Science.gov

Sample records for active wavefront correction

  1. Upgrading telescopes by active pupil wavefront correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, J. E.; Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Exit pupil correction of the Large Deployable Reflector's (a proposed IR to sub-mm space telescope) segmented primary can be done by reimaging it onto a like segmented surface at the exit pupil. This allows the primary to be more flexible, the adaptive element to be smaller, and the supporting structure to be cheaper than if all correction were performed at a stiffly supported primary. Piston, tilt, and decenter errors of an annulus of the primary and the equations for the required corrections are considered. To verify these, the perturbations with spline functions in the lens design program are simulated. Strehl ratios used to measure image quality show that a piston error of 1 mm is fully corrected over a 5 arcmin field for an f/10 system with a 0.7 n.a. primary at 30 micrometers. Limits of correction are also shown for tilt and decenter errors of segments. Tolerances are given for tilt and decenter errors of the remaining optics also.

  2. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  3. Curvature wavefront sensing performance simulations for active correction of the Javalambre wide-field telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chueca, Sergio; Marín-Franch, Antonio; Cenarro, Andrés. Javier; Varela, Jesús; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Cristóbal-Hornillos, David; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Gruel, Nicolás.; Moles, Mariano; Yanes, Axel; Rueda, Fernando; Rueda, Sergio; Luis-Simoes, Roberto; Hernández-Fuertes, Javier; López-Sainz, Angel; Maícas-Sacristán, Natalio; Lamadrid, José Luis; Díaz-Martín, Miguel Chioare; Taylor, Keith

    2012-09-01

    In order to maintain image quality during Javalambre wide field telescope operations, deformations and rigid body motions must be actively controlled to minimize optical disturbances. For JST/T250 the aberrations of the telescope will be measured with four curvature sensors at the focal plane. To correct the measured distortions, the secondary mirror position (with a hexapod support) and the camera position can be modified in a control closed loop. Multiple software tools have been developed to accomplish this goal, constituting the "Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre" (OAJ) Active Optics Pipeline. We present a comprehensive analysis of the wave-front sensing system, including the availability of reference stars, pupil registration, wavefront estimators and the iteration matrix evaluation techniques. Some preliminary simulations have been made using a telescope model with a Optical Ray Tracing Software.

  4. Curvature wavefront sensing performance evaluation for active correction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

    PubMed

    Manuel, Anastacia M; Phillion, Donald W; Olivier, Scot S; Baker, Kevin L; Cannon, Brice

    2010-01-18

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, modified Paul-Baker design, with an 8.4-meter primary mirror, a 3.4-m secondary, and a 5.0-m tertiary, along with three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat focal plane with a field of view of 9.6 square degrees. In order to maintain image quality during operation, the deformations and rigid body motions of the three large mirrors must be actively controlled to minimize optical aberrations, which arise primarily from forces due to gravity and thermal expansion. We describe the methodology for measuring the telescope aberrations using a set of curvature wavefront sensors located in the four corners of the LSST camera focal plane. We present a comprehensive analysis of the wavefront sensing system, including the availability of reference stars, demonstrating that this system will perform to the specifications required to meet the LSST performance goals. PMID:20173981

  5. Space active optics: performance of a deformable mirror for in-situ wave-front correction in space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hourtoule, Claire; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lopez, Céline; Devilliers, Christophe; Liotard, Arnaud; Chazallet, Frederic

    2012-09-01

    MADRAS (Mirror Active, Deformable and Regulated for Applications in Space) project aims at demonstrating the interest of Active Optics for space applications. We present the prototype of a 24 actuators, 100 mm diameter deformable mirror to be included in a space telescope's pupil relay to compensate for large lightweight primary mirror deformation. The mirror design has been optimized with Finite Element Analysis and its experimental performance characterized in representative conditions. The developed deformable mirror provides an efficient wave-front correction with a limited number of actuators and a design fitting space requirements.

  6. ARGOS wavefront sensing: from detection to correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Bonaglia, M.; Borelli, J.; Busoni, L.; Connot, C.; Esposito, S.; Gaessler, W.; Kulas, M.; Mazzoni, T.; Puglisi, A.; Rabien, S.; Storm, J.; Ziegleder, J.

    2014-08-01

    Argos is the ground-layer adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope. In order to perform its wide-field correction, Argos uses three laser guide stars which sample the atmospheric turbulence. To perform the correction, Argos has at disposal three different wavefront sensing measurements : its three laser guide stars, a NGS tip-tilt, and a third wavefront sensor. We present the wavefront sensing architecture and its individual components, in particular: the finalized Argos pnCCD camera detecting the 3 laser guide stars at 1kHz, high quantum efficiency and 4e- noise; the Argos tip-tilt sensor based on a quad-cell avalanche photo-diodes; and the Argos wavefront computer. Being in the middle of the commissioning, we present the first wavefront sensing configurations and operations performed at LBT, and discuss further improvements in the measurements of the 3 laser guide star slopes as detected by the pnCCD.

  7. Wavefront Correction for Large, Flexible Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Jammejad, Vahraz; Rajagopalan, Harish; Xu, Shenheng

    2010-01-01

    A wavefront-correction system has been proposed as part of an outer-space radio communication system that would include a large, somewhat flexible main reflector antenna, a smaller subreflector antenna, and a small array feed at the focal plane of these two reflector antennas. Part of the wavefront-correction system would reside in the subreflector, which would be a planar patch-element reflectarray antenna in which the phase shifts of the patch antenna elements would be controlled via microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio -frequency (RF) switches. The system would include the following sensing-and-computing subsystems: a) An optical photogrammetric subsystem built around two cameras would estimate geometric distortions of the main reflector; b) A second subsystem would estimate wavefront distortions from amplitudes and phases of signals received by the array feed elements; and c) A third subsystem, built around small probes on the subreflector plane, would estimate wavefront distortions from differences among phases of signals received by the probes. The distortion estimates from the three subsystems would be processed to generate control signals to be fed to the MEMS RF switches to correct for the distortions, thereby enabling collimation and aiming of the received or transmitted radio beam to the required precision.

  8. Tomographic wavefront correction for the LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D W; Olivier, S S; Baker, K; Seppala, L; Hvisc, S

    2006-05-03

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a three mirror modified Paul-Baker design with an 8.4m primary, a 3.4m secondary, and a 5.0m tertiary followed by a 3-element refractive corrector producing a 3.5 degree field of view. This design produces image diameters of <0.3 arcsecond 80% encircled energy over its full field of view. The image quality of this design is sufficient to ensure that the final images produced by the telescope will be limited by the atmospheric seeing at an excellent astronomical site. In order to maintain this image quality, the deformations and rigid body motions of the three large mirrors must be actively controlled to minimize optical aberrations. By measuring the optical wavefront produced by the telescope at multiple points in the field, mirror deformations and rigid body motions that produce a good optical wavefront across the entire field may be determined. We will describe the details of the techniques for obtaining these solutions. We will show that, for the expected mirror deformations and rigid body misalignments, the solutions that are found using these techniques produce an image quality over the field that is close to optimal. We will discuss how many wavefront sensors are needed and the tradeoffs between the number of wavefront sensors, their layout and noise sensitivity.

  9. Wavefront sensing and correction with the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Poyneer, L.; Savransky, D.; Macintosh, B.; Hartung, M.; Dillon, D.; Gavel, D.; Dunn, Jennifer; Wallace, K.; Palmer, D.; De Rosa, Robert

    2012-07-01

    High-contrast imaging is a growing observational technique aimed at discovering and characterizing extrasolar planets. The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is designed to achieve contrast ratios of 10-6 - 10-7 and requires unprecedented wavefront correction and coronagraphic control of diffraction. G PI is a facility instrument now undergoing integration and testing and is scheduled for first light on the 8-m Gemini South telescope towards the end of 2012. In this paper, we focus on the wavefront sensing and correction aspects of the instrument. To measure the wavefront, GPI combines a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a high-accuracy infrared interferometric wavefront calibration system. The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor uses 1700 subapertures to precisely sample the wavefront at 1.5 kHz and features a spatial filter to prevent aliasing. The wavefront calibration system measures the slower temporal frequency errors as well as non-common path aberrations. The wavefront correction is performed using a two-stage adaptive optics system employing a 9x9 piezoelectric deformable mirror and a 43x43 actuators MEMS deformable mirror operating in a woofer-tweeter configuration. Finally, an image sharpening technique is used to further increase the contrast of the final image. In this paper, we describe the three wavefront sensing methods and how we combine their respective information to achieve the best possible contrast.

  10. Device for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Earl R.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    A system for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser. As the laser medium flows past the optical excitation source and the fluid warms its index of refraction changes creating an optical wedge. A system is provided for correcting the thermally induced optical phase errors.

  11. Phase-Controlled Magnetic Mirror for Wavefront Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Wollack, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Typically, light interacts with matter via the electric field and interaction with weakly bound electrons. In a magnetic mirror, a patterned nanowire is fabricated over a metallic layer with a dielectric layer in between. Oscillation of the electrons in the nanowires in response to the magnetic field of incident photons causes a re-emission of photons and operation as a "magnetic mirror." By controlling the index of refraction in the dielectric layer using a local applied voltage, the phase of the emitted radiation can be controlled. This allows electrical modification of the reflected wavefront, resulting in a deformable mirror that can be used for wavefront control. Certain applications require wavefront quality in the few-nanometer regime, which is a major challenge for optical fabrication and alignment of mirrors or lenses. The use of a deformable magnetic mirror allows for a device with no moving parts that can modify the phase of incident light over many spatial scales, potentially with higher resolution than current approaches. Current deformable mirrors modify the incident wavefront by using nano-actuation of a substrate to physically bend the mirror to a desired shape. The purpose of the innovation is to modify the incident wavefront for the purpose of correction of fabrication and alignment-induced wavefront errors at the system level. The advanced degree of precision required for some applications such as gravity wave detection (LISA - Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) or planet finding (FKSI - Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer) requires wavefront control at the limits of the current state of the art. All the steps required to fabricate a magnetic mirror have been demonstrated. The modification is to apply a bias voltage to the dielectric layer so as to change the index of refraction and modify the phase of the reflected radiation. Light is reflected off the device and collected by a phase-sensing interferometer. The interferometer determines the

  12. An adaptive optic for correcting low-order wavefront aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C A; Wilhelmsen, J

    1999-09-02

    Adaptive Optics used for correcting low-order wavefront aberrations were tested and compared using interferometry, beam propagation, and a far-field test. Results confirm that the design and manufacturing specifications were met. Experimental data also confirms theoretical performance expectations, indicating the usefulness of these optics (especially in a laser-beam processing system), and identifying the resulting differences between the two fabrication methods used to make the optics.

  13. Wavefront-Guided Scleral Lens Correction in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Marsack, Jason D.; Ravikumar, Ayeswarya; Nguyen, Chi; Ticak, Anita; Koenig, Darren E.; Elswick, James D.; Applegate, Raymond A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the performance of state-of-the-art wavefront-guided scleral contact lenses (wfgSCLs) on a sample of keratoconic eyes, with emphasis on performance quantified with visual quality metrics; and to provide a detailed discussion of the process used to design, manufacture and evaluate wfgSCLs. Methods Fourteen eyes of 7 subjects with keratoconus were enrolled and a wfgSCL was designed for each eye. High-contrast visual acuity and visual quality metrics were used to assess the on-eye performance of the lenses. Results The wfgSCL provided statistically lower levels of both lower-order RMS (p < 0.001) and higher-order RMS (p < 0.02) than an intermediate spherical equivalent scleral contact lens. The wfgSCL provided lower levels of lower-order RMS than a normal group of well-corrected observers (p < < 0.001). However, the wfgSCL does not provide less higher-order RMS than the normal group (p = 0.41). Of the 14 eyes studied, 10 successfully reached the exit criteria, achieving residual higher-order root mean square wavefront error (HORMS) less than or within 1 SD of the levels experienced by normal, age-matched subjects. In addition, measures of visual image quality (logVSX, logNS and logLIB) for the 10 eyes were well distributed within the range of values seen in normal eyes. However, visual performance as measured by high contrast acuity did not reach normal, age-matched levels, which is in agreement with prior results associated with the acute application of wavefront correction to KC eyes. Conclusions Wavefront-guided scleral contact lenses are capable of optically compensating for the deleterious effects of higher-order aberration concomitant with the disease, and can provide visual image quality equivalent to that seen in normal eyes. Longer duration studies are needed to assess whether the visual system of the highly aberrated eye wearing a wfgSCL is capable of producing visual performance levels typical of the normal population. PMID:24830371

  14. Harmonic source wavefront aberration correction for ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dianis, Scott W.; von Ramm, Olaf T.

    2011-01-01

    A method is proposed which uses a lower-frequency transmit to create a known harmonic acoustical source in tissue suitable for wavefront correction without a priori assumptions of the target or requiring a transponder. The measurement and imaging steps of this method were implemented on the Duke phased array system with a two-dimensional (2-D) array. The method was tested with multiple electronic aberrators [0.39π to 1.16π radians root-mean-square (rms) at 4.17 MHz] and with a physical aberrator 0.17π radians rms at 4.17 MHz) in a variety of imaging situations. Corrections were quantified in terms of peak beam amplitude compared to the unaberrated case, with restoration between 0.6 and 36.6 dB of peak amplitude with a single correction. Standard phantom images before and after correction were obtained and showed both visible improvement and 14 dB contrast improvement after correction. This method, when combined with previous phase correction methods, may be an important step that leads to improved clinical images. PMID:21303031

  15. Correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Wei, Yin; Chen, Xinhua; Tang, Minxue

    2014-11-01

    Membrane mirror with flexible polymer film substrate is a new-concept ultra lightweight mirror for space applications. Compared with traditional mirrors, membrane mirror has the advantages of lightweight, folding and deployable, low cost and etc. Due to the surface shape of flexible membrane mirror is easy to deviate from the design surface shape, it will bring wavefront aberration to the optical system. In order to solve this problem, a method of membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction based on the liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) will be studied in this paper. The wavefront aberration correction principle of LCSLM is described and the phase modulation property of a LCSLM is measured and analyzed firstly. Then the membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction system is designed and established according to the optical properties of a membrane mirror. The LCSLM and a Hartmann-Shack sensor are used as a wavefront corrector and a wavefront detector, respectively. The detected wavefront aberration is calculated and converted into voltage value on LCSLM for the mirror wavefront aberration correction by programming in Matlab. When in experiment, the wavefront aberration of a glass plane mirror with a diameter of 70 mm is measured and corrected for verifying the feasibility of the experiment system and the correctness of the program. The PV value and RMS value of distorted wavefront are reduced and near diffraction limited optical performance is achieved. On this basis, the wavefront aberration of the aperture center Φ25 mm in a membrane mirror with a diameter of 200 mm is corrected and the errors are analyzed. It provides a means of correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror.

  16. Wavefront aberration measurements and corrections through thick tissue using fluorescent microsphere reference beacons

    PubMed Central

    Azucena, Oscar; Crest, Justin; Cao, Jian; Sullivan, William; Kner, Peter; Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren; Olivier, Scot; Kubby, Joel

    2010-01-01

    We present a new method to directly measure and correct the aberrations introduced when imaging through thick biological tissue. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is used to directly measure the wavefront error induced by a Drosophila embryo. The wavefront measurements are taken by seeding the embryo with fluorescent microspheres used as “artificial guide-stars.” The wavefront error is corrected in ten millisecond steps by applying the inverse to the wavefront error on a micro-electro-mechanical deformable mirror in the image path of the microscope. The results show that this new approach is capable of improving the Strehl ratio by 2 times on average and as high as 10 times when imaging through 100 μm of tissue. The results also show that the isoplanatic half-width is approximately 19 μm resulting in a corrected field of view 38 μm in diameter around the guide-star. PMID:20721137

  17. Optimizing wavefront-guided corrections for highly aberrated eyes in the presence of registration uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yue; Queener, Hope M.; Marsack, Jason D.; Ravikumar, Ayeswarya; Bedell, Harold E.; Applegate, Raymond A.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic registration uncertainty of a wavefront-guided correction with respect to underlying wavefront error (WFE) inevitably decreases retinal image quality. A partial correction may improve average retinal image quality and visual acuity in the presence of registration uncertainties. The purpose of this paper is to (a) develop an algorithm to optimize wavefront-guided correction that improves visual acuity given registration uncertainty and (b) test the hypothesis that these corrections provide improved visual performance in the presence of these uncertainties as compared to a full-magnitude correction or a correction by Guirao, Cox, and Williams (2002). A stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm was used to optimize the partial-magnitude correction for three keratoconic eyes based on measured scleral contact lens movement. Given its high correlation with logMAR acuity, the retinal image quality metric log visual Strehl was used as a predictor of visual acuity. Predicted values of visual acuity with the optimized corrections were validated by regressing measured acuity loss against predicted loss. Measured loss was obtained from normal subjects viewing acuity charts that were degraded by the residual aberrations generated by the movement of the full-magnitude correction, the correction by Guirao, and optimized SPGD correction. Partial-magnitude corrections optimized with an SPGD algorithm provide at least one line improvement of average visual acuity over the full magnitude and the correction by Guirao given the registration uncertainty. This study demonstrates that it is possible to improve the average visual acuity by optimizing wavefront-guided correction in the presence of registration uncertainty. PMID:23757512

  18. Wavefront construction Kirchhoff migration with ray-amplitude corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, Michael C.; Hildebrand, S. T.; Huang, L.; Alde, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Kirchhoff migration using ray tracing travel times has been a popular imaging method for many years. There are significant limitations in the ability of Kirchhoff migration using only first arrivals to reliably image regions of complex structure. Thus, new methods for imaging have been sought. One approach for improving imaging capability is to use ray tracing methods that allow the calculation of multiple-valued travel time tables to be used in migration. Additional improvements in ray-based imaging methods may be obtained by including amplitudes and phases of rays calculated using some ray tracing approach. One approach for calculating multiple-valued travel time tables along with estimates of amplitudes and phases is the use of wavefront construction ray tracing. We introduce our wavefront construction-based migration algorithm and present some example images obtained using the method. We compare the images obtained with those obtained using a dual-domain wave-equation migration method that we call Extended Local Rytov Fourier migration method.

  19. Closed loop, DM diversity-based, wavefront correction algorithm for high contrast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Give'on, Amir; Belikov, Ruslan; Shaklan, Stuart; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2007-09-17

    High contrast imaging from space relies on coronagraphs to limit diffraction and a wavefront control systems to compensate for imperfections in both the telescope optics and the coronagraph. The extreme contrast required (up to 10(-10) for terrestrial planets) puts severe requirements on the wavefront control system, as the achievable contrast is limited by the quality of the wavefront. This paper presents a general closed loop correction algorithm for high contrast imaging coronagraphs by minimizing the energy in a predefined region in the image where terrestrial planets could be found. The estimation part of the algorithm reconstructs the complex field in the image plane using phase diversity caused by the deformable mirror. This method has been shown to achieve faster and better correction than classical speckle nulling. PMID:19547602

  20. Integrated Wavefront Correction and Bias Estimation for the High-Contrast Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, A. J. Eldorado

    Just over two decades ago the first planet outside our solar system was found, and thousands more have been discovered since. Nearly all these exoplanets were indirectly detected by sensing changes in their host stars' light. However, exoplanets must be directly imaged to determine their atmospheric compositions and the orbital parameters unavailable from only indirect detections. The main challenge of direct imaging is to observe stellar companions much fainter than the star and at small angular separations. Coronagraphy is one method of suppressing stellar diffraction to provide high star-to-planet contrast, but coronagraphs are extremely sensitive to quasi-static aberrations in the optical system. Active correction of the stellar wavefront is performed with deformable mirrors to recover high-contrast regions in the image. Estimation and control of the stellar electric field is performed iteratively in the camera's focal plane to avoid non-common path aberrations arising from a separate pupil sensor. Estimation can thus be quite time consuming because it requires several high-contrast intensity images per correction iteration. This thesis focuses on efficient focal plane wavefront correction (FPWC) for coronagraphy. Time is a precious commodity for a space telescope, so there is a strong incentive to reduce the total exposure time required for focal plane wavefront estimation. Much of our work emphasizes faster, more robust estimation via Kalman filtering, which optimally combines prior data with new measurements. The other main contribution of this thesis is a paradigm shift in the use of estimation images. Time for FPWC has generally been considered to be lost overhead, but we demonstrate that estimation images can be used for the detection and characterization of exoplanets and disks. These science targets are incoherent with their host stars, so we developed and implemented an iterated extended Kalman filter (IEKF) for simultaneous estimation of the stellar

  1. Compensation of Phase Nonlinearity of Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator for High-Resolution Wavefront Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Zhou, H.; Li, J.; Qiao, Y. J.; Si, J.; Gao, W.

    2015-07-01

    The ability of phase modulation enables liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) to control wavefront. However, the disadvantage of its inherent nonlinear phase response will decrease the wavefront control accuracy. In this paper, a compensation for the nonlinear phase response is proposed based on Inverse Interpolation method. Characteristic curve of phase retardation versus gray levels for a 256x256 pixels phase-only LCSLM has been measured and calibrated by Inverse Interpolation. A mapping relationship between input gray levels and driving gray levels has been built and recorded by a linear look-up table ANTI2.LUT. The nonlinear error of the phase drops from 15.9% to 2.42% by using ANTI2.LUT. Further more, the mapping curve of ANTI2.LUT is almost consistent with 290.LUT from the manufacturer, which proved the efficiency of the compensation of phase nonlinearity. Finally, the distorted wavefront caused by a liquid crystal flake is corrected using LCSLM based on ANTI2.LUT. Experimental results show that the peak-valley value of the distorted wavefront decreases from 1.56l to 0.26l (l =0.6328 λm), the root-mean-square value decreases from 0.25l to 0.02l and the Strehl ratio of diffractive spots increases from 0.08 to 0.97. So LCSLM can be applied to realize high-precision and high-resolution wavefront correction with linear phase response.

  2. A Novel Method of High Accuracy, Wavefront Phase and Amplitude Correction for Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Charles W.; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2003-01-01

    Detection of extra-solar, and especially terrestrial-like planets, using coronagraphy requires an extremely high level of wavefront correction. For example, the study of Woodruff et al. (2002) has shown that phase uniformity of order 10(exp -4)lambda(rms) must be achieved over the critical range of spatial frequencies to produce the approx. 10(exp 10) contrast needed for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission. Correction of wavefront phase errors to this level may be accomplished by using a very high precision deformable mirror (DM). However, not only phase but also amplitude uniformity of the same scale (approx. 10(exp -4)) and over the same spatial frequency range must be simultaneously obtained to remove all residual speckle in the image plane. We present a design for producing simultaneous wavefront phase and amplitude uniformity to high levels from an input wavefront of lower quality. The design uses a dual Michelson interferometer arrangement incorporating two DM and a single, fixed mirror (all at pupils) and two beamsplitters: one with unequal (asymmetric) beam splitting and one with symmetric beam splitting. This design allows high precision correction of both phase and amplitude using DM with relatively coarse steps and permits a simple correction algorithm.

