated with the time-dependent macroscopic activity of the entire network. This surprising observation also sheds light on the cooperative origin of neuronal burst in cultured networks. Our findings present an alternative flexible approach to the technique based on a massive tiling of networks by large-scale arrays of electrodes to monitor their activity. PMID:27824075

  4. Rigid clamp

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, Gilbert L.; Burt, Jack D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a clamp mechanism that can be used to attach or temporarily support objects inside of tubular goods. The clamp mechanism can also be modified so that it grips objects. The clamp has a self-centering feature to accommodate out-of-roundness or other internal defections in tubular objects such as pipe. A plurality of clamping shoes are expanded by a linkage which is preferably powered by a motor to contact the inside of a pipe. The motion can be reversed and jaw elements can be connected to the linkage so as to bring the jaws together to grab an object.

  5. Ba2+ release from soda glass modifies single maxi K+ channel activity in patch clamp experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Copello, J; Simon, B; Segal, Y; Wehner, F; Ramanujam, V M; Alcock, N; Reuss, L

    1991-01-01

    Glasses used to fabricate patch pipettes may release components which affect ion channels (Cota, G., and C.M. Armstrong. 1988. Biophys. J. 53:107-109; Furman, R.E., and J.C. Tanaka. 1988. Biophys. J. 53:287-292; Rojas, L., and C. Zuazaga. 1988. Neurosci. Lett. 88:39-44). The gating properties of maxi K+ channels from Necturus gallbladder epithelium depend on whether borosilicate glass (BG) or blue tip hematocrit glass (SG) is used to construct the patch pipettes. The data are consistent with solubilization from SG of a component which exerts voltage-dependent, cytosolic-side specific block, closely resembling "slow block" by Ba2+ ions. Ringer's solution preincubated with SG, but not with BG, blocked inside-out maxi K+ channels when used as bathing solution. Mass spectrometry revealed that Ba2+ is released by the glass from fast and slow-release compartments (SG contains 3% wt/wt BaO), and is the only ion found in the solution at concentrations consistent with the observed channel block. Additionally, SG released O2-, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, all to micromolar concentrations. These elements do not interfere with maxi K+ channels but they could in principle alter the properties of other ion channels. Thus, screening for channel-modifying substances released by the glass may be necessary for the adequate interpretation of patch-clamp results. PMID:1742460

  6. Microchip amplifier for in vitro, in vivo, and automated whole cell patch-clamp recording

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Ilya; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B.; Chubykin, Alexander A.; Yang, Aimei; Bear, Mark F.; Boyden, Edward S.; Forest, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Patch clamping is a gold-standard electrophysiology technique that has the temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio capable of reporting single ion channel currents, as well as electrical activity of excitable single cells. Despite its usefulness and decades of development, the amplifiers required for patch clamping are expensive and bulky. This has limited the scalability and throughput of patch clamping for single-ion channel and single-cell analyses. In this work, we have developed a custom patch-clamp amplifier microchip that can be fabricated using standard commercial silicon processes capable of performing both voltage- and current-clamp measurements. A key innovation is the use of nonlinear feedback elements in the voltage-clamp amplifier circuit to convert measured currents into logarithmically encoded voltages, thereby eliminating the need for large high-valued resistors, a factor that has limited previous attempts at integration. Benchtop characterization of the chip shows low levels of current noise [1.1 pA root mean square (rms) over 5 kHz] during voltage-clamp measurements and low levels of voltage noise (8.2 μV rms over 10 kHz) during current-clamp measurements. We demonstrate the ability of the chip to perform both current- and voltage-clamp measurement in vitro in HEK293FT cells and cultured neurons. We also demonstrate its ability to perform in vivo recordings as part of a robotic patch-clamping system. The performance of the patch-clamp amplifier microchip compares favorably with much larger commercial instrumentation, enabling benchtop commoditization, miniaturization, and scalable patch-clamp instrumentation. PMID:25429119

  7. Ionic currents influencing spontaneous firing and pacemaker frequency in dopamine neurons of the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and dorsal raphe nucleus (vlPAG/DRN): A voltage-clamp and computational modelling study.

    PubMed

    Dougalis, Antonios G; Matthews, Gillian A C; Liss, Birgit; Ungless, Mark A

    2017-04-03

    Dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) fire spontaneous action potentials (APs) at slow, regular patterns in vitro but a detailed account of their intrinsic membrane properties responsible for spontaneous firing is currently lacking. To resolve this, we performed a voltage-clamp electrophysiological study in brain slices to describe their major ionic currents and then constructed a computer model and used simulations to understand the mechanisms behind autorhythmicity in silico. We found that vlPAG/DRN DA neurons exhibit a number of voltage-dependent currents activating in the subthreshold range including, a hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH), a transient, A-type, potassium current (IA), a background, 'persistent' (INaP) sodium current and a transient, low voltage activated (LVA) calcium current (ICaLVA). Brain slice pharmacology, in good agreement with computer simulations, showed that spontaneous firing occurred independently of IH, IA or calcium currents. In contrast, when blocking sodium currents, spontaneous firing ceased and a stable, non-oscillating membrane potential below AP threshold was attained. Using the DA neuron model we further show that calcium currents exhibit little activation (compared to sodium) during the interspike interval (ISI) repolarization while, any individual potassium current alone, whose blockade positively modulated AP firing frequency, is not required for spontaneous firing. Instead, blockade of a number of potassium currents simultaneously is necessary to eliminate autorhythmicity. Repolarization during ISI is mediated initially via the deactivation of the delayed rectifier potassium current, while a sodium background 'persistent' current is essentially indispensable for autorhythmicity by driving repolarization towards AP threshold.

  8. Activation of Ih and TTX-sensitive sodium current at subthreshold voltages during CA1 pyramidal neuron firing.

    PubMed

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason; Bean, Bruce P

    2015-10-01

    We used dynamic clamp and action potential clamp techniques to explore how currents carried by tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels and HCN channels (Ih) regulate the behavior of CA1 pyramidal neurons at resting and subthreshold voltages. Recording from rat CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we found that the apparent input resistance and membrane time constant were strongly affected by both conductances, with Ih acting to decrease apparent input resistance and time constant and sodium current acting to increase both. We found that both Ih and sodium current were active during subthreshold summation of artificial excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) generated by dynamic clamp, with Ih dominating at less depolarized voltages and sodium current at more depolarized voltages. Subthreshold sodium current-which amplifies EPSPs-was most effectively recruited by rapid voltage changes, while Ih-which blunts EPSPs-was maximal for slow voltage changes. The combined effect is to selectively amplify rapid EPSPs. We did similar experiments in mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, doing voltage-clamp experiments using experimental records of action potential firing of CA1 neurons previously recorded in awake, behaving animals as command voltages to quantify flow of Ih and sodium current at subthreshold voltages. Subthreshold sodium current was larger and subthreshold Ih was smaller in mouse neurons than in rat neurons. Overall, the results show opposing effects of subthreshold sodium current and Ih in regulating subthreshold behavior of CA1 neurons, with subthreshold sodium current prominent in both rat and mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons and additional regulation by Ih in rat neurons.

  9. Activation of Ih and TTX-sensitive sodium current at subthreshold voltages during CA1 pyramidal neuron firing

    PubMed Central

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We used dynamic clamp and action potential clamp techniques to explore how currents carried by tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels and HCN channels (Ih) regulate the behavior of CA1 pyramidal neurons at resting and subthreshold voltages. Recording from rat CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we found that the apparent input resistance and membrane time constant were strongly affected by both conductances, with Ih acting to decrease apparent input resistance and time constant and sodium current acting to increase both. We found that both Ih and sodium current were active during subthreshold summation of artificial excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) generated by dynamic clamp, with Ih dominating at less depolarized voltages and sodium current at more depolarized voltages. Subthreshold sodium current—which amplifies EPSPs—was most effectively recruited by rapid voltage changes, while Ih—which blunts EPSPs—was maximal for slow voltage changes. The combined effect is to selectively amplify rapid EPSPs. We did similar experiments in mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, doing voltage-clamp experiments using experimental records of action potential firing of CA1 neurons previously recorded in awake, behaving animals as command voltages to quantify flow of Ih and sodium current at subthreshold voltages. Subthreshold sodium current was larger and subthreshold Ih was smaller in mouse neurons than in rat neurons. Overall, the results show opposing effects of subthreshold sodium current and Ih in regulating subthreshold behavior of CA1 neurons, with subthreshold sodium current prominent in both rat and mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons and additional regulation by Ih in rat neurons. PMID:26289465

  10. Reconstitution of a Transmembrane Protein, the Voltage-gated Ion Channel, KvAP, into Giant Unilamellar Vesicles for Microscopy and Patch Clamp Studies

    PubMed Central

    Garten, Matthias; Aimon, Sophie; Bassereau, Patricia; Toombes, Gilman E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) are a popular biomimetic system for studying membrane associated phenomena. However, commonly used protocols to grow GUVs must be modified in order to form GUVs containing functional transmembrane proteins. This article describes two dehydration-rehydration methods — electroformation and gel-assisted swelling — to form GUVs containing the voltage-gated potassium channel, KvAP. In both methods, a solution of protein-containing small unilamellar vesicles is partially dehydrated to form a stack of membranes, which is then allowed to swell in a rehydration buffer. For the electroformation method, the film is deposited on platinum electrodes so that an AC field can be applied during film rehydration. In contrast, the gel-assisted swelling method uses an agarose gel substrate to enhance film rehydration. Both methods can produce GUVs in low (e.g., 5 mM) and physiological (e.g., 100 mM) salt concentrations. The resulting GUVs are characterized via fluorescence microscopy, and the function of reconstituted channels measured using the inside-out patch-clamp configuration. While swelling in the presence of an alternating electric field (electroformation) gives a high yield of defect-free GUVs, the gel-assisted swelling method produces a more homogeneous protein distribution and requires no special equipment. PMID:25650630

  11. Effects of deuterium oxide on the rate and dissociation constants for saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin action. Voltage-clamp studies on frog myelinated nerve

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The actions of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) in normal water and in deuterium oxide (D2O) have been studied in frog myelinated nerve. Substitution of D2O for H2O in normal Ringer's solution has no effect on the potency of TTX in blocking action potentials but increases the potency of STX by approximately 50%. Under voltage clamp, the steady-state inhibition of sodium currents by 1 nM STX is doubled in D2O as a result of a halving of the rate of dissociation of STX from the sodium channel; the rate of block by STX is not measurably changed by D2O. Neither steady-state inhibition nor the on- or off-rate constants of TTX are changed by D2O substitution. The isotopic effects on STX binding are observed less than 10 min after the toxin has been added to D2O, thus eliminating the possibility that slow-exchange (t 1/2 greater than 10 h) hydrogen-binding sites on STX are involved. The results are consistent with a hypothesis that attributes receptor-toxin stabilization to isotopic changes of hydrogen bonding; this interpretation suggests that hydrogen bonds contribute more to the binding of STX than to that of TTX at the sodium channel. PMID:6268735

  12. Non-selective voltage-activated cation channel in the human red blood cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, L; Bollensdorff, C; Bernhardt, I

    1999-02-04

    Using the patch-clamp technique, a non-selective voltage-activated Na+ and K+ channel in the human red blood cell membrane was found. The channel operates only at positive membrane potentials from about +30 mV (inside positive) onwards. For sodium and potassium ions, similar conductances of about 21 pS were determined. Together with the recently described K+(Na+)/H+ exchanger, this channel is responsible for the increase of residual K+ and Na+ fluxes across the human red blood cell membrane when the cells are suspended in low ionic strength medium.

  13. Faster voltage-dependent activation of Na+ channels in growth cones versus somata of neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Loew, L M; Davidson, R M

    1996-01-01

    Kinetics of voltage-gated ionic channels fundamentally reflect the response of the channels to local electric fields. In this report cell-attached patch-clamp studies reveal that the voltage-dependent activation rate of sodium channels residing in the growth cone membrane differs from that of soma sodium channels in differentiating N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. Because other electrophysiological properties of these channels do not differ, this finding may be a reflection of the difference in intramembrane electric field in these two regions of the cell. This represents a new mechanism for channels to attain a range of activities both within and between cells. PMID:8913589

  14. External protons destabilize the activated voltage sensor in hERG channels.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu Patrick; Cheng, Yen May; Van Slyke, Aaron C; Claydon, Tom W

    2014-03-01

    Extracellular acidosis shifts hERG channel activation to more depolarized potentials and accelerates channel deactivation; however, the mechanisms underlying these effects are unclear. External divalent cations, e.g., Ca(2+) and Cd(2+), mimic these effects and coordinate within a metal ion binding pocket composed of three acidic residues in hERG: D456 and D460 in S2 and D509 in S3. A common mechanism may underlie divalent cation and proton effects on hERG gating. Using two-electrode voltage clamp, we show proton sensitivity of hERG channel activation (pKa = 5.6), but not deactivation, was greatly reduced in the presence of Cd(2+) (0.1 mM), suggesting a common binding site for the Cd(2+) and proton effect on activation and separable effects of protons on activation and deactivation. Mutational analysis confirmed that D509 plays a critical role in the pH dependence of activation, as shown previously, and that cooperative actions involving D456 and D460 are also required. Importantly, neutralization of all three acidic residues abolished the proton-induced shift of activation, suggesting that the metal ion binding pocket alone accounts for the effects of protons on hERG channel activation. Voltage-clamp fluorimetry measurements demonstrated that protons shifted the voltage dependence of S4 movement to more depolarized potentials. The data indicate a site and mechanism of action for protons on hERG activation gating; protonation of D456, D460 and D509 disrupts interactions between these residues and S4 gating charges to destabilize the activated configuration of S4.

  15. Effects of Conformational Peptide Probe DP4 on Bidirectional Signaling between DHPR and RyR1 Calcium Channels in Voltage-Clamped Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Olojo, Rotimi O.; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Schneider, Martin F.

    2011-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, excitation-contraction coupling involves the activation of dihydropyridine receptors (DHPR) and type-1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1) to produce depolarization-dependent sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release via orthograde signaling. Another form of DHPR-RyR1 communication is retrograde signaling, in which RyRs modulate the gating of DHPR. DP4 (domain peptide 4), is a peptide corresponding to residues Leu2442-Pro2477 of the central domain of the RyR1 that produces RyR1 channel destabilization. Here we explore the effects of DP4 on orthograde excitation-contraction coupling and retrograde RyR1-DHPR signaling in isolated murine muscle fibers. Intracellular dialysis of DP4 increased the peak amplitude of Ca2+ release during step depolarizations by 64% without affecting its voltage-dependence or kinetics, and also caused a similar increase in Ca2+ release during an action potential waveform. DP4 did not modify either the amplitude or the voltage-dependence of the intramembrane charge movement. However, DP4 augmented DHPR Ca2+ current density without affecting its voltage-dependence. Our results demonstrate that the conformational changes induced by DP4 regulate both orthograde E-C coupling and retrograde RyR1-DHPR signaling. PMID:21575570

  16. Voltage-dependent potassium channels in activated rat microglia.

    PubMed Central

    Nörenberg, W; Gebicke-Haerter, P J; Illes, P

    1994-01-01

    1. Voltage-dependent currents of untreated (proliferating) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated rat microglial cells in culture were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. 2. Membrane potentials showed prominent peaks at -35 mV and -70 mV. Membrane potentials of LPS-treated cells alternated between the two values. This may be due to a negative slope region of the I-V relation resulting in two zero current potentials. 3. From a holding potential of -70 mV, hyperpolarizing steps evoked an inwardly rectifying current both in proliferating and in LPS-treated cells, while depolarizing steps below -50 mV evoked an outwardly rectifying current only in LPS-treated microglia. The currents were K+ selective, as indicated by their reversal potential of approximately 0 mV in symmetric K+ concentrations (150 mM both intra- and extracellularly) and the reversal potential of the outward tail currents of approximately -90 mV at a normal extracellular K+ concentration (4.5 mM). 4. The activation of the outward current could be fitted by Hodgkin-Huxley-type n4 kinetics. The time constant of activation depended on voltage. 5. The inactivation of the inward and outward currents could be fitted by a single exponential. The time constant of the inward current inactivation was dependent on voltage, whereas the time constant of the outward current inactivation was virtually independent of voltage, except near the threshold of activation. Recovery of the outward from inactivation was slow and could be fitted by two exponentials. Responses to depolarizing steps were stable at 0.125 Hz, but greatly decreased from the first to the second pulse at 1 Hz. 6. The inactivation of the inward, but not of the outward, current disappeared in a low Na(+)-containing medium (5 mM). The inward current was selectively inhibited by extracellular Cs+ and Ba2+. The outward current was selectively inhibited by Cd2+, 4-aminopyridine and charybdotoxin. Replacement of intracellular K+ by an

  17. GABAB receptors inhibit low-voltage activated and high-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels in sensory neurons via distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2015-09-18

    Growing evidence suggests that mammalian peripheral somatosensory neurons express functional receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid, GABAA and GABAB. Moreover, local release of GABA by pain-sensing (nociceptive) nerve fibres has also been suggested. Yet, the functional significance of GABA receptor triggering in nociceptive neurons is not fully understood. Here we used patch-clamp recordings from small-diameter cultured DRG neurons to investigate effects of GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents. We found that baclofen inhibited both low-voltage activated (LVA, T-type) and high-voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) currents in a proportion of DRG neurons by 22% and 32% respectively; both effects were sensitive to Gi/o inhibitor pertussis toxin. Inhibitory effect of baclofen on both current types was about twice less efficacious as compared to that of the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO. Surprisingly, only HVA but not LVA current modulation by baclofen was partially prevented by G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S. In contrast, only LVA but not HVA current modulation was reversed by the application of a reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT). Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) current by baclofen and the recovery of such inhibition by DTT were successfully reconstituted in the expression system. Our data suggest that inhibition of LVA current in DRG neurons by baclofen is partially mediated by an unconventional signaling pathway that involves a redox mechanism. These findings reinforce the idea of targeting peripheral GABA receptors for pain relief.

  18. Single electrode dynamic clamp with StdpC

    PubMed Central

    Samu, David; Marra, Vincenzo; Kemenes, Ildiko; Crossley, Michael; Kemenes, György; Staras, Kevin; Nowotny, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic clamp is a powerful approach for electrophysiological investigations allowing researchers to introduce artificial electrical components into target neurons to simulate ionic conductances, chemical or electrotonic inputs or connections to other cells. Due to the rapidly changing and potentially large current injections during dynamic clamp, problematic voltage artifacts appear on the electrode used to inject dynamic clamp currents into a target neuron. Dynamic clamp experiments, therefore, typically use two separate electrodes in the same cell, one for recording membrane potential and one for injecting currents. The requirement for two independent electrodes has been a limiting factor for the use of dynamic clamp in applications where dual recordings of this kind are difficult or impossible to achieve. The recent development of an active electrode compensation (AEC) method has overcome some of these prior limitations, permitting artifact-free dynamic clamp experimentation with a single electrode. Here we describe an AEC method for the free dynamic clamp software StdpC. The AEC component of StdpC is the first such system implemented for the use of non-expert users and comes with a set of semi-automated configuration and calibration procedures that facilitate its use. We briefly introduce the AEC method and its implementation in StdpC and then validate it with an electronic model cell and in two different biological preparations. PMID:22898473

  19. Single electrode dynamic clamp with StdpC.

    PubMed

    Samu, David; Marra, Vincenzo; Kemenes, Ildiko; Crossley, Michael; Kemenes, György; Staras, Kevin; Nowotny, Thomas

    2012-10-15

    Dynamic clamp is a powerful approach for electrophysiological investigations allowing researchers to introduce artificial electrical components into target neurons to simulate ionic conductances, chemical or electrotonic inputs or connections to other cells. Due to the rapidly changing and potentially large current injections during dynamic clamp, problematic voltage artifacts appear on the electrode used to inject dynamic clamp currents into a target neuron. Dynamic clamp experiments, therefore, typically use two separate electrodes in the same cell, one for recording membrane potential and one for injecting currents. The requirement for two independent electrodes has been a limiting factor for the use of dynamic clamp in applications where dual recordings of this kind are difficult or impossible to achieve. The recent development of an active electrode compensation (AEC) method has overcome some of these prior limitations, permitting artifact-free dynamic clamp experimentation with a single electrode. Here we describe an AEC method for the free dynamic clamp software StdpC. The AEC component of StdpC is the first such system implemented for the use of non-expert users and comes with a set of semi-automated configuration and calibration procedures that facilitate its use. We briefly introduce the AEC method and its implementation in StdpC and then validate it with an electronic model cell and in two different biological preparations.

  20. Voltage Dependence of a Neuromodulator-Activated Ionic Current123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neuromodulatory inward current (IMI) generated by crab Cancer borealis stomatogastric ganglion neurons is an inward current whose voltage dependence has been shown to be crucial in the activation of oscillatory activity of the pyloric network of this system. It has been previously shown that IMI loses its voltage dependence in conditions of low extracellular calcium, but that this effect appears to be regulated by intracellular calmodulin. Voltage dependence is only rarely regulated by intracellular signaling mechanisms. Here we address the hypothesis that the voltage dependence of IMI is mediated by intracellular signaling pathways activated by extracellular calcium. We demonstrate that calmodulin inhibitors and a ryanodine antagonist can reduce IMI voltage dependence in normal Ca2+, but that, in conditions of low Ca2+, calmodulin activators do not restore IMI voltage dependence. Further, we show evidence that CaMKII alters IMI voltage dependence. These results suggest that calmodulin is necessary but not sufficient for IMI voltage dependence. We therefore hypothesize that the Ca2+/calmodulin requirement for IMI voltage dependence is due to an active sensing of extracellular calcium by a GPCR family calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and that the reduction in IMI voltage dependence by a calmodulin inhibitor is due to CaSR endocytosis. Supporting this, preincubation with an endocytosis inhibitor prevented W7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride)-induced loss of IMI voltage dependence, and a CaSR antagonist reduced IMI voltage dependence. Additionally, myosin light chain kinase, which is known to act downstream of the CaSR, seems to play a role in regulating IMI voltage dependence. Finally, a Gβγ-subunit inhibitor also affects IMI voltage dependence, in support of the hypothesis that this process is regulated by a G-protein-coupled CaSR. PMID:27257619

  1. Voltage Dependence of a Neuromodulator-Activated Ionic Current.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael; Golowasch, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The neuromodulatory inward current (IMI) generated by crab Cancer borealis stomatogastric ganglion neurons is an inward current whose voltage dependence has been shown to be crucial in the activation of oscillatory activity of the pyloric network of this system. It has been previously shown that IMI loses its voltage dependence in conditions of low extracellular calcium, but that this effect appears to be regulated by intracellular calmodulin. Voltage dependence is only rarely regulated by intracellular signaling mechanisms. Here we address the hypothesis that the voltage dependence of IMI is mediated by intracellular signaling pathways activated by extracellular calcium. We demonstrate that calmodulin inhibitors and a ryanodine antagonist can reduce IMI voltage dependence in normal Ca(2+), but that, in conditions of low Ca(2+), calmodulin activators do not restore IMI voltage dependence. Further, we show evidence that CaMKII alters IMI voltage dependence. These results suggest that calmodulin is necessary but not sufficient for IMI voltage dependence. We therefore hypothesize that the Ca(2+)/calmodulin requirement for IMI voltage dependence is due to an active sensing of extracellular calcium by a GPCR family calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and that the reduction in IMI voltage dependence by a calmodulin inhibitor is due to CaSR endocytosis. Supporting this, preincubation with an endocytosis inhibitor prevented W7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride)-induced loss of IMI voltage dependence, and a CaSR antagonist reduced IMI voltage dependence. Additionally, myosin light chain kinase, which is known to act downstream of the CaSR, seems to play a role in regulating IMI voltage dependence. Finally, a Gβγ-subunit inhibitor also affects IMI voltage dependence, in support of the hypothesis that this process is regulated by a G-protein-coupled CaSR.

  2. Voltage-activated currents recorded from rabbit pigmented ciliary body epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Fain, G L; Farahbakhsh, N A

    1989-01-01

    1. The whole-cell recording mode of the patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the presence of voltage-activated currents in the isolated pigmented cells from the rabbit ciliary body epithelium grown in culture. 2. In Ringer solution with composition similar to that of the rabbit aqueous humour, depolarizing voltage steps activated a transient inward current and a delayed outward current, while hyperpolarization elicited an inwardly rectified current. 3. The depolarization-activated inward current was mainly carried by Na+ and was blocked by submicromolar concentrations of tetrodotoxin. This current in many cells was sufficiently large to produce a regenerative Na+ spike. 4. The depolarization-activated outward current was carried by K+ and blocked by external TEA and Ba2+. Its activation appeared to be Ca2(+)-independent. 5. The hyperpolarization-activated inward current was almost exclusively carried by K+ and was blocked by Ba2+ and Cs+. For large hyperpolarizations below -120 mV, this current exhibited a biphasic activation with a fast transient peak followed by a slower sag, that appeared to be due to K+ depletion. 6. The voltage-dependent K+ conductances probably act to stabilize the cell membrane resting potential and may also play a role in ion transport. The function of the Na(+)-dependent inward current is unclear, but it may permit the electrically coupled epithelial cells of the ciliary body to conduct propagated action potentials. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2621623

  3. Coupling between Voltage Sensors and Activation Gate in Voltage-gated K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhe; Klem, Angela M.; Ramu, Yajamana

    2002-01-01

    Current through voltage-gated K+ channels underlies the action potential encoding the electrical signal in excitable cells. The four subunits of a voltage-gated K+ channel each have six transmembrane segments (S1–S6), whereas some other K+ channels, such as eukaryotic inward rectifier K+ channels and the prokaryotic KcsA channel, have only two transmembrane segments (M1 and M2). A voltage-gated K+ channel is formed by an ion-pore module (S5–S6, equivalent to M1–M2) and the surrounding voltage-sensing modules. The S4 segments are the primary voltage sensors while the intracellular activation gate is located near the COOH-terminal end of S6, although the coupling mechanism between them remains unknown. In the present study, we found that two short, complementary sequences in voltage-gated K+ channels are essential for coupling the voltage sensors to the intracellular activation gate. One sequence is the so called S4–S5 linker distal to the voltage-sensing S4, while the other is around the COOH-terminal end of S6, a region containing the actual gate-forming residues. PMID:12407078

  4. Two distinct voltage-sensing domains control voltage sensitivity and kinetics of current activation in CaV1.1 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Tuluc, Petronel; Benedetti, Bruno; Coste de Bagneaux, Pierre; Grabner, Manfred; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2016-06-01

    Alternative splicing of the skeletal muscle CaV1.1 voltage-gated calcium channel gives rise to two channel variants with very different gating properties. The currents of both channels activate slowly; however, insertion of exon 29 in the adult splice variant CaV1.1a causes an ∼30-mV right shift in the voltage dependence of activation. Existing evidence suggests that the S3-S4 linker in repeat IV (containing exon 29) regulates voltage sensitivity in this voltage-sensing domain (VSD) by modulating interactions between the adjacent transmembrane segments IVS3 and IVS4. However, activation kinetics are thought to be determined by corresponding structures in repeat I. Here, we use patch-clamp analysis of dysgenic (CaV1.1 null) myotubes reconstituted with CaV1.1 mutants and chimeras to identify the specific roles of these regions in regulating channel gating properties. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the structure and/or hydrophobicity of the IVS3-S4 linker is critical for regulating voltage sensitivity in the IV VSD, but by itself cannot modulate voltage sensitivity in the I VSD. Swapping sequence domains between the I and the IV VSDs reveals that IVS4 plus the IVS3-S4 linker is sufficient to confer CaV1.1a-like voltage dependence to the I VSD and that the IS3-S4 linker plus IS4 is sufficient to transfer CaV1.1e-like voltage dependence to the IV VSD. Any mismatch of transmembrane helices S3 and S4 from the I and IV VSDs causes a right shift of voltage sensitivity, indicating that regulation of voltage sensitivity by the IVS3-S4 linker requires specific interaction of IVS4 with its corresponding IVS3 segment. In contrast, slow current kinetics are perturbed by any heterologous sequences inserted into the I VSD and cannot be transferred by moving VSD I sequences to VSD IV. Thus, CaV1.1 calcium channels are organized in a modular manner, and control of voltage sensitivity and activation kinetics is accomplished by specific molecular mechanisms

  5. Voltage and Current Unbalance Compensation Using a Parallel Active Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Tolbert, Leon M; Kueck, John D; Rizy, D Tom

    2007-01-01

    A three-phase insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT)-based parallel active filter is used for current and/or voltage unbalance compensation. An instantaneous power theory is adopted for real-time calculation and control. Three control schemes, current control, voltage control, and integrated control are proposed to compensate the unbalance of current, voltage, or both. The compensation results of the different control schemes in unbalance cases (load unbalance or voltage source unbalance) are compared and analyzed. The simulation and experimental results show that the control schemes can compensate the unbalance in load current or in the voltage source. Different compensation objectives can be achieved, i.e., balanced and unity power factor source current, balanced and regulated voltage, or both, by choosing appropriate control schemes.

  6. Whole-GUV patch-clamping.

    PubMed

    Garten, Matthias; Mosgaard, Lars D; Bornschlögl, Thomas; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bassereau, Patricia; Toombes, Gilman E S

    2017-01-10

    Studying how the membrane modulates ion channel and transporter activity is challenging because cells actively regulate membrane properties, whereas existing in vitro systems have limitations, such as residual solvent and unphysiologically high membrane tension. Cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) would be ideal for in vitro electrophysiology, but efforts to measure the membrane current of intact GUVs have been unsuccessful. In this work, two challenges for obtaining the "whole-GUV" patch-clamp configuration were identified and resolved. First, unless the patch pipette and GUV pressures are precisely matched in the GUV-attached configuration, breaking the patch membrane also ruptures the GUV. Second, GUVs shrink irreversibly because the membrane/glass adhesion creating the high-resistance seal (>1 GΩ) continuously pulls membrane into the pipette. In contrast, for cell-derived giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs), breaking the patch membrane allows the GPMV contents to passivate the pipette surface, thereby dynamically blocking membrane spreading in the whole-GMPV mode. To mimic this dynamic passivation mechanism, beta-casein was encapsulated into GUVs, yielding a stable, high-resistance, whole-GUV configuration for a range of membrane compositions. Specific membrane capacitance measurements confirmed that the membranes were truly solvent-free and that membrane tension could be controlled over a physiological range. Finally, the potential for ion transport studies was tested using the model ion channel, gramicidin, and voltage-clamp fluorometry measurements were performed with a voltage-dependent fluorophore/quencher pair. Whole-GUV patch-clamping allows ion transport and other voltage-dependent processes to be studied while controlling membrane composition, tension, and shape.

  7. Elevations of intracellular calcium reflect normal voltage-dependent behavior, and not constitutive activity, of voltage-dependent calcium channels in gastrointestinal and vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    McCarron, John G; Olson, Marnie L; Currie, Susan; Wright, Amanda J; Anderson, Kurt I; Girkin, John M

    2009-04-01

    In smooth muscle, the gating of dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca(2+) channels may either be stochastic and voltage dependent or coordinated among channels and constitutively active. Each form of gating has been proposed to be largely responsible for Ca(2+) influx and determining the bulk average cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration. Here, the contribution of voltage-dependent and constitutively active channel behavior to Ca(2+) signaling has been studied in voltage-clamped single vascular and gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells using wide-field epifluorescence with near simultaneous total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Depolarization (-70 to +10 mV) activated a dihydropyridine-sensitive voltage-dependent Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) and evoked a rise in [Ca(2+)] in each of the subplasma membrane space and bulk cytoplasm. In various regions of the bulk cytoplasm the [Ca(2+)] increase ([Ca(2+)](c)) was approximately uniform, whereas that of the subplasma membrane space ([Ca(2+)](PM)) had a wide range of amplitudes and time courses. The variations that occurred in the subplasma membrane space presumably reflected an uneven distribution of active Ca(2+) channels (clusters) across the sarcolemma, and their activation appeared consistent with normal voltage-dependent behavior. Indeed, in the present study, dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca(2+) channels were not normally constitutively active. The repetitive localized [Ca(2+)](PM) rises ("persistent Ca(2+) sparklets") that characterize constitutively active channels were observed rarely (2 of 306 cells). Neither did dihydropyridine-sensitive constitutively active Ca(2+) channels regulate the bulk average [Ca(2+)](c). A dihydropyridine blocker of Ca(2+) channels, nimodipine, which blocked I(Ca) and accompanying [Ca(2+)](c) rise, reduced neither the resting bulk average [Ca(2+)](c) (at -70 mV) nor the rise in [Ca(2+)](c), which accompanied an increased electrochemical driving force on the ion by hyperpolarization (-130 m

  8. Role of low voltage activated calcium channels in neuritogenesis and active migration of embryonic neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Louhivuori, Lauri M; Louhivuori, Verna; Wigren, Henna-Kaisa; Hakala, Elina; Jansson, Linda C; Nordström, Tommy; Castrén, Maija L; Akerman, Karl E

    2013-04-15

    The central role of calcium influx and electrical activity in embryonic development raises important questions about the role and regulation of voltage-dependent calcium influx. Using cultured neural progenitor cell (NPC) preparations, we recorded barium currents through voltage-activated channels using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique and monitored intracellular free calcium concentrations with Fura-2 digital imaging. We found that NPCs as well as expressing high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channels express functional low-threshold voltage-dependent calcium channels in the very early stages of differentiation (5 h to 1 day). The size of the currents recorded at -50 versus -20 mV after 1 day in differentiation was dependent on the nature of the charge carrier. Peak currents measured at -20 mV in the presence 10 mM Ca2+ instead of 10 mM Ba2+ had a tendency to be smaller, whereas the nature of the divalent species did not influence the amplitude measured at -50 mV. The T-type channel blockers mibefradil and NNC 55-0396 significantly reduced the calcium responses elicited by depolarizing with extracellular potassium, while the overall effect of the HVA calcium channel blockers was small at differentiation day 1. At differentiation day 20, the calcium responses were effectively blocked by nifedipine. Time-lapse imaging of differentiating neurospheres cultured in the presence of low-voltage-activated (LVA) blockers showed a significant decrease in the number of active migrating neuron-like cells and neurite extensions. Together, these data provide evidence that LVA calcium channels are involved in the physiology of differentiating and migrating NPCs.

  9. Clamp usable as jig and lifting clamp

    DOEpatents

    Tsuyama, Yoshizo

    1976-01-01

    There is provided a clamp which is well suited for use as a lifting clamp for lifting and moving materials of assembly in a shipyard, etc. and as a pulling jig in welding and other operations. The clamp comprises a clamp body including a shackle for engagement with a pulling device and a slot for receiving an article, and a pair of jaws provided on the leg portions of the clamp body on the opposite sides of the slot to grip the article in the slot, one of said jaws consisting of a screw rod and the other jaw consisting of a swivel jaw with a spherical surface, whereby when the article clamped in the slot by the pair of jaws tends to slide in any direction with respect to the clamp body, the article is more positively gripped by the pair of jaws.

  10. Transient sodium current at subthreshold voltages: activation by EPSP waveforms.

    PubMed

    Carter, Brett C; Giessel, Andrew J; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Bean, Bruce P

    2012-09-20

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channels carry large transient currents during action potentials and also "persistent" sodium current, a noninactivating TTX-sensitive current present at subthreshold voltages. We examined gating of subthreshold sodium current in dissociated cerebellar Purkinje neurons and hippocampal CA1 neurons, studied at 37°C with near-physiological ionic conditions. Unexpectedly, in both cell types small voltage steps at subthreshold voltages activated a substantial component of transient sodium current as well as persistent current. Subthreshold EPSP-like waveforms also activated a large component of transient sodium current, but IPSP-like waveforms engaged primarily persistent sodium current with only a small additional transient component. Activation of transient as well as persistent sodium current at subthreshold voltages produces amplification of EPSPs that is sensitive to the rate of depolarization and can help account for the dependence of spike threshold on depolarization rate, as previously observed in vivo.

  11. Transient sodium current at subthreshold voltages: activation by EPSP waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Brett C.; Giessel, Andrew J.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.; Bean, Bruce P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channels carry large transient currents during action potentials and also “persistent” sodium current, a non-inactivating TTX-sensitive current present at subthreshold voltages. We examined gating of subthreshold sodium current in dissociated cerebellar Purkinje neurons and hippocampal CA1 neurons, studied at 37 °C with near-physiological ionic conditions. Unexpectedly, in both cell types small voltage steps at subthreshold voltages activated a substantial component of transient sodium current as well as persistent current. Subthreshold EPSP-like waveforms also activated a large component of transient sodium current, but IPSP-like waveforms engaged primarily persistent sodium current with only a small additional transient component. Activation of transient as well as persistent sodium current at subthreshold voltages produces amplification of EPSPs that is sensitive to the rate of depolarization and can help account for the dependence of spike threshold on depolarization rate, as previously observed in vivo. PMID:22998875

  12. Voltage-induced slow activation and deactivation of mechanosensitive channels in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, S D; Magleby, K L

    1997-01-01

    1. The relationship between stretch and voltage activation of mechanosensitive (MS) channels from Xenopus oocytes was studied in excised patches of membrane using the patch clamp technique. 2. As is characteristic of MS channels to oocytes, stretching the membrane by applying negative pressure to the patch pipette at -50 mV activated the MS channels rapidly. The channels then deactivated rapidly when the stretch was removed. The stretch-activated MS channels entered a main conductance level (45 pS) and one or more subconductance levels in the range of about 75-90% of the main conductance level. 3. In the absence of stretch, a depolarizing step from -50 to +50 mV activated apparent MS channels after long delays of typically 1-20 s (range, 100 ms to 6 min). Upon repolarization, the channels deactivated slowly with a single exponential (mean time constant of 4 s) or double exponential (mean time constants of 0.8 and 3 s) time course. 4. Delayed activation with depolarization and slow deactivation upon repolarization were also observed for apparent MS channels in on-cell patches. 5. The voltage-activated channels were cation selective and had the same selectivity and conductance levels as the stretch activated MS channels. Applying stretch during voltage-induced channel activity did not activate any additional channels, and the same maximal number of channels were typically activated by either stretch or by voltage. These observations suggest that voltage activates the same MS channels that are activated by stretch. 6. The opening of MS channels following steps to +50 mV occurred in an apparently co-operative manner in 70% of the excised patches containing multiple MS channels. 7. In the absence of stretch, the opening frequency and open probability of MS channels increased with depolarization in the examined voltage range of -60 to -20 mV. 8. Applying a brief stretch during the delay to activation at +50 mV activated the MS channels rapidly, which then remained active

  13. Effects of SDPNFLRF-amide (PF1) on voltage-activated currents in Ascaris suum muscle.

    PubMed

    Verma, S; Robertson, A P; Martin, R J

    2009-02-01

    Helminth infections are of significant concern in veterinary and human medicine. The drugs available for chemotherapy are limited in number and the extensive use of these drugs has led to the development of resistance in parasites of animals and humans (Geerts and Gryseels, 2000; Kaplan, 2004; Osei-Atweneboana et al., 2007). The cyclooctadepsipeptide, emodepside, belongs to a new class of anthelmintic that has been released for animal use in recent years. Emodepside has been proposed to mimic the effects of the neuropeptide PF1 on membrane hyperpolarization and membrane conductance (Willson et al., 2003). We investigated the effects of PF1 on voltage-activated currents in Ascaris suum muscle cells. The whole cell voltage-clamp technique was employed to study these currents. Here we report two types of voltage-activated inward calcium currents: transient peak (I(peak)) and a steady-state (I(ss)). We found that 1microM PF1 inhibited the two calcium currents. The I(peak) decreased from -146nA to -99nA (P=0.0007) and the I(ss) decreased from -45nA to -12nA (P=0.002). We also found that PF1 in the presence of calcium increased the voltage-activated outward potassium current (from 521nA to 628nA (P=0.004)). The effect on the potassium current was abolished when calcium was removed and replaced with cobalt; it was also reduced at a higher concentration of PF1 (10microM). These studies demonstrate a mechanism by which PF1 decreases the excitability of the neuromuscular system by modulating calcium currents in nematodes. PF1 inhibits voltage-activated calcium currents and potentiates the voltage-activated calcium-dependent potassium current. The effect on a calcium-activated-potassium channel appears to be common to both PF1 and emodepside (Guest et al., 2007). It will be of interest to investigate the actions of emodepside on calcium currents to further elucidate the mechanism of action.

  14. Voltage-activated sodium current is inhibited by capsaicin in rat atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Milesi, V; Rebolledo, A; Alvis, A G; Raingo, J; Grassi de Gende, A O

    2001-04-13

    The effects of capsaicin, the active principle of hot pepper genus Capsicum, were studied on voltage-activated, tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ currents in isolated rat atrial cells using the patch clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. 0.4 and 4 microM of capsaicin produced a significant tonic block on voltage-activated Na+ current (I(Na)) evoked by a depolarizing step to -40 mV from a holding potential of -100 mV (49 +/- 7% n = 11, P < 0.05 and 72 +/- 13% n = 4, P < 0.05 respectively). We didn't observe any use-dependent block of capsaicin in our experimental conditions. Capsaicin slowed the time decay of inactivation of I(Na), and increased the time constant of the recovery of inactivation. Capsaicin and tetrodotoxin (TTX) depressed contractility of isolated electrically driven left rat atria, being the depression of maximal velocity of force development (dF/dt(max)) with respect to control values of 19 +/- 3% at 1 microM of capsaicin and 22 +/- 2% at 1 microM of TTX. These results show an inhibitory effect of capsaicin on I(Na) in isolated atrial cells that may modify the electrical and contractile function of the rat heart.

  15. N-cadherin modulates voltage activated calcium influx via RhoA, p120-catenin, and myosinactin interaction

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, Glen S.; Theisen, Christopher S.; Brusés, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    N-cadherin is a transmembrane adhesion receptor that contributes to neuronal development and synapse formation through homophilic interactions that provide structural-adhesive support to contacts between cell membranes. In addition, N-cadherin homotypic binding may initiate cell signaling that regulates neuronal physiology. In this study, we investigated signaling capabilities of N-cadherin that control voltage activated calcium influx. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recording of isolated inward calcium currents in freshly isolated chick ciliary ganglion neurons we show that the juxtamembrane region of N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain regulates high-threshold voltage activated calcium currents by interacting with p120-catenin and activating RhoA. This regulatory mechanism requires myosin interaction with actin. Furthermore, N-cadherin homophilic binding enhanced voltage activated calcium current amplitude in dissociated neurons that have already developed mature synaptic contacts in vivo. The increase in calcium current amplitude was not affected by brefeldin A suggesting that the effect is caused via direct channel modulation and not by increasing channel expression. In contrast, homotypic N-cadherin interaction failed to regulate calcium influx in freshly isolated immature neurons. However, RhoA inhibitors enhanced calcium current amplitude in these immature neurons, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of RhoA on calcium entry is regulated during neuronal development and synapse maturation. These results indicate that N-cadherin modulates voltage activated calcium entry by a mechanism that involves RhoA activity and its downstream effects on the cytoskeleton, and suggest that N-cadherin provides support for synaptic maturation and sustained synaptic activity by facilitating voltage activated calcium influx. PMID:19162191

  16. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  17. Estimating the number of channels in patch-clamp recordings: application to kinetic analysis of multichannel data from voltage-operated channels.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, W; Hohenthanner, K; Höfer, G F; Groschner, K; Romanin, C

    1997-01-01

    Important kinetic information of voltage-operated ion channels can be obtained by estimating the open probability, the availability, and the first latency, and by applying run analysis. In the case of multichannel patches, estimation of the number of available channels is a prerequisite for the above analysis. Here we describe a method for calculation of the a posteriori probability of the number of available channels in each sweep by using the Bayes formula. This probability serves as a measure for the number of channels and allows for first latency determination and run analysis. The methods described were applied to simulated and experimental data obtained from L-type Ca2+ channel recordings. PMID:9138562

  18. MATLAB implementation of a dynamic clamp with bandwidth >125 KHz capable of generating INa at 37°C

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Chris; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R.; Cohen, Ira S.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the construction of a dynamic clamp with bandwidth >125 KHz that utilizes a high performance, yet low cost, standard home/office PC interfaced with a high-speed (16 bit) data acquisition module. High bandwidth is achieved by exploiting recently available software advances (code-generation technology, optimized real-time kernel). Dynamic-clamp programs are constructed using Simulink, a visual programming language. Blocks for computation of membrane currents are written in the high-level matlab language; no programming in C is required. The instrument can be used in single- or dual-cell configurations, with the capability to modify programs while experiments are in progress. We describe an algorithm for computing the fast transient Na+ current (INa) in real time, and test its accuracy and stability using rate constants appropriate for 37°C. We then construct a program capable of supplying three currents to a cell preparation: INa, the hyperpolarizing-activated inward pacemaker current (If), and an inward-rectifier K+ current (IK1). The program corrects for the IR drop due to electrode current flow, and also records all voltages and currents. We tested this program on dual patch-clamped HEK293 cells where the dynamic clamp controls a current-clamp amplifier and a voltage-clamp amplifier controls membrane potential, and current-clamped HEK293 cells where the dynamic clamp produces spontaneous pacing behavior exhibiting Na+ spikes in otherwise passive cells. PMID:23224681

  19. Voltage dependence of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel K(Ca)3.1 in human erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Stoneking, Colin J; Shivakumar, Oshini; Thomas, David Nicholson; Colledge, William H; Mason, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    We have isolated a K(+)-selective, Ca(2+)-dependent whole cell current and single-channel correlate in the human erythroleukemia (HEL) cell line. The whole cell current was inhibited by the intermediate-conductance KCa3.1 inhibitors clotrimazole, TRAM-34, and charybdotoxin, unaffected by the small-conductance KCa2 family inhibitor apamin and the large-conductance KCa1.1 inhibitors paxilline and iberiotoxin, and augmented by NS309. The single-channel correlate of the whole cell current was blocked by TRAM-34 and clotrimazole, insensitive to paxilline, and augmented by NS309 and had a single-channel conductance in physiological K(+) gradients of ~9 pS. RT-PCR revealed that the KCa3.1 gene, but not the KCa1.1 gene, was expressed in HEL cells. The KCa3.1 current, isolated in HEL cells under whole cell patch-clamp conditions, displayed an activated current component during depolarizing voltage steps from hyperpolarized holding potentials and tail currents upon repolarization, consistent with voltage-dependent modulation. This activated current increased with increasing voltage steps above -40 mV and was sensitive to inhibition by clotrimazole, TRAM-34, and charybdotoxin and insensitive to apamin, paxilline, and iberiotoxin. In single-channel experiments, depolarization resulted in an increase in open channel probability (Po) of KCa3.1, with no increase in channel number. The voltage modulation of Po was an increasing monotonic function of voltage. In the absence of elevated Ca(2+), voltage was ineffective at inducing channel activity in whole cell and single-channel experiments. These data indicate that KCa3.1 in HEL cells displays a unique form of voltage dependence modulating Po.

  20. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  1. Making an Adjustable C-Clamp. Kit No. 603. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Manual. [Revised.] T & I--Metalwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jim; Alexander, Larry

    This student activity kit consists of a programmed, self-instructional learning guide and an accompanying instructor's manual for use in teaching trade and industrial education students how to make an adjustable C-clamp. The student guide contains step-by-step instructions in the following areas: basic layout principles; use of a hack saw, file,…

  2. A new balancing three level three dimensional space vector modulation strategy for three level neutral point clamped four leg inverter based shunt active power filter controlling by nonlinear back stepping controllers.

    PubMed

    Chebabhi, Ali; Fellah, Mohammed Karim; Kessal, Abdelhalim; Benkhoris, Mohamed F

    2016-07-01

    In this paper is proposed a new balancing three-level three dimensional space vector modulation (B3L-3DSVM) strategy which uses a redundant voltage vectors to realize precise control and high-performance for a three phase three-level four-leg neutral point clamped (NPC) inverter based Shunt Active Power Filter (SAPF) for eliminate the source currents harmonics, reduce the magnitude of neutral wire current (eliminate the zero-sequence current produced by single-phase nonlinear loads), and to compensate the reactive power in the three-phase four-wire electrical networks. This strategy is proposed in order to gate switching pulses generation, dc bus voltage capacitors balancing (conserve equal voltage of the two dc bus capacitors), and to switching frequency reduced and fixed of inverter switches in same times. A Nonlinear Back Stepping Controllers (NBSC) are used for regulated the dc bus voltage capacitors and the SAPF injected currents to robustness, stabilizing the system and to improve the response and to eliminate the overshoot and undershoot of traditional PI (Proportional-Integral). Conventional three-level three dimensional space vector modulation (C3L-3DSVM) and B3L-3DSVM are calculated and compared in terms of error between the two dc bus voltage capacitors, SAPF output voltages and THDv, THDi of source currents, magnitude of source neutral wire current, and the reactive power compensation under unbalanced single phase nonlinear loads. The success, robustness, and the effectiveness of the proposed control strategies are demonstrated through simulation using Sim Power Systems and S-Function of MATLAB/SIMULINK.

  3. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Brown, Malcolm P; Stancel, Robert

    2012-06-05

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  4. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Malcolm P.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Stancel, Robert

    2013-03-19

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  5. Clamping in Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Livesey, M

    1991-01-01

    A certain assumption that appears in the proof of correctness of the standard Boltzmann machine learning procedure is investigated. The assumption, called the clamping assumption, concerns the behavior of a Boltzmann machine when some of its units are clamped to a fixed state. It is argued that the clamping assumption is essentially an assertion of the time reversibility of a certain Markov chain underlying the behavior of the Boltzmann machine. As such, the clamping assumption is generally false, though it is certainly true of the Boltzmann machines themselves. The author also considers how the concept of the Boltzmann machine may be generalized while retaining the validity of the clamping assumption.

  6. Simulating the Activation of Voltage Sensing Domain for a Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Using Polarizable Force Field.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-Ning; Gong, Haipeng

    2017-03-02

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels play vital roles in the signal transduction of excitable cells. Upon activation of a NaV channel, the change of transmembrane voltage triggers conformational change of the voltage sensing domain, which then elicits opening of the pore domain and thus allows an influx of Na(+) ions. Description of this process with atomistic details is in urgent demand. In this work, we simulated the partial activation process of the voltage sensing domain of a prokaryotic NaV channel using a polarizable force field. We not only observed the conformational change of the voltage sensing domain from resting to preactive state, but also rigorously estimated the free energy profile along the identified reaction pathway. Comparison with the control simulation using an additive force field indicates that voltage-gating thermodynamics of NaV channels may be inaccurately described without considering the electrostatic polarization effect.

  7. Voltage-activated Calcium Currents in Octopus Cells of the Mouse Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Ramazan

    2007-01-01

    Octopus cells, neurons in the most posterior and dorsal part of the mammalian ventral cochlear nucleus, convey the timing of synchronous firing of auditory nerve fibers to targets in the contralateral superior paraolivary nucleus and ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus. The low input resistances and short time constants at rest that arise from the partial activation of a large, low-voltage-activated K+ conductance (gKL) and a large mixed-cation, hyperpolarization-activated conductance (gh) enable octopus cells to detect coincident firing of auditory nerve fibers with exceptional temporal precision. Octopus cells fire conventional, Na+ action potentials but a voltage-sensitive Ca2+ conductance was also detected. In this study, we explore the nature of that calcium conductance under voltage-clamp. Currents, carried by Ca2+ or Ba2+ and blocked by 0.4 mM Cd2+, were activated by depolarizations positive to −50 mV and peaked at −23 mV. At −23 mV they reached 1.1 ± 0.1 nA in the presence of 5 mM Ca2+ and 1.6 ± 0.1 nA in 5 mM Ba2+. Ten micromolar BAY K 8644, an agonist of high-voltage-activated L-type channels, enhanced IBa by 63 ± 11% (n = 8) and 150 μM nifedipine, an antagonist of L-type channels, reduced the IBa by 65 ± 5% (n = 5). Meanwhile, 0.5 μM ω-Agatoxin IVA, an antagonist of P/Q-type channels, or 1 μM ω-conotoxin GVIA, an antagonist of N-type channels, suppressed IBa by 15 ± 4% (n = 5) and 9 ± 4% (n = 5), respectively. On average 16% of the current remained in the presence of the cocktail of blockers, indicative of the presence of R-type channels. Together these experiments show that octopus cells have a depolarization-sensitive gCa that is largely formed from L-type Ca2+ channels and that P/Q-, N-, and R-type channels are expressed at lower levels in octopus cells. PMID:17710492

  8. Construction of a low-frequency high-power piezoelectric transformer with a specified step-up voltage transformation ratio using two identical bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kazunari; Konno, Takuma; Kosugi, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    We propose a low-frequency piezoelectric transformer comprising two identical bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducers (BLTs) and a stepped horn with a half-wavelength straight extension. The transformer can realize a specified step-up voltage transformation ratio as determined by the cross-sectional area ratio of the horn whose both ends the two BLTs are connected to, and the driving frequency at which the specified transformation ratio is realized can be set near its mechanical resonance. Thus, it can be mechanically held firmly at its vibratory node without affecting the mechanical vibration mode or resulting in a loss of energy. After relevant finite-element simulations, experiments were conducted for a trial-fabricated transformer of the above type. As a result, the experimental results predicted by the simulations were obtained in step-up operation. The influence of the load resistance on the deviation of the driving frequency from its total mechanical resonance of 53.1 kHz was found to be less than 130 Hz (0.24% of the resonance frequency) only. High-power performance of the piezoelectric transformer was also demonstrated.

  9. Compact, Stiff, Remotely-Actuable Quick-Release Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Ted W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a clamp that is compact and lightweight, yet provides high holding strength and stiffness or rigidity. The clamp uses a unique double slant interface design which provides mechanical advantages to resist forces applied to the clamp member as the load increases. The clamp allows for rapid and remote-activated release of the clamp jaws by applying only a small operating force to an over-center lock/release mechanism, such as by pulling a manual tether.

  10. Cascading MutS and MutL sliding clamps control DNA diffusion to activate mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaquan; Hanne, Jeungphill; Britton, Brooke M; Bennett, Jared; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard

    2016-11-24

    Mismatched nucleotides arise from polymerase misincorporation errors, recombination between heteroallelic parents and chemical or physical DNA damage. Highly conserved MutS (MSH) and MutL (MLH/PMS) homologues initiate mismatch repair and, in higher eukaryotes, act as DNA damage sensors that can trigger apoptosis. Defects in human mismatch repair genes cause Lynch syndrome or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and 10-40% of related sporadic tumours. However, the collaborative mechanics of MSH and MLH/PMS proteins have not been resolved in any organism. We visualized Escherichia coli (Ec) ensemble mismatch repair and confirmed that EcMutS mismatch recognition results in the formation of stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that randomly diffuse along the DNA with intermittent backbone contact. The EcMutS sliding clamps act as a platform to recruit EcMutL onto the mismatched DNA, forming an EcMutS-EcMutL search complex that then closely follows the DNA backbone. ATP binding by EcMutL establishes a second long-lived DNA clamp that oscillates between the principal EcMutS-EcMutL search complex and unrestricted EcMutS and EcMutL sliding clamps. The EcMutH endonuclease that targets mismatch repair excision only binds clamped EcMutL, increasing its DNA association kinetics by more than 1,000-fold. The assembly of an EcMutS-EcMutL-EcMutH search complex illustrates how sequential stable sliding clamps can modulate one-dimensional diffusion mechanics along the DNA to direct mismatch repair.

  11. Upregulation of the large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channels by Janus kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Zohreh; Almilaji, Ahmad; Honisch, Sabina; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Liu, GuoXing; Bhavsar, Shefalee K; Ruth, Peter; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Lang, Florian

    2014-06-01

    The iberiotoxin-sensitive large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels (maxi-K(+)-channels) hyperpolarize the cell membrane thus supporting Ca(2+) entry through Ca(2+)-release activated Ca(2+) channels. Janus kinase-2 (JAK2) has been identified as novel regulator of ion transport. To explore whether JAK2 participates in the regulation of BK channels, cRNA encoding Ca(2+)-insensitive BK channels (BK(M513I+Δ899-903)) was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without cRNA encoding wild-type JAK2, gain-of-function (V617F)JAK2, or inactive (K882E)JAK2. K(+) conductance was determined by dual electrode voltage clamp and BK-channel protein abundance by confocal microscopy. In A204 alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells, iberiotoxin-sensitive K(+) current was determined utilizing whole cell patch clamp. A204 cells were further transfected with JAK2 and BK-channel transcript, and protein abundance was quantified by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. As a result, the K(+) current in BK(M513I+Δ899-903)-expressing oocytes was significantly increased following coexpression of JAK2 or (V617F)JAK2 but not (K882E)JAK2. Coexpression of the BK channel with (V617F)JAK2 but not (K882E)JAK2 enhanced BK-channel protein abundance in the oocyte cell membrane. Exposure of BK-channel and (V617F)JAK2-expressing oocytes to the JAK2 inhibitor AG490 (40 μM) significantly decreased K(+) current. Inhibition of channel insertion by brefeldin A (5 μM) decreased the K(+) current to a similar extent in oocytes expressing the BK channel alone and in oocytes expressing the BK channel and (V617F)JAK2. The iberiotoxin (50 nM)-sensitive K(+) current in rhabdomyosarcoma cells was significantly decreased by AG490 pretreatment (40 μM, 12 h). Moreover, overexpression of JAK2 in A204 cells significantly enhanced BK channel mRNA and protein abundance. In conclusion, JAK2 upregulates BK channels by increasing channel protein abundance in the cell membrane.

  12. Large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel regulation by protein kinase C in guinea pig urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Smith, Amy C; Parajuli, Shankar P; Malysz, John; Petkov, Georgi V

    2014-03-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels are critical regulators of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) excitability and contractility. PKC modulates the contraction of DSM and BK channel activity in non-DSM cells; however, the cellular mechanism regulating the PKC-BK channel interaction in DSM remains unknown. We provide a novel mechanistic insight into BK channel regulation by PKC in DSM. We used patch-clamp electrophysiology, live-cell Ca(2+) imaging, and functional studies of DSM contractility to elucidate BK channel regulation by PKC at cellular and tissue levels. Voltage-clamp experiments showed that pharmacological activation of PKC with PMA inhibited the spontaneous transient BK currents in native freshly isolated guinea pig DSM cells. Current-clamp recordings revealed that PMA significantly depolarized DSM membrane potential and inhibited the spontaneous transient hyperpolarizations in DSM cells. The PMA inhibitory effects on DSM membrane potential were completely abolished by the selective BK channel inhibitor paxilline. Activation of PKC with PMA did not affect the amplitude of the voltage-step-induced whole cell steady-state BK current or the single BK channel open probability (recorded in cell-attached mode) upon inhibition of all major Ca(2+) sources for BK channel activation with thapsigargin, ryanodine, and nifedipine. PKC activation with PMA elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels in DSM cells and increased spontaneous phasic and nerve-evoked contractions of DSM isolated strips. Our results support the concept that PKC activation leads to a reduction of BK channel activity in DSM via a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, thus increasing DSM contractility.

  13. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  14. A Transformerless Hybrid Active Filter Capable of Complying with Harmonic Guidelines for Medium-Voltage Motor Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Ryota; Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper presents a transformerless hybrid active filter that is integrated into medium-voltage adjustable-speed motor drives for fans, pumps, and compressors without regenerative braking. The authors have designed and constructed a three-phase experimental system rated at 400V and 15kW, which is a downscaled model from a feasible 6.6-kV 1-MW motor drive system. This system consists of the hybrid filter connecting a passive filter tuned to the 7th harmonic filter in series with an active filter that is based on a three-level diode-clamped PWM converter, as well as an adjustable-speed motor drive in which a diode rectifier is used as the front end. The hybrid filter is installed on the ac side of the diode rectifier with no line-frequency transformer. The downscaled system has been exclusively tested so as to confirm the overall compensating performance of the hybrid filter and the filtering performance of a switching-ripple filter for mitigating switching-ripple voltages produced by the active filter. Experimental results verify that the hybrid filter achieves harmonic compensation of the source current in all the operating regions from no-load to the rated-load conditions, and that the switching-ripple filter reduces the switching-ripple voltages as expected.

  15. Monitoring Brain Activity with Protein Voltage and Calcium Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Storace, Douglas A.; Braubach, Oliver R.; Jin, Lei; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Sung, Uhna

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the roles of different cell types in the behaviors generated by neural circuits requires protein indicators that report neural activity with high spatio-temporal resolution. Genetically encoded fluorescent protein (FP) voltage sensors, which optically report the electrical activity in distinct cell populations, are, in principle, ideal candidates. Here we demonstrate that the FP voltage sensor ArcLight reports odor-evoked electrical activity in the in vivo mammalian olfactory bulb in single trials using both wide-field and 2-photon imaging. ArcLight resolved fast odorant-responses in individual glomeruli, and distributed odorant responses across a population of glomeruli. Comparisons between ArcLight and the protein calcium sensors GCaMP3 and GCaMP6f revealed that ArcLight had faster temporal kinetics that more clearly distinguished activity elicited by individual odorant inspirations. In contrast, the signals from both GCaMPs were a saturating integral of activity that returned relatively slowly to the baseline. ArcLight enables optical electrophysiology of mammalian neuronal population activity in vivo. PMID:25970202

  16. Quick action clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calco, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A quick release toggle clamp that utilizes a spring that requires a deliberate positive action for disengagement is presented. The clamp has a sliding bolt that provides a latching mechanism. The bolt is moved by a handle that tends to remain in an engaged position while under tension.

  17. MATLAB implementation of a dynamic clamp with bandwidth of >125 kHz capable of generating I Na at 37 °C.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Chris; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R; Cohen, Ira S

    2013-04-01

    We describe the construction of a dynamic clamp with a bandwidth of >125 kHz that utilizes a high-performance, yet low-cost, standard home/office PC interfaced with a high-speed (16 bit) data acquisition module. High bandwidth is achieved by exploiting recently available software advances (code-generation technology and optimized real-time kernel). Dynamic-clamp programs are constructed using Simulink, a visual programming language. Blocks for computation of membrane currents are written in the high-level MATLAB language; no programming in C is required. The instrument can be used in single- or dual-cell configurations, with the capability to modify programs while experiments are in progress. We describe an algorithm for computing the fast transient Na(+) current (I Na) in real time and test its accuracy and stability using rate constants appropriate for 37 °C. We then construct a program capable of supplying three currents to a cell preparation: I Na, the hyperpolarizing-activated inward pacemaker current (I f) and an inward-rectifier K(+) current (I K1). The program corrects for the IR drop due to electrode current flow and also records all voltages and currents. We tested this program on dual patch-clamped HEK293 cells where the dynamic clamp controls a current-clamp amplifier and a voltage-clamp amplifier controls membrane potential, and current-clamped HEK293 cells where the dynamic clamp produces spontaneous pacing behavior exhibiting Na(+) spikes in otherwise passive cells.

  18. Mechanisms of Activation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grizel, A. V.; Glukhov, G. S.; Sokolova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium ion channels (Kv) play an important role in a variety of cellular processes, including the functioning of excitable cells, regulation of apoptosis, cell growth and differentiation, the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, maintenance of cardiac activity, etc. Failure in the functioning of Kv channels leads to severe genetic disorders and the development of tumors, including malignant ones. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Kv channels functioning is a key factor in determining the cause of the diseases associated with mutations in the channels, and in the search for new drugs. The mechanism of activation of the channels is a topic of ongoing debate, and a consensus on the issue has not yet been reached. This review discusses the key stages in studying the mechanisms of functioning of Kv channels and describes the basic models of their activation known to date. PMID:25558391

  19. Estimating the voltage-dependent free energy change of ion channels using the median voltage for activation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sandipan; Chanda, Baron

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are crucial for electrical activity and chemical signaling in a variety of cell types. Structure-activity studies involving electrophysiological characterization of mutants are widely used and allow us to quickly realize the energetic effects of a mutation by measuring macroscopic currents and fitting the observed voltage dependence of conductance to a Boltzmann equation. However, such an approach is somewhat limiting, principally because of the inherent assumption that the channel activation is a two-state process. In this analysis, we show that the area delineated by the gating charge displacement curve and its ordinate axis is related to the free energy of activation of a voltage-gated ion channel. We derive a parameter, the median voltage of charge transfer (V(m)), which is proportional to this area, and prove that the chemical component of free energy change of a system can be obtained from the knowledge of V(m) and the maximum number of charges transferred. Our method is not constrained by the number or connectivity of intermediate states and is applicable to instances in which the observed responses show a multiphasic behavior. We consider various models of ion channel gating with voltage-dependent steps, latent charge movement, inactivation, etc. and discuss the applicability of this approach in each case. Notably, our method estimates a net free energy change of approximately -14 kcal/mol associated with the full-scale activation of the Shaker potassium channel, in contrast to -2 to -3 kcal/mol estimated from a single Boltzmann fit. Our estimate of the net free energy change in the system is consistent with those derived from detailed kinetic models (Zagotta et al. 1994. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.103.2.321). The median voltage method can reliably quantify the magnitude of free energy change associated with activation of a voltage-dependent system from macroscopic equilibrium measurements. This will be particularly useful

  20. Improved Active Harmonic Current Elimination Based on Voltage Detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tianyuan; Dong, Shuan; Huang, Yingwei; Liu, Jian; Le, Jian; Liu, Kaipei

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing penetration of power electronic equipment in modern residential distribution systems, harmonics mitigation through the distributed generation (DG) interfacing converters has received significant attention. Among recently proposed methods, the so-called active resonance damper (ARD) and harmonic voltage compensator (HVC) based on voltage detection can effectively reduce the harmonic distortions in selected areas of distribution systems. However, it is found out that when traditional ARD algorithm is used to eliminate harmonic current injected by non-linear loads, its performance is constrained by stability problems and can at most eliminate half of the load harmonic currents. Thus, inspired by the duality between ARD and HVC, this paper presents a novel improved resistive active power filter (R-APF) algorithm based on integral-decoupling control. The design guideline for its parameters is then investigated through carefully analyzing the closed-loop poles' trajectory. Computer studies demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively mitigate the load harmonic currents and its performance is much better than traditional ARD based on proportional control.

  1. Improved Active Harmonic Current Elimination Based on Voltage Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tianyuan; Dong, Shuan; Huang, Yingwei; Liu, Jian; Le, Jian; Liu, Kaipei

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing penetration of power electronic equipment in modern residential distribution systems, harmonics mitigation through the distributed generation (DG) interfacing converters has received significant attention. Among recently proposed methods, the so-called active resonance damper (ARD) and harmonic voltage compensator (HVC) based on voltage detection can effectively reduce the harmonic distortions in selected areas of distribution systems. However, it is found out that when traditional ARD algorithm is used to eliminate harmonic current injected by non-linear loads, its performance is constrained by stability problems and can at most eliminate half of the load harmonic currents. Thus, inspired by the duality between ARD and HVC, this paper presents a novel improved resistive active power filter (R-APF) algorithm based on integral-decoupling control. The design guideline for its parameters is then investigated through carefully analyzing the closed-loop poles’ trajectory. Computer studies demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively mitigate the load harmonic currents and its performance is much better than traditional ARD based on proportional control. PMID:27295213

  2. Phosphoinositide 5- and 3-phosphatase activities of a voltage-sensing phosphatase in living cells show identical voltage dependence

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Dongil; Kim, Dong-Il; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensing phosphatases (VSPs) are homologs of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), a phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] 3-phosphatase. However, VSPs have a wider range of substrates, cleaving 3-phosphate from PI(3,4)P2 and probably PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as 5-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3 in response to membrane depolarization. Recent proposals say these reactions have differing voltage dependence. Using Förster resonance energy transfer probes specific for different PIs in living cells with zebrafish VSP, we quantitate both voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions against endogenous substrates. These activities become apparent with different voltage thresholds, voltage sensitivities, and catalytic rates. As an analytical tool, we refine a kinetic model that includes the endogenous pools of phosphoinositides, endogenous phosphatase and kinase reactions connecting them, and four exogenous voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions of VSP. We show that apparent voltage threshold differences for seeing effects of the 5- and 3-phosphatase activities in cells are not due to different intrinsic voltage dependence of these reactions. Rather, the reactions have a common voltage dependence, and apparent differences arise only because each VSP subreaction has a different absolute catalytic rate that begins to surpass the respective endogenous enzyme activities at different voltages. For zebrafish VSP, our modeling revealed that 3-phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5)P3 is 55-fold slower than 5-phosphatase activity against PI(4,5)P2; thus, PI(4,5)P2 generated more slowly from dephosphorylating PI(3,4,5)P3 might never accumulate. When 5-phosphatase activity was counteracted by coexpression of a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase, there was accumulation of PI(4,5)P2 in parallel to PI(3,4,5)P3 dephosphorylation

  3. Laser beam guard clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Richard K.

    2010-09-07

    A quick insert and release laser beam guard panel clamping apparatus having a base plate mountable on an optical table, a first jaw affixed to the base plate, and a spring-loaded second jaw slidably carried by the base plate to exert a clamping force. The first and second jaws each having a face acutely angled relative to the other face to form a V-shaped, open channel mouth, which enables wedge-action jaw separation by and subsequent clamping of a laser beam guard panel inserted through the open channel mouth. Preferably, the clamping apparatus also includes a support structure having an open slot aperture which is positioned over and parallel with the open channel mouth.

  4. A monogenean without clamps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ectoparasites face a daily challenge: to remain attached to their host. Polyopisthocotylean monogeneans attach to the surface of fish gills by highly specialized structures, the sclerotized clamps. In the original description of the protomicrocotylid species Lethacotyle fijiensis, described 50 years...

  5. High voltage protection in active matrix flat-panel imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Joerg; Zhao, Wei

    2006-03-01

    Various direct and indirect active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPI) are being investigated for x-ray imaging. In both direct AMFPI and indirect AMFPI with avalanche gain, a bias potential up to several thousand volts is required to operate the photoconductor. Under the condition of a large amount of radiation exposure between subsequent readout, a potential >80 V could appear across the amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film transistor (TFT) and cause permanent damage. The purpose of this paper is to investigate a simple pixel design for high voltage protection. The pixel electrode acts as an additional gate for the top channel of an a-Si TFT to drain excess image charge from the pixel electrode until an equilibrium is reached where the TFT channel current equals the detector signal current at a predetermined safe maximum value V Pmax for the pixel potential. This "dual-gate" TFT structure without additional protective device simplifies the TFT array design and improves yield. However special care is required to understand the characteristics of both the top and the bottom gates to ensure sufficient detector dynamic range as well as reliable high voltage protection. A physical model for dual-gate a-Si TFTs was developed and device parameters were determined by fitting the model to measured characteristics from a dual-gate TFT array. Our results showed that compared to the bottom (normal) gate, the protective gate has a shallower transfer characteristics (i.e. channel current as a function of gate voltage) due to a higher density of states in the top interface. Nevertheless it provides adequate protection of the TFT with V Pmax of ~40 V for typical radiographic exposures.

  6. Regulation by second messengers of the slowly activating, voltage-dependent potassium current expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Busch, A E; Kavanaugh, M P; Varnum, M D; Adelman, J P; North, R A

    1992-01-01

    1. Voltage-clamp recordings of membrane current were made from Xenopus oocytes that had been injected with RNA which had been transcribed in vitro from a cloned complementary DNA. 2. Depolarization from -80 mV evoked outward potassium currents that developed very slowly. At -20 mV the time constant for activation was about 50 s, and at +40 mV about 6 s. 3. The potassium current was increased by the calcium ionophore A23187 or by intracellular injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), each of which should increase the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The current was decreased by injection of BAPTA (1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid). The current was also reduced by phorbol esters; this effect was blocked by staurosporine. 4. In oocytes that had also been injected with RNA encoding the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT2) receptor, 5-HT increased the potassium current. After caffeine pretreatment, to block the release of intracellular calcium, 5-HT decreased the current; this decrease was prevented by staurosporine. 5. It is concluded that the slowly activating, voltage-dependent potassium current expressed in Xenopus oocytes is increased by increases in [Ca2+]i and is decreased by activation of protein kinase C. Stimulation of 5-HT2 receptors can have both these effects, but the former normally predominates. Images Fig. 4 PMID:1432714

  7. Role of low-voltage-activated calcium current and extracellular calcium in controlling the firing pattern of developing CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Sánchez-Alonso, José Luis; Vicente-Torres, María Ángeles; Colino, Asunción

    2017-03-06

    The firing pattern of individual neurons is an important element for information processing and storing. During the first weeks of development, there is a transitional period during which CA1 pyramidal neurons display burst-spiking behavior in contrast to the adult regular-firing pattern. Spike after-depolarizations (ADPs) constitute a major factor underlying burst-spiking behavior. Using current-clamp recordings, we studied ADP waveforms and firing patterns in CA1 pyramidal neurons of Wistar rats from 9 to 19 postnatal days (P9-19). The percentage of burst-spiking neurons increased up to P16, in correlation with the emergence of an active component in the ADP. The application of low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channel blockers such as nickel or mibefradil suppressed the generation of the active ADP component and burst-spiking behavior. In agreement with the development of the ADP waveform and burst-spiking behavior, voltage-clamp experiments in dissociated pyramidal neurons showed an increase in the LVA calcium current in P16-19 vs P9-12. Finally, we found that a reduction of extracellular calcium levels decreases the percentage of burst-spiking cells due to a reduction in the active component of the ADP. We conclude that a major contribution of LVA calcium channels to ADP determines the bursting capability of CA1 pyramidal neurons during a transitional postnatal period in contrast to adulthood.

  8. The voltage-activated hydrogen ion conductance in rat alveolar epithelial cells is determined by the pH gradient

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Voltage-activated H+ currents were studied in rat alveolar epithelial cells using tight-seal whole-cell voltage clamp recording and highly buffered, EGTA-containing solutions. Under these conditions, the tail current reversal potential, Vrev, was close to the Nernst potential, EH, varying 52 mV/U pH over four delta pH units (delta pH = pHo - pHi). This result indicates that H+ channels are extremely selective, PH/PTMA > 10(7), and that both internal and external pH, pHi, and pHo, were well controlled. The H+ current amplitude was practically constant at any fixed delta pH, in spite of up to 100-fold symmetrical changes in H+ concentration. Thus, the rate-limiting step in H+ permeation is pH independent, must be localized to the channel (entry, permeation, or exit), and is not bulk diffusion limitation. The instantaneous current- voltage relationship exhibited distinct outward rectification at symmetrical pH, suggesting asymmetry in the permeation pathway. Sigmoid activation kinetics and biexponential decay of tail currents near threshold potentials indicate that H+ channels pass through at least two closed states before opening. The steady state H+ conductance, gH, as well as activation and deactivation kinetic parameters were all shifted along the voltage axis by approximately 40 mV/U pH by changes in pHi or pHo, with the exception of the fast component of tail currents which was shifted less if at all. The threshold potential at which H+ currents were detectably activated can be described empirically as approximately 20-40(pHo-pHi) mV. If internal and external protons regulate the voltage dependence of gH gating at separate sites, then they must be equally effective. A simpler interpretation is that gating is controlled by the pH gradient, delta pH. We propose a simple general model to account for the observed delta pH dependence. Protonation at an externally accessible site stabilizes the closed channel conformation. Deprotonation of this site permits a

  9. Low-voltage activated calcium currents in ganglion cells of the tiger salamander retina: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Dori; Miller, Robert F

    2007-01-01

    We examined the functional properties of a low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium current in ganglion cells of the neotenous tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) retina. Our analysis was based on whole-cell recordings from acutely dissociated ganglion cell bodies identified by retrograde dye injections. Using a continuously perfused cell preparation, the LVA current was isolated with the use of potassium channel blocking agents added to the bathing medium and the pipette solution, while tetrodotoxin was added to the bathing medium to block Na+ channels. Approximately 70% of ganglion cells had an easily identified LVA current. The LVA current activated at membrane potentials more positive than -90 mV, and inactivated rapidly. It was relatively insensitive to nickel (IC50 > 500 microM) and amiloride (IC50 > 750 microM). Voltage- and current-clamp studies allowed us to generate a model of this current using the NEURON simulation program. Studies were also carried out to measure the LVA Ca2+ current in ganglion cells with dendrites to confirm that it had a significant dendritic representation. Physiological mechanisms that may depend on LVA Ca2+ currents are discussed with an emphasis on the role that dendrites play in ganglion cell function.

  10. Proton currents constrain structural models of voltage sensor activation

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Aaron L; Mokrab, Younes; Bennett, Ashley L; Sansom, Mark SP; Ramsey, Ian Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is evidently unique among voltage sensor domain proteins in mediating an intrinsic ‘aqueous’ H+ conductance (GAQ). Mutation of a highly conserved ‘gating charge’ residue in the S4 helix (R1H) confers a resting-state H+ ‘shuttle’ conductance (GSH) in VGCs and Ci VSP, and we now report that R1H is sufficient to reconstitute GSH in Hv1 without abrogating GAQ. Second-site mutations in S3 (D185A/H) and S4 (N4R) experimentally separate GSH and GAQ gating, which report thermodynamically distinct initial and final steps, respectively, in the Hv1 activation pathway. The effects of Hv1 mutations on GSH and GAQ are used to constrain the positions of key side chains in resting- and activated-state VS model structures, providing new insights into the structural basis of VS activation and H+ transfer mechanisms in Hv1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18017.001 PMID:27572256

  11. Functional dissection of synaptic circuits: in vivo patch-clamp recording in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Can; Zhang, Guangwei; Xiong, Ying; Zhou, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity is dominated by synaptic inputs from excitatory or inhibitory neural circuits. With the development of in vivo patch-clamp recording, especially in vivo voltage-clamp recording, researchers can not only directly measure neuronal activity, such as spiking responses or membrane potential dynamics, but also quantify synaptic inputs from excitatory and inhibitory circuits in living animals. This approach enables researchers to directly unravel different synaptic components and to understand their underlying roles in particular brain functions. Combining in vivo patch-clamp recording with other techniques, such as two-photon imaging or optogenetics, can provide even clearer functional dissection of the synaptic contributions of different neurons or nuclei. Here, we summarized current applications and recent research progress using the in vivo patch-clamp recording method and focused on its role in the functional dissection of different synaptic inputs. The key factors of a successful in vivo patch-clamp experiment and possible solutions based on references and our experiences were also discussed. PMID:26052270

  12. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  13. The β2 clamp in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA polymerase III αβ2ε replicase promotes polymerization and reduces exonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shoujin; Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Hongtai; Fleming, Joy; Yang, Weiqiang; Wang, Shihua; Wei, Wenjing; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Guofeng; Deng, Jiaoyu; Hou, Jian; Zhou, Ying; Lin, Shiqiang; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase III (DNA pol III) is a multi-subunit replication machine responsible for the accurate and rapid replication of bacterial genomes, however, how it functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires further investigation. We have reconstituted the leading-strand replication process of the Mtb DNA pol III holoenzyme in vitro, and investigated the physical and functional relationships between its key components. We verify the presence of an αβ2ε polymerase-clamp-exonuclease replicase complex by biochemical methods and protein-protein interaction assays in vitro and in vivo and confirm that, in addition to the polymerase activity of its α subunit, Mtb DNA pol III has two potential proofreading subunits; the α and ε subunits. During DNA replication, the presence of the β2 clamp strongly promotes the polymerization of the αβ2ε replicase and reduces its exonuclease activity. Our work provides a foundation for further research on the mechanism by which the replication machinery switches between replication and proofreading and provides an experimental platform for the selection of antimicrobials targeting DNA replication in Mtb. PMID:26822057

  14. Clamping characteristics study on different types of clamping unit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhiwei; Liu, Haichao; Xie, Pengcheng; Yang, Weimin

    2015-05-22

    Plastic products are becoming more and more widely used in aerospace, IT, digital electronics and many other fields. With the development of technology, the requirement of product precision is getting higher and higher. However, type and working performance of clamping unit play a decisive role in product precision. Clamping characteristics of different types of clamping unit are discussed in this article, which use finite element numerical analysis method through the software ABAQUS to study the clamping uniformity, and detect the clamping force repeatability precision. The result shows that compared with toggled three-platen clamping unit, clamping characteristics of internal circulation two-platen clamping unit are better, for instance, its mold cavity deformation and force that bars and mold parting surface suffered are more uniform, and its clamping uniformity and repeatability precision is also better.

  15. Identification of an ovarian voltage-activated Na+-channel type: hints to involvement in luteolysis.

    PubMed

    Bulling, A; Berg, F D; Berg, U; Duffy, D M; Stouffer, R L; Ojeda, S R; Gratzl, M; Mayerhofer, A

    2000-07-01

    An endocrine type of voltage-activated sodium channel (eNaCh) was identified in the human ovary and human luteinized granulosa cells (GC). Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed that the eNaCh in GC is functional and tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive. The luteotrophic hormone human CG (hCG) was found to decrease the peak amplitude of the sodium current within seconds. Treatment with hCG for 24-48 h suppressed not only eNaCh mRNA levels, but also mean Na+ peak currents and resting membrane potentials. An unexpected role for eNaChs in regulating cell morphology and function was indicated after pharmacological modulation of presumed eNaCh steady-state activity in GC cultures for 24-48 h using TTX (NaCh blocker) and veratridine (NaCh activator). TTX preserved a highly differentiated cellular phenotype. Veratridine not only increased the number of secondary lysosomes but also led to a significantly reduced progesterone production. Importantly, endocrine cells of the nonhuman primate corpus luteum (CL), which represent in vivo counterparts of luteinized GC, also contain eNaCh mRNA. Although the mechanism of channel activity under physiological conditions is not clear, it may include persistent Na+ currents. As observed in GC in culture, abundant secondary lysosomes were particularly evident in the regressing CL, suggesting a functional link between eNaCh activity and this form of cellular regression in vivo. Our results identify eNaCh in ovarian endocrine cells and demonstrate that their expression is under the inhibitory control of hCG. Activation of eNaChs in luteal cells, due to loss of gonadotropin support, may initiate a cascade of events leading to decreased CL function, a process that involves lysosomal activation and autophagy. These results imply that ovarian eNaChs are involved in the physiological demise of the temporary endocrine organ CL in the primate ovary during the menstrual cycle. Because commonly used drugs, including phenytoin, target NaChs, these results

  16. Modulation by different GABAB receptor types of voltage-activated calcium currents in rat thalamocortical neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Guyon, A; Leresche, N

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents were studied in rat thalamocortical neurones with the use of whole cell voltage-clamp recordings in brain slices. 2. The contribution of N-, L- and P-types of Ca2+ channels to the total high voltage-activated Ca2+ (HVA Ca2+) current was assessed by the use of omega-conotoxin, nifedipine and omega-agatoxin IVA, respectively. No P-type current could be detected. Thus, the HVA Ca2+ current contained an N- and an L-type current (23 and 15% of the total current, respectively) and a residual current, which will be referred to as the 'R' component. 3. Baclofen (1-50 microM) had no effect on the low voltage-activated (LVA) Ca2+ current (IT). 4. At low concentrations (0.5-10 microM), baclofen decreased the HVA Ca2+ currents by about 10-20% without a marked modification on the kinetics, whereas 50 microM baclofen decreased the HVA Ca2+ currents by about 40% with a pronounced slowing down of the kinetics. 5. The 10-20% decrease of the total HVA Ca2+ currents produced by the low concentrations of baclofen occurred as the result of a 30% block of the 'R' component. The additional decrease observed with the dose of 50 microM was due to a full block of the N-type current. The L-type was unaffected by baclofen. 6. The effect of baclofen on the total HVA Ca2+ current was partially blocked by GABAB receptor antagonists indicating that it occurred through stimulation of GABAB receptors. 7. The effect of baclofen on the N-type current was abolished by CGP 35348 (100 microM) and CGP 55845A (100 nM). The effect on the 'R' component was also antagonized by CGP 55845A (100 nM) although with a lower potency, but was not blocked by CGP 35348 (100 microM). 8. We conclude that the effects of baclofen on the various components of the HVA Ca2+ currents occur through different types of GABAB receptors. One receptor has a high affinity for baclofen (i.e. saturated by concentrations as low as 0.5 micro

  17. Clamp for detonating fuze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holderman, E. J.

    1968-01-01

    Quick acting clamp provides physical support for a closely confined detonating fuse in an application requiring removal and replacement at frequent intervals during test. It can be designed with a base of any required strength and configuration to permit the insertion of an object.

  18. The voltage dependence of the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel is modified by mutations in the first putative intracellular loop

    PubMed Central

    Cenedese, Valentina; Betto, Giulia; Celsi, Fulvio; Cherian, O. Lijo; Pifferi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs) are involved in several physiological processes. Recently, TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 have been shown to function as CaCCs, but very little information is available on the structure–function relations of these channels. TMEM16B is expressed in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons, in microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, and in the synaptic terminals of retinal photoreceptors. Here, we have performed the first site-directed mutagenesis study on TMEM16B to understand the molecular mechanisms of voltage and Ca2+ dependence. We have mutated amino acids in the first putative intracellular loop and measured the properties of the wild-type and mutant TMEM16B channels expressed in HEK 293T cells using the whole cell voltage-clamp technique in the presence of various intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. We mutated E367 into glutamine or deleted the five consecutive glutamates 386EEEEE390 and 399EYE401. The EYE deletion did not significantly modify the apparent Ca2+ dependence nor the voltage dependence of channel activation. E367Q and deletion of the five glutamates did not greatly affect the apparent Ca2+ affinity but modified the voltage dependence, shifting the conductance–voltage relations toward more positive voltages. These findings indicate that glutamates E367 and 386EEEEE390 in the first intracellular putative loop play an important role in the voltage dependence of TMEM16B, thus providing an initial structure–function study for this channel. PMID:22412191

  19. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Induces the Voltage-Independent Activation of Inward Membrane Currents and Elevation of Intracellular Calcium in HIT-T15 Insulinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    LEECH, COLIN A.; HOLZ, GEORGE G.; HABENER, JOEL F.

    2010-01-01

    The secretion of insulin by pancreatic β-cells is controlled by synergistic interactions of glucose and hormones of the glucagon-related peptide family, of which pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a member. Here we show by simultaneous recording of intracellular calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) and membrane potential that both PACAP-27 and PACAP-38 depolarize HIT-T15 cells and raise [Ca2+]i. PACAP stimulation can result in membrane depolarization by two distinct mechanisms: 1) PACAP reduces the membrane conductance and increases membrane excitability; and 2) PACAP activates a pronounced inward current that is predominantly a Na+ current, blockable by La3+, and which exhibits a reversal potential of about −28 mV. Activation of this current does not require membrane depolarization, because the response is observed when cells are held under voltage clamp at −70 mV. This current may result from the cAMP-dependent activation of nonspecific cation channels because the current is also observed in response to forskolin or membrane-permeant analogs of cAMP. We also suggest that PACAP raises [Ca2+]i and stimulates insulin secretion by three distinct mechanisms: 1) depolarization activates Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels, 2) mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores, and 3) entry of Ca2+ via voltage-independent Ca2+ channels. These effects of PACAP may play an important role in a neuro-entero-endocrine loop regulating insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells during the transition period from fasting to feeding. PMID:7895663

  20. Hair cells use active zones with different voltage dependence of Ca2+ influx to decompose sounds into complementary neural codes

    PubMed Central

    Ohn, Tzu-Lun; Rutherford, Mark A.; Jing, Zhizi; Jung, Sangyong; Duque-Afonso, Carlos J.; Hoch, Gerhard; Picher, Maria Magdalena; Scharinger, Anja; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    For sounds of a given frequency, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) with different thresholds and dynamic ranges collectively encode the wide range of audible sound pressures. Heterogeneity of synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and SGNs is an attractive candidate mechanism for generating complementary neural codes covering the entire dynamic range. Here, we quantified active zone (AZ) properties as a function of AZ position within mouse IHCs by combining patch clamp and imaging of presynaptic Ca2+ influx and by immunohistochemistry. We report substantial AZ heterogeneity whereby the voltage of half-maximal activation of Ca2+ influx ranged over ∼20 mV. Ca2+ influx at AZs facing away from the ganglion activated at weaker depolarizations. Estimates of AZ size and Ca2+ channel number were correlated and larger when AZs faced the ganglion. Disruption of the deafness gene GIPC3 in mice shifted the activation of presynaptic Ca2+ influx to more hyperpolarized potentials and increased the spontaneous SGN discharge. Moreover, Gipc3 disruption enhanced Ca2+ influx and exocytosis in IHCs, reversed the spatial gradient of maximal Ca2+ influx in IHCs, and increased the maximal firing rate of SGNs at sound onset. We propose that IHCs diversify Ca2+ channel properties among AZs and thereby contribute to decomposing auditory information into complementary representations in SGNs. PMID:27462107

  1. Reconstruction of Cell Surface Densities of Ion Pumps, Exchangers, and Channels from mRNA Expression, Conductance Kinetics, Whole-Cell Calcium, and Current-Clamp Voltage Recordings, with an Application to Human Uterine Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Atia, Jolene; McCloskey, Conor; Shmygol, Anatoly S; Rand, David A; van den Berg, Hugo A; Blanks, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    Uterine smooth muscle cells remain quiescent throughout most of gestation, only generating spontaneous action potentials immediately prior to, and during, labor. This study presents a method that combines transcriptomics with biophysical recordings to characterise the conductance repertoire of these cells, the 'conductance repertoire' being the total complement of ion channels and transporters expressed by an electrically active cell. Transcriptomic analysis provides a set of potential electrogenic entities, of which the conductance repertoire is a subset. Each entity within the conductance repertoire was modeled independently and its gating parameter values were fixed using the available biophysical data. The only remaining free parameters were the surface densities for each entity. We characterise the space of combinations of surface densities (density vectors) consistent with experimentally observed membrane potential and calcium waveforms. This yields insights on the functional redundancy of the system as well as its behavioral versatility. Our approach couples high-throughput transcriptomic data with physiological behaviors in health and disease, and provides a formal method to link genotype to phenotype in excitable systems. We accurately predict current densities and chart functional redundancy. For example, we find that to evoke the observed voltage waveform, the BK channel is functionally redundant whereas hERG is essential. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that activation of calcium-activated chloride conductances by intracellular calcium release is the key factor underlying spontaneous depolarisations.

  2. Reconstruction of Cell Surface Densities of Ion Pumps, Exchangers, and Channels from mRNA Expression, Conductance Kinetics, Whole-Cell Calcium, and Current-Clamp Voltage Recordings, with an Application to Human Uterine Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Atia, Jolene; McCloskey, Conor; Shmygol, Anatoly S.; Rand, David A.; van den Berg, Hugo A.; Blanks, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine smooth muscle cells remain quiescent throughout most of gestation, only generating spontaneous action potentials immediately prior to, and during, labor. This study presents a method that combines transcriptomics with biophysical recordings to characterise the conductance repertoire of these cells, the ‘conductance repertoire’ being the total complement of ion channels and transporters expressed by an electrically active cell. Transcriptomic analysis provides a set of potential electrogenic entities, of which the conductance repertoire is a subset. Each entity within the conductance repertoire was modeled independently and its gating parameter values were fixed using the available biophysical data. The only remaining free parameters were the surface densities for each entity. We characterise the space of combinations of surface densities (density vectors) consistent with experimentally observed membrane potential and calcium waveforms. This yields insights on the functional redundancy of the system as well as its behavioral versatility. Our approach couples high-throughput transcriptomic data with physiological behaviors in health and disease, and provides a formal method to link genotype to phenotype in excitable systems. We accurately predict current densities and chart functional redundancy. For example, we find that to evoke the observed voltage waveform, the BK channel is functionally redundant whereas hERG is essential. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that activation of calcium-activated chloride conductances by intracellular calcium release is the key factor underlying spontaneous depolarisations. PMID:27105427

  3. NS1643 Interacts around L529 of hERG to Alter Voltage Sensor Movement on the Path to Activation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiqing; Cheng, Yen May; Lees-Miller, James P.; Perissinotti, Laura L.; Claydon, Tom W.; Hull, Christina M.; Thouta, Samrat; Roach, Daniel E.; Durdagi, Serdar; Noskov, Sergei Y.; Duff, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    Activators of hERG1 such as NS1643 are being developed for congenital/acquired long QT syndrome. Previous studies identify the neighborhood of L529 around the voltage-sensor as a putative interacting site for NS1643. With NS1643, the V1/2 of activation of L529I (−34 ± 4 mV) is similar to wild-type (WT) (−37 ± 3 mV; P > 0.05). WT and L529I showed no difference in the slope factor in the absence of NS1643 (8 ± 0 vs. 9 ± 0) but showed a difference in the presence of NS1643 (9 ± 0.3 vs. 22 ± 1; P < 0.01). Voltage-clamp-fluorimetry studies also indicated that in L529I, NS1643 reduces the voltage-sensitivity of S4 movement. To further assess mechanism of NS1643 action, mutations were made in this neighborhood. NS1643 shifts the V1/2 of activation of both K525C and K525C/L529I to hyperpolarized potentials (−131 ± 4 mV for K525C and −120 ± 21 mV for K525C/L529I). Both K525C and K525C/K529I had similar slope factors in the absence of NS1643 (18 ± 2 vs. 34 ± 5, respectively) but with NS1643, the slope factor of K525C/L529I increased from 34 ± 5 to 71 ± 10 (P < 0.01) whereas for K525C the slope factor did not change (18 ± 2 at baseline and 16 ± 2 for NS1643). At baseline, K525R had a slope factor similar to WT (9 vs. 8) but in the presence of NS1643, the slope factor of K525R was increased to 24 ± 4 vs. 9 ± 0 mV for WT (P < 0.01). Molecular modeling indicates that L529I induces a kink in the S4 voltage-sensor helix, altering a salt-bridge involving K525. Moreover, docking studies indicate that NS1643 binds to the kinked structure induced by the mutation with a higher affinity. Combining biophysical, computational, and electrophysiological evidence, a mechanistic principle governing the action of some activators of hERG1 channels is proposed. PMID:25809253

  4. Functional coupling between sodium-activated potassium channels and voltage-dependent persistent sodium currents in cricket Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Izumi; Yoshino, Masami

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we examined the functional coupling between Na(+)-activated potassium (KNa) channels and Na(+) influx through voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Single-channel activity of KNa channels was recorded with the cell-attached patch configuration. The open probability (Po) of KNa channels increased with increasing Na(+) concentration in a bath solution, whereas it decreased by the substitution of Na(+) with an equimolar concentration of Li(+). The Po of KNa channels was also found to be reduced by bath application of a high concentration of TTX (1 μM) and riluzole (100 μM), which inhibits both fast (INaf) and persistent (INaP) Na(+) currents, whereas it was unaffected by a low concentration of TTX (10 nM), which selectively blocks INaf. Bath application of Cd(2+) at a low concentration (50 μM), as an inhibitor of INaP, also decreased the Po of KNa channels. Conversely, bath application of the inorganic Ca(2+)-channel blockers Co(2+) and Ni(2+) at high concentrations (500 μM) had little effect on the Po of KNa channels, although Cd(2+) (500 μM) reduced the Po of KNa channels. Perforated whole cell clamp analysis further indicated the presence of sustained outward currents for which amplitude was dependent on the amount of Na(+) influx. Taken together, these results indicate that KNa channels could be activated by Na(+) influx passing through voltage-dependent persistent Na(+) channels. The functional significance of this coupling mechanism was discussed in relation to the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells and its possible role in the formation of long-term memory.

  5. Differential regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents and metabotropic glutamate receptor activity by measles virus infection in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Günther, Christine; Laube, Mandy; Liebert, Uwe-Gerd; Kraft, Robert

    2012-01-06

    Measles virus (MV) infection may lead to severe chronic CNS disease processes, including MV-induced encephalitis. Because the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is a major determinant of the (patho-)physiological state in all cells we asked whether important Ca(2+) conducting pathways are affected by MV infection in cultured cortical rat neurons. Patch-clamp measurements revealed a decrease in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents during MV-infection, while voltage-gated K(+) currents and NMDA-evoked currents were unaffected. Calcium-imaging experiments using 50mM extracellular KCl showed reduced [Ca(2+)](i) increases in MV-infected neurons, confirming a decreased activity of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. In contrast, the group-I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist DHPG evoked changes in [Ca(2+)](i) that were increased in MV-infected cells. Our results show that MV infection conversely regulates Ca(2+) signals induced by group-I mGluRs and by voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, suggesting that these physiological impairments may contribute to an altered function of cortical neurons during MV-induced encephalitis.

  6. Long-Term Spatiotemporal Reconfiguration of Neuronal Activity Revealed by Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging in the Cerebellar Granular Layer

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Daniela; Mapelli, Jonathan; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal organization of long-term synaptic plasticity in neuronal networks demands techniques capable of monitoring changes in synaptic responsiveness over extended multineuronal structures. Among these techniques, voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD imaging) is of particular interest due to its good spatial resolution. However, improvements of the technique are needed in order to overcome limits imposed by its low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we show that VSD imaging can detect long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in acute cerebellar slices. Combined VSD imaging and patch-clamp recordings revealed that the most excited regions were predominantly associated with granule cells (GrCs) generating EPSP-spike complexes, while poorly responding regions were associated with GrCs generating EPSPs only. The correspondence with cellular changes occurring during LTP and LTD was highlighted by a vector representation obtained by combining amplitude with time-to-peak of VSD signals. This showed that LTP occurred in the most excited regions lying in the core of activated areas and increased the number of EPSP-spike complexes, while LTD occurred in the less excited regions lying in the surround. VSD imaging appears to be an efficient tool for investigating how synaptic plasticity contributes to the reorganization of multineuronal activity in neuronal circuits. PMID:26294979

  7. Voltage-dependent antagonist/agonist actions of taurine on Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels of rat skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, D; Barbieri, M; Conte Camerino, D

    2001-09-01

    Emerging evidence supports the idea that taurine exerts some of its actions through inhibition of inward rectifier K(+) channels, ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, and voltage-dependent K(+) channels. However, to date not much is known about the effects of this sulfonic amino acid on Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (K(Ca(2+))) channels, which are widely expressed in various tissues, including skeletal muscle. In the present work, the effects of taurine on K(Ca(2+)) channels of rat skeletal muscle fibers were investigated using the patch-clamp technique. The application of the amino acid to the internal side of the excised macropatches induced a dose-dependent decrease in the outward K(Ca(2+)) currents recorded at positive membrane potentials in the presence of 8 to 16 microM concentrations of free Ca(2+) ions in the bath with an IC(50) of 31.9. 10(-3) +/- 1 M (slope factor = 1.2) (n = 11 patches). In contrast, at negative membrane potentials taurine caused an enhancement of the muscular inward K(Ca(2+)) currents with a DE(50) (drug concentration needed to enhance the current by 50%) of 46.7. 10(-3) +/- 2 M (slope factor = 1.3) (n = 9 patches). Single channel analysis revealed that this effect was mediated by changes in the reversal potential of the K(Ca(2+)) channel for K(+) ions with no changes in the gating properties or in the sensitivity of the channel to Ca(2+) ions. Taurine also did not affect the single channel conductance. In conclusion, taurine shows a voltage-dependent dualistic action on K(Ca(2+)) channels, being an inhibitor of the channel at positive membrane potentials and an activator at negative membrane potentials.

  8. Cantilever clamp fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A device is disclosed for sealing and clamping a cylindrical element which is to be attached to an object such as a wall, a pressurized vessel or another cylindrical element. The device includes a gland having an inner cylindrical wall, which is threaded at one end and is attached at a bendable end to a deformable portion, which in turn is attached to one end of a conical cantilever structure. The other end of the cantilever structure connects at a bendable area to one end of an outer cylindrical wall. The opposite end of cylindrical wall terminates in a thickened portion, the radially outer surface of which is adapted to accommodate a tool for rotating the gland. The terminal end of cylindrical wall also includes an abutment surface, which is adapted to engage a seal, which in turn engages a surface of a receiver. The receiver further includes a threaded portion for engagement with the threaded portion of gland whereby a tightening rotation of gland relative to receiver will cause relative movement between cylindrical walls and of gland. This movement causes a rotation of the conical structure and thus a bending action at bending area and at the bending end of the upper end of inner cylindrical wall. These rotational and bending actions result in a forcing of the deformable portion radially inwardly so as to contact and deform a pipe. This forcible contact creates a seal between gland and pipe, and simultaneously clamps the pipe in position.

  9. Can robots patch-clamp as well as humans? Characterization of a novel sodium channel mutation.

    PubMed

    Estacion, M; Choi, J S; Eastman, E M; Lin, Z; Li, Y; Tyrrell, L; Yang, Y; Dib-Hajj, S D; Waxman, S G

    2010-06-01

    Ion channel missense mutations cause disorders of excitability by changing channel biophysical properties. As an increasing number of new naturally occurring mutations have been identified, and the number of other mutations produced by molecular approaches such as in situ mutagenesis has increased, the need for functional analysis by patch-clamp has become rate limiting. Here we compare a patch-clamp robot using planar-chip technology with human patch-clamp in a functional assessment of a previously undescribed Nav1.7 sodium channel mutation, S211P, which causes erythromelalgia. This robotic patch-clamp device can increase throughput (the number of cells analysed per day) by 3- to 10-fold. Both modes of analysis show that the mutation hyperpolarizes activation voltage dependence (8 mV by manual profiling, 11 mV by robotic profiling), alters steady-state fast inactivation so that it requires an additional Boltzmann function for a second fraction of total current (approximately 20% manual, approximately 40% robotic), and enhances slow inactivation (hyperpolarizing shift--15 mV by human,--13 mV robotic). Manual patch-clamping demonstrated slower deactivation and enhanced (approximately 2-fold) ramp response for the mutant channel while robotic recording did not, possibly due to increased temperature and reduced signal-to-noise ratio on the robotic platform. If robotic profiling is used to screen ion channel mutations, we recommend that each measurement or protocol be validated by initial comparison to manual recording. With this caveat, we suggest that, if results are interpreted cautiously, robotic patch-clamp can be used with supervision and subsequent confirmation from human physiologists to facilitate the initial profiling of a variety of electrophysiological parameters of ion channel mutations.

  10. Regulation of Guinea Pig Detrusor Smooth Muscle Excitability by 17β-Estradiol: The Role of the Large Conductance Voltage- and Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Provence, Aaron; Hristov, Kiril L; Parajuli, Shankar P; Petkov, Georgi V

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen replacement therapies have been suggested to be beneficial in alleviating symptoms of overactive bladder. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms of estrogen in urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) at the cellular level remain unknown. Large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels, which are key regulators of UBSM function, are suggested to be non-genomic targets of estrogens. This study provides an electrophysiological investigation into the role of UBSM BK channels as direct targets for 17β-estradiol, the principle estrogen in human circulation. Single BK channel recordings on inside-out excised membrane patches and perforated whole cell patch-clamp were applied in combination with the BK channel selective inhibitor paxilline to elucidate the mechanism of regulation of BK channel activity by 17β-estradiol in freshly-isolated guinea pig UBSM cells. 17β-Estradiol (100 nM) significantly increased the amplitude of depolarization-induced whole cell steady-state BK currents and the frequency of spontaneous transient BK currents in freshly-isolated UBSM cells. The increase in whole cell BK currents by 17β-estradiol was eliminated upon blocking BK channels with paxilline. 17β-Estradiol (100 nM) significantly increased (~3-fold) the single BK channel open probability, indicating direct 17β-estradiol-BK channel interactions. 17β-Estradiol (100 nM) caused a significant hyperpolarization of the membrane potential of UBSM cells, and this hyperpolarization was reversed by blocking the BK channels with paxilline. 17β-Estradiol (100 nM) had no effects on L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel currents recorded under perforated patch-clamp conditions. This study reveals a new regulatory mechanism in the urinary bladder whereby BK channels are directly activated by 17β-estradiol to reduce UBSM cell excitability.

  11. The AMPK Activator A769662 Blocks Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Discovery of a Novel Pharmacophore with Potential Utility for Analgesic Development

    PubMed Central

    Asiedu, Marina N.; Han, Chongyang; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Price, Theodore J.; Dussor, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) regulate neuronal excitability by governing action potential (AP) generation and propagation. Recent studies have revealed that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators decrease sensory neuron excitability, potentially by preventing sodium (Na+) channel phosphorylation by kinases such as ERK or via modulation of translation regulation pathways. The direct positive allosteric modulator A769662 displays substantially greater efficacy than other AMPK activators in decreasing sensory neuron excitability suggesting additional mechanisms of action. Here, we show that A769662 acutely inhibits AP firing stimulated by ramp current injection in rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. PT1, a structurally dissimilar AMPK activator that reduces nerve growth factor (NGF) -induced hyperexcitability, has no influence on AP firing in TG neurons upon acute application. In voltage-clamp recordings, application of A769662 reduces VGSC current amplitudes. These findings, based on acute A769662 application, suggest a direct channel blocking effect. Indeed, A769662 dose-dependently blocks VGSC in rat TG neurons and in Nav1.7-transfected cells with an IC50 of ~ 10 μM. A769662 neither displayed use-dependent inhibition nor interacted with the local anesthetic (LA) binding site. Popliteal fossa administration of A769662 decreased noxious thermal responses with a peak effect at 5 mins demonstrating an analgesic effect. These data indicate that in addition to AMPK activation, A769662 acts as a direct blocker/modulator of VGSCs, a potential mechanism enhancing the analgesic property of this compound. PMID:28118359

  12. The AMPK Activator A769662 Blocks Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Discovery of a Novel Pharmacophore with Potential Utility for Analgesic Development.

    PubMed

    Asiedu, Marina N; Han, Chongyang; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Price, Theodore J; Dussor, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) regulate neuronal excitability by governing action potential (AP) generation and propagation. Recent studies have revealed that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators decrease sensory neuron excitability, potentially by preventing sodium (Na+) channel phosphorylation by kinases such as ERK or via modulation of translation regulation pathways. The direct positive allosteric modulator A769662 displays substantially greater efficacy than other AMPK activators in decreasing sensory neuron excitability suggesting additional mechanisms of action. Here, we show that A769662 acutely inhibits AP firing stimulated by ramp current injection in rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. PT1, a structurally dissimilar AMPK activator that reduces nerve growth factor (NGF) -induced hyperexcitability, has no influence on AP firing in TG neurons upon acute application. In voltage-clamp recordings, application of A769662 reduces VGSC current amplitudes. These findings, based on acute A769662 application, suggest a direct channel blocking effect. Indeed, A769662 dose-dependently blocks VGSC in rat TG neurons and in Nav1.7-transfected cells with an IC50 of ~ 10 μM. A769662 neither displayed use-dependent inhibition nor interacted with the local anesthetic (LA) binding site. Popliteal fossa administration of A769662 decreased noxious thermal responses with a peak effect at 5 mins demonstrating an analgesic effect. These data indicate that in addition to AMPK activation, A769662 acts as a direct blocker/modulator of VGSCs, a potential mechanism enhancing the analgesic property of this compound.

  13. Hybrid voltage sensor imaging of electrical activity from neurons in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongsheng; McMahon, Shane; Zhang, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Gene targeting with genetically encoded optical voltage sensors brings the methods of voltage imaging to genetically defined neurons and offers a method of studying circuit activity in these selected populations. The present study reports the targeting of genetically encoded hybrid voltage sensors (hVOS) to neurons in transgenic mice. The hVOS family of probes employs a membrane-targeted fluorescent protein, which generates voltage-dependent fluorescence changes in the presence of dipicrylamine (DPA) as the result of a voltage-dependent optical interaction between the two molecules. We generated transgenic mice with two different high-performance hVOS probes under control of a neuron-specific thy-1 promoter. Hippocampal slices from these animals present distinct spatial patterns of expression, and electrical stimulation evoked fluorescence changes as high as 3%. Glutamate receptor and Na+ channel antagonists blocked these responses. One hVOS probe tested here harbors an axonal targeting motif (from GAP-43) and shows preferential expression in axons; this probe can thus report axonal voltage changes. Voltage imaging in transgenic mice expressing hVOS probes opens the door to the study of functional activity in genetically defined populations of neurons in intact neural circuits. PMID:22993267

  14. Plasma membrane Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channels with a high selectivity for Ca2+ identified by patch-clamp recording in rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Rychkov, G; Brereton, H M; Harland, M L; Barritt, G J

    2001-04-01

    Repetitive waves of increased cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration play a central role in the process by which hormones regulate liver function. Maintenance of these Ca2+ waves requires Ca2+ inflow through store-operated Ca2+ channels. The properties and mechanism(s) of activation of these channels are not well understood. Store-operated Ca2+ channels (SOCs) in the H4-IIE rat liver cell line were studied by whole-cell patch clamping. Depletion of Ca2+ in intracellular stores by intracellular perfusion with either inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) or thapsigargin in the presence of 10 mmol/L ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), or with 10 mmol/L EGTA alone, activated an inward current that reversed at a membrane potential above +40 mV. In physiologic extracellular medium, this inward current was carried exclusively by Ca2+ and was blocked by a variety of di- and trivalent cations. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+, the inward current was carried by monovalent cations. This current was 10 to 30 times larger than that observed in the presence of extracellular Ca2+, and permitted the detection of single-channel events that corresponded to a single-channel conductance of about 40 pS. Both the Ca2+ and Na+ inward currents were blocked by the calmodulin antagonist, N-(6-amino hexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulphonamide (W7), but not by calmidazolium or calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II fragment 290-309. It is concluded that liver cells possess plasma membrane Ca2+ channels that have a high selectivity for Ca2+, are activated by a decrease in the concentration of Ca2+ in intracellular stores through a mechanism that is unlikely to involve calmodulin, and are involved in re-filling intracellular Ca2+ stores during Ca2+ signaling.

  15. Saddle Clamp With Captive Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belrose, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    Saddle clamp modified to prevent parts from falling off when installed or removed. Allows easy access for tightening or loosening bolts, and retains alignment with tube mounted in it when opened. All parts are held captive - bolts by retaining washers, floating nuts by pressing and swaging, and upper clamp band by tether. Upper and lower bolt flanges offset from each other to ensure access.

  16. Plastic Clamp Retains Clevis Pin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortes, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    Plastic clamp requires no special installation or removal tools. Clamp slips easily over end of pin. Once engaged in groove, holds pin securely. Installed and removed easily without special tools - screwdriver or putty knife adequate for prying out of groove. Used to retain bearings, rollers pulleys, other parts that rotate. Applications include slowly and intermittently rotating parts in appliances.

  17. Hippocampal hypoglycaemia-activated K+ channels: single-channel analysis of glucose and voltage dependence.

    PubMed

    Tromba, C; Salvaggio, A; Racagni, G; Volterra, A

    1994-11-01

    The effect of glucose on kinetics and the voltage-dependent characteristics of glucose-sensitive channels in hippocampal neurons were examined with the cell-attached mode of the patch-clamp technique. Recordings of a 100-pS K+ channel in the presence or absence of glucose demonstrate that the increase in channel open state probability (Po) induced by glucose deprivation (40- to 400-times the control in high-glucose medium) was largely due to a decrease in the global amount of time spent by the channel in a long-lived closed state. The Po value of the same 100-pS channel was also found to increase (by approx. 80-times) following a depolarization of 40 mV from rest, the main factor responsible for this being a dramatic shortening of the long closed-times on depolarization. Another glucose-sensitive channel of smaller conductance (approx. 10 pS) showed a similar dependence of Po on glucose, but different dependence on voltage, with long openings at the same hyperpolarized potentials where the 100-pS channel was almost always closed. Our results indicate that the action of glucose on the kinetics of hippocampal channels closely resembles that of ATP-sensitive channels in pancreatic beta-cells. Furthermore, they indicate that the two types of glucose-sensitive channels found in hippocampal neurons, differing not only in their single-channel conductance but also in the dependence on voltage, could play different roles in the responses of these cells to modified energetic supply.