  3. Implementation of adaptive optics in fluorescent microscopy using wavefront sensing and correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azucena, Oscar; Crest, Justin; Cao, Jian; Sullivan, William; Kner, Peter; Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren; Olivier, Scot; Kubby, Joel

    2010-02-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) improves the quality of astronomical imaging systems by using real time measurement of the turbulent medium in the optical path using a guide star (natural or artificial) as a point source reference beacon [1]. AO has also been applied to vision science to improve the view of the human eye. This paper will address our current research focused on the improvement of fluorescent microscopy for biological imaging utilizing current AO technology. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) is used to measure the aberration introduced by a Drosophila Melanogaster embryo with an implanted 1 micron fluorescent bead that serves as a point source reference beacon. Previous measurements of the wavefront aberrations have found an average peak-to-valley and root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront error of 0.77 micrometers and 0.15 micrometers, respectively. Measurements of the Zernike coefficients indicated that the correction of the first 14 Zernike coefficients is sufficient to correct the aberrations we measured. Here we show that a MEMS deformable mirror with 3.5 microns of stroke and 140 actuators is sufficient to correct these aberrations. The design, assembly and initial results for the use of a MEMS deformable mirror, SHWS and implanted fluorescent reference beacon for wavefront correction are discussed.

  4. Wavefront correction with a ferrofluid deformable mirror: experimental results and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brousseau, Denis; Borra, Ermanno F.; Thibault, Simon; Ritcey, Anna M.; Parent, Jocelyn; Seddiki, Omar; Déry, Jean-Philippe; Faucher, Luc; Vassallo, Julien; Naderian, Azadeh

    2008-07-01

    We present the research status of a deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid whose surface is actuated by a triangular array of small current carrying coils. We demonstrate that the mirror can correct a 11 μm low order aberrated wavefront to a residual RMS wavefront error 0.05 μm. Recent developments show that these deformable mirrors can reach a frequency response of several hundred hertz. A new method for linearizing the response of these mirrors is also presented.

  5. Piezocomposite Actuator Arrays for Correcting and Controlling Wavefront Error in Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel Case; Peterson, Lee D.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Shi, Fang; Agnes, Greg S.; Hoffman, Samuel M.; Wilkie, William Keats

    2012-01-01

    Three reflectors have been developed and tested to assess the performance of a distributed network of piezocomposite actuators for correcting thermal deformations and total wave-front error. The primary testbed article is an active composite reflector, composed of a spherically curved panel with a graphite face sheet and aluminum honeycomb core composite, and then augmented with a network of 90 distributed piezoelectric composite actuators. The piezoelectric actuator system may be used for correcting as-built residual shape errors, and for controlling low-order, thermally-induced quasi-static distortions of the panel. In this study, thermally-induced surface deformations of 1 to 5 microns were deliberately introduced onto the reflector, then measured using a speckle holography interferometer system. The reflector surface figure was subsequently corrected to a tolerance of 50 nm using the actuators embedded in the reflector's back face sheet. Two additional test articles were constructed: a borosilicate at window at 150 mm diameter with 18 actuators bonded to the back surface; and a direct metal laser sintered reflector with spherical curvature, 230 mm diameter, and 12 actuators bonded to the back surface. In the case of the glass reflector, absolute measurements were performed with an interferometer and the absolute surface was corrected. These test articles were evaluated to determine their absolute surface control capabilities, as well as to assess a multiphysics modeling effort developed under this program for the prediction of active reflector response. This paper will describe the design, construction, and testing of active reflector systems under thermal loads, and subsequent correction of surface shape via distributed peizeoelctric actuation.

  6. Simulating wavefront correction via deformable mirrors at x-ray beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Tommaso; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Plinta, Audrey; Cavaco, Jeffrey L.; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2012-10-01

    Deformable mirrors (DMs) have been successfully used in astronomical adaptive optics at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, greatly reducing atmospheric-induced aberrations. Building upon the extensive techniques and methods developed for these applications, we propose to extend this capability to the soft and hard x-ray regime in order to take full advantage of the beam quality characteristic of new facilities such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS-II), and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Achieving this goal challenges both current mirror manufacturing techniques and wavefront propagation modeling. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with Northrop Grumman AOA Xinetics Inc., is currently developing an x-ray deformable mirror to correct for wave-front aberrations introduced along the beam path of a typical x-ray beamline. To model the expected performance of such a mirror, we have developed a simulation based on the wavefront propagation code PROPER. We will present the current implementation of the software, which models actuation of a deformable mirror and evaluates its effect on wavefront correction.

  7. Hybrid Architecture Active Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Hyde, Tupper

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for performing relatively high-speed wavefront sensing and control to overcome thermal instabilities in a segmented primary mirror telescope [e.g., James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at L2], by using the onboard fine guidance sensor (FGS) to minimize expense and complexity. This FGS performs centroiding on a bright star to feed the information to the pointing and control system. The proposed concept is to beam split the image of the guide star (or use a single defocused guide star image) to perform wavefront sensing using phase retrieval techniques. Using the fine guidance sensor star image for guiding and fine phasing eliminates the need for other, more complex ways of achieving very accurate sensing and control that is needed for UV-optical applications. The phase retrieval occurs nearly constantly, so passive thermal stability over fourteen days is not required. Using the FGS as the sensor, one can feed segment update information to actuators on the primary mirror that can update the primary mirror segment fine phasing with this frequency. Because the thermal time constants of the primary mirror are very slow compared to this duration, the mirror will appear extremely stable during observations (to the level of accuracy of the sensing and control). The sensing can use the same phase retrieval techniques as the JWST by employing an additional beam splitter, and having each channel go through a weak lens (one positive and one negative). The channels can use common or separate detectors. Phase retrieval can be performed onboard. The actuation scheme would include a coarse stage able to achieve initial alignment of several millimeters of range (similar to JWST and can use a JWST heritage sensing approach in the science camera) and a fine stage capable of continual updates.

  8. Adaptive temporal and wavefront aberration correction for ultrafast lasers with a membrane deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Leah Bruner

    Two adaptive optic systems for correction of either temporal phase error and wavefront errors for ultrafast pulses are demonstrated. These systems consists of a computer controlled micromachined membrane deformable mirror (MMDM) and a genetic learning algorithm (GA). Nonlinear excitation such as two-photon fluorescence or second harmonic generation are used as feedback to the GA to determine the appropriate correction to apply to the mirror. Two MMDMs are used, a 30 x 8 mm, 39 actuator linear MMDM for pulse-shaping applications and a 15 mm diameter, 37 actuator wavefront MMDM. Linear pre-compensation of self-phase modulation (SPM) was experimentally demonstrated utilizing the linear MMDM in a linear pulse-shaper for ultrafast pulses. The nonlinear nature of SPM makes arbitrary polynomial compensation necessary. Pre-compensation of SPM generated in an optical fiber by a 10 fs pulse reduced the pulse from 30fs to 20fs. We demonstrates adaptive correction with the wavefront MMDM by corrected for coma and astigmatism in a reflective multiphoton scanning microscope. An f1, parabola produces a very tight focus with no aberration when it is perfectly aligned. However, when beam scanning is used for two-dimensional imaging the image is severely aberrated. The MMDM and the GA are able to find the best possible wavefront for aberration correction for each scanning position. The horizontal scanning range was increased from 60 mum without the adaptive correction to 170 mum, ≈3 times the uncorrected scanning range, and the vertical scanning range was increased by a comparable amount. This resulted in an increase in scanning area of 9 times. The wavefront MMDM was also used for adaptive correction of spherical aberration from focusing from air, deep into a water-based sample. This depth-based aberration results from an index of refraction mismatch between the sample and the immersion medium of the objective and occurs regardless of beam scanning or sample scanning. By

  9. Correction and simulation of the intensity compensation algorithm used in curvature wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhi-Xu; Bai, Hua; Cui, Xiang-Qun

    2015-05-01

    The wavefront measuring range and recovery precision of a curvature sensor can be improved by an intensity compensation algorithm. However, in a focal system with a fast f-number, especially a telescope with a large field of view, the accuracy of this algorithm cannot meet the requirements. A theoretical analysis of the corrected intensity compensation algorithm in a focal system with a fast f-number is first introduced and afterwards the mathematical equations used in this algorithm are expressed. The corrected result is then verified through simulation. The method used by such a simulation can be described as follows. First, the curvature signal from a focal system with a fast f-number is simulated by Monte Carlo ray tracing; then the wavefront result is calculated by the inner loop of the FFT wavefront recovery algorithm and the outer loop of the intensity compensation algorithm. Upon comparing the intensity compensation algorithm of an ideal system with the corrected intensity compensation algorithm, we reveal that the recovered precision of the curvature sensor can be greatly improved by the corrected intensity compensation algorithm. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  10. Developmental Cryogenic Active Telescope Testbed, a Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Claudia M.; Davila, Pamela S.; Redding, David C.; Morell, Armando; Lowman, Andrew E.; Wilson, Mark E.; Young, Eric W.; Pacini, Linda K.; Coulter, Dan R.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the technology validation strategy of the next generation space telescope (NGST), a system testbed is being developed at GSFC, in partnership with JPL and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which will include all of the component functions envisioned in an NGST active optical system. The system will include an actively controlled, segmented primary mirror, actively controlled secondary, deformable, and fast steering mirrors, wavefront sensing optics, wavefront control algorithms, a telescope simulator module, and an interferometric wavefront sensor for use in comparing final obtained wavefronts from different tests. The developmental. cryogenic active telescope testbed (DCATT) will be implemented in three phases. Phase 1 will focus on operating the testbed at ambient temperature. During Phase 2, a cryocapable segmented telescope will be developed and cooled to cryogenic temperature to investigate the impact on the ability to correct the wavefront and stabilize the image. In Phase 3, it is planned to incorporate industry developed flight-like components, such as figure controlled mirror segments, cryogenic, low hold power actuators, or different wavefront sensing and control hardware or software. A very important element of the program is the development and subsequent validation of the integrated multidisciplinary models. The Phase 1 testbed objectives, plans, configuration, and design will be discussed.

  11. Wavefront correction with Kalman filtering for the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, A. J. Eldorado; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler D.

    2015-09-01

    The only way to characterize most exoplanets spectrally is via direct imaging. For example, the Coronagraph Instrument (CGI) on the proposed Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) mission plans to image and characterize several cool gas giants around nearby stars. The integration time on these faint exoplanets will be many hours to days. A crucial assumption for mission planning is that the time required to dig a dark hole (a region of high star-to-planet contrast) with deformable mirrors is small compared to science integration time. The science camera must be used as the wavefront sensor to avoid non-common path aberrations, but this approach can be quite time intensive. Several estimation images are required to build an estimate of the starlight electric field before it can be partially corrected, and this process is repeated iteratively until high contrast is reached. Here we present simulated results of batch process and recursive wavefront estimation schemes. In particular, we test a Kalman filter and an iterative extended Kalman filter (IEKF) to reduce the total exposure time and improve the robustness of wavefront correction for the WFIRST-AFTA CGI. An IEKF or other nonlinear filter also allows recursive, real-time estimation of sources incoherent with the star, such as exoplanets and disks, and may therefore reduce detection uncertainty.

  12. Simple wavefront correction framework for two-photon microscopy of in-vivo brain

    PubMed Central

    Galwaduge, P. T.; Kim, S. H.; Grosberg, L. E.; Hillman, E. M. C.

    2015-01-01

    We present an easily implemented wavefront correction scheme that has been specifically designed for in-vivo brain imaging. The system can be implemented with a single liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM), which makes it compatible with existing patterned illumination setups, and provides measurable signal improvements even after a few seconds of optimization. The optimization scheme is signal-based and does not require exogenous guide-stars, repeated image acquisition or beam constraint. The unconstrained beam approach allows the use of Zernike functions for aberration correction and Hadamard functions for scattering correction. Low order corrections performed in mouse brain were found to be valid up to hundreds of microns away from the correction location. PMID:26309763

  13. Detection and correction of wavefront errors caused by slight reference tilt in two-step phase-shifting digital holography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianfeng; Cai, Luzhong; Gao, Fei; Jia, Yulei; Zhang, Hui

    2015-11-10

    A simple and convenient method, without the need for any additional optical devices and measurements, is suggested to improve the quality of the reconstructed object wavefront in two-step phase-shifting digital holography by decreasing the errors caused by reference beam tilt, which often occurs in practice and subsequently introduces phase distortion in the reconstructed wave. The effects of reference beam tilt in two-step generalized interferometry is analyzed theoretically, showing that this tilt incurs no error either on the extracted phase shift or on the retrieved real object wave amplitude on the recording plane, but causes great deformation of the recovered object wavefront. A corresponding error detection and correction approach is proposed, and the formulas to calculate the tilt angle and correct the wavefront are deduced. A series of computer simulations to find and remove the wavefront errors caused by reference beam tilt demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. PMID:26560791

  14. Update on laser vision correction using wavefront analysis with the CustomCornea system and LADARVision 193-nm excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguen, Ezra I.; Salz, James J.; McDonald, Marguerite B.; Pettit, George H.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2002-06-01

    A study was undertaken to assess whether results of laser vision correction with the LADARVISION 193-nm excimer laser (Alcon-Autonomous technologies) can be improved with the use of wavefront analysis generated by a proprietary system including a Hartman-Schack sensor and expressed using Zernicke polynomials. A total of 82 eyes underwent LASIK in several centers with an improved algorithm, using the CustomCornea system. A subgroup of 48 eyes of 24 patients was randomized so that one eye undergoes conventional treatment and one eye undergoes treatment based on wavefront analysis. Treatment parameters were equal for each type of refractive error. 83% of all eyes had uncorrected vision of 20/20 or better and 95% were 20/25 or better. In all groups, uncorrected visual acuities did not improve significantly in eyes treated with wavefront analysis compared to conventional treatments. Higher order aberrations were consistently better corrected in eyes undergoing treatment based on wavefront analysis for LASIK at 6 months postop. In addition, the number of eyes with reduced RMS was significantly higher in the subset of eyes treated with a wavefront algorithm (38% vs. 5%). Wavefront technology may improve the outcomes of laser vision correction with the LADARVISION excimer laser. Further refinements of the technology and clinical trials will contribute to this goal.

  15. Optimization of wavefront-coded infinity-corrected microscope systems with extended depth of field

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tingyu; Mauger, Thomas; Li, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    The depth of field of an infinity-corrected microscope system is greatly extended by simply applying a specially designed phase mask between the objective and the tube lens. In comparison with the method of modifying the structure of objective, it is more cost effective and provides improved flexibility for assembling the system. Instead of using an ideal optical system for simulation which was the focus of the previous research, a practical wavefront-coded infinity-corrected microscope system is designed in this paper by considering the various aberrations. Two new optimization methods, based on the commercial optical design software, are proposed to design a wavefront-coded microscope using a non-symmetric phase mask and a symmetric phase mask, respectively. We use polynomial phase mask and rational phase mask as examples of the non-symmetric and symmetric phase masks respectively. Simulation results show that both optimization methods work well for a 32 × infinity-corrected microscope system with 0.6 numerical aperture. The depth of field is extended to about 13 times of the traditional one. PMID:24010008

  16. Visual outcome after correcting the refractive error of large pupil patients with wavefront-guided ablation

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Mounir A; Allam, Waleed A; Shaheen, Mohamed S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy and predictability of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) treatments using the iris registration (IR) technology for the correction of refractive errors in patients with large pupils. Setting Horus Vision Correction Center, Alexandria, Egypt. Methods Prospective noncomparative study including a total of 52 eyes of 30 consecutive laser refractive correction candidates with large mesopic pupil diameters and myopia or myopic astigmatism. Wavefront-guided LASIK was performed in all cases using the VISX STAR S4 IR excimer laser platform. Visual, refractive, aberrometric and mesopic contrast sensitivity (CS) outcomes were evaluated during a 6-month follow-up. Results Mean mesopic pupil diameter ranged from 8.0 mm to 9.4 mm. A significant improvement in uncorrected distance visual acuity (UCDVA) (P < 0.01) was found postoperatively, which was consistent with a significant refractive correction (P < 0.01). No significant change was detected in corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) (P = 0.11). Efficacy index (the ratio of postoperative UCDVA to preoperative CDVA) and safety index (the ratio of postoperative CDVA to preoperative CDVA) were calculated. Mean efficacy and safety indices were 1.06 ± 0.33 and 1.05 ± 0.18, respectively, and 92.31% of eyes had a postoperative spherical equivalent within ±0.50 diopters (D). Manifest refractive spherical equivalent improved significantly (P < 0.05) from a preoperative level of −3.1 ± 1.6 D (range −6.6 to 0 D) to −0.1 ± 0.2 D (range −1.3 to 0.1 D) at 6 months postoperative. No significant changes were found in mesopic CS (P ≥ 0.08), except CS for three cycles/degree, which improved significantly (P = 0.02). Magnitudes of primary coma and trefoil did not change significantly (P ≥ 0.34), with a small but statistically significant increase in primary spherical aberration. Conclusion Wavefront-guided LASIK provides an effective correction of low to moderate myopia or

  17. Wavefront correction and high-resolution in vivo OCT imaging with an objective integrated multi-actuator adaptive lens

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics is rapidly transforming microscopy and high-resolution ophthalmic imaging. The adaptive elements commonly used to control optical wavefronts are liquid crystal spatial light modulators and deformable mirrors. We introduce a novel Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens that can correct aberrations to high order, and which has the potential to increase the spread of adaptive optics to many new applications by simplifying its integration with existing systems. Our method combines an adaptive lens with an imaged-based optimization control that allows the correction of images to the diffraction limit, and provides a reduction of hardware complexity with respect to existing state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens design that we present can correct wavefront aberrations up to the 4th order of the Zernike polynomial characterization. The performance of the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens is demonstrated in a wide field microscope, using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for closed loop control. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens and image-based wavefront-sensorless control were also integrated into the objective of a Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography system for in vivo imaging of mouse retinal structures. The experimental results demonstrate that the insertion of the Multi-actuator Objective Lens can generate arbitrary wavefronts to correct aberrations down to the diffraction limit, and can be easily integrated into optical systems to improve the quality of aberrated images. PMID:26368169

  18. Wavefront correction and high-resolution in vivo OCT imaging with an objective integrated multi-actuator adaptive lens.

    PubMed

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-08-24

    Adaptive optics is rapidly transforming microscopy and high-resolution ophthalmic imaging. The adaptive elements commonly used to control optical wavefronts are liquid crystal spatial light modulators and deformable mirrors. We introduce a novel Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens that can correct aberrations to high order, and which has the potential to increase the spread of adaptive optics to many new applications by simplifying its integration with existing systems. Our method combines an adaptive lens with an imaged-based optimization control that allows the correction of images to the diffraction limit, and provides a reduction of hardware complexity with respect to existing state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens design that we present can correct wavefront aberrations up to the 4th order of the Zernike polynomial characterization. The performance of the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens is demonstrated in a wide field microscope, using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for closed loop control. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens and image-based wavefront-sensorless control were also integrated into the objective of a Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography system for in vivo imaging of mouse retinal structures. The experimental results demonstrate that the insertion of the Multi-actuator Objective Lens can generate arbitrary wavefronts to correct aberrations down to the diffraction limit, and can be easily integrated into optical systems to improve the quality of aberrated images. PMID:26368169

  19. An SLM-based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for aberration correction in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Richard W.; Wright, Amanda J.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2010-12-01

    Holographic optical tweezers allow the creation of multiple optical traps in 3D configurations through the use of dynamic diffractive optical elements called spatial light modulators (SLMs). We show that, in addition to controlling traps, the SLM in a holographic tweezers system can be both the principal element of a wavefront sensor and the corrective element in a closed-loop adaptive optics system. This means that aberrations in such systems can be estimated and corrected without altering the experimental setup. Aberrations are estimated using the Shack-Hartmann method, where an array of spots is projected into the sample plane and the distortion of this array is used to recover the aberration. The system can recover aberrations of up to ten wavelengths peak-peak, and is sensitive to aberrations much smaller than a wavelength. The spot pattern could also be analysed by eye, as a tool for aligning the system.

  20. Robust Wave-front Correction in a Small Scale Adaptive Optics System Using a Membrane Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Park, S.; Baik, S.; Jung, J.; Lee, S.; Yoo, J.

    A small scale laboratory adaptive optics system using a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (WFS) and a membrane deformable mirror (DM) has been built for robust image acquisition. In this study, an adaptive limited control technique is adopted to maintain the long-term correction stability of an adaptive optics system. To prevent the waste of dynamic correction range for correcting small residual wave-front distortions which are inefficient to correct, the built system tries to limit wave-front correction when a similar small difference wave-front pattern is repeatedly generated. Also, the effect of mechanical distortion in an adaptive optics system is studied and a pre-recognition method for the distortion is devised to prevent low-performance system operation. A confirmation process for a balanced work assignment among deformable mirror (DM) actuators is adopted for the pre-recognition. The corrected experimental results obtained by using a built small scale adaptive optics system are described in this paper.

  1. Area-selected Ion Milling for Reflection Wavefront Error Correction of Soft X-ray Multilayer Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuru, Toshihide; Sakai, Yu; Hatano, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    For accurate reflection wavefront error correction of imaging soft X-ray multilayer mirrors, a period-by-period ion milling system was developed. A stable and homogenized radial distribution of ion beam was realized for an ion milling over a whole area of 100 mm-wide multilayer. To demonstrate the wavefront error correction principle, a dielectric multilayer mirror for visible light was locally milled by our system. Wavefront as measured by a phase shifting interferometer showed the reflection phase of local milling multilayer advanced. Area-selected ion millings with mask templates made of Mo and Si, and by photoresist contact masks were carried out. Although striped patterns generated by the difference of spectroscopic reflectance between Mo and Si were observed at peripherals of milling area when templates were used, a clear and sharp edge pattern was obtained with contact mask. Soft X-ray reflectance of a Mo/Si multilayer milled with photoresist contact mask showed good feasibility of precise wavefront error correction of multilayers. These results proved our phase correction method is promising and practical for the 0.1 nm-period correction of soft X-ray multilayer mirror.

  2. Large-aperture deformable mirror correction of tiled-grating wavefront error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, B. E.; Jungquist, R.; Qiao, J.; Abbey, S.; Dean, S. E.; Maywar, D. N.; Moore, M. D.; Waxer, L. J.; Wilson, M. E.

    2006-06-01

    When tiling three gratings, with each individually exhibiting astigmatism and power due to holographic errors and coating stress, the resulting wavefront aberrations contain high-frequency components as well as the fundamental frequency, which is nearly three cycles across the aperture in the tiling direction. A deformable mirror (DM) that was designed to compensate for much slower errors (e.g., those arising from distortion in amplifier disks) is being used to compensate for this tiling-induced error. This investigation studies the effectiveness of compensating only the fundamental frequency of the tiled aberration, and shows that this provides a significant improvement that is adequate for a range of expected aberrations. Limitations of the DM correction technique are also studied.

  3. Experimental analysis of the fitting error of diffractive liquid crystal wavefront correctors for atmospheric turbulence corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lina; Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Zhang, Peiguang; Yao, Lishuang; Wang, Shaoxin; Hu, Lifa; Xuan, Li

    2016-05-01

    An experimental analysis was conducted to investigate the fitting error of diffractive liquid crystal wavefront correctors (LCWFCs). First, an experiment was performed to validate the theoretical equations presented in our previous work Cao et al., 2009 [9]. The results showed an apparent discrepancy between the theoretical and measured results for the fitting error. This difference was examined and the influence of nonlinearities and rounding errors generated by the LCWFC was analyzed and discussed. Finally, the fitting error formula of the LCWFC was modified to obtain a more effective tool for the design of LCWFCs for atmospheric turbulence correction. These results will be useful for researchers who design liquid crystal adaptive optics systems for large-aperture ground-based telescopes.

  4. Space-Variant Post-Filtering for Wavefront Curvature Correction in Polar-Formatted Spotlight-Mode SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    DOREN,NEALL E.

    1999-10-01

    Wavefront curvature defocus effects occur in spotlight-mode SAR imagery when reconstructed via the well-known polar-formatting algorithm (PFA) under certain imaging scenarios. These include imaging at close range, using a very low radar center frequency, utilizing high resolution, and/or imaging very large scenes. Wavefront curvature effects arise from the unrealistic assumption of strictly planar wavefronts illuminating the imaged scene. This dissertation presents a method for the correction of wavefront curvature defocus effects under these scenarios, concentrating on the generalized: squint-mode imaging scenario and its computational aspects. This correction is accomplished through an efficient one-dimensional, image domain filter applied as a post-processing step to PF.4. This post-filter, referred to as SVPF, is precalculated from a theoretical derivation of the wavefront curvature effect and varies as a function of scene location. Prior to SVPF, severe restrictions were placed on the imaged scene size in order to avoid defocus effects under these scenarios when using PFA. The SVPF algorithm eliminates the need for scene size restrictions when wavefront curvature effects are present, correcting for wavefront curvature in broadside as well as squinted collection modes while imposing little additional computational penalty for squinted images. This dissertation covers the theoretical development, implementation and analysis of the generalized, squint-mode SVPF algorithm (of which broadside-mode is a special case) and provides examples of its capabilities and limitations as well as offering guidelines for maximizing its computational efficiency. Tradeoffs between the PFA/SVPF combination and other spotlight-mode SAR image formation techniques are discussed with regard to computational burden, image quality, and imaging geometry constraints. It is demonstrated that other methods fail to exhibit a clear computational advantage over polar-formatting in conjunction

  5. Both channel coding and wavefront correction on the turbulence mitigation of optical communications using orbital angular momentum multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shengmei; Wang, Le; Zou, Li; Gong, Longyan; Cheng, Weiwen; Zheng, Baoyu; Chen, Hanwu

    2016-10-01

    A free-space optical (FSO) communication link with multiplexed orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes has been demonstrated to largely enhance the system capacity without a corresponding increase in spectral bandwidth, but the performance of the link is unavoidably degraded by atmospheric turbulence (AT). In this paper, we propose a turbulence mitigation scheme to improve AT tolerance of the OAM-multiplexed FSO communication link using both channel coding and wavefront correction. In the scheme, we utilize a wavefront correction method to mitigate the phase distortion first, and then we use a channel code to further correct the errors in each OAM mode. The improvement of AT tolerance is discussed over the performance of the link with or without channel coding/wavefront correction. The results show that the bit error rate performance has been improved greatly. The detrimental effect of AT on the OAM-multiplexed FSO communication link could be removed by the proposed scheme even in the relatively strong turbulence regime, such as Cn2 = 3.6 ×10-14m - 2 / 3.

  6. Advanced wavefront correction technology for the next generation of adaptive optics equipped ophthalmic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, Nathan; Helmbrecht, Michael; Hart, Matthew; Juneau, Thor

    2005-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is becoming increasingly important in improving system resolution in flood illuminated fundus cameras, confocal laser scanning ophthalmoscopes (cSLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). For the latter two cases, AO also provides an increase in the throughput light levels. The flood and cSLO modalities have allowed for the routine, in-vivo visualization of individual cone photoreceptor cells and real time blood flow measurements of single leukocyte cells. Most recently, evidence of the rod mosaic has also been observed. A key component in all of these systems is the deformable mirror (DM) that provides the correction of the high order aberrations. The majority of these systems to-date have utilized large, expensive DMs originally designed for astronomy. This paper details ongoing work at Iris AO, Inc in which advanced fabrication techniques based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are being leveraged. This approach yields extremely compact DMs that offer higher performance and lower cost, coupled with the ability for batch fabrication. The Iris AO design uses an array of individually addressable hexagonal segments than can each be moved in three orthogonal directions. Such a design allows for superior ocular wavefront fitting performance and very high stroke (>10 microns). Additionally, our DMs can be fabricated with diameters that are an order of magnitude smaller than conventional non-MEMS techniques.

  7. Wavefront-guided versus standard laser in situ keratomileusis to correct low to moderate myopia.

    PubMed

    Nuijts, Rudy M M A; Nabar, Vaishaly A; Hament, Willem J; Eggink, Fred A G J

    2002-11-01

    To evaluate the 6-month refractive outcomes of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) (Zyoptix, Bausch & Lomb) versus standard LASIK (PlanoScan, Bausch & Lomb). Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands. In a prospective randomized study, 12 patients with myopia had Zyoptix wavefront-guided LASIK in 1 eye and PlanoScan LASIK in the contralateral eye. The safety, efficacy, predictability, stability, optical zone size, and ablation depth were evaluated. The mean preoperative spherical equivalent (SE) of the subjective manifest refraction was -3.88 diopters (D) +/- 1.92 (SD) (Zyoptix) and -4.35 +/- 2.11 D (PlanoScan). Six months postoperatively, 8% of PlanoScan patients and 16% of Zyoptix patients gained at least 2 lines of best corrected visual acuity; the safety index was 1.12 in the Zyoptix group and 1.08 in the PlanoScan group. An SE of +/-1.00 D and +/-0.50 D was achieved by 100% and 92%, respectively, in both groups. There were 2 undercorrections in the Zyoptix group and 1 undercorrection in the PlanoScan group. In the Zyoptix group, 100% had a UCVA of 20/40 and 67% of 20/20 and in the PlanoScan group, 100% and 83%, respectively. The efficacy index was 0.87 and 0.93 in the Zyoptix group and PlanoScan group, respectively. The mean optical zone 6 months postoperatively was 6.16 +/- 0.34 mm in the PlanoScan group and 6.23 +/- 0.41 mm in the Zyoptix group (P =.67). The ablation depth per diopter of defocus equivalent was 13.5 +/- 4.6 microm/D and 8.6 +/- 4.4 microm/D, respectively (P =.01).An excellent safety index was achieved with the Zyoptix and PlanoScan treatments. The efficacy index was marginally lower for Zyoptix treatments as a result of 2 undercorrections. The ablation depth in the Zyoptix group per diopter of defocus equivalent was significantly lower than in the PlanoScan group. Further refinements in defining the ablation algorithms may increase the efficacy index. PMID:12457662

  8. Wavefront curvature sensing in a 2.5m wide-field telescope: design, analysis, and implementation for real-time correction of telescope alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousberg, Gregory P.; Moreau, Vincent; Pirnay, Olivier; Gloesener, Pierre; Flebus, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    In the framework of the design and manufacturing of a wide-field 2.5m telescope for the Observatorio Astrofisica de Javalambre (OAJ), AMOS has developed a novel wavefront sensing system that allows for real time correction of the alignment of the telescope without perturbing the acquisition of science images. The system is based on the wavefront curvature sensing (WCS) technique in which two out-of-focus images of a star are used for reconstructing the telescope wavefront error. Any deviations from the nominal wavefront error that is obtained after telescope final alignment are tracked and corrective actions can be implemented so as to optimize the telescope optical quality. The wavefront reconstruction technique and the associated corrections of the telescope alignment have been modelled and analyzed so as to validate the proposed approach before implementation in the telescope. To this aim, a bespoke coupled Zemax-Matlab model has been developed by AMOS. The model incorporates the algorithm for the telescope wavefront error reconstruction from out-of-focus images and computation of the alignment corrections in the telescope model. The justification of the wavefront sensing approach, its robustness against several sources of errors, as well as the selection of the appropriate equipment for its implementation in the telescope are discussed on the basis of this combined model.

  9. Error analysis and correction in wavefront reconstruction from the transport-of-intensity equation

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Sergio; Thibos, Larry N.

    2007-01-01

    Wavefront reconstruction from the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) is a well-posed inverse problem given smooth signals and appropriate boundary conditions. However, in practice experimental errors lead to an ill-condition problem. A quantitative analysis of the effects of experimental errors is presented in simulations and experimental tests. The relative importance of numerical, misalignment, quantization, and photodetection errors are shown. It is proved that reduction of photodetection noise by wavelet filtering significantly improves the accuracy of wavefront reconstruction from simulated and experimental data. PMID:20052302

  10. Hybrid architecture active wavefront sensing and control system, and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D. (Inventor); Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor); Hyde, Tristram T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    According to various embodiments, provided herein is an optical system and method that can be configured to perform image analysis. The optical system can comprise a telescope assembly and one or more hybrid instruments. The one or more hybrid instruments can be configured to receive image data from the telescope assembly and perform a fine guidance operation and a wavefront sensing operation, simultaneously, on the image data received from the telescope assembly.

  11. Phase correction method for least-squares wavefront calculation in statistical generalized phase-shifting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Nobukazu; Kajihara, Kazuki

    2015-09-01

    When phase-shifting digital holography with a continuous fringe-scanning scheme is implemented using a PC-based measurement system without any synchronous circuit, nonuniform phase-shifted interference fringes are captured because of the fluctuation in the image-capturing interval. To cope with the nonuniform phase shifts, a statistical generalized phase-shifting approach is employed. Because the algorithm is designed to use an arbitrary phase shift, the nonuniform phase shifts do not obstruct object-wave retrieval. Moreover, multiple interference fringes can be obtained in a short time owing to the continuous fringe-scanning scheme. However, the wavefront calculation method is not designed for sequentially recorded interference fringes. To use multiple interference fringes appropriately, we develop a least-squares wavefront calculation method combined with corrections for the initial phase and the direction of phase rotation. We verify the proposed method by numerical simulations and optical experiments. The results show that the object wave with the same initial phase can be correctly reconstructed by using both phase correction methods simultaneously.

  12. Wavelet-based denoising of the Fourier metric in real-time wavefront correction for single molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Kayvan Forouhesh; Mortensen, Luke J.; Kner, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront sensorless schemes for correction of aberrations induced by biological specimens require a time invariant property of an image as a measure of fitness. Image intensity cannot be used as a metric for Single Molecule Localization (SML) microscopy because the intensity of blinking fluorophores follows exponential statistics. Therefore a robust intensity-independent metric is required. We previously reported a Fourier Metric (FM) that is relatively intensity independent. The Fourier metric has been successfully tested on two machine learning algorithms, a Genetic Algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization, for wavefront correction about 50 μm deep inside the Central Nervous System (CNS) of Drosophila. However, since the spatial frequencies that need to be optimized fall into regions of the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) that are more susceptible to noise, adding a level of denoising can improve performance. Here we present wavelet-based approaches to lower the noise level and produce a more consistent metric. We compare performance of different wavelets such as Daubechies, Bi-Orthogonal, and reverse Bi-orthogonal of different degrees and orders for pre-processing of images.

  13. Dynamic Aberration Correction for Conformal Window of High-Speed Aircraft Using Optimized Model-Based Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bing; Li, Yan; Han, Xin-Li; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    For high-speed aircraft, a conformal window is used to optimize the aerodynamic performance. However, the local shape of the conformal window leads to large amounts of dynamic aberrations varying with look angle. In this paper, deformable mirror (DM) and model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSLAO) are used for dynamic aberration correction of an infrared remote sensor equipped with a conformal window and scanning mirror. In model-based WSLAO, aberration is captured using Lukosz mode, and we use the low spatial frequency content of the image spectral density as the metric function. Simulations show that aberrations induced by the conformal window are dominated by some low-order Lukosz modes. To optimize the dynamic correction, we can only correct dominant Lukosz modes and the image size can be minimized to reduce the time required to compute the metric function. In our experiment, a 37-channel DM is used to mimic the dynamic aberration of conformal window with scanning rate of 10 degrees per second. A 52-channel DM is used for correction. For a 128 × 128 image, the mean value of image sharpness during dynamic correction is 1.436 × 10(-5) in optimized correction and is 1.427 × 10(-5) in un-optimized correction. We also demonstrated that model-based WSLAO can achieve convergence two times faster than traditional stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) method. PMID:27598161

  14. Active Correction of Aberrations of Low-Quality Telescope Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Yijian

    2007-01-01

    A system of active optics that includes a wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror has been demonstrated to be an effective means of partly correcting wavefront aberrations introduced by fixed optics (lenses and mirrors) in telescopes. It is envisioned that after further development, active optics would be used to reduce wavefront aberrations of about one wave or less in telescopes having aperture diameters of the order of meters or tens of meters. Although this remaining amount of aberration would be considered excessive in scientific applications in which diffraction-limited performance is required, it would be acceptable for free-space optical- communication applications at wavelengths of the order of 1 m. To prevent misunderstanding, it is important to state the following: The technological discipline of active optics, in which the primary or secondary mirror of a telescope is directly and dynamically tilted, distorted, and/or otherwise varied to reduce wavefront aberrations, has existed for decades. The term active optics does not necessarily mean the same thing as does adaptive optics, even though active optics and adaptive optics are related. The term "adaptive optics" is often used to refer to wavefront correction at speeds characterized by frequencies ranging up to between hundreds of hertz and several kilohertz high enough to enable mitigation of adverse effects of fluctuations in atmospheric refraction upon propagation of light beams. The term active optics usually appears in reference to wavefront correction at significantly lower speeds, characterized by times ranging from about 1 second to as long as minutes. Hence, the novelty of the present development lies, not in the basic concept of active or adaptive optics, but in the envisioned application of active optics in conjunction with a deformable mirror to achieve acceptably small wavefront errors in free-space optical communication systems that include multi-meter-diameter telescope mirrors that are

  15. Improvements on adaptive optics control approaches: experimental tests of wavefront correction forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Stangalini, Marco; Giovannelli, Luca; Berrilli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The FORS (closed loop forecasting system) control algorithm has been already successfully applied to improve the efficiency of a simulated adaptive optics (AO) system. To test its performance in real conditions, we implemented this algorithm in a hardware AO demonstrator, introducing controlled aberrations into the system. We present here the results of introducing into the system both a simple periodic defocus aberration and a real open loop defocus time sequence acquired at the vacuum tower telescope solar telescope. In both cases, FORS yields a significant performance increase, improving the stability of the system in closed-loop conditions and decreasing the amplitude of the residual uncorrected wavefront aberrations.

  16. Open-loop wavefront sensing scheme for specimen aberrations correction in two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andilla, Jordi; Porcar-Guezenec, Rafael; Levecq, Xavier; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    The recent linkage between adaptive optics, a technique borrowed from astronomy and various imaging devices, has enabled to push forward their imaging capabilities by improving its contrast and resolution. A specific case is nonlinear microscopy (NLM) that, although it brings several inherent advantages (compared to linear fluorescence techniques) due to its nonlinear dependence on the excitation beam, its enhanced capabilities can be limited by the sample inhomogeneous structure. In this work, we demonstrate how these imaging capabilities can be enhanced by, employing adaptive optics in a two step correction process. Firstly, a closed-loop methodology aided by Shack-Hartman Wavefront sensing scheme is implemented for compensating the aberrations produced by the laser and the optical elements before the high numerical aperture microscope objective, resulting in a one-time calibration process. Then the residual aberrations are produced by the microscope objective and the sample. These are measured in a similar way as it is done in astronomy (employing a laser guide-star), using the two-photon excited fluorescence. The properties of this incoherent emission produced inside a test sample are compared to a genetically modified Caenorhabditis. elegans nematode expressing GFP showing that the emission of this protein (at 810nm) can be sensed efficiently with our WFS by modifying the exposure time. Therefore the recorded wavefront will capture the sample aberrations which are used to shape a deformable mirror in an open-loop configuration. This correction principle is demonstrated in a test sample by correcting aberrations in a "single-shot" resulting in a reduced sample exposure.

  17. Open-loop control of liquid-crystal spatial light modulators for vertical atmospheric turbulence wavefront correction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hu, Lifa; Mu, Quanquan; Cao, Zhaoliang; Xuan, Li

    2011-01-01

    We present an open-loop adaptive optics (AO) system based on two liquid-crystal spatial light modulators (LCSLMs) that profit from high precision wavefront generation and good repeatability. A wide optical bandwidth of 300 nm is designed for the system, and a new open-loop optical layout is invented to conveniently switch between the open and closed loop. The corresponding control algorithm is introduced with a loop frequency (the reciprocal of the total time delay of a correction loop) of 103 Hz. The system was mounted onto a 2.16 m telescope for vertical atmospheric turbulence correction. The full width at half-maximum of the image of the star α Boo reached 0.636 arc sec after the open-loop correction, while it was 2.12 arc sec before the correction. The result indicates that the open-loop AO system based on LCSLMs potentially has the ability to be used for general astronomical applications. PMID:21221164

  18. General formulation for wavefront curvature correction in polar-formatted spotlight-mode SAR images using space-variant post-filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Doren, N.E.; Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Wahl, D.E.; Thompson, P.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce a general formulation for wavefront curvature correction in spotlight-mode SAR images formed using the polar-formatting algorithm (PFA). This correction is achieved through the use of an efficient, image domain space-variant filter which is applied as a post-processing step to PFA. Wavefront curvature defocus effects occur in certain SAR collection modes that include imaging at close range, using low center frequency, and/or imaging very large scenes. The formulation is general in that it corrects for wavefront curvature in roadside as well as squinted collection modes, with no computational penalty for correcting squint-mode images. Algorithms such as the range migration technique (also known as seismic migration), and a recent enhancement known as frequency domain replication, FReD, have been developed to accommodate these wavefront curvature effects. However, they exhibit no clear computational advantage over space-variant post-filtering in conjunction with polar formatting (PF2). This paper will present the basic concepts of the formulation, and will provide computer results demonstrating the capabilities of space-variant post-filtering.

  19. Optical Modeling Activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 3; Wavefront Aberrations due to Alignment and Figure Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This is part three of a series describing the ongoing optical modeling activities for James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The work here investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The optical design of the telescope is a three-mirror anastigmat, with an active fold mirror at the exit pupil for fine guiding. The primary mirror is over 6.5 meters in diameter, and is composed of 18 hexagonal segments that can individually positioned on hexapods, as well as compensated for radius of curvature. This effectively gives both alignment and figure control of the primary mirror. The secondary mirror can be moved in rigid body only, giving alignment control of the telescope. The tertiary mirror is fixed, however, as well as the location of the science instrumentation. Simulations are performed of various combinations of active alignment corrections of component figure errors, and of primary mirror figure corrections of alignment errors. Single field point and moderate field knowledge is assumed in the corrections. Aberrations over the field are reported for the varying cases, and examples presented.

  20. Correction of walk-off induced wavefront distortion for continuous-variable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hongxin; Shen, Yong; Guo, Hong

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate wave front distortion in critically phase matched continuous-wave (CW) second harmonic generation (SHG). Due to the walk-off effect in the nonlinear crystal, the generated second harmonic is extremely elliptical and quite non-Gaussian, which causes a very low matching and coupling efficiency in experiment. Cylindrical lenses and walk-off compensating crystals are adopted to correct distorted wave fronts, and obtain a good TEM00 mode efficiency. Theoretically we simulate the correction effect of 266nm laser generated with SHG. The experiment results accord well with theoretical simulation and above 80 percent TEM00 component is obtained for 266nm continuous wave laser with 4.8 degree walk-off angle in BBO crystal. After that, an optical mode cleaner is used to obtain an ideal Gaussian mode. With these treatments, the generated second harmonic can be utilized in continuous-variable regime, where almost perfect mode matching is demanded.

  1. Toward 10(exp 10) Contrast for Terrestrial Exoplanet Detection: Demonstration of Wavefront Correction in a Shaped Pupil Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belikov, Ruslan; Give'on, Amir; Trauger, John T.; Carr, Michael; Kasdin, Jeremy N.; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Kuhnert, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Experimental demonstration of wavefront control with shaped pupils. Contrast level is maintained across different wavelengths and 10% broadband light. Further improvements in contrast believed to have been possible with more time and parameter optimizations.

  2. Multi-actuator adaptive lens for wavefront correction in optical coherence tomography and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Stefano; Lee, Sujin; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new type of adaptive lens with 18 actuators that can correct up the 4th order of aberration. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens (M-AL) can guarantee a good level of aberration correction for many applications and, with respect to deformable mirror, it allows the realization of more compact and simple optical systems. The adaptive lens is based on the use of piezoelectric actuators and, without any obstruction or electrodes in the clear aperture, can guarantee a fast response time, in the order of about 10ms. The clear aperture of the M-AL allows its use in "classical" Adaptive Optics configuration together with a wavefront sensor. To introduce a further simplification to the optical system design we show that the adaptive lens can be also driven with a wavefront sensorless control algorithm during in vivo optical coherence tomography of the human retina and for two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. In the experimental setup we used two aberration correcting devices a commercial adaptive lens (AL) with a high dynamic range to correct for defocus and the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens (M-AL) to correct for the Zernike aberrations up to the 4th order. Experimental results show that the ocular aberrations of human eyes can be successfully corrected with our M-AL for pupils of 5mm and that retinal cones can be readily imaged.

  3. Stress activated contractile wavefronts in the mechanically-excitable embryonic heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Kevin; Majkut, Stephanie; Discher, Dennis; Lubensky, Tom; Liu, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    The heart is a prime example of a robust, active system with behavior-the heart beat-that is extraordinarily well timed and coordinated. For more than half a century, electrical activity induced by ion release and diffusion has been argued to be the mechanism driving cardiac action. But recent work indicates that this phenomenon is also regulated by mechanical activity. In the embryonic avian heart tube, the speed of the contractile wavefront traversing the heart tube with each beat is measured to be a monotonic, linear function of tissue stiffness. Traditional electrical conduction models of excitation-contraction cannot explain this dependence; such a result indicates that the myocardium is mechanically excitable. Here, we extend this work by using experimental observations of stiffness-dependent behavior in isolated cardiomyocytes as an input to study contractile wavefronts in the tissue as a whole. We model the heart tube as an active, overdamped elastic network where the primary stress mediator is the extracellular matrix. Using this simple model, we explain experimental observations of the systolic wave and predict qualitatively new behavior.

  4. Correction and Communicative Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Huw P.

    1980-01-01

    In classes where the communicative approach to language teaching is taken and where learners are asked to form groups in order to communicate, the teacher should be ready to respond to requests, give immediate correction, and use a monitoring sheet to note errors. The sheet can also be used for individual students. (PJM)

  5. Optical modeling activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST): III. Wavefront aberrations due to alignment and figure compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is part three of a series describing the ongoing optical modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two papers discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients [1-2]. The work here investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (i.e. the primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The optical design of the telescope is a three-mirror anastigmat, with an active fold mirror at the exit pupil for fine guiding. The primary mirror is over 6.5 meters in diameter, and is composed of 18 hexagonal segments that can individually positioned on hexapods, as well as compensated for radius of curvature. This architecture effectively gives both alignment and figure control of the primary mirror. The secondary mirror can be moved in rigid body only, and the tertiary mirror is fixed. Simulations are performed of various combinations of alignment and figure errors corrected by the primary and secondary mirrors. Single field point knowledge is assumed in the corrections, and aberrations over the field are reported for the varying cases.