  18. Regulation of the voltage-insensitive step of HERG activation by extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinlian; Bett, Glenna C L

    2010-06-01

    Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (HERG, Kv11.1, KCNH2) voltage-gated K(+) channels dominate cardiac action potential repolarization. In addition, HERG channels play a role in neuronal and smooth cell excitability as well as cancer pathology. Extracellular pH (pH(o)) is modified during myocardial ischemia, inflammation, and respiratory alkalosis, so understanding the response of HERG channels to changes in pH is of clinical significance. The relationship between pH(o) and HERG channel gating appears complex. Acidification has previously been reported to speed, slow, or have no effect on activation. We therefore undertook comprehensive analysis of the effect of pH(o) on HERG channel activation. HERG channels have unique and complex activation gating characteristics with both voltage-sensitive and voltage-insensitive steps in the activation pathway. Acidosis decreased the activation rate, suppressed peak current, and altered the sigmoidicity of gating near threshold potentials. At positive voltages, where the voltage-insensitive transition is rate limiting, pH(o) modified the voltage-insensitive step with a pK(a) similar to that of histidine. Hill coefficient analysis was incompatible with a coefficient of 1 but was well described by a Hill coefficient of 4. We derived a pH(o)-sensitive term for a five-state Markov model of HERG channel gating. This model demonstrates the mechanism of pH(o) sensitivity in HERG channel activation. Our experimental data and mathematical model demonstrate that the pH(o) sensitivity of HERG channel activation is dominated by the pH(o) sensitivity of the voltage-insensitive step, in a fashion that is compatible with the presence of at least one proton-binding site on each subunit of the channel tetramer.

  19. An Active Substrate Driver for Enabling Mixed-Voltage SOI Systems-On-A-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, S. A.; Blalock, B. J.; Mojarradi, M. M.; Li, H. W.

    2001-01-01

    The current trend for space application systems is towards fully integrated systems-on-a-chip. To facilitate this drive, high-voltage transistors must reside on the same substrate as low-voltage transistors. These systems must also be radiation tolerant, particularly for space missions such as the Europa Lander and Titan Explorer. SOI CMOS technology offers high levels of radiation hardness. As a result, a high-voltage lateral MOSFET has been developed in a partially-depleted (PD) SOI technology. Utilizing high voltages causes a parasitic transistor to have non-negligible effects on a circuit. Several circuit architectures have been used to compensate for the radiation induced threshold voltage shift of the parasitic back-channel transistor. However, a new architecture for high-voltage systems must be employed to bias the substrate to voltage levels insuring all parasitic transistors remain off. An active substrate driver has been developed to accomplish task. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. A new dynamic voltage restorer with separating active and reactive power circuit design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Fu-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Conventional dynamic voltage restorers (DVRs) install parallel battery and capacitor sets at the DC bus to supply the required power for voltage sag compensation. However, the reactive power output of a DVR may increase the ripple voltage at the inner DC bus, possibly resulting in a higher operating temperature of the battery and thus decreased battery life. This paper proposes a DVR system that uses a cascade power module to effectively compensate voltage sag. By separating the active and reactive compensation powers, the proposed DVR provides a lower ripple DC link for extending battery life and offers a flexible way to design the capacitor bank. To confirm the effectiveness of the proposed design, theoretical analysis and experimental validation were conducted under various scenarios. Test results confirm the feasibility and practicality of the proposed method.

  1. Activation of TRPM2 and TRPV1 Channels in Dorsal Root Ganglion by NADPH Oxidase and Protein Kinase C Molecular Pathways: a Patch Clamp Study.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2017-03-01

    Despite considerable research, the mechanisms of neuropathic pain induced by excessive oxidative stress production and overload calcium ion (Ca(2+)) entry in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) remain substantially unidentified. The transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels are activated with different stimuli including oxidative stress. TRPM2 and TRPV1 have been shown to be involved in induction of neuropathic pain. However, the activation mechanisms of TRPM2 and TRPV1 via NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C (PKC) pathways are poorly understood. In this study, I investigated the roles of NADPH oxidase and PKC on Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels in in vitro DRG neurons of rats. Rat DRG neurons were used in whole-cell patch clamp experiments. The H2O2-induced TRPM2 current densities were decreased by N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid (ACA), and dose-dependent capsaicin (CAP) and H2O2-induced TRPV1 currents were inhibited by capsazepine (CPZ). The TRPV1 channel is activated in the DRG neurons by 0.01 mM capsaicin but not 0.001 mM or 0.05 mM capsaicin. TRPM2 and TRPV1 currents were increased by the PKC activator, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), although the currents were decreased by ACA, CPZ, and the PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I (BIM). Both channel currents were further increased by PMA + H2O2 as compared to H2O2 only. In the combined presence of PMA + BIM, no TRPM2 or TRPV1 currents were observed. The CAP and H2O2-induced TRPM2 current densities were also decreased by the NADPH oxidase inhibitors apocynin and N-Acetylcysteine. In conclusion, these results demonstrate a protective role for NADPH oxidase and PKC inhibitors on Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels in DRG neurons. Since excessive oxidative stress production and Ca(2+) entry are implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, the findings may be relevant to the etiology and treatment of neuropathology in DRG neurons.

  2. Measurement and analysis of postsynaptic potentials using a novel voltage-deconvolution method.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Magnus J E; Silberberg, Gilad

    2008-02-01

    Accurate measurement of postsynaptic potential amplitudes is a central requirement for the quantification of synaptic strength, dynamics of short-term and long-term plasticity, and vesicle-release statistics. However, the intracellular voltage is a filtered version of the underlying synaptic signal and so a method of accounting for the distortion caused by overlapping postsynaptic potentials must be used. Here a voltage-deconvolution technique is demonstrated that defilters the entire voltage trace to reveal an underlying signal of well-separated synaptic events. These isolated events can be cropped out and reconvolved to yield a set of isolated postsynaptic potentials from which voltage amplitudes may be measured directly-greatly simplifying this common task. The method also has the significant advantage of providing a higher temporal resolution of the dynamics of the underlying synaptic signal. The versatility of the method is demonstrated by a variety of experimental examples, including excitatory and inhibitory connections to neurons with passive membranes and those with activated voltage-gated currents. The deconvolved current-clamp voltage has many features in common with voltage-clamp current measurements. These similarities are analyzed using cable theory and a multicompartment cell reconstruction, as well as direct comparison to voltage-clamp experiments.

  3. Mg2+ mediates interaction between the voltage sensor and cytosolic domain to activate BK channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Hu, Lei; Shi, Jingyi; Delaloye, Kelli; Horrigan, Frank T; Cui, Jianmin

    2007-11-13

    The voltage-sensor domain (VSD) of voltage-dependent ion channels and enzymes is critical for cellular responses to membrane potential. The VSD can also be regulated by interaction with intracellular proteins and ligands, but how this occurs is poorly understood. Here, we show that the VSD of the BK-type K(+) channel is regulated by a state-dependent interaction with its own tethered cytosolic domain that depends on both intracellular Mg(2+) and the open state of the channel pore. Mg(2+) bound to the cytosolic RCK1 domain enhances VSD activation by electrostatic interaction with Arg-213 in transmembrane segment S4. Our results demonstrate that a cytosolic domain can come close enough to the VSD to regulate its activity electrostatically, thereby elucidating a mechanism of Mg(2+)-dependent activation in BK channels and suggesting a general pathway by which intracellular factors can modulate the function of voltage-dependent proteins.

  4. Internal V-Band Clamp

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Hafenrichter, Everett S.; Chapa, Agapito C.; Harris, Steven M.; Martinez, Marcus J.; Baty, Roy S.

    2006-02-28

    A system for clamping two tubular members together in an end-to-end relationship uses a split ring with a V-shaped outer rim that can engage a clamping surface on each member. The split ring has a relaxed closed state where the ends of the ring are adjacent and the outside diameter of the split ring is less than the minimum inside diameter of the members at their ends. The members are clamped when the split ring is spread into an elastically stretched position where the ring rim is pressed tightly against the interior surfaces of the members. Mechanisms are provided for removing the spreader so the split ring will return to the relaxed state, releasing the clamped members.

  5. Molecular Interactions between Tarantula Toxins and Low-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Salari, Autoosa; Vega, Benjamin S; Milescu, Lorin S; Milescu, Mirela

    2016-04-05

    Few gating-modifier toxins have been reported to target low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channels, and the structural basis of toxin sensitivity remains incompletely understood. Studies of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels have identified the S3b-S4 "paddle motif," which moves at the protein-lipid interface to drive channel opening, as the target for these amphipathic neurotoxins. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels contain four homologous voltage sensor domains, suggesting multiple toxin binding sites. We show here that the S3-S4 segments within Cav3.1 can be transplanted into Kv2.1 to examine their individual contributions to voltage sensing and pharmacology. With these results, we now have a more complete picture of the conserved nature of the paddle motif in all three major voltage-gated ion channel types (Kv, Nav, and Cav). When screened with tarantula toxins, the four paddle sequences display distinct toxin binding properties, demonstrating that gating-modifier toxins can bind to Cav channels in a domain specific fashion. Domain III was the most commonly and strongly targeted, and mutagenesis revealed an acidic residue that is important for toxin binding. We also measured the lipid partitioning strength of all toxins tested and observed a positive correlation with their inhibition of Cav3.1, suggesting a key role for membrane partitioning.

  6. A slow voltage-dependent Na(+)-current induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine and the G-protein-coupled activation mechanism in the ganglion cells of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Kudo, A; Sasaki, K; Tamazawa, Y; Matsumoto, M

    1991-01-01

    Application of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) induces a slowly depolarizing response in the neurons of Aplysia abdominal ganglion. In voltage-clamped cells, 5HT induced a slow inward current that increased steeply with membrane depolarization from -85 mV showing a negative slope conductance, but never reversed into outward when hyperpolarized beyond the equilibrium potential for K+. The 5HT-induced response was markedly augmented in Ca(2+)-free media, but depressed in Na(+)-free media, and unaffected by a change in external potassium. Intracellular injection of guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) significantly depressed the 5HT response in a dose-dependent way. Injection of cholera toxin (CTX) selectively blocked the 5HT-induced response, the effect being irreversible. Neither 3'-deoxyadenosine, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor H-8, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, depressed the 5HT response. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) did not augment the 5HT response appreciably. The 5HT responses were not depressed at all during a saturated response to Br-cyclic AMP injected intracellularly. It was concluded that the 5HT response is produced by opening of the voltage-dependent Na(+)-channels with activation of CTX-sensitive G-protein but not necessarily with an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP.

  7. Regulation of Voltage-Activated K(+) Channel Gating by Transmembrane β Subunits.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-activated K(+) (K(V)) channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. K(V) channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD) surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many K(V) channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the K(V) β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM) segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of K(V) α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening, and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into K(V) channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  8. Hypotonicity activates a voltage-dependent membrane conductance in N2a neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Taruno, Akiyuki; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2017-03-04

    To maintain cellular and bodily homeostasis, cells respond to extracellular stimuli including osmotic stress by activating various ion channels, which have been implicated in many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. However, cellular osmosensory mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report a novel voltage-dependent current in N2a cells activated by exposure to hypotonic stress. After a hypotonic challenge, N2a cells sequentially develop two distinct currents. The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) current emerges first and, after a delay, activation of a previously uncharacterized strongly outwardly rectifying current follows. The latter, delayed current (Id) is insensitive to NPPB, a nonspecific blocker of Cl(-) channels, and intracellular Mg(2+), which inhibits VRAC and swelling-activated TRPM3 and TRPM7 channels. Replacement of extracellular Na(+) with NMDG(+) reduces inward tail currents, suggesting that Id is mediated by cations. Finally, Id shows voltage-dependent activation with slow activation kinetics and half-maximal activation at +76 mV. These pharmacological and biophysical characteristics of Id are distinct from those of known osmotic cell swelling-activated ion channels. In conclusion, our data identify and characterize a novel osmotically-activated, voltage-dependent ion channel in N2a cells.

  9. Calcium-Activated SK Channels Influence Voltage-Gated Ion Channels to Determine the Precision of Firing in Globus Pallidus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Deister, Christopher A.; Chan, C. Savio; Surmeier, D. James; Wilson, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Globus pallidus (GP) neurons fire rhythmically in the absence of synaptic input, suggesting that they may encode their inputs as changes in the phase of their rhythmic firing. Action potential afterhyperpolarization (AHP) enhances precision of firing by ensuring that the ion channels recover from inactivation by the same amount on each cycle. Voltage-clamp experiments in slices showed that the longest component of the GP neuron’s AHP is blocked by apamin, a selective antagonist of calcium-activated SK channels. Application of 100 nm apamin also disrupted the precision of firing in perforated-patch and cell-attached recordings. SK channel blockade caused a small depolarization in spike threshold and made it more variable, but there was no reduction in the maximal rate of rise during an action potential. Thus, the firing irregularity was not caused solely by a reduction in voltage-gated Na+ channel availability. Subthreshold voltage ramps triggered a large outward current that was sensitive to the initial holding potential and had properties similar to the A-type K+ current in GP neurons. In numerical simulations, the availability of both Na+ and A-type K+ channels during autonomous firing were reduced when SK channels were removed, and a nearly equal reduction in Na+ and K+ subthreshold-activated ion channel availability produced a large decrease in the neuron’s slope conductance near threshold. This change made the neuron more sensitive to intrinsically generated noise. In vivo, this change would also enhance the sensitivity of GP neurons to small synaptic inputs. PMID:19571136

  10. In Situ Measurement of Voltage-Induced Stress in Conducting Polymers with Redox-Active Dopants.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sujat; Kim, Sung Yeol; Palmore, Lia R; Jin, Shenghua; Jadhav, Nitin; Chason, Eric; Palmore, G Tayhas R

    2016-09-14

    Minimization of stress-induced mechanical rupture and delamination of conducting polymer (CP) films is desirable to prevent failure of devices based on these materials. Thus, precise in situ measurement of voltage-induced stress within these films should provide insight into the cause of these failure mechanisms. The evolution of stress in films of polypyrrole (pPy), doped with indigo carmine (IC), was measured in different electrochemical environments using the multibeam optical stress sensor (MOSS) technique. The stress in these films gradually increases to a constant value during voltage cycling, revealing an initial break-in period for CP films. The nature of the ions involved in charge compensation of pPy[IC] during voltage cycling was determined from electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) data. The magnitude of the voltage-induced stress within pPy[IC] at neutral pH correlated with the radius of the hydrated mobile ion in the order Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+). At acidic pH, the IC dopant in pPy[IC] undergoes reversible oxidation and reduction within the range of potentials investigated, providing a secondary contribution to the observed voltage-induced stress. We report on the novel stress response of these polymers due to the presence of pH-dependent redox-active dopants and how it can affect material performance.

  11. Induced Voltage Linear Extraction Method Using an Active Kelvin Bridge for Disturbing Force Self-Sensing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Bo

    2016-05-20

    This paper presents an induced voltage linear extraction method for disturbing force self-sensing in the application of giant magnetostrictive actuators (GMAs). In this method, a Kelvin bridge combined with an active device is constructed instead of a conventional Wheatstone bridge for extraction of the induced voltage, and an additional GMA is adopted as a reference actuator in the self-sensing circuit in order to balance the circuit bridge. The linear fitting of the measurement data is done according to the linear relationship between the disturbing forces and the integral of the induced voltage. The experimental results confirm the good performance of the proposed method, and the self-sensitivity of the disturbing forces is better than 2.0 (mV·s)/N.

  12. Voltage-gated calcium channels function as Ca2+-activated signaling receptors.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Daphne

    2014-02-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are transmembrane cell surface proteins responsible for multifunctional signals. In response to voltage, VGCCs trigger synaptic transmission, drive muscle contraction, and regulate gene expression. Voltage perturbations open VGCCs enabling Ca(2+) binding to the low affinity Ca(2+) binding site of the channel pore. Subsequent to permeation, Ca(2+) targets selective proteins to activate diverse signaling pathways. It is becoming apparent that the Ca(2+)-bound channel triggers secretion in excitable cells and drives contraction in cardiomyocytes prior to Ca(2+) permeation. Here, I highlight recent data implicating receptor-like function of the Ca(2+)-bound channel in converting external Ca(2+) into an intracellular signal. The two sequential mechanistic perspectives of VGCC function are discussed in the context of the prevailing and long-standing current models of depolarization-evoked secretion and cardiac contraction.

  13. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-04-14

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation.

  14. Fast and slow activation of voltage-dependent ion channels in radish vacuoles.

    PubMed Central

    Gambale, F; Cantu, A M; Carpaneto, A; Keller, B U

    1993-01-01

    The molecular processes associated with voltage-dependent opening and closing (gating) of ion channels were investigated using a new preparation from plant cells, i.e., voltage and calcium-activated ion channels in radish root vacuoles. These channels display a main single channel conductance of approximately 90 pS and are characterized by long activation times lasting several hundreds of milliseconds. Here, we demonstrate that these channels have a second kinetically distinct activation mode which is characterized by even longer activation times. Different membrane potential protocols allowed to switch between the fast and the slow mode in a controlled and reversible manner. At transmembrane potentials of -100 mV, the ratio between the fast and slow activation time constant was around 1:5. Correspondingly, activation times lasting several seconds were observed in the slow mode. The molecular process controlling fast and slow activation may represent an effective modulator of voltage-dependent gating of ion channels in other plant and animal systems. PMID:7507716

  15. Split-tapered joint clamping device

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, Max J.; Schwartz, Jr., John F.

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to a clamping device for removably attaching a tool element to a bracket element wherein a bracket element is disposed in a groove in the tool and a clamping member is disposed in said groove and in engagement with a clamping face of the bracket and a wall of the groove and with the clamping member having pivot means engaging the bracket and about which the clamping member rotates.

  16. Voltage-dependent motion of the catalytic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase monitored by a fluorescent amino acid

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Souhei; Jinno, Yuka; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) derives the voltage dependence of its catalytic activity from coupling to a voltage sensor homologous to that of voltage-gated ion channels. To assess the conformational changes in the cytoplasmic region upon activation of the voltage sensor, we genetically incorporated a fluorescent unnatural amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), into the catalytic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). Measurements of Anap fluorescence under voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the catalytic region assumes distinct conformations dependent on the degree of voltage-sensor activation. FRET analysis showed that the catalytic region remains situated beneath the plasma membrane, irrespective of the voltage level. Moreover, Anap fluorescence from a membrane-facing loop in the C2 domain showed a pattern reflecting substrate turnover. These results indicate that the voltage sensor regulates Ci-VSP catalytic activity by causing conformational changes in the entire catalytic region, without changing their distance from the plasma membrane. PMID:27330112

  17. Voltage-activated Ca2+ channels and their role in the endocrine function of the pituitary gland in newborn and adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Sedej, Simon; Tsujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Zorec, Robert; Rupnik, Marjan

    2004-01-01

    We have prepared fresh pituitary gland slices from adult and, for the first time, from newborn mice to assess modulation of secretory activity via voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (VACCs). Currents through VACCs and membrane capacitance have been measured with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Melanotrophs in newborns were significantly larger than in adults. In both newborn and adult melanotrophs activation of VACCs triggered exocytosis. All pharmacologically isolated VACC types contributed equally to the secretory activity. However, the relative proportion of VACCs differed between newborns and adults. In newborn cells L-type channels dominated and, in addition, an exclusive expression of a toxin-resistant R-type-like current was found. The expression of L-type VACCs was up-regulated by the increased oestrogen levels observed in females, and was even more emphasized in the cells of pregnant females and oestrogen-treated adult male mice. We suggest a general mechanism modulating endocrine secretion in the presence of oestrogen and particularly higher sensitivity to treatments with L-type channel blockers during high oestrogen physiological states. PMID:14724188

  18. Correlation of open cell-attached and excised patch clamp techniques.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, D; Hayslett, J P

    1995-11-01

    The excised patch clamp configuration provides a unique technique for some types of single channel analyses, but maintenance of stable, long-lasting preparations may be confounded by rundown and/or rapid loss of seal. Studies were performed on the amiloride-sensitive Na+ channel, located on the apical surface of A6 cells, to determine whether the nystatin-induced open cell-attached patch could serve as an alternative configuration. Compared to excised inside-out patches, stable preparations were achieved more readily with the open cell-attached patch (9% vs. 56% of attempts). In both preparations, the current voltage (I-V) relation was linear, current amplitudes were equal at opposite equivalent clamped voltages, and Erev was zero in symmetrical Na+ solutions, indicating similar Na+ activities on the cytosolic and external surfaces of the patch. Moreover, there was no evidence that nystatin altered channel activity in the patch because slope conductance (3-4pS) and Erev (75 mV), when the bath was perfused with a high K:low Na solution (ENa = 80 mV), were nearly equal in both patch configurations. Our results therefore indicate that the nystatin-induced open cell-attached patch can serve as an alternative approach to the excised inside-out patch when experiments require modulation of univalent ions in the cytosol.

  19. pH- and voltage-dependent conductances in toad skin.

    PubMed

    Lacaz-Vieira, F

    1995-11-01

    The present study focuses on two closely related topics on ion conductance in toad skins: (i) the interaction of apical protons with the apical voltage-dependent Cl(-)-activated channels of the mitochondria-rich cells, and (ii) the description and characterization of a novel subject, a voltage-dependent H(+)-activated conductance. The Cl- conductance (GCl) is activated by tissue hyperpolarization (which leads to apical membrane depolarization) and the presence of Cl- ions in the apical solution. Increasing apical proton concentration (from pH 8 to pH 4) impairs the process of activation of the Cl- conductive pathway, slowing the kinetics of It activation and reducing the steady-stage values of Gt and It. This effect is markedly voltage-dependent since no effect is seen at Vt = -100 mv and is fully present at -50 mV. The voltage-dependence of the pH effect suggests that the critical protonation sites of the apical Cl- channels are not freely exposed to the apical solution but dwell within the membrane electric field. An also coherent interpretation is that titration of apical proton binding sites affects the gating of the voltage-dependent Cl- channels, shifting the conductance-vs.-voltage curve to more negative clamping potentials. Tissue conductance in the absence of apical Cl- ions can be importantly affected by the pH of the apical solution (pHa), the effect being markedly dependent on the clamping potential. Generally speaking, the effect of rising apical proton concentration can be conspicuous at negative clamping potentials, while at positive potentials changes in tissue conductance were never observed. For a clamping potential of -100 mV, a turning point somewhere between pHa = 4 and pHa = 3 was observed. Apical acidification to pH 4 has no effect upon tissue conductance while apical acidification to pH 3 leads to a marked, slow and reversible increase of tissue conductance. A striking similitude exists between the voltage-dependent Cl(-)-gated conductance

  20. Expression and functional analysis of voltage-activated Na+ channels in human prostate cancer cell lines and their contribution to invasion in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Laniado, M. E.; Lalani, E. N.; Fraser, S. P.; Grimes, J. A.; Bhangal, G.; Djamgoz, M. B.; Abel, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Ion channels are important for many cellular functions and disease states including cystic fibrosis and multidrug resistance. Previous work in the Dunning rat model of prostate cancer has suggested a relationship between voltage-activated Na+ channels (VASCs) and the invasive phenotype in vitro. The objectives of this study were to 1) evaluate the expression of VASCs in the LNCaP and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines by Western blotting, flow cytometry, and whole-cell patch clamping, 2) determine their role in invasion in vitro using modified Boyden chambers with and without a specific blocker of VASCs (tetrodotoxin). A 260-kd protein representing VASCs was found only in the PC-3 cell line, and these were shown to be membrane expressed on flow cytometry. Patch clamping studies indicated that functional VASCs were present in 10% of PC-3 cells and blocking these by tetrodotoxin (600 nmol/L) reduced their invasiveness by 31% (P = 0.02) without affecting the invasiveness of the LNCaP cells. These results indicate that the reduction of invasion is a direct result of VASC blockade and not a nonspecific action of the drug. This is the first report of VASCs in a human prostatic cell line. VASCs are present in PC-3 but not LNCaP cells as determined by both protein and functional studies. Tetrodotoxin reduced the invasiveness of PC-3 but not LNCaP cells, and these data suggest that ion channels may play an important functional role in tumor invasion. Images Figure 1 PMID:9094978

  1. Heterogeneity of Voltage- and Chemosignal-Activated Response Profiles in Vomeronasal Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Labra, Antonieta; Brann, Jessica H.; Fadool, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Liolaemus lizards were explored to ascertain whether they would make an amenable model to study single-cell electrophysiology of neurons in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Despite a rich array of chemosensory-related behaviors chronicled for this genus, no anatomical or functional data exist for the VNO, the organ mediating these types of behaviors. Two Liolaemus species (L. bellii and L. nigroviridis) were collected in Central Chile in the Farellones Mountains and transported to the United States. Lizards were subjected to hypothermia and then a lethal injection of sodium pentabarbitol prior to all experiments described in the following text. Retrograde dye perfusion combined with histological techniques demonstrated a compartmentalization of the proportionally large VNO from the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) in cryosections of L. bellii. SDS-PAGE analysis of the VNO of both species demonstrated the expression of three G protein subunits, namely, Gαo, Gαi2, and Gβ, and the absence of Gαolf, Gα11, and Gq, the latter of which are traditionally found in the MOE. Vomeronasal (VN) neurons were enzymatically isolated for whole cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology of single neurons. Both species demonstrated a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, rapidly inactivating sodium current and a tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive potassium current that had a transient and sustained component. VN neurons were classified into two types dependent on the ratio of sodium over sustained potassium current. VN neurons exhibited outward and inward chemosignal-evoked currents when stimulated with pheromone-containing secretions taken from the feces, skin, and precloacal pores. Fifty-nine percent of the neurons were responsive to at least one compound when presented with a battery of five different secretions. The breadth of responsiveness (H metric) demonstrated a heterogeneous population of tuning with a mean of 0.29. PMID:15972830

  2. A self-strain feedback tuning-fork-shaped ionic polymer metal composite clamping actuator with soft matter elasticity-detecting capability for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Huang, Wei-Lun

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a smart tuning-fork-shaped ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) clamping actuator for biomedical applications. The two fingers of the actuator, which perform the clamping motion, can be electrically controlled through a unique electrode design on the IPMC material. The generated displacement or strain of the fingers can be sensed using an integrated soft strain-gage sensor. The IPMC actuator and associated soft strain gage were fabricated using a micromachining technique. A 13.5×4×2 mm(3) actuator was shaped from Nafion solution and a selectively grown metal electrode formed the active region. The strain gage consisted of patterned copper foil and polyethylene as a substrate. The relationship between the strain gage voltage output and the displacement at the front end of the actuator's fingers was characterized. The equivalent Young's modulus, 13.65 MPa, of the soft-strain-gage-integrated IPMC finger was analyzed. The produced clamping force exhibited a linear increasing rate of 1.07 mN/s, based on a dc driving voltage of 7 V. Using the developed actuator to clamp soft matter and simultaneously acquire its Young's modulus was achieved. This demonstrated the feasibility of the palpation function and the potential use of the actuator in minimally invasive surgery.

  3. Third-order voltage-mode active-C band pass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Ashish; Ghosh, Mourina; Paul, Sajal K.

    2015-05-01

    In this research article, a new third-order voltage-mode active-C asymmetrical band pass filter is proposed. It uses three numbers of current-controlled current conveyors and three numbers of equal-valued capacitors. The topology has the following important features: uses only three active elements, uses three capacitors, uses all grounded capacitors and no resistor is suitable for integrated circuit design, there is no matching constraint, high input impedance, low output impedance, central frequency can easily be electronically controlled by bias current, and frequency response is asymmetrical in nature. The application of the proposed topology in the realisation of a voltage-mode sixth-order symmetrical band pass filter has been demonstrated. The workability of the proposed topology and sixth-order filter has been confirmed by simulation results using 0.35-µm Austria Micro Systems complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology.

  4. A clamp-like biohybrid catalyst for DNA oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dongen, Stijn F. M.; Clerx, Joost; Nørgaard, Kasper; Bloemberg, Tom G.; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.; Trakselis, Michael A.; Nelson, Scott W.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Rowan, Alan E.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.

    2013-11-01

    In processive catalysis, a catalyst binds to a substrate and remains bound as it performs several consecutive reactions, as exemplified by DNA polymerases. Processivity is essential in nature and is often mediated by a clamp-like structure that physically tethers the catalyst to its (polymeric) template. In the case of the bacteriophage T4 replisome, a dedicated clamp protein acts as a processivity mediator by encircling DNA and subsequently recruiting its polymerase. Here we use this DNA-binding protein to construct a biohybrid catalyst. Conjugation of the clamp protein to a chemical catalyst with sequence-specific oxidation behaviour formed a catalytic clamp that can be loaded onto a DNA plasmid. The catalytic activity of the biohybrid catalyst was visualized using a procedure based on an atomic force microscopy method that detects and spatially locates oxidized sites in DNA. Varying the experimental conditions enabled switching between processive and distributive catalysis and influencing the sliding direction of this rotaxane-like catalyst.

  5. Studying mechanosensitive ion channels with an automated patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Barthmes, Maria; Jose, Mac Donald F; Birkner, Jan Peter; Brüggemann, Andrea; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Koçer, Armağan

    2014-03-01

    Patch clamp electrophysiology is the main technique to study mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs), however, conventional patch clamping is laborious and success and output depends on the skills of the operator. Even though automated patch systems solve these problems for other ion channels, they could not be applied to MSCs. Here, we report on activation and single channel analysis of a bacterial mechanosensitive ion channel using an automated patch clamp system. With the automated system, we could patch not only giant unilamellar liposomes but also giant Escherichia coli (E. coli) spheroplasts. The tension sensitivity and channel kinetics data obtained in the automated system were in good agreement with that obtained from the conventional patch clamp. The findings will pave the way to high throughput fundamental and drug screening studies on mechanosensitive ion channels.

  6. An Adaptive Reconfigurable Active Voltage Doubler/Rectifier for Extended-Range Inductive Power Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    We present an adaptive reconfigurable active voltage doubler (VD)/rectifier (REC) (VD/REC) in standard CMOS, which can adaptively change its topology to either a VD or a REC by sensing the output voltage, leading to more robust inductive power transmission over an extended range. Both active VD and REC modes provide much lower dropout voltage and far better power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to their passive counterparts by adopting offset-controlled high-speed comparators that drive the rectifying switches at proper times in the high-frequency band. We have fabricated the active VD/REC in a 0.5-µm 3-metal 2-poly CMOS process, occupying 0.585 mm2 of chip area. In an exemplar setup, VD/REC extended the power transmission range by 33% (from 6 to 8 cm) in relative coil distance and 41.5% (from 53° to 75°) in relative coil orientation compared to using the REC alone. While providing 3.1-V dc output across a 500-Ω load from 2.15- (VD) and 3.7-V (REC) peak ac inputs at 13.56 MHz, VD/REC achieved measured PCEs of 70% and 77%, respectively. PMID:24633369

  7. Modulation of voltage-activated channels by calcitonin gene-related peptide in cultured rat neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Zona, C; Farini, D; Palma, E; Eusebi, F

    1991-01-01

    1. Whole-cell currents were recorded from cultures of dissociated neocortical neurones of the rat. Rat alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; 1 nM-1 microM) caused significant dose-dependent decreases in the voltage-activated transient (A-current) and delayed rectifier K+ currents. Forskolin (10 nM-20 microM) mimicked this effect. Peak K+ currents were gradually decreased after loading neurones with cyclic AMP (100 microM) through patch pipettes. CGRP was ineffective in neurones loaded with cyclic AMP. 2. CGRP (0.5-2 microM) increased cytosolic cyclic AMP concentration and this effect was mimicked by forskolin (5-40 microM). 3. CGRP (0.1-1 microM) reduced high-threshold Ca2+ currents; as did forskolin (5-20 microM) and cyclic AMP loaded into the neurones. In contrast, low-threshold Ca2+ currents were not affected by any of these agents. 4. Voltage-activated Na+ currents were significantly reduced by both CGRP (0.1-1 microM) and forskolin (5-20 microM). A similar effect was observed when cells were loaded with cyclic AMP. 5. We conclude that, in neocortical neurones, CGRP attenuates voltage-activated currents by stimulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signalling system. PMID:1726796

  8. The Voltage Activation of Cortical KCNQ Channels Depends on Global PIP2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang S.; Duignan, Kevin M.; Hawryluk, Joanna M.; Soh, Heun; Tzingounis, Anastasios V.

    2016-01-01

    The slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) is a calcium-activated potassium conductance with critical roles in multiple physiological processes. Pharmacological and genetic data suggest that KCNQ channels partly mediate the sAHP. However, these channels are not typically open within the observed voltage range of the sAHP. Recent work has shown that the sAHP is gated by increased PIP2 levels, which are generated downstream of calcium binding by neuronal calcium sensors such as hippocalcin. Here, we examined whether changes in PIP2 levels could shift the voltage-activation range of KCNQ channels. In HEK293T cells, expression of the PIP5 kinase PIPKIγ90, which increases global PIP2 levels, shifted the KCNQ voltage activation to within the operating range of the sAHP. Further, the sensitivity of this effect on KCNQ3 channels appeared to be higher than that on KCNQ2. Therefore, we predict that KCNQ3 plays an essential role in maintaining the sAHP under low PIP2 conditions. In support of this notion, we find that sAHP inhibition by muscarinic receptors that increase phosphoinositide turnover in neurons is enhanced in Kcnq3-knockout mice. Likewise, the presence of KCNQ3 is essential for maintaining the sAHP when hippocalcin is ablated, a condition that likely impairs PIP2 generation. Together, our results establish the relationship between PIP2 and the voltage dependence of cortical KCNQ channels (KCNQ2/3, KCNQ3/5, and KCNQ5), and suggest a possible mechanism for the involvement of KCNQ channels in the sAHP. PMID:26958886

  9. Upregulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels by long-term activation of the ghrelin-growth hormone secretagogue receptor in clonal GC somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Belisario; Felix, Ricardo; Monjaraz, Eduardo

    2009-05-01

    A central question in adenohypophyseal cell physiology concerns the role of transmembrane ionic fluxes in the initiation of the hormone secretion process. In the current report, we investigated the effects of the growth hormone (GH) secretagogues ghrelin and GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) on the regulation of the functional expression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels using the tumoral somatotrope GC cell line as a model. Cells were cultured under control conditions or in presence of the GH secretagogues (GHS) for 96 h, and Na(+) currents (I(Na)) were characterized in whole cell patch-clamp experiments. GHS treatment significantly increased I(Na) density in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of GHRP-6 were accompanied by an augment in conductance without changes in the kinetics and the voltage dependence of the currents, suggesting an increase in the number of channels in the cell membrane. Sustained inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channel activity decreased I(Na) density and prevented the effects of the GHS, whereas long-term exposure to an L-channel agonist increased I(Na) density and enhanced the actions of GHRP-6, indicating that Ca(2+) entry through these channels plays a role in the regulation of Na(+) channel expression. Likewise, GHRP-6 failed to enhance Na(+) channel expression in the presence of membrane-permeable inhibitors of protein kinases A and C, as well as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. Conversely, treatment with a cAMP analog or a protein kinase C activator enhanced both basal and GHS-induced secretion of GH measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay, suggesting that GHRP-6 acting through the ghrelin receptor and different signaling pathways enhances Na(+) channel membrane expression, which favors hormone release from GC somatotropes.

  10. Molecular and functional differences in voltage-activated sodium currents between GABA projection neurons and dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shengyuan; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2011-12-01

    GABA projection neurons (GABA neurons) in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) and dopamine projection neurons (DA neurons) in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) have strikingly different firing properties. SNc DA neurons fire low-frequency, long-duration spikes, whereas SNr GABA neurons fire high-frequency, short-duration spikes. Since voltage-activated sodium (Na(V)) channels are critical to spike generation, the different firing properties raise the possibility that, compared with DA neurons, Na(V) channels in SNr GABA neurons have higher density, faster kinetics, and less cumulative inactivation. Our quantitative RT-PCR analysis on immunohistochemically identified nigral neurons indicated that mRNAs for pore-forming Na(V)1.1 and Na(V)1.6 subunits and regulatory Na(V)β1 and Na(v)β4 subunits are more abundant in SNr GABA neurons than SNc DA neurons. These α-subunits and β-subunits are key subunits for forming Na(V) channels conducting the transient Na(V) current (I(NaT)), persistent Na current (I(NaP)), and resurgent Na current (I(NaR)). Nucleated patch-clamp recordings showed that I(NaT) had a higher density, a steeper voltage-dependent activation, and a faster deactivation in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. I(NaT) also recovered more quickly from inactivation and had less cumulative inactivation in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. Furthermore, compared with nigral DA neurons, SNr GABA neurons had a larger I(NaR) and I(NaP). Blockade of I(NaP) induced a larger hyperpolarization in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. Taken together, these results indicate that Na(V) channels expressed in fast-spiking SNr GABA neurons and slow-spiking SNc DA neurons are tailored to support their different spiking capabilities.

  11. Note: High-efficiency energy harvester using double-clamped piezoelectric beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yingmei; Wu, Xuan; Parmar, Mitesh; Lee, Dong-weon

    2014-02-15

    In this study, an improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been reported, which is realized by using a double-clamped piezoelectric beam, based on uniaxial stretching strain. The buckling mechanism is applied to maximize axial stress in the double-clamped beam. The voltage generated by using the double-clamped piezoelectric beam is higher than that generated by using other conventional structures, such as bending cantilevers coated/sandwiched with piezoelectric film, which is proven both theoretically and experimentally. The power generation efficiency is enhanced by further optimizing the double-clamped structure. The optimized high-efficiency energy harvester utilizing double-clamped piezoelectric beams generates a peak output power of 80 μW, under an acceleration of 0.1g.

  12. Note: high-efficiency energy harvester using double-clamped piezoelectric beams.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yingmei; Wu, Xuan; Parmar, Mitesh; Lee, Dong-weon

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been reported, which is realized by using a double-clamped piezoelectric beam, based on uniaxial stretching strain. The buckling mechanism is applied to maximize axial stress in the double-clamped beam. The voltage generated by using the double-clamped piezoelectric beam is higher than that generated by using other conventional structures, such as bending cantilevers coated/sandwiched with piezoelectric film, which is proven both theoretically and experimentally. The power generation efficiency is enhanced by further optimizing the double-clamped structure. The optimized high-efficiency energy harvester utilizing double-clamped piezoelectric beams generates a peak output power of 80 μW, under an acceleration of 0.1g.

  13. Note: High-efficiency energy harvester using double-clamped piezoelectric beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yingmei; Wu, Xuan; Parmar, Mitesh; Lee, Dong-weon

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been reported, which is realized by using a double-clamped piezoelectric beam, based on uniaxial stretching strain. The buckling mechanism is applied to maximize axial stress in the double-clamped beam. The voltage generated by using the double-clamped piezoelectric beam is higher than that generated by using other conventional structures, such as bending cantilevers coated/sandwiched with piezoelectric film, which is proven both theoretically and experimentally. The power generation efficiency is enhanced by further optimizing the double-clamped structure. The optimized high-efficiency energy harvester utilizing double-clamped piezoelectric beams generates a peak output power of 80 μW, under an acceleration of 0.1g.

  14. Whole-Cell Patch-Clamp Recording of Mouse and Rat Inner Hair Cells in the Intact Organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Goutman, Juan D; Pyott, Sonja J

    2016-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamping is a widely applied method to record currents across the entire membrane of a cell. This protocol describes application of this method to record currents from the sensory inner hair cells in the intact auditory sensory epithelium, the organ of Corti, isolated from rats or mice. This protocol particularly outlines the basic equipment required, provides instructions for the preparation of solutions and small equipment items, and methodology for recording voltage-activated and evoked synaptic currents from the inner hair cells.

  15. Properties of two voltage-activated potassium currents in acutely isolated juvenile rat dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    Beck, H; Ficker, E; Heinemann, U

    1992-12-01

    1. The properties of outward currents were investigated in acutely isolated dentate gyrus granule cells at postnatal ages of day 5-7, 10-14, 18-24 (P5-7, P10-14, P18-24) and at adulthood (2-3 mo), with the use of the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. 2. Kinetic analysis and pharmacological properties showed that an A-type K+ current (IA) and a delayed rectifier current (IK) were present in these cells. 3. IA in P10-14 cells activated and inactivated rapidly with a decay time constant of 7.5 +/- 2.1 (SD) ms with command pulses to +30 mV. The removal of inactivation was monoexponential with a time constant of 23.1 ms (holding potential, -50 mV; conditioning voltage steps of varying duration to -110 mV). V 1/2 of the Boltzmann function describing steady-state inactivation was -65.1 +/- 1.8 mV with a slope factor of -6.0. IA was sensitive to 5 mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) but not to 10 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA). 4. IK in P10-14 cells displayed a voltage-dependent activation time constant (4.3 +/- 0.8 ms for command pulses to +30 mV and 16.2 +/- 2.4 for command pulses to -10 mV) and a double-exponential decay (time constants 194 +/- 21 and 1,625 +/- 254 ms). The rate constant of removal of inactivation was 332.1 ms. IK showed a reduction by 61.4 +/- 5.3% with 10 mM TEA and was partially blocked by 5 mM 4-AP in a subpopulation of cells. 5. Whereas IA remained stable over time, IK showed a substantial reduction of current amplitude by 67% after 30 min of cell perfusion through the patch pipette. The time course of this reduction was monoexponential with a time constant of 6.9 min and was partly due to a shift in V1/2 of the steady-state inactivation from -79.2 to -99.6 mV. 6. IA and IK remained stable with respect to kinetic properties during ontogenesis. However, the relative contribution and pharmacological properties of the investigated K+ currents varied with age. Although IA dominated in P5-7 cells, IK was prominent in most older cells. Five millimolars 4-AP reduced

  16. Free-energy landscape of ion-channel voltage-sensor-domain activation.

    PubMed

    Delemotte, Lucie; Kasimova, Marina A; Klein, Michael L; Tarek, Mounir; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2015-01-06

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) are membrane-bound protein modules that confer voltage sensitivity to membrane proteins. VSDs sense changes in the transmembrane voltage and convert the electrical signal into a conformational change called activation. Activation involves a reorganization of the membrane protein charges that is detected experimentally as transient currents. These so-called gating currents have been investigated extensively within the theoretical framework of so-called discrete-state Markov models (DMMs), whereby activation is conceptualized as a series of transitions across a discrete set of states. Historically, the interpretation of DMM transition rates in terms of transition state theory has been instrumental in shaping our view of the activation process, whose free-energy profile is currently envisioned as composed of a few local minima separated by steep barriers. Here we use atomistic level modeling and well-tempered metadynamics to calculate the configurational free energy along a single transition from first principles. We show that this transition is intrinsically multidimensional and described by a rough free-energy landscape. Remarkably, a coarse-grained description of the system, based on the use of the gating charge as reaction coordinate, reveals a smooth profile with a single barrier, consistent with phenomenological models. Our results bridge the gap between microscopic and macroscopic descriptions of activation dynamics and show that choosing the gating charge as reaction coordinate masks the topological complexity of the network of microstates participating in the transition. Importantly, full characterization of the latter is a prerequisite to rationalize modulation of this process by lipids, toxins, drugs, and genetic mutations.

  17. Free-energy landscape of ion-channel voltage-sensor–domain activation

    PubMed Central

    Delemotte, Lucie; Kasimova, Marina A.; Klein, Michael L.; Tarek, Mounir; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) are membrane-bound protein modules that confer voltage sensitivity to membrane proteins. VSDs sense changes in the transmembrane voltage and convert the electrical signal into a conformational change called activation. Activation involves a reorganization of the membrane protein charges that is detected experimentally as transient currents. These so-called gating currents have been investigated extensively within the theoretical framework of so-called discrete-state Markov models (DMMs), whereby activation is conceptualized as a series of transitions across a discrete set of states. Historically, the interpretation of DMM transition rates in terms of transition state theory has been instrumental in shaping our view of the activation process, whose free-energy profile is currently envisioned as composed of a few local minima separated by steep barriers. Here we use atomistic level modeling and well-tempered metadynamics to calculate the configurational free energy along a single transition from first principles. We show that this transition is intrinsically multidimensional and described by a rough free-energy landscape. Remarkably, a coarse-grained description of the system, based on the use of the gating charge as reaction coordinate, reveals a smooth profile with a single barrier, consistent with phenomenological models. Our results bridge the gap between microscopic and macroscopic descriptions of activation dynamics and show that choosing the gating charge as reaction coordinate masks the topological complexity of the network of microstates participating in the transition. Importantly, full characterization of the latter is a prerequisite to rationalize modulation of this process by lipids, toxins, drugs, and genetic mutations. PMID:25535341

  18. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E.; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27164140

  19. A high frequency active voltage doubler in standard CMOS using offset-controlled comparators for inductive power transmission.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std . CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm(2) of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages.

  20. A High Frequency Active Voltage Doubler in Standard CMOS Using Offset-Controlled Comparators for Inductive Power Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std. CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm2 of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages. PMID:23853321

  1. Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels as Functional Markers of Mature Neurons in Human Olfactory Neuroepithelial Cells: Implications for the Study of Neurodevelopment in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Reyes-García, Jorge; Valdés-Tovar, Marcela; Calixto, Eduardo; Montaño, Luis M.; Benítez-King, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    In adulthood, differentiation of precursor cells into neurons continues in several brain structures as well as in the olfactory neuroepithelium. Isolated precursors allow the study of the neurodevelopmental process in vitro. The aim of this work was to determine whether the expression of functional Voltage-Activated Ca2+ Channels (VACC) is dependent on the neurodevelopmental stage in neuronal cells obtained from the human olfactory epithelium of a single healthy donor. The presence of channel-forming proteins in Olfactory Sensory Neurons (OSN) was demonstrated by immunofluorescent labeling, and VACC functioning was assessed by microfluorometry and the patch-clamp technique. VACC were immunodetected only in OSN. Mature neurons responded to forskolin with a five-fold increase in Ca2+. By contrast, in precursor cells, a subtle response was observed. The involvement of VACC in the precursors’ response was discarded for the absence of transmembrane inward Ca2+ movement evoked by step depolarizations. Data suggest differential expression of VACC in neuronal cells depending on their developmental stage and also that the expression of these channels is acquired by OSN during maturation, to enable specialized functions such as ion movement triggered by membrane depolarization. The results support that VACC in OSN could be considered as a functional marker to study neurodevelopment. PMID:27314332

  2. Relaxation of Isolated Ventricular Cardiomyocytes by a Voltage-Dependent Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, John H. B.; Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Ershler, Philip R.

    1988-08-01

    Cell contraction and relaxation were measured in single voltage-clamped guinea pig cardiomyocytes to investigate the contribution of sarcolemmal Na+-Ca2+ exchange to mechanical relaxation. Cells clamped from -80 to 0 millivolts displayed initial phasic and subsequent tonic contractions; caffeine reduced or abolished the phasic and enlarged the tonic contraction. The rate of relaxation from tonic contractions was steeply voltage-dependent and was significantly slowed in the absence of a sarcolemmal Na+ gradient. Tonic contractions elicited in the absence of a Na+ gradient promptly relaxed when external Na+ was applied, reflecting activation of Na+-Ca2+ exchange. It appears that a voltage-dependent Na+-Ca2+ exchange can rapidly mechanically relax mammalian heart muscle.

  3. Unfolding of a temperature-sensitive domain controls voltage-gated channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni, Cristina; Rohaim, Ahmed; Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Stein, Richard A.; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Mishra, Smriti; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Minor, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) are outfitted with diverse cytoplasmic domains that impact function. To examine how such elements may affect VGIC behavior, we addressed how the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (BacNaV) C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (CTD) affects function. Our studies show that the BacNaV CTD exerts a profound influence on gating through a temperature-dependent unfolding transition in a discrete cytoplasmic domain, the neck domain, proximal to the pore. Structural and functional studies establish that the BacNaV CTD comprises a bi-partite four-helix bundle that bears an unusual hydrophilic core whose integrity is central to the unfolding mechanism and that couples directly to the channel activation gate. Together, our findings define a general principle for how the widespread four-helix bundle cytoplasmic domain architecture can control VGIC responses, uncover a mechanism underlying the diverse BacNaV voltage dependencies, and demonstrate that a discrete domain can encode the temperature dependent response of a channel. PMID:26919429

  4. Overproduction and purification of RFC-related clamp loaders and PCNA-related clamps from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bylund, Göran O; Majka, Jerzy; Burgers, Peter M J

    2006-01-01

    The replication clamp PCNA and its loader RFC (Replication Factor C) are central factors required for processive replication and coordinated DNA repair. Recently, several additional related clamp loaders have been identified. These alternative clamp loaders contain the small Rfc2-5 subunits of RFC, but replace the large Rfc1 subunit by a pathway-specific alternative large subunit, Rad24 for the DNA damage checkpoint, Ctf18 for the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion, and Elg1 for a general function in chromosome stability. In order to define biochemical functions for these loaders, the loaders were overproduced in yeast and purified at a milligram scale. To aid in purification, the large subunit of each clamp loader was fused to a GST-tag that, after purification could be easily removed by a rhinoviral protease. This methodology yielded all clamp loaders in high yield and with high enzymatic activity. The yeast 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp, consisting of Rad17, Mec3, and Ddc1, was overproduced and purified in a similar manner.

  5. Activation of CRH receptor type 1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons increases excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by the modulation of voltage-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Stephan; Mattusch, Corinna; Metzger, Michael W; Dedic, Nina; Noll-Hussong, Michael; Kafitz, Karl W; Eder, Matthias; Deussing, Jan M; Holsboer, Florian; Kochs, Eberhard; Rammes, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays an important role in a substantial number of patients with stress-related mental disorders, such as anxiety disorders and depression. CRH has been shown to increase neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effects of CRH on neuronal excitability were investigated in acute hippocampal brain slices. Population spikes (PS) and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) were evoked by stimulating Schaffer-collaterals and recorded simultaneously from the somatic and dendritic region of CA1 pyramidal neurons. CRH was found to increase PS amplitudes (mean ± Standard error of the mean; 231.8 ± 31.2% of control; n = 10) while neither affecting fEPSPs (104.3 ± 4.2%; n = 10) nor long-term potentiation (LTP). However, when Schaffer-collaterals were excited via action potentials (APs) generated by stimulation of CA3 pyramidal neurons, CRH increased fEPSP amplitudes (119.8 ± 3.6%; n = 8) and the magnitude of LTP in the CA1 region. Experiments in slices from transgenic mice revealed that the effect on PS amplitude is mediated exclusively by CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) expressed on glutamatergic neurons. The effects of CRH on PS were dependent on phosphatase-2B, L- and T-type calcium channels and voltage-gated potassium channels but independent on intracellular Ca(2+)-elevation. In patch-clamp experiments, CRH increased the frequency and decay times of APs and decreased currents through A-type and delayed-rectifier potassium channels. These results suggest that CRH does not affect synaptic transmission per se, but modulates voltage-gated ion currents important for the generation of APs and hence elevates by this route overall neuronal activity.

  6. Activation of CRH receptor type 1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons increases excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by the modulation of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Stephan; Mattusch, Corinna; Metzger, Michael W.; Dedic, Nina; Noll-Hussong, Michael; Kafitz, Karl W.; Eder, Matthias; Deussing, Jan M.; Holsboer, Florian; Kochs, Eberhard; Rammes, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays an important role in a substantial number of patients with stress-related mental disorders, such as anxiety disorders and depression. CRH has been shown to increase neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effects of CRH on neuronal excitability were investigated in acute hippocampal brain slices. Population spikes (PS) and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) were evoked by stimulating Schaffer-collaterals and recorded simultaneously from the somatic and dendritic region of CA1 pyramidal neurons. CRH was found to increase PS amplitudes (mean ± Standard error of the mean; 231.8 ± 31.2% of control; n = 10) while neither affecting fEPSPs (104.3 ± 4.2%; n = 10) nor long-term potentiation (LTP). However, when Schaffer-collaterals were excited via action potentials (APs) generated by stimulation of CA3 pyramidal neurons, CRH increased fEPSP amplitudes (119.8 ± 3.6%; n = 8) and the magnitude of LTP in the CA1 region. Experiments in slices from transgenic mice revealed that the effect on PS amplitude is mediated exclusively by CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) expressed on glutamatergic neurons. The effects of CRH on PS were dependent on phosphatase-2B, L- and T-type calcium channels and voltage-gated potassium channels but independent on intracellular Ca2+-elevation. In patch-clamp experiments, CRH increased the frequency and decay times of APs and decreased currents through A-type and delayed-rectifier potassium channels. These results suggest that CRH does not affect synaptic transmission per se, but modulates voltage-gated ion currents important for the generation of APs and hence elevates by this route overall neuronal activity. PMID:23882180

  7. From Squid to Mammals with the HH Model through the Nav Channels' Half-Activation-Voltage Parameter.

    PubMed

    Krouchev, Nedialko I; Rattay, Frank; Sawan, Mohamad; Vinet, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The model family analyzed in this work stems from the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model (HHM). for a single-compartment (space-clamp) and continuous variation of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) half-activation-voltage parameter ΔV1/2, which controls the window of sodium-influx currents. Unlike the baseline HHM, its parametric extension exhibits a richer multitude of dynamic regimes, such as multiple fixed points (FP's), bi- and multi-stability (coexistence of FP's and/or periodic orbits). Such diversity correlates with a number of functional properties of excitable neural tissue, such as the capacity or not to evoke an action potential (AP) from the resting state, by applying a minimal absolute rheobase current amplitude. The utility of the HHM rooted in the giant squid for the descriptions of the mammalian nervous system is of topical interest. We conclude that the model's fundamental principles are still valid (up to using appropriate parameter values) for warmer-blooded species, without a pressing need for a substantial revision of the mathematical formulation. We demonstrate clearly that the continuous variation of the ΔV1/2 parameter comes close to being equivalent with recent HHM 'optimizations'. The neural dynamics phenomena described here are nontrivial. The model family analyzed in this work contains the classical HHM as a special case. The validity and applicability of the HHM to mammalian neurons can be achieved by picking the appropriate ΔV1/2 parameter in a significantly broad range of values. For such large variations, in contrast to the classical HHM, the h and n gates' dynamics may be uncoupled--i.e. the n gates may no longer be considered in mere linear correspondence to the h gates. ΔV1/2 variation leads to a multitude of dynamic regimes--e.g. models with either 1 fixed point (FP) or with 3 FP's. These may also coexist with stable and/or unstable periodic orbits. Hence, depending on the initial conditions, the system may behave as either

  8. From Squid to Mammals with the HH Model through the Nav Channels’ Half-Activation-Voltage Parameter

    PubMed Central

    Krouchev, Nedialko I.; Rattay, Frank; Sawan, Mohamad; Vinet, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The model family analyzed in this work stems from the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model (HHM). for a single-compartment (space-clamp) and continuous variation of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) half-activation-voltage parameter ΔV1/2, which controls the window of sodium-influx currents. Unlike the baseline HHM, its parametric extension exhibits a richer multitude of dynamic regimes, such as multiple fixed points (FP’s), bi- and multi-stability (coexistence of FP’s and/or periodic orbits). Such diversity correlates with a number of functional properties of excitable neural tissue, such as the capacity or not to evoke an action potential (AP) from the resting state, by applying a minimal absolute rheobase current amplitude. The utility of the HHM rooted in the giant squid for the descriptions of the mammalian nervous system is of topical interest. We conclude that the model’s fundamental principles are still valid (up to using appropriate parameter values) for warmer-blooded species, without a pressing need for a substantial revision of the mathematical formulation. We demonstrate clearly that the continuous variation of the ΔV1/2 parameter comes close to being equivalent with recent HHM ‘optimizations’. The neural dynamics phenomena described here are nontrivial. The model family analyzed in this work contains the classical HHM as a special case. The validity and applicability of the HHM to mammalian neurons can be achieved by picking the appropriate ΔV1/2 parameter in a significantly broad range of values. For such large variations, in contrast to the classical HHM, the h and n gates’ dynamics may be uncoupled - i.e. the n gates may no longer be considered in mere linear correspondence to the h gates. ΔV1/2 variation leads to a multitude of dynamic regimes—e.g. models with either 1 fixed point (FP) or with 3 FP’s. These may also coexist with stable and/or unstable periodic orbits. Hence, depending on the initial conditions, the system may

  9. Molecular Basis of Regulating High Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels by S-Nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meng-Hua; Bavencoffe, Alexis; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2015-12-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in a variety of physiological processes, such as vasoregulation and neurotransmission, and has a complex role in the regulation of pain transduction and synaptic transmission. We have shown previously that NO inhibits high voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels in primary sensory neurons and excitatory synaptic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn. However, the molecular mechanism involved in this inhibitory action remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of S-nitrosylation in the NO regulation of high voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP) rapidly reduced N-type currents when Cav2.2 was coexpressed with the Cavβ1 or Cavβ3 subunits in HEK293 cells. In contrast, SNAP only slightly inhibited P/Q-type and L-type currents reconstituted with various Cavβ subunits. SNAP caused a depolarizing shift in voltage-dependent N-type channel activation, but it had no effect on Cav2.2 protein levels on the membrane surface. The inhibitory effect of SNAP on N-type currents was blocked by the sulfhydryl-specific modifying reagent methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium. Furthermore, the consensus motifs of S-nitrosylation were much more abundant in Cav2.2 than in Cav1.2 and Cav2.1. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that Cys-805, Cys-930, and Cys-1045 in the II-III intracellular loop, Cys-1835 and Cys-2145 in the C terminus of Cav2.2, and Cys-346 in the Cavβ3 subunit were nitrosylation sites mediating NO sensitivity of N-type channels. Our findings demonstrate that the consensus motifs of S-nitrosylation in cytoplasmically accessible sites are critically involved in post-translational regulation of N-type Ca(2+) channels by NO. S-Nitrosylation mediates the feedback regulation of N-type channels by NO.