  6. Rapid, parallel path planning by propagating wavefronts of spiking neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Ponulak, Filip; Hopfield, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient path planning and navigation is critical for animals, robotics, logistics and transportation. We study a model in which spatial navigation problems can rapidly be solved in the brain by parallel mental exploration of alternative routes using propagating waves of neural activity. A wave of spiking activity propagates through a hippocampus-like network, altering the synaptic connectivity. The resulting vector field of synaptic change then guides a simulated animal to the appropriate selected target locations. We demonstrate that the navigation problem can be solved using realistic, local synaptic plasticity rules during a single passage of a wavefront. Our model can find optimal solutions for competing possible targets or learn and navigate in multiple environments. The model provides a hypothesis on the possible computational mechanisms for optimal path planning in the brain, at the same time it is useful for neuromorphic implementations, where the parallelism of information processing proposed here can fully be harnessed in hardware. PMID:23882213

  7. Wavefront sensor and wavefront corrector matching in adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Dubra, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Matching wavefront correctors and wavefront sensors by minimizing the condition number and mean wavefront variance is proposed. The particular cases of two continuous-sheet deformable mirrors and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with square packing geometry are studied in the presence of photon noise, background noise and electronics noise. Optimal number of lenslets across each actuator are obtained for both deformable mirrors, and a simple experimental procedure for optimal alignment is described. The results show that high-performance adaptive optics can be achieved even with low cost off-the-shelf Shack-Hartmann arrays with lenslet spacing that do not necessarily match those of the wavefront correcting elements. PMID:19532513

  8. Wavefront and divergence of the beamlet prototype laser

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M A; Salmon, J T; Seppala, L G; Van Wonterghem, B M; Wegner, P J; Weiland, T L; Williams, W H

    1998-10-30

    We have measured the wavefront and the divergence of the Beamlet prototype laser under a variety of conditions. Emphasis of the tests was on quantifying best attainable divergence in the angular regime below 30 {micro}rad to benchmark propagation models that are used to set wavefront gradient specifications for NIF optical components. Performance with and without active wavefront correction was monitored with radial shearing interferometers that measured near-field wavefront at the input and output of the main amplifier with a spatial resolution of 1 cm, and cameras which measured the corresponding intensity distributions in the far field with an angular resolution of 0.3 {micro}rad. Details of the measurements are discussed and related to NIF focal spot requirements and optics specifications.

  9. Space-variant filtering for correction of wavefront curvature effects in spotlight-mode SAR imagery formed via polar formatting

    SciTech Connect

    Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Wahl, D.E.; Thompson, P.A.; Doren, N.E.

    1996-12-31

    Wavefront curvature defocus effects can occur in spotlight-mode SAR imagery when reconstructed via the well-known polar formatting algorithm (PFA) under certain scenarios that include imaging at close range, use of very low center frequency, and/or imaging of very large scenes. The range migration algorithm (RMA), also known as seismic migration, was developed to accommodate these wavefront curvature effects. However, the along-track upsampling of the phase history data required of the original version of range migration can in certain instances represent a major computational burden. A more recent version of migration processing, the Frequency Domain Replication and Downsampling (FReD) algorithm, obviates the need to upsample, and is accordingly more efficient. In this paper the authors demonstrate that the combination of traditional polar formatting with appropriate space-variant post-filtering for refocus can be as efficient or even more efficient than FReD under some imaging conditions, as demonstrated by the computer-simulated results in this paper. The post-filter can be pre-calculated from a theoretical derivation of the curvature effect. The conclusion is that the new polar formatting with post filtering algorithm (PF2) should be considered as a viable candidate for a spotlight-mode image formation processor when curvature effects are present.

  10. Wavefront technology for vision and ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junzhong

    2003-07-01

    Wavefront technology promises to change the way vision care will be conducted. Wavefront-sensing optometers provide instant, accurate measurement of the total wave aberration of the eye, and that one measurement contains all the information needed for refractive vision diagnosis and refractive vision correction. Wavefront optometers are now being used to create individualized laser vision correction based, not on the coventional sphero-cylindrical correction, but rather on the total wavefront errors in patients' eyes. Comprehensive vision diagnosis based on the wave aberration and the image quality derived from it is far different from the conventional test of visual acuity. Wavefront technology has made it possible to image microscopic features as small as the photoreceptors and to improve resolution of retinal imaging techniques for early diagnosis of retinal diseases. This article is a review covering the hsitory and progress being made in the development of the wavefront technologies.

  11. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    Programs at LLNL that involve large laser systems--ranging from the National Ignition Facility to new tactical laser weapons--depend on the maintenance of laser beam quality through precise control of the optical wavefront. This can be accomplished using adaptive optics, which compensate for time-varying aberrations that are often caused by heating in a high-power laser system. Over the past two decades, LLNL has developed a broad capability in adaptive optics technology for both laser beam control and high-resolution imaging. This adaptive optics capability has been based on thin deformable glass mirrors with individual ceramic actuators bonded to the back. In the case of high-power lasers, these adaptive optics systems have successfully improved beam quality. However, as we continue to extend our applications requirements, the existing technology base for wavefront control cannot satisfy them. To address this issue, this project studied improved modeling tools to increase our detailed understanding of the performance of these systems, and evaluated novel approaches to low-order wavefront control that offer the possibility of reduced cost and complexity. We also investigated improved beam control technology for high-resolution wavefront control. Many high-power laser systems suffer from high-spatial-frequency aberrations that require control of hundreds or thousands of phase points to provide adequate correction. However, the cost and size of current deformable mirrors can become prohibitive for applications requiring more than a few tens of phase control points. New phase control technologies are becoming available which offer control of many phase points with small low-cost devices. The goal of this project was to expand our wavefront control capabilities with improved modeling tools, new devices that reduce system cost and complexity, and extensions to high spatial and temporal frequencies using new adaptive optics technologies. In FY 99, the second year of

  12. Wavefront Sensing via High Speed DSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Future light-weighted and segmented primary mirror systems require active optical control to maintain mirror positioning and figure to within nanometer tolerances. Current image-based wavefront sensing approaches rely on post-processing techniques to return an estimate of the aberrated optical wavefront with accuracies to the nanometer level. But the lag times between wavefront sensing, and then control, contributes to a significant latency in the wavefront sensing implementation. In this analysis we demonstrate accelerated image-based wavefront sensing performance using multiple digital signal processors (DSP's). The computational architecture is discussed as well as the heritage leading to the approach.

  13. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  14. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a gradient approach and an additional deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2015-09-01

    High development cost is a challenge for space telescopes and imaging satellites. One of the primary reasons for this high cost is the development of the primary mirror, which must meet diffraction limit surface figure requirements. Recent efforts to develop lower cost, lightweight, replicable primary mirrors include development of silicon carbide actuated hybrid mirrors and carbon fiber mirrors. The silicon carbide actuated hybrid mirrors at the Naval Postgraduate School do not meet the surface quality required for an optical telescope due to high spatial frequency residual surface errors. A technique under investigation at the Naval Postgraduate School is to correct the residual surface figure error using a deformable mirror in the optical path. We present a closed loop feedback gradient controller to actively control a SMT active segment and an additional deformable mirror to reduce residual wavefront error. The simulations and experimental results show that the gradient controller reduces the residual wavefront error more than an integral controller.

  15. Hybrid curvature and modal wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shihao; Haist, Tobias; Dietrich, Tom; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    The crosstalk effect considerably limits the capability of holography-based modal wavefront sensing (HMWS) when measuring wavefronts with large aberrations. In this contribution, we introduce a curvature-based measurement technique into HMWS to extend the dynamic range and the sensitivity of HMWS via a compact holographic design. If the input aberrations are large, the dominating aberration modes are first detected via curvature sensing and compensated using a wavefront correcting device, e.g. a membrane mirror. The system then switches to HMWS to obtain better sensitivity and accuracy with reduced aberrations. Different approaches for the reconstruction of the wavefront have been tested and extensive simulations for different aberrations have been analyzed.

  16. A prospective comparison of phakic collamer lenses and wavefront-optimized laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis for correction of myopia

    PubMed Central

    Parkhurst, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare night vision and low-luminance contrast sensitivity (CS) in patients undergoing implantation of phakic collamer lenses or wavefront-optimized laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Patients and methods This is a nonrandomized, prospective study, in which 48 military personnel were recruited. Rabin Super Vision Test was used to compare the visual acuity and CS of Visian implantable collamer lens (ICL) and LASIK groups under normal and low light conditions, using a filter for simulated vision through night vision goggles. Results Preoperative mean spherical equivalent was −6.10 D in the ICL group and −6.04 D in the LASIK group (P=0.863). Three months postoperatively, super vision acuity (SVa), super vision acuity with (low-luminance) goggles (SVaG), super vision contrast (SVc), and super vision contrast with (low luminance) goggles (SVcG) significantly improved in the ICL and LASIK groups (P<0.001). Mean improvement in SVaG at 3 months postoperatively was statistically significantly greater in the ICL group than in the LASIK group (mean change [logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution, LogMAR]: ICL =−0.134, LASIK =−0.085; P=0.032). Mean improvements in SVc and SVcG were also statistically significantly greater in the ICL group than in the LASIK group (SVc mean change [logarithm of the CS, LogCS]: ICL =0.356, LASIK =0.209; P=0.018 and SVcG mean change [LogCS]: ICL =0.390, LASIK =0.259; P=0.024). Mean improvement in SVa at 3 months was comparable in both groups (P=0.154). Conclusion Simulated night vision improved with both ICL implantation and wavefront-optimized LASIK, but improvements were significantly greater with ICLs. These differences may be important in a military setting and may also affect satisfaction with civilian vision correction. PMID:27418804

  17. Wavefront Measurement in Ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl

    Wavefront sensing or aberration measurement in the eye is a key problem in refractive surgery and vision correction with laser. The accuracy of these measurements is critical for the outcome of the surgery. Practically all clinical methods use laser as a source of light. To better understand the background, we analyze the pre-laser techniques developed over centuries. They allowed new discoveries of the nature of the optical system of the eye, and many served as prototypes for laser-based wavefront sensing technologies. Hartmann's test was strengthened by Platt's lenslet matrix and the CCD two-dimensional photodetector acquired a new life as a Hartmann-Shack sensor in Heidelberg. Tscherning's aberroscope, invented in France, was transformed into a laser device known as a Dresden aberrometer, having seen its reincarnation in Germany with Seiler's help. The clinical ray tracing technique was brought to life by Molebny in Ukraine, and skiascopy was created by Fujieda in Japan. With the maturation of these technologies, new demands now arise for their wider implementation in optometry and vision correction with customized contact and intraocular lenses.

  18. Wavefront reconstruction using smartphone based wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Zhan, Qiwen

    2015-11-01

    Smartphone camera system has the capability of being integrated into powerful field-sensing tools, capturing data and sharing these data with computing servers or cloud experts. The purpose of this work is to implement a wavefront sensor based on the smartphone platform, which has many potential applications in thin-films and bio-related sensing areas. To overcome problems caused by traditional wavefront curvature sensing setups, distorted micro-gratings are designed and introduced into the system in the dual role of both beam splitter and defocuser. The new design is capable of capturing two images of different levels of defocus in a single shot, which are then used as the input data to reconstruct the wavefront. Through testing with generated known spherical wavefronts, the smartphone based wavefront sensor has demonstrated decent system resolution and wavefront sensing accuracy.

  19. 77 FR 39452 - Substantial Business Activities; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ..., June 12, 2012 (77 FR 34887) regarding whether a foreign corporation has substantial business activities...- 107889-12), which was the subject of FR. Doc. 2012-14238, is corrected as follows: On page 34887, column... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BK85 Substantial Business Activities; Correction...

  20. An Efficient Correction Algorithm for Eliminating Image Misalignment Effects on Co-Phasing Measurement Accuracy for Segmented Active Optics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Dan; Xu, Shuyan; Nie, Haitao; Wang, Zongyang

    2016-01-01

    The misalignment between recorded in-focus and out-of-focus images using the Phase Diversity (PD) algorithm leads to a dramatic decline in wavefront detection accuracy and image recovery quality for segmented active optics systems. This paper demonstrates the theoretical relationship between the image misalignment and tip-tilt terms in Zernike polynomials of the wavefront phase for the first time, and an efficient two-step alignment correction algorithm is proposed to eliminate these misalignment effects. This algorithm processes a spatial 2-D cross-correlation of the misaligned images, revising the offset to 1 or 2 pixels and narrowing the search range for alignment. Then, it eliminates the need for subpixel fine alignment to achieve adaptive correction by adding additional tip-tilt terms to the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) of the out-of-focus channel. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed correction algorithm to improve the measurement accuracy during the co-phasing of segmented mirrors. With this alignment correction, the reconstructed wavefront is more accurate, and the recovered image is of higher quality. PMID:26934045

  1. A First Order Wavefront Estimation Algorithm for P1640 Calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhaia, C.; Vasisht, G.; Shao, M.; Lockhart, T.; Cady, E.; Oppenheimer, B.; Burruss, R.; Roberts, J.; Beichman, C.; Brenner, D.; Crepp, J.; Dekany, R.; Hinkley, S.; Hillenbrand, L.; Parry, I.; Pueyo, L.; Rice, E.; Roberts, L. C. Jr.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Soummer, R.; Vescelus, F.; Wallace, K.; Zimmerman, N.

    2012-01-01

    P1640 calibrator is a wavefront sensor working with the P1640 coronagraph and the Palomar 3000 actuator adaptive optics system (P3K) at the Palomar 200 inch Hale telescope. It measures the wavefront by interfering post-coronagraph light with a reference beam formed by low-pass filtering the blocked light from the coronagraph focal plane mask. The P1640 instrument has a similar architecture to the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) and its performance is currently limited by the quasi-static speckles due to non-common path wavefront errors, which comes from the non-common path for the light to arrive at the AO wavefront sensor and the coronagraph mask. By measuring the wavefront after the coronagraph mask, the non-common path wavefront error can be estimated and corrected by feeding back the error signal to the deformable mirror (DM) of the P3K AO system. Here, we present a first order wavefront estimation algorithm and an instrument calibration scheme used in experiments done recently at Palomar observatory. We calibrate the P1640 calibrator by measuring its responses to poking DM actuators with a sparse checkerboard pattern at different amplitudes. The calibration yields a complex normalization factor for wavefront estimation and establishes the registration of the DM actuators at the pupil camera of the P1640 calibrator, necessary for wavefront correction. Improvement of imaging quality after feeding back the wavefront correction to the AO system demonstrated the efficacy of the algorithm.

  2. Wavefront control system for the Keck telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J. M., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The laser guide star adaptive optics system currently being developed for the Keck 2 telescope consists of several major subsystems: the optical bench, wavefront control, user interface and supervisory control, and the laser system. The paper describes the design and implementation of the wavefront control subsystem that controls a 349 actuator deformable mirror for high order correction and tip-tilt mirrors for stabilizing the image and laser positions.

  3. JWST Wavefront Control Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Shahram Ron; Aronstein, David L.

    2011-01-01

    A Matlab-based toolbox has been developed for the wavefront control and optimization of segmented optical surfaces to correct for possible misalignments of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) using influence functions. The toolbox employs both iterative and non-iterative methods to converge to an optimal solution by minimizing the cost function. The toolbox could be used in either of constrained and unconstrained optimizations. The control process involves 1 to 7 degrees-of-freedom perturbations per segment of primary mirror in addition to the 5 degrees of freedom of secondary mirror. The toolbox consists of a series of Matlab/Simulink functions and modules, developed based on a "wrapper" approach, that handles the interface and data flow between existing commercial optical modeling software packages such as Zemax and Code V. The limitations of the algorithm are dictated by the constraints of the moving parts in the mirrors.

  4. WITHDRAWN: Clinical fitting of CAD/CAM zirconia single crowns generated from digital intraoral impressions based on active wavefront sampling.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Roberto; Cardelli, Paolo; Baldissara, Paolo; Monaco, Carlo

    2011-10-17

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this clinical trial was to test the accuracy of single all-ceramic zirconia crowns resulting from digital intraoral impressions with active wavefront sampling technology by measuring the marginal and internal fits of the crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-seven teeth (24 anterior and 13 posterior) in fifteen patients were restored with single zirconia-ceramic crowns (Lava/Lava Ceram; 3M ESPE) generated from a digital intraoral scanner (Lava Chairside Oral Scanner; 3M ESPE). Before definitive insertion, silicone replicas were produced for all 37 crowns. The sample was cut in four sections; each section was evaluated in four points: marginal gap, mid-axial wall, axio-occlusal edge and centro-occlusal. A total of 592 measurements (148 for each evaluation point) was examined using stereomicroscopy with a magnification of 50×. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to evaluate whether there were differences between anterior and posterior values (alpha=0.05). RESULTS: The mean values for each point were: 48.65μm (SD 29.45μm) for the marginal gap, 112.25μm (SD 55.54μm) at the mid-axial wall, 137.81μm (SD 71.31μm) at the axio-occlusal edge of the abutments, and 157.25μm (SD 75.51μm) at the centro-occlusal location. No statistical differences were found between the anterior and posterior group for each point (p-values: P1=0.39; P2=0.38; P3=0.07; P4=0.30). CONCLUSIONS: The marginal and internal fitting values obtained were within literature agreed as clinically acceptable for both anterior and posterior teeth. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Single crown restorations obtained using digital intraoral impressions based on active wavefront sampling technology presented enough accuracy to be used as an alternative to the conventional impression techniques. PMID:22027653

  5. Optimal wavefront control for adaptive segmented mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Goodman, Joseph W.

    1989-01-01

    A ground-based astronomical telescope with a segmented primary mirror will suffer image-degrading wavefront aberrations from at least two sources: (1) atmospheric turbulence and (2) segment misalignment or figure errors of the mirror itself. This paper describes the derivation of a mirror control feedback matrix that assumes the presence of both types of aberration and is optimum in the sense that it minimizes the mean-squared residual wavefront error. Assumptions of the statistical nature of the wavefront measurement errors, atmospheric phase aberrations, and segment misalignment errors are made in the process of derivation. Examples of the degree of correlation are presented for three different types of wavefront measurement data and compared to results of simple corrections.

  6. Wavefront Control for Extreme Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A

    2003-07-16

    Current plans for Extreme Adaptive Optics systems place challenging requirements on wave-front control. This paper focuses on control system dynamics, wave-front sensing and wave-front correction device characteristics. It may be necessary to run an ExAO system after a slower, low-order AO system. Running two independent systems can result in very good temporal performance, provided specific design constraints are followed. The spatially-filtered wave-front sensor, which prevents aliasing and improves PSF sensitivity, is summarized. Different models of continuous and segmented deformable mirrors are studied. In a noise-free case, a piston-tip-tilt segmented MEMS device can achieve nearly equivalent performance to a continuous-sheet DM in compensating for a static phase aberration with use of spatial filtering.

  7. Optimal wavefront estimation of incoherent sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, A. J. Eldorado; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler

    2014-08-01

    Direct imaging is in general necessary to characterize exoplanets and disks. A coronagraph is an instrument used to create a dim (high-contrast) region in a star's PSF where faint companions can be detected. All coronagraphic high-contrast imaging systems use one or more deformable mirrors (DMs) to correct quasi-static aberrations and recover contrast in the focal plane. Simulations show that existing wavefront control algorithms can correct for diffracted starlight in just a few iterations, but in practice tens or hundreds of control iterations are needed to achieve high contrast. The discrepancy largely arises from the fact that simulations have perfect knowledge of the wavefront and DM actuation. Thus, wavefront correction algorithms are currently limited by the quality and speed of wavefront estimates. Exposures in space will take orders of magnitude more time than any calculations, so a nonlinear estimation method that needs fewer images but more computational time would be advantageous. In addition, current wavefront correction routines seek only to reduce diffracted starlight. Here we present nonlinear estimation algorithms that include optimal estimation of sources incoherent with a star such as exoplanets and debris disks.

  8. Relaying an optical wavefront

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Vawter, G. Allen

    2007-03-06

    A wavefront rely devices samples an incoming optical wavefront at different locations, optically relays the samples while maintaining the relative position of the samples and the relative phase between the samples. The wavefront is reconstructed due to interference of the samples. Devices can be designed for many different wavelengths, including for example the ultraviolet, visible, infrared and even longer wavelengths such as millimeter waves. In one application, the device function as a telescope but with negligible length.

  9. Curvature wavefront sensing for the large synoptic survey telescope.

    PubMed

    Xin, Bo; Claver, Chuck; Liang, Ming; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Angeli, George; Shipsey, Ian

    2015-10-20

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will use an active optics system (AOS) to maintain alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from information derived from four curvature wavefront sensors located at the corners of the focal plane. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1 mm on either side of focus. In this paper, we describe the extensions to published curvature wavefront sensing algorithms needed to address challenges presented by the LSST, namely the large central obscuration, the fast f/1.23 beam, off-axis pupil distortions, and vignetting at the sensor locations. We also describe corrections needed for the split sensors and the effects from the angular separation of different stars providing the intrafocal and extrafocal images. Lastly, we present simulations that demonstrate convergence, linearity, and negligible noise when compared to atmospheric effects when the algorithm extensions are applied to the LSST optical system. The algorithm extensions reported here are generic and can easily be adapted to other wide-field optical systems including similar telescopes with large central obscuration and off-axis curvature sensing. PMID:26560396

  10. Curvature wavefront sensing for the large synoptic survey telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Bo; Claver, Chuck; Liang, Ming; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Angeli, George; Shipsey, Ian

    2015-10-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will use an active optics system (AOS) to maintain alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from information derived from 4 curvature wavefront sensors located at the corners of the focal plane. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1mm on either side of focus. In this paper we describe the extensions to published curvature wavefront sensing algorithms needed to address challenges presented by the LSST, namely the large central obscuration, the fast f/1.23 beam, off-axis pupil distortions, and vignetting at the sensor locations. We also describe corrections needed for the split sensors and the effects from the angular separation of different stars providing the intra- and extra-focal images. Lastly, we present simulations that demonstrate convergence, linearity, and negligible noise when compared to atmospheric effects when the algorithm extensions are applied to the LSST optical system. The algorithm extensions reported here are generic and can easily be adapted to other wide-field optical systems including similar telescopes with large central obscuration and off-axis curvature sensing.

  11. Compliant deformable mirror approach for wavefront improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James H.; Penado, F. Ernesto

    2016-04-01

    We describe a compliant static deformable mirror approach to reduce the wavefront concavity at the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI). A single actuator pressing on the back surface of just one of the relay mirrors deforms the front surface in a correcting convex shape. Our design uses the mechanical advantage gained from a force actuator sandwiched between a rear flexure plate and the back surface of the mirror. We superimpose wavefront contour measurements with our finite element deformed mirror model. An example analysis showed improvement from 210-nm concave-concave wavefront to 51-nm concave-concave wavefront. With our present model, a 100-nm actuator increment displaces the mirror surface by 1.1 nm. We describe the need for wavefront improvement that arises from the NPOI reconfigurable array, offer a practical design approach, and analyze the support structure and compliant deformable mirror using the finite element method. We conclude that a 20.3-cm-diameter, 1.9-cm-thick Zerodur® mirror shows that it is possible to deform the reflective surface and cancel out three-fourths of the wavefront deformation without overstressing the material.

  12. A Simplified Approach for Simultaneous Measurements of Wavefront Velocity and Curvature in the Heart Using Activation Times.

    PubMed

    Mazeh, Nachaat; Haines, David E; Kay, Matthew W; Roth, Bradley J

    2013-12-01

    The velocity and curvature of a wave front are important factors governing the propagation of electrical activity through cardiac tissue, particularly during heart arrhythmias of clinical importance such as fibrillation. Presently, no simple computational model exists to determine these values simultaneously. The proposed model uses the arrival times at four or five sites to determine the wave front speed (v), direction (θ), and radius of curvature (ROC) (r 0). If the arrival times are measured, then v, θ, and r 0 can be found from differences in arrival times and the distance between these sites. During isotropic conduction, we found good correlation between measured values of the ROC r 0 and the distance from the unipolar stimulus (r = 0.9043 and p < 0.0001). The conduction velocity (m/s) was correlated (r = 0.998, p < 0.0001) using our method (mean = 0.2403, SD = 0.0533) and an empirical method (mean = 0.2352, SD = 0.0560). The model was applied to a condition of anisotropy and a complex case of reentry with a high voltage extra stimulus. Again, results show good correlation between our simplified approach and established methods for multiple wavefront morphologies. In conclusion, insignificant measurement errors were observed between this simplified approach and an approach that was more computationally demanding. Accuracy was maintained when the requirement that ε (ε = b/r 0, ratio of recording site spacing over wave fronts ROC) was between 0.001 and 0.5. The present simplified model can be applied to a variety of clinical conditions to predict behavior of planar, elliptical, and reentrant wave fronts. It may be used to study the genesis and propagation of rotors in human arrhythmias and could lead to rotor mapping using low density endocardial recording electrodes. PMID:24772193

  13. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a deformable mirror in a woofer-tweeter configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's segmented mirror telescope (SMT) was developed using prototype silicon carbide active hybrid mirror technology to demonstrate lower cost and rapid manufacture of primary mirror segments for a space telescope. The developmental mirror segments used too few actuators limiting the ability to adequately correct the surface figure error. To address the unintended shortfall of the developmental mirrors, a deformable mirror is added to the SMT and control techniques are developed. The control techniques are similar to woofer-tweeter adaptive optics, where the SMT segment represents the woofer and the deformable mirror represents the tweeter. The optical design of an SMT woofer-tweeter system is presented, and the impacts of field angle magnification on the placement and size of the deformable mirror are analyzed. A space telescope woofer-tweeter wavefront control technique is proposed using a global influence matrix and closed-loop constrained minimization controller. The control technique simultaneously manipulates the woofer and tweeter mirrors. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate a significant improvement in wavefront error of the primary mirror and the control technique shows significant wavefront error improvement compared to sequentially controlling the woofer and tweeter mirrors.

  14. Adaptive Wavefront Calibration and Control for the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J

    2007-02-02

    Quasi-static errors in the science leg and internal AO flexure will be corrected. Wavefront control will adapt to current atmospheric conditions through Fourier modal gain optimization, or the prediction of atmospheric layers with Kalman filtering.

  15. Space Active Optics: toward optimized correcting mirrors for future large spaceborne observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lemaitre, Gérard; Liotard, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Wave-front correction in optical instruments is often needed, either to compensate Optical Path Differences, off-axis aberrations or mirrors deformations. Active optics techniques are developed to allow efficient corrections with deformable mirrors. In this paper, we will present the conception of particular deformation systems which could be used in space telescopes and instruments in order to improve their performances while allowing relaxing specifications on the global system stability. A first section will be dedicated to the design and performance analysis of an active mirror specifically designed to compensate for aberrations that might appear in future 3m-class space telescopes, due to lightweight primary mirrors, thermal variations or weightless conditions. A second section will be dedicated to a brand new design of active mirror, able to compensate for given combinations of aberrations with a single actuator. If the aberrations to be corrected in an instrument and their evolutions are known in advance, an optimal system geometry can be determined thanks to the elasticity theory and Finite Element Analysis.

  16. A coronagraph based on two spatial light modulators for active amplitude apodizing and phase corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhao, Gang; Wu, Zhen; Chen, Rui; Liu, Chengchao; Yang, Feng; Yang, Chao

    2014-08-01

    Almost all high-contrast imaging coronagraphs proposed until now are based on passive coronagraph optical components. Recently, Ren and Zhu proposed for the first time a coronagraph that integrates a liquid crystal array (LCA) for the active pupil apodizing and a deformable mirror (DM) for the phase corrections. Here, for demonstration purpose, we present the initial test result of a coronagraphic system that is based on two liquid crystal spatial light modulators (SLM). In the system, one SLM is served as active pupil apodizing and amplitude correction to suppress the diffraction light; another SLM is used to correct the speckle noise that is caused by the wave-front distortions. In this way, both amplitude and phase error can be actively and efficiently compensated. In the test, we use the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to control two SLMs, which is based on the point spread function (PSF) sensing and evaluation and optimized for a maximum contrast in the discovery area. Finally, it has demonstrated a contrast of 10-6 at an inner working angular distance of ~6.2 λ/D, which is a promising technique to be used for the direct imaging of young exoplanets on ground-based telescopes.

  17. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) wavefront control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Atta, L; Bliss, E; Bruns, D; Feldman, M; Grey, A; Henesian, M; J; Koch, J; LaFiandra, C; Lawson; Sacks, R; Salmon, T; Toeppen, J; Winters, S; Woods, B; Zacharias, R

    1998-08-17

    A wavefront control system will be employed on NIF to correct beam aberrations that otherwise would limit the minimum target focal spot size. For most applications, NIF requires a focal spot that is a few times the diffraction limit. Sources of aberrations that must be corrected include prompt pump-induced distortions in the laser slabs, thermal distortions in the laser slabs from previous shots, manufacturing figure errors in the optics, beam off-axis effects, gas density variations, and gravity, mounting, and coating- induced optic distortions. The NIF Wavefront Control System consists of five subsystems: 1) a deformable mirror, 2) a wavefront sensor, 3) a computer controller, 4) a wavefront reference system, and 5) a system of fast actuators to allow the wavefront control system to operate to within one second of the laser shot. The system includes the capability for in situ calibrations and operates in closed loop prior to the shot. Shot wavefront data is recorded. This paper describes the function, realization, and performance of each wavefront control subsystem. Subsystem performance will be characterized by computer models and by test results. The focal spot improvement in the NIF laser system effected by the wavefront control system will be characterized through computer models.

  18. Phase discrepancy induced from least squares wavefront reconstruction of wrapped phase measurements with high noise or large localized wavefront gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbock, Michael J.; Hyde, Milo W.

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive optics is used in applications such as laser communication, remote sensing, and laser weapon systems to estimate and correct for atmospheric distortions of propagated light in real-time. Within an adaptive optics system, a reconstruction process interprets the raw wavefront sensor measurements and calculates an estimate for the unwrapped phase function to be sent through a control law and applied to a wavefront correction device. This research is focused on adaptive optics using a self-referencing interferometer wavefront sensor, which directly measures the wrapped wavefront phase. Therefore, its measurements must be reconstructed for use on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. In testing and evaluating a novel class of branch-point- tolerant wavefront reconstructors based on the post-processing congruence operation technique, an increase in Strehl ratio compared to a traditional least squares reconstructor was noted even in non-scintillated fields. To investigate this further, this paper uses wave-optics simulations to eliminate many of the variables from a hardware adaptive optics system, so as to focus on the reconstruction techniques alone. The simulation results along with a discussion of the physical reasoning for this phenomenon are provided. For any applications using a self-referencing interferometer wavefront sensor with low signal levels or high localized wavefront gradients, understanding this phenomena is critical when applying a traditional least squares wavefront reconstructor.

  19. Wavefront sensing and control performance modeling of the Thirty Meter telescope for systematic trade analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissly, Carl; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Troy, Mitchell; Chanan, Gary; Roberts, Scott; Rogers, John

    2014-08-01

    We have developed an integrated optical model of the semi-static performance of the Thirty Meter Telescope. The model includes surface and rigid body errors of all telescope optics as well as a model of the Alignment and Phasing System Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors and control algorithms. This integrated model allows for simulation of the correction of the telescope wavefront, including optical errors on the secondary and tertiary mirrors, using the primary mirror segment active degrees of freedom. This model provides the estimate of the predicted telescope performance for system engineering and error budget development. In this paper we present updated performance values for the TMT static optical errors in terms of Normalized Point Source Sensitivity and RMS wavefront error after Adaptive Optics correction. As an example of a system level trade, we present the results from an analysis optimizing the number of Shack-Hartmann lenslets per segment. We trade the number of lenslet rings over each primary mirror segment against the telescope performance metrics of PSSN and RMS wavefront error.

  20. Filter Function for Wavefront Sensing Over a Field of View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A filter function has been derived as a means of optimally weighting the wavefront estimates obtained in image-based phase retrieval performed at multiple points distributed over the field of view of a telescope or other optical system. When the data obtained in wavefront sensing and, more specifically, image-based phase retrieval, are used for controlling the shape of a deformable mirror or other optic used to correct the wavefront, the control law obtained by use of the filter function gives a more balanced optical performance over the field of view than does a wavefront-control law obtained by use of a wavefront estimate obtained from a single point in the field of view.

  1. The Gemini Planet Imager Calibration Wavefront Sensor Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Burruss, Rick S.; Bartos, Randall D.; Trinh, Thang Q.; Pueyo, Laurent A.; Fregoso, Santos F.; Angione, John R.; Shelton, J. Chris

    2010-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager is an extreme adaptive optics system that will employ an apodized-pupil coronagraph to make direct detections of faint companions of nearby stars to a contrast level of the 10(exp -7) within a few lambda/D of the parent star. Such high contrasts from the ground require exquisite wavefront sensing and control both for the AO system as well as for the coronagraph. Un-sensed non-common path phase and amplitude errors after the wavefront sensor dichroic but before the coronagraph would lead to speckles which would ultimately limit the contrast. The calibration wavefront system for GPI will measure the complex wavefront at the system pupil before the apodizer and provide slow phase corrections to the AO system to mitigate errors that would cause a loss in contrast. The calibration wavefront sensor instrument for GPI has been built. We will describe the instrument and its performance.

  2. Wavefront response matrix for closed-loop adaptive optics system based on non-modulation pyramid wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Bai, Fuzhong; Ning, Yu; Li, Fei; Jiang, Wenhan

    2012-06-01

    Pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS) is a kind of wavefront sensor with high spatial resolution and high energy utilization. In this paper an adaptive optics system with PWFS as wavefront sensor and liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) as wavefront corrector is built in the laboratory. The wavefront response matrix is a key element in the close-loop operation. It can be obtained by measuring the real response to given aberrations, which is easily contaminated by noise and influenced by the inherent aberration in the optical system. A kind of analytic solution of response matrix is proposed, with which numerical simulation and experiment are also implemented to verify the performance of closed-loop correction of static aberration based on linear reconstruction theory. Results show that this AO system with the proposed matrix can work steadily in closed-loop operation.

  3. MOSAIC: a new wavefront metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher; Naulleau, Patrick

    2009-02-02

    MOSAIC is a new wavefront metrology that enables complete wavefront characterization from print or aerial image based measurements. Here we describe MOSAIC and verify its utility with a model-based proof of principle.

  4. Wavefront detection method of a single-sensor based adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chongchong; Hu, Lifa; Xu, Huanyu; Wang, Yukun; Li, Dayu; Wang, Shaoxin; Mu, Quanquan; Yang, Chengliang; Cao, Zhaoliang; Lu, Xinghai; Xuan, Li

    2015-08-10

    In adaptive optics system (AOS) for optical telescopes, the reported wavefront sensing strategy consists of two parts: a specific sensor for tip-tilt (TT) detection and another wavefront sensor for other distortions detection. Thus, a part of incident light has to be used for TT detection, which decreases the light energy used by wavefront sensor and eventually reduces the precision of wavefront correction. In this paper, a single Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based wavefront measurement method is presented for both large amplitude TT and other distortions' measurement. Experiments were performed for testing the presented wavefront method and validating the wavefront detection and correction ability of the single-sensor based AOS. With adaptive correction, the root-mean-square of residual TT was less than 0.2 λ, and a clear image was obtained in the lab. Equipped on a 1.23-meter optical telescope, the binary stars with angle distance of 0.6″ were clearly resolved using the AOS. This wavefront measurement method removes the separate TT sensor, which not only simplifies the AOS but also saves light energy for subsequent wavefront sensing and imaging, and eventually improves the detection and imaging capability of the AOS. PMID:26367988

  5. Analysis of active alignment control of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide-field corrector using Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hart, Michael; Hill, Gary J.; Rafal, M. D.

    2010-07-01

    One of the key aspects of the Wide-Field Upgrade (WFU) for the 10m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is the use of wavefront sensing (WFS) to close the loop of active alignment control of the new four-mirror Wide-Field Corrector (WFC), as it tracks sidereal motion, with respect to the fixed spherical segmented primary mirror. This makes the telescope pupil dynamically change in shape. This is a unique challenge to the WFS on the HET, in addition to various influences of seeing, primary mirror segment errors, and dynamic deflection of the internal optical components of the WFC. We conducted extensive simulations to understand the robustness of the WFS in the face of these errors and the results of these analyses are discussed in this paper.

  6. The Wavefront Control System for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Van Atta, L; Perez, M; Zacharias, R; Rivera, W

    2001-10-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires that pulses from each of the 192 laser beams be positioned on target with an accuracy of 50 {micro}m rms. Beam quality must be sufficient to focus a total of 1.8 MJ of 0.351-{micro}m light into a 600-{micro}m-diameter volume. An optimally flat beam wavefront can achieve this pointing and focusing accuracy. The control system corrects wavefront aberrations by performing closed-loop compensation during laser alignment to correct for gas density variations. Static compensation of flashlamp-induced thermal distortion is established just prior to the laser shot. The control system compensates each laser beam at 10 Hz by measuring the wavefront with a 77-lenslet Hartmann sensor and applying corrections with a 39-actuator deformable mirror. The distributed architecture utilizes SPARC AXi computers running Solaris to perform real-time image processing of sensor data and PowerPC-based computers running VxWorks to compute mirror commands. A single pair of SPARC and PowerPC processors accomplishes wavefront control for a group of eight beams. The software design uses proven adaptive optic control algorithms that are implemented in a multi-tasking environment to economically control the beam wavefronts in parallel. Prototype tests have achieved a closed-loop residual error of 0.03 waves rms. aberrations, the spot size requirement and goal could not be met without a wavefront control system.

  7. Wavefront sensing, control, and pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Thomas; Sevaston, George; Agronin, Michael; Bely, Pierre; Colavita, Mark; Clampin, Mark; Harvey, James; Idell, Paul; Sandler, Dave; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-01-01

    A majority of future NASA astrophysics missions from orbiting interferometers to 16-m telescopes on the Moon have, as a common requirement, the need to bring light from a large entrance aperture to the focal plane in a way that preserves the spatial coherence properties of the starlight. Only by preserving the phase of the incoming wavefront, can many scientific observations be made, observations that range from measuring the red shift of quasi-stellar objects (QSO's) to detecting the IR emission of a planet in orbit around another star. New technologies for wavefront sensing, control, and pointing hold the key to advancing our observatories of the future from those already launched or currently under development. As the size of the optical system increases, either to increase the sensitivity or angular resolution of the instrument, traditional technologies for maintaining optical wavefront accuracy become prohibitively expensive or completely impractical. For space-based instruments, the low mass requirement and the large temperature excursions further challenge existing technologies. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is probably the last large space telescope to rely on passive means to keep its primary optics stable and the optical system aligned. One needs only look to the significant developments in wavefront sensing, control, and pointing that have occurred over the past several years to appreciate the potential of this technology for transforming the capability of future space observatories. Future developments in space-borne telescopes will be based in part on developments in ground-based systems. Telescopes with rigid primary mirrors much larger than 5 m in diameter are impractical because of gravity loading. New technologies are now being introduced, such as active optics, that address the scale problem and that allow very large telescopes to be built. One approach is a segmented design such as that being pioneered by the W.M. Keck telescope now under

  8. Liquid Crystal on Silicon Wavefront Corrector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Miranda, Felix; Wang, Xinghua; Bos, Philip, J.

    2004-01-01

    A low cost, high resolution, liquid crystal on silicon, spatial light modulator has been developed for the correction of huge aberrations in an optical system where the polarization dependence and the chromatic nature are tolerated. However, the overall system performance suggests that this device is also suitable for real time correction of aberration in human eyes. This device has a resolution of 1024 x 768, and is driven by an XGA display driver. The effective stroke length of the device is 700 nm and 2000 nm for the visible and IR regions of the device, respectively. The response speeds are 50 Hz and 5 Hz, respectively, which are fast enough for real time adaptive optics for aberrations in human eyes. By modulating a wavefront of 2 pi, this device can correct for arbitrary high order wavefront aberrations since the 2-D pixel array is independently controlled by the driver. The high resolution and high accuracy of the device allow for diffraction limited correction of the tip and tilt or defocus without an additional correction loop. We have shown that for every wave of aberration, an 8 step blazed grating is required to achieve high diffraction efficiency around 80%. In light of this, up to 125 waves peak to valley of tip and tilt can be corrected if we choose the simplest aberration. Corrections of 34 waves of aberration, including high order Zernicke terms in a high magnification telescope, to diffraction limited performance (residual wavefront aberration less than 1/30 lambda at 632.8 nm) have been observed at high efficiency.

  9. Communicating Correct Syntax through Translation Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastos, Perry

    1979-01-01

    Audiolingual and translation exercises are presented that were designed to correct syntax of junior high school French language students. The exercises were given to eliminate translating the present progressive and the imperfect word for word, and to develop more awareness of reflexive construction and the imperfect tense. (SW)

  10. Wavefront distortion optimized with volume Bragg gratings in photothermorefractive glass.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fan; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Xiaojie; Yuan, Xiao

    2016-03-15

    The wavefront characteristics in 2D angular filtering on the basis of two orthogonal transmitting volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) is presented. The experimental results show that middle-high frequency wavefront distortions are efficiently suppressed with VBGs. The peak-valley value of the beam at a wavelength of 1053 nm reduces from 2.075λ to 0.209λ, and the root mean square value reduces from 0.207λ to 0.041λ. The wavefront power spectrum density shows that the wavefront distribution of the beam in medium and high frequencies is corrected by the VBGs. Additionally, the far-field distribution and focusing properties of the beam are improved. The beam Strehl ratio increases from 0.43 to 0.96, and the encircled energy improves from 95% energy at 4.01 mrad to 95% energy at 1.26 mrad. PMID:26977639

  11. Wavefront sensing within the VISTA infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Paul; Berry, Paul; Bingham, Richard G.; Bissonauth, Nirmal; Caldwell, Martin; Dipper, Nigel A.; Dunlop, Colin N.; Henry, David M.; Luke, Peter; Myers, Richard M.; Robertson, David J.

    2004-09-01

    VISTA is a 4-metre survey telescope currently being constructed on the NTT peak of ESO"s Cerro Paranal Observatory. The telescope will be equipped with a dedicated infrared camera providing images of a 1.65 degree field of view. The telescope and camera are of an innovative f/3.26 design with no intermediate focus and no cold stop. The mosaic of 16 IR detectors is located directly at Cassegrain focus and a novel baffle arrangement is used to suppress stray light within the cryostat. The pointing and alignment of the telescope and camera is monitored by wavefront sensing elements within the camera cryostat itself. This paper describes the optical, mechanical, electronic and thermal design of the combined curvature sensor and auto-guider units positioned at the periphery of the camera field of view. Centroid and image aberration data is provided to the telescope control system allowing real time correction of pointing and alignment of the actively positioned M2 unit. Also described are the custom optics, mounted in the camera filter wheel, which are used to perform near on-axis high order curvature sensing. Analysis of the corresponding defocused images allows calibration tables of M1 actuator positions to be constructed for varying telescope declination and temperature.

  12. Wavefront control of the large optics test and integration site (LOTIS) 6.5m collimator.

    PubMed

    West, Steven C; Bailey, Samuel H; Burge, James H; Cuerden, Brian; Hagen, Jeff; Martin, Hubert M; Tuell, Michael T

    2010-06-20

    The LOTIS Collimator provides scene projection within a 6.5m diameter collimated beam used for optical testing research in air and vacuum. Diffraction-limited performance (0.4 to 5microm wavelength) requires active wavefront control of the alignment and primary mirror shape. A hexapod corrects secondary mirror alignment using measurements from collimated sources directed into the system with nine scanning pentaprisms. The primary mirror shape is controlled with 104 adjustable force actuators based on figure measurements from a center-of-curvature test. A variation of the Hartmann test measures slopes by monitoring the reflections from 36 small mirrors bonded to the optical surface of the primary mirror. The Hartmann source and detector are located at the f/15 Cassegrain focus. Initial operation has demonstrated a closed-loop 110 nm rms wavefront error in ambient air over the 6.5m collimated beam. PMID:20563205

  13. Wavefront control of the Large Optics Test and Integration Site (LOTIS) 6.5m Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    West, Steven C.; Bailey, Samuel H.; Burge, James H.; Cuerden, Brian; Hagen, Jeff; Martin, Hubert M.; Tuell, Michael T.

    2010-06-20

    The LOTIS Collimator provides scene projection within a 6.5m diameter collimated beam used for optical testing research in air and vacuum. Diffraction-limited performance (0.4 to 5{mu}m wavelength) requires active wavefront control of the alignment and primary mirror shape. A hexapod corrects secondary mirror alignment using measurements from collimated sources directed into the system with nine scanning pentaprisms. The primary mirror shape is controlled with 104 adjustable force actuators based on figure measurements from a center-of-curvature test. A variation of the Hartmann test measures slopes by monitoring the reflections from 36 small mirrors bonded to the optical surface of the primary mirror. The Hartmann source and detector are located at the f/15 Cassegrain focus. Initial operation has demonstrated a closed-loop 110nmrms wavefront error in ambient air over the 6.5mcollimated beam.

  14. Managing the optical wavefront for high contrast exoplanet imaging with the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, John T.; Krist, John E.; Moody, Dwight

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of extreme high contrast astronomical imaging from space has inspired developments of new coronagraph methods for exoplanet imaging and spectroscopy. However, the requisite contrast, at levels of a billion to one or better for the direct imaging of cool mature exoplanets in reflected visible starlight, leads to challenging new requirements on the stability and control of the optical wavefront at levels currently beyond the reach of ground based telescopes. We briefly review the designs, laboratory validations, and science prospects for direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet systems with an actively corrected Lyot coronagraph. We review exoplanet science performance predicted for NASA's WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph. Together with a pair of deformable mirrors for optical wavefront control, the Lyot coronagraph creates high contrast dark fields of view extending to angular separations within 0.1 arcsec from the central star at visible wavelengths. Performance metrics are presented, including image contrast and spectral bandwidth, and laboratory validation experience.

  15. MEMS deformable mirror embedded wavefront sensing and control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Donald; Schoen, Michael; Bush, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Electrostatic Membrane Deformable Mirror (MDM) technology developed using silicon bulk micro-machining techniques offers the potential of providing low-cost, compact wavefront control systems for diverse optical system applications. Electrostatic mirror construction using bulk micro-machining allows for custom designs to satisfy wavefront control requirements for most optical systems. An electrostatic MDM consists of a thin membrane, generally with a thin metal or multi-layer high-reflectivity coating, suspended over an actuator pad array that is connected to a high-voltage driver. Voltages applied to the array elements deflect the membrane to provide an optical surface capable of correcting for measured optical aberrations in a given system. Electrostatic membrane DM designs are derived from well-known principles of membrane mechanics and electrostatics, the desired optical wavefront control requirements, and the current limitations of mirror fabrication and actuator drive electronics. MDM performance is strongly dependent on mirror diameter and air damping in meeting desired spatial and temporal frequency requirements. In this paper, we present wavefront control results from an embedded wavefront control system developed around a commercially available high-speed camera and an AgilOptics Unifi MDM driver using USB 2.0 communications and the Linux development environment. This new product, ClariFast TM, combines our previous Clarifi TM product offering into a faster more streamlined version dedicated strictly to Hartmann Wavefront sensing.