  10. The RFC clamp loader: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nina Y; O'Donnell, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The eukaryotic RFC clamp loader couples the energy of ATP hydrolysis to open and close the circular PCNA sliding clamp onto primed sites for use by DNA polymerases and repair factors. Structural studies reveal clamp loaders to be heteropentamers. Each subunit contains a region of homology to AAA+ proteins that defines two domains. The AAA+ domains form a right-handed spiral upon binding ATP. This spiral arrangement generates a DNA binding site within the center of RFC. DNA enters the central chamber through a gap between the AAA+ domains of two subunits. Specificity for a primed template junction is achieved by a third domain that blocks DNA, forcing it to bend sharply. Thus only DNA with a flexible joint can bind the central chamber. DNA entry also requires a slot in the PCNA clamp, which is opened upon binding the AAA+ domains of the clamp loader. ATP hydrolysis enables clamp closing and ejection of RFC, completing the clamp loading reaction.

  11. Stochastic diffusion model of multistep activation in a voltage-dependent K channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, S. R.

    2010-04-01

    The energy barrier to the activated state for the S4 voltage sensor of a K channel is dependent on the electrostatic force between positively charged S4 residues and negatively charged groups on neighboring segments, the potential difference across the membrane, and the dielectric boundary force on the charged residues near the interface between the solvent and the low dielectric region of the membrane gating pore. The variation of the potential function with transverse displacement and rotation of the S4 sensor across the membrane may be derived from a solution of Poisson's equation for the electrostatic potential. By approximating the energy of an S4 sensor along a path between stationary states by a piecewise linear function of the transverse displacement, the dynamics of slow activation, in the millisecond range, may be described by the lowest frequency component of an analytical solution of interacting diffusion equations of Fokker-Planck type for resting and barrier regions. The solution of the Smoluchowski equations for an S4 sensor in an energy landscape with several barriers is in accord with an empirical master equation for multistep activation in a voltage-dependent K channel.

  12. Whole-cell clamp of dissociated photoreceptors from the eye of Lima scabra.

    PubMed

    Nasi, E

    1991-01-01

    Voltage-dependent membrane currents were investigated in enzymatically dissociated photoreceptors of Lima scabra using the whole-cell clamp technique. Depolarizing steps to voltages more positive than -10 mV elicit a transient inward current followed by a delayed, sustained outward current. The outward current is insensitive to replacement of a large fraction of extracellular Cl- with the impermeant anion glucuronate. Superfusion with tetraethylammonium and 4-aminopyridine reversibly abolishes the outward current, and internal perfusion with cesium also suppresses it, indicating that it is mediated by potassium channels. Isolation of the inward current reveals a fast activation kinetics, the peak amplitude occurring as early as 4-5 ms after stimulus onset, and a relatively rapid, though incomplete inactivation. Within the range of voltages examined, spanning up to +90 mV, reversal was not observed. The inward current is not sensitive to tetrodotoxin at concentrations up to 10 microM, and survives replacement of extracellular Na with tetramethylammonium. On the other hand, it is completely eliminated by calcium removal from the perfusing solution, and it is partially blocked by submillimolar concentrations of cadmium, suggesting that it is entirely due to voltage-dependent calcium channels. Analysis of the kinetics and voltage dependence of the isolated calcium current indicates the presence of two components, possibly reflecting the existence of separate populations of channels. Barium and strontium can pass through these channels, though less easily than calcium. Both the activation and the inactivation become significantly more sluggish when these ions serve as the charge carrier. A large fraction of the outward current is activated by preceding calcium influx. Suppression of this calcium-dependent potassium current shows a small residual component resembling the delayed rectifier. In addition, a transient outward current sensitive to 4-aminopyridine (Ia) could

  13. A charged residue in S4 regulates coupling among the activation gate, voltage, and Ca2+ sensors in BK channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guohui; Yang, Huanghe; Liang, Hongwu; Yang, Junqiu; Shi, Jingyi; McFarland, Kelli; Chen, Yihan; Cui, Jianmin

    2014-09-10

    Coupling between the activation gate and sensors of physiological stimuli during ion channel activation is an important, but not well-understood, molecular process. One difficulty in studying sensor-gate coupling is to distinguish whether a structural perturbation alters the function of the sensor, the gate, or their coupling. BK channels are activated by membrane voltage and intracellular Ca(2+) via allosteric mechanisms with coupling among the activation gate and sensors quantitatively defined, providing an excellent model system for studying sensor-gate coupling. By studying BK channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, here we show that mutation E219R in S4 alters channel function by two independent mechanisms: one is to change voltage sensor activation, shifting voltage dependence, and increase valence of gating charge movements; the other is to regulate coupling among the activation gate, voltage sensor, and Ca(2+) binding via electrostatic interactions with E321/E324 located in the cytosolic side of S6 in a neighboring subunit, resulting in a shift of the voltage dependence of channel opening and increased Ca(2+) sensitivity. These results suggest a structural arrangement of the inner pore of BK channels differing from that in other voltage gated channels.

  14. Concentration-jump analysis of voltage-dependent conductances activated by glutamate and kainate in neurons of the avian cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Raman, I M; Trussell, L O

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the mechanisms underlying the voltage sensitivity of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors in voltage-clamped outside-out patches and whole cells taken from the nucleus magnocellularis of the chick. Responses to either glutamate or kainate had outwardly rectifying current-voltage relations. The rate and extent of desensitization during prolonged exposure to agonist, and the rate of deactivation after brief exposure to agonist, decreased at positive potentials, suggesting that a kinetic transition was sensitive to membrane potential. Voltage dependence of the peak conductance and of the deactivation kinetics persisted when desensitization was reduced with aniracetam or blocked with cyclothiazide. Furthermore, the rate of recovery from desensitization to glutamate was not voltage dependent. Upon reduction of extracellular divalent cation concentration, kainate-evoked currents increased but preserved rectifying current-voltage relations. Rectification was strongest at lower kainate concentrations. Surprisingly, nonstationary variance analysis of desensitizing responses to glutamate or of the current deactivation after kainate removal revealed an increase in the mean single-channel conductance with more positive membrane potentials. These data indicate that the rectification of the peak response to a high agonist concentration reflects an increase in channel conductance, whereas rectification of steady-state current is dominated by voltage-sensitive channel kinetics. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8580330

  15. High-speed pressure clamp.

    PubMed

    Besch, Stephen R; Suchyna, Thomas; Sachs, Frederick

    2002-10-01

    We built a high-speed, pneumatic pressure clamp to stimulate patch-clamped membranes mechanically. The key control element is a newly designed differential valve that uses a single, nickel-plated piezoelectric bending element to control both pressure and vacuum. To minimize response time, the valve body was designed with minimum dead volume. The result is improved response time and stability with a threefold decrease in actuation latency. Tight valve clearances minimize the steady-state air flow, permitting us to use small resonant-piston pumps to supply pressure and vacuum. To protect the valve from water contamination in the event of a broken pipette, an optical sensor detects water entering the valve and increases pressure rapidly to clear the system. The open-loop time constant for pressure is 2.5 ms for a 100-mmHg step, and the closed-loop settling time is 500-600 micros. Valve actuation latency is 120 micros. The system performance is illustrated for mechanically induced changes in patch capacitance.

  16. Electronics drivers for high voltage dielectric electro active polymer (DEAP) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric electro active polymer (DEAP) can be used in actuation, sensing and energy harvesting applications, but driving the DEAP based actuators and generators has three main challenges from a power electronics standpoint, i.e. high voltage (around 2.5 kV), nonlinearity, and capacitive behavior. In this paper, electronics divers for heating valves, loud speakers, incremental motors, and energy harvesting are reviewed, studied and developed in accordance with their corresponding specifications. Due to the simplicity and low power capacity (below 10W), the reversible Fly-back converters with both magnetic and piezoelectric transformers are employed for the heating valve and incremental motor application, where only ON/OFF regulation is adopted for energy saving; as for DEAP based energy harvesting, the noisolated Buck/Boost converter is used, due to the system high power capacity (above 100W), but the voltage balancing across the series-connected high voltage IGBTs is a critical issue and accordingly a novel gate driver circuitry is proposed and equipped; due to the requirements of the audio products, such as low distortion and noise, the multi-level Buck converter based Class-D amplifier, because of its high control linearity, is implemented for the loud speaker applications. A synthesis among those converter topologies and control techniques is given; therefore, for those DEAP based applications, their diversity and similarity of electronics drivers, as well as the key technologies employed are analyzed. Therefore a whole picture of how to choose the proper topologies can be revealed. Finally, the design guidelines in order to achieve high efficiency and reliability are discussed.

  17. Shunt hybrid active power filter under nonideal voltage based on fuzzy logic controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Papan; Mekhilef, Saad

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a synchronous reference frame (SRF) method based on a modified phase lock loop (PLL) circuit is developed for a three-phase four-wire shunt hybrid active power filter (APF). Its performance is analysed under unbalanced grid conditions. The dominant lower order harmonics as well as reactive power can be compensated by the passive elements, whereas the active part mitigates the remaining distortions and improves the power quality. As different control methods show contradictory performance, fuzzy logic controller is considered here for DC-link voltage regulation of the inverter. Extensive simulations of the proposed technique are carried out in a MATLAB-SIMULINK environment. A laboratory prototype has been built on dSPACE1104 platform to verify the feasibility of the suggested SHAPF controller. The simulation and experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  18. Voltage dependence of a stochastic model of activation of an alpha helical S4 sensor in a K channel membrane.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, S R

    2011-09-07

    The voltage dependence of the ionic and gating currents of a K channel is dependent on the activation barriers of a voltage sensor with a potential function which may be derived from the principal electrostatic forces on an S4 segment in an inhomogeneous dielectric medium. By variation of the parameters of a voltage-sensing domain model, consistent with x-ray structures and biophysical data, the lowest frequency of the survival probability of each stationary state derived from a solution of the Smoluchowski equation provides a good fit to the voltage dependence of the slowest time constant of the ionic current in a depolarized membrane, and the gating current exhibits a rising phase that precedes an exponential relaxation. For each depolarizing potential, the calculated time dependence of the survival probabilities of the closed states of an alpha helical S4 sensor are in accord with an empirical model of the ionic and gating currents recorded during the activation process.

  19. Calcium-activated potassium channels in the luminal membrane of Amphiuma diluting segment: voltage-dependent block by intracellular Na+ upon depolarisation.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, K; Hunter, M; Giebisch, G

    1990-06-01

    Calcium-activated potassium channels in the luminal membrane of Amphiuma diluting segment were studied using the patch-clamp technique in both the cell-attached and inside-out configurations. The open probability (Po) of the channel is sensitive to both membrane potential and cytoplasmic calcium activity; depolarizing potentials and high calcium concentrations leading to an increased Po. In the cell-attached condition, channel openings were observed between pipette potentials of -100 and -240 mV. As the driving force for potassium exit from the cell into the pipette is increased the single channel currents show a biphasic response. First, the currents increase as expected; however, the single channel currents diminish in magnitude at pipette potentials more negative than -120 mV. We propose that this reduction is due to rapid blockade of the potassium channel by intracellular sodium. This proposal is supported by two facts: (a) using inside-out patches it was possible to reduce the single channel currents in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, similar to that observed in the cell-attached condition, by raising the sodium concentration of the fluid bathing the cytoplasmic face of the patch; (b) pretreatment of tubules with the loop-acting diuretic furosemide (10(-5) M), an agent known to decrease the intracellular sodium activity, caused an attenuation of the reduction in single channel current seen under control conditions. Given the very low Po of the channels at the resting membrane potential and the sensitivity of the channels to intracellular sodium, it is unlikely that blockade of these channels by intracellular sodium would lead to a physiological regulation of the apical K conductance.

  20. Patch clamp recordings of retinal bipolar cells in response to extracellular electrical stimulation in wholemount mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Walston, Steven T; Chow, Robert H; Weiland, James D

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a family of inherited retinal diseases identified by the degeneration of photoreceptors, which leads to blindness. In efforts to restore vision lost to retinitis pigmentosa, retinal prostheses have been developed to generate visual percepts by electrically stimulating the surviving retinal bipolar and ganglion cells. The response of retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation has been characterized through direct measurement. However, the response of bipolar cells has only been inferred by measuring retinal ganglion cell activity. This investigation reports on a novel tissue preparation technique facilitating bipolar cell patch clamp recordings in wholemount retina. We find that bipolar cells respond to extracellular electrical stimuli with time-locked voltage spike depolarizations, which are likely mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels.

  1. Neuroprotective effect of interleukin-6 regulation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels of cortical neurons is time- and dose-dependent.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Peng, Guo-Yi; Sheng, Jiang-Tao; Zhu, Fang-Fang; Guo, Jing-Fang; Chen, Wei-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Interleukin-6 has been shown to be involved in nerve injury and nerve regeneration, but the effects of long-term administration of high concentrations of interleukin-6 on neurons in the central nervous system is poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of 24 hour exposure of interleukin-6 on cortical neurons at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 5 and 10 ng/mL) and the effects of 10 ng/mL interleukin-6 exposure to cortical neurons for various durations (2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours) by studying voltage-gated Na(+) channels using a patch-clamp technique. Voltage-clamp recording results demonstrated that interleukin-6 suppressed Na(+) currents through its receptor in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but did not alter voltage-dependent activation and inactivation. Current-clamp recording results were consistent with voltage-clamp recording results. Interleukin-6 reduced the action potential amplitude of cortical neurons, but did not change the action potential threshold. The regulation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels in rat cortical neurons by interleukin-6 is time- and dose-dependent.

  2. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, Bruce P.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Striker, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  3. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

    1993-02-23

    A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  4. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    House, Carrie D; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T; Annunziata, Christina M; Gutkind, J Silvio; Hales, Tim G; Lee, Norman H

    2015-06-22

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  5. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-06-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  6. A Bright and Fast Red Fluorescent Protein Voltage Indicator That Reports Neuronal Activity in Organotypic Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed S.; Farhi, Samouil L.; Zhao, Yongxin; Brinks, Daan; Zou, Peng; Ruangkittisakul, Araya; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.; Ballanyi, Klaus; Cohen, Adam E.

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging of voltage indicators based on green fluorescent proteins (FPs) or archaerhodopsin has emerged as a powerful approach for detecting the activity of many individual neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution. Relative to green FP-based voltage indicators, a bright red-shifted FP-based voltage indicator has the intrinsic advantages of lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescent background, and compatibility with blue-light-excitable channelrhodopsins. Here, we report a bright red fluorescent voltage indicator (fluorescent indicator for voltage imaging red; FlicR1) with properties that are comparable to the best available green indicators. To develop FlicR1, we used directed protein evolution and rational engineering to screen libraries of thousands of variants. FlicR1 faithfully reports single action potentials (∼3% ΔF/F) and tracks electrically driven voltage oscillations at 100 Hz in dissociated Sprague Dawley rat hippocampal neurons in single trial recordings. Furthermore, FlicR1 can be easily imaged with wide-field fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that FlicR1 can be used in conjunction with a blue-shifted channelrhodopsin for all-optical electrophysiology, although blue light photoactivation of the FlicR1 chromophore presents a challenge for applications that require spatially overlapping yellow and blue excitation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Fluorescent-protein-based voltage indicators enable imaging of the electrical activity of many genetically targeted neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we describe the engineering of a bright red fluorescent protein-based voltage indicator designated as FlicR1 (fluorescent indicator for voltage imaging red). FlicR1 has sufficient speed and sensitivity to report single action potentials and voltage fluctuations at frequencies up to 100 Hz in single-trial recordings with wide-field microscopy. Because it is excitable with yellow light, FlicR1 can be used in conjunction with blue-light-activated

  7. Stabilization of the Activated hERG Channel Voltage Sensor by Depolarization Involves the S4-S5 Linker.

    PubMed

    Thouta, Samrat; Hull, Christina M; Shi, Yu Patrick; Sergeev, Valentine; Young, James; Cheng, Yen M; Claydon, Thomas W

    2017-01-24

    Slow deactivation of hERG channels is critical for preventing cardiac arrhythmia yet the mechanistic basis for the slow gating transition is unclear. Here, we characterized the temporal sequence of events leading to voltage sensor stabilization upon membrane depolarization. Progressive increase in step depolarization duration slowed voltage-sensor return in a biphasic manner (τfast = 34 ms, τslow = 2.5 s). The faster phase of voltage-sensor return slowing correlated with the kinetics of pore opening. The slower component occurred over durations that exceeded channel activation and was consistent with voltage sensor relaxation. The S4-S5 linker mutation, G546L, impeded the faster phase of voltage sensor stabilization without attenuating the slower phase, suggesting that the S4-S5 linker is important for communications between the pore gate and the voltage sensor during deactivation. These data also demonstrate that the mechanisms of pore gate-opening-induced and relaxation-induced voltage-sensor stabilization are separable. Deletion of the distal N-terminus (Δ2-135) accelerated off-gating current, but did not influence the relative contribution of either mechanism of stabilization of the voltage sensor. Lastly, we characterized mode-shift behavior in hERG channels, which results from stabilization of activated channel states. The apparent mode-shift depended greatly on recording conditions. By measuring slow activation and deactivation at steady state we found the "true" mode-shift to be ∼15 mV. Interestingly, the "true" mode-shift of gating currents was ∼40 mV, much greater than that of the pore gate. This demonstrates that voltage sensor return is less energetically favorable upon repolarization than pore gate closure. We interpret this to indicate that stabilization of the activated voltage sensor limits the return of hERG channels to rest. The data suggest that this stabilization occurs as a result of reconfiguration of the pore gate upon opening by

  8. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage-sensing lipid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sasha S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-04-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We found that the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), has not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Using fast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage-clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we found that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage-sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This two-step allosteric control over a dual-specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility, endocytosis and exocytosis.

  9. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage sensing lipid phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Sasha S.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We find the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), to have not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage sensing domain (VSD). Using fast FRET reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we find that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This novel 2-step allosteric control over a dual specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility and endo/exocytosis. PMID:26878552

  10. Melanocortin 4 receptor constitutive activity inhibits L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in neurons.

    PubMed

    Agosti, F; Cordisco Gonzalez, S; Martinez Damonte, V; Tolosa, M J; Di Siervi, N; Schioth, H B; Davio, C; Perello, M; Raingo, J

    2017-03-27

    The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in several brain nuclei playing a crucial role in the regulation of energy balance controlling the homeostasis of the organism. It displays both agonist-evoked and constitutive activity, and moreover, it can couple to different G proteins. Most of the research on MC4R has been focused on agonist-induced activity, while the molecular and cellular basis of MC4R constitutive activity remains scarcely studied. We have previously shown that neuronal N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) are inhibited by MC4R agonist-dependent activation, while the CaV subtypes that carry L- and P/Q-type current are not. Here, we tested the hypothesis that MC4R constitutive activity can affect CaV, with focus on the channel subtypes that can control transcriptional activity coupled to depolarization (L-type, CaV1.2/1.3) and neurotransmitter release (N- and P/Q-type, CaV2.2 and CaV2.1). We found that MC4R constitutive activity inhibits specifically CaV1.2/1.3 and CaV2.1 subtypes of CaV. We also explored the signaling pathways mediating this inhibition, and thus propose that agonist-dependent and basal MC4R activation modes signal differentially through Gs and Gi/o pathways to impact on different CaV subtypes. In addition, we found that chronic incubation with MC4R endogenous inverse agonist, agouti and agouti-related peptide (AgRP), occludes CaV inhibition in a cell line and in amygdaloid complex cultured neurons as well. Thus, we define new mechanisms of control of the main mediators of depolarization-induced calcium entry into neurons by a GPCR that displays constitutive activity.

  11. NO Hyperpolarizes Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Decreases the Intracellular Ca2+ Concentration by Activating Voltage-Gated K+ Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Jian; Tod, Mary L.; Rubin, Lewis J.; Blaustein, Mordecai P.

    1996-09-01

    NO causes pulmonary vasodilation in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, the activity of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels controls resting membrane potential. In turn, membrane potential is an important regulator of the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and pulmonary vascular tone. We used patch clamp methods to determine whether the NO-induced pulmonary vasodilation is mediated by activation of KV channels. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy was employed to test the effect of NO on the depolarization-induced rise in [Ca2+]i. Blockade of KV channels by 4-aminopyridine (5 mM) depolarized pulmonary artery myocytes to threshold for initiation of Ca2+ action potentials, and thereby increased [Ca2+]i. NO (≈ 3 μ M) and the NO-generating compound sodium nitroprusside (5-10 μ M) opened KV channels in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. The enhanced K+ currents then hyperpolarized the cells, and blocked Ca2+-dependent action potentials, thereby preventing the evoked increases in [Ca2+]i. Nitroprusside also increased the probability of KV channel opening in excised, outside-out membrane patches. This raises the possibility that NO may act either directly on the channel protein or on a closely associated molecule rather than via soluble guanylate cyclase. In isolated pulmonary arteries, 4-aminopyridine significantly inhibited NO-induced relaxation. We conclude that NO promotes the opening of KV channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. The resulting membrane hyperpolarization, which lowers [Ca2+]i, is apparently one of the mechanisms by which NO induces pulmonary vasodilation.

  12. Thermal analysis of HTS air-core transformer used in voltage compensation type active SFCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.; Tang, Y.; Li, J.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, L.; Ren, L.

    2010-11-01

    The three-phase voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) is composed of three HTS air-core transformers and a three-phase four-wire Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) converter. The primary winding of the each phase HTS air-core transformer is in series with the main system, and the second winding is connected with the PWM converter. The single-phase conduction-cooled HTS air-core transformer is consisting of four double-pancakes wound by the Bi2223/Ag tape. In this paper, according to the electromagnetic analysis on the single-phase HTS air-core transformer, its AC loss corresponding to different operation modes is calculated. Furthermore, the thermal behaviors are studied by the time-stepping numerical simulations. On the basis of the simulation results, the related problems with the HTS air-core transformer's thermal stability are discussed.

  13. The MuPix high voltage monolithic active pixel sensor for the Mu3e experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, H.; Berger, N.; Bravar, S.; Corrodi, S.; Damyanova, A.; Förster, F.; Gredig, R.; Herkert, A.; Huang, Q.; Huth, L.; Kiehn, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Maldaner, S.; Perić, I.; Philipp, R.; Robmann, P.; Schöning, A.; Shrestha, S.; vom Bruch, D.; Weber, T.; Wiedner, D.

    2015-03-01

    Mu3e is a novel experiment searching for charged lepton flavor violation in the rare decay μ → eee. In order to reduce background by up to 16 orders of magnitude, decay vertex position, decay time and particle momenta have to be measured precisely. A pixel tracker based on 50 μm thin high voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS) in a magnetic field will deliver precise vertex and momentum information. Test beam results like an excellent efficiency of >99.5% and a time resolution of better than 16.6 ns obtained with the MuPix HV-MAPS chip developed for the Mu3e pixel tracker are presented.

  14. Autowaves in an active two-wire line with exponential current-voltage characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, V. M.

    2006-03-15

    Nonlinear wave processes in two-wire lines containing an active element with an exponential current-voltage characteristic (CVC) similar to that of a p-n junction are investigated. These lines are models of systems that are encountered in various physical and biological applications, such as biological membranes and semiconductor devices. It is shown that such systems may operate in different modes each of which has different dispersion and dissipation properties and, as a consequence, is described by autowave processes of different types. The behavior of a system in all basic modes is analyzed. For each mode, exact solutions to relevant equations are found and their differential conservation laws and intrinsic symmetries are investigated. One of common properties of such equations is the presence of a special superposition principle that describes the discrete structure of excitations in a line that consist of individual elementary excitations. It is shown that autopulses may be generated in such systems.

  15. Zero Voltage Soft Switching Duty Cycle Pulse Modulated High Frequency Inverter-Fed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitobi, Manabu; Matsushige, Takayuki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo; Bessyo, Daisuke; Omori, Hideki; Terai, Haruo

    The utility grid voltage of commercial AC power source in Japan and USA is 100V, but in other Asian and European countries, it is 220V. In recent years, in Japan 200V outputted single-phase three-wire system begins to be used for high power applications. In 100V utility AC power applications and systems, an active voltage clamped quasi-resonant inverter circuit topology sing IGBTs has been effectively used so far for the consumer microwave oven. In this paper, presented is a half bridge type voltage-clamped asymmetrical soft switching PWM high-frequency inverter type AC-DC converter using IGBTs which is designed for consumer magnetron drive used as the consumer microwave oven in 200V utility AC power system. The zero voltage soft switching inverter treated here can use the same power rated switching semiconductor devices and three-winding high frequency transformer as those of the active voltage clamped quasi-resonant inverter using the IGBTs that has already been used for 100V utility AC power source. The operating performances of the voltage source single ended push pull (SEPP) type soft switching PWM inverter are evaluated and discussed for 100V and 200V common use consumer microwave oven. The harmonic line current components in the utility AC power side of the AC-DC power converter with ZVS-PWM SEPP inverter are reduced and improved on the basis of sine wave like pulse frequency modulation and sine wave like pulse width modulation for the utility AC voltage source.

  16. Optical electrophysiology for probing function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Reichert, Elaine; Cohen, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels mediate electrical dynamics in excitable tissues and are an important class of drug targets. Channels can gate in sub-millisecond timescales, show complex manifolds of conformational states, and often show state-dependent pharmacology. Mechanistic studies of ion channels typically involve sophisticated voltage-clamp protocols applied through manual or automated electrophysiology. Here, we develop all-optical electrophysiology techniques to study activity-dependent modulation of ion channels, in a format compatible with high-throughput screening. Using optical electrophysiology, we recapitulate many voltage-clamp protocols and apply to Nav1.7, a channel implicated in pain. Optical measurements reveal that a sustained depolarization strongly potentiates the inhibitory effect of PF-04856264, a Nav1.7-specific blocker. In a pilot screen, we stratify a library of 320 FDA-approved compounds by binding mechanism and kinetics, and find close concordance with patch clamp measurements. Optical electrophysiology provides a favorable tradeoff between throughput and information content for studies of NaV channels, and possibly other voltage-gated channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15202.001 PMID:27215841

  17. Zinc pyrithione-mediated activation of voltage-gated KCNQ potassium channels rescues epileptogenic mutants.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qiaojie; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Min

    2007-05-01

    KCNQ potassium channels are activated by changes in transmembrane voltage and play an important role in controlling electrical excitability. Human mutations of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 potassium channel genes result in reduction or loss of channel activity and cause benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNCs). Thus, small molecules capable of augmenting KCNQ currents are essential both for understanding the mechanism of channel activity and for developing therapeutics. We performed a high-throughput screen in search for agonistic compounds potentiating KCNQ potassium channels. Here we report identification of a new opener, zinc pyrithione (1), which activates both recombinant and native KCNQ M currents. Interactions with the channel protein cause an increase of single-channel open probability that could fully account for the overall conductance increase. Separate point mutations have been identified that either shift the concentration dependence or affect potentiation efficacy, thereby providing evidence for residues influencing ligand binding and downstream events. Furthermore, zinc pyrithione is capable of rescuing the mutant channels causal to BFNCs.

  18. Mechanism of ATP-driven PCNA clamp loading by S. cerevisiae RFC.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siying; Levin, Mikhail K; Sakato, Miho; Zhou, Yayan; Hingorani, Manju M

    2009-05-08

    Circular clamps tether polymerases to DNA, serving as essential processivity factors in genome replication, and function in other critical cellular processes as well. Clamp loaders catalyze clamp assembly onto DNA, and the question of how these proteins construct a topological link between a clamp and DNA, especially the mechanism by which ATP is utilized for the task, remains open. Here we describe pre-steady-state analysis of ATP hydrolysis, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp opening, and DNA binding by Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C (RFC), and present the first kinetic model of a eukaryotic clamp-loading reaction validated by global data analysis. ATP binding to multiple RFC subunits initiates a slow conformational change in the clamp loader, enabling it to bind and open PCNA and to bind DNA as well. PCNA opening locks RFC into an active state, and the resulting RFC.ATP.PCNA((open)) intermediate is ready for the entry of DNA into the clamp. DNA binding commits RFC to ATP hydrolysis, which is followed by PCNA closure and PCNA.DNA release. This model enables quantitative understanding of the multistep mechanism of a eukaryotic clamp loader and furthermore facilitates comparative analysis of loaders from diverse organisms.

  19. Graded boosting of synaptic signals by low-threshold voltage-activated calcium conductance

    PubMed Central

    Carbó Tano, Martín; Vilarchao, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Low-threshold voltage-activated calcium conductances (LT-VACCs) play a substantial role in shaping the electrophysiological attributes of neurites. We have investigated how these conductances affect synaptic integration in a premotor nonspiking (NS) neuron of the leech nervous system. These cells exhibit an extensive neuritic tree, do not fire Na+-dependent spikes, but express an LT-VACC that was sensitive to 250 μM Ni2+ and 100 μM NNC 55-0396 (NNC). NS neurons responded to excitation of mechanosensory pressure neurons with depolarizing responses for which amplitude was a linear function of the presynaptic firing frequency. NNC decreased these synaptic responses and abolished the concomitant widespread Ca2+ signals. Coherent with the interpretation that the LT-VACC amplified signals at the postsynaptic level, this conductance also amplified the responses of NS neurons to direct injection of sinusoidal current. Synaptic amplification thus is achieved via a positive feedback in which depolarizing signals activate an LT-VACC that, in turn, boosts these signals. The wide distribution of LT-VACC could support the active propagation of depolarizing signals, turning the complex NS neuritic tree into a relatively compact electrical compartment. PMID:25972583

  20. Pronase acutely modifies high voltage-activated calcium currents and cell properties of Lymnaea neurons.

    PubMed

    Hermann, P M; Lukowiak, K; Wildering, W C; Bulloch, A G

    1997-12-01

    Pronase E ('pronase') is one of the proteolytic enzymes that are used in preparative procedures such as cell isolation and to soften the sheath of invertebrate ganglia. Although several effects of proteolytic enzymes on the physiology of non-neuronal tissues have been described, the effects of these enzymes on central neurons have received little attention. We examined the effects of bath-applied pronase on neurons in the Lymnaea central nervous system and in vitro. Pronase caused action potential broadening in neurons that exhibit a shoulder on the repolarization phase of their action potentials. This effect of pronase was accompanied by, although unrelated to, a depolarization and decrease in action potential interval. Some, but not all, effects of pronase in the central nervous system were reversible. For example, the decreases in membrane potential and action potential interval were both reversed after approximately 1 h of washing with saline. However, the effect of pronase on the action potential duration was not reversed after a period of 90 min. The modulation of action potential width prompted us to examine Ca2+ currents. Exposure to pronase resulted in an increase in both peak and late high voltage-activated Ca2+ currents in isolated neurons. Pronase neither changed the inactivation rate nor caused a shift in the current-voltage relationship of the current. The changes in action potential duration could be prevented by application of 0.1 mM Cd2+, indicating that the action potential broadening caused by pronase depends on Ca2+ influx. This is the first systematic study of the acute and direct actions of pronase on Ca2+ currents and cell properties both in the CNS and in vitro.

  1. Voltage dependence and pH regulation of human polycystin-2-mediated cation channel activity.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Perrett, Silvia; Batelli, Marisa; Kim, Keetae; Essafi, Makram; Timpanaro, Gustavo; Moltabetti, Nicolas; Reisin, Ignacio L; Arnaout, M Amin; Cantiello, Horacio F

    2002-07-12

    Polycystin-2, the product of the human PKD2 gene, whose mutations cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, is a large conductance, Ca(2+)-permeable non-selective cation channel. Polycystin-2 is functionally expressed in the apical membrane of the human syncytiotrophoblast, where it may play a role in the control of fetal electrolyte homeostasis. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that regulate polycystin-2 channel function. In this study, the role of pH in the regulation of polycystin-2 was assessed by ion channel reconstitution of both apical membranes of human syncytiotrophoblast and the purified FLAG-tagged protein from in vitro transcribed/translated material. A kinetic analysis of single channel currents, including dwell time histograms, confirmed two open and two close states for spontaneous channel behavior and a strong voltage dependence of the open probability of the channel (P(o)). A reduction of cis pH (pH(cis)) decreased P(o) and shifted the voltage dependence of channel function but had no effect on the single channel conductance. An increase in pH(cis), in contrast, increased NP(o) (channel number times P(o)). Elimination of the H(+) chemical gradient did not reverse the low pH(cis) inhibition of polycystin-2. Similar findings confirmed the pH effect on the in vitro translated, FLAG-tagged purified polycystin-2. The data indicate the presence of an H(+) ion regulatory site in the channel protein, which is accessible from the cytoplasmic side of the protein. This protonation site controls polycystin-2 cation-selective channel activity.

  2. OD1, the first toxin isolated from the venom of the scorpion Odonthobuthus doriae active on voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Amir; Bosmans, Frank; Amininasab, Mehriar; Clynen, Elke; Cuypers, Eva; Zaremirakabadi, Abbas; Sarbolouki, Mohammad-Nabi; Schoofs, Liliane; Vatanpour, Hossein; Tytgat, Jan

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we isolated and pharmacologically characterized the first alpha-like toxin from the venom of the scarcely studied Iranian scorpion Odonthobuthus doriae. The toxin was termed OD1 and its primary sequence was determined: GVRDAYIADDKNCVYTCASNGYCNTECTKNGAESGYCQWIGRYGNACWCIKLPDEVPIRIPGKCR. Using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique, the pharmacological effects of OD1 were studied on three cloned voltage-gated Na+ channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes (Na(v)1.2/beta1, Na(v)1.5/beta1, para/tipE). The inactivation process of the insect channel, para/tipE, was severely hampered by 200 nM of OD1 (EC50 = 80+/-14 nM) while Na(v)1.2/beta1 still was not affected at concentrations up to 5 microM. Na(v)1.5/beta1 was influenced at micromolar concentrations.

  3. Control method for peak power delivery with limited DC-bus voltage

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, John; Xu, Longya; Bhargava, Brij B.

    2006-09-05

    A method for driving a neutral point-clamped multi-level voltage source inverter supplying a synchronous motor is provided. A DC current is received at a neutral point-clamped multi-level voltage source inverter. The inverter has first, second, and third output nodes. The inverter also has a plurality of switches. A desired speed of a synchronous motor connected to the inverter by the first second and third nodes is received by the inverter. The synchronous motor has a rotor and the speed of the motor is defined by the rotational rate of the rotor. A position of the rotor is sensed, current flowing to the motor out of at least two of the first, second, and third output nodes is sensed, and predetermined switches are automatically activated by the inverter responsive to the sensed rotor position, the sensed current, and the desired speed.

  4. Voltage-Sensitive Dyes And Imaging Techniques Reveal New Patterns Of Electrical Activity In Heart Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Guy

    1988-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes bind to the plasms membrane of excitable cells (ie., muscle or nerve cells) and exhibit fluorescence and/or absorption changes that vary linearly with changes in transmembrane electrical potential. These potentiometric optical probes can be used to measure local changes in transmembrane potential by monitoring optical signals from dye molecules bound to the surface membrane. Consequently, when excitable cells are stained with such a dye and are stimulated to fire an electrical impulse (ie., an action potential (AP)), the changes in dye fluorescence have the characteristic shape and time course of APs recorded with an intracellular micro-electrode. Potentiometric dyes in conjuction with imaging techniques can now be used to visualize complex patterns and propagation of electrical activity. With photodiode arrays on video imaging techniques, patterns of biological electrical activity can be obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution which could not be obtained by conventional micro-electrodes. These methods reveal new details and offer powerful approaches to study fundamental problem in cardiac electrophysiology, communication in nerve networks, and the organization of cortical neurons.

  5. Implementation of an active instructional design for teaching the concepts of current, voltage and resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlaineta-Agüero, S.; Del Sol-Fernández, S.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; García-Salcedo, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work we show the implementation of a learning sequence based on an active learning methodology for teaching Physics, this proposal tends to promote a better learning in high school students with the use of a comic book and it combines the use of different low-cost experimental activities for teaching the electrical concepts of Current, Resistance and Voltage. We consider that this kind of strategy can be easily extrapolated to higher-education levels like Engineering-college/university level and other disciplines of Science. To evaluate this proposal, we used some conceptual questions from the Electric Circuits Concept Evaluation survey developed by Sokoloff and the results from this survey was analysed with the Normalized Conceptual Gain proposed by Hake and the Concentration Factor that was proposed by Bao and Redish, to identify the effectiveness of the methodology and the models that the students presented after and before the instruction, respectively. We found that this methodology was more effective than only the implementation of traditional lectures, we consider that these results cannot be generalized but gave us the opportunity to view many important approaches in Physics Education; finally, we will continue to apply the same experiment with more students, in the same and upper levels of education, to confirm and validate the effectiveness of this methodology proposal.

  6. Pyrethroid Insecticides Directly Activate Microglia Through Interaction With Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; Liu, Jason; Richardson, Jason R

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are considered to be the resident immune cells of the central nervous system and contribute significantly to ongoing neuroinflammation in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, we and others identified that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are present on microglia cells and contribute to excessive accumulation of intracellular Na(+ )and release of major pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Based on this finding and the fact that pyrethroid pesticides act on VGSC, we hypothesized that exposure of microglia to the pyrethroid pesticides, permethrin and deltamethrin, would activate microglia and increase the release of TNF-α. BV2 cells or primary microglia were treated with 0-5 µM deltamethrin or permethrin in the presence or absence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a VGSC blocker for 24-48 h. Both pyrethroids caused a rapid Na(+ )influx and increased accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na(+))i] in the microglia in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX. Furthermore, deltamethrin and permethrin increased the release of TNF-α in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by pre-treatment of cells with TTX. These results demonstrate that pyrethroid pesticides may directly activate microglial cells through their interaction with microglial VGSC. Because neuroinflammation plays a key role in many neurodegenerative diseases, these data provide an additional mechanism by which exposure to pyrethroid insecticides may contribute to neurodegeneration.

  7. Patch-clamp analysis in canine cardiac Purkinje cells of a novel sodium component in the pacemaker range.

    PubMed

    Rota, Marcello; Vassalle, Mario

    2003-04-01

    A putative Na+ component playing a role in the initiation and maintenance of spontaneous discharge in Purkinje fibres was studied by means of the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in canine cardiac single Purkinje cells. In 4 mM [K+]o, during depolarising clamp steps, a slowly inactivating current appeared at approximately -58 mV, negative to the threshold for the fast Na+ current (INa; approximately -50 mV). During depolarising ramps, the current underwent inward rectification with a negative slope region that began at approximately -60 mV. The current underlying the negative slope increased during faster ramps, decreased as a function of time when the initial depolarising ramp was over, decreased during depolarisations positive to approximately -35 mV and was much larger than the current during the symmetrical repolarising ramp. Increasing biphasic ('oscillatory') voltage ramps required much smaller currents at a holding potential (Vh) of -60 mV than at -80 mV and were associated with a marked decrease in slope conductance. At Vh -50/-40 mV, the oscillatory ramp currents and superimposed pulse currents reversed direction. The negative slope in the I-V relation as well as the change in current direction at -50/-40 mV were markedly reduced by tetrodotoxin (15 microM) and lidocaine (lignocaine, 100 microM) and therefore are due to a slowly inactivating Na+ current, labelled here INa3. Lower [K+]o (2.7 mM) reduced the steady state slope conductance as well as the current in the diastolic range, and increased as well as shifted INa3 in a negative direction. High [K+]o had the opposite effects. Cs+ (2 mM) and Ba2+ (2 mM) reduced the initial current during depolarising ramps but not INa3. In current-clamp mode, current-induced voltage oscillations elicited action potentials through a gradual transition between diastolic depolarisation and upstroke, consistent with the activation of INa3. Thus, the initiation and maintenance of spontaneous discharge in Purkinje strands

  8. The Monogenean Which Lost Its Clamps

    PubMed Central

    Justine, Jean-Lou; Rahmouni, Chahrazed; Gey, Delphine; Schoelinck, Charlotte; Hoberg, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Ectoparasites face a daily challenge: to remain attached to their hosts. Polyopisthocotylean monogeneans usually attach to the surface of fish gills using highly specialized structures, the sclerotized clamps. In the original description of the protomicrocotylid species Lethacotyle fijiensis, described 60 years ago, the clamps were considered to be absent but few specimens were available and this observation was later questioned. In addition, genera within the family Protomicrocotylidae have either clamps of the “gastrocotylid” or the “microcotylid” types; this puzzled systematists because these clamp types are characteristic of distinct, major groups. Discovery of another, new, species of the genus Lethacotyle, has allowed us to explore the nature of the attachment structures in protomicrocotylids. Lethacotyle vera n. sp. is described from the gills of the carangid Caranx papuensis off New Caledonia. It is distinguished from Lethacotyle fijiensis, the only other species of the genus, by the length of the male copulatory spines. Sequences of 28S rDNA were used to build a tree, in which Lethacotyle vera grouped with other protomicrocotylids. The identity of the host fish was confirmed with COI barcodes. We observed that protomicrocotylids have specialized structures associated with their attachment organ, such as lateral flaps and transverse striations, which are not known in other monogeneans. We thus hypothesized that the clamps in protomicrocotylids were sequentially lost during evolution, coinciding with the development of other attachment structures. To test the hypothesis, we calculated the surfaces of clamps and body in 120 species of gastrocotylinean monogeneans, based on published descriptions. The ratio of clamp surface: body surface was the lowest in protomicrocotylids. We conclude that clamps in protomicrocotylids are vestigial organs, and that occurrence of “gastrocotylid” and simpler “microcotylid” clamps within the same family are

  9. The monogenean which lost its clamps.

    PubMed

    Justine, Jean-Lou; Rahmouni, Chahrazed; Gey, Delphine; Schoelinck, Charlotte; Hoberg, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    Ectoparasites face a daily challenge: to remain attached to their hosts. Polyopisthocotylean monogeneans usually attach to the surface of fish gills using highly specialized structures, the sclerotized clamps. In the original description of the protomicrocotylid species Lethacotyle fijiensis, described 60 years ago, the clamps were considered to be absent but few specimens were available and this observation was later questioned. In addition, genera within the family Protomicrocotylidae have either clamps of the "gastrocotylid" or the "microcotylid" types; this puzzled systematists because these clamp types are characteristic of distinct, major groups. Discovery of another, new, species of the genus Lethacotyle, has allowed us to explore the nature of the attachment structures in protomicrocotylids. Lethacotyle vera n. sp. is described from the gills of the carangid Caranx papuensis off New Caledonia. It is distinguished from Lethacotyle fijiensis, the only other species of the genus, by the length of the male copulatory spines. Sequences of 28S rDNA were used to build a tree, in which Lethacotyle vera grouped with other protomicrocotylids. The identity of the host fish was confirmed with COI barcodes. We observed that protomicrocotylids have specialized structures associated with their attachment organ, such as lateral flaps and transverse striations, which are not known in other monogeneans. We thus hypothesized that the clamps in protomicrocotylids were sequentially lost during evolution, coinciding with the development of other attachment structures. To test the hypothesis, we calculated the surfaces of clamps and body in 120 species of gastrocotylinean monogeneans, based on published descriptions. The ratio of clamp surface: body surface was the lowest in protomicrocotylids. We conclude that clamps in protomicrocotylids are vestigial organs, and that occurrence of "gastrocotylid" and simpler "microcotylid" clamps within the same family are steps in an

  10. Implementation of a fast 16-Bit dynamic clamp using LabVIEW-RT.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Paul H M; Wheeler, Diek W; Beacom, Joshua; Horn, John P

    2004-01-01

    The dynamic-clamp method provides a powerful electrophysiological tool for creating virtual ionic conductances in living cells and studying their influence on membrane potential. Here we describe G-clamp, a new way to implement a dynamic clamp using the real-time version of the Lab-VIEW programming environment together with a Windows host, an embedded microprocessor that runs a real-time operating system and a multifunction data-acquisition board. The software includes descriptions of a fast voltage-dependent sodium conductance, delayed rectifier, M-type and A-type potassium conductances, and a leak conductance. The system can also read synaptic conductance waveforms from preassembled data files. These virtual conductances can be reliably implemented at speeds < or =43 kHz while simultaneously saving two channels of data with 16-bit precision. G-clamp also includes utilities for measuring current-voltage relations, synaptic strength, and synaptic gain. Taking an approach built on a commercially available software/hardware platform has resulted in a system that is easy to assemble and upgrade. In addition, the graphical programming structure of LabVIEW should make it relatively easy for others to adapt G-clamp for new experimental applications.

  11. Solution structure and alanine scan of a spider toxin that affects the activation of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Sabo, Jennifer K; Bosmans, Frank; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Tytgat, Jan; Norton, Raymond S

    2007-02-16

    Magi 5, from the hexathelid spider Macrothele gigas, is a 29-residue polypeptide containing three disulfide bridges. It binds specifically to receptor site 4 on mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels and competes with scorpion beta-toxins, such as Css IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus. As a consequence, Magi 5 shifts the activation voltage of the mammalian rNav1.2a channel to more hyperpolarized voltages, whereas the insect channel, DmNav1, is not affected. To gain insight into toxin-channel interactions, Magi 5 and 23 analogues were synthesized. The three-dimensional structure of Magi 5 in aqueous solution was determined, and its voltage-gated sodium channel-binding surfaces were mapped onto this structure using data from electrophysiological measurements on a series of Ala-substituted analogues. The structure clearly resembles the inhibitor cystine knot structural motif, although the triple-stranded beta-sheet typically found in that motif is partially distorted in Magi 5. The interactive surface of Magi 5 toward voltage-gated sodium channels resembles in some respects the Janus-faced atracotoxins, with functionally important charged residues on one face of the toxin and hydrophobic residues on the other. Magi 5 also resembles the scorpion beta-toxin Css IV, which has distinct nonpolar and charged surfaces that are critical for channel binding and has a key Glu involved in voltage sensor trapping. These two distinct classes of toxin, with different amino acid sequences and different structures, may utilize similar groups of residues on their surface to achieve the common end of modifying voltage-gated sodium channel function.

  12. Perforated patch-clamp analysis of the passive membrane properties of three classes of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Spruston, N; Johnston, D

    1992-03-01

    1. Perforated patch-clamp recordings were made from the three major classes of hippocampal neurons in conventional in vitro slices prepared from adult guinea pigs. This technique provided experimental estimates of passive membrane properties (input resistance, RN, and membrane time constant, tau m) determined in the absence of the leak conductance associated with microelectrode impalement or the washout of cytoplasmic constituents associated with conventional whole-cell recordings. 2. To facilitate comparison of our data with previous results and to determine the passive membrane properties under conditions as physiological as possible, recordings were made at the resting potential, in physiological saline, and without any added blockers of voltage-dependent conductances. 3. Membrane-potential responses to current steps were analyzed, and four criteria were used to identify voltage responses that were the least affected by activation of voltage-dependent conductances. tau m was estimated from the slowest component (tau 0) of multiexponential fits of responses deemed passive by these criteria. RN was estimated from the slope of the linear region in the hyperpolarizing direction of the voltage-current relation. 4. It was not possible to measure purely passive membrane properties that were completely independent of membrane potential in any of the three classes of hippocampal neurons. Changing the membrane potential by constant current injection resulted in changes in RN and tau 0; subthreshold depolarization produced an increase, and hyperpolarization a decrease, in both RN and tau 0 for all three classes of hippocampal neurons. 5. Each of the three classes of hippocampal neurons also displayed a depolarizing "sag" during larger hyperpolarizing voltage transients. To evaluate the effect of the conductances underlying this sag on passive membrane properties, 2-5 mM Cs+ was added to the physiological saline. Extracellular Cs+ effectively blocked the sag in all three

  13. Cardioprotective effect of histamine H3-receptor activation: pivotal role of G beta gamma-dependent inhibition of voltage-operated Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Morrey, Christopher; Estephan, Rima; Abbott, Geoffrey W; Levi, Roberto

    2008-09-01

    We previously showed that activation of G(i/o)-coupled histamine H(3)-receptors (H(3)R) is cardioprotective because it attenuates excessive norepinephrine release from cardiac sympathetic nerves. This action is characterized by a marked decrease in intraneuronal Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)), as G alpha(i) impairs the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, and this decreases Ca(2+) influx via voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels (VOCC). Yet, the G(i/o)-derived betagamma dimer could directly inhibit VOCC, and the subsequent reduction in Ca(2+) influx would be responsible for the H(3)R-mediated attenuation of transmitter exocytosis. In this study, we tested this hypothesis in nerve-growth factor-differentiated rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) stably transfected with H(3)R (PC12-H(3)) and with the G betagamma scavenger beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (beta-ARK1)-(495-689)-polypeptide (PC12-H(3)/beta-ARK1). Thus, we evaluated the effects of H(3)R activation directly on the following: 1) Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique; and 2) K(+)-induced exocytosis of endogenous dopamine. H(3)R activation attenuated both peak I(Ca) and dopamine exocytosis in PC12-H(3) but not in PC12-H(3)/beta-ARK1 cells. Moreover, a membrane permeable phosducin-like G betagamma scavenger also prevented the antiexocytotic effect of H(3)R activation. In contrast, the H(3)R-induced attenuation of cAMP accumulation and dopamine exocytosis in response to forskolin were the same in both PC12-H(3) and PC12-H(3)/beta-ARK1 cells. Our findings reveal that although G alpha(i) participates in the H(3)-mediated antiexocytotic effect when the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-PKA pathway is stimulated, a direct G betagamma-induced inhibition of VOCC, resulting in an attenuation of I(Ca), plays a pivotal role in the H(3)R-mediated decrease in [Ca(2+)](i) and associated cardioprotective antiexocytotic effects. The discovery of this H(3)R-signaling step may offer new therapeutic approaches

  14. An ultra-low-voltage electronic implementation of inertial neuron model with nonmonotonous Liao's activation function.

    PubMed

    Kant, Nasir Ali; Dar, Mohamad Rafiq; Khanday, Farooq Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The output of every neuron in neural network is specified by the employed activation function (AF) and therefore forms the heart of neural networks. As far as the design of artificial neural networks (ANNs) is concerned, hardware approach is preferred over software one because it promises the full utilization of the application potential of ANNs. Therefore, besides some arithmetic blocks, designing AF in hardware is the most important for designing ANN. While attempting to design the AF in hardware, the designs should be compatible with the modern Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) design techniques. In this regard, the implemented designs should: only be in Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) technology in order to be compatible with the digital designs, provide electronic tunability feature, and be able to operate at ultra-low voltage. Companding is one of the promising circuit design techniques for achieving these goals. In this paper, 0.5 V design of Liao's AF using sinh-domain technique is introduced. Furthermore, the function is tested by implementing inertial neuron model. The performance of the AF and inertial neuron model have been evaluated through simulation results, using the PSPICE software with the MOS transistor models provided by the 0.18-μm Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturer Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (TSM CMOS) process.

  15. A new and simple method for delivering clamped nitric oxide concentrations in the physiological range: application to activation of guanylyl cyclase-coupled nitric oxide receptors.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Charmaine; Wykes, Victoria; Bellamy, Tomas C; Garthwaite, John

    2003-12-01

    The signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) could engage multiple pathways to influence cellular function. Unraveling their relative biological importance has been difficult because it has not been possible to administer NO under the steady-state conditions that are normally axiomatic for analyzing ligand-receptor interactions and downstream signal transduction. To address this problem, we devised a chemical method for generating constant NO concentrations, derived from balancing NO release from a NONOate donor with NO consumption by a sink. On theoretical grounds, 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO) was selected as the sink. The mixture additionally contained urate to convert an unwanted product of the reaction (NO2) into nitrite ions. The method enabled NO concentrations covering the physiological range (0-100 nM) to be formed within approximately 1 s. Moreover, the concentrations were sufficiently stable over at least several minutes to be useful for biological purposes. When applied to the activation of guanylyl cyclase-coupled NO receptors, the method gave an EC50 of 1.7 nM NO for the protein purified from bovine lung, which is lower than estimated previously using a biological NO sink (red blood cells). The corresponding values for the alpha1beta1 and alpha2beta1 isoforms were 0.9 nM and 0.5 nM, respectively. The slopes of the concentration-response curves were more shallow than before (Hill coefficient of 1 rather than 2), questioning the need to consider the binding of more than one NO molecule for receptor activation. The discrepancies are ascribable to limitations of the earlier method. Other biological problems can readily be addressed by adaptations of the new method.

  16. Active voltage contrast imaging of cross-sectional surface of multilayer ceramic capacitor using helium ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, C.; Ishida, N.; Masuda, H.; Nagano, S.; Kitahara, M.; Ogata, Y.; Fujita, D.

    2016-08-01

    We studied active voltage contrast (AVC) imaging using helium ion microscopy (HIM). We observed secondary electron (SE) images of the cross-sectional surface of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) with and without a voltage applied to the internal electrodes. When no voltage was applied, we obtained an image reflecting the material contrast between the Ni internal electrode region and the BaTiO3 dielectric region of the cross-sectional surface of the MLCC. When a voltage was applied, the electrical potential difference between the grounded and the positively biased internal electrodes affected the contrast (voltage contrast). Moreover, attenuation of the SE intensity from the grounded to the positively biased internal electrodes was observed in the dielectric region. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements of the contact potential difference (CPD) were performed on the same sample. By using the AVC image from the HIM observation and the CPD image from the KPFM measurement, we could quantitatively evaluate the electrical potential. We think that the results of this study will lead to an expansion in the number of applications of HIM.

  17. Expressional potency of mRNAs encoding receptors and voltage-activated channels in the postmortem rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, D S; Miledi, R

    1991-01-01

    The stability and integrity of mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels in the postmortem rat brain was investigated by isolating poly(A)+ mRNA, injecting it into Xenopus oocytes, and then examining the expression of functional neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels in the oocyte membrane by electrophysiological recording. This approach was also used to assess the stability of mRNAs in brains that were incubated in oxygenated mammalian Ringer's solution for various lengths of time and from brains that were freshly frozen and then thawed at room temperature. Oocytes injected with mRNA from up to 21-hr postmortem brains gave large agonist- and voltage-activated responses, indicating that mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels are relatively stable in postmortem brain tissue. In contrast, oocytes injected with mRNA from brains incubated in Ringer's solution exhibited smaller responses, and oocytes injected with mRNA from tissue that was frozen and then thawed displayed very small or undetectable responses. Northern blot analysis using a nucleic acid probe for rat brain Na(+)-channel mRNA indicated that the size of the Na+ currents in injected oocytes reflected the levels of mRNA for Na+ channels in the different mRNA preparations. Thus, the expressional potency of mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels is quite stable in postmortem brains in situ, but it is reduced if the brains are kept in oxygenated saline, and freezing and thawing of tissue results in rapid degeneration of mRNA. Images PMID:1705710

  18. Low Voltage Activation of KCa1.1 Current by Cav3-KCa1.1 Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Rehak, Renata; Bartoletti, Theodore M.; Engbers, Jordan D. T.; Berecki, Geza; Turner, Ray W.; Zamponi, Gerald W.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-activated potassium channels of the KCa1.1 class are known to regulate repolarization of action potential discharge through a molecular association with high voltage-activated calcium channels. The current study examined the potential for low voltage-activated Cav3 (T-type) calcium channels to interact with KCa1.1 when expressed in tsA-201 cells and in rat medial vestibular neurons (MVN) in vitro. Expression of the channel α-subunits alone in tsA-201 cells was sufficient to enable Cav3 activation of KCa1.1 current. Cav3 calcium influx induced a 50 mV negative shift in KCa1.1 voltage for activation, an interaction that was blocked by Cav3 or KCa1.1 channel blockers, or high internal EGTA. Cav3 and KCa1.1 channels coimmunoprecipitated from lysates of either tsA-201 cells or rat brain, with Cav3 channels associating with the transmembrane S0 segment of the KCa1.1 N-terminus. KCa1.1 channel activation was closely aligned with Cav3 calcium conductance in that KCa1.1 current shared the same low voltage dependence of Cav3 activation, and was blocked by voltage-dependent inactivation of Cav3 channels or by coexpressing a non calcium-conducting Cav3 channel pore mutant. The Cav3-KCa1.1 interaction was found to function highly effectively in a subset of MVN neurons by activating near –50 mV to contribute to spike repolarization and gain of firing. Modelling data indicate that multiple neighboring Cav3-KCa1.1 complexes must act cooperatively to raise calcium to sufficiently high levels to permit KCa1.1 activation. Together the results identify a novel Cav3-KCa1.1 signaling complex where Cav3-mediated calcium entry enables KCa1.1 activation over a wide range of membrane potentials according to the unique voltage profile of Cav3 calcium channels, greatly extending the roles for KCa1.1 potassium channels in controlling membrane excitability. PMID:23626738

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  20. Dynamic clamp with StdpC software.