  16. Megapixel wavefront correctors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, Thomas G.; Bierden, Paul A.; Zhu, Hao; Cornelissen, Steven; Kim, Jin Hong

    2004-10-01

    Optical-quality microelectromechanical deformable mirrors (DMs) and spatial light modulators (SLMs) are described. With such mirrors, the shape of the reflective surface can be modified dynamically to control an optical wavefront. A principal application is to compensate for aberrations and thereby improve image resolution in telescopes or microscopes: a process known as adaptive optics. μDMs are an enabling component for adaptive optics. Over several years, researchers at Boston University and Boston Micromachines Corporation have developed manufacturing processes that allow production of continuous and segmented deformable mirrors. We have produced mirror arrays with up to 22,500 actuators, 3.5μm of useful stroke, tens of picometer position repeatability, >98% reflectivity, and flatness better than 15nm RMS. Challenges to manufacturing optical quality micromachined mirrors in particular have been addressed: reducing surface roughness, increasing reflectivity, and eliminating post-release curvature in the mirror. These silicon based deformable mirrors can modulate spatial and temporal features of an optical wavefront, and have applications in imaging, beam-forming, and optical communication systems. New developments in DM design are discussed, and manufacturing approaches to microamachined DM and SLM production are presented, and designs that will permit scaling to millions of actuators are introduced.

  17. Refractive error sensing from wavefront slopes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The problem of measuring the objective refractive error with an aberrometer has shown to be more elusive than expected. Here, the formalism of differential geometry is applied to develop a theoretical framework of refractive error sensing. At each point of the pupil, the local refractive error is given by the wavefront curvature, which is a 2 × 2 symmetric matrix, whose elements are directly related to sphere, cylinder, and axis. Aberrometers usually measure the local gradient of the wavefront. Then refractive error sensing consists of differentiating the gradient, instead of integrating as in wavefront sensing. A statistical approach is proposed to pass from the local to the global (clinically meaningful) refractive error, in which the best correction is assumed to be the maximum likelihood estimation. In the practical implementation, this corresponds to the mode of the joint histogram of the 3 different elements of the curvature matrix. Results obtained both in computer simulations and with real data provide a close agreement and consistency with the main optical image quality metrics such as the Strehl ratio. PMID:21149305

  18. Specialized wavefront sensors for adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Mansell, J.D.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1995-08-01

    The performance of an adaptive optical system is strongly dependent upon correctly measuring the wavefront of the arriving light. The most common wavefront measurement techniques used to date are the shearing interferometer and the Shack-Hartmann sensor. Shack-Hartmann sensors rely on the use of lenslet arrays to sample the aperture appropriately. These have traditionally been constructed using ULM or step and repeat technology, and more recently with binary optics technology. Diffractive optics fabrication methodology can be used to remove some of the limitations of the previous technologies and can allow for low-cost production of sophisticated elements. We have investigated several different specialized wavefront sensor configurations using both Shack-Hartmann and shearing interferometer principles. We have taken advantage of the arbitrary nature of these elements to match pupil shapes of detector and telescope aperture and to introduce magnification between the lenslet array and the detector. We have fabricated elements that facilitate matching the sampling to the current atmospheric conditions. The sensors were designed using a far-field diffraction model and a photolithography layout program. They were fabricated using photolithography and RIE etching. Several different designs will be presented with some experimental results from a small-scale adaptive optics brass-board.

  19. Adaptive optics two photon microscopy with direct wavefront sensing using autofluorescent guide-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Norton, Andrew; Kissel, Matthew; Azucena, Oscar; Kubby, Joel

    2014-03-01

    A fast direct wavefront sensing method for dynamic in-vivo adaptive optical two photon microscopy has demonstrated. By using the direct wavefront sensing and open loop control, the system provides high-speed wavefront measurement and correction. To measure the wavefront in the middle of a Drosophila embryo at early stages, autofluorescence from endogenous fluorophores in the yolk were used as reference guide-stars. This method does not rely on fluorescently labeled proteins as guide-stars, which can simplify the sample preparation for wavefront measurement. The method was tested through live imaging of a Drosophila embryo. The aberration in the middle of the embryo was measured directly for the first time. After correction, both contrast and signal intensity of the structure in the middle of the embryo was improved.

  20. Large field-of-view wavefront control for deep brain imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    The biggest obstacle for deep tissue imaging is the scattering of light due to the heterogeneous distribution of biological tissue. In this respect, multiphoton microscopy has an inherent advantage as the scattering is significantly reduced by the use of longer excitation wavelengths. However, as we go deeper into the brain, effects of scattering still accumulate resulting in a loss of resolution and increased background noise. Adaptive optics is an ideal tool of choice to correct for such distortions of the excitation wavefront; the incident light can be tuned to cancel out the wavefront distortion experienced while propagating into greater depths resulting in a diffraction limited focus at the depth of interest. However, the biggest limitation of adaptive optics for in vivo brain imaging is its limited corrected field-of-view (FOV). For typical multiphoton laser scanning microscopes, the wavefront corrector for adaptive optics is placed at the pupil plane. This means that a single correction wavefront is applied to the entire scanned FOV which results in inefficient correction as the correction is averaged over the entire FOV. In this work, we demonstrate a novel approach to measure and display different correction wavefronts over different segments of the FOV. The application of the different correction wavefronts for each segment is realized in parallel resulting in fast aberration corrected imaging over a large FOV for high resolution in vivo brain imaging.

  1. Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Fang; Basinger, Scott A.; Diaz, Rosemary T.; Gappinger, Robert O.; Tang, Hong; Lam, Raymond K.; Sidick, Erkin; Hein, Randall C.; Rud, Mayer; Troy, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT) is built as a versatile facility for developing and demonstrating, in hardware, the future technologies of wave front sensing and control algorithms for active optical systems. The testbed includes a source projector for a broadband point-source and a suite of extended scene targets, a dispersed fringe sensor, a Shack-Hartmann camera, and an imaging camera capable of phase retrieval wavefront sensing. The testbed also provides two easily accessible conjugated pupil planes which can accommodate the active optical devices such as fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and segmented mirrors. In this paper, we describe the testbed optical design, testbed configurations and capabilities, as well as the initial results from the testbed hardware integrations and tests.

  2. Phase Adaptation and Correction by Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiziani, Hans J.

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive optical elements and systems for imaging or laser beam propagation are used for some time in particular in astronomy, where the image quality is degraded by atmospheric turbulence. In astronomical telescopes a deformable mirror is frequently used to compensate wavefront-errors due to deformations of the large mirror, vibrations as well as turbulence and hence to increase the image quality. In the last few years interesting elements like Spatial Light Modulators, SLM's, such as photorefractive crystals, liquid crystals and micro mirrors and membrane mirrors were introduced. The development of liquid crystals and micro mirrors was driven by data projectors as consumer products. They contain typically a matrix of individually addressable pixels of liquid crystals and flip mirrors respectively or more recently piston mirrors for special applications. Pixel sizes are in the order of a few microns and therefore also appropriate as active diffractive elements in digital holography or miniature masks. Although liquid crystals are mainly optimized for intensity modulation; they can be used for phase modulation. Adaptive optics is a technology for beam shaping and wavefront adaptation. The application of spatial light modulators for wavefront adaptation and correction and defect analysis as well as sensing will be discussed. Dynamic digital holograms are generated with liquid crystal devices (LCD) and used for wavefront correction as well as for beam shaping and phase manipulation, for instance. Furthermore, adaptive optics is very useful to extend the measuring range of wavefront sensors and for the wavefront adaptation in order to measure and compare the shape of high precision aspherical surfaces.

  3. Coating-induced wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiley, Daniel J.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1992-12-01

    The coatings which are used on telescope mirrors and other optical interfaces can have a profound effect on the image quality formed by an optical system. This paper evaluates the defocus and astigmatism which are caused by the s- and p-phase shifts of coatings. These coating-induced wavefront aberrations are usually insignificant, but can, under certain circumstances, overshadow the geometric wavefront aberrations of the system. The wavefront aberrations induced by reflection-enhanced coatings on an f/1.5 Cassegrain telescope are numerically evaluated as an example.

  4. Wavefront reconstruction by modal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Christian; Naidoo, Darryl; Flamm, Daniel; Schmidt, Oliver A; Forbes, Andrew; Duparré, Michael

    2012-08-27

    We propose a new method to determine the wavefront of a laser beam based on modal decomposition by computer-generated holograms. The hologram is encoded with a transmission function suitable for measuring the amplitudes and phases of the modes in real-time. This yields the complete information about the optical field, from which the Poynting vector and the wavefront are deduced. Two different wavefront reconstruction options are outlined: reconstruction from the phase for scalar beams, and reconstruction from the Poynting vector for inhomogeneously polarized beams. Results are compared to Shack-Hartmann measurements that serve as a reference and are shown to reproduce the wavefront and phase with very high fidelity. PMID:23037024

  5. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.; Alford, W. J.; Gruetzner, James K.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  6. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  7. Correction.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    In the article by Heuslein et al, which published online ahead of print on September 3, 2015 (DOI: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.115.305775), a correction was needed. Brett R. Blackman was added as the penultimate author of the article. The article has been corrected for publication in the November 2015 issue. PMID:26490278

  8. Extended scene wavefront sensor for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomer, Thierry; Ravel, Karen; Corlay, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    The spatial resolution of optical monitoring satellites increases continuously and it is more and more difficult to satisfy the stability constraints of the instrument. The compactness requirements induce high sensitivity to drift during storage and launching. The implementation of an active loop for the control of the performances for the telescope becomes essential, in the same way of astronomy telescopes on ground. The active loop requires disposing of informations in real time of optical distortions of the wavefront, due to mirror deformations. It is the role of the Shack-Hartmann wave front sensor studied by Sodern. It is located in the focal plane of the telescope, in edge of field of view, in order not to disturb acquisition by the main instrument. Its particular characteristic, compared to a traditional wavefront sensor is not only to work on point source as star image, but also on extended scenes, as those observed by the instrument. The exit pupil of the telescope is imaged on a micro lenses array by a relay optics. Each element of the micro lenses array generates a small image, drifted by the local wavefront slope. The processing by correlation between small images allows to measure local slope and to recover the initial wavefront deformation according to Zernike decomposition. Sodern has realized the sensor dimensioning and has studied out the comparison of various algorithms of images correlation making it possible to measure the local slopes of the wave front. Simulations, taking into account several types of detectors, enabled to compare the performances of these solutions and a choice of detector was carried out. This article describes the state of progress of the work done so far. It shows the result of the comparisons on the choice of the detector, the main features of the sensor definition and the performances obtained.

  9. Estimate Low and High Order Wavefront Using P1640 Calibrator Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhai, C.; Vasisht, G.; Shao, M.; Lockhart, T.; Cady, E.; Oppenheimer, B.; Burruss, R.; Roberts, J.; Beichman, C.; Brenner, D.; Crepp, J.; Dekany, R.; Hillenbrand, L.; Hinkley, S.; Parry, I.; Pueyo, L.; Rice, E.; Roberts, L. C. Jr.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Soummer, R.; Tang, H.; Vescelus, F.; Wallace, K.; Zimmerman, N.

    2013-01-01

    P1640 high contrast imaging system on the Palomar 200 inch Telescope consists of an apodized-pupil Lyot coronagraph, the PALM-3000 adaptive optics (P3K-AO), and P1640 Calibrator (CAL). Science images are recorded by an integral field spectrograph covering J-H bands for detecting and characterizing stellar companions. With aberrations from atmosphere corrected by the P3K-AO, instrument performance is limited mainly by the quasi-static speckles due to noncommon path wavefront aberrations for the light to propagate to the P3K-AO wavefront sensor and to the coronagraph mask. The non-common path wavefront aberrations are sensed by CAL, which measures the post-coronagraph E-field using interferometry, and can be effectively corrected by offsetting the P3K-AO deformable mirror target position accordingly. Previously, we have demonstrated using CAL measurements to correct high order wavefront aberrations, which is directly connected to the static speckles in the image plane. Low order wavefront, on the other hand, usually of larger amplitudes, causes light to leak through the coronagraph making the whole image plane brighter. Knowledge error in low order wavefront aberrations can also affect the estimation of the high order wavefront. Even though, CAL is designed to sense efficiently high order wavefront aberrations, the low order wavefront front can be inferred with less sensitivity. Here, we describe our method for estimating both low and high order wavefront aberrations using CAL measurements by propagating the post-coronagraph E-field to a pupil before the coronagraph. We present the results from applying this method to both simulated and experiment data.

  10. Non-iterative adaptive optical microscopy using wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X.; Azucena, O.; Kubby, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will review the development of wide-field and confocal microscopes with wavefront sensing and adaptive optics for correcting refractive aberrations and compensating scattering when imaging through thick tissues (Drosophila embryos and mouse brain tissue). To make wavefront measurements in biological specimens we have modified the laser guide-star techniques used in astronomy for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as star light passes through Earth's turbulent atmosphere. Here sodium atoms in Earth's mesosphere, at an altitude of 95 km, are excited to fluoresce at resonance by a high-power sodium laser. The fluorescent light creates a guide-star reference beacon at the top of the atmosphere that can be used for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as the light passes through the atmosphere. We have developed a related approach for making wavefront measurements in biological specimens using cellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins as laser guide-stars. An example is a fluorescently labeled centrosome in a fruit fly embryo or neurons and dendrites in mouse brains. Using adaptive optical microscopy we show that the Strehl ratio, the ratio of the peak intensity of an aberrated point source relative to the diffraction limited image, can be improved by an order of magnitude when imaging deeply into live dynamic specimens, enabling near diffraction limited deep tissue imaging.

  11. Wavefront image sensor chip.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiquan; Ren, Jian; Tearney, Guillermo J; Yang, Changhuei

    2010-08-01

    We report the implementation of an image sensor chip, termed wavefront image sensor chip (WIS), that can measure both intensity/amplitude and phase front variations of a light wave separately and quantitatively. By monitoring the tightly confined transmitted light spots through a circular aperture grid in a high Fresnel number regime, we can measure both intensity and phase front variations with a high sampling density (11 microm) and high sensitivity (the sensitivity of normalized phase gradient measurement is 0.1 mrad under the typical working condition). By using WIS in a standard microscope, we can collect both bright-field (transmitted light intensity) and normalized phase gradient images. Our experiments further demonstrate that the normalized phase gradient images of polystyrene microspheres, unstained and stained starfish embryos, and strongly birefringent potato starch granules are improved versions of their corresponding differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope images in that they are artifact-free and quantitative. Besides phase microscopy, WIS can benefit machine recognition, object ranging, and texture assessment for a variety of applications. PMID:20721059

  12. Correction.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    In the article by Narayan et al (Narayan O, Davies JE, Hughes AD, Dart AM, Parker KH, Reid C, Cameron JD. Central aortic reservoir-wave analysis improves prediction of cardiovascular events in elderly hypertensives. Hypertension. 2015;65:629–635. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04824), which published online ahead of print December 22, 2014, and appeared in the March 2015 issue of the journal, some corrections were needed.On page 632, Figure, panel A, the label PRI has been corrected to read RPI. In panel B, the text by the upward arrow, "10% increase in kd,” has been corrected to read, "10% decrease in kd." The corrected figure is shown below.The authors apologize for these errors. PMID:26558821

  13. Wavefront-Guided Scleral Lens Prosthetic Device for Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Sabesan, Ramkumar; Johns, Lynette; Tomashevskaya, Olga; Jacobs, Deborah S.; Rosenthal, Perry; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of correcting ocular higher order aberrations (HOA) in keratoconus (KC) using wavefront-guided optics in a scleral lens prosthetic device (SLPD). Methods Six advanced keratoconus patients (11 eyes) were fitted with a SLPD with conventional spherical optics. A custom-made Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was used to measure aberrations through a dilated pupil wearing the SLPD. The position of SLPD, i.e. horizontal and vertical decentration relative to the pupil and rotation were measured and incorporated into the design of the wavefront-guided optics for the customized SLPD. A submicron-precision lathe created the designed irregular profile on the front surface of the device. The residual aberrations of the same eyes wearing the SLPD with wavefront-guided optics were subsequently measured. Visual performance with natural mesopic pupil was compared between SLPDs having conventional spherical and wavefront-guided optics by measuring best-corrected high-contrast visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. Results Root-mean-square of HOA(RMS) in the 11 eyes wearing conventional SLPD with spherical optics was 1.17±0.57μm for a 6 mm pupil. HOA were effectively corrected by the customized SLPD with wavefront-guided optics and RMS was reduced 3.1 times on average to 0.37±0.19μm for the same pupil. This correction resulted in significant improvement of 1.9 lines in mean visual acuity (p<0.05). Contrast sensitivity was also significantly improved by a factor of 2.4, 1.8 and 1.4 on average for 4, 8 and 12 cycles/degree, respectively (p<0.05 for all frequencies). Although the residual aberration was comparable to that of normal eyes, the average visual acuity in logMAR with the customized SLPD was 0.21, substantially worse than normal acuity. Conclusions The customized SLPD with wavefront-guided optics corrected the HOA of advanced KC patients to normal levels and improved their vision significantly. PMID:23478630

  14. Application of geometric phase to wavefront sensing for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.

    2014-02-01

    Modern adaptive optics systems give high performance, both in terms of Strehl ratio (degree of correction) and corrected field of view. Arguably the most important subsystem is the wavefront sensor, which measures the deviation from flatness of the incident wavefront that has been perturbed by the turbulent atmosphere, and commands an actuated mirror to compensate. An aspect of the wavefront sensor essential to achieving high sensitivity is that it perform over a broad spectral bandwidth; operation without correction for guide star color is also desirable. With this in mind, wavefront sensors are considered that make use of the geometric (or topological) phase, which has the property that the value of the phase is independent of wavelength. Conceptual system designs and advantages are discussed.

  15. Measuring the shape of membrane mirror based on Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; Yang, Bin; Tang, Minxue; Chen, Xinhua

    2013-12-01

    Compared with traditional mirrors, a membrane mirror made of flexible film material has the advantages of folding and deployable, lightweight, low cost and etc, and it is prospected to be used as large aperture space optical elements. In order to solve the problem of measuring the shape of the membrane mirror, a method based on the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing has been studied in this paper. The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing system and the principle of wavefront detection are introduced firstly. In this system, the measured wavefront is collected by the microlens of the lenslets and focus on the CCD, the light spot coordinate offsets relative to the ideal spots are got and then the wavefront can be reconstructed. Secondly, according to the optical properties of a membrane mirror, the membrane mirror wavefront detection system has been designed and established. The preprocessing of the light spot image of the testing wavefront focused by the microlens array, the determination of the centroid coordination and the algorithm of wavefront reconstruction modal based on Zernike polynomials are researched and a program for reconstructing the wavefront is written with in Matlab. When measuring, in order to eliminate the influence of other optical components in the detection system on the testing wavefront, a standard plane mirror is used to calibrate the system. A glass planar mirror made of glass with a diameter of 50mm and a known distribution of surface shape is used to verify the feasibility of the test system and the correction of the algorithm. Finally, the wavefront of a membrane mirror with a diameter of 85mm is measured and the errors are analyzed. It provides a means of measuring the shape of membrane mirror.

  16. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    Seismic images of the Brooks Range, Arctic Alaska, reveal crustal-scale duplexing: Correction Geology, v. 23, p. 65 68 (January 1995) The correct Figure 4A, for the loose insert, is given here. See Figure 4A below. Corrected inserts will be available to those requesting copies of the article from the senior author, Gary S. Fuis, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Figure 4A. P-wave velocity model of Brooks Range region (thin gray contours) with migrated wide-angle reflections (heavy red lines) and migreated vertical-incidence reflections (short black lines) superimposed. Velocity contour interval is 0.25 km/s; 4,5, and 6 km/s contours are labeled. Estimated error in velocities is one contour interval. Symbols on faults shown at top are as in Figure 2 caption.

  17. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Jacopo; van Werkhoven, Tim; Verhaegen, Michel; Truong, Hoa H; Keller, Christoph U; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-06-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The aberration correction is achieved by maximizing a suitable image quality metric. We implement a model-based aberration correction algorithm in a second-harmonic microscope. The tip, tilt, and defocus aberrations are removed from the basis functions used for the control of the DM, as these aberrations induce distortions in the acquired images. We compute the parameters of a quadratic polynomial that is used to model the image quality metric directly from experimental input-output measurements. Finally, we apply the aberration correction by maximizing the image quality metric using the least-squares estimate of the unknown aberration. PMID:24977374

  18. Correction.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Neogi T, Jansen TLTA, Dalbeth N, et al. 2015 Gout classification criteria: an American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism collaborative initiative. Ann Rheum Dis 2015;74:1789–98. The name of the 20th author was misspelled. The correct spelling is Janitzia Vazquez-Mellado. We regret the error. PMID:26881284

  19. Sparse aperture mask for low order wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Hari; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Cavanagh, Kathleen; Riggs, A. J. E.

    2015-09-01

    A high contrast is required for direct imaging of exoplanets. Ideally, the level of contrast required for direct imaging of exoplanets can be achieved by coronagraphic imaging, but in practice, the contrast is degraded by wavefront aberrations. To achieve the required contrast, low-order wavefront aberrations such as tip-tilt, defocus and coma must be determined and corrected. In this paper, we present a technique that integrates a sparse- aperture mask (SAM) with a shaped pupil coronagraph (SPC) to make precise estimates of these low-order aberrations. Starlight rejected by the coronagraph's focal plane stop is collimated to a relay pupil, where the mask forms an interference fringe pattern on a detector. Using numerical simulations, we show that the SAM can estimate rapidly varying tip-tilt errors in space telescopes arising from line-of-sight pointing oscillations as well as other higher-order modes. We also show that a Kalman filter can be used with the SAM to improve the estimation. At Princetons High Contrast Imaging Laboratory, we have recently created a testbed devoted to low-order wavefront sensing experiments. The testbed incorporates custom-fabricated masks (shaped pupil, focal plane, and sparse aperture) with a deformable mirror and a CCD camera to demonstrate the estimation and correction of low-order aberrations. Our first experiments aim to replicate the results of the SAM wavefront sensor (SAM WFS) Fourier propagation models.

  20. Wavefront construction in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, S.R. Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Travel time computation in inhomogeneous media is essential for pre-stack Kirchhoff imaging in areas such as the sub-salt province in the Gulf of Mexico. The 2D algorithm published by Vinje, et al, has been extended to 3D to compute wavefronts in complicated inhomogeneous media. The 3D wavefront construction algorithm provides many advantages over conventional ray tracing and other methods of computing travel times in 3D. The algorithm dynamically maintains a reasonably consistent ray density without making a priori guesses at the number of rays to shoot. The determination of caustics in 3D is a straight forward geometric procedure. The wavefront algorithm also enables the computation of multi-valued travel time surfaces.

  1. Wavefront modifier with integrated sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Mike; Laycock, Leslie; Rowe, Duncan; Cairns, Lee

    2009-09-01

    We present a novel method for integrating a wavefront sensor into a deformable mirror. This development should simplify the design of laser and electro-optic systems, and lead to smart mirrors which need no external control systems. In operation, a small fraction of the incident light is transmitted through the mirror coating and is sampled by a Hartmann Mask. Options include open loop, traditional closed loop or fully integrated operation whereby the wavefront sensor is used to provide direct feedback to the mirror actuators, enabling automatic alignment or phase conjugation.

  2. Correction.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    In the article by Guessous et al (Guessous I, Pruijm M, Ponte B, Ackermann D, Ehret G, Ansermot N, Vuistiner P, Staessen J, Gu Y, Paccaud F, Mohaupt M, Vogt B, Pechère-Bertschi A, Martin PY, Burnier M, Eap CB, Bochud M. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions. Hypertension. 2015;65:691–696. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04512), which published online ahead of print December 8, 2014, and appeared in the March 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed.One of the author surnames was misspelled. Antoinette Pechère-Berstchi has been corrected to read Antoinette Pechère-Bertschi.The authors apologize for this error. PMID:26763012

  3. One-Dimensional Wavefront Sensor Analysis

    1996-04-25

    This software analyzes one-dimensional wavefront sensor data acquired with any of several data acquisition systems. It analyzes the data to determine centroids, wavefront slopes and overall wavefront error. The data can be displayed in many formats, with plots of various parameters vs time and position, including computer generated movies. Data can also be exported for use by other programs.

  4. Correction.

    PubMed

    2015-05-22

    The Circulation Research article by Keith and Bolli (“String Theory” of c-kitpos Cardiac Cells: A New Paradigm Regarding the Nature of These Cells That May Reconcile Apparently Discrepant Results. Circ Res. 2015:116:1216-1230. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.305557) states that van Berlo et al (2014) observed that large numbers of fibroblasts and adventitial cells, some smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and rare cardiomyocytes originated from c-kit positive progenitors. However, van Berlo et al reported that only occasional fibroblasts and adventitial cells derived from c-kit positive progenitors in their studies. Accordingly, the review has been corrected to indicate that van Berlo et al (2014) observed that large numbers of endothelial cells, with some smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, and more rarely cardiomyocytes, originated from c-kit positive progenitors in their murine model. The authors apologize for this error, and the error has been noted and corrected in the online version of the article, which is available at http://circres.ahajournals.org/content/116/7/1216.full ( PMID:25999426

  5. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    Alleged mosasaur bite marks on Late Cretaceous ammonites are limpet (patellogastropod) home scars Geology, v. 26, p. 947 950 (October 1998) This article had the following printing errors: p. 947, Abstract, line 11, “sepia” should be “septa” p. 947, 1st paragraph under Introduction, line 2, “creep” should be “deep” p. 948, column 1, 2nd paragraph, line 7, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 1, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 5, “19774” should be “1977)” p. 949, column 1, 4th paragraph, line 7, “in particular” should be “In particular” CORRECTION Mammalian community response to the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: An isotaphonomic study in the northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming Geology, v. 26, p. 1011 1014 (November 1998) An error appeared in the References Cited. The correct reference appears below: Fricke, H. C., Clyde, W. C., O'Neil, J. R., and Gingerich, P. D., 1998, Evidence for rapid climate change in North America during the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: Oxygen isotope compositions of biogenic phosphate from the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming): Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 160, p. 193 208.

  6. Simulation of electrowetting lens and prism arrays for wavefront compensation.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Juliet T; Bright, Victor M; Cogswell, Carol C; Niederriter, Robert D; Watson, Alexander; Zahreddine, Ramzi; Cormack, Robert H

    2012-09-20

    A novel application of electrowetting devices has been simulated: wavefront correction using an array of electrowetting lenses and prisms. Five waves of distortion can be corrected with Strehl ratios of 0.9 or higher, utilizing piston, tip-tilt, and curvature corrections from arrays of 19 elements and fill factors as low as 40%. Effective control of piston can be achieved by placing the liquid lens array at the focus of two microlens arrays. Seven waves of piston delay can be generated with variation in focal length between 1.5 and 500 mm. PMID:23033033

  7. Ultrasonically encoded wavefront shaping for focusing into random media

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Jian Wei; Lai, Puxiang; Suzuki, Yuta; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Phase distortions due to scattering in random media restrict optical focusing beyond one transport mean free path. However, scattering can be compensated for by applying a correction to the illumination wavefront using spatial light modulators. One method of obtaining the wavefront correction is by iterative determination using an optimization algorithm. In the past, obtaining a feedback signal required either direct optical access to the target region, or invasive embedding of molecular probes within the random media. Here, we propose using ultrasonically encoded light as feedback to guide the optimization dynamically and non-invasively. In our proof-of-principle demonstration, diffuse light was refocused to the ultrasound focal zone, with a focus-to-background ratio of more than one order of magnitude after 600 iterations. With further improvements, especially in optimization speed, the proposed method should find broad applications in deep tissue optical imaging and therapy. PMID:24472822

  8. The NGS Pyramid wavefront sensor for ERIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.; Antichi, J.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.; Carbonaro, L.; Agapito, G.; Biliotti, V.; Briguglio, R.; Di Rico, G.; Dolci, M.; Ferruzzi, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Marchetti, E.; Fedrigo, E.; Le Louarn, M.; Conzelmann, R.; Delabre, B.; Amico, P.; Hubin, N.

    2014-07-01

    ERIS is the new Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for VLT in construction at ESO with the collaboration of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, ETH-Institute for Astronomy and INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri. The ERIS AO system relies on a 40×40 sub-aperture Pyramid Wavefront Sensor (PWFS) for two operating modes: a pure Natural Guide Star high-order sensing for high Strehl and contrast correction and a low-order visible sensing in support of the Laser Guide Star AO mode. In this paper we present in detail the preliminary design of the ERIS PWFS that is developed under the responsibility of INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in collaboration with ESO.

  9. Correcting Radial Velocities for Long-Term Magnetic Activity Variations.

    PubMed

    Saar; Fischer

    2000-05-01

    We study stars in the Lick planetary survey for correlations between simultaneous measurements of high-precision radial velocities vr and magnetic activity (as measured in an SIR emission index from Ca ii lambda8662). We find significant correlations in approximately 30% of the stars. After removing linear trends between SIR and vr, we find that the dispersion in vr in these stars is decreased by an average of 17%, or approximately 45% of the dispersion above the measurement noise. F stars and less active stars with variable Ca ii H and K lines are the most successfully corrected. The magnitude of the slope of the SIR versus vr relations increases proportional to vsini and (excepting M dwarfs) tends to decrease with decreasing Teff. We argue that the main cause of these effects is modification of the mean line bisector shape brought on by long-term, magnetic activity-induced changes in the surface brightness and convective patterns. The correlations can be used to partially correct vr data for the effects of long-term activity variations, potentially permitting study of planets around some (higher mass) younger stars and planets producing smaller stellar reflex velocities. PMID:10790082

  10. Research on encoding multi-gray-scale phase hologram and wavefront reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxin; Zhou, Hao; Li, Jingyao; Qiao, Yujing; Gao, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Application of computer-generated holography for wavefront generation is beneficial for optical interferometry and 3D image display. However, there is a noticeable encoding error in computer-generated holograms, which is encoded by using the object's wavefront function in a computer. The encoding error will be transmitted and amplified during fabrication of a hologram, which can cause a reconstructed error in the generated wavefront. A correction method of encoding errors based on the least-squares fitting is proposed. A validating experiment is completed by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to reconstruct a group of paraboloid wavefronts. The results show that encoding errors increase the reconstructed error of a wavefront less than optical system errors, and the root-mean-square value drops 0.022λ after the correction of the encoding error, but it falls 0.092λ after the correction of optical system errors. The total error has been reduced by 0.114λ. This research is helpful for prediction of encoding errors and improvement of wavefront reconstruction accuracy. PMID:27139675

  11. Performance and Results of the NAOS Visible Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, P.; Dorn, R. J.; Rousset, G.; Cavadore, C.; Charton, J.; Cumani, C.; Fusco, T.; Hubin, N.; Kern, P.; Lizon, J. L.; Magnard, Y.; Puget, P.; Rabaud, D.; Rabou, P.; Stadler, E.

    The Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) was installed in December 2001 on the Nasmyth focus of the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). It includes two wavefront sensors: one operates at IR wavelengths, the other at visible wavelengths. This paper describes the NAOS visible wavefront sensor based on a Shack-Hartmann principle. This wavefront sensor unit includes: 1) A continuous flow liquid nitrogen cryostat and a low noise fast readout CCD camera controlled by the ESO new generation CCD system FIERA using a fast frame rate EEV/Marconi CCD-50. This 128´128 pixels split frame transfer device has a readout noise of 3 e- at 50 Kpix/sec/port. FIERA provides remotely controlled readout modes with optional binning, windowing and flexible integration time. 2) Two remotely exchangeable micro-lens arrays (14´14 and 7´7 micro-lenses) cooled to the CCD temperature ( -100 °C). The CCD array is directly located in the micro lenses focal plane, only a few millimeters apart without any relay optics. Additional opto-mechanical functions are also provided (atmospheric dispersion compensator, flux level control, field of view limitation). On-sky performances of the wavefront sensor are presented. Adaptive optics corrections were obtained with a reference star as faint as visible magnitude 17. The maximum achievable band-path is 35 Hz at 0 dB for the open loop transfer function.

  12. Wavefront Control Toolbox for James Webb Space Telescope Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiri, Ron; Aronstein, David L.; Smith, Jeffery Scott; Dean, Bruce H.; Sabatke, Erin

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a Matlab toolbox for wavefront control of optical systems. We have applied this toolbox to the optical models of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in general and to the JWST Testbed Telescope (TBT) in particular, implementing both unconstrained and constrained wavefront optimization to correct for possible misalignments present on the segmented primary mirror or the monolithic secondary mirror. The optical models implemented in Zemax optical design program and information is exchanged between Matlab and Zemax via the Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) interface. The model configuration is managed using the XML protocol. The optimization algorithm uses influence functions for each adjustable degree of freedom of the optical mode. The iterative and non-iterative algorithms have been developed to converge to a local minimum of the root-mean-square (rms) of wavefront error using singular value decomposition technique of the control matrix of influence functions. The toolkit is highly modular and allows the user to choose control strategies for the degrees of freedom to be adjusted on a given iteration and wavefront convergence criterion. As the influence functions are nonlinear over the control parameter space, the toolkit also allows for trade-offs between frequency of updating the local influence functions and execution speed. The functionality of the toolbox and the validity of the underlying algorithms have been verified through extensive simulations.

  13. Wavefront control of high power laser beams for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E; Feldman, M; Grey, A; Koch, J; Lund, L; Sacks, R; Smith, D; Stolz, C; Van Atta, L; Winters, S; Woods, B; Zacharias, R

    1999-09-22

    The use of lasers as the driver for inertial confinement fusion and weapons physics experiments is based on their ability to produce high-energy short pulses in a beam with low divergence. Indeed, the focus ability of high quality laser beams far exceeds alternate technologies and is a major factor in the rationale for building high power lasers for such applications. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large, 192-beam, high-power laser facility under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fusion and weapons physics experiments. Its uncorrected minimum focal spot size is limited by laser system aberrations. The NIF includes a Wavefront Control System to correct these aberrations to yield a focal spot small enough for its applications. Sources of aberrations to be corrected include prompt pump-induced distortions in the laser amplifiers, previous-shot thermal distortions, beam off-axis effects, and gravity, mounting, and coating-induced optic distortions. Aberrations from gas density variations and optic manufacturing figure errors are also partially corrected. This paper provides an overview of the NIF Wavefront Control System and describes the target spot size performance improvement it affords. It describes provisions made to accommodate the NIF's high fluence (laser beam and flashlamp), large wavefront correction range, wavefront temporal bandwidth, temperature and humidity variations, cleanliness requirements, and exception handling requirements (e.g. wavefront out-of-limits conditions).

  14. Wavefront control of high-power laser beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Richard A.; Bliss, Erlan S.; Winters, Scott; Sacks, Richard A.; Feldman, Mark; Grey, Andrew; Koch, Jeffrey A.; Stolz, Christopher J.; Toeppen, John S.; Van Atta, Lewis; Woods, Bruce W.

    2000-04-01

    The use of lasers as the driver for inertial confinement fusion and weapons physics experiments is based on their ability to produce high-energy short pulses in a beam with low divergence. Indeed, the focusability of high quality laser beams far exceeds alternate technologies and is a major factor in the rationale for building high power lasers for such applications. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large, 192-beam, high-power laser facility under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fusion and weapons physics experiments. Its uncorrected minimum focal spot size is limited by laser system aberrations. The NIF includes a Wavefront Control System to correct these aberrations to yield a focal spot small enough for its applications. Sources of aberrations to be corrected include prompt pump-induced distortions in the laser amplifiers, previous-shot thermal distortions, beam off-axis effects, and gravity, mounting, and coating-induced optic distortions. Aberrations from gas density variations and optic-manufacturing figure errors are also partially corrected. This paper provides an overview of the NIF Wavefront Control System and describes the target spot size performance improvement it affords. It describes provisions made to accommodate the NIF's high fluence (laser beam and flashlamp), large wavefront correction range, wavefront temporal bandwidth, temperature and humidity variations, cleanliness requirements, and exception handling requirements (e.g. wavefront out-of-limits conditions).

  15. Broadband, Common-path, Interferometric Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James Kent (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid sensors comprising Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (S-HWFS) and Zernike Wavefront Sensor (Z-WFS) capabilities are presented. The hybrid sensor includes a Z-WFS optically arranged in-line with a S-HWFS such that the combined wavefront sensor operates across a wide dynamic range and noise conditions. The Z-WFS may include the ability to introduce a dynamic phase shift in both transmissive and reflective modes.

  16. FOCAL PLANE WAVEFRONT SENSING USING RESIDUAL ADAPTIVE OPTICS SPECKLES

    SciTech Connect

    Codona, Johanan L.; Kenworthy, Matthew

    2013-04-20

    Optical imperfections, misalignments, aberrations, and even dust can significantly limit sensitivity in high-contrast imaging systems such as coronagraphs. An upstream deformable mirror (DM) in the pupil can be used to correct or compensate for these flaws, either to enhance the Strehl ratio or suppress the residual coronagraphic halo. Measurement of the phase and amplitude of the starlight halo at the science camera is essential for determining the DM shape that compensates for any non-common-path (NCP) wavefront errors. Using DM displacement ripples to create a series of probe and anti-halo speckles in the focal plane has been proposed for space-based coronagraphs and successfully demonstrated in the lab. We present the theory and first on-sky demonstration of a technique to measure the complex halo using the rapidly changing residual atmospheric speckles at the 6.5 m MMT telescope using the Clio mid-IR camera. The AO system's wavefront sensor measurements are used to estimate the residual wavefront, allowing us to approximately compute the rapidly evolving phase and amplitude of speckle halo. When combined with relatively short, synchronized science camera images, the complex speckle estimates can be used to interferometrically analyze the images, leading to an estimate of the static diffraction halo with NCP effects included. In an operational system, this information could be collected continuously and used to iteratively correct quasi-static NCP errors or suppress imperfect coronagraphic halos.

  17. Wavefront reconstruction from tangential and sagittal curvature.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Barbero, Sergio; Portilla, Javier; López-Alonso, José Manuel

    2014-12-10

    In a previous contribution [Appl. Opt.51, 8599 (2012)], a coauthor of this work presented a method for reconstructing the wavefront aberration from tangential refractive power data measured using dynamic skiascopy. Here we propose a new regularized least squares method where the wavefront is reconstructed not only using tangential but also sagittal curvature data. We prove that our new method provides improved quality reconstruction for typical and also for highly aberrated wavefronts, under a wide range of experimental error levels. Our method may be applied to any type of wavefront sensor (not only dynamic skiascopy) able to measure either just tangential or tangential plus sagittal curvature data. PMID:25608069

  18. Wavefront Reconstruction for a Natural Guide Star Ground Layer Adaptive Optics System on the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Marcos; Bouchez, Antonin; Conan, Rodolphe; McLeod, Brian

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present a wavefront reconstruction paradigm for NGS GLAO systems. The conventional approach to reconstructing the wavefront for LGS GLAO systems is to have a number of LGSs in a ring outside the science field and simply average the individual wavefronts. This approach is not well-suited to NGS GLAO because the stars have an irregular distribution and varying magnitudes. In this paper, we derive covariance matrices for the wavefronts in different directions and the measurement noise. Using these covariance matrices, we are able to find the minimum-variance reconstructor and estimate the residual wavefront as a function of location in the field. This can be used to determine which guide stars produce the best correction. End-to-end simulations in YAO are run to estimate the expected performance of the NGS GLAO system for the Giant Magellan Telescope. We find that there is essentially full sky coverage.

  19. Scene-based Wave-front Sensing for Remote Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; LaFortune, K; Chan, C

    2003-07-30

    Scene-based wave-front sensing (SBWFS) is a technique that allows an arbitrary scene to be used for wave-front sensing with adaptive optics (AO) instead of the normal point source. This makes AO feasible in a wide range of interesting scenarios. This paper first presents the basic concepts and properties of SBWFS. Then it discusses that application of this technique with AO to remote imaging. For the specific case of correction of a lightweight optic. End-to-end simulation results establish that in this case, SBWFS can perform as well as point-source AO. Design considerations such as noise propagation, number of subapertures and tracking changing image content are analyzed.

  20. Wavefront Control and Image Restoration with Less Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    PseudoDiversity is a method of recovering the wavefront in a sparse- or segmented- aperture optical system typified by an interferometer or a telescope equipped with an adaptive primary mirror consisting of controllably slightly moveable segments. (PseudoDiversity should not be confused with a radio-antenna-arraying method called pseudodiversity.) As in the cases of other wavefront- recovery methods, the streams of wavefront data generated by means of PseudoDiversity are used as feedback signals for controlling electromechanical actuators of the various segments so as to correct wavefront errors and thereby, for example, obtain a clearer, steadier image of a distant object in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. There are numerous potential applications in astronomy, remote sensing from aircraft and spacecraft, targeting missiles, sighting military targets, and medical imaging (including microscopy) through such intervening media as cells or water. In comparison with prior wavefront-recovery methods used in adaptive optics, PseudoDiversity involves considerably simpler equipment and procedures and less computation. For PseudoDiversity, there is no need to install separate metrological equipment or to use any optomechanical components beyond those that are already parts of the optical system to which the method is applied. In Pseudo- Diversity, the actuators of a subset of the segments or subapertures are driven to make the segments dither in the piston, tilt, and tip degrees of freedom. Each aperture is dithered at a unique frequency at an amplitude of a half wavelength of light. During the dithering, images on the focal plane are detected and digitized at a rate of at least four samples per dither period. In the processing of the image samples, the use of different dither frequencies makes it possible to determine the separate effects of the various dithered segments or apertures. The digitized image-detector outputs are processed in the spatial

  1. On-line measurement of wavefront aberration on optics caused by intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuodong; Liu, Fuhua; Jiang, Chang; Wang, Fei; Shao, Bibo; Ji, Yunfeng

    2015-05-01

    It is presented that the thermally induced transmitted wavefront aberration of a high-reflectivity sampling mirror was detected on line using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) in the beam quality measurement of an intense laser. As a result of heat absorption in the sampling mirror with active aperture of 120 mm, thermally induced wavefront aberration emerged when the mirror was exposed to high laser intensity of several kilowatts per centimeter square. Time-dependent wavefront aberration curves were acquired, and the transmitted wavefronts were reconstructed based on Zernike mode reconstruction theory. The experimental results indicate that the magnitude of the dynamic transmitted wavefront aberration increases gradually with the growing heat deposit during laser irradiation. The maximum of wavefront aberration observed after irradiation for 5 seconds reaches 0.11 μm of root-mean-square value. After further analysis, the experimental results of dynamic aberration can be applied in modifications for the measurement results of intense laser beam quality or tests for the thermal stability of optics used in the intense laser systems.

  2. A smooth introduction to the wavefront set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouder, Christian; Viet Dang, Nguyen; Hélein, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    The wavefront set of a distribution describes not only the points where the distribution is singular, but also the ‘directions’ of the singularities. Because of its ability to control the product of distributions, the wavefront set was a key element of recent progress in renormalized quantum field theory in curved spacetime, quantum gravity, the discussion of time machines or quantum energy inequalitites. However, the wavefront set is a somewhat subtle concept whose standard definition is not easy to grasp. This paper is a step-by-step introduction to the wavefront set, with examples and motivation. Many different definitions and new interpretations of the wavefront set are presented. Some of them involve a Radon transform.

  3. Wavefront Measurement for Laser-Guiding Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    University of Chicago; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Shiraishi, S.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The wavefront of a short laser pulse after interaction in a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) was measured to diagnose laser-guiding quality. Experiments were performed on a 100 TW class laser at the LOASIS facility of LBNL using a hydrogenfilled capillary discharge waveguide. Laser-guiding with a pre-formed plasma channel allows the laser pulse to propagate over many Rayleigh lengths at high intensity and is crucial to accelerate electrons to the highest possible energy. Efficient coupling of laser energy into the plasma is realized when the laser and the channel satisfy a matched guiding condition, in which the wavefront remains flat within the channel. Using a wavefront sensor, the laser-guiding quality was diagnosed based on the wavefront of the laser pulse exiting the plasma channel. This wavefront diagnostic will contribute to achieving controlled, matched guiding in future experiments.

  4. Wavefront Measurement for Laser-Guiding Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, S.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    The wavefront of a short laser pulse after interaction in a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) was measured to diagnose laser-guiding quality. Experiments were performed on a 100 TW class laser at the LOASIS facility of LBNL using a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. Laser-guiding with a pre-formed plasma channel allows the laser pulse to propagate over many Rayleigh lengths at high intensity and is crucial to accelerate electrons to the highest possible energy. Efficient coupling of laser energy into the plasma is realized when the laser and the channel satisfy a matched guiding condition, in which the wavefront remains flat within the channel. Using a wavefront sensor, the laser-guiding quality was diagnosed based on the wavefront of the laser pulse exiting the plasma channel. This wavefront diagnostic will contribute to achieving controlled, matched guiding in future experiments.

  5. Tomographic Errors From Wavefront Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, A. E.; Trampert, J.

    2008-12-01

    Despite recent advances in full-waveform modeling ray theory is still, for good reasons, the preferred method in global tomography. It is well known that ray theory is most accurate for anomalies that are large compared to the wavelength. Exactly what errors result from the failure of this assumption is less well understood, in spite of the fact that anomalies found in the Earth from ray-based tomography methods are often outside the regime in which ray theory is known to be valid. Using the spectral element method, we have computed exact delay times and compared them to ray-theoretical traveltimes for two classic anomalies, one large and disk-shaped near the core mantle boundary, and the other a plume-like structure extending throughout the mantle. Wavefront healing is apparent in the traveltime anomalies generated by these structures; its effects are strongly asymmetric between P and S arrivals due to wavelength differences and source directionality. Simple computations in two dimensions allow us to develop the intuition necessary to understand how diffractions around the anomalies explain these results. When inverting the exact travel time anomalies with ray theory we expect wavefront healing to have a strong influence on the resulting structures. We anticipate that the asymmetry will be of particular importance in anomalies in the bulk velocity structure.