    PubMed

    Kemenes, Ildikó; Marra, Vincenzo; Crossley, Michael; Samu, Dávid; Staras, Kevin; Kemenes, György; Nowotny, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Dynamic clamp is a powerful method that allows the introduction of artificial electrical components into target cells to simulate ionic conductances and synaptic inputs. This method is based on a fast cycle of measuring the membrane potential of a cell, calculating the current of a desired simulated component using an appropriate model and injecting this current into the cell. Here we present a dynamic clamp protocol using free, fully integrated, open-source software (StdpC, for spike timing-dependent plasticity clamp). Use of this protocol does not require specialist hardware, costly commercial software, experience in real-time operating systems or a strong programming background. The software enables the configuration and operation of a wide range of complex and fully automated dynamic clamp experiments through an intuitive and powerful interface with a minimal initial lead time of a few hours. After initial configuration, experimental results can be generated within minutes of establishing cell recording.

  1. A Comparison of the Performance and Application Differences Between Manual and Automated Patch-Clamp Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yajuan, Xiao; Xin, Liang; Zhiyuan, Li

    2012-01-01

    The patch clamp technique is commonly used in electrophysiological experiments and offers direct insight into ion channel properties through the characterization of ion channel activity. This technique can be used to elucidate the interaction between a drug and a specific ion channel at different conformational states to understand the ion channel modulators’ mechanisms. The patch clamp technique is regarded as a gold standard for ion channel research; however, it suffers from low throughput and high personnel costs. In the last decade, the development of several automated electrophysiology platforms has greatly increased the screen throughput of whole cell electrophysiological recordings. New advancements in the automated patch clamp systems have aimed to provide high data quality, high content, and high throughput. However, due to the limitations noted above, automated patch clamp systems are not capable of replacing manual patch clamp systems in ion channel research. While automated patch clamp systems are useful for screening large amounts of compounds in cell lines that stably express high levels of ion channels, the manual patch clamp technique is still necessary for studying ion channel properties in some research areas and for specific cell types, including primary cells that have mixed cell types and differentiated cells that derive from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Therefore, further improvements in flexibility with regard to cell types and data quality will broaden the applications of the automated patch clamp systems in both academia and industry. PMID:23346269

  2. Neuroprotective activity of stiripentol with a possible involvement of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Verleye, Marc; Buttigieg, Dorothée; Steinschneider, Rémy

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of data has shown that recurrent epileptic seizures may be caused by an excessive release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain. Glutamatergic overstimulation results in massive neuronal influxes of calcium and sodium through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and kainic acid glutamate subtype receptors and also through voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels. These persistent and abnormal sodium and calcium entry points have deleterious consequences (neurotoxicity) for neuronal function. The therapeutic value of an antiepileptic drug would include not only control of seizure activity but also protection of neuronal tissue. The present study examines the in vitro neuroprotective effects of stiripentol, an antiepileptic compound with γ-aminobutyric acidergic properties, on neuronal-astroglial cultures from rat cerebral cortex exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) or to glutamate (40 µM for 20 min), two in vitro models of brain injury. In addition, the affinity of stiripentol for the different glutamate receptor subtypes and the interaction with the cell influx of Na(+) and of Ca(2+) enhanced by veratridine and NMDA, respectively, are assessed. Stiripentol (10-100 µM) included in the culture medium during OGD or with glutamate significantly increased the number of surviving neurons relative to controls. Stiripentol displayed no binding affinity for different subtypes of glutamate receptors (IC50  >100 µM) but significantly blocked the entry of Na(+) and Ca(2+) activated by veratridine and NMDA, respectively. These results suggest that Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels could contribute to the neuroprotective properties of sitiripentol.

  3. Soft-Switched Neutral-Point-Clamped Single-Phase Boost Rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Ryozo; Ishizaka, Kouichi

    A soft-switched neutral-point-clamped single-phase boost rectifier capable of compensating the imbalance load voltage is studied. This is based on a single-phase rectifier, in which an inductor is placed in series with the AC supply to resonate with a capacitor connected across the DC output of a full-bridge rectifier and the switching transition is mainly governed by a series resonance. The experimental prototype using insulated-gate bipolar transistors is implemented to investigate the operation under the charge control. The experimental results confirm that the rectifier has a neutral-point-clamp feature providing a good quality AC current.

  4. Voltage- and calcium-dependent motility of saccular hair bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, Patricia M.; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-12-01

    Active bundle motility, which is hypothesized to supply feedback for mechanical amplification of signals, is thought to enhance sensitivity and sharpen tuning in vestibular and auditory organs. To study active hair bundle motility, we combined high-speed camera recordings of bullfrog sacculi, which were mounted in a two-compartment chamber, and voltage-clamp of the hair cell membrane potential. Using this paradigm, we measured three types of bundle motions: 1) spontaneous oscillations which can be analyzed to measure the physiological operating range of the transduction channel; 2) a sustained quasi-static movement of the bundle that depends on membrane potential; and 3) a fast, transient and asymmetric movement that resets the bundle position and depends on changes in the membrane potential. These data support a role for both calcium and voltage in the transduction-channel function.

  5. Clamped-filament elongation model for actin-based motors.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Richard B; Purich, Daniel L

    2002-01-01

    Although actin-based motility drives cell crawling and intracellular locomotion of organelles and certain pathogens, the underlying mechanism of force generation remains a mystery. Recent experiments demonstrated that Listeria exhibit episodes of 5.4-nm stepwise motion corresponding to the periodicity of the actin filament subunits, and extremely small positional fluctuations during the intermittent pauses [S. C. Kuo and J. L. McGrath. 2000. Nature. 407:1026-1029]. These findings suggest that motile bacteria remain firmly bound to actin filament ends as they elongate, a behavior that appears to rule out previous models for actin-based motility. We propose and analyze a new mechanochemical model (called the "Lock, Load & Fire" mechanism) for force generation by means of affinity-modulated, clamped-filament elongation. During the locking step, the filament's terminal ATP-containing subunit binds tightly to a clamp situated on the surface of a motile object; in the loading step, actin.ATP monomer(s) bind to the filament end, an event that triggers the firing step, wherein ATP hydrolysis on the clamped subunit attenuates the filament's affinity for the clamp. This last step initiates translocation of the new ATP-containing terminus to the clamp, whereupon another cycle begins anew. This model explains how surface-tethered filaments can grow while exerting flexural or tensile force on the motile surface. Moreover, stochastic simulations of the model reproduce the signature motions of Listeria. This elongation motor, which we term actoclampin, exploits actin's intrinsic ATPase activity to provide a simple, high-fidelity enzymatic reaction cycle for force production that does not require elongating filaments to dissociate from the motile surface. This mechanism may operate whenever actin polymerization is called upon to generate the forces that drive cell crawling or intracellular organelle motility. PMID:11806905

  6. Diverless pipeline repair clamp: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Knott, B. )

    1991-12-01

    Offshore oil and gas developments are underway for water depths beyond which divers can function. The economic lifelines of these projects are the pipelines which will transport the products to shore. In preparation for the day when one of these pipelines will require repair because of a leak, the Pipeline Research Committee of the American Gas Association is funding research directed at developing diverless pipeline repair capabilities. Several types of damage are possible, ranging from latent weld defects on one end of the spectrum to damage resulting in parting of the pipe at the other end. This study is specifically directed toward laying the groundwork for development of a diverless pipeline repair clamp for use in repair of leaks resulting from minor pipe defects. The incentive for a clamp type repair is costs. When compared to replacing a section of pipe, either by welding or by mechanical means, the clamp type repair requires much less disturbance of the pipe, less time, fewer operations and less equipment. This report summarizes (1) capabilities of remotely operated vehicles (ROV's) and associated systems, (2) highlights areas for further research and development, (3) describes the required capabilities of the diverless repairclamp, (4) investigates some alternatives to the diverless clamp, (5) overviews the state of the art in leak repair clamps, and (6) critiques several possible generic clamp concepts.

  7. Sound absorption by clamped poroelastic plates.

    PubMed

    Aygun, H; Attenborough, K

    2008-09-01

    Measurements and predictions have been made of the absorption coefficient and the surface acoustic impedance of poroelastic plates clamped in a large impedance tube and separated from the rigid termination by an air gap. The measured and predicted absorption coefficient and surface impedance spectra exhibit low frequency peaks. The peak frequencies observed in the absorption coefficient are close to those predicted and measured in the deflection spectra of the clamped poroelastic plates. The influences of the rigidity of the clamping conditions and the width of the air gap have been investigated. Both influences are found to be important. Increasing the rigidity of clamping reduces the low frequency absorption peaks compared with those measured for simply supported plates or plates in an intermediate clamping condition. Results for a closed cell foam plate and for two open cell foam plates made from recycled materials are presented. For identical clamping conditions and width of air gap, the results for the different materials differ as a consequence mainly of their different elasticity, thickness, and cell structure.

  8. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 maintains the membrane potential and regulates the activation and chemokine-induced migration of a monocyte-derived dendritic cell subset.

    PubMed

    Kis-Toth, Katalin; Hajdu, Peter; Bacskai, Ildiko; Szilagyi, Orsolya; Papp, Ferenc; Szanto, Attila; Posta, Edit; Gogolak, Peter; Panyi, Gyorgy; Rajnavolgyi, Eva

    2011-08-01

    Expression of CD1a protein defines a human dendritic cell (DC) subset with unique functional activities. We aimed to study the expression of the Nav1.7 sodium channel and the functional consequences of its activity in CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) DC. Single-cell electrophysiology (patch-clamp) and quantitative PCR experiments performed on sorted CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) immature DC (IDC) showed that the frequency of cells expressing Na(+) current, current density, and the relative expression of the SCN9A gene encoding Nav1.7 were significantly higher in CD1a(+) cells than in their CD1a(-) counterparts. The activity of Nav1.7 results in a depolarized resting membrane potential (-8.7 ± 1.5 mV) in CD1a(+) IDC as compared with CD1a(-) cells lacking Nav1.7 (-47 ± 6.2 mV). Stimulation of DC by inflammatory signals or by increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in reduced Nav1.7 expression. Silencing of the SCN9A gene shifted the membrane potential to a hyperpolarizing direction in CD1a(+) IDC, resulting in decreased cell migration, whereas pharmacological inhibition of Nav1.7 by tetrodotoxin sensitized the cells for activation signals. Fine-tuning of IDC functions by a voltage-gated sodium channel emerges as a new regulatory mechanism modulating the migration and cytokine responses of these DC subsets.

  9. Effective contractile response to voltage-gated Na+ channels revealed by a channel activator.

    PubMed

    Ho, W-S Vanessa; Davis, Alison J; Chadha, Preet S; Greenwood, Iain A

    2013-04-15

    This study investigated the molecular identity and impact of enhancing voltage-gated Na(+) (Na(V)) channels in the control of vascular tone. In rat isolated mesenteric and femoral arteries mounted for isometric tension recording, the vascular actions of the Na(V) channel activator veratridine were examined. Na(V) channel expression was probed by molecular techniques and immunocytochemistry. In mesenteric arteries, veratridine induced potent contractions (pEC(50) = 5.19 ± 0.20, E(max) = 12.0 ± 2.7 mN), which were inhibited by 1 μM TTX (a blocker of all Na(V) channel isoforms, except Na(V)1.5, Na(V)1.8, and Na(V)1.9), but not by selective blockers of Na(V)1.7 (ProTx-II, 10 nM) or Na(V)1.8 (A-80347, 1 μM) channels. The responses were insensitive to endothelium removal but were partly (~60%) reduced by chemical destruction of sympathetic nerves by 6-hydroxydopamine (2 mM) or antagonism at the α1-adrenoceptor by prazosin (1 μM). KB-R7943, a blocker of the reverse mode of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (3 μM), inhibited veratridine contractions in the absence or presence of prazosin. T16A(inh)-A01, a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel blocker (10 μM), also inhibited the prazosin-resistant contraction to veratridine. Na(V) channel immunoreactivity was detected in freshly isolated mesenteric myocytes, with apparent colocalization with the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Veratridine induced similar contractile effects in the femoral artery, and mRNA transcripts for Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels were evident in both vessel types. We conclude that, in addition to sympathetic nerves, NaV channels are expressed in vascular myocytes, where they are functionally coupled to the reverse mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, causing contraction. The TTX-sensitive Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels are likely involved in vascular control.

  10. Ion channelopathies in human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes: a dynamic clamp study with virtual IK1

    PubMed Central

    Meijer van Putten, Rosalie M. E.; Mengarelli, Isabella; Guan, Kaomei; Zegers, Jan G.; van Ginneken, Antoni C. G.; Verkerk, Arie O.; Wilders, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) are widely used in studying basic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias that are caused by ion channelopathies. Unfortunately, the action potential profile of hiPSC-CMs—and consequently the profile of individual membrane currents active during that action potential—differs substantially from that of native human cardiomyocytes, largely due to almost negligible expression of the inward rectifier potassium current (IK1). In the present study, we attempted to “normalize” the action potential profile of our hiPSC-CMs by inserting a voltage dependent in silico IK1 into our hiPSC-CMs, using the dynamic clamp configuration of the patch clamp technique. Recordings were made from single hiPSC-CMs, using the perforated patch clamp technique at physiological temperature. We assessed three different models of IK1, with different degrees of inward rectification, and systematically varied the magnitude of the inserted IK1. Also, we modified the inserted IK1 in order to assess the effects of loss- and gain-of-function mutations in the KCNJ2 gene, which encodes the Kir2.1 protein that is primarily responsible for the IK1 channel in human ventricle. For our experiments, we selected spontaneously beating hiPSC-CMs, with negligible IK1 as demonstrated in separate voltage clamp experiments, which were paced at 1 Hz. Upon addition of in silico IK1 with a peak outward density of 4–6 pA/pF, these hiPSC-CMs showed a ventricular-like action potential morphology with a stable resting membrane potential near −80 mV and a maximum upstroke velocity >150 V/s (n = 9). Proarrhythmic action potential changes were observed upon injection of both loss-of-function and gain-of-function IK1, as associated with Andersen–Tawil syndrome type 1 and short QT syndrome type 3, respectively (n = 6). We conclude that injection of in silico IK1 makes the hiPSC-CM a more reliable model for investigating mechanisms underlying cardiac

  11. Active Device-Less Voltage Equalization Charger Using Capacitors, Diodes, and an AC Power Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Koji

    Conventional cell/module voltage equalizers or equalization chargers based on traditional dc-dc converters require numerous switches or transformers as the number of series connections increases; therefore, their cost and complexity tend to increase and their reliability decreases as the number of connections increases. This paper proposes a novel voltage equalization charger that consists only of passive components such as capacitors, diodes, and a transformer. The fundamental operating principle, major features, and derivation of equivalent dc circuits are presented. A symmetrical configuration is also proposed to mitigate the RMS current flowing through energy storage cells in the charging process. Simulations and experimental charging and cycle tests were performed on series-connected electric double-layer capacitor modules to demonstrate the equalization performance. The experimental and simulation results were in good agreement, and the voltage imbalances were gradually eliminated as time elapsed even during charge-discharge cycling.

  12. Digital radiology using active matrix readout of amorphous selenium: detectors with high voltage protection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W; Law, J; Waechter, D; Huang, Z; Rowlands, J A

    1998-04-01

    A flat-panel x-ray imaging detector is being investigated for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. The detector uses a layer of amorphous selenium (a-Se) to convert x rays to a charge image, which is then electronically read out with a two-dimensional array of thin film transistors (TFTs). In order to sensitize the a-Se layer to x rays, a high voltage (of the order of several thousand volts) is applied to its top surface. The TFTs, which are at the bottom surface of the a-Se layer, are not subjected to any high voltage under normal radiological operational conditions since the pixel potential is < 10 V. However under a fault condition where these two events occur simultaneously: (1) suspended detector scan; and (2) an x-ray exposure more than ten times higher than normal, the voltage on the TFTs could rise to a damaging value. This paper describes a method for protecting the TFTs from high voltage damage under this fault condition. It employs a dual-gate TFT structure, one gate is for scanning control and the other is connected to the pixel electrode for high voltage protection. Before the pixel potential reaches a damaging value, the protection gate turns on the TFT automatically and drains excess charge away from the pixel thus providing a safe pixel saturation potential. In this paper, the characteristic curves of dual-gate TFTs are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The pixel x-ray response for imaging detectors with high voltage protection are predicted, and it is shown that with practical TFT designs the detector can provide a safe pixel saturation potential as well as satisfy the dynamic range required for diagnostic x-ray imaging applications.

  13. The role of K+ currents in frequency-dependent spike broadening in Aplysia R20 neurons: a dynamic-clamp analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, M; Koester, J

    1996-07-01

    The R20 neurons of Aplysia exhibit frequency-dependent spike broadening. Previously, we had used two-electrode voltage clamp to examine the mechanisms of this spike broadening (Ma and Koester, 1995). We identified three K+ currents that mediate action-potential repolarization: a transient A-type K+ current (I(Adepol)), a delayed rectifier current (IK-V), and a Ca(2+)-sensitive K+ current(IK-CA). A major constraint in that study was the lack of completely selective blockers for I(Adepol) and I(K-V), resulting in an inability to assess directly the effects of their activation and inactivation on spike broadening. In the present study, the dynamic-clamp technique, which employs computer simulation to inject biologically realistic currents into a cell under current-clamp conditions (Sharp et al., 1993a,b), was used either to block I(Adepol) or I(K-V) or to modify their inactivation properties. The data in this paper, together with earlier results, lead to the following hypothesis for the mechanism of spike broadening in the R20 cells. As the spike train progresses, the primary responsibility for spike repolarization gradually shifts from I(Adepol) to I(K-V) to I(K-Ca). This sequence can be explained on the basis of the relative rates of activation and inactivation of each current with respect to the constantly changing spike durations, the cumulative inactivation of I(Adepol) and I(K-V), and the progressive potentiation of I(K-Ca). Positive feedback interactions between spike broadening and inactivation contribute to the cumulative inactivation of both I(Adepol) and I(K-V). The data also illustrate that when two or more currents have similar driving forces and partially overlapping activation characteristics, selectively blocking one current under current-clamp conditions can lead to a significant underestimate of its normal physiological importance.

  14. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  15. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  16. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  17. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  18. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  19. An Ultrasonic Clamp for Bloodless Partial Nephrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril; Bouchoux, Guillaume; Murat, François Joseph; Birer, Alain; Theillère, Yves; Chapelon, Jean Yves; Cathignol, Dominique

    2007-05-01

    Maximum conservation of the kidney is preferable through partial nephrectomy for patients at risk of disease recurrence of renal cancers. Haemostatic tools are needed in order to achieve bloodless surgery and reduce post surgery morbidity. Two piezo-ceramic transducers operating at a frequency of 4 MHz were mounted on each arm of a clamp. When used for coagulation purposes, two transducers situated on opposite arms of the clamp were driven simultaneously. Heat delivery was optimized as each transducers mirrored back to targeted tissues the wave generated by the opposite transducer. Real-time treatment monitoring with an echo-based technique was also envisaged with this clamp. Therapy was periodically interrupted so one transducer could generate a pulse. The echo returning from the opposite transducer was treated. Coagulation necroses were obtained in vitro on substantial thicknesses (23-38mm) of pig liver over exposure durations ranging from 30s to 130s, and with acoustic intensities of less than 15W/cm2 per transducer. Both kidneys of two pigs were treated in vivo with the clamp (14.5W/cm2 for 90s), and the partial nephrectomies performed proved to be bloodless. In vitro and in vivo, wide transfixing lesions corresponded to an echo energy decrease superior to -10dB and parabolic form of the time of flight versus treatment time. In conclusion, this ultrasound clamp has proven to be an excellent mean for achieving monitored haemostasis in kidney.

  20. High Voltage, Fast-Switching Module for Active Control of Magnetic Fields and Edge Plasma Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Prager, James; Slobodov, Ilia

    2016-10-01

    Fast, reliable, real-time control of plasma is critical to the success of magnetic fusion science. High voltage and current supplies are needed to mitigate instabilities in all experiments as well as disruption events in large scale tokamaks for steady-state operation. Silicon carbide (SiC) MOSFETs offer many advantages over IGBTs including lower drive energy requirements, lower conduction and switching losses, and higher switching frequency capabilities; however, these devices are limited to 1.2-1.7 kV devices. As fusion enters the long-pulse and burning plasma eras, efficiency of power switching will be important. Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. developing a high voltage SiC MOSFET module that operates at 10 kV. This switch module utilizes EHT gate drive technology, which has demonstrated the ability to increase SiC MOSFET switching efficiency. The module will allow more rapid development of high voltage switching power supplies at lower cost necessary for the next generation of fast plasma feedback and control. EHT is partnering with the High Beta Tokamak group at Columbia to develop detailed high voltage module specifications, to ensure that the final product meets the needs of the fusion science community.

  1. Blockade by ifenprodil of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones: comparison with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist actions.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J; Fletcher, E J; Baxter, K; MacDonald, J F

    1994-01-01

    1. The block by ifenprodil of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels was investigated in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by 50 mM K+ (high-[K+]o) in Fura-2-loaded rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones in culture and on currents carried by Ba2+ ions (IBa) through Ca2+ channels in mouse cultured hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp. The effects of ifenprodil on voltage-activated Ca2+ channels were compared with its antagonist actions on N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) evoked responses in the same neuronal preparations. 2. Rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by transient exposure to high-[K+]o in our preparation of rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones are mediated predominantly by Ca2+ flux through nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels, with smaller contributions from nifedipine-resistant, omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ channels sensitive to crude funnel-web spider venom (Church et al., 1994). Ifenprodil (0.1-200 microM) reversibly attenuated high-[K+]o-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 17 +/- 3 microM, compared with an IC50 value of 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM for the reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by 20 microM NMDA. Tested in the presence of nifedipine 10 microM, ifenprodil (1-50 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the dihydropyridine-resistant high-[K+]o-evoked rise in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 13 +/- 4 microM. The results suggest that ifenprodil blocks Ca2+ flux through multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Application of the polyamine, spermine (0.25-5 mM), produced a concentration-dependent reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by high-[K+]o.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834201

  2. Control strategy for three-phase four-wire PWM converter of integrated voltage compensation type active SFCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Tang, Yuejin; Shi, Jing; Li, Zhi; Ren, Li; Cheng, Shijie

    2010-02-01

    The integrated voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) is composed of three air-core superconducting transformers and a three-phase four-wire PWM converter. In order to realize the current-limiting characteristics of the integrated active SFCL, it is needed to control the three-phase four-wire PWM converter flexibly and reasonably. Thereby, the control strategy for the converter is analyzed in this paper. In dq0 reference frame, the mathematical model of the converter is founded. The double-loop control strategy, consisting of voltage outer loop and current inner loop, is presented. Moreover, the voltage balance control for the split DC link capacitors is also considered. Using MATLAB, the simulation model of the integrated active SFCL is built. According to the simulation results, it is known that, the presented control strategy is feasible and valid, and the converter can work well under unsymmetrical and symmetrical fault conditions, and then the fault current can be limited quickly and effectively.

  3. Force-clamp laser trapping of rapidly interacting molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Monico, Carina; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-06-01

    Forces play a fundamental role in a wide array of biological processes, regulating enzymatic activity, kinetics of molecular bonds, and molecular motors mechanics. Single molecule force spectroscopy techniques have enabled the investigation of such processes, but they are inadequate to probe short-lived (millisecond and sub-millisecond) molecular complexes. We developed an ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy technique that uses a dual trap configuration to apply constant loads to a single intermittently interacting biological polymer and a binding protein. Our system displays a delay of only ˜10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. The force-clamp configuration in which our assay operates allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds. Moreover, conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors can be recorded with sub-nanometer accuracy and few tens of microseconds of temporal resolution. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  4. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, Daniel W.; Lange, Arnold C.

    1997-01-01

    A high power, solid state power supply is described for producing a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads suitable for powering an electron beam gun or other ion source. The present power supply is most useful for outputs in a range of about 100-400 kW or more. The power supply is comprised of a plurality of discrete switching type dc-dc converter modules, each comprising a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, and an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module. The inputs to the converter modules are fed from a common dc rectifier/filter and are linked together in parallel through decoupling networks to suppress high frequency input interactions. The outputs of the converter modules are linked together in series and connected to the input of the transmission line to the load through a decoupling and line matching network. The dc-dc converter modules are phase activated such that for n modules, each module is activated equally 360.degree./n out of phase with respect to a successive module. The phased activation of the converter modules, combined with the square current waveforms out of the step up transformers, allows the power supply to operate with greatly reduced output capacitance values which minimizes the stored energy available for discharge into an electron beam gun or the like during arcing. The present power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle using simulated voltage feedback signals and voltage feedback loops. Circuitry is also provided for sensing incipient arc currents reflected at the output of the power supply and for simultaneously decoupling the power supply circuitry from the arcing load.

  5. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

    1997-03-11

    A high power, solid state power supply is described for producing a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads suitable for powering an electron beam gun or other ion source. The present power supply is most useful for outputs in a range of about 100-400 kW or more. The power supply is comprised of a plurality of discrete switching type dc-dc converter modules, each comprising a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, and an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module. The inputs to the converter modules are fed from a common dc rectifier/filter and are linked together in parallel through decoupling networks to suppress high frequency input interactions. The outputs of the converter modules are linked together in series and connected to the input of the transmission line to the load through a decoupling and line matching network. The dc-dc converter modules are phase activated such that for n modules, each module is activated equally 360{degree}/n out of phase with respect to a successive module. The phased activation of the converter modules, combined with the square current waveforms out of the step up transformers, allows the power supply to operate with greatly reduced output capacitance values which minimizes the stored energy available for discharge into an electron beam gun or the like during arcing. The present power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle using simulated voltage feedback signals and voltage feedback loops. Circuitry is also provided for sensing incipient arc currents reflected at the output of the power supply and for simultaneously decoupling the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. 7 figs.

  6. The pathophysiology of aortic cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Zammert, Martin; Gelman, Simon

    2016-09-01

    During open aortic surgery, interrupting the blood flow through the aorta by applying a cross-clamp is often a key step to allow for surgical repair. As a consequence, ischemia is induced in parts of the body distal to the clamp site. This significant alteration in the blood flow is almost always associated with hemodynamic changes. Upon release of the cross-clamp, the blood flow is restored, triggering an ischemia-reperfusion response, leading to many pathophysiological processes such as inflammation, humoral changes, and metabolite circulation that could lead to injury in many organ systems and may significantly influence the postoperative outcome. It is therefore important to understand these processes and how they can be treated in order to allow for safe surgical aortic repairs while ensuring the best possible outcomes.

  7. The voltage-dependent proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin is characterized by optoelectric behavior.

    PubMed

    Geibel, S; Friedrich, T; Ormos, P; Wood, P G; Nagel, G; Bamberg, E

    2001-10-01

    The light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) was functionally expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in HEK-293 cells. The latter expression system allowed high time resolution of light-induced current signals. A detailed voltage clamp and patch clamp study was performed to investigate the DeltapH versus Deltapsi dependence of the pump current. The following results were obtained. The current voltage behavior of bR is linear in the measurable range between -160 mV and +60 mV. The pH dependence is less than expected from thermodynamic principles, i.e., one DeltapH unit produces a shift of the apparent reversal potential of 34 mV (and not 58 mV). The M(2)-BR decay shows a significant voltage dependence with time constants changing from 20 ms at +60 mV to 80 ms at -160 mV. The linear I-V curve can be reconstructed by this behavior. However, the slope of the decay rate shows a weaker voltage dependence than the stationary photocurrent, indicating that an additional process must be involved in the voltage dependence of the pump. A slowly decaying M intermediate (decay time > 100 ms) could already be detected at zero voltage by electrical and spectroscopic means. In effect, bR shows optoelectric behavior. The long-lived M can be transferred into the active photocycle by depolarizing voltage pulses. This is experimentally demonstrated by a distinct charge displacement. From the results we conclude that the transport cycle of bR branches via a long-lived M(1)* in a voltage-dependent manner into a nontransporting cycle, where the proton release and uptake occur on the extracellular side.

  8. The activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is required at a posttranslational level for induction of voltage-dependent sodium channels by peptide growth factors in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and expression of voltage-dependent sodium (Na) channels is a crucial aspect of neuronal differentiation because of the central role these ion channels play in the generation of action potentials and the transfer of information in the nervous system. We have used rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell lines deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity to examine the role of PKA in the induction of Na channel expression by nerve growth factor (NGF) and basic FGF (bFGF). In the parental PC12 cell line both NGF and bFGF elicit an increase in the density of functional Na channels, as determined from whole-cell patch clamp recordings. This increase does not occur in two PC12 cell lines deficient in both isozymes of PKA (PKAI and PKAII), and is strongly reduced in a third line deficient in PKAII, but not PKAI. Despite the inability of the neurotrophic factors to induce functional Na channel expression in the PKA-deficient cells, Northern blot hybridization studies and saxitoxin binding assays of intact cells indicate that NGF and bFGF are still capable of eliciting increases in both Na channel mRNA and Na channel protein in the membrane. Thus, PKA activity appears to be necessary at a posttranslational step in the synthesis and expression of functional Na channels, and thereby plays an important role in determining neuronal excitability. PMID:1311713

  9. Planar silicon patch-clamp electrodes integrated with polydimethylsiloxane microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarah, John Michael

    The patch-clamp technique allows one to probe single ion channels and macroscopic ion channel activity in their native environment and resolve their activity as their physical and chemical surroundings are varied. The traditional method of patch-clamping cells involves bringing a clean, flame-polished glass pipette tip with a 1-2 mum diameter pore into contact with a cell membrane to form a high electrical resistance seal. This technique is the gold standard for cellular electrophysiology investigations because it allows the observation of single ion channel protein dynamics as well as activity from an ensemble ion channels from a single cell. Furthermore, any drug approved by federal drug agencies must be screened against particular ion channels with the patch-clamp technique. However, this technique by its nature is serial, time consuming, difficult when exchanging pipette solutions, and difficult to integrate with other technologies. These reasons have prompted several investigators to explore alternative approaches to traditional pipette patch-clamping to increase the throughput of measurements. Herein, I describe the development of a silicon-wafer based device platform that enables the measurement of ion channel activities. The electrical nature of the cell/wafer seal is characterized for several pore design variations. The majority of gigaohm seals obtained falls in the range of 10-20GO. The cell-attached and whole cell configurations are demonstrated. Whole cell ion channel activity originating from various cell fines is consistent with the more traditional micropipette patch-clamp recordings. The silicon fabrication methods developed, although novel, utilize established semiconductor technologies, making them amenable to batch fabrication techniques. I integrate these silicon devices with PDMS microfluidics with monolithic valves, allowing ultra-fast solution exchange as low as tens of milliseconds for the extracellular solution. Furthermore, I developed a

  10. Membrane-localized β-subunits alter the PIP2 regulation of high-voltage activated Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Suh, Byung-Chang; Kim, Dong-Il; Falkenburger, Björn H; Hille, Bertil

    2012-02-21

    The β-subunits of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Ca(V)) channels regulate the functional expression and several biophysical properties of high-voltage-activated Ca(V) channels. We find that Ca(V) β-subunits also determine channel regulation by the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). When Ca(V)1.3, -2.1, or -2.2 channels are cotransfected with the β3-subunit, a cytosolic protein, they can be inhibited by activating a voltage-sensitive lipid phosphatase to deplete PIP(2). When these channels are coexpressed with a β2a-subunit, a palmitoylated peripheral membrane protein, the inhibition is much smaller. PIP(2) sensitivity could be increased by disabling the two palmitoylation sites in the β2a-subunit. To further test effects of membrane targeting of Ca(V) β-subunits on PIP(2) regulation, the N terminus of Lyn was ligated onto the cytosolic β3-subunit to confer lipidation. This chimera, like the Ca(V) β2a-subunit, displayed plasma membrane localization, slowed the inactivation of Ca(V)2.2 channels, and increased the current density. In addition, the Lyn-β3 subunit significantly decreased Ca(V) channel inhibition by PIP(2) depletion. Evidently lipidation and membrane anchoring of Ca(V) β-subunits compete with the PIP(2) regulation of high-voltage-activated Ca(V) channels. Compared with expression with Ca(V) β3-subunits alone, inhibition of Ca(V)2.2 channels by PIP(2) depletion could be significantly attenuated when β2a was coexpressed with β3. Our data suggest that the Ca(V) currents in neurons would be regulated by membrane PIP(2) to a degree that depends on their endogenous β-subunit combinations.

  11. Clamping instability and van der Waals forces in carbon nanotube mechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Aykol, Mehmet; Hou, Bingya; Dhall, Rohan; Chang, Shun-Wen; Branham, William; Qiu, Jing; Cronin, Stephen B

    2014-05-14

    We investigate the role of weak clamping forces, typically assumed to be infinite, in carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Due to these forces, we observe a hysteretic clamping and unclamping of the nanotube device that results in a discrete drop in the mechanical resonance frequency on the order of 5-20 MHz, when the temperature is cycled between 340 and 375 K. This instability in the resonant frequency results from the nanotube unpinning from the electrode/trench sidewall where it is bound weakly by van der Waals forces. Interestingly, this unpinning does not affect the Q-factor of the resonance, since the clamping is still governed by van der Waals forces above and below the unpinning. For a 1 μm device, the drop observed in resonance frequency corresponds to a change in nanotube length of approximately 50-65 nm. On the basis of these findings, we introduce a new model, which includes a finite tension around zero gate voltage due to van der Waals forces and shows better agreement with the experimental data than the perfect clamping model. From the gate dependence of the mechanical resonance frequency, we extract the van der Waals clamping force to be 1.8 pN. The mechanical resonance frequency exhibits a striking temperature dependence below 200 K attributed to a temperature-dependent slack arising from the competition between the van der Waals force and the thermal fluctuations in the suspended nanotube.

  12. Gating Kinetics of the Cyclic-GMP-Activated Channel of Retinal Rods: Flash Photolysis and Voltage-Jump Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Jeffrey W.; Zimmerman, Anita L.; Stryer, Lubert; Baylor, Denis A.

    1988-02-01

    The gating kinetics of the cGMP-activated cation channel of salamander retinal rods have been studied in excised membrane patches. Relaxations in patch current were observed after two kinds of perturbation: (i) fast jumps of cGMP concentration, generated by laser flash photolysis of a cGMP ester (``caged'' cGMP), and (ii) membrane voltage jumps, which perturb activation of the channel by cGMP. In both methods the speed of activation increased with the final cGMP concentration. The results are explained by a simple kinetic model in which activation involves three sequential cGMP binding steps with bimolecular rate constants close to the diffusion-controlled limit; fully liganded channels undergo rapid open-closed transitions. Voltage perturbs activation by changing the rate constant for channel closing, which increases with hyperpolarization. Intramolecular transitions of the fully liganded channel limit the kinetics of activation at high cGMP concentrations (>50 μ M), whereas at physiological cGMP concentrations (<5 μ M), the kinetics of activation are limited by the third cGMP binding step. The channel appears to be optimized for rapid responses to changes in cytoplasmic cGMP concentration.

  13. Artificial phosphorylation sites modulate the activity of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The KvAP potassium channel is representative of a family of voltage-gated ion channels where the membrane potential is sensed by a transmembrane helix containing several positively charged arginines. Previous work by Wang and Zocchi [A. Wang and G. Zocchi, PLoS ONE 6, e18598 (2011), 10.1371/journal.pone.0018598] showed how a negatively charged polyelectrolyte attached in proximity to the voltage sensing element can bias the opening probability of the channel. Here we introduce three phosphorylation sites at the same location and show that the response curve of the channel shifts by about 20 mV upon phosphorylation, while other characteristics such as the single-channel conductance are unaffected. In summary, we construct an artificial phosphorylation site which confers allosteric regulation to the channel.

  14. Intracellular calcium oscillations in strongly metastatic human breast and prostate cancer cells: control by voltage-gated sodium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Rizaner, Nahit; Onkal, Rustem; Fraser, Scott P; Pristerá, Alessandro; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-10-01

    The possible association of intracellular Ca(2+) with metastasis in human cancer cells is poorly understood. We have studied Ca(2+) signaling in human prostate and breast cancer cell lines of strongly versus weakly metastatic potential in a comparative approach. Intracellular free Ca(2+) was measured using a membrane-permeant fluorescent Ca(2+)-indicator dye (Fluo-4 AM) and confocal microscopy. Spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations were observed in a proportion of strongly metastatic human prostate and breast cancer cells (PC-3M and MDA-MB-231, respectively). In contrast, no such oscillations were observed in weakly/non metastatic LNCaP and MCF-7 cells, although a rise in the resting Ca(2+) level could be induced by applying a high-K(+) solution. Various parameters of the oscillations depended on extracellular Ca(2+) and voltage-gated Na(+) channel activity. Treatment with either tetrodotoxin (a general blocker of voltage-gated Na(+) channels) or ranolazine (a blocker of the persistent component of the channel current) suppressed the Ca(2+) oscillations. It is concluded that the functional voltage-gated Na(+) channel expression in strongly metastatic cancer cells makes a significant contribution to generation of oscillatory intracellular Ca(2+) activity. Possible mechanisms and consequences of the Ca(2+) oscillations are discussed.

  15. Components of gating charge movement and S4 voltage-sensor exposure during activation of hERG channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuren; Dou, Ying; Goodchild, Samuel J; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Fedida, David

    2013-04-01

    The human ether-á-go-go-related gene (hERG) K(+) channel encodes the pore-forming α subunit of the rapid delayed rectifier current, IKr, and has unique activation gating kinetics, in that the α subunit of the channel activates and deactivates very slowly, which focuses the role of IKr current to a critical period during action potential repolarization in the heart. Despite its physiological importance, fundamental mechanistic properties of hERG channel activation gating remain unclear, including how voltage-sensor movement rate limits pore opening. Here, we study this directly by recording voltage-sensor domain currents in mammalian cells for the first time and measuring the rates of voltage-sensor modification by [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate chloride (MTSET). Gating currents recorded from hERG channels expressed in mammalian tsA201 cells using low resistance pipettes show two charge systems, defined as Q(1) and Q(2), with V(1/2)'s of -55.7 (equivalent charge, z = 1.60) and -54.2 mV (z = 1.30), respectively, with the Q(2) charge system carrying approximately two thirds of the overall gating charge. The time constants for charge movement at 0 mV were 2.5 and 36.2 ms for Q(1) and Q(2), decreasing to 4.3 ms for Q(2) at +60 mV, an order of magnitude faster than the time constants of ionic current appearance at these potentials. The voltage and time dependence of Q2 movement closely correlated with the rate of MTSET modification of I521C in the outermost region of the S4 segment, which had a V(1/2) of -64 mV and time constants of 36 ± 8.5 ms and 11.6 ± 6.3 ms at 0 and +60 mV, respectively. Modeling of Q(1) and Q(2) charge systems showed that a minimal scheme of three transitions is sufficient to account for the experimental findings. These data point to activation steps further downstream of voltage-sensor movement that provide the major delays to pore opening in hERG channels.

  16. Kinetic analysis of PCNA clamp binding and release in the clamp loading reaction catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C

    PubMed Central

    Marzahn, Melissa R.; Hayner, Jaclyn N.; Meyer, Jennifer A.; Bloom, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases require a sliding clamp to achieve processive DNA synthesis. The toroidal clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders, members of the AAA+ family of ATPases. These enzymes utilize the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform a variety of cellular functions. In this study, a clamp loader-clamp binding assay was developed to measure the rates of ATP-dependent clamp binding and ATP-hydrolysis-dependent clamp release for the S. cerevisiae clamp loader (RFC) and clamp (PCNA). Pre-steady-state kinetics of PCNA binding showed that although ATP binding to RFC increases affinity for PCNA, ATP binding rates and ATP-dependent conformational changes in RFC are fast relative to PCNA binding rates. Interestingly, RFC binds PCNA faster than the Escherichia coli γ complex clamp loader binds the β-clamp. In the process of loading clamps on DNA, RFC maintains contact with PCNA while PCNA closes, as the observed rate of PCNA closing is faster than the rate of PCNA release, precluding the possibility of an open clamp dissociating from DNA. Rates of clamp closing and release are not dependent on the rate of the DNA binding step and are also slower than reported rates of ATP hydrolysis, showing that these rates reflect unique intramolecular reaction steps in the clamp loading pathway. PMID:25450506

  17. Kinetic analysis of PCNA clamp binding and release in the clamp loading reaction catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C.

    PubMed

    Marzahn, Melissa R; Hayner, Jaclyn N; Meyer, Jennifer A; Bloom, Linda B

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerases require a sliding clamp to achieve processive DNA synthesis. The toroidal clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders, members of the AAA+family of ATPases. These enzymes utilize the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform a variety of cellular functions. In this study, a clamp loader-clamp binding assay was developed to measure the rates of ATP-dependent clamp binding and ATP-hydrolysis-dependent clamp release for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader (RFC) and clamp (PCNA). Pre-steady-state kinetics of PCNA binding showed that although ATP binding to RFC increases affinity for PCNA, ATP binding rates and ATP-dependent conformational changes in RFC are fast relative to PCNA binding rates. Interestingly, RFC binds PCNA faster than the Escherichia coli γ complex clamp loader binds the β-clamp. In the process of loading clamps on DNA, RFC maintains contact with PCNA while PCNA closes, as the observed rate of PCNA closing is faster than the rate of PCNA release, precluding the possibility of an open clamp dissociating from DNA. Rates of clamp closing and release are not dependent on the rate of the DNA binding step and are also slower than reported rates of ATP hydrolysis, showing that these rates reflect unique intramolecular reaction steps in the clamp loading pathway.

  18. Π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J; Santos, Michael S; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the 'π-clamp', that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  19. Patch-clamp amplifiers on a chip.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Pujitha; Culurciello, Eugenio; Yang, Youshan; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Kindlmann, Peter J; Sigworth, Fred J

    2010-10-15

    We present the first, fully integrated, two-channel implementation of a patch-clamp measurement system. With this "PatchChip" two simultaneous whole-cell recordings can be obtained with rms noise of 8pA in a 10kHz bandwidth. The capacitance and series-resistance of the electrode can be compensated up to 10pF and 100MΩ respectively under computer control. Recordings of hERG and Na(v) 1.7 currents demonstrate the system's capabilities, which are on par with large, commercial patch-clamp instrumentation. By reducing patch-clamp amplifiers to a millimeter size micro-chip, this work paves the way to the realization of massively parallel, high-throughput patch-clamp systems for drug screening and ion-channel research. The PatchChip is implemented in a 0.5μm silicon-on-sapphire process; its size is 3×3mm(2) and the power consumption is 5mW per channel with a 3.3V power supply.

  20. Histamine H3-receptor activation augments voltage-dependent Ca2+ current via GTP hydrolysis in rabbit saphenous artery.

    PubMed

    Oike, M; Kitamura, K; Kuriyama, H

    1992-03-01

    1. Actions of histamine on the voltage-dependent Ba2+(Ca2+) currents (IBa, ICa) were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on dispersed smooth muscle cells from the rabbit saphenous artery. 2. Histamine (half-maximal dose, EC50 = 530 nM) augmented the IBa evoked by a brief depolarizing pulse (100 ms duration; to +10 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV) in a concentration-dependent manner. The maximum augmentation was obtained with 30 microM-histamine (1.29 times control). This augmentation of IBa was inhibited by the H3-antagonist, thioperamide (Ki = 30 nM, slope of the Schild plot = 1.0), but not by H1- or H2-antagonists (mepyramine or diphenhydramine, or cimetidine, respectively). 3. An H3-agonist, R alpha-methylhistamine (EC50 = 93 nM), also augmented IBa in a concentration-dependent manner at a holding potential of -80 mV and the maximum augmentation (1.25 times control) was obtained with 10 microM. This augmentation was also inhibited by thioperamide, but not by the above H1- and H2- antagonists. 4. Intracellularly applied 500 microM-guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) enhanced, but 1 mM-guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) abolished, the histamine-induced augmentation of IBa. When one of the non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S; greater than 5 microM), guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP; 200 microM) or guanylyl (beta, gamma-methylene)-diphosphonate (GMP-PCP; 1 mM) was intracellularly applied, the IBa amplitude evoked without the application of histamine was not affected, but the excitatory effect of histamine on IBa was reversed to an inhibition. Pre-treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX: 300 ng/ml and 3 micrograms/ml) did not modify the histamine-induced responses in the absence or presence of GTP gamma S. 5. 4 beta-Phorbol 12,13-dibutylate (PDBu) increased the amplitude of IBa. However, this action of PDBu was not enhanced by the application of GTP (500 microM) in the pipette, but

  1. Inverse coupling in leak and voltage-activated K+ channel gates underlies distinct roles in electrical signaling.

    PubMed

    Ben-Abu, Yuval; Zhou, Yufeng; Zilberberg, Noam; Yifrach, Ofer

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-activated (Kv) and leak (K(2P)) K(+) channels have key, yet distinct, roles in electrical signaling in the nervous system. Here we examine how differences in the operation of the activation and slow inactivation pore gates of Kv and K(2P) channels underlie their unique roles in electrical signaling. We report that (i) leak K(+) channels possess a lower activation gate, (ii) the activation gate is an important determinant controlling the conformational stability of the K(+) channel pore, (iii) the lower activation and upper slow inactivation gates of leak channels cross-talk and (iv) unlike Kv channels, where the two gates are negatively coupled, these two gates are positively coupled in K(2P) channels. Our results demonstrate how basic thermodynamic properties of the K(+) channel pore, particularly conformational stability and coupling between gates, underlie the specialized roles of Kv and K(2P) channel families in electrical signaling.

  2. β1-subunit–induced structural rearrangements of the Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Juan P.; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E.; Hyde, H. Clark; Zaelzer, Cristian A.; Aguayo, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Luk, Louis Y. P.; Kent, Stephen B. H.; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D.; Bezanilla, Francisco; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channels are involved in a large variety of physiological processes. Regulatory β-subunits are one of the mechanisms responsible for creating BK channel diversity fundamental to the adequate function of many tissues. However, little is known about the structure of its voltage sensor domain. Here, we present the external architectural details of BK channels using lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET). We used a genetically encoded lanthanide-binding tag (LBT) to bind terbium as a LRET donor and a fluorophore-labeled iberiotoxin as the LRET acceptor for measurements of distances within the BK channel structure in a living cell. By introducing LBTs in the extracellular region of the α- or β1-subunit, we determined (i) a basic extracellular map of the BK channel, (ii) β1-subunit–induced rearrangements of the voltage sensor in α-subunits, and (iii) the relative position of the β1-subunit within the α/β1-subunit complex. PMID:27217576

  3. β1-subunit-induced structural rearrangements of the Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Juan P; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E; Hyde, H Clark; Zaelzer, Cristian A; Aguayo, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Romina V; Luk, Louis Y P; Kent, Stephen B H; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D; Bezanilla, Francisco; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-06-07

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels are involved in a large variety of physiological processes. Regulatory β-subunits are one of the mechanisms responsible for creating BK channel diversity fundamental to the adequate function of many tissues. However, little is known about the structure of its voltage sensor domain. Here, we present the external architectural details of BK channels using lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET). We used a genetically encoded lanthanide-binding tag (LBT) to bind terbium as a LRET donor and a fluorophore-labeled iberiotoxin as the LRET acceptor for measurements of distances within the BK channel structure in a living cell. By introducing LBTs in the extracellular region of the α- or β1-subunit, we determined (i) a basic extracellular map of the BK channel, (ii) β1-subunit-induced rearrangements of the voltage sensor in α-subunits, and (iii) the relative position of the β1-subunit within the α/β1-subunit complex.

  4. Pacemaking in dopaminergic ventral tegmental area neurons: depolarizing drive from background and voltage-dependent sodium conductances

    PubMed Central

    Khaliq, Zayd M.; Bean, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) fire spontaneously in a pacemaker-like manner. We analyzed the ionic currents that drive pacemaking in dopaminergic VTA neurons, studied in mouse brain slices. Pacemaking was not inhibited by blocking hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) or blocking all calcium current by Mg2+ replacement of Ca2+. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) stopped spontaneous activity and usually resulted in stable resting potentials near −60 mV to −55 mV, 10–15 mV below the action potential threshold. When external sodium was replaced by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) with TTX present, cells hyperpolarized by an average of −11 mV, suggesting a significant resting sodium conductance not sensitive to TTX. Voltage-clamp experiments using slow (10 mV/s) ramps showed a steady-state, steeply voltage-dependent current blocked by TTX that activates near −60 mV, as well as a sodium “background” current with little voltage-sensitivity, revealed by NMDG replacement for sodium with TTX present. We quantified these two components of sodium current during the pacemaking trajectory using action potential clamp. The initial phase of depolarization, up to about −55 mV, is driven mainly by non-voltage-dependent sodium background current. Above −55 mV, TTX-sensitive voltage-dependent “persistent” Na current helps drive the final phase of depolarization to the spike threshold. Voltage-dependent calcium current is small at all subthreshold voltages. The pacemaking mechanism in VTA neurons differs from that in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons, where subthreshold calcium current plays a dominant role. In addition, we found that non-voltage-dependent background sodium current is much smaller in SNc neurons than VTA neurons. PMID:20505107

  5. Voltage- and current-activated metal-insulator transition in VO2-based electrical switches: a lifetime operation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crunteanu, Aurelian; Givernaud, Julien; Leroy, Jonathan; Mardivirin, David; Champeaux, Corinne; Orlianges, Jean-Christophe; Catherinot, Alain; Blondy, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    Vanadium dioxide is an intensively studied material that undergoes a temperature-induced metal-insulator phase transition accompanied by a large change in electrical resistivity. Electrical switches based on this material show promising properties in terms of speed and broadband operation. The exploration of the failure behavior and reliability of such devices is very important in view of their integration in practical electronic circuits. We performed systematic lifetime investigations of two-terminal switches based on the electrical activation of the metal-insulator transition in VO2 thin films. The devices were integrated in coplanar microwave waveguides (CPWs) in series configuration. We detected the evolution of a 10 GHz microwave signal transmitted through the CPW, modulated by the activation of the VO2 switches in both voltage- and current-controlled modes. We demonstrated enhanced lifetime operation of current-controlled VO2-based switching (more than 260 million cycles without failure) compared with the voltage-activated mode (breakdown at around 16 million activation cycles). The evolution of the electrical self-oscillations of a VO2-based switch induced in the current-operated mode is a subtle indicator of the material properties modification and can be used to monitor its behavior under various external stresses in sensor applications.

  6. Dynamics and Stability of Pinned-Clamped and Clamped-Pinned Cylindrical Shells Conveying Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, A. K.; Wong, S. S. T.; Païdoussis, M. P.

    2001-11-01

    The paper examines the dynamics and stability of fluid-conveying cylindrical shells having pinned-clamped or clamped-pinned boundary conditions, where ``pinned'' is an abbreviation for ``simply supported''. Flügge's equations are used to describe the shell motion, while the fluid-dynamic perturbation pressure is obtained utilizing the linearized potential flow theory. The solution is obtained using two methods - the travelling wave method and the Fourier-transform approach. The results obtained by both methods suggest that the negative damping of the clamped-pinned systems and positive damping of the pinned-clamped systems, observed by previous investigators for any arbitrarily small flow velocity, are simply numerical artefacts; this is reinforced by energy considerations, in which the work done by the fluid on the shell is shown to be zero. Hence, it is concluded that both systems are conservative.

  7. Effects of acidic pH on voltage-gated ion channels in rat trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-Eon; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Choi, In-Sun; Kim, Do-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    The effects of acidic pH on several voltage-dependent ion channels, such as voltage-dependent K+ and Ca2+ channels, and hyperpolarization-gated and cyclic nucleotide-activated cation (HCN) channels, were examined using a whole-cell patch clamp technique on mechanically isolated rat mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons. The application of a pH 6.5 solution had no effect on the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K+ currents. A pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K+ currents. The pH 6.0 also shifted both the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The application of a pH 6.5 solution scarcely affected the peak amplitude of membrane currents mediated by HCN channels, which were profoundly inhibited by the general HCN channel blocker Cs+ (1 mM). However, the pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of HCN-mediated currents. Although the pH 6.0 solution showed complex modulation of the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships, the midpoint voltages for the activation of HCN channels were not changed by acidic pH. On the other hand, voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels were significantly inhibited by an acidic pH. The application of an acidic pH solution significantly shifted the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The modulation of several voltage-dependent ion channels by an acidic pH might affect the excitability of mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons, and thus physiological functions mediated by the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus could be affected in acidic pH conditions. PMID:28280415

  8. Alpha 1-adrenergic agonists selectively suppress voltage-dependent K+ current in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Apkon, M; Nerbonne, J M

    1988-01-01

    The effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agonists on the waveforms of action potentials and voltage-gated ionic currents were examined in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes by the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique. After "puffer" applications of either of two alpha 1 agonists, phenylephrine and methoxamine, action-potential durations were increased. In voltage-clamped cells, phenylephrine (5-20 microM) or methoxamine (5-10 microM) reduced the amplitudes of Ca2+-independent voltage-activated outward K+ currents (Iout); neither the kinetics nor the voltage-dependent properties of Iout were significantly affected. The effects of phenylephrine or methoxamine on Iout were larger and longer-lasting at higher concentrations and after prolonged or repeated exposures; in all experiments, however, Iout recovered completely when puffer applications were discontinued. The suppression of Iout is attributed to the activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, as neither beta- nor alpha 2-adrenergic agonists had measurable effects on Iout; in addition, the effect of phenylephrine was attenuated in the presence of the alpha antagonist phentolamine (10 microM), but not in the presence of the beta antagonist propranolol (10 microM). Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents, in contrast, were not altered measurably by phenylephrine or methoxamine and no currents were activated directly by these agents. Suppression of Iout was also observed during puffer applications of either of two protein kinase C activators, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10 nM-1 microM) and 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (60 microM). We conclude that the activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in adult rat ventricular myocytes leads to action-potential prolongation as a result of the specific suppression of Iout and that this effect may be mediated by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:2903506

  9. The TCF C-clamp DNA binding domain expands the Wnt transcriptome via alternative target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hoverter, Nate P.; Zeller, Michael D.; McQuade, Miriam M.; Garibaldi, Angela; Busch, Anke; Selwan, Elizabeth M.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Baldi, Pierre; Waterman, Marian L.

    2014-01-01

    LEF/TCFs direct the final step in Wnt/β-catenin signalling by recruiting β-catenin to genes for activation of transcription. Ancient, non-vertebrate TCFs contain two DNA binding domains, a High Mobility Group box for recognition of the Wnt Response Element (WRE; 5′-CTTTGWWS-3′) and the C-clamp domain for recognition of the GC-rich Helper motif (5′-RCCGCC-3′). Two vertebrate TCFs (TCF-1/TCF7 and TCF-4/TCF7L2) use the C-clamp as an alternatively spliced domain to regulate cell-cycle progression, but how the C-clamp influences TCF binding and activity genome-wide is not known. Here, we used a doxycycline inducible system with ChIP-seq to assess how the C-clamp influences human TCF1 binding genome-wide. Metabolic pulse-labeling of nascent RNA with 4′Thiouridine was used with RNA-seq to connect binding to the Wnt transcriptome. We find that the C-clamp enables targeting to a greater number of gene loci for stronger occupancy and transcription regulation. The C-clamp uses Helper sites concurrently with WREs for gene targeting, but it also targets TCF1 to sites that do not have readily identifiable canonical WREs. The coupled ChIP-seq/4′Thiouridine-seq analysis identified new Wnt target genes, including additional regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, C-clamp containing isoforms of TCFs are potent transcriptional regulators with an expanded transcriptome directed by C-clamp-Helper site interactions. PMID:25414359

  10. A central swivel point in the RFC clamp loader controls PCNA opening and loading on DNA.

    PubMed

    Sakato, Miho; O'Donnell, Mike; Hingorani, Manju M

    2012-02-17

    Replication factor C (RFC) is a five-subunit complex that loads proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamps onto primer-template DNA (ptDNA) during replication. RFC subunits belong to the AAA(+) superfamily, and their ATPase activity drives interactions between the clamp loader, the clamp, and the ptDNA, leading to topologically linked PCNA·ptDNA. We report the kinetics of transient events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RFC-catalyzed PCNA loading, including ATP-induced RFC activation, PCNA opening, ptDNA binding, ATP hydrolysis, PCNA closing, and PCNA·ptDNA release. This detailed perspective enables assessment of individual RFC-A, RFC-B, RFC-C, RFC-D, and RFC-E subunit functions in the reaction mechanism. Functions have been ascribed to RFC subunits previously based on a steady-state analysis of 'arginine-finger' ATPase mutants; however, pre-steady-state analysis provides a different view. The central subunit RFC-C serves as a critical swivel point in the clamp loader. ATP binding to this subunit initiates RFC activation, and the clamp loader adopts a spiral conformation that stabilizes PCNA in a corresponding open spiral. The importance of RFC subunit response to ATP binding decreases as RFC-C>RFC-D>RFC-B, with RFC-A being unnecessary. RFC-C-dependent activation of RFC also enables ptDNA binding, leading to the formation of the RFC·ATP·PCNA(open)·ptDNA complex. Subsequent ATP hydrolysis leads to complex dissociation, with RFC-D activity contributing the most to rapid ptDNA release. The pivotal role of the RFC-B/C/D subunit ATPase core in clamp loading is consistent with the similar central location of all three ATPase active subunits of the Escherichia coli clamp loader.

  11. The active-zone protein Munc13 controls the use-dependence of presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Calloway, Nathaniel; Gouzer, Géraldine; Xue, Mingyu; Ryan, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Presynaptic calcium channel function is critical for converting electrical information into chemical communication but the molecules in the active zone that sculpt this function are poorly understood. We show that Munc13, an active-zone protein essential for exocytosis, also controls presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) function dictating their behavior during various forms of activity. We demonstrate that in vitro Munc13 interacts with voltage-VGCCs via a pair of basic residues in Munc13's C2B domain. We show that elimination of this interaction by either removal of Munc13 or replacement of Munc13 with a Munc13 C2B mutant alters synaptic VGCC's response to and recovery from high-frequency action potential bursts and alters calcium influx from single action potential stimuli. These studies illustrate a novel form of synaptic modulation and show that Munc13 is poised to profoundly impact information transfer at nerve terminals by controlling both vesicle priming and the trigger for exocytosis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07728.001 PMID:26196145

  12. VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Von Eschen, R.L.; Scheele, P.F.

    1962-04-24

    A transistorized voltage regulator which provides very close voitage regulation up to about 180 deg F is described. A diode in the positive line provides a constant voltage drop from the input to a regulating transistor emitter. An amplifier is coupled to the positive line through a resistor and is connected between a difference circuit and the regulating transistor base which is negative due to the difference in voltage drop across thc diode and the resistor so that a change in the regulator output causes the amplifier to increase or decrease the base voltage and current and incrcase or decrease the transistor impedance to return the regulator output to normal. (AEC)

  13. A low-voltage high-speed terahertz spatial light modulator using active metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Saroj; Sonkusale, Sameer R.

    2016-11-01

    An all solid-state metamaterial based terahertz (THz) spatial light modulator (SLM) is presented which uses high mobility 2DEG to manipulate the metamaterial resonant frequency (0.45 THz) leading to terahertz wave modulation. The 2DEG is created by embedding pseudomorphic high-electron mobility transistors in the capacitive gap of each electrical-LC resonator, allowing the charge density to be controlled with very low voltage (1 V) and modulating speeds up to 10 MHz while consuming sub-milliwatt power. We have demonstrated our SLM as a 2 × 2 pixel array operating around 0.45 THz by raster scanning a 6 × 6 image of an occluded metal object behind a thick polystyrene screen using a single-pixel THz imaging setup.

  14. Mechanical properties of a lap joint under uniform clamping pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diller, S. V.; Metherell, A. F.

    1969-01-01

    Equations were derived for the load deflection relations, the energy dissipation per cycle, and the instantaneous rate of dissipation for a lap joint idealized as two overlapping plates clamped together under a uniform clamping pressure.

  15. Regulation of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel function, trafficking, and membrane stability by auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Felix, Ricardo; Calderón-Rivera, Aida; Andrade, Arturo

    2013-09-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channels mediate Ca(2+) ions influx into cells in response to depolarization of the plasma membrane. They are responsible for initiation of excitation-contraction and excitation-secretion coupling, and the Ca(2+) that enters cells through this pathway is also important in the regulation of protein phosphorylation, gene transcription, and many other intracellular events. Initial electrophysiological studies divided CaV channels into low-voltage-activated (LVA) and high-voltage-activated (HVA) channels. The HVA CaV channels were further subdivided into L, N, P/Q, and R-types which are oligomeric protein complexes composed of an ion-conducting CaVα1 subunit and auxiliary CaVα2δ, CaVβ, and CaVγ subunits. The functional consequences of the auxiliary subunits include altered functional and pharmacological properties of the channels as well as increased current densities. The latter observation suggests an important role of the auxiliary subunits in membrane trafficking of the CaVα1 subunit. This includes the mechanisms by which CaV channels are targeted to the plasma membrane and to appropriate regions within a given cell. Likewise, the auxiliary subunits seem to participate in the mechanisms that remove CaV channels from the plasma membrane for recycling and/or degradation. Diverse studies have provided important clues to the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of CaV channels by the auxiliary subunits, and the roles that these proteins could possibly play in channel targeting and membrane Stabilization.

  16. Towards a Dynamic Clamp for Neurochemical Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Catalina Maria; Kwon, Hyuck-Jin; Hashmi, Ali; Yu, Gan; Zhao, Jiheng; Gao, Jianlong; Xu, Jie; Xue, Wei; Dimitrov, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    The classic dynamic clamp technique uses a real-time electrical interface between living cells and neural simulations in order to investigate hypotheses about neural function and structure. One of the acknowledged drawbacks of that technique is the limited control of the cells' chemical microenvironment. In this manuscript, we use a novel combination of nanosensor and microfluidic technology and microfluidic and neural simulations to add sensing and control of chemical concentrations to the dynamic clamp technique. Specifically, we use a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip to generate distinct chemical concentration gradients (ions or neuromodulators), to register the concentrations with embedded nanosensors and use the processed signals as an input to simulations of a neural cell. The ultimate goal of this project is to close the loop and provide sensor signals to the microfluidic lab-on-a-chip to mimic the interaction of the simulated cell with other cells in its chemical environment. PMID:25946635

  17. Clamp on ultrasonic instruments in subsea applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haugen, S.; Hodgson, S.; Upchurch, J.; McMahan, J.; Hazelrigg, K.; Mundorff, J.

    1995-12-01

    Monitoring of solids flow in pipelines has until recently required pipework intervention in order to insert probes and switches. Both sand particles and cleaning pigs are by nature destructive to these directly exposed detectors due to erosion and inertia. The instruments presented in this paper provide a superior alternative in ultrasonic clamp-on technology requiring only superficial pipework installation. Wells can now be operated efficiently in a way that minimizes the risk of erosion and collapse. Pigging operations can be monitored both by on-line pig detection and debris monitoring thereby allowing a safe and optimized survey to take place. The non-intrusive clamp-on concept raises standards in instrument reliability, durability and measurement performance.

  18. Mechanical and metallurgical properties of carotid artery clamps.

    PubMed

    Dujovny, M; Kossovsky, N; Kossowsky, R; Segal, R; Diaz, F G; Kaufman, H; Perlin, A; Cook, E E

    1985-11-01

    The mechanical and metallurgical properties of carotid artery clamps were evaluated. The pressure plate retreat propensity, metallurgical composition, surface morphology, magnetic properties, and corrosion resistance of the Crutchfield, Selverstone, Salibi, and Kindt clamps were tested. None of the clamps showed evidence of pressure plate retreat. The clamps differed significantly in their composition, surface cleanliness, magnetic properties, and corrosion resistance. The Crutchfield clamp was the only one manufactured from an ASTM-ANSI-approved implantable stainless steel (AISI 316) and the only clamp in which the surfaces were clean and free of debris. The Selverstone clamp was made principally from AISI 304 stainless steel, as was one Salibi clamp. The pressure plate on another Salibi clamp was made from a 1% chromium and 1% manganese steel. Machining and surface debris consisting principally of aluminum, silicon, and sulfur was abundant on the Selverstone and Salibi clamps. The Kindt clamp was manufactured from AISI 301 stainless steel with a silicate-aluminized outer coating. The Crutchfield and Selverstone clamps were essentially nonferromagnetic, whereas the Salibi and Kindt clamps were sensitive to magnetic flux. In the pitting potential corrosion test, the Crutchfield clamp demonstrated good corrosion resistance with a pitting potential of 310 mV and no surface corrosion or pitting by scanning electron microscopy examination. The Selverstone clamp had lower pitting potentials and showed various degrees of corrosion and surface pitting by scanning electron microscopy. The Salibi pressure plate had a very low pitting potential of -525 mV and showed severe corrosion. By metallurgical criteria, only the Crutchfield clamp is suitable for long term implantation.

  19. Voltage-Independent Calcium Release in Heart Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggli, Ernst; Lederer, W. Jonathan

    1990-10-01

    The Ca2+ that activates contraction in heart muscle is regulated as in skeletal muscle by processes that depend on voltage and intracellular Ca2+ and involve a positive feedback system. How the initial electrical signal is amplified in heart muscle has remained controversial, however. Analogous protein structures from skeletal muscle and heart muscle have been identified physiologically and sequenced; these include the Ca2+ channel of the sarcolemma and the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although the parallels found in cardiac and skeletal muscles have provoked valuable experiments in both tissues, separation of the effects of voltage and intracellular Ca2+ on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in heart muscle has been imperfect. With the use of caged Ca2+ and flash photolysis in voltage-clamped heart myocytes, effects of membrane potential in heart muscle cells on Ca2+ release from intracellular stores have been studied. Unlike the response in skeletal muscle, voltage across the sarcolemma of heart muscle does not affect the release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that other regulatory processes are needed to control Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release.

  20. Resurgent current of voltage-gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda H; Raman, Indira M

    2014-01-01

    Resurgent Na+ current results from a distinctive form of Na+ channel gating, originally identified in cerebellar Purkinje neurons. In these neurons, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels responsible for action potential firing have specialized mechanisms that reduce the likelihood that they accumulate in fast inactivated states, thereby shortening refractory periods and permitting rapid, repetitive, and/or burst firing. Under voltage clamp, step depolarizations evoke transient Na+ currents that rapidly activate and quickly decay, and step repolarizations elicit slower channel reopening, or a ‘resurgent’ current. The generation of resurgent current depends on a factor in the Na+ channel complex, probably a subunit such as NaVβ4 (Scn4b), which blocks open Na+ channels at positive voltages, competing with the fast inactivation gate, and unblocks at negative voltages, permitting recovery from an open channel block along with a flow of current. Following its initial discovery, resurgent Na+ current has been found in nearly 20 types of neurons. Emerging research suggests that resurgent current is preferentially increased in a variety of clinical conditions associated with altered cellular excitability. Here we review the biophysical, molecular and structural mechanisms of resurgent current and their relation to the normal functions of excitable cells as well as pathophysiology. PMID:25172941

  1. Carbon nanotube-clamped metal atomic chain

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Yin, Li-Chang; Li, Feng; Liu, Chang; Yu, Wan-Jing; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Wu, Bo; Lee, Young-Hee; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Metal atomic chain (MAC) is an ultimate one-dimensional structure with unique physical properties, such as quantized conductance, colossal magnetic anisotropy, and quantized magnetoresistance. Therefore, MACs show great potential as possible components of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices. However, MACs are usually suspended between two macroscale metallic electrodes; hence obvious technical barriers exist in the interconnection and integration of MACs. Here we report a carbon nanotube (CNT)-clamped MAC, where CNTs play the roles of both nanoconnector and electrodes. This nanostructure is prepared by in situ machining a metal-filled CNT, including peeling off carbon shells by spatially and elementally selective electron beam irradiation and further elongating the exposed metal nanorod. The microstructure and formation process of this CNT-clamped MAC are explored by both transmission electron microscopy observations and theoretical simulations. First-principles calculations indicate that strong covalent bonds are formed between the CNT and MAC. The electrical transport property of the CNT-clamped MAC was experimentally measured, and quantized conductance was observed. PMID:20427743

  2. π-Clamp Mediated Cysteine Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is a grand challenge in chemistry. Protecting groups or catalysts must be used to selectively modify one site among many that are similarly reactive. General strategies are rare such the local chemical environment around the target site is tuned for selective transformation. Here we show a four amino acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the “π-clamp”, tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for the site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We used the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues (e.g. antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes), which was impossible with prior cysteine modification methods. The modified π-clamp antibodies retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach for site-selective chemistry and provides opportunities to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics. PMID:26791894

  3. Temperature-Controlled Clamping and Releasing Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosing, David; Ford, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    A report describes the development of a mechanism that automatically clamps upon warming and releases upon cooling between temperature limits of approx. =180 K and approx. =293 K. The mechanism satisfied a need specific to a program that involved repeated excursions of a spectrometer between a room-temperature atmospheric environment and a cryogenic vacuum testing environment. The mechanism was also to be utilized in the intended application of the spectrometer, in which the spectrometer would be clamped for protection during launch of a spacecraft and released in the cold of outer space to allow it to assume its nominal configuration for scientific observations. The mechanism is passive in the sense that its operation does not depend on a control system and does not require any power other than that incidental to heating and cooling. The clamping and releasing action is effected by bolt-preloaded stacks of shape-memory-alloy (SMA) cylinders. In designing this mechanism, as in designing other, similar SMA mechanisms, it was necessary to account for the complex interplay among thermal expansion, elastic and inelastic deformation under load, and SMA thermomechanical properties.

  4. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  5. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  6. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.532 Clips, straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a...

  7. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.532 Clips, straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a...

  8. Damping mechanisms of single-clamped and prestressed double-clamped resonant polymer microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, S.; Hierold, C.

    2008-11-01

    In this article, an investigation of the damping mechanisms of resonant single- and double-clamped polymer microbeams for a frequency range from 10 kHz to 5 MHz is presented. The suspended structures are made of SU-8, an epoxy-type photoresist, by means of a sacrificial layer technique. The vibration was measured with a laser-Doppler vibrometer in high vacuum at different temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. The influence of air damping in rarefied air was investigated and the intrinsic damping mechanisms were determined in high vacuum (p <0.05 Pa). After excluding a variety of possible damping factors, the dominant intrinsic dissipation mechanism of the single-clamped microbeams was understood to be the material damping with maximum quality factors (Q) of around 70 at 20 °C. Quality factors of up to 720 at 20 °C were measured for stringlike double-clamped microbeams, which suggest a different intrinsic damping mechanism than material loss. It is shown that internal damping mechanisms due to flexure and elongation have a small impact on the damping of stretched strings. Modeling the clamping loss based on the wave transmission into the suspended anchor plates indicates that it is the dominant intrinsic dissipation in the prestressed double-clamped microresonators. At atmospheric pressure it was shown that at low frequencies the quality factors of single-clamped and stringlike double-clamped microbeams are limited by the squeeze-film air damping. At high frequencies the quality factors are limited by the specific intrinsic damping. In between the two particular regions with a specific dominant damping mechanism the quality factors show a maximum.

  9. Robotic multi-well planar patch-clamp for native and primary mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, Carol J; Li, Jing; Sukumar, Piruthivi; Majeed, Yasser; Dallas, Mark L; English, Anne; Emery, Paul; Porter, Karen E; Smith, Andrew M; McFadzean, Ian; Beccano-Kelly, Dayne; Bahnasi, Yahya; Cheong, Alex; Naylor, Jacqueline; Zeng, Fanning; Liu, Xing; Gamper, Nikita; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Pearson, Hugh A; Peers, Chris; Robertson, Brian; Beech, David J

    2009-01-01

    Multi-well robotic planar patch-clamp has become common in drug development and safety programmes because it enables efficient and systematic testing of compounds against ion channels during voltage-clamp. It has not, however, been adopted significantly in other important areas of ion channel research, where conventional patch-clamp remains the favoured method. Here we show the wider potential of the multi-well approach with the capability for efficient intracellular solution exchange, describing protocols and success rates for recording from a range of native and primary mammalian cells derived from blood vessels, arthritic joints, and the immune and central nervous systems. The protocol involves preparing a suspension of single cells to be dispensed robotically into 4-8 microfluidic chambers each containing a glass chip with a small aperture. Under automated control, giga-seals and whole-cell access are achieved followed by pre-programmed routines of voltage paradigms and fast extracellular or intracellular solution exchange. Recording from 48 chambers usually takes 1-6 hr depending on the experimental design and yields 16-33 cell recordings. PMID:19197268

  10. A general modelling and control algorithm of a three-phase multilevel diode clamped inverter by means of a direct space vector control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhali, O.; Francois, B.; Berkouk, E. M.; Saudemont, C.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a simple and general direct modulation strategy that enables to copy directly modulated waveforms onto output voltages of a multilevel three-phase Diode Clamped Inverter (DCI). A general modelling of this converter is presented. A space vector scheme is developed without using Park transforms. Based on this algorithm, the location of the reference voltage vector is determined and the voltage vectors for the modulation are deduced. Simultaneously, their durations are calculated. The proposed algorithm is general and can be directly applied to a (n+1) levels inverter independently on its topology (Diode Clamped Inverter, Neutral Point Clamped, Flying Capacitor Inverter...). To verify this algorithm, both control algorithms of a 5-level DCI and a 11-level DCI are considered and simulation results are given.

  11. Sulfate Is Both a Substrate and an Activator of the Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel of Arabidopsis Hypocotyl Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Thomine, Sébastien; Colcombet, Jean; Guern, Jean; Barbier-Brygoo, Hélène

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the anion content of in vitro-cultured Arabidopsis plantlets, we explored the selectivity of the voltage-dependent anion channel of the plasma membrane of hypocotyl cells. In the whole-cell configuration, substitution of cytosolic Cl− by different anions led to the following sequence of relative permeabilities: NO3− (2.6) ≥ SO42− (2.0) > Cl− (1.0) > HCO3− (0.8) ≫ malate2− (0.03). Large whole-cell currents were measured for NO3− and SO42−, about five to six times higher than the equivalent Cl− currents. Since SO42− is usually considered to be a weakly permeant or non-permeant ion, the components of the large whole-cell current were explored in more detail. Aside from its permeation through the channel with a unitary conductance, about two-thirds that of Cl−, SO42− had a regulatory effect on channel activity by preventing the run-down of the anion current both in the whole-cell and the outside-out configuration, increasing markedly the whole-cell current. The fact that the voltage-dependent plasma membrane anion channel of hypocotyl cells can mediate large NO3− and SO42− currents and is regulated by nucleotides favors the idea that this anion channel can contribute to the cellular homeostasis of important metabolized anions. PMID:10482681

  12. Honeybee locomotion is impaired by Am-CaV3 low voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel antagonist.

    PubMed

    Rousset, M; Collet, C; Cens, T; Bastin, F; Raymond, V; Massou, I; Menard, C; Thibaud, J-B; Charreton, M; Vignes, M; Chahine, M; Sandoz, J C; Charnet, P

    2017-02-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels are key transducers of cellular excitability and participate in several crucial physiological responses. In vertebrates, 10 Ca(2+) channel genes, grouped in 3 families (CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3), have been described and characterized. Insects possess only one member of each family. These genes have been isolated in a limited number of species and very few have been characterized although, in addition to their crucial role, they may represent a collateral target for neurotoxic insecticides. We have isolated the 3 genes coding for the 3 Ca(2+) channels expressed in Apis mellifera. This work provides the first detailed characterization of the honeybee T-type CaV3 Ca(2+) channel and demonstrates the low toxicity of inhibiting this channel. Comparing Ca(2+) currents recorded in bee neurons and myocytes with Ca(2+) currents recorded in Xenopus oocytes expressing the honeybee CaV3 gene suggests native expression in bee muscle cells only. High-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels could be recorded in the somata of different cultured bee neurons. These functional data were confirmed by in situ hybridization, immunolocalization and in vivo analysis of the effects of a CaV3 inhibitor. The biophysical and pharmacological characterization and the tissue distribution of CaV3 suggest a role in honeybee muscle function.

  13. The Mechanism of Voltage Dependent Gating of the NaChBac Prokaryotic Sodium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaen, Paul G.

    Electrical signaling in cells depends on selective conductance of ions through membrane proteins called 'voltage gated ion channels'. These channels are characterized by their ability turn on and off the flow of ionic current by opening and closing their conductive pore in response to changes in membrane potential. The opening and closing of the pore is a mechanically linked to conformational movement of the positively charged fourth transmembrane segment (S4) in 'the voltage sensor' region. How the S4 moves in response to membrane potential is a controversial subject. In this thesis, we used the prokaryotic sodium channel NaChBac as our model sodium channel to study voltage dependent movement of the S4 in the voltage sensor. We use a disulfide-locking method where we introduced pairs of cysteines in the voltage sensor that crosslink and trap the S4 in its path after depolarization. We screened over one hundred mutations of the NaChBac channel in the whole cell patch clamp assay and demonstrated discrete and sequential voltage dependent ion pair interactions that occur in at least three states between the positively charged residues of the S4 segment and the acidic residues in the S1, S2 and S3 segments. In conjunction with structural modeling of the voltage sensor and our disulfide locking data, we propose that the S4 moves in and out of the plane of the membrane 8-13 A, forming distinct gating charge interactions with counter charges of the voltage sensor and adopts a 310 helix over a portion of its structure during activation. These findings are compatible with the sliding helix model and refine our understanding of the structural determinates of voltage sensor function in voltage gated ion channels.

  14. Testing and evaluation of stretching strain in clamped-clamped beams for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emad, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Mohamed A. E.; Ghoneima, Maged; Dessouky, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, evaluation of stretching strain capabilities to harvest energy from a piezoelectric clamped-clamped beam is theoretically modeled and experimentally tested. The utilization of stretching strain has many advantages as: elimination of any substrate material, and the simple electrode configuration. The doubly clamped structure exhibits a highly nonlinear frequency response (Hardening Duffing) that widens the bandwidth during the frequency up-ward sweep. The wide bandwidth makes it suitable for practical applications. A design of 53.5 {{mm}}3 (29.7 {{mm}}3 piezoelectric material + 23.8 {{mm}}3 proof mass) energy harvester was tested using PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) that can generate up to 15 μW from vibrations of 0.5{g} at 128 {Hz} and 2 MΩ load. The design can also generate up to 41 μ {{W}} from vibrations of 1{g} at 140 {Hz} and 2 MΩ load.

  15. Timing of umbilical cord clamping of term infants.

    PubMed

    Ceriani Cernadas, José María

    2017-04-01

    For at least over 200 years, multiple controversies have arisen around the timing of umbilical cord clamping. In the past decades, early cord clamping (within the first 15 seconds) had markedly prevailed. Only in the 21st century, randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the benefits of delayed cord clamping (at 2-3 minutes). Delayed cord clamping has been practiced in obstetrics based on the recommendations made by scientific societies and in systematic reviews, which have provided solid evidence to support this practice in term infants. This review describes the most relevant factors supporting the use of delayed cord clamping in term infants. It points out the essential role played by physiological mechanisms which, undoubtedly, allow us to understand the benefits of delayed cord clamping and advise us to wait for what nature has established. Other relevant aspects supporting delayed cord clamping are also described here.

  16. Functional segregation of voltage-activated calcium channels in motoneurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Garry; Lasser-Katz, Efrat; Simchovitz, Alon; Sharon, Ronit; Soreq, Hermona; Surmeier, D. James

    2015-01-01

    Calcium influx elevates mitochondrial oxidant stress (mOS) in dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurons that are prone to Lewy body pathologies in presymptomatic Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. In experimental PD models, treatment with isradipine, the dihydropyridine with the highest affinity to Cav1.3 channels, prevents subthreshold calcium influx via Cav1.3 channels into midbrain dopamine neurons and protects them from mOS. In DMV neurons, isradipine is also effective in reducing mOS despite overwhelming evidence that subthreshold calcium influx is negligible compared with spike-triggered influx. To solve this conundrum we combined slice electrophysiology, two-photon laser scanning microscopy, mRNA profiling, and computational modeling. We find that the unusually depolarized subthreshold voltage trajectory of DMV neurons is positioned between the relatively hyperpolarized activation curve of Cav1.3 channels and that of other high-voltage activated (HVA) calcium channels, thus creating a functional segregation between Cav1.3 and HVA calcium channels. The HVA channels flux the bulk of calcium during spikes but can only influence pacemaking through their coupling to calcium-activated potassium currents. In contrast, Cav1.3 currents, which we show to be more than an order-of-magnitude smaller than the HVA calcium currents, are able to introduce sufficient inward current to speed up firing. However, Kv4 channels that are constitutively open in the subthreshold range guarantee slow pacemaking, despite the depolarizing action of Cav1.3 and other pacemaking currents. We propose that the efficacy of isradipine in preventing mOS in DMV neurons arises from its mixed effect on Cav1.3 channels and on HVA Cav1.2 channels. PMID:26156385

  17. Functional segregation of voltage-activated calcium channels in motoneurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Garry; Lasser-Katz, Efrat; Simchovitz, Alon; Sharon, Ronit; Soreq, Hermona; Surmeier, D James; Goldberg, Joshua A

    2015-09-01

    Calcium influx elevates mitochondrial oxidant stress (mOS) in dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurons that are prone to Lewy body pathologies in presymptomatic Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. In experimental PD models, treatment with isradipine, the dihydropyridine with the highest affinity to Cav1.3 channels, prevents subthreshold calcium influx via Cav1.3 channels into midbrain dopamine neurons and protects them from mOS. In DMV neurons, isradipine is also effective in reducing mOS despite overwhelming evidence that subthreshold calcium influx is negligible compared with spike-triggered influx. To solve this conundrum we combined slice electrophysiology, two-photon laser scanning microscopy, mRNA profiling, and computational modeling. We find that the unusually depolarized subthreshold voltage trajectory of DMV neurons is positioned between the relatively hyperpolarized activation curve of Cav1.3 channels and that of other high-voltage activated (HVA) calcium channels, thus creating a functional segregation between Cav1.3 and HVA calcium channels. The HVA channels flux the bulk of calcium during spikes but can only influence pacemaking through their coupling to calcium-activated potassium currents. In contrast, Cav1.3 currents, which we show to be more than an order-of-magnitude smaller than the HVA calcium currents, are able to introduce sufficient inward current to speed up firing. However, Kv4 channels that are constitutively open in the subthreshold range guarantee slow pacemaking, despite the depolarizing action of Cav1.3 and other pacemaking currents. We propose that the efficacy of isradipine in preventing mOS in DMV neurons arises from its mixed effect on Cav1.3 channels and on HVA Cav1.2 channels.

  18. Patch Clamping Protoplasts from Vascular Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Elzenga, J. Theo M.; Keller, Christopher P.; Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for the isolation of protoplasts (Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Avena sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana) in preparation for ion flux studies using patch clamp electrophysiology. Protoplasts that have been exposed to hydrolytic, cell wall degrading, enzymes for as little as 5 minutes form gigaseals (seal resistance higher than 10 giga Ohm) with the patch pipette with success rates greater than 40%. Sealing of these protoplasts is fast, averaging less than 2 minutes. This method yields high rates of gigaseal formation in a variety of tissues from both monocots and dicots and will enhance data collection in ion flux studies of plasma membranes of vascular plants. PMID:16668586

  19. The Clamp Loader Assembles the β Clamp onto Either a 3′ or 5′ Primer Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mee Sook; O'Donnell, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Clamp loaders assemble sliding clamps onto 3′ primed sites for DNA polymerases. Clamp loaders are thought to be specific for a 3′ primed site, and unable to bind a 5′ site. We demonstrate here that the Escherichia coli γ complex clamp loader can load the β clamp onto a 5′ primed site, although with at least 20-fold reduced efficiency relative to loading at a 3′ primed site. Preferential clamp loading at a 3′ site does not appear to be due to DNA binding, as the clamp loader forms an avid complex with β at a 5′ site. Preferential loading at a 3′ versus a 5′ site occurs at the ATP hydrolysis step, needed to close the ring around DNA. We also address DNA structural features that are recognized for preferential loading at a 3′ site. Although the single-stranded template strand extends in opposite directions from 3′ and 5′ primed sites, thus making it a favorite candidate for distinguishing between 3′ and 5′ sites, the single-strand polarity at a primed template junction does not determine 3′ site selection for clamp loading. Instead, we find that clamp loader recognition of a 3′ site lies in the duplex portion of the primed site, not the single-strand portion. We present evidence that the β clamp facilitates its own loading specificity for a 3′ primed site. Implications to eukaryotic clamp loader complexes are proposed. PMID:19759020

  20. Synthesis of a CNT-grafted TiO(2) nanocatalyst and its activity triggered by a DC voltage.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chien-Sheng; Tseng, Yao-Hsuan; Lin, Hong-Ying; Huang, Chia-Hung; Shen, Chih-Yen; Li, Yuan-Yao; Ismat Shah, S; Huang, Chin-Pao

    2007-11-21

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted TiO(2) (CNT/TiO(2)) was synthesized as an electrically conductive catalyst that exhibits redox ability under electrical excitation besides ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The CNT/TiO(2) material was synthesized by a two-step process. Ni nanoparticles were photodeposited onto TiO(2) first. The Ni nanoparticles then served as seeds for the growth of CNTs using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of C(2)H(2). The CNT/TiO(2) nanocomposite exhibits strong oxidation activity toward NO gas molecules via both photocatalysis under UV irradiation and electrocatalysis under a DC voltage of 500 V in dark conditions.

  1. Influence of a voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter on the transient stability of power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Tang, Y. J.; Shi, J.; Chen, N.; Song, M.; Cheng, S. J.; Hu, Y.; Chen, X. S.

    2009-10-01

    We have proposed a voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL). In this paper, the influence of the SFCL on the transient stability of power system is investigated. For the typical one-machine infinite-bus system, the power-angle characteristics of generator with SFCL are studied in different working conditions, and the transient physical process is analyzed. Using MATLAB SIMULINK, the power-angle swing curves are simulated under different current-limiting modes, fault types and fault clearance times. The results show that the proposed SFCL can effectively reduce the transient swing amplitude of rotor and extend the critical clearance time under mode 1, compared with mode 2 and mode 3 having few effects on enhancing the transient stability.

  2. Voltage-gated potassium currents within the dorsal vagal nucleus: inhibition by BDS toxin.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Mark L; Morris, Neil P; Lewis, David I; Deuchars, Susan A; Deuchars, Jim

    2008-01-16

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential components of neuronal excitability. The Kv3.4 channel protein is widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS), where it can form heteromeric or homomeric Kv3 channels. Electrophysiological studies reported here highlight a functional role for this channel protein within neurons of the dorsal vagal nucleus (DVN). Current clamp experiments revealed that blood depressing substance (BDS) and intracellular dialysis of an anti-Kv3.4 antibody prolonged the action potential duration. In addition, a BDS sensitive, voltage-dependent, slowly inactivating outward current was observed in voltage clamp recordings from DVN neurons. Electrical stimulation of the solitary tract evoked EPSPs and IPSPs in DVN neurons and BDS increased the average amplitude and decreased the paired pulse ratio, consistent with a presynaptic site of action. This presynaptic modulation was action potential dependent as revealed by ongoing synaptic activity. Given the role of the Kv3 proteins in shaping neuronal excitability, these data highlight a role for homomeric Kv3.4 channels in spike timing and neurotransmitter release in low frequency firing neurons of the DVN.

  3. The ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate fungicide Mancozeb activates voltage-gated KCNQ2 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhu, Jin; Kong, Qingya; Jiang, Baifeng; Wan, Xia; Yue, Jinfeng; Li, Min; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jian; Gao, Zhaobing

    2013-06-07

    Mancozeb (manganese/zinc ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate) is an organometallic fungicide that has been associated with human neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. In a high-throughput screen for modulators of KCNQ2 channel, a fundamental player modulating neuronal excitability, Mancozeb, was found to significantly potentiate KCNQ2 activity. Mancozeb was validated electrophysiologically as a KCNQ2 activator with an EC50 value of 0.92±0.23μM. Further examination showed that manganese but not zinc ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate is the active component for the positive modulation effects. In addition, the compounds are effective when the metal ions are substituted by iron but lack potentiation activity when the metal ions are substituted by sodium, signifying the importance of the metal ion. However, the iron (Fe(3+)) alone, organic ligands alone or the mixture of iron with the organic ligand did not show any potentiation effect, suggesting as the active ingredient is a specific complex rather than two separate additive or synergistic components. Our study suggests that potentiation on KCNQ2 potassium channels might be the possible mechanism of Mancozeb toxicity in the nervous system.

  4. External copper inhibits the activity of the large-conductance calcium- and voltage-sensitive potassium channel from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morera, F J; Wolff, D; Vergara, C

    2003-03-01

    We have characterized the effect of external copper on the gating properties of the large-conductance calcium- and voltage-sensitive potassium channel from skeletal muscle, incorporated into artificial bilayers. The effect of Cu2+ was evaluated as changes in the gating kinetic properties of the channel after the addition of this ion. We found that, from concentrations of 20 microM and up, copper induced a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in channel open probability. The inhibition of channel activity by Cu2+ could not be reversed by washing or by addition of the copper chelator, bathocuproinedisulfonic acid. However, channel activity was appreciably restored by the sulfhydryl reducing agent dithiothreitol. The effect of copper was specific since other transition metal divalent cations such as Ni2+, Zn2+ or Cd2+ did not affect BK(Ca) channel activity in the same concentration range. These results suggest that external Cu2+-induced inhibition of channel activity was due to direct or indirect oxidation of key amino-acid sulfhydryl groups that might have a role in channel gating.

  5. Coordinated role of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Na+/H+ exchanger in sustaining microglial activation during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; Sonsalla, Patricia K; Richardson, Jason R

    2013-12-01

    Persistent neuroinflammation and microglial activation play an integral role in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. We investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) and Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHE) in the activation of immortalized microglial cells (BV-2) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. LPS (10 and 100 ng/ml) caused a dose- and time-dependent accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na(+))i] in BV-2 cells. Pre-treatment of cells with the VGSC antagonist tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 μM) abolished short-term Na(+) influx, but was unable to prevent the accumulation of (Na(+))i observed at 6 and 24h after LPS exposure. The NHE inhibitor cariporide (1 μM) significantly reduced accumulation of (Na(+))i 6 and 24h after LPS exposure. Furthermore, LPS increased the mRNA expression and protein level of NHE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced after co-treatment with TTX and/or cariporide. LPS increased production of TNF-α, ROS, and H2O2 and expression of gp91(phox), an active subunit of NADPH oxidase, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX or TTX+cariporide. Collectively, these data demonstrate a closely-linked temporal relationship between VGSC and NHE-1 in regulating function in activated microglia, which may provide avenues for therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing neuroinflammation.

  6. Laser-assisted patch clamping: a methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Laser microsurgery can be used to perform both cell biological manipulations, such as targeted cell ablation, and molecular genetic manipulations, such as genetic transformation and chromosome dissection. In this report, we describe a laser microsurgical method that can be used either to ablate single cells or to ablate a small area (1-3 microns diameter) of the extracellular matrix. In plants and microorganisms, the extracellular matrix consists of the cell wall. While conventional patch clamping of these cells, as well as of many animal cells, requires enzymatic digestion of the extracellular matrix, we illustrate that laser microsurgery of a portion of the wall enables patch clamp access to the plasma membrane of higher plant cells remaining situated in their tissue environment. What follows is a detailed description of the construction and use of an economical laser microsurgery system, including procedures for single cell and targeted cell wall ablation. This methodology will be of interest to scientists wishing to perform cellular or subcellular ablation with a high degree of accuracy, or wishing to study how the extracellular matrix affects ion channel function.

  7. Negligible substrate clamping effect on piezoelectric response in (111)-epitaxial tetragonal Pb(Zr, Ti)O{sub 3} films

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tomoaki; Yasumoto, Jun; Ito, Daisuke; Yoshino, Masahito; Nagasaki, Takanori; Sakata, Osami; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kiguchi, Takanori; Shiraishi, Takahisa; Shimizu, Takao; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2015-08-21

    The converse piezoelectric responses of (111)- and (001)-epitaxial tetragonal Pb(Zr{sub 0.35}Ti{sub 0.65})O{sub 3} [PZT] films were compared to investigate the orientation dependence of the substrate clamping effect. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and piezoelectric force microscopy revealed that the as-grown (111)-PZT film has a polydomain structure with normal twin boundaries that are changed by the poling process to inclined boundaries, as predicted by Romanov et al. [Phys. Status Solidi A 172, 225 (1999)]. Time-resolved synchrotron XRD under bias voltage showed the negligible impact of substrate clamping on the piezoelectric response in the (111)-PZT film, unlike the case for (001)-PZT film. The origin of the negligible clamping effect in the (111)-PZT film is discussed from the viewpoint of the elastic properties and the compensation of lattice distortion between neighboring domains.

  8. Negligible substrate clamping effect on piezoelectric response in (111)-epitaxial tetragonal Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Tomoaki; Yasumoto, Jun; Ito, Daisuke; Sakata, Osami; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kiguchi, Takanori; Shiraishi, Takahisa; Shimizu, Takao; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Masahito; Nagasaki, Takanori

    2015-08-01

    The converse piezoelectric responses of (111)- and (001)-epitaxial tetragonal Pb(Zr0.35Ti0.65)O3 [PZT] films were compared to investigate the orientation dependence of the substrate clamping effect. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and piezoelectric force microscopy revealed that the as-grown (111)-PZT film has a polydomain structure with normal twin boundaries that are changed by the poling process to inclined boundaries, as predicted by Romanov et al. [Phys. Status Solidi A 172, 225 (1999)]. Time-resolved synchrotron XRD under bias voltage showed the negligible impact of substrate clamping on the piezoelectric response in the (111)-PZT film, unlike the case for (001)-PZT film. The origin of the negligible clamping effect in the (111)-PZT film is discussed from the viewpoint of the elastic properties and the compensation of lattice distortion between neighboring domains.

  9. In Vivo Mesoscopic Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Brain Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Frank, Aaron; Wu, Yalun; Chen, Chao-Wei; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Functional mapping of brain activity is important in elucidating how neural networks operate in the living brain. The whisker sensory system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the central nervous system. Each facial whisker is represented by discrete modules of neurons all along the pathway leading to the neocortex. These modules are called “barrels” in layer 4 of the primary somatosensory cortex. Their location (approximately 300–500 μm below cortical surface) allows for convenient imaging of whisker-evoked neural activity in vivo. Fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) provides depth-resolved fluorescence molecular information with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Angled illumination and detection configurations can improve both resolution and penetration depth. We applied angled FLOT (aFLOT) to record 3D neural activities evoked in the whisker system of mice by deflection of a single whisker in vivo. A 100 μm capillary and a pair of microelectrodes were inserted to the mouse brain to test the capability of the imaging system. The results show that it is possible to obtain 3D functional maps of the sensory periphery in the brain. This approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other brain structures.

  10. In Vivo Mesoscopic Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Frank, Aaron; Wu, Yalun; Chen, Chao-wei; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Functional mapping of brain activity is important in elucidating how neural networks operate in the living brain. The whisker sensory system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the central nervous system. Each facial whisker is represented by discrete modules of neurons all along the pathway leading to the neocortex. These modules are called “barrels” in layer 4 of the primary somatosensory cortex. Their location (approximately 300–500 μm below cortical surface) allows for convenient imaging of whisker-evoked neural activity in vivo. Fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) provides depth-resolved fluorescence molecular information with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Angled illumination and detection configurations can improve both resolution and penetration depth. We applied angled FLOT (aFLOT) to record 3D neural activities evoked in the whisker system of mice by deflection of a single whisker in vivo. A 100 μm capillary and a pair of microelectrodes were inserted to the mouse brain to test the capability of the imaging system. The results show that it is possible to obtain 3D functional maps of the sensory periphery in the brain. This approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other brain structures. PMID:27125318

  11. Fast neutron activation analysis by means of low voltage neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M. E.

    A description of D-T neutron generator (NG) is presented. This machine can be used for fast neutron activation analysis applied to determine some selected elements, especially light elements, in different materials. Procedure of neutron flux determination and efficiency calculation is described. Examples of testing some Egyptian natural cosmetics are given.

  12. Low-Voltage-Activated CaV3.1 Calcium Channels Shape T Helper Cell Cytokine Profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyun; Zhang, Xuexin; Xue, Li; Xing, Juan; Jouvin, Marie-Hélène; Putney, James W; Anderson, Matthew P; Trebak, Mohamed; Kinet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-19

    Activation of T cells is mediated by the engagement of T cell receptors (TCRs) followed by calcium entry via store-operated calcium channels. Here we have shown an additional route for calcium entry into T cells-through the low-voltage-activated T-type CaV3.1 calcium channel. CaV3.1 mediated a substantial current at resting membrane potentials, and its deficiency had no effect on TCR-initiated calcium entry. Mice deficient for CaV3.1 were resistant to the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and had reduced productions of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by central nervous system (CNS)-infiltrating T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells. CaV3.1 deficiency led to decreased secretion of GM-CSF from in vitro polarized Th1 and Th17 cells. Nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) was also reduced in CaV3.1-deficient T cells. These data provide evidence for T-type channels in immune cells and their potential role in shaping the autoimmune response.

  13. Transcainide causes two modes of open-channel block with different voltage sensitivities in batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, G W; French, R J

    1994-01-01

    Transcainide, a complex derivative of lidocaine, blocks the open state of BTX-activated sodium channels from bovine heart and rat skeletal muscle in two distinct ways. When applied to either side of the membrane, transcainide caused discrete blocking events a few hundred milliseconds in duration (slow block), and a concomitant reduction in apparent single-channel amplitude, presumably because of rapid block beyond the temporal resolution of our recordings (fast block). We quantitatively analyzed block from the cytoplasmic side. Both modes of block occurred via binding of the drug to the open channel, approximately followed 1:1 stoichiometry, and were similar for both channel subtypes. For slow block, the blocking rate increased, and the unblocking rate decreased with depolarization, yielding an overall enhancement of block at positive potentials, and suggesting a blocking site at an apparent electrical distance about 45% of the way from the cytoplasmic end of the channel (z delta approximately 0.45). In contrast, the fast blocking mode was only slightly enhanced by depolarization (z delta approximately 0.15). Phenomenologically, the bulky and complex transcainide molecule combines the almost voltage-insensitive blocking action of phenylhydrazine (Zamponi and French, 1994a (companion paper)) with a slow open-channel blocking action that shows a voltage dependence typical of simpler amines. Only the slower blocking mode was sensitive to the removal of external sodium ions, suggesting that the two types of block occur at distinct sites. Dose-response relations were also consistent with independent binding of transcainide to two separate sites on the channel. PMID:7811913

  14. Testing of Diode-Clamping in an Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Martin, Adam K.; Hudgins, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Testing of a 5.5 kV silicon (Si) diode and 5.8 kV prototype silicon carbide (SiC) diode in an inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT) circuit was performed to obtain a comparison of the resulting circuit recapture efficiency,eta(sub r), defined as the percentage of the initial charge energy remaining on the capacitor bank after the diode interrupts the current. The diode was placed in a pulsed circuit in series with a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) switch, and the voltages across different components and current waveforms were collected over a range of capacitor charge voltages. Reverse recovery parameters, including turn-off time and peak reverse recovery current, were measured and capacitor voltage waveforms were used to determine the recapture efficiency for each case. The Si fast recovery diode in the circuit was shown to yield a recapture efficiency of up to 20% for the conditions tested, while the SiC diode further increased recapture efficiency to nearly 30%. The data presented show that fast recovery diodes operate on a timescale that permits them to clamp the discharge quickly after the first half cycle, supporting the idea that diode-clamping in IPPT circuit reduces energy dissipation that occurs after the first half cycle

  15. High Performance ZVT with Bus Clamping Modulation Technique for Single Phase Full Bridge Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yinglai; Ayyanar, Raja

    2016-03-20

    This paper proposes a topology based on bus clamping modulation and zero-voltage-transition (ZVT) technique to realize zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) for all the main switches of the full bridge inverters, and inherent ZVS and/or ZCS for the auxiliary switches. The advantages of the strategy include significant reduction in the turn-on loss of the ZVT auxiliary switches which typically account for a major part of the total loss in other ZVT circuits, and reduction in the voltage ratings of auxiliary switches. The modulation scheme and the commutation stages are analyzed in detail. Finally, a 1kW, 500 kHz switching frequency inverter of the proposed topology using SiC MOSFETs has been built to validate the theoretical analysis. The ZVT with bus clamping modulation technique of fixed timing and adaptive timing schemes are implemented in DSP TMS320F28335 resulting in full ZVS for the main switches in the full bridge inverter. The proposed scheme can save up to 33 % of the switching loss compared with no ZVT case.

  16. Bothriurus bonariensis scorpion venom activates voltage-dependent sodium channels in insect and mammalian nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Douglas Silva; Carvalho, Evelise Leis; de Lima, Jeferson Camargo; Breda, Ricardo Vaz; Oliveira, Raquel Soares; de Freitas, Thiago Carrazoni; Salamoni, Simone Denise; Domingues, Michelle Flores; Piovesan, Angela Regina; Boldo, Juliano Tomazzoni; de Assis, Dênis Reis; da Costa, Jaderson Costa; Dal Belo, Cháriston André; Pinto, Paulo Marcos

    2016-10-25

    Animal venoms have been widely recognized as a major source of biologically active molecules. Bothriurus bonariensis, popularly known as black scorpion, is the arthropod responsible for the highest number of accidents involving scorpion sting in Southern Brazil. Here we reported the first attempt to investigate the neurobiology of B. bonariensis venom (BBV) in the insect and mammalian nervous system. BBV (32 μg/g) induced a slow neuromuscular blockade in the in vivo cockroach nerve-muscle preparations (70 ± 4%, n = 6, p < 0.001), provoking repetitive twitches and significantly decreasing the frequency of spontaneous leg action potentials (SNCAPs) from 82 ± 3 min(-1) to 36 ± 1.3 min(-1) (n = 6, p < 0.05), without affecting the amplitude. When tested in primary cultures of rat hippocampal cells, BBV induced a massive increase of Ca(2+) influx (250 ± 1% peak increase, n = 3, p < 0.0001). The disturbance of calcium homeostasis induced by BBV on the mammalian central nervous system was not accompanied by cellular death and was prevented by the co-treatment of the hippocampal cells with tetrodotoxin, a selective sodium channel blocker. The results suggest that the biological activity of BBV is mostly related to a modulation of sodium channels function. Our biological activity survey suggests that BBV may have a promising insecticidal and therapeutic potential.

  17. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; Tomson, Neil C.; Anstey, Mitchell R.

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  18. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; ...

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  19. Rab3-interacting molecules 2α and 2β promote the abundance of voltage-gated CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels at hair cell active zones

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sangyong; Oshima-Takago, Tomoko; Chakrabarti, Rituparna; Wong, Aaron B.; Jing, Zhizi; Yamanbaeva, Gulnara; Picher, Maria Magdalena; Wojcik, Sonja M.; Göttfert, Fabian; Predoehl, Friederike; Michel, Katrin; Hell, Stefan W.; Schoch, Susanne; Strenzke, Nicola; Wichmann, Carolin; Moser, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ influx triggers the fusion of synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic active zone (AZ). Here we demonstrate a role of Ras-related in brain 3 (Rab3)–interacting molecules 2α and β (RIM2α and RIM2β) in clustering voltage-gated CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels at the AZs of sensory inner hair cells (IHCs). We show that IHCs of hearing mice express mainly RIM2α, but also RIM2β and RIM3γ, which all localize to the AZs, as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunohistochemistry, patch-clamp, fluctuation analysis, and confocal Ca2+ imaging demonstrate that AZs of RIM2α-deficient IHCs cluster fewer synaptic CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels, resulting in reduced synaptic Ca2+ influx. Using superresolution microscopy, we found that Ca2+ channels remained clustered in stripes underneath anchored ribbons. Electron tomography of high-pressure frozen synapses revealed a reduced fraction of membrane-tethered vesicles, whereas the total number of membrane-proximal vesicles was unaltered. Membrane capacitance measurements revealed a reduction of exocytosis largely in proportion with the Ca2+ current, whereas the apparent Ca2+ dependence of exocytosis was unchanged. Hair cell-specific deletion of all RIM2 isoforms caused a stronger reduction of Ca2+ influx and exocytosis and significantly impaired the encoding of sound onset in the postsynaptic spiral ganglion neurons. Auditory brainstem responses indicated a mild hearing impairment on hair cell-specific deletion of all RIM2 isoforms or global inactivation of RIM2α. We conclude that RIM2α and RIM2β promote a large complement of synaptic Ca2+ channels at IHC AZs and are required for normal hearing. PMID:26034270

  20. Development of voltage-dependent calcium, sodium, and potassium currents in Xenopus spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, D K; Ribera, A B; Spitzer, N C

    1988-03-01

    Action potentials of embryonic nerve and muscle cells often have a different ionic dependence and longer duration than those of mature cells. The action potential of spinal cord neurons from Xenopus laevis exhibits a prominent calcium component at early stages of development that diminishes with age as the impulse becomes principally sodium dependent. Whole-cell voltage-clamp analysis has been undertaken to characterize the changes in membrane currents during development of these neurons in culture. Four voltage-dependent currents of cells were identified and examined during the first day in vitro, when most of the change in the action potential occurs. There are no changes in the peak density of the calcium current (ICa), its voltage dependence, or time to half-maximal activation; a small increase in inactivation is apparent. The major change in sodium current (INa) is a 2-fold increase in its density. In addition, more subtle changes in the kinetics of the macroscopic sodium current were noted. The peak density of voltage-dependent potassium current (IKv) increases 3-fold, and this current becomes activated almost twice as fast. No changes were noted in the extent of its inactivation. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IKc) consists of an inactivating and a sustained component. The former increases 2-fold in peak current density, and the latter increases similarly at less depolarized voltages. The changes in these currents contribute to the decrease in duration and the change in ionic dependence of the impulse.

  1. A new role for AMP-activated protein kinase in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in late-stage embryonic retinal photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cathy C Y; Shi, Liheng; Lin, Chia-Hung; Kim, Andy Jeesu; Ko, Michael L; Ko, Gladys Y-P

    2015-11-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated when the intracellular ATP production decreases. The activities of AMPK display circadian rhythms in various organs and tissues, indicating that AMPK is involved in the circadian regulation of cellular metabolism. In vertebrate retina, the circadian clocks regulate many aspects of retinal function and physiology, including light/dark adaption, but whether and how AMPK was involved in the retinal circadian rhythm was not known. We hypothesized that the activation of AMPK (measured as phosphorylated AMPK) in the retina was under circadian control, and AMPK might interact with other intracellular signaling molecules to regulate photoreceptor physiology. We combined ATP assays, western blots, immunostaining, patch-clamp recordings, and pharmacological treatments to decipher the role of AMPK in the circadian regulation of photoreceptor physiology. We found that the overall retinal ATP content displayed a diurnal rhythm that peaked at early night, which was nearly anti-phase to the diurnal and circadian rhythms of AMPK phosphorylation. AMPK was also involved in the circadian phase-dependent regulation of photoreceptor L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs), the ion channel essential for sustained neurotransmitter release. The activation of AMPK dampened the L-VGCC currents at night with a corresponding decrease in protein expression of the L-VGCCα1 pore-forming subunit, while inhibition of AMPK increased the L-VGCC current during the day. AMPK appeared to be upstream of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) but downstream of adenylyl cyclase in regulating the circadian rhythm of L-VGCCs. Hence, as a cellular energy sensor, AMPK integrates into the cell signaling network to regulate the circadian rhythm of photoreceptor physiology. We found that in chicken embryonic retina, the activation of AMP-activated protein

  2. Re-visiting the trans insertion model for complexin clamping

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Shyam S; Li, Feng; Coleman, Jeff; Schauder, Curtis M; Kümmel, Daniel; Pincet, Frederic; Rothman, James E; Reinisch, Karin M

    2015-01-01

    We have previously proposed that complexin cross-links multiple pre-fusion SNARE complexes via a trans interaction to function as a clamp on SNARE-mediated neurotransmitter release. A recent NMR study was unable to detect the trans clamping interaction of complexin and therefore questioned the previous interpretation of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer and isothermal titration calorimetry data on which the trans clamping model was originally based. Here we present new biochemical data that underscore the validity of our previous interpretation and the continued relevancy of the trans insertion model for complexin clamping. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04463.001 PMID:25831964

  3. An Optimal Cell Detection Technique for Automated Patch Clamping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    While there are several hardware techniques for the automated patch clamping of cells that describe the equipment apparatus used for patch clamping, very few explain the science behind the actual technique of locating the ideal cell for a patch clamping procedure. We present a machine vision approach to patch clamping cell selection by developing an intelligent algorithm technique that gives the user the ability to determine the good cell to patch clamp in an image within one second. This technique will aid the user in determining the best candidates for patch clamping and will ultimately save time, increase efficiency and reduce cost. The ultimate goal is to combine intelligent processing with instrumentation and controls in order to produce a complete turnkey automated patch clamping system capable of accurately and reliably patch clamping cells with a minimum amount of human intervention. We present a unique technique that identifies good patch clamping cell candidates based on feature metrics of a cell's (x, y) position, major axis length, minor axis length, area, elongation, roundness, smoothness, angle of orientation, thinness and whether or not the cell is only particularly in the field of view. A patent is pending for this research.

  4. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, B. K.; Shepherd, S. D.; Pender, C. W.; Wood, B. E.

    1993-01-01

    Infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps from LDEF are described. The measurements were made using a hemiellipsoidal mirror reflectometer with interferometer for wavelengths between 2-15 microns. The tray clamps investigated were from locations about the entire spacecraft and provided the opportunity for comparing the effects of atomic oxygen at each location. Results indicate there was essentially no dependence on atomic oxygen fluence for the surfaces studied, but there did appear to be a slight dependence on solar radiation exposure. The reflectances of the front sides of the tray clamps consistently were slightly higher than for the protected rear tray clamp surfaces.

  5. Screening fluorescent voltage indicators with spontaneously spiking HEK cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeehae; Werley, Christopher A; Venkatachalam, Veena; Kralj, Joel M; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Cohen, Adam E

    2013-01-01

    Development of improved fluorescent voltage indicators is a key challenge in neuroscience, but progress has been hampered by the low throughput of patch-clamp characterization. We introduce a line of non-fluorescent HEK cells that stably express NaV 1.3 and KIR 2.1 and generate spontaneous electrical action potentials. These cells enable rapid, electrode-free screening of speed and sensitivity of voltage sensitive dyes or fluorescent proteins on a standard fluorescence microscope. We screened a small library of mutants of archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch) in spiking HEK cells and identified two mutants with greater voltage-sensitivity than found in previously published Arch voltage indicators.