  6. High stability wavefront reference source

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, M.; Mockler, D.J.

    1994-05-03

    A thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source which produces a collimated output laser beam is disclosed. The output beam comprises substantially planar reference wavefronts which are useful for aligning and testing optical interferometers. The invention receives coherent radiation from an input optical fiber, directs a diverging input beam of the coherent radiation to a beam folding mirror (to produce a reflected diverging beam), and collimates the reflected diverging beam using a collimating lens. In a class of preferred embodiments, the invention includes a thermally and mechanically stable frame comprising rod members connected between a front end plate and a back end plate. The beam folding mirror is mounted on the back end plate, and the collimating lens mounted to the rods between the end plates. The end plates and rods are preferably made of thermally stable metal alloy. Preferably, the input optical fiber is a single mode fiber coupled to an input end of a second single mode optical fiber that is wound around a mandrel fixedly attached to the frame of the apparatus. The output end of the second fiber is cleaved so as to be optically flat, so that the input beam emerging therefrom is a nearly perfect diverging spherical wave. 7 figures.

  7. High stability wavefront reference source

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, Mark; Mockler, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    A thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source which produces a collimated output laser beam. The output beam comprises substantially planar reference wavefronts which are useful for aligning and testing optical interferometers. The invention receives coherent radiation from an input optical fiber, directs a diverging input beam of the coherent radiation to a beam folding mirror (to produce a reflected diverging beam), and collimates the reflected diverging beam using a collimating lens. In a class of preferred embodiments, the invention includes a thermally and mechanically stable frame comprising rod members connected between a front end plate and a back end plate. The beam folding mirror is mounted on the back end plate, and the collimating lens mounted to the rods between the end plates. The end plates and rods are preferably made of thermally stable metal alloy. Preferably, the input optical fiber is a single mode fiber coupled to an input end of a second single mode optical fiber that is wound around a mandrel fixedly attached to the frame of the apparatus. The output end of the second fiber is cleaved so as to be optically flat, so that the input beam emerging therefrom is a nearly perfect diverging spherical wave.

  8. Performance and results of the NAOS visible wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Rousset, Gérard; Dorn, Reinhold J.; Cavadore, Cyril; Charton, Julien; Cumani, Claudio; Fusco, Thierry; Hubin, Norbert N.; Kern, Pierre Y.; Lizon, Jean-Luis; Magnard, Yves; Puget, Pascal; Rabaud, Didier; Rabou, Patrick; Stadler, Eric

    2003-02-01

    The NAOS adaptive optics system was installed in December 2001 on the Nasmyth focus of the ESO VLT. It includes two wavefront sensors: one is working at IR wavelength analysis and the other at visible wavelengths. This paper describes the NAOS Visible Wave Front Sensor based on a Shack-Hartman principle and its performances as measured on the sky. This wavefront sensor includes within a continuous flow liquid nitrogen cryostat: 1) a low noise fast readout CCD camera controlled by the ESO new generation CCD system FIERA using a fast frame rate EEV/Marconi CCD-50 focal plane array. This 128×128 pixels focal plane array has a readout noise of 3 e- at 50 kilopixel/sec/port. FIERA provides remotely controlled readout modes with optional binning, windowing and flexible integration time. 2) two remotely exchangeable micro-lens arrays (14×14 and 7×7 micro-lenses) cooled at the CCD temperature ( -100 °C) within the cryostat. The CCD array is directly located in the micro lenses focal plane at a few millimeters apart without relay optics. 3) Additional opto-mechanical functions are also provided (atmospheric dispersion compensator, flux level control, field of view limitation). On sky performances of the wavefront sensor are presented. Adaptive Optics corrections was obtained with a reference star as faint as a visible magnitude 17 with a band-path of 40 Hz in close loop.

  9. Global wavefront sensing for extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragazzoni, R.; Bergomi, M.; Brunelli, A.; Dima, M.; Farinato, J.; Magrin, D.; Marafatto, L.; Viotto, V.

    2012-07-01

    In ELTs the larger size of the aperture will translates into different categories of problems and different kind of solutions. The concept of Global Multi Conjugated Adaptive Optics is here introduced. In this, the wavefront sensing is extended to a much larger Field of View, practically limited by the telescope optics or optomechanics and by the limit given by the coverage of the metapupil at the highest altitude of interest. The correction of these layers is employed in a numerical fashion and the information is retrieved in order to compensate for a much limited Field of View. All this, being done in a layer oriented fashion, does allow for a simplified treatment of the Signal to Noise Ratio and to an estimate of the performances in the plot h vs. spatial scales where layers and the related Kolmogorov distributed turbulence are plotted. Once this information is retrieved it is fed back into the existing Deformable Mirror with a back-projection that allow for the most efficient way in terms of coverage of the spatial frequencies. The nature of the closed- vs open-loop of such an approach is also briefly discussed. The aim of a sky coverage and of performances getting closer or exceeding the ones provided by Laser Guide Stars can be at hands.

  10. Coherence gated wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for two photon excited fluorescence retinal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel system for adaptive optics two photon imaging. We utilize the bandwidth of the femtosecond excitation beam to perform coherence gated imaging (OCT) of the sample. The location of the focus is directly observable in the cross sectional OCT images, and adjusted to the desired depth plane. Next, using real time volumetric OCT, we perform Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics (WSAO) aberration correction using a multi-element adaptive lens capable of correcting up to 4th order Zernike polynomials. The aberration correction is performed based on an image quality metric, for example intensity. The optimization time is limited only by the OCT acquisition rate, and takes ~30s. Following aberration correction, two photon fluorescence images are acquired, and compared to results without adaptive optics correction. This technique is promising for multiphoton imaging in multi-layered, scattering samples such as eye and brain, in which traditional wavefront sensing and guide-star sensorless adaptive optics approaches may not be suitable.

  11. x-y curvature wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, Manuel P; Valle, Pedro J

    2015-04-15

    In this Letter, we propose a new curvature wavefront sensor based on the principles of optical differentiation. The theoretically modeled setup consists of a diffractive optical mask placed at the intermediate plane of a classical two-lens coherent optical processor. The resulting image is composed of a number of local derivatives of the entrance pupil function whose proper combination provides the wavefront curvature. In contrast to the common radial curvature sensors, this one is able to provide the x and y wavefront curvature maps simultaneously. The sensor offers other additional advantages like having high spatial resolution, adjustable dynamic range, and not being sensitive to misalignment. PMID:25872040

  12. Scalable analog wavefront sensor with subpixel resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Standard Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors use a CCD element to sample position and distortion of a target or guide star. Digital sampling of the element and transfer to a memory space for subsequent computation adds significant temporal delay, thus, limiting the spatial frequency and scalability of the system as a wavefront sensor. A new approach to sampling uses information processing principles in an insect compound eye. Analog circuitry eliminates digital sampling and extends the useful range of the system to control a deformable mirror and make a faster, more capable wavefront sensor.

  13. Detecting higher-order wavefront errors with an astigmatic hybrid wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Shane

    2009-06-01

    The reconstruction of wavefront errors from measurements over subapertures can be made more accurate if a fully characterized quadratic surface can be fitted to the local wavefront surface. An astigmatic hybrid wavefront sensor with added neural network postprocessing is shown to have this capability, provided that the focal image of each subaperture is sufficiently sampled. Furthermore, complete local curvature information is obtained with a single image without splitting beam power. PMID:19488150

  14. Active Optical Control of Quasi-Static Aberrations for ATST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. C.; Upton, R.; Rimmele, T. R.; Hubbard, R.; Barden, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) requires active control of quasi-static telescope aberrations in order to achieve the image quality set by its science requirements. Four active mirrors will be used to compensate for optical misalignments induced by changing gravitational forces and thermal gradients. These misalignments manifest themselves primarily as low-order wavefront aberrations that will be measured by a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. When operating in closed-loop with the wavefront sensor, the active optics control algorithm uses a linear least-squares reconstructor incorporating force constraints to limit force applied to the primary mirror while also incorporating a neutral-point constraint on the secondary mirror to limit pointing errors. The resulting system compensates for astigmatism and defocus with rigid-body motion of the secondary mirror and higher-order aberrations with primary mirror bending modes. We demonstrate this reconstruction method and present simulation results that apply the active optics correction to aberrations generated by finite-element modeling of thermal and gravitational effects over a typical day of ATST operation. Quasi-static wavefront errors are corrected to within limits set by wavefront sensor noise in all cases with very little force applied to the primary mirror surface and minimal pointing correction needed.

  15. 77 FR 20399 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Notice; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... INFORMATION: The Board published in the Federal Register of March 16, 2012 (77 FR 15755), a document... document (FR Doc. 2012-6332) announced the approval of mandatory financial information collection on BHCs...: Announcement of Approval, FR Doc. 2012-6332, published on March 16, 2012, make the following corrections:...

  16. Incoherent wavefront reconstruction by a retroemission device.

    PubMed

    Khaydukov, Eugenyi V; Semchishen, Vladimir A; Zvyagin, Andrei V

    2015-04-01

    This Letter addresses wavefront reconstruction by a retroemission device (REM). REM represents a lenslet array mounted on a substrate made of photoluminescent optical material, such as a polymer film impregnated with upconversion nanoparticles. An excitation light wavefront incident on the REM was sampled by the lenslet array piece-wise. Each wavelet at the lenslet aperture was converged into a voxel in the substrate, with its coordinates encoding the angle of incidence and curvature of the wavelet. Photoluminescence excited in the voxel was radiated isotropically, its back-propagating fraction was captured by the lenslet and transformed into a back-propagating wavelet, which contributed to reproduction of the entire incident wavefront with some fidelity. We experimentally proved the wavefront reconstruction based on REM, and present its theoretical model based on a Fresnel-Kirchhoff approximation. PMID:25831284

  17. Clustering of solitons in weakly correlated wavefronts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhigang; Sears, Suzanne M.; Martin, Hector; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Segev, Mordechai

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the spontaneous clustering of solitons in partially coherent wavefronts during the final stages of pattern formation initiated by modulation instability and noise. PMID:16578870

  18. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Boye, Robert; Adelsberger, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  19. Wavefront shaping using a deformable mirror for focusing inside optical tissue phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ricardo; Coelho, João. M. P.; Gabriel, Ana; Vieira, Pedro; Oliveira Silva, Catarina; Reis, Catarina

    2014-08-01

    Although light has long being used in medicine, scattering always hindered its use. This study intends to evolve into three different frontlines: development of methodologies to concentrate light inside biological tissues, development of an optical tissue phantom and development of multifunctional gold nanoparticles with therapeutic potential for targeting anticancer drug delivery. The impact of the scattering agent (milk) concentration in the measured wavefront and spot radius is analyzed. Wavefront correction proves to be efficient in overcoming the scattering effect in the different phantoms. Future studies for developing a photodynamic approach under near-infrared wavelength are now in progress and will be further presented.

  20. Optical wavefront shaping for the enhancement of Raman signal in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jonathan V.; Throckmorton, Graham A.; Hokr, Brett H.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to non-invasively focus light through scattering media has significant applications in many fields ranging from nanotechnology to deep tissue sensing. Until recently, the multiple light scattering events that occur in complex media such as biological tissue have inhibited the focusing ability and penetration depth of optical tools. Through the use of optical wavefront shaping, the spatial distortions due to these scattering events can be corrected, and the incident light can be focused through the scattering medium. Here, we demonstrate that wavefront shaping can be used to non-invasively enhance the Raman signal of a material through a scattering medium. Raman signal enhancement was achieved using backscattered light and a continuous sequential algorithm. Our results show the potential of wavefront shaping as an important addition to non-invasive detection techniques.

  1. Wave-front aberrations analysis by Zernike polynomials based on the annular sub-aperture stitching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lei; Hui, Mei; Deng, Jiayuan; Gong, Cheng; Zhao, Yuejin

    2012-11-01

    Annular sub-aperture stitching method was developed for testing large-aperture aspheric surfaces without using of any compensating element for measurement. It is necessary to correct measurement of aspheric optical aberrations and create mathematical description to describe wave-front aberrations. Zernike polynomials are suitable to describe wave aberration functions and data fitting of experimental measurements for the annular sub-aperture stitching system. This paper uses Zernike polynomials to describe the wave-front aberrations of full wave-front and reconstructed wave-front by annular sub-aperture stitching algorithm. At the same time, the imaging quality of the aspheric optical element can be contrasted. The stitching result shows good agreement with the full aperture result.

  2. Simple broadband implementation of a phase contrast wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.

    2004-01-01

    The most critical element of an adaptive optics system is its wavefront sensor, which must measure the closed-loop difference between the corrected wavefront and an ideal template at high speed, in real time, over a dense sampling of the pupil. Most high-order systems have used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors, but a novel approach based on Zernike's phase contrast principle appears promising. In this paper we discuss a simple way to achromatize such a phase contrast wavefront sensor, using the pi/2 phase difference between reflected and transmitted rays in a thin, symmetric beam splitter. We further model the response at a range of wavelengths to show that the required transverse dimension of the focal-plane phase-shifting spot, nominally lambda/D, may not be very sensitive to wavelength, and so in practice additional optics to introduce wavelength-dependent transverse magnification achromatizing this spot diameter may not be required. A very simple broadband implementation of the phase contrast wavefront sensor results.

  3. End-To-End performance test of the LINC-NIRVANA Wavefront-Sensor system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwein, Juergen; Bertram, Thomas; Conrad, Al; Briegel, Florian; Kittmann, Frank; Zhang, Xiangyu; Mohr, Lars

    2011-09-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is an imaging Fizeau interferometer, for use in near infrared wavelengths, being built for the Large Binocular Telescope. Multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) increases the sky coverage and the field of view over which diffraction limited images can be obtained. For its MCAO implementation, Linc-Nirvana utilizes four total wavefront sensors; each of the two beams is corrected by both a ground-layer wavefront sensor (GWS) and a high-layer wavefront sensor (HWS). The GWS controls the adaptive secondary deformable mirror (DM), which is based on an DSP slope computing unit. Whereas the HWS controls an internal DM via computations provided by an off-the-shelf multi-core Linux system. Using wavefront sensor data collected from a prior lab experiment, we have shown via simulation that the Linux based system is sufficient to operate at 1kHz, with jitter well below the needs of the final system. Based on that setup we tested the end-to-end performance and latency through all parts of the system which includes the camera, the wavefront controller, and the deformable mirror. We will present our loop control structure and the results of those performance tests.

  4. Extending the locking range of VHG-stabilized diode laser bars using wavefront compensator phaseplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Roy; Trela, Natalia; Wendland, Jozef J.; Baker, Howard J.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the successful use of wavefront compensator phaseplates to extend the locking range of VHG-stabilized diode laser bars by correcting the effects of imperfect source collimation. We first show that smile values of greater than 1μm peak to valley typically limit the achievable wavelength locking range, and that using wavefront compensation to reduce the effective smile to below 0.5μm allows all emitters to be simultaneously locked, even for bars with standard facet coatings, operating under conditions where the bar's natural lasing wavelength is over 9nm from the VHG locking wavelength. We then show that, even under conditions of low smile, wavefront errors can limit the locking range and locking efficiency, and that these limits can again be overcome by wavefront compensation. This allows wavelength lock to be maintained over an increased range of diode temperature and drive current, without incurring the efficiency loss that would be incurred by increasing grating strength. By integrating wavefront compensation into the slow-axis collimator, we can achieve this high-brightness VHG-optimized beam in a compact optical system.

  5. Wavefront measurement of space infrared telescopes at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Hidehiro; Onaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Takao; Enya, Keigo; Murakami, Hiroshi; Yamashiro, Ryoji; Ezaki, Tatsuhiko; Numao, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Yoshikazu

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we describe our recent activities on wave-front measurement of space infrared telescopes. Optical performance of the 685-mm lightweight telescope on board the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, ASTRO-F, has been evaluated at cryogenic temperatures. The mirrors of the ASTRO-F telescope are made of sandwich-type silicon carbide (SiC) material, comprising porous core and CVD coat of SiC on the surface. The total wavefront errors of the telescope were measured with an interferometer from outside a liquid-helium chamber; a 75-cm reflecting flat mirror was used for auto-collimating the light from the interferometer. The cryogenic deformation of the flat mirror was derived independently by shifting it in the chamber and its contribution to the wavefront error was removed. In addition to the ASTRO-F telescope, we are currently developing a 3.5-m telescope system for SPICA, the next Japanese infrared astronomical satellite project. Details of our methodology for the ASTRO-F telescope, together with our optical test plan for the SPICA telescope, are reported.

  6. Generalised optical differentiation wavefront sensor: a sensitive high dynamic range wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Haffert, S Y

    2016-08-22

    Current wavefront sensors for high resolution imaging have either a large dynamic range or a high sensitivity. A new kind of wavefront sensor is developed which can have both: the Generalised Optical Differentiation wavefront sensor. This new wavefront sensor is based on the principles of optical differentiation by amplitude filters. We have extended the theory behind linear optical differentiation and generalised it to nonlinear filters. We used numerical simulations and laboratory experiments to investigate the properties of the generalised wavefront sensor. With this we created a new filter that can decouple the dynamic range from the sensitivity. These properties make it suitable for adaptive optic systems where a large range of phase aberrations have to be measured with high precision. PMID:27557179

  7. Focal plane wavefront sensor achromatization: The multireference self-coherent camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, J. R.; Galicher, R.; Baudoz, P.; Rousset, G.; Mazoyer, J.; Dupuis, O.

    2016-04-01

    Context. High contrast imaging and spectroscopy provide unique constraints for exoplanet formation models as well as for planetary atmosphere models. But this can be challenging because of the planet-to-star small angular separation (<1 arcsec) and high flux ratio (>105). Recently, optimized instruments like VLT/SPHERE and Gemini/GPI were installed on 8m-class telescopes. These will probe young gazeous exoplanets at large separations (≳1 au) but, because of uncalibrated phase and amplitude aberrations that induce speckles in the coronagraphic images, they are not able to detect older and fainter planets. Aims: There are always aberrations that are slowly evolving in time. They create quasi-static speckles that cannot be calibrated a posteriori with sufficient accuracy. An active correction of these speckles is thus needed to reach very high contrast levels (>106-107). This requires a focal plane wavefront sensor. Our team proposed a self coherent camera, the performance of which was demonstrated in the laboratory. As for all focal plane wavefront sensors, these are sensitive to chromatism and we propose an upgrade that mitigates the chromatism effects. Methods: First, we recall the principle of the self-coherent camera and we explain its limitations in polychromatic light. Then, we present and numerically study two upgrades to mitigate chromatism effects: the optical path difference method and the multireference self-coherent camera. Finally, we present laboratory tests of the latter solution. Results: We demonstrate in the laboratory that the multireference self-coherent camera can be used as a focal plane wavefront sensor in polychromatic light using an 80 nm bandwidth at 640 nm (bandwidth of 12.5%). We reach a performance that is close to the chromatic limitations of our bench: 1σ contrast of 4.5 × 10-8 between 5 and 17 λ0/D. Conclusions: The performance of the MRSCC is promising for future high-contrast imaging instruments that aim to actively minimize the

  8. Correlations between corneal and total wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrochen, Michael; Jankov, Mirko; Bueeler, Michael; Seiler, Theo

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: Corneal topography data expressed as corneal aberrations are frequently used to report corneal laser surgery results. However, the optical image quality at the retina depends on all optical elements of the eye such as the human lens. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations and to discuss the importance of corneal aberrations for representing corneal laser surgery results. Methods: Thirty three eyes of 22 myopic subjects were measured with a corneal topography system and a Tschernig-type wavefront analyzer after the pupils were dilated to at least 6 mm in diameter. All measurements were centered with respect to the line of sight. Corneal and total wavefront aberrations were calculated up to the 6th Zernike order in the same reference plane. Results: Statistically significant correlations (p < 0.05) between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations were found for the astigmatism (C3,C5) and all 3rd Zernike order coefficients such as coma (C7,C8). No statistically significant correlations were found for all 4th to 6th order Zernike coefficients except for the 5th order horizontal coma C18 (p equals 0.003). On average, all Zernike coefficients for the corneal aberrations were found to be larger compared to Zernike coefficients for the total wavefront aberrations. Conclusions: Corneal aberrations are only of limited use for representing the optical quality of the human eye after corneal laser surgery. This is due to the lack of correlation between corneal and total wavefront aberrations in most of the higher order aberrations. Besides this, the data present in this study yield towards an aberration balancing between corneal aberrations and the optical elements within the eye that reduces the aberration from the cornea by a certain degree. Consequently, ideal customized ablations have to take both, corneal and total wavefront aberrations, into consideration.

  9. Wavefront Analysis of Adaptive Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Hillman, Lloyd

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for this work came from a NASA Headquarters interest in investigating design concepts for a large space telescope employing active optics technology. Current and foreseeable launch vehicles will be limited to carrying around 4-5 meter diameter objects. Thus, if a large, filled-aperture telescope (6-20 meters in diameter) is to be placed in space, it will be required to have a deployable primary mirror. Such a mirror may be an inflatable membrane or a segmented mirror consisting of many smaller pieces. In any case, it is expected that the deployed primary will not be of sufficient quality to achieve diffraction-limited performance for its aperture size. Thus, an active optics system will be needed to correct for initial as well as environmentally-produced primary figure errors. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed considerable expertise in the area of active optics with the PAMELA test-bed. The combination of this experience along with the Marshall optical shop's work in mirror fabrication made MSFC the logical choice to lead NASA's effort to develop active optics technology for large, space-based, astronomical telescopes. Furthermore, UAH's support of MSFC in the areas of optical design, fabrication, and testing of space-based optical systems placed us in a key position to play a major role in the development of this future-generation telescope. A careful study of the active optics components had to be carried out in order to determine control segment size, segment quality, and segment controllability required to achieve diffraction-limited resolution with a given primary mirror. With this in mind, UAH undertook the following effort to provide NASA/MSFC with optical design and analysis support for the large telescope study. All of the work performed under this contract has already been reported, as a team member with MSFC, to NASA Headquarters in a series of presentations given between May and December of 1995. As specified on the delivery

  10. Improved artificial bee colony algorithm for wavefront sensor-less system in free space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chaojun; Han, Xiang'e.

    2015-10-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) technology is an effective way to alleviate the effect of turbulence on free space optical communication (FSO). A new adaptive compensation method can be used without a wave-front sensor. Artificial bee colony algorithm (ABC) is a population-based heuristic evolutionary algorithm inspired by the intelligent foraging behaviour of the honeybee swarm with the advantage of simple, good convergence rate, robust and less parameter setting. In this paper, we simulate the application of the improved ABC to correct the distorted wavefront and proved its effectiveness. Then we simulate the application of ABC algorithm, differential evolution (DE) algorithm and stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to the FSO system and analyze the wavefront correction capabilities by comparison of the coupling efficiency, the error rate and the intensity fluctuation in different turbulence before and after the correction. The results show that the ABC algorithm has much faster correction speed than DE algorithm and better correct ability for strong turbulence than SPGD algorithm. Intensity fluctuation can be effectively reduced in strong turbulence, but not so effective in week turbulence.

  11. Military target task performance after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Tana; Deaver, Dawne; Howell, Christopher; Moyer, Steve; Nguyen, Oanh; Mueller, Greg; Ryan, Denise; Sia, Rose K.; Stutzman, Richard; Pasternak, Joseph; Bower, Kraig

    2014-06-01

    Major decisions regarding