  6. Nanoindentation characteristics of clamped freestanding Cu membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong Hong; Fang, Te-Hua; Kang, Shao-Hui; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2007-04-04

    This research employed instrumented nanoindentation to address the issue of bending to stretching-induced deformation of clamped freestanding Cu membranes. The experimental results show that indentation-induced plastic deformation only comes into effect at the centre and the indented edge of the Cu membrane when the indenter is applied, while the other locations remain undamaged. A step-by-step evolution was presumed for the time histories of the bending to stretching-induced deformation and for the timing of the significant change in slope of the load-deflection curve. Deformation was deliberately introduced at the transition from the single-point bending indentation to the surface stretching indentation at the impact location touched with the indenter. Good elastic recovery was found at locations away from the indenter. A similar finding can be arrived at by means of finite element analysis.

  7. Pipe lifting hook having clamp assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Codner, J.A.

    1984-06-12

    A pipe lifting hook is provided having a generally ''C'' shaped hook member having an elongated lower portion being insertable within the end of a joint of pipe and having an upper portion positionable above the pipe and provided with lifting connection means. The hook member is frictionally clamped to the pipe by grip shoe means that is movably supported by the upper portion of the hook member and is selectably movable from a released position out of contact with said pipe to a locked position in frictional locking engagement with the outer surface of the pipe. A ratchet mechanism couples said grip shoe means to the upper portion of the hook member and is manually positionable to lock said grip shoe means at said locked position or release said grip shoe means for movement toward said released position thereof.

  8. Direct GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition of the substantia gelatinosa from the rostral ventromedial medulla revealed by in vivo patch-clamp analysis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Go; Yasaka, Toshiharu; Katafuchi, Toshihiko; Furue, Hidemasa; Mizuno, Masaharu; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Yoshimura, Megumu

    2006-02-08

    Stimulation of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) is believed to exert analgesic effects through the activation of the serotonergic system descending to the spinal dorsal horn; however, how nociceptive transmission is modulated by the descending system has not been fully clarified. To investigate the inhibitory mechanisms affected by the RVM, an in vivo patch-clamp technique was used to record IPSCs from the substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the spinal cord evoked by chemical (glutamate injection) and electrical stimulation (ES) of the RVM in adult rats. In the voltage-clamp mode, the RVM glutamate injection and RVM-ES produced an increase in both the frequency and amplitude of IPSCs in SG neurons that was not blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists. Serotonin receptor antagonists were unexpectedly without effect, but a GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, or a glycine receptor antagonist, strychnine, completely suppressed the RVM stimulation-induced increase in IPSCs. The RVM-ES-evoked IPSCs showed fixed latency and no failure at 20 Hz stimuli with a conduction velocity of >3 m/s (3.1-20.7 m/s), suggesting descending monosynaptic GABAergic and/or glycinergic inputs from the RVM to the SG through myelinated fibers. In the current-clamp mode, action potentials elicited by noxious mechanical stimuli applied to the receptive field of the ipsilateral hindlimb were suppressed by the RVM-ES in more than half of the neurons tested (63%; 10 of 16). These findings suggest that the RVM-mediated antinociceptive effects on noxious inputs to the SG may be exerted preferentially by the direct GABAergic and glycinergic pathways to the SG.

  9. CaV2.1 voltage activated calcium channels and synaptic transmission in familial hemiplegic migraine pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Uchitel, Osvaldo D; Inchauspe, Carlota González; Urbano, Francisco J; Di Guilmi, Mariano N

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the genetic forms of epilepsy, chronic pain, and migraine caused by mutations in ion channels have given crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms, pathogenesis, and therapeutic approaches to complex neurological disorders. In this review we focus on the role of mutated CaV2.1 (i.e., P/Q-type) voltage-activated Ca2+ channels, and on the ultimate consequences that mutations causing familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 (FHM1) have in neurotransmitter release. Transgenic mice harboring the human pathogenic FHM1 mutation R192Q or S218L (KI) have been used as models to study neurotransmission at several central and peripheral synapses. FHM1 KI mice are a powerful tool to explore presynaptic regulation associated with expression of CaV2.1 channels. Mutated CaV2.1 channels activate at more hyperpolarizing potentials and lead to a gain-of-function in synaptic transmission. This gain-of-function might underlie alterations in the excitatory/ inhibitory balance of synaptic transmission, favoring a persistent state of hyperexcitability in cortical neurons that would increase the susceptibility for cortical spreading depression (CSD), a mechanism believed to initiate the attacks of migraine with aura.

  10. Patch-clamp array with on-chip electronics, optics, flow control and mechanical actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Okandan, Murat; Draper, Bruce Leroy; Mani, Seethambal S.

    2003-07-01

    Fast and quantitative analysis of cellular activity, signaling and responses to external stimuli is a crucial capability and it has been the goal of several projects focusing on patch clamp measurements. To provide the maximum functionality and measurement options, we have developed a patch clamp array device that incorporates on-chip electronics, mechanical, optical and microfluidic coupling as well as cell localization through fluid flow. The preliminary design, which integrated microfluidics, electrodes and optical access, was fabricated and tested. In addition, new designs which further combine mechanical actuation, on-chip electronics and various electrode materials with the previous designs are currently being fabricated.

  11. A Novel NaV1.5 Voltage Sensor Mutation Associated with Severe Atrial and Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Gang; Zhu, Wandi; Kanter, Ronald J.; Silva, Jonathan R.; Honeywell, Christina; Gow, Robert M.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Inherited autosomal dominant mutations in cardiac sodium channels (NaV1.5) cause various arrhythmias, such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome. Although dozens of mutations throughout the protein have been reported, there are few reported mutations within a voltage sensor S4 transmembrane segment and few that are homozygous. Here we report analysis of a novel lidocaine-sensitive recessive mutation, p.R1309H, in the NaV1.5 DIII/S4 voltage sensor in a patient with a complex arrhythmia syndrome. Methods and Results We expressed the wild type or mutant NaV1.5 heterologously for analysis with the patch-clamp and voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) techniques. p.R1309H depolarized the voltage-dependence of activation, hyperpolarized the voltage-dependence of inactivation, and slowed recovery from inactivation, thereby reducing the channel availability at physiologic membrane potentials. Additionally, p.R1309H increased the “late” Na+ current. The location of the mutation in DIIIS4 prompted testing for a gating pore current. We observed an inward current at hyperpolarizing voltages that likely exacerbates the loss-of-function defects at resting membrane potentials. Lidocaine reduced the gating pore current. Conclusions The p.R1309H homozygous NaV1.5 mutation conferred both gain-of-function and loss-of-function effects on NaV1.5 channel activity. Reduction of a mutation-induced gating pore current by lidocaine suggested a therapeutic mechanism. PMID:26801742

  12. Niflumic Acid Alters Gating of HCN2 Pacemaker Channels by Interaction with the Outer Region of S4 Voltage Sensing Domains

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lan; Sanguinetti, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Niflumic acid, 2-{[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino}pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (NFA), is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modifies the gating of many ion channels. Here, we investigated the effects of NFA on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) pacemaker channels expressed in X. laevis oocytes using site-directed mutagenesis and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Extracellular NFA acted rapidly and caused a slowing of activation and deactivation and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of HCN2 channel activation (-24.5 ± 1.2 mV at 1 mM). Slowed channel gating and reduction of current magnitude was marked in oocytes treated with NFA, while clamped at 0 mV but minimal in oocytes clamped at -100 mV, indicating the drug preferentially interacts with channels in the closed state. NFA at 0.1 to 3 mM shifted the half-point for channel activation in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC50 of 0.54 ± 0.068 mM and a predicted maximum shift of -38 mV. NFA at 1 mM also reduced maximum HCN2 conductance by ∼20%, presumably by direct block of the pore. The rapid onset and state-dependence of NFA-induced changes in channel gating suggests an interaction with the extracellular region of the S4 transmembrane helix, the primary voltage-sensing domain of HCN2. Neutralization (by mutation to Gln) of any three of the outer four basic charged residues in S4, but not single mutations, abrogated the NFA-induced shift in channel activation. We conclude that NFA alters HCN2 gating by interacting with the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor domains. PMID:19218366

  13. Niflumic acid alters gating of HCN2 pacemaker channels by interaction with the outer region of S4 voltage sensing domains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lan; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2009-05-01

    Niflumic acid, 2-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (NFA), is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modifies the gating of many ion channels. Here, we investigated the effects of NFA on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) pacemaker channels expressed in X. laevis oocytes using site-directed mutagenesis and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Extracellular NFA acted rapidly and caused a slowing of activation and deactivation and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of HCN2 channel activation (-24.5 +/- 1.2 mV at 1 mM). Slowed channel gating and reduction of current magnitude was marked in oocytes treated with NFA, while clamped at 0 mV but minimal in oocytes clamped at -100 mV, indicating the drug preferentially interacts with channels in the closed state. NFA at 0.1 to 3 mM shifted the half-point for channel activation in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC(50) of 0.54 +/- 0.068 mM and a predicted maximum shift of -38 mV. NFA at 1 mM also reduced maximum HCN2 conductance by approximately 20%, presumably by direct block of the pore. The rapid onset and state-dependence of NFA-induced changes in channel gating suggests an interaction with the extracellular region of the S4 transmembrane helix, the primary voltage-sensing domain of HCN2. Neutralization (by mutation to Gln) of any three of the outer four basic charged residues in S4, but not single mutations, abrogated the NFA-induced shift in channel activation. We conclude that NFA alters HCN2 gating by interacting with the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor domains.

  14. Electrodic voltages in the presence of dissolved sulfide: Implications for monitoring natural microbial activity

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, L.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Yee, N.; O'Brien, M.; Zhang, C.; Williams, K. H.

    2008-10-01

    There is growing interest in the development of new monitoring strategies for obtaining spatially extensive data diagnostic of microbial processes occurring in the earth. Open-circuit potentials arising from variable redox conditions in the fluid local-to-electrode surfaces (electrodic potentials) were recorded for a pair of silver-silver chloride electrodes in a column experiment, whereby a natural wetland soil containing a known community of sulfate reducers was continuously fed with a sulfate-rich nutrient medium. Measurements were made between five electrodes equally spaced along the column and a reference electrode placed on the column inflow. The presence of a sulfate reducing microbial population, coupled with observations of decreasing sulfate levels, formation of black precipitate (likely iron sulfide),elevated solid phase sulfide, and a characteristic sulfurous smell, suggest microbial-driven sulfate reduction (sulfide generation) in our column. Based on the known sensitivity of a silver electrode to dissolved sulfide concentration, we interpret the electrodic potentials approaching 700 mV recorded in this experiment as an indicator of the bisulfide (HS-) concentration gradients in the column. The measurement of the spatial and temporal variation in these electrodic potentials provides a simple and rapid method for monitoring patterns of relative HS- concentration that are indicative of the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Our measurements have implications both for the autonomous monitoring of anaerobic microbial processes in the subsurface and the performance of self-potential electrodes, where it is critical to isolate, and perhaps quantify, electrochemical interfaces contributing to observed potentials.

  15. Characterization of a voltage-dependent conductance in the basolateral membrane of leech skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schnizler, M; Clauss, W

    1998-05-01

    Voltage clamp studies were performed on the dorsal integument of Hirudo medicinalis. Under apical calcium-free conditions an inward-directed component of transepithelial current was activated by changes of transepithelial voltage. Depolarization caused up to 50% increase of the transepithelial sodium current. Hyperpolarization had no comparable effects. With calcium (1.8 mM) or amiloride (100 microM) in the apical solution and in sodium-free solutions the inward-directed current failed to increase after depolarization. Activation also occurred under chloride-free conditions. Permeabilization of the apical membrane by nystatin (5 microM) increased the current activation significantly. After nystatin, calcium as well as amiloride lost their inhibitory effects. This indicates a basolateral localization of the voltage-dependent conductance. Vesicle insertion or cytoskeletal structures are probably not involved in regulation, as seen by the lack of effects of brefeldin A and the cytochalasins B and D. However, serosal hyposmolar solutions (170 mosmol.1(-1)) caused a reinforced activation of the current. Our results indicate a voltage-dependent conductance in a tight sodium-absorbing epithelium.

  16. Voltage-dependent K channels in protoplasts of trap-lobe cells of Dionaea muscipula.

    PubMed

    Iijima, T; Hagiwara, S

    1987-01-01

    The outward rectification of the K+ current in mesophyll cell protoplasts from trap-lobes of Dionaea muscipula was studied with the patch-clamp technique. The rectification had instantaneous and time-dependent components. Changes in [K+]i strongly affected the conductance voltage relation of the plasma membrane while changes in [K+]o had little effect on the relation. Thus, the outward rectification depends on the membrane voltage and the concentration of intracellular K+. Corresponding single-channel activities were observed both in the intact membrane (cell-attached recording) and in excised patches. The single-channel conductance was about 3.3 pS with symmetrical solutions containing 30 mM K+.

  17. Suppression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and neuronal excitability by imperatorin.

    PubMed

    Wu, King-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Hung; Cheng, Ka-Shun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yang, Chin-Tsang; Wong, Kar-Lok; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Chan, Paul; Leung, Yuk-Man

    2013-12-05

    Imperatorin is a naturally occurring furocoumarin compound isolated from plants such as Angelica archangelica and Cnidium monnieri. It has multiple pharmacological effects including anticonvulsant effects. Here we determined the effects of imperatorin on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSC) using whole-cell patch clamp techniques in differentiated neuronal NG108-15 cells. We showed that imperatorin inhibited VGSC; such inhibition did not show state-dependence. Imperatorin caused a left shift in the steady-state inactivation curve without affecting activation gating. The inhibition of VGSC by imperatorin displayed a mild frequency-dependence. Imperatorin was also shown to inhibit VGSC and action potential amplitude without affecting voltage-gated K(+) channels in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that imperatorin dampens neuronal excitability by inhibiting VGSC.

  18. Structure-function analysis of the C-clamp of TCF/Pangolin in Wnt/ß-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Aditi J; Ravindranath, Aditi; Cadigan, Ken M

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Wnt/ß-catenin (Wnt/ß-cat) pathway plays an important role in animal development in metazoans. Many Wnt targets are regulated by members of the TCF/LEF1 (TCF) family of transcription factors. All TCFs contain a High Mobility Group (HMG) domain that bind specific DNA sequences. Invertebrate TCFs and some vertebrate TCF isoforms also contain another domain, called the C-clamp, which allows TCFs to recognize an additional DNA motif known as the Helper site. While the C-clamp has been shown to be important for regulating several Wnt reporter genes in cell culture, its physiological role in regulating Wnt targets is less clear. In addition, little is known about this domain, except that two of the four conserved cysteines are functionally important. Here, we carried out a systematic mutagenesis and functional analysis of the C-clamp from the Drosophila TCF/Pangolin (TCF/Pan) protein. We found that the C-clamp is a zinc-binding domain that is sufficient for binding to the Helper site. In addition to this DNA-binding activity, the C-clamp also inhibits the HMG domain from binding its cognate DNA site. Point mutations were identified that specifically affected DNA-binding or reduced the inhibitory effect. These mutants were characterized in TCF/Pan rescue assays. The specific DNA-binding activity of the C-clamp was essential for TCF/Pan function in cell culture and in patterning the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila, demonstrating the importance of this C-clamp activity in regulating Wnt target gene expression. In contrast, the inhibitory mutation had a subtle effect in cell culture and no effect on TCF/Pan activity in embryos. These results provide important information about the functional domains of the C-clamp, and highlight its importance for Wnt/ß-cat signaling in Drosophila.

  19. The PCNA-RFC families of DNA clamps and clamp loaders.

    PubMed

    Majka, Jerzy; Burgers, Peter M J

    2004-01-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen PCNA functions at multiple levels in directing DNA metabolic pathways. Unbound to DNA, PCNA promotes localization of replication factors with a consensus PCNA-binding domain to replication factories. When bound to DNA, PCNA organizes various proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA modification, and chromatin modeling. Its modification by ubiquitin directs the cellular response to DNA damage. The ring-like PCNA homotrimer encircles double-stranded DNA and slides spontaneously across it. Loading of PCNA onto DNA at template-primer junctions is performed in an ATP-dependent process by replication factor C (RFC), a heteropentameric AAA+ protein complex consisting of the Rfc1, Rfc2, Rfc3, Rfc4, and Rfc5 subunits. Loading of yeast PCNA (POL30) is mechanistically distinct from analogous processes in E. coli (beta subunit by the gamma complex) and bacteriophage T4 (gp45 by gp44/62). Multiple stepwise ATP-binding events to RFC are required to load PCNA onto primed DNA. This stepwise mechanism should permit editing of this process at individual steps and allow for divergence of the default process into more specialized modes. Indeed, alternative RFC complexes consisting of the small RFC subunits together with an alternative Rfc1-like subunit have been identified. A complex required for the DNA damage checkpoint contains the Rad24 subunit, a complex required for sister chromatid cohesion contains the Ctf18 subunit, and a complex that aids in genome stability contains the Elg1 subunit. Only the RFC-Rad24 complex has a known associated clamp, a heterotrimeric complex consisting of Rad17, Mec3, and Ddc1. The other putative clamp loaders could either act on clamps yet to be identified or act on the two known clamps.

  20. The magnitudes of hyperpolarization-activated and low-voltage-activated potassium currents co-vary in neurons of the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiao-Jie; Oertel, Donata

    2011-08-01

    In the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), neurons have hyperpolarization-activated conductances, which in some cells are enormous, that contribute to the ability of neurons to convey acoustic information in the timing of their firing by decreasing the input resistance and speeding-up voltage changes. Comparisons of the electrophysiological properties of neurons in the VCN of mutant mice that lack the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel α subunit 1 (HCN1(-/-)) (Nolan et al. 2003) with wild-type controls (HCN1(+/+)) and with outbred ICR mice reveal that octopus, T stellate, and bushy cells maintain their electrophysiological distinctions in all strains. Hyperpolarization-activated (I(h)) currents were smaller and slower, input resistances were higher, and membrane time constants were longer in HCN1(-/-) than in HCN1(+/+) in octopus, bushy, and T stellate cells. There were significant differences in the average magnitudes of I(h), input resistances, and time constants between HCN1(+/+) and ICR mice, but the resting potentials did not differ between strains. I(h) is opposed by a low-voltage-activated potassium (I(KL)) current in bushy and octopus cells, whose magnitudes varied widely between neuronal types and between strains. The magnitudes of I(h) and I(KL) were correlated across neuronal types and across mouse strains. Furthermore, these currents balanced one another at the resting potential in individual cells. The magnitude of I(h) and I(KL) is linked in bushy and octopus cells and varies not only between HCN1(-/-) and HCN1(+/+) but also between "wild-type" strains of mice, raising the question to what extent the wild-type strains reflect normal mice.

  1. The magnitudes of hyperpolarization-activated and low-voltage-activated potassium currents co-vary in neurons of the ventral cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiao-Jie

    2011-01-01

    In the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), neurons have hyperpolarization-activated conductances, which in some cells are enormous, that contribute to the ability of neurons to convey acoustic information in the timing of their firing by decreasing the input resistance and speeding-up voltage changes. Comparisons of the electrophysiological properties of neurons in the VCN of mutant mice that lack the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel α subunit 1 (HCN1−/−) (Nolan et al. 2003) with wild-type controls (HCN1+/+) and with outbred ICR mice reveal that octopus, T stellate, and bushy cells maintain their electrophysiological distinctions in all strains. Hyperpolarization-activated (Ih) currents were smaller and slower, input resistances were higher, and membrane time constants were longer in HCN1−/− than in HCN1+/+ in octopus, bushy, and T stellate cells. There were significant differences in the average magnitudes of Ih, input resistances, and time constants between HCN1+/+ and ICR mice, but the resting potentials did not differ between strains. Ih is opposed by a low-voltage-activated potassium (IKL) current in bushy and octopus cells, whose magnitudes varied widely between neuronal types and between strains. The magnitudes of Ih and IKL were correlated across neuronal types and across mouse strains. Furthermore, these currents balanced one another at the resting potential in individual cells. The magnitude of Ih and IKL is linked in bushy and octopus cells and varies not only between HCN1−/− and HCN1+/+ but also between “wild-type” strains of mice, raising the question to what extent the wild-type strains reflect normal mice. PMID:21562186

  2. Space Life Sciences Directorate's Position on the Physiological Effects of Exposing the Crewmemeber to Low-Voltage Electrical Hazards During Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Kramer, Leonard; Mikatarian, Ron; Polk, James; Duncan, Michael; Koontz, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The models predict that, for low voltage exposures in the space suit, physiologically active current could be conducted across the crew member causing catastrophic hazards. Future work with Naval Health Research Center Detachment Directed Energy Bio-effects Laboratory is being proposed to analyze additional current paths across the human torso and upper limbs. These models may need to be verified with human studies.

  3. Antillatoxin, a novel lipopeptide, enhances neurite outgrowth in immature cerebrocortical neurons through activation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Jabba, S V; Prakash, A; Dravid, S M; Gerwick, W H; Murray, T F

    2010-03-01

    Antillatoxin (ATX) is a structurally novel lipopeptide that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) leading to sodium influx in cerebellar granule neurons and cerebrocortical neurons 8 to 9 days in vitro (Li et al., 2001; Cao et al., 2008). However, the precise recognition site for ATX on the VGSC remains to be defined. Inasmuch as elevation of intracellular sodium ([Na(+)](i)) may increase N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated Ca(2+) influx, Na(+) may function as a signaling molecule. We hypothesized that ATX may enhance neurite outgrowth in cerebrocortical neurons by elevating [Na(+)](i) and augmenting NMDAR function. ATX (30-100 nM) robustly stimulated neurite outgrowth, and this enhancement was sensitive to the VGSC antagonist, tetrodotoxin. To unambiguously demonstrate the enhancement of NMDA receptor function by ATX, we recorded single-channel currents from cell-attached patches. ATX was found to increase the open probability of NMDA receptors. Na(+)-dependent up-regulation of NMDAR function has been shown to be regulated by Src family kinase (SFK) (Yu and Salter, 1998). The Src kinase inhibitor PP2 abrogated ATX-enhanced neurite outgrowth, suggesting a SFK involvement in this response. ATX-enhanced neurite outgrowth was also inhibited by the NMDAR antagonist, (5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801), and the calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibitor, 1,8-naphthoylene benzimidazole-3-carboxylic acid (STO-609), demonstrating the requirement for NMDAR activation with subsequent downstream engagement of the Ca(2+)-dependent CaMKK pathway. These results with the structurally and mechanistically novel natural product, ATX, confirm and generalize our earlier results with a neurotoxin site 5 ligand. These data suggest that VGSC activators may represent a novel pharmacological strategy to regulate neuronal plasticity through NMDAR-dependent mechanisms.

  4. Mild Alkalization Acutely Triggers the Warburg Effect by Enhancing Hexokinase Activity via Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Won; Moon, Seung Hwan; Cho, Young Seok; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2016-01-01

    To fully understand the glycolytic behavior of cancer cells, it is important to recognize how it is linked to pH dynamics. Here, we evaluated the acute effects of mild acidification and alkalization on cancer cell glucose uptake and glycolytic flux and investigated the role of hexokinase (HK). Cancer cells exposed to buffers with graded pH were measured for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, lactate production and HK activity. Subcellular localization of HK protein was assessed by western blots and confocal microscopy. The interior of T47D breast cancer cells was mildly alkalized to pH 7.5 by a buffer pH of 7.8, and this was accompanied by rapid increases of FDG uptake and lactate extrusion. This shift toward glycolytic flux led to the prompt recovery of a reversed pH gradient. In contrast, mild acidification rapidly reduced cellular FDG uptake and lactate production. Mild acidification decreased and mild alkalization increased mitochondrial HK translocation and enzyme activity. Cells transfected with specific siRNA against HK-1, HK-2 and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)1 displayed significant attenuation of pH-induced changes in FDG uptake. Confocal microscopy showed increased co-localization of HK-1 and HK-2 with VDAC1 by alkaline treatment. In isolated mitochondria, acidic pH increased and alkaline pH decreased release of free HK-1 and HK-2 from the mitochondrial pellet into the supernatant. Furthermore, experiments using purified proteins showed that alkaline pH promoted co-immunoprecipitation of HK with VDAC protein. These findings demonstrate that mild alkalization is sufficient to acutely trigger cancer cell glycolytic flux through enhanced activity of HK by promoting its mitochondrial translocation and VDAC binding. This process might serve as a mechanism through which cancer cells trigger the Warburg effect to maintain a dysregulated pH. PMID:27479079

  5. PIP2 in pancreatic β-cells regulates voltage-gated calcium channels by a voltage-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Lizbeth; Puente, Erika I; Reyes-Vaca, Arturo; Arenas, Isabel; Garduño, Julieta; Bravo-Martínez, Jorge; Garcia, David E

    2016-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a membrane phosphoinositide that regulates the activity of many ion channels. Influx of calcium primarily through voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels promotes insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. However, whether CaV channels are regulated by PIP2, as is the case for some non-insulin-secreting cells, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CaV channels are regulated by PIP2 depletion in pancreatic β-cells through activation of a muscarinic pathway induced by oxotremorine methiodide (Oxo-M). CaV channel currents were recorded by the patch-clamp technique. The CaV current amplitude was reduced by activation of the muscarinic receptor 1 (M1R) in the absence of kinetic changes. The Oxo-M-induced inhibition exhibited the hallmarks of voltage-independent regulation and did not involve PKC activation. A small fraction of the Oxo-M-induced CaV inhibition was diminished by a high concentration of Ca(2+) chelator, whereas ≥50% of this inhibition was prevented by diC8-PIP2 dialysis. Localization of PIP2 in the plasma membrane was examined by transfecting INS-1 cells with PH-PLCδ1, which revealed a close temporal association between PIP2 hydrolysis and CaV channel inhibition. Furthermore, the depletion of PIP2 by a voltage-sensitive phosphatase reduced CaV currents in a way similar to that observed following M1R activation. These results indicate that activation of the M1R pathway inhibits the CaV channel via PIP2 depletion by a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism in pancreatic β- and INS-1 cells and thereby support the hypothesis that membrane phospholipids regulate ion channel activity by interacting with ion channels.

  6. The α2δ-1 subunit remodels CaV1.2 voltage sensors and allows Ca2+ influx at physiological membrane potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Antonios; Sigg, Daniel; Weiss, James N.; Neely, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Excitation-evoked calcium influx across cellular membranes is strictly controlled by voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV), which possess four distinct voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) that direct the opening of a central pore. The energetic interactions between the VSDs and the pore are critical for tuning the channel’s voltage dependence. The accessory α2δ-1 subunit is known to facilitate CaV1.2 voltage-dependent activation, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, using voltage clamp fluorometry, we track the activation of the four individual VSDs in a human L-type CaV1.2 channel consisting of α1C and β3 subunits. We find that, without α2δ-1, the channel complex displays a right-shifted voltage dependence such that currents mainly develop at nonphysiological membrane potentials because of very weak VSD–pore interactions. The presence of α2δ-1 facilitates channel activation by increasing the voltage sensitivity (i.e., the effective charge) of VSDs I–III. Moreover, the α2δ-1 subunit also makes VSDs I–III more efficient at opening the channel by increasing the coupling energy between VSDs II and III and the pore, thus allowing Ca influx within the range of physiological membrane potentials. PMID:27481713

  7. Steroid hormone regulation of the voltage-gated, calcium-activated potassium channel expression in developing muscular and neural systems.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Sheldon L; Witten, Jane L

    2010-11-01

    A precise organization of gene expression is required for developing neural and muscular systems. Steroid hormones can control the expression of genes that are critical for development. In this study we test the hypothesis that the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates gene expression of the voltage-gated calcium-activated potassium ion channel, Slowpoke or KCNMA1. Late in adult development of the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, slowpoke (msslo) levels increased contributing to the maturation of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs) and CNS. We show that critical components of ecdysteroid gene regulation were present during upreglation of msslo in late adult DLM and CNS development. Ecdysteroid receptor complex heterodimeric partner proteins, the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP), and the ecdysone-induced early gene, msE75B, were expressed at key developmental time points, suggesting that ecdysteroids direct aspects of gene expression in the DLMs during these late developmental stages. We provide evidence that ecdysteroids suppress msslo transcription in the DLMs; when titers decline msslo transcript levels increase. These results are consistent with msslo being a downstream gene in an ecdysteroid-mediated gene cascade during DLM development. We also show that the ecdysteroids regulate msslo transcript levels in the developing CNS. These results will contribute to our understanding of how the spatiotemporal regulation of slowpoke transcription contributes to tailoring cell excitability to the differing physiological and behavioral demands during development.

  8. Nonreduction-Active Hole-Transporting Layers Enhancing Open-Circuit Voltage and Efficiency of Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiefeng; Jiang, Fangyuan; Qin, Fei; Meng, Wei; Jiang, Youyu; Xiong, Sixing; Tong, Jinhui; Li, Zaifang; Liu, Yun; Zhou, Yinhua

    2016-12-14

    Inverted planar perovskite solar cells using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as the hole-transporting layer (HTL) are very attractive because of their low-temperature and easy processing. However, the planar cells with the PEDOT:PSS HTL typically display lower open-circuit voltage (VOC) (about 0.90 V) than that of devices with TiO2-based conventional structure (1.0-1.1 V). The underlying reasons are still not clear. In this work, we report the PEDOT:PSS that is intrinsically p-doped can be chemically reduced by methylamine iodide (MAI) and MAPbI3. The reaction reduces the work function (WF) of PEDOT:PSS, which suppresses the efficient hole collection and yields lower VOC. To overcome this issue, we adopt undoped semiconducting polymers that are intrinsically nonreduction-active (NRA) as the HTL for inverted planar perovskite solar cells. The cells display enhanced VOC from 0.88 ± 0.04 V (PEDOT:PSS HTL, reference cells) to 1.02 ± 0.03 V (P3HT HTL) and 1.04 ± 0.03 V (PTB7 and PTB-Th HTL). The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the devices with these NRA HTL reaches about 17%.

  9. Spexin Enhances Bowel Movement through Activating L-type Voltage-dependent Calcium Channel via Galanin Receptor 2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-yuan; Zhang, Man; Huang, Tao; Yang, Li-ling; Fu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Ling; Zhong, Linda LD; Mu, Huai-xue; Shi, Xiao-ke; Leung, Christina FP; Fan, Bao-min; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Ai-ping; Zhu, Li-xin; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel neuropeptide spexin was found to be broadly expressed in various endocrine and nervous tissues while little is known about its functions. This study investigated the role of spexin in bowel movement and the underlying mechanisms. In functional constipation (FC) patients, serum spexin levels were significantly decreased. Consistently, in starved mice, the mRNA of spexin was significantly decreased in intestine and colon. Spexin injection increased the velocity of carbon powder propulsion in small intestine and decreased the glass beads expulsion time in distal colon in mice. Further, spexin dose-dependently stimulated the intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction. Galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) antagonist M871, but not Galanin receptor 3 (GALR3) antagonist SNAP37899, effectively suppressed the stimulatory effects of spexin on intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction, which could be eliminated by extracellular [Ca2+] removal and L-type voltage-dependentCa2+ channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine. Besides, spexin dramatically increased the [Ca2+]i in isolated colonic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that spexin can act on GALR2 receptor to regulate bowel motility by activating L-type VDCC. Our findings provide evidence for important physiological roles of spexin in GI functions. Selective action on spexin pathway might have therapeutic effects on GI diseases with motility disorders. PMID:26160593

  10. Honeybee locomotion is impaired by Am-CaV3 low voltage-activated Ca2+ channel antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Rousset, M.; Collet, C.; Cens, T.; Bastin, F.; Raymond, V.; Massou, I.; Menard, C.; Thibaud, J.-B.; Charreton, M.; Vignes, M.; Chahine, M.; Sandoz, J. C.; Charnet, P.

    2017-01-01

    Voltage‐gated Ca2+ channels are key transducers of cellular excitability and participate in several crucial physiological responses. In vertebrates, 10 Ca2+ channel genes, grouped in 3 families (CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3), have been described and characterized. Insects possess only one member of each family. These genes have been isolated in a limited number of species and very few have been characterized although, in addition to their crucial role, they may represent a collateral target for neurotoxic insecticides. We have isolated the 3 genes coding for the 3 Ca2+ channels expressed in Apis mellifera. This work provides the first detailed characterization of the honeybee T-type CaV3 Ca2+ channel and demonstrates the low toxicity of inhibiting this channel. Comparing Ca2+ currents recorded in bee neurons and myocytes with Ca2+ currents recorded in Xenopus oocytes expressing the honeybee CaV3 gene suggests native expression in bee muscle cells only. High‐voltage activated Ca2+ channels could be recorded in the somata of different cultured bee neurons. These functional data were confirmed by in situ hybridization, immunolocalization and in vivo analysis of the effects of a CaV3 inhibitor. The biophysical and pharmacological characterization and the tissue distribution of CaV3 suggest a role in honeybee muscle function. PMID:28145504

  11. OPTIMAL TIMING FOR CLAMPING THE UMBILICAL CORD AFTER BIRTH

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Tonse N. K.; Singal, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis This paper provides a brief overview of pros and cons of clamping the cord too early (within seconds) after birth. It also highlights evolving data that suggests that delaying cord clamping for 30–60 seconds after birth is beneficial to the baby and the mother, with no measurable negative effects. PMID:23164185

  12. Combination Space Station Handrail Clamp and Pointing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A device for attaching an experiment carrier to a space station handrail is provided. The device has two major components, a clamping mechanism for attachment to a space station handrail, and a pointing carrier on which an experiment package can be mounted and oriented. The handrail clamp uses an overcenter mechanism and the carrier mechanism uses an adjustable preload ball and socket for carrier positioning. The handrail clamp uses a stack of disk springs to provide a spring loaded button. This configuration provides consistent clamping force over a range of possible handrail thicknesses. Three load points are incorporated in the clamping mechanism thereby spreading the clamping load onto three separate points on the handrail. A four bar linkage is used to provide for a single actuation lever for all three load points. For additional safety, a secondary lock consisting of a capture plate and push lock keeps the clamp attached to the handrail in the event of main clamp failure. For the carrier positioning mechanism, a ball in a spring loaded socket uses friction to provide locking torque; however. the ball and socket are torque limited so that the ball ran slip under kick loads (125 pounds or greater). A lead screw attached to disk spring stacks is used to provide an adjustable spring force on the socket. A locking knob is attached to the lead screw to allow for hand manipulation of the lead screw.

  13. First clinical experience with the air purge control and electrical remote-controlled tubing clamp in mini bypass.

    PubMed

    Huybregts, Rien M A J M; Veerman, Derk P; Vonk, Alexander B A; Nesselaar, Alfred F; Paulus, Reggie C E; Thone-Passchier, Deirdre H; Smith, Annette L; de Vroege, Roel

    2006-09-01

    Most mini bypass systems do not contain a venous and cardiotomy reservoir in the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit and lack the capability to remove venous air. In conjunction with the manufacturer the air purge control system, a system which automatically removes air that is captured in a venous bubble trap, has been developed. This system is combined with an electrical remote clamp, which automatically clamps the arterial line in case air leaves the bubble trap. Twenty consecutive patients undergoing surgery with CPB were included in this clinical validation. Venous air was removed by the air purge control during bypass. The electrical remote clamp was never activated by the system, confirming that the air purge control adequately removed venous air during these cases. The air purge control, in conjunction with the electrical remote clamp, is a valuable safety feature in mini bypass, enhancing patient safety and user friendliness while providing a level of safety equivalent to those of conventional bypass systems.

  14. Linker-gating ring complex as passive spring and Ca(2+)-dependent machine for a voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaowei; Qian, Xiang; Magleby, Karl L

    2004-06-10

    Ion channels are proteins that control the flux of ions across cell membranes by opening and closing (gating) their pores. It has been proposed that channels gated by internal agonists have an intracellular gating ring that extracts free energy from agonist binding to open the gates using linkers that directly connect the gating ring to the gates. Here we find for a voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K+ (BK) channel that shortening the linkers increases channel activity and lengthening the linkers decreases channel activity, both in the presence and absence of intracellular Ca2+. These observations are consistent with a mechanical model in which the linker-gating ring complex forms a passive spring that applies force to the gates in the absence of Ca2+ to modulate the voltage-dependent gating. Adding Ca2+ then changes the force to further activate the channel. Both the passive and Ca(2+)-induced forces contribute to the gating of the channel.

  15. Parallel input parallel output high voltage bi-directional converters for driving dielectric electro active polymer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thummala, P.; Zhang, Z.; Andersen, M. A. E.; Rahimullah, S.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) actuators are capacitive devices which provide mechanical motions when charged electrically. The charging characteristics of a DEAP actuator depends on its size, voltage applied to its electrodes, and its operating frequency. The main idea of this paper is to design and implement driving circuits for the DEAP actuators for their use in various applications. This paper presents implementation of parallel input, parallel output, high voltage (~2.5 kV) bi-directional DC-DC converters for driving the DEAP actuators. The topology is a bidirectional flyback DC-DC converter incorporating commercially available high voltage MOSFETs (4 kV) and high voltage diodes (5 kV). Although the average current of the aforementioned devices is limited to 300 mA and 150 mA, respectively, connecting the outputs of multiple converters in parallel can provide a scalable design. This enables operating the DEAP actuators in various static and dynamic applications e.g. positioning, vibration generation or damping, and pumps. The proposed idea is experimentally verified by connecting three high voltage converters in parallel to operate a single DEAP actuator. The experimental results with both film capacitive load and the DEAP actuator are shown for a maximum charging voltage of 2 kV.

  16. A novel measuring method of clamping force for electrostatic chuck in semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesheng, Wang; Jia, Cheng; Yin, Zhong; Linhong, Ji

    2016-04-01

    Electrostatic chucks are one of the core components of semiconductor devices. As a key index of electrostatic chucks, the clamping force must be controlled within a reasonable range. Therefore, it is essential to accurately measure the clamping force. To reduce the negative factors influencing measurement precision and repeatability, this article presents a novel method to measure the clamping force and we elaborate both the principle and the key procedure. A micro-force probe component is introduced to monitor, adjust, and eliminate the gap between the wafer and the electrostatic chuck. The contact force between the ruby probe and the wafer is selected as an important parameter to characterize de-chucking, and we have found that the moment of de-chucking can be exactly judged. Moreover, this article derives the formula calibrating equivalent action area of backside gas pressure under real working conditions, which can effectively connect the backside gas pressure at the moment of de-chucking and the clamping force. The experiments were then performed on a self-designed measuring platform. The de-chucking mechanism is discussed in light of our analysis of the experimental data. Determination criteria for de-chucking point are summed up. It is found that the relationship between de-chucking pressure and applied voltage conforms well to quadratic equation. Meanwhile, the result reveals that actual de-chucking behavior is much more complicated than the description given in the classical empirical formula. Project supported by No. 02 National Science and Technology Major Project of China (No. 2011ZX02403-004).

  17. Catch and Patch: A Pipette-Based Approach for Automating Patch Clamp That Enables Cell Selection and Fast Compound Application.

    PubMed

    Danker, Timm; Braun, Franziska; Silbernagl, Nikole; Guenther, Elke

    2016-03-01

    Manual patch clamp, the gold standard of electrophysiology, represents a powerful and versatile toolbox to stimulate, modulate, and record ion channel activity from membrane fragments and whole cells. The electrophysiological readout can be combined with fluorescent or optogenetic methods and allows for ultrafast solution exchanges using specialized microfluidic tools. A hallmark of manual patch clamp is the intentional selection of individual cells for recording, often an essential prerequisite to generate meaningful data. So far, available automation solutions rely on random cell usage in the closed environment of a chip and thus sacrifice much of this versatility by design. To parallelize and automate the traditional patch clamp technique while perpetuating the full versatility of the method, we developed an approach to automation, which is based on active cell handling and targeted electrode placement rather than on random processes. This is achieved through an automated pipette positioning system, which guides the tips of recording pipettes with micrometer precision to a microfluidic cell handling device. Using a patch pipette array mounted on a conventional micromanipulator, our automated patch clamp process mimics the original manual patch clamp as closely as possible, yet achieving a configuration where recordings are obtained from many patch electrodes in parallel. In addition, our implementation is extensible by design to allow the easy integration of specialized equipment such as ultrafast compound application tools. The resulting system offers fully automated patch clamp on purposely selected cells and combines high-quality gigaseal recordings with solution switching in the millisecond timescale.

  18. Cell-Detection Technique for Automated Patch Clamping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    A unique and customizable machinevision and image-data-processing technique has been developed for use in automated identification of cells that are optimal for patch clamping. [Patch clamping (in which patch electrodes are pressed against cell membranes) is an electrophysiological technique widely applied for the study of ion channels, and of membrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the membranes. Patch clamping is used in many biological research fields such as neurobiology, pharmacology, and molecular biology.] While there exist several hardware techniques for automated patch clamping of cells, very few of those techniques incorporate machine vision for locating cells that are ideal subjects for patch clamping. In contrast, the present technique is embodied in a machine-vision algorithm that, in practical application, enables the user to identify good and bad cells for patch clamping in an image captured by a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera attached to a microscope, within a processing time of one second. Hence, the present technique can save time, thereby increasing efficiency and reducing cost. The present technique involves the utilization of cell-feature metrics to accurately make decisions on the degree to which individual cells are "good" or "bad" candidates for patch clamping. These metrics include position coordinates (x,y) in the image plane, major-axis length, minor-axis length, area, elongation, roundness, smoothness, angle of orientation, and degree of inclusion in the field of view. The present technique does not require any special hardware beyond commercially available, off-the-shelf patch-clamping hardware: A standard patchclamping microscope system with an attached CCD camera, a personal computer with an imagedata- processing board, and some experience in utilizing imagedata- processing software are all that are needed. A cell image is first captured by the microscope CCD camera and image-data-processing board, then the image

  19. Neurogenic detrusor overactivity is associated with decreased expression and function of the large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Afeli, Serge A Y; Parajuli, Shankar P; Cheng, Qiuping; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from a variety of neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis often develop neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), which currently lacks a universally effective therapy. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NDO is associated with changes in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel expression and function. DSM tissue samples from 33 patients were obtained during open bladder surgeries. NDO patients were clinically characterized preoperatively with pressure-flow urodynamics demonstrating detrusor overactivity, in the setting of a clinically relevant neurological condition. Control patients did not have overactive bladder and did not have a clinically relevant neurological disease. We conducted quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology on freshly-isolated DSM cells, and functional studies on DSM contractility. qPCR experiments revealed that DSM samples from NDO patients showed decreased BK channel mRNA expression in comparison to controls. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated reduced whole cell and transient BK currents (TBKCs) in freshly-isolated DSM cells from NDO patients. Functional studies on DSM contractility showed that spontaneous phasic contractions had a decreased sensitivity to iberiotoxin, a selective BK channel inhibitor, in DSM strips isolated from NDO patients. These results reveal the novel finding that NDO is associated with decreased DSM BK channel expression and function leading to increased DSM excitability and contractility. BK channel openers or BK channel gene transfer could be an alternative strategy to control NDO. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate the value of BK channel opening drugs or gene therapies for NDO treatment and to identify any possible adverse effects.

  20. Inhibition of voltage-gated potassium channels mediates uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingying; Zhong, Xiangqin; Ding, Yaqin; Bai, Tao; Wang, Hui; Wu, Hongbin; Liu, Yunfeng; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is important to maintain glucose homeostasis and is regulated by electrical activities. Uncarboxylated osteocalcin, a bone-derived protein, has been reported to regulate glucose metabolism by increasing insulin secretion, stimulating β cell proliferation and improving insulin sensitivity. But the underlying mechanisms of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the relationship of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion and voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels, voltage-gated calcium channels in rat β cells. Insulin secretion was measured by radioimmunoassay. Channel currents and membrane action potentials were recorded using the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Calcium imaging system was used to analyze intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). The data show that under 16.7mmol/l glucose conditions uncarboxylated osteocalcin alone increased insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i, but with no such effects on insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i in the presence of a KV channel blocker, tetraethylammonium chloride. In the patch-clamp experiments, uncarboxylated osteocalcin lengthened action potential duration and significantly inhibited KV currents, but had no influence on the characteristics of voltage-gated calcium channels. These results indicate that KV channels are involved in uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells. By inhibiting KV channels, uncarboxylated osteocalcin prolongs action potential duration, increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and finally promotes insulin secretion. This finding provides new insight into the mechanisms of osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion.

  1. Trends in Aortic Clamp Use During Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: The Effect of Aortic Clamping Strategies on Neurologic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, William T.; Kilgo, Patrick; Puskas, John D.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Lattouf, Omar M.; Guyton, Robert A.; Halkos, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different clamping strategies during CABG on the incidence of postoperative stroke. Methods In this case-control study, all patients at Emory hospitals from 2002–2009 with postoperative stroke after isolated CABG (N=141) were matched 1:4 to a contemporaneous cohort of patients without postoperative stroke (N=565). Patients were matched according to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Predicted Risk of Postoperative Stroke (PROPS), which is based on 26 variables. On- (ONCAB) and off-pump (OPCAB) patients were matched separately. Multiple logistic regression analysis with adjusted odds ratios (OR) was performed to identify operative variables associated with postoperative stroke. Results Among the ONCAB cohort, the single cross-clamp technique was associated with a decreased risk of stroke compared to the double clamp (cross clamp + partial clamp) technique (OR=0.385, p=0.044). Within the OPCAB cohort, there was no significant difference in stroke according to clamp use. Epiaortic ultrasound of the ascending aorta increased from 45.3% in 2002 to 89.4% in 2009. From 2002–2009, clamp use decreased from 97.7% of cases to 72.7%. Conclusions During ONCAB, the use of a single cross-clamp compared to the double clamp technique decreases the risk of postoperative stroke. The use of any aortic clamp has decreased and epiaortic ultrasound use has increased from 2002–2009, indicating a change in operative technique and surgeon awareness of the potential complications associated with manipulation of the aorta. PMID:23477689

  2. High-voltage integrated active quenching circuit for single photon count rate up to 80 Mcounts/s.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Giulia; Rech, Ivan; Gulinatti, Angelo; Ghioni, Massimo

    2016-08-08

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been subject to a fast improvement in recent years. In particular, custom technologies specifically developed to fabricate SPAD devices give the designer the freedom to pursue the best detector performance required by applications. A significant breakthrough in this field is represented by the recent introduction of a red enhanced SPAD (RE-SPAD) technology, capable of attaining a good photon detection efficiency in the near infrared range (e.g. 40% at a wavelength of 800 nm) while maintaining a remarkable timing resolution of about 100ps full width at half maximum. Being planar, the RE-SPAD custom technology opened the way to the development of SPAD arrays particularly suited for demanding applications in the field of life sciences. However, to achieve such excellent performance custom SPAD detectors must be operated with an external active quenching circuit (AQC) designed on purpose. Next steps toward the development of compact and practical multichannel systems will require a new generation of monolithically integrated AQC arrays. In this paper we present a new, fully integrated AQC fabricated in a high-voltage 0.18 µm CMOS technology able to provide quenching pulses up to 50 Volts with fast leading and trailing edges. Although specifically designed for optimal operation of RE-SPAD devices, the new AQC is quite versatile: it can be used with any SPAD detector, regardless its fabrication technology, reaching remarkable count rates up to 80 Mcounts/s and generating a photon detection pulse with a timing jitter as low as 119 ps full width at half maximum. The compact design of our circuit has been specifically laid out to make this IC a suitable building block for monolithically integrated AQC arrays.

  3. Diethylcarbamazine Increases Activation of Voltage-Activated Potassium (SLO-1) Currents in Ascaris suum and Potentiates Effects of Emodepside

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Samuel K.; Robertson, Alan P.; Martin, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Diethylcarbamazine is a drug that is used for the treatment of filariasis in humans and animals; it also has effects on intestinal nematodes, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. Emodepside is a resistance-busting anthelmintic approved for treating intestinal parasitic nematodes in animals. The novel mode of action and resistance-breaking properties of emodepside has led to its use against intestinal nematodes of animals, and as a candidate drug for treating filarial parasites. We have previously demonstrated effects of emodepside on SLO-1 K+-like currents in Ascaris suum. Here, we demonstrate that diethylcarbamazine, which has been proposed to work through host mediated effects, has direct effects on a nematode parasite, Ascaris suum. It increases activation of SLO-1 K+ currents and potentiates effects of emodepside. Our results suggest consideration of the combination of emodepside and diethylcarbamazine for therapy, which is predicted to be synergistic. The mode of action of diethylcarbamazine may involve effects on parasite signaling pathways (including nitric oxide) as well as effects mediated by host inflammatory mediators. PMID:25411836

  4. Diethylcarbamazine increases activation of voltage-activated potassium (SLO-1) currents in Ascaris suum and potentiates effects of emodepside.

    PubMed

    Buxton, Samuel K; Robertson, Alan P; Martin, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Diethylcarbamazine is a drug that is used for the treatment of filariasis in humans and animals; it also has effects on intestinal nematodes, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. Emodepside is a resistance-busting anthelmintic approved for treating intestinal parasitic nematodes in animals. The novel mode of action and resistance-breaking properties of emodepside has led to its use against intestinal nematodes of animals, and as a candidate drug for treating filarial parasites. We have previously demonstrated effects of emodepside on SLO-1 K+-like currents in Ascaris suum. Here, we demonstrate that diethylcarbamazine, which has been proposed to work through host mediated effects, has direct effects on a nematode parasite, Ascaris suum. It increases activation of SLO-1 K+ currents and potentiates effects of emodepside. Our results suggest consideration of the combination of emodepside and diethylcarbamazine for therapy, which is predicted to be synergistic. The mode of action of diethylcarbamazine may involve effects on parasite signaling pathways (including nitric oxide) as well as effects mediated by host inflammatory mediators.

  5. Calcium Transients in Dendrites of Neocortical Neurons Evoked by Single Subthreshold Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials via Low-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markram, Henry; Sakmann, Bert

    1994-05-01

    Simultaneous recordings of membrane voltage and concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]_i) were made in apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal cells of rat neocortex after filling dendrites with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator Calcium Green-1. Subthreshold excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), mediated by the activation of glutamate receptor channels, caused a brief increase in dendritic [Ca2+]_i. This rise in dendritic [Ca2+]_i was mediated by the opening of low-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in the dendritic membrane. The results provide direct evidence that dendrites do not function as passive cables even at low-frequency synaptic activity; rather, a single subthreshold EPSP changes the dendritic membrane conductance by opening Ca2+ channels and generating a [Ca2+]_i transient that may propagate towards the soma. The activation of these Ca2+ channels at a low-voltage threshold is likely to influence the way in which dendritic EPSPs contribute to the electrical activity of the neuron.

  6. Hypoxic increase in nitric oxide generation of rat sensory neurons requires activation of mitochondrial complex II and voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Henrich, M; Paddenberg, R; Haberberger, R V; Scholz, A; Gruss, M; Hempelmann, G; Kummer, W

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that sensory neurons of rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) respond to hypoxia with an activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) resulting in enhanced NO production associated with mitochondria which contributes to resistance against hypoxia. Extracellular calcium is essential to this effect. In the present study on rat DRG slices, we set out to determine what types of calcium channels operate under hypoxia, and which upstream events contribute to their activation, thereby focusing upon mitochondrial complex II. Both the metallic ions Cd2+ and Ni2+, known to inhibit voltage-gated calcium channels and T-type channels, respectively, and verapamil and nifedipine, typical blocker of L-type calcium channels completely prevented the hypoxic neuronal NO generation. Inhibition of complex II by thenoyltrifluoroacetone at the ubiquinon binding site or by 3-nitropropionic acid at the substrate binding site largely diminished hypoxic-induced NO production while having an opposite effect under normoxia. An additional blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels entirely abolished the hypoxic response. The complex II inhibitor malonate inhibited both normoxic and hypoxic NO generation. These data show that complex II activity is required for increased hypoxic NO production. Since succinate dehydrogenase activity of complex II decreased at hypoxia, as measured by histochemistry and densitometry, we propose a hypoxia-induced functional switch of complex II from succinate dehydrogenase to fumarate reductase, which subsequently leads to activation of voltage-gated calcium channels resulting in increased NO production by eNOS.

  7. Design, Control, and Modeling of a New Voltage Source Converter for HVDC System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Madhan; Singh, Bhim; Ketan Panigrahi, Bijaya

    2013-05-01

    Abstract: A New Voltage Source Converter (VSC) based on neutral clamped three-level circuit is proposed for High Voltage DC (HVDC) system. The proposed VSC is designed in a multipulse configuration. The converter is operated by Fundamental Frequency Switching (FFS). A new control method is developed for achieving all the necessary control aspects of HVDC system such as independent real and reactive power control, bidirectional real and reactive power control. The basic of the control method is varying the pulse width and by keeping the dc link voltage constant. The steady state and dynamic performances of HVDC system interconnecting two different frequencies network are demonstrated for active and reactive power control. Total number of transformers used in this system are reduced to half in comparison with the two-level VSCs for both active and reactive power control. The performance of the HVDC system is improved in terms of reduced harmonics level even at fundamental frequency switching. The harmonic performance of the designed converter is also studied for different value of the dead angle (β), and the optimized range of the dead angle is achieved for varying reactive power requirement. Simulation results are presented for the designed three level multipulse voltage source converters with the proposed control algorithm.

  8. Avoiding aortic clamping during CABG reduces postoperative stroke

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Emmanuel; Puskas, John D; Thourani, Vinod H; Kilgo, Patrick; Chen, Edward P; Leshnower, Bradley G; Lattouf, Omar M; Guyton, Robert A.; Glas, Kathryn E; Halkos, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether the incidence of postoperative stroke (PS) could be reduced by eliminating aortic clamping during CABG. Methods From 2002–2013, 12,079 patients underwent primary, isolated CABG at a single US academic institution. Aortic manipulation was completely avoided by using in-situ internal mammary arteries for inflow in 1,552 (12.9%) patients (no-touch), a clampless facilitating device (CFD) was used for proximal anastomoses in 1,548 (12.8%) patients, and aortic clamping was used in 8,979 (74.3%) patients. These strategies were assessed in a logistic regression model controlling for relevant variables. Results The overall incidence of PS was 1.4% (n=165), with an unadjusted incidence of 0.6% (n=10) in the no-touch group, 1.2% (n=18) in the CFD group, and 1.5% (n=137) in the clamp group (p<0.01 for no-touch vs clamp). The ratio of observed to expected stroke rate increased as the degree of aortic manipulation increased, from 0.48 in the no-touch group, to 0.61 in the CFD group, and 0.95 in the clamp group. Aortic clamping was independently associated with an increase in PS compared to a no-touch technique (AOR 2.50, p<0.01). When separated by CPB utilization, both the off-pump partial clamp and on-pump cross-clamp techniques increased the risk of PS compared to no-touch (AOR 2.52, p<0.01 and AOR 4.25, p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion A no-aortic touch technique has the lowest risk for postoperative stroke for patients undergoing CABG. Clamping the aorta during CABG increases the risk of PS, regardless of the severity of aortic disease. PMID:25293356

  9. Reciprocating clamp apparatus for thermoforming plastic containers

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.H.; Harry, I.L.; Krishnakumar, S.M.

    1984-03-06

    This relates to the forming of containers and like hollow articles from sheets or webs of thermoplastic material. Two webs or sheets are simultaneously acted upon by way of a forming apparatus which includes a reciprocating clamp first cooperable with one outer platen and then the other in sequence wherein, while a first web or sheet is being formed within a plurality of mold cavities to define a plurality of hollow articles such as containers, the other sheet or web may be stripped from its respective mold set and a new sheet or a new portion of a sheet or web may be advanced into position for molding. The forming apparatus may be constructed in a manner wherein the web portions which are to be formed may be billowed away from the mold cavities as an initial step in the stretching and orientation of the thermoplastic material. The thermoplastic material may be heated to the desired forming temperature using separate sets of rf electrodes so that only those portions of the thermoplastic material which are to be formed need be heated. Two sets of containers of different sizes may be formed from the webs or sheets, and then internested to form double wall containers wherein the walls may be formed of different materials and wherein the outer material may be a barrier material, or wherein the walls of the containers are spaced apart to form an insulated container. This abstract forms no part of the specification of this application and is not to be construed as limiting the claims of the application.

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor activation lowers the threshold for NMDA-receptor-dependent homosynaptic long-term depression in the hippocampus through activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Coussens, C M; Kerr, D S; Abraham, W C

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 on homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) were examined in hippocampal slices obtained from adrenal-intact adult male rats. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials were evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway and recorded in stratum radiatum of area CA1. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) was delivered at LTD threshold (2 bouts of 600 pulses, 1 Hz, at baseline stimulation intensity). LFS of the Schaffer collaterals did not produce significant homosynaptic LTD in control slices. However, identical conditioning in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 (10 microM) produced a robust LTD, which was blocked by the selective glucocorticoid antagonist RU-38486. The LTD induced by glucocorticoid receptor activation was dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, because the specific NMDA receptor antagonist D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5) blocked the facilitation. However, the facilitation of LTD was not due to a potentiation of the isolated NMDA receptor potential by RU-28362. The facilitation of LTD by RU-28362 was also blocked by coincubation of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) antagonist nimodipine. Selective activation of the L-type VDCCs by the agonist Bay K 8644 also facilitated LTD induction. Both nimodipine and D-AP5 were effective in blocking the facilitation of LTD by Bay K 8644. These results indicate that L-type VDCCs can contribute to NMDA-receptor-dependent LTD induction.

  11. Continuous delta opioid receptor activation reduces neuronal voltage gated sodium channel (NaV1.7) levels through activation of protein kinase C in painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Munmun; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The NaV1.7 tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel isoform plays a critical role in nociception. In rodent models of diabetic neuropathy, increased NaV1.7 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons correlates with the emergence of pain-related behaviors characteristic of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN). We examined the effect of transgene-mediated expression of enkephalin on pain-related behaviors and their biochemical correlates in DRG neurons. Transfection of DRG neurons by subcutaneous inoculation of a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vector expressing proenkephalin (PE) reversed nocisponsive behavioral responses to heat, cold, and mechanical pressure characteristic of PDN. Vector-mediated enkephalin production in vivo prevented the increase in DRG NaV1.7 observed in PDN, an effect that correlated with inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and protein kinase C (PKC). Primary DRG neurons in vitro exposed to 45 mM glucose for 18 hrs also demonstrated an increase in NaV1.7 and increased phosphorylation of p38 and PKC; these changes were prevented by transfection in vitro with the enkephalin-expressing vector. The effect of hyperglycemia on NaV1.7 production in vitro was mimicked by exposure to PMA, and blocked by the myristolated PKC inhibitor 20–28 or the p38 inhibitor SB202190; the effect of vector-mediated enkephalin on NaV1.7 levels was prevented by naltrindole. The results of these studies suggest that activation of the presynaptic delta opioid receptor by enkephalin prevents the increase in neuronal NaV1.7 in DRG through inhibition of PKC and p38. These results establish a novel interaction between the delta opioid receptor and voltage gated sodium channels. PMID:18579738

  12. High voltage load resistor array

    DOEpatents

    Lehmann, Monty Ray

    2005-01-18

    A high voltage resistor comprising an array of a plurality of parallel electrically connected resistor elements each containing a resistive solution, attached at each end thereof to an end plate, and about the circumference of each of the end plates, a corona reduction ring. Each of the resistor elements comprises an insulating tube having an electrode inserted into each end thereof and held in position by one or more hose clamps about the outer periphery of the insulating tube. According to a preferred embodiment, the electrode is fabricated from stainless steel and has a mushroom shape at one end, that inserted into the tube, and a flat end for engagement with the end plates that provides connection of the resistor array and with a load.

  13. Common Gating of Both CLC Transporter Subunits Underlies Voltage-dependent Activation of the 2Cl−/1H+ Exchanger ClC-7/Ostm1*

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Carmen F.; Ullrich, Florian; Leisle, Lilia; Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    CLC anion transporters form dimers that function either as Cl− channels or as electrogenic Cl−/H+ exchangers. CLC channels display two different types of “gates,” “protopore” gates that open and close the two pores of a CLC dimer independently of each other and common gates that act on both pores simultaneously. ClC-7/Ostm1 is a lysosomal 2Cl−/1H+ exchanger that is slowly activated by depolarization. This gating process is drastically accelerated by many CLCN7 mutations underlying human osteopetrosis. Making use of some of these mutants, we now investigate whether slow voltage activation of plasma membrane-targeted ClC-7/Ostm1 involves protopore or common gates. Voltage activation of wild-type ClC-7 subunits was accelerated by co-expressing an excess of ClC-7 subunits carrying an accelerating mutation together with a point mutation rendering these subunits transport-deficient. Conversely, voltage activation of a fast ClC-7 mutant could be slowed by co-expressing an excess of a transport-deficient mutant. These effects did not depend on whether the accelerating mutation localized to the transmembrane part or to cytoplasmic cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) domains of ClC-7. Combining accelerating mutations in the same subunit did not speed up gating further. No currents were observed when ClC-7 was truncated after the last intramembrane helix. Currents and slow gating were restored when the C terminus was co-expressed by itself or fused to the C terminus of the β-subunit Ostm1. We conclude that common gating underlies the slow voltage activation of ClC-7. It depends on the CBS domain-containing C terminus that does not require covalent binding to the membrane domain of ClC-7. PMID:23983121

  14. Common gating of both CLC transporter subunits underlies voltage-dependent activation of the 2Cl-/1H+ exchanger ClC-7/Ostm1.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Carmen F; Ullrich, Florian; Leisle, Lilia; Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2013-10-04

    CLC anion transporters form dimers that function either as Cl(-) channels or as electrogenic Cl(-)/H(+) exchangers. CLC channels display two different types of "gates," "protopore" gates that open and close the two pores of a CLC dimer independently of each other and common gates that act on both pores simultaneously. ClC-7/Ostm1 is a lysosomal 2Cl(-)/1H(+) exchanger that is slowly activated by depolarization. This gating process is drastically accelerated by many CLCN7 mutations underlying human osteopetrosis. Making use of some of these mutants, we now investigate whether slow voltage activation of plasma membrane-targeted ClC-7/Ostm1 involves protopore or common gates. Voltage activation of wild-type ClC-7 subunits was accelerated by co-expressing an excess of ClC-7 subunits carrying an accelerating mutation together with a point mutation rendering these subunits transport-deficient. Conversely, voltage activation of a fast ClC-7 mutant could be slowed by co-expressing an excess of a transport-deficient mutant. These effects did not depend on whether the accelerating mutation localized to the transmembrane part or to cytoplasmic cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) domains of ClC-7. Combining accelerating mutations in the same subunit did not speed up gating further. No currents were observed when ClC-7 was truncated after the last intramembrane helix. Currents and slow gating were restored when the C terminus was co-expressed by itself or fused to the C terminus of the β-subunit Ostm1. We conclude that common gating underlies the slow voltage activation of ClC-7. It depends on the CBS domain-containing C terminus that does not require covalent binding to the membrane domain of ClC-7.

  15. Mapping the Interaction Site for a β-Scorpion Toxin in the Pore Module of Domain III of Voltage-gated Na+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Joel Z.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Scheuer, Todd; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Catterall, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels initiates and propagates action potentials in electrically excitable cells. β-Scorpion toxins, including toxin IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssIV), enhance activation of NaV channels. CssIV stabilizes the voltage sensor in domain II in its activated state via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. Amino acid residues required for the action of CssIV have been identified in the S1-S2 and S3-S4 extracellular loops of domain II. The extracellular loops of domain III are also involved in toxin action, but individual amino acid residues have not been identified. We used site-directed mutagenesis and voltage clamp recording to investigate amino acid residues of domain III that are involved in CssIV action. In the IIISS2-S6 loop, five substitutions at four positions altered voltage-sensor trapping by CssIVE15A. Three substitutions (E1438A, D1445A, and D1445Y) markedly decreased voltage-sensor trapping, whereas the other two substitutions (N1436G and L1439A) increased voltage-sensor trapping. These bidirectional effects suggest that residues in IIISS2-S6 make both positive and negative interactions with CssIV. N1436G enhanced voltage-sensor trapping via increased binding affinity to the resting state, whereas L1439A increased voltage-sensor trapping efficacy. Based on these results, a three-dimensional model of the toxin-channel interaction was developed using the Rosetta modeling method. These data provide additional molecular insight into the voltage-sensor trapping mechanism of toxin action and define a three-point interaction site for β-scorpion toxins on NaV channels. Binding of α- and β-scorpion toxins to two distinct, pseudo-symmetrically organized receptor sites on NaV channels acts synergistically to modify channel gating and paralyze prey. PMID:22761417

  16. Mapping the interaction site for a β-scorpion toxin in the pore module of domain III of voltage-gated Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Joel Z; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Scheuer, Todd; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Catterall, William A

    2012-08-31

    Activation of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channels initiates and propagates action potentials in electrically excitable cells. β-Scorpion toxins, including toxin IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssIV), enhance activation of Na(V) channels. CssIV stabilizes the voltage sensor in domain II in its activated state via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. Amino acid residues required for the action of CssIV have been identified in the S1-S2 and S3-S4 extracellular loops of domain II. The extracellular loops of domain III are also involved in toxin action, but individual amino acid residues have not been identified. We used site-directed mutagenesis and voltage clamp recording to investigate amino acid residues of domain III that are involved in CssIV action. In the IIISS2-S6 loop, five substitutions at four positions altered voltage-sensor trapping by CssIV(E15A). Three substitutions (E1438A, D1445A, and D1445Y) markedly decreased voltage-sensor trapping, whereas the other two substitutions (N1436G and L1439A) increased voltage-sensor trapping. These bidirectional effects suggest that residues in IIISS2-S6 make both positive and negative interactions with CssIV. N1436G enhanced voltage-sensor trapping via increased binding affinity to the resting state, whereas L1439A increased voltage-sensor trapping efficacy. Based on these results, a three-dimensional model of the toxin-channel interaction was developed using the Rosetta modeling method. These data provide additional molecular insight into the voltage-sensor trapping mechanism of toxin action and define a three-point interaction site for β-scorpion toxins on Na(V) channels. Binding of α- and β-scorpion toxins to two distinct, pseudo-symmetrically organized receptor sites on Na(V) channels acts synergistically to modify channel gating and paralyze prey.

  17. Nerve growth factor enhances voltage-gated Na+ channel activity and Transwell migration in Mat-LyLu rat prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2007-03-01

    The highly dynamic nature of voltage-gated Na+ channel (VGSC) expression and its controlling mechanism(s) are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of nerve growth factor (NGF) in regulating VGSC activity in the strongly metastatic Mat-LyLu cell model of rat prostate cancer (PCa). NGF increased peak VGSC current density in a time- and dose-dependent manner. NGF also shifted voltage to peak and the half-activation voltage to more positive potentials, and produced currents with faster kinetics of activation; sensitivity to the VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) was not affected. The NGF-induced increase in peak VGSC current density was suppressed by both the pan-trk antagonist K252a, and the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT5720. NGF did not affect the Nav1.7 mRNA level, but the total VGSC alpha-subunit protein level was upregulated. NGF potentiated the cells' migration in Transwell assays, and this was not affected by TTX. We concluded that NGF upregulated functional VGSC expression in Mat-LyLu cells, with PKA as a signaling intermediate, but enhancement of migration by NGF was independent of VGSC activity.

  18. Exaggerated natriuresis during clamping of systemic NO supply in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Jane A; Rasmussen, Mona S; Vach, Werner; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F; Bie, Peter

    2012-01-01

    NO (nitric oxide) may be involved in fluid homoeostasis. We hypothesized that increases in NO synthesis contribute to acute, saline-induced natriuresis, which, therefore, should be blunted when NO availability is stabilized. Young men were studied during simultaneous infusions of L-NAME [NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; bolus of 750 μg·kg⁻¹ of body weight and 8.3 μg·min⁻¹·kg⁻¹ of body weight] and SNP (sodium nitroprusside), the latter at a rate preventing L-NAME from increasing total peripheral resistance ('NO-clamping'). Slow volume expansion (saline, 20 μmol of NaCl·min⁻¹·kg⁻¹ of body weight for 3 h) was performed with and without concomitant NO-clamping. NO-clamping itself decreased RPF (renal plasma flow; P~0.02) and tended to decrease arterial blood pressure [MABP (mean arterial blood pressure)]. Volume expansion markedly decreased the plasma levels of renin, AngII (angiotensin II) and aldosterone (all P<0.001), while MABP (oscillometry), heart rate, cardiac output (impedance cardiography), RPF (by p-aminohippurate), GFR [glomerular filtration rate; by using 51Cr-labelled EDTA] and plasma [Na+] and [K+] remained constant. Volume expansion increased sodium excretion (P<0.02) at constant filtered load, but more so during NO-clamping than during control (+184% compared with 52%; P<0.0001). Urinary nitrate/nitrite excretion increased during volume expansion; plasma cGMP and plasma vasopressin were unchanged. The results demonstrate that NO-clamping augments sodium excretion in response to volume expansion at constant MABP and GFR, reduced RPF and decreased renin system activity, a response termed hypernatriuresis. The results indicate that mediator(s) other than MABP, RPF, GFR and renin system activity contribute significantly to the homoeostatic response to saline loading, but the specific mechanisms of hypernatriuresis remain obscure.

  19. Simultaneous patch-clamping and calcium imaging in developing dendrites.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Thomas; Lohmann, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Calcium imaging has been used extensively to explore the role of action potential (AP) firing in the development of neuronal structure and synaptic function because increases in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) reliably and, within a certain range, linearly reflect neuronal spiking activity. Patterns of APs in individual cells can be deduced from calcium recordings, which have typically been performed at the level of cell bodies. However, neurons are particularly susceptible to phototoxicity when they are illuminated at the soma. Furthermore, for some imaging experiments (e.g., those that address the interactions between dendrites and axons during synapse formation), the cell body of a given neuron may simply not be in the field of view. In these situations, it would be helpful to determine the spiking patterns of a neuron from the calcium activity in its subcellular compartments such as stretches of dendrites or axons. Here, we describe an approach for determining the relationship between AP firing and dendritic calcium transients by simultaneously imaging calcium transients in small dendritic stretches of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in slice cultures from neonatal rats and recording spiking activity with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in these neurons. These experiments allow us to correlate the electrophysiological spiking pattern with the accompanying changes in the calcium concentration in individual dendritic segments.

  20. Block of voltage-gated potassium channels by Pacific ciguatoxin-1 contributes to increased neuronal excitability in rat sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Birinyi-Strachan, Liesl C.; Gunning, Simon J.; Lewis, Richard J.; Nicholson, Graham M. . E-mail: Graham.Nicholson@uts.edu.au

    2005-04-15

    The present study investigated the actions of the polyether marine toxin Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) on neuronal excitability in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using patch-clamp recording techniques. Under current-clamp conditions, bath application of 2-20 nM P-CTX-1 caused a rapid, concentration-dependent depolarization of the resting membrane potential in neurons expressing tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive voltage-gated sodium (Na{sub v}) channels. This action was completely suppressed by the addition of 200 nM TTX to the external solution, indicating that this effect was mediated through TTX-sensitive Na{sub v} channels. In addition, P-CTX-1 also prolonged action potential and afterhyperpolarization (AHP) duration. In a subpopulation of neurons, P-CTX-1 also produced tonic action potential firing, an effect that was not accompanied by significant oscillation of the resting membrane potential. Conversely, in neurons expressing TTX-resistant Na{sub v} currents, P-CTX-1 failed to alter any parameter of neuronal excitability examined in this study. Under voltage-clamp conditions in rat DRG neurons, P-CTX-1 inhibited both delayed-rectifier and 'A-type' potassium currents in a dose-dependent manner, actions that occurred in the absence of alterations to the voltage dependence of activation. These actions appear to underlie the prolongation of the action potential and AHP, and contribute to repetitive firing. These data indicate that a block of potassium channels contributes to the increase in neuronal excitability, associated with a modulation of Na{sub v} channel gating, observed clinically in response to ciguatera poisoning.

  1. [Rhythmic bioelectrical activity of the cerebral cortex analyzed with allowance for the nonlinear voltage dependence of excitatory postsynaptic potentials induced by neocortical neurons].

    PubMed

    Bakharev, B V

    2008-01-01

    A nonlinear voltage dependence between the membrane and excitatory postsynaptic potentials coming via corticocortical connections was derived based on literature data. The existence of a region of stability of oscillations with increasing mean value of nonspecific afferent input was shown. As the afferent input strongly increases, a high-frequency component of oscillations (40-60 Hz), appeas which may result in the instability of oscillations and initiation of abnormal brain activity.

  2. Laser Transmission Welding of Thermoplastics With Dual Clamping Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devrient, M.; Knoll, B.; Geiger, R.

    Beside well chosen process parameters a geometrical joining partner design suitable for laser transmission welding and adequate clamping pressure appliance is necessary to form high quality welds. Amongst other clamping techniques Dual Clamping Devices (DCD) are a promising approach to fulfill the process needs and to get to a robust and also fail safe clamping. When using DCD the laser beam has to pass thin non transmitting bars while a weld seam is formed. So the laser beam is partial refracted, reflected and absorbed. Here the influences of the bars onto the laser beam intensity distribution behind the bars rather in the interaction zone of the laser beam and the two joining partners are investigated. Welding experiments with DCD are carried out and discussed. Based on the experimental results thermal process simulations are performed, to get a deeper knowledge about the effect of the bars onto the spatially and temporally changing temperature field within the joining partners.

  3. The Application of Mechanical Clamps to Portsmouth Connectors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-23

    Resistance Readings ..... .............. .64 TABLE 12 - ALT SUMM!ARY - POLYURETHANE CONNECTORS Resis- ance Readings ..... .............. .65 v7 ft...34 FIGURE 17 Pressure Tank Pressure Fittings . ........ . 37 vi I THE APPLICATION OF MECHANICAL CLAMPS TO PORTSMOUTH CONNECTORS BACKGROUN )D This

  4. Diacylglycerols induce both ion pumping in patch-clamped guard-cell protoplasts and opening of intact stomata.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y; Assmann, S M

    1991-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells in leaves regulate the apertures of microscopic pores through which photosynthetic gas exchange and water vapor loss occur. Environmental signals, including light, high humidity, and low CO2 concentrations, open stomata by increasing the volume of guard cells. Activation of a plasma membrane H+ pump initiates K+ and Cl- influx, accompanied by malate synthesis, resulting in osmotic water flow into the guard cells, a bowing apart of the guard-cell pair, and consequent stomatal opening. Physiological and electrophysiological techniques were employed to investigate the possibility that a second-messenger lipid, 1,2-diacylglycerol, is involved in the transduction of opening stimuli. The synthetic diacylglycerols 1,2-dihexanoylglycerol and 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol enhanced light-induced stomatal opening in Commelina communis and induced stomatal opening under darkness, whereas an isomer with no known second-messenger role, 1,3-dioctanoylglycerol, did not affect stomatal responses. 1-(5-Isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, the enzyme typically activated by 1,2-diacylglycerol in animal cells, inhibited light-stimulated stomatal opening and enhanced dark-induced stomatal closure. N-[(2-Methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-8), which inhibits cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases preferentially over lipid-dependent protein kinases such as protein kinase C, had little effect on stomatal apertures. Whole-cell patch clamping of guard-cell protoplasts of Vicia faba revealed that 1,2-dihexanoylglycerol and 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol activated an ATP-dependent, voltage-independent current, suggesting activation of an electrogenic ion pump such as the H+ pump. Diacylglycerol or functionally similar lipids may act through protein phosphorylation to provide the intracellular signals that mediate H+-ATPase activation and stomatal opening in response to light or other opening stimuli. PMID:11607161

  5. Mechanism of Electromagnetic Energy Effects on the Nervous System: Voltage-Clamp Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    Lin, Role of External Calcium in Microwave-Induced Snail Neuron Response, Abstract, 5th Annual Scientific Session Bioelectro - magnetics Society...Snail Nerve Cells to Noise Modulated Microwave Field, Abstract, 4th Annual Scientific Session of Bioelectro - magnetics Society, held in Los Angeles

  6. A loudspeaker-driven system for rapid and multiple solution exchanges in patch-clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Méry, P F; Lechêne, P; Fischmeister, R

    1992-04-01

    A new and inexpensive system allowing rapid and synchronized changes of solutions around a membrane patch or a cell under voltage-clamp conditions is described. Four plastic capillary tubings (OD 640 microns; ID 430 microns) were glued together horizontally and attached to a coil of a commercially available loudspeaker. Servo-control of the position of the coil allowed the mouth of any of the capillaries to be positioned near the pipette tip within 6 ms. A high flow speed of the test solution was crucial to achieve rapid solution exchange. At a flow speed of 5 cm/s, complete exchange of the external environment of a frog ventricular cell was achieved within 20-30 ms. The time course of solution change was found to be 3-5 times faster at the tip of an open patch pipette. To preserve the physical integrity of the cell, the cell was usually perfused by a control capillary at a slow velocity (0.2-0.4 cm/s) and test solutions flowing out of adjacent capillaries at high velocity (4-5 cm/s) were applied to the cell only for short periods. Determination of the three-dimensional contamination profile around the mouth of the control capillary allowed the optimal conditions for the use of the system to be established and possible sources of contamination to be avoided between adjacent capillaries with unmatched flow speeds. Successive and multiple changes in external solutions could be easily synchronized with voltage-clamp depolarizations to examine the time course of the effect of drugs on voltage-operated ion channels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Spatial dynamics, thermalization, and gain clamping in a photon condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, Jonathan; Kirton, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically the effects of pump-spot size and location on photon condensates. By exploring the inhomogeneous molecular excitation fraction, we make clear the relation between spatial equilibration, gain clamping, and thermalization in a photon condensate. This provides a simple understanding of several recent experimental results. We find that as thermalization breaks down, gain clamping is imperfect, leading to "transverse spatial hole burning" and multimode condensation. This opens the possibility of engineering the gain profile to control the condensate structure.

  8. Analysis of the dynamic avalanche of carrier stored trench bipolar transistor (CSTBT) during clamped inductive turn-off transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Peng; Fu, Guicui

    2017-03-01

    The dynamic avalanche has a huge impact on the switching robustness of carrier stored trench bipolar transistor (CSTBT). The purpose of this work is to investigate the CSTBT's dynamic avalanche mechanism during clamped inductive turn-off transient. At first, with a Mitsubishi 600 V/150 A CSTBT and a Infineon 600 V/200 A field stop insulated gate bipolar transistor (FS-IGBT) utilized, the clamped inductive turn-off characteristics are obtained by double pulse test. The unclamped inductive switching (UIS) test is also utilized to identify the CSTBT's clamping voltage under dynamic avalanche condition. After the test data analysis, it is found that the CSTBT's dynamic avalanche is abnormal and can be triggered under much looser condition than the conventional buffer layer IGBT. The comparison between the FS-IGBT and CSTBT's experimental results implies that the CSTBT's abnormal dynamic avalanche phenomenon may be induced by the carrier storage (CS) layer. Based on the semiconductor physics, the electric field distribution and dynamic avalanche generation in the depletion region are analyzed. The analysis confirms that the CS layer is the root cause of the CSTBT's abnormal dynamic avalanche mechanism. Moreover, the CSTBT's negative gate capacitance effect is also investigated to clarify the underlying mechanism of the gate voltage bump observed in the test. In the end, the mixed-mode numerical simulation is utilized to reproduce the CSTBT's dynamic avalanche behavior. The simulation results validate the proposed dynamic avalanche mechanisms.

  9. C-Terminal Modulatory Domain Controls Coupling of Voltage-Sensing to Pore Opening in Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Andreas; Ortner, Nadine; Striessnig, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Activity of voltage-gated Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels is required for proper hearing as well as sinoatrial node and brain function. This critically depends on their negative activation voltage range, which is further fine-tuned by alternative splicing. Shorter variants miss a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTM), which allows them to activate at even more negative potentials than C-terminally long-splice variants. It is at present unclear whether this is due to an increased voltage sensitivity of the Cav1.3 voltage-sensing domain, or an enhanced coupling of voltage-sensor conformational changes to the subsequent opening of the activation gate. We studied the voltage-dependence of voltage-sensor charge movement (QON-V) and of current activation (ICa-V) of the long (Cav1.3L) and a short Cav1.3 splice variant (Cav1.342A) expressed in tsA-201 cells using whole cell patch-clamp. Charge movement (QON) of Cav1.3L displayed a much steeper voltage-dependence and a more negative half-maximal activation voltage than Cav1.2 and Cav3.1. However, a significantly higher fraction of the total charge had to move for activation of Cav1.3 half-maximal conductance (Cav1.3: 68%; Cav1.2: 52%; Cav3.1: 22%). This indicated a weaker coupling of Cav1.3 voltage-sensor charge movement to pore opening. However, the coupling efficiency was strengthened in the absence of the CTM in Cav1.342A, thereby shifting ICa-V by 7.2 mV to potentials that were more negative without changing QON-V. We independently show that the presence of intracellular organic cations (such as n-methyl-D-glucamine) induces a pronounced negative shift of QON-V and a more negative activation of ICa-V of all three channels. These findings illustrate that the voltage sensors of Cav1.3 channels respond more sensitively to depolarization than those of Cav1.2 or Cav3.1. Weak coupling of voltage sensing to pore opening is enhanced in the absence of the CTM, allowing short Cav1.342A splice variants to activate at lower voltages

  10. Ion Channels in Native Chloroplast Membranes: Challenges and Potential for Direct Patch-Clamp Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pottosin, Igor; Dobrovinskaya, Oxana

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis without any doubt depends on the activity of the chloroplast ion channels. The thylakoid ion channels participate in the fine partitioning of the light-generated proton-motive force (p.m.f.). By regulating, therefore, luminal pH, they affect the linear electron flow and non-photochemical quenching. Stromal ion homeostasis and signaling, on the other hand, depend on the activity of both thylakoid and envelope ion channels. Experimentally, intact chloroplasts and swollen thylakoids were proven to be suitable for direct measurements of the ion channels activity via conventional patch-clamp technique; yet, such studies became infrequent, although their potential is far from being exhausted. In this paper we wish to summarize existing challenges for direct patch-clamping of native chloroplast membranes as well as present available results on the activity of thylakoid Cl− (ClC?) and divalent cation-permeable channels, along with their tentative roles in the p.m.f. partitioning, volume regulation, and stromal Ca2+ and Mg2+ dynamics. Patch-clamping of the intact envelope revealed both large-conductance porin-like channels, likely located in the outer envelope membrane and smaller conductance channels, more compatible with the inner envelope location. Possible equivalent model for the sandwich-like arrangement of the two envelope membranes within the patch electrode will be discussed, along with peculiar properties of the fast-activated cation channel in the context of the stromal pH control. PMID:26733887

  11. A unique role for Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels in starburst amacrine cell signaling in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Ozaita, Ander; Petit-Jacques, Jerome; Völgyi, Béla; Ho, Chi Shun; Joho, Rolf H; Bloomfield, Stewart A; Rudy, Bernardo

    2004-08-18

    Direction-selective retinal ganglion cells show an increased activity evoked by light stimuli moving in the preferred direction. This selectivity is governed by direction-selective inhibition from starburst amacrine cells occurring during stimulus movement in the opposite or null direction. To understand the intrinsic membrane properties of starburst cells responsible for direction-selective GABA release, we performed whole-cell recordings from starburst cells in mouse retina. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed prominent voltage-dependent K(+) currents. The currents were mostly blocked by 1 mm TEA, activated rapidly at voltages more positive than -20 mV, and deactivated quickly, properties reminiscent of the currents carried by the Kv3 subfamily of K+ channels. Immunoblots confirmed the presence of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins in retina and immunohistochemistry revealed their expression in starburst cell somata and dendrites. The Kv3-like current in starburst cells was absent in Kv3.1-Kv3.2 knock-out mice. Current-clamp recordings showed that the fast activation of the Kv3 channels provides a voltage-dependent shunt that limits depolarization of the soma to potentials more positive than -20 mV. This provides a mechanism likely to contribute to the electrical isolation of individual starburst cell dendrites, a property thought essential for direction selectivity. This function of Kv3 channels differs from that in other neurons where they facilitate high-frequency repetitive firing. Moreover, we found a gradient in the intensity of Kv3.1b immunolabeling favoring proximal regions of starburst cells. We hypothesize that this Kv3 channel gradient contributes to the preference for centrifugal signal flow in dendrites underlying direction-selective GABA release from starburst amacrine cells

  12. Regulation of Na(+) channel inactivation by the DIII and DIV voltage-sensing domains.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Eric J; Zhu, Wandi; Schubert, Angela R; Voelker, Taylor; Varga, Zoltan; Silva, Jonathan R

    2017-03-06

    Functional eukaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) (NaV) channels comprise four domains (DI-DIV), each containing six membrane-spanning segments (S1-S6). Voltage sensing is accomplished by the first four membrane-spanning segments (S1-S4), which together form a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). A critical NaV channel gating process, inactivation, has previously been linked to activation of the VSDs in DIII and DIV. Here, we probe this interaction by using voltage-clamp fluorometry to observe VSD kinetics in the presence of mutations at locations that have been shown to impair NaV channel inactivation. These locations include the DIII-DIV linker, the DIII S4-S5 linker, and the DIV S4-S5 linker. Our results show that, within the 10-ms timeframe of fast inactivation, the DIV-VSD is the primary regulator of inactivation. However, after longer 100-ms pulses, the DIII-DIV linker slows DIII-VSD deactivation, and the rate of DIII deactivation correlates strongly with the rate of recovery from inactivation. Our results imply that, over the course of an action potential, DIV-VSDs regulate the onset of fast inactivation while DIII-VSDs determine its recovery.

  13. Regulation of Na+ channel inactivation by the DIII and DIV voltage-sensing domains

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Eric J.; Zhu, Wandi; Voelker, Taylor; Varga, Zoltan

    2017-01-01

    Functional eukaryotic voltage-gated Na+ (NaV) channels comprise four domains (DI–DIV), each containing six membrane-spanning segments (S1–S6). Voltage sensing is accomplished by the first four membrane-spanning segments (S1–S4), which together form a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). A critical NaV channel gating process, inactivation, has previously been linked to activation of the VSDs in DIII and DIV. Here, we probe this interaction by using voltage-clamp fluorometry to observe VSD kinetics in the presence of mutations at locations that have been shown to impair NaV channel inactivation. These locations include the DIII–DIV linker, the DIII S4–S5 linker, and the DIV S4-S5 linker. Our results show that, within the 10-ms timeframe of fast inactivation, the DIV-VSD is the primary regulator of inactivation. However, after longer 100-ms pulses, the DIII–DIV linker slows DIII-VSD deactivation, and the rate of DIII deactivation correlates strongly with the rate of recovery from inactivation. Our results imply that, over the course of an action potential, DIV-VSDs regulate the onset of fast inactivation while DIII-VSDs determine its recovery. PMID:28232510

  14. Tityustoxin-K(alpha) blockade of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Aldo Rogelis A; Arantes, Eliane C; Monje, Francisco; Stuhmer, Walter; Varanda, Wamberto Antonio

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the action of TsTX-Kα on cloned Kv1.3 channels of the Shaker subfamily of voltage-gated potassium channels, using the voltage–clamp technique. Highly purified TsTX-Kα was obtained from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus using a new purification protocol. Our results show that TsTX-Kα blocks Kv1.3 with high affinity in two expression systems. TsTX-Kα blockade of Kv1.3 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes was found to be completely reversible and to exhibit a pH dependence. The KD was 3.9 nM at pH 7.5, 9.5 nM at pH 7.0 and 94.5 nM at pH 6.5. The blocking properties of TsTX-Kα in a mammalian cell line (L929), stably transfected to express Kv1.3, were studied using the patch–clamp technique. In this preparation, the toxin had a KD of 19.8 nM at pH 7.4. TsTX-Kα was found to affect neither the voltage-dependence of activation, nor the activation and deactivation time constants. The block appeared to be independent of the transmembrane voltage and the toxin did not interfere with the C-type inactivation process. Taken as a whole, our findings indicate that TsTX-Kα acts as a simple blocker of Kv1.3 channels. It is concluded that this toxin is a useful tool for probing not only the physiological roles of Kv1.2, but also those mediated by Kv1.3 channels. PMID:12871837

  15. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Debanne, Dominique; Alcaraz, Gisele

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  16. Nonlinear response of a clamped-clamped beam with internal resonance under sinusoidal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afaneh, Abdul-Hafiz Ahmed

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear response characteristics of a clamped-clamped beam is investigated analytically, numerically, and experimentally. The beam is under an initial static axial load and subjected to a harmonic excitation of its support. Two ranges of the axial load are considered. These are below (the beam is initially straight) and above Euler buckling load (the beam is initially buckled). Hamilton's principle is used to derive a fourth order partial differential equation of motion which is descritized and reduced to a set of second order ordinary differential equations by applying Galerkin's method. Under certain values of the static load, the normal modes are nonlinearly coupled and this coupling results in a fourth order internal resonance condition between the first three modes when the beam is initially straight. Second and third order internal resonance conditions occur between the first two modes for the case of initially buckled beam. The multiple scales method showed the significant effects of these internal resonance conditions on the system behavior. In the straight beam case, the third mode which is externally excited transfers energy to the first two modes within a small range of internal detuning. Outside this region, the response is governed by a unimodal response of the third mode. In the neighborhood of 1:1 internal resonance, it is found that within the region of two mode interaction, the solution is either stationary or nonstationary depending on the excitation level and system parameters. Saturation and jump phenomena are found to take place in the case of two mode interaction with 2:1 internal resonance. Numerical simulation and experimental testing confirmed these predictions and revealed the occurrence of multifurcation, snap-through (escaping from one well to the other in an irregular manner), and chaotic motion.

  17. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by proteoliposomes and cultured rat sertoli cells: Evidence for involvement of voltage-activated and voltage-independent calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1989-12-01

    We have previously reported incorporation into liposomes of Triton X-100-solubilized FSH receptor-G-protein complexes derived from purified bovine calf testis membranes. In the present study we have used this model system to show that FSH induces flux of 45Ca2+ into such proteoliposomes in a hormone-specific concentration-dependent manner. FSH, inactivated by boiling, had no stimulatory effect on 45Ca2+ flux, nor did isolated alpha- or beta-subunits of FSH. Addition of GTP (or its analogs 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate and guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)) or sodium fluoride (in the presence or absence of GTP or its analogs) failed to induce 45Ca2+ flux into proteoliposomes, suggesting that the uptake of 45Ca2+ was receptor, and not G-protein, related. Voltage-independent (ruthenium red and gadolinium chloride) and voltage-activated (methyoxyverapamil and nifedipine) calcium channel-blocking agents reduced FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ flux into proteoliposomes to control levels. FSH also induced uptake of 45Ca2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells. Ruthenium red and gadolinium chloride had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake or estradiol secretion by cultured rat Sertoli cells, nor did methoxyverapamil or nifedipine. All four calcium channel blockers, however, were able to reduce FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake to basal levels and FSH-stimulated conversion of androstenedione to estradiol by up to 50%, indicating an involvement of Ca2+ in FSH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Our results suggest that the well documented changes in intracellular calcium levels consequent to FSH binding may be due, at least in part, to an influx of calcium through FSH receptor-regulated calcium channels.

  18. Inhibition by pregnenolone sulphate, a metabolite of the neurosteroid pregnenolone, of voltage-gated sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Horishita, Takafumi; Ueno, Susumu; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Sudo, Yuka; Uezono, Yasuhito; Okura, Dan; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Neurosteroids are known as allosteric modulators of the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) play an important role in mediating excitotoxic damages. Here we report the effects of neurosteroids on the function of Na(v), using voltage-clamp techniques in Xenopus oocytes expressed with the Na(v)1.2 α subunit. Pregnenolone sulphate, but not pregnenolone, inhibited sodium currents (I(Na)) at 3 - 100 μmol/L. The suppression of I(Na) by pregnenolone sulphate was due to increased inactivation with little change in activation. These findings suggest that pregnenolone sulphate, a metabolite of pregnenolone, suppresses the function of Na(v) via increased inactivation, which may contribute to the neuroprotection.

  19. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage-dependent K+ channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sol; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Hye Won; Shin, Sung Eun; Choi, Il-Whan; Firth, Amy L; Bang, Hyoweon; Bae, Young Min; Park, Won Sun

    2016-12-01

    We examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline on voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using the voltage-clamp technique. Sertraline decreased the Kv channel current in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 0.18 mu M and a slope value (Hill coefficient) of 0.61. Although the application of 1 mu M sertraline did not affect the steady-state activation curves, sertraline caused a significant, negative shift in the inactivation curves. Pretreatment with another SSRI, paroxetine, had no significant effect on Kv currents and did not alter the inhibitory effects of sertraline on Kv currents. From these results, we concluded that sertraline dose-dependently inhibited Kv currents independently of serotonin reuptake inhibition by shifting inactivation curves to a more negative potential.

  20. A Transformerless Motor Drive with a Five-Level Diode-Clamped PWM Inverter for Fan/Blower Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Kazunori; Hatti, Natchpong; Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper describes a 6.6-kV adjustable-speed motor drive for use in fans, blowers, and pumps without a transformer. The power-conversion system consists of a diode rectifier, a five-level diode-clamped PWM inverter, and a voltage-balancing circuit. A 200-V 5.5-kW downscale model is developed, constructed, and tested. The five-level PWM inverter and the voltage-balancing circuit are studied in detail. Experimental results obtained from testing the 200-V downscale model confirm the viability and effectiveness of the 6.6-kV adjustable-speed motor drive, indicating that the dc mean voltages of the four split dc capacitors are well balanced under all the given operating conditions.

  1. Zn{sup 2+} induces apoptosis in human highly metastatic SHG-44 glioma cells, through inhibiting activity of the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Shangrong; Li, Shu Jie

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Hv1 is expressed in highly metastatic glioma cell. •Zn{sup 2+} ions induces apoptosis in highly metastatic glioma cells. •Zn{sup 2+} ions markedly inhibit proton secretion. •Zn{sup 2+} ions reduce the gelatinase activity. •Inhibition of Hv1 activity via Zn{sup 2+} ions can effectively retard the cancer growth. -- Abstract: In contrast to the voltage-gated K{sup +} channels, the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 contains a voltage-sensor domain but lacks a pore domain. Here, we showed that Hv1 is expressed in the highly metastatic glioma cell SHG-44, but lowly in the poorly metastatic glioma cell U-251. Inhibition of Hv1 activity by 140 μM zinc chloride induces apoptosis in the human highly metastatic glioma cells. Zn{sup 2+} ions markedly inhibit proton secretion, and reduce the gelatinase activity in the highly metastatic glioma cells. In vivo, the glioma tumor sizes of the implantation of the SHG-44 xenografts in nude mice that were injected zinc chloride solution, were dramatically smaller than that in the controlled groups. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of Hv1 activity via Zn{sup 2+} ions can effectively retard the cancer growth and suppress the cancer metastasis by the decrease of proton extrusion and the down-regulation of gelatinase activity. Our results suggest that Zn{sup 2+} ions may be used as a potential anti-glioma drug for glioma therapy.

  2. High Voltage Insulation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherb, V.; Rogalla, K.; Gollor, M.

    2008-09-01

    In preparation of new Electronic Power Conditioners (EPC's) for Travelling Wave Tub Amplifiers (TWTA's) on telecom satellites a study for the development of new high voltage insulation technology is performed. The initiative is mandatory to allow compact designs and to enable higher operating voltages. In a first task a market analysis was performed, comparing different materials with respect to their properties and processes. A hierarchy of selection criteria was established and finally five material candidates (4 Epoxy resins and 1 Polyurethane resin) were selected to be further investigated in the test program. Samples for the test program were designed to represent core elements of an EPC, the high voltage transformer and Printed Circuit Boards of the high voltage section. All five materials were assessed in the practical work flow of the potting process and electrical, mechanical, thermal and lifetime testing was performed. Although the lifetime tests results were overlayed by a larges scatter, finally two candidates have been identified for use in a subsequent qualification program. This activity forms part of element 5 of the ESA ARTES Programme.

  3. One-channel Cell-attached Patch-clamp Recording

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Bruce A.; Cummings, Kirstie A.; Paganelli, Meaghan A.; Murthy, Swetha E.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are universal devices for fast communication across biological membranes. The temporal signature of the ionic flux they generate depends on properties intrinsic to each channel protein as well as the mechanism by which it is generated and controlled and represents an important area of current research. Information about the operational dynamics of ion channel proteins can be obtained by observing long stretches of current produced by a single molecule. Described here is a protocol for obtaining one-channel cell-attached patch-clamp current recordings for a ligand gated ion channel, the NMDA receptor, expressed heterologously in HEK293 cells or natively in cortical neurons. Also provided are instructions on how to adapt the method to other ion channels of interest by presenting the example of the mechano-sensitive channel PIEZO1. This method can provide data regarding the channel’s conductance properties and the temporal sequence of open-closed conformations that make up the channel’s activation mechanism, thus helping to understand their functions in health and disease. PMID:24961614

  4. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Bobby E.; Cromwell, Brian K.; Pender, Charles W.; Shepherd, Seth D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements (2-15 microns) that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps retrieved from the LDEF spacecraft. These clamps were used for maintaining the experiments in place and were located at various locations about the spacecraft. Changes in reflectance of the tray clamps at these locations were compared with atomic oxygen fluxes at the same locations. A decrease in absorption band depth was seen for the surfaces exposed to space indicating that there was some surface layer erosion. In all of the surfaces measured, little evidence of contamination was observed and none of the samples showed evidence of the brown nicotine stain that was so prominent in other experiments. Total emissivity values were calculated for both exposed and unexposed tray clamp surfaces. Only small differences, usually less than 1 percent, were observed. The spectral reflectances were measured using a hemi-ellipsoidal mirror reflectometer matched with an interferometer spectrometer. The rapid scanning capability of the interferometer allowed the reflectance measurements to be made in a timely fashion. The ellipsoidal mirror has its two foci separated by 2 inches and located on the major axis. A blackbody source was located at one focus while the tray clamp samples were located at the conjugate focus. The blackbody radiation was modulated and then focused by the ellipsoid onto the tray clamps. Radiation reflected from the tray clamp was sampled by the interferometer by viewing through a hole in the ellipsoid. A gold mirror (reflectance approximately 98 percent) was used as the reference surface.

  5. Compartmental models of rat cerebellar Purkinje cells based on simultaneous somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Arnd; Häusser, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Simultaneous dendritic and somatic patch-clamp recordings were made from Purkinje cells in cerebellar slices from 12- to 21-day-old rats. Voltage responses to current impulses injected via either the dendritic or the somatic pipette were obtained in the presence of the selective Ih blocker ZD 7288 and blockers of spontaneous synaptic input. Neurons were filled with biocytin for subsequent morphological reconstruction. Four neurons were reconstructed and converted into detailed compartmental models. The specific membrane capacitance (Cm), specific membrane resistance (Rm) and intracellular resistivity (Ri) were optimized by direct fitting of the model responses to the electrophysiological data from the same cell. Mean values were: Cm, 0.77 ± 0.17 μF cm−2 (mean ±s.d.; range, 0.64-1.00 μF cm−2), Rm, 122 ± 18 kΩ cm2 (98-141 kΩ cm2) and Ri, 115 ± 20 Ω cm (93-142 Ω cm). The steady-state electrotonic architecture of these cells was compact under the experimental conditions used. However, somatic voltage-clamp recordings of parallel fibre and climbing fibre synaptic currents were substantially filtered and attenuated. The detailed models were compared with a two-compartment model of Purkinje cells. The range of synaptic current kinetics that can be faithfully recorded using somatic voltage clamp is predicted fairly well by the two-compartment model, even though some of its underlying assumptions are violated. A model of Ih was constructed based on voltage-clamp data, and inserted into the passive compartmental models. Somatic EPSP amplitude was substantially attenuated compared to the amplitude of dendritic EPSPs at their site of generation. However, synaptic efficacy of the same quantal synaptic conductance, as measured by the somatic EPSP amplitude, was only weakly dependent on synaptic location on spiny branchlets. The passive electrotonic structure of Purkinje cells is unusual in that the steady-state architecture is very compact, while voltage transients

  6. Paired patch clamp recordings from motor-neuron and target skeletal muscle in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hua; Brehm, Paul

    2010-11-20

    Larval zebrafish represent the first vertebrate model system to allow simultaneous patch clamp recording from a spinal motor-neuron and target muscle. This is a direct consequence of the accessibility to both cell types and ability to visually distinguish the single segmental CaP motor-neuron on the basis of morphology and location. This video demonstrates the microscopic methods used to identify a CaP motor-neuron and target muscle cells as well as the methodologies for recording from each cell type. Identification of the CaP motor-neuron type is confirmed by either dye filling or by the biophysical features such as action potential waveform and cell input resistance. Motor-neuron recordings routinely last for one hour permitting long-term recordings from multiple different target muscle cells. Control over the motor-neuron firing pattern enables measurements of the frequency-dependence of synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Owing to a large quantal size and the low noise provided by whole cell voltage clamp, all of the unitary events can be resolved in muscle. This feature permits study of basic synaptic properties such as release properties, vesicle recycling, as well as synaptic depression and facilitation. The advantages offered by this in vivo preparation eclipse previous neuromuscular model systems studied wherein the motor-neurons are usually stimulated by extracellular electrodes and the muscles are too large for whole cell patch clamp. The zebrafish preparation is amenable to combining electrophysiological analysis with a wide range of approaches including transgenic lines, morpholino knockdown, pharmacological intervention and in vivo imaging. These approaches, coupled with the growing number of neuromuscular disease models provided by mutant lines of zebrafish, open the door for new understanding of human neuromuscular disorders.

  7. Activity-dependent regulation of voltage-gated Na+ channel expression in Mat-LyLu rat prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2006-06-01

    We have shown previously that voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are up-regulated in human metastatic disease (prostate, breast and small-cell lung cancers), and that VGSC activity potentiates metastatic cell behaviours. However, the mechanism(s) regulating functional VGSC expression in cancer cells remains unknown. We investigated the possibility of activity-dependent (auto)regulation of VGSC functional expression in the strongly metastatic Mat-LyLu model of rat prostate cancer. Pretreatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX) for 24-72 h subsequently suppressed peak VGSC current density without affecting voltage dependence. The hypothesis was tested that the VGSC auto-regulation occurred via VGSC-mediated Na(+) influx and subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Indeed, TTX pretreatment reduced the level of phosphorylated PKA, and the PKA inhibitor KT5720 decreased, whilst the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the Na(+) ionophore monensin both increased the peak VGSC current density. TTX reduced the mRNA level of Nav1.7, predominant in these cells, and VGSC protein expression at the plasma membrane, although the total VGSC protein level remained unchanged. TTX pretreatment eliminated the VGSC-dependent component of the cells' migration in Transwell assays. We concluded that the VGSC activity in Mat-LyLu rat prostate cancer cells was up-regulated in steady-state via a positive feedback mechanism involving PKA, and this enhanced the cells' migratory potential.

  8. Chemical synthesis of tetracyclic terpenes and evaluation of antagonistic activity on endothelin-A receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianyu; Aguilar, Angelo; Zou, Bende; Bao, Weier; Koldas, Serkan; Shi, Aibin; Desper, John; Wangemann, Philine; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Hua, Duy H

    2015-09-01

    A class of tetracyclic terpenes was synthesized and evaluated for antagonistic activity of endothelin-1 (ET-1) induced vasoconstriction and inhibitory activity of voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. Three repeated Robinson annulation reactions were utilized to construct the tetracyclic molecules. A stereoselective reductive Robinson annulation was discovered for the formation of optically pure tricyclic terpenes. Stereoselective addition of cyanide to the hindered α-face of tetracyclic enone (-)-18 was found and subsequent transformation into the aldehyde function was affected by the formation of bicyclic hemiiminal (-)-4. Six selected synthetic tetracyclic terpenes show inhibitory activities in ET-1 induced vasoconstriction in the gerbil spiral modiolar artery with putative affinity constants ranging between 93 and 319 nM. Moreover, one compound, (-)-3, was evaluated further and found to inhibit voltage-activated Ca(2+) currents but not to affect Na(+) or K(+) currents in dorsal root ganglion cells under similar concentrations. These observations imply a dual mechanism of action. In conclusion, tetracyclic terpenes represent a new class of hit molecules for the discovery of new drugs for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension and vascular related diseases.

  9. Chemical Synthesis of Tetracyclic Terpenes and Evaluation of Antagonistic Activity on Endothelin-A Receptors and Voltage-gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianyu; Aguilar, Angelo; Zou, Bende; Bao, Weier; Koldas, Serkan; Aibin, Shi; Desper, John; Wangemann, Philine; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Hua, Duy H.

    2015-01-01

    A class of tetracyclic terpenes was synthesized and evaluated for antagonistic activity of endothelin-1 (ET-1) induced vasoconstriction and inhibitory activity of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. Three repeated Robinson annulation reactions were utilized to construct the tetracyclic molecules. A stereoselective reductive Robinson annulation was discovered for the formation of optically pure tricyclic terpenes. Stereoselective addition of cyanide to the hindered α-face of tetracyclic enone (-)-18 was found and subsequent transformation into the aldehyde function was affected by the formation of bicyclic hemiiminal (-)-4. Six selected synthetic tetracyclic terpenes show inhibitory activities in ET-1 induced vasoconstriction in the gerbil spiral modiolar artery with putative affinity constants ranging between 93 and 319 nM. Moreover, one compound, (-)-3, was evaluated further and found to inhibit voltage-activated Ca2+ currents but not to affect Na+ or K+ currents in dorsal root ganglion cells under similar concentrations. These observations imply a dual mechanism of action. In conclusion, tetracyclic terpenes represent a new class of hit molecules for the discovery of new drugs for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension and vascular related diseases. PMID:26190460

  10. Structure-Activity Studies of Cysteine-Rich α-Conotoxins that Inhibit High-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels via GABA(B) Receptor Activation Reveal a Minimal Functional Motif.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Bodil B; Berecki, Géza; Daniel, James T; Lee, Han Siean; Jackson, Kathryn A V; Tae, Han-Shen; Sadeghi, Mahsa; Castro, Joel; O'Donnell, Tracy; Deiteren, Annemie; Brierley, Stuart M; Craik, David J; Adams, David J; Clark, Richard J

    2016-04-04

    α-Conotoxins are disulfide-rich peptides that target nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Recently we identified several α-conotoxins that also modulate voltage-gated calcium channels by acting as G protein-coupled GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) agonists. These α-conotoxins are promising drug leads for the treatment of chronic pain. To elucidate the diversity of α-conotoxins that act through this mechanism, we synthesized and characterized a set of peptides with homology to α-conotoxins known to inhibit high voltage-activated calcium channels via GABA(B)R activation. Remarkably, all disulfide isomers of the active α-conotoxins Pu1.2 and Pn1.2, and the previously studied Vc1.1 showed similar levels of biological activity. Structure determination by NMR spectroscopy helped us identify a simplified biologically active eight residue peptide motif containing a single disulfide bond that is an excellent lead molecule for developing a new generation of analgesic peptide drugs.

  11. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

    1996-10-15

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules. 5 figs.

  12. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, Daniel W.; Lange, Arnold C.

    1996-01-01

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage put under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules.

  13. Chronic haloperidol increases voltage-gated Na+ currents in mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiqiang; Zhu, Fangfang; Guo, Jingfang; Sheng, Jiangtao; Li, Wenli; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Wang, Gefei; Li, Kangsheng

    2014-07-18

    Typical antipsychotics are characterized by extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS). Previous studies demonstrated that typical antipsychotics could inhibit neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC). However, EPS typically emerge only upon prolonged exposure. As a result, we examined effects of haloperidol, a prototype typical antipsychotic, on neuronal VGSC upon incubation for varying duration. Briefly, VGSC currents were activated and recorded using a whole-cell patch-clamp technique in primary culture of mouse cortical neurons. VGSC activity was inhibited by acute haloperidol exposure (for minutes), but enhanced in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by chronic haloperidol exposure (for hours). The effects of chronic haloperidol were associated with increased expression of VGSC subunits as well as corresponding electrophysiological channel properties. In summary, we found enhanced VGSC currents upon chronic haloperidol exposure in cortical neurons in contrast to inhibition by acute haloperidol exposure. Such a results may contribute to EPS of typical antipsychotics.

  14. Design of an integrated thermoelectric generator power converter for ultra-low power and low voltage body energy harvesters aimed at ExG active electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataei, Milad; Robert, Christian; Boegli, Alexis; Farine, Pierre-André

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a detailed design procedure for an efficient thermal body energy harvesting integrated power converter. The procedure is based on the examination of power loss and power transfer in a converter for a self-powered medical device. The efficiency limit for the system is derived and the converter is optimized for the worst case scenario. All optimum system parameters are calculated respecting the transducer constraints and the application form factor. Circuit blocks including pulse generators are implemented based on the system specifications and optimized converter working frequency. At this working condition, it has been demonstrated that the wide area capacitor of the voltage doubler, which provides high voltage switch gating, can be eliminated at the expense of wider switches. With this method, measurements show that 54% efficiency is achieved for just a 20 mV transducer output voltage and 30% of the chip area is saved. The entire electronic board can fit in one EEG or ECG electrode, and the electronic system can convert the electrode to an active electrode.

  15. Measuring beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in youth: Does the hyperglycemic clamp suffice?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity, disposition index (DI), calculated from two clamps (2cDI, insulin sensitivity from the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and first-phase insulin from the hyperglycemic clamp) with the DI calculated from the hyperglycemic clamp alone (hcD...

  16. Voltage-dependent ion channel currents in putative neuroendocrine cells dissociated from the ventral prostate of rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Hee; Shin, Sun Young; Yun, Sang Soon; Kim, Tae Jin; Oh, Seung-June; Kim, Kwang Myung; Chung, Young-Shin; Hong, Eun-Kyoung; Uhm, Dae-Yong; Kim, Sung Joon

    2003-04-01

    Prostate neuroendocrine (NE) cells play important roles in the growth and differentiation of the prostate. Following enzymatic digestion of rat ventral prostate, the whole-cell patch-clamp technique was applied to dark, round cells that exhibited chromogranin-A immunoreactivity, a representative marker of NE cells. Under zero current-clamp conditions, putative NE cells showed hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials of some -70 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were induced by an increase in external [K+] or by the injection of current. Using a CsCl pipette solution, step-like depolarization activated high-voltage-activated Ca2+ current (HVA I(Ca)) and tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-activated Na+ current. The HVA I(Ca) was blocked by nifedipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA, L-type and N-type Ca2+ channel blockers, respectively. Using a KCl pipette solution, the transient outward K+ current (I(to)), Ca2+ -activated K+ currents (I(K,Ca)), the non-inactivating outward current and an inwardly rectifying K+ current (I(Kir)) were identified. I(K,Ca) was suppressed by charybdotoxin (50 nM), iberiotoxin (10 nM) or clotrimazol (1 microM), but not by apamine (100 nM). I(to) was inhibited by 4-aminopyridine (5 mM). I(Kir) was identified as a Ba2+ -sensitive inwardly rectifying current in the presence of a high-K+ bath solution. The voltage- and Ca2+ -activated ion channels could play significant roles in the regulation of neurohormonal secretion in the prostate.

  17. Subcellular Patch-clamp Recordings from the Somatodendritic Domain of Nigral Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Dendrites of dopaminergic neurons receive and convey synaptic input, support action potential back-propagation and neurotransmitter release. Understanding these fundamental functions will shed light on the information transfer in these neurons. Dendritic patch-clamp recordings provide the possibility to directly examine the electrical properties of dendrites and underlying voltage-gated ion channels. However, these fine structures are not easily accessible to patch pipettes because of their small diameter. This report describes a step-by-step procedure to collect stable and reliable recordings from the dendrites of dopaminergic neurons in acute slices. Electrophysiological measurements are combined with post hoc recovery of cell morphology. Successful experiments rely on improved preparation of slices, solutions and pipettes, adequate adjustment of the optics and stability of the pipette in contact with the recorded structure. Standard principles of somatic patch-clamp recording are applied to dendrites but with a gentler approach of the pipette. These versatile techniques can be implemented to address various questions concerning the excitable properties of dendrites. PMID:27842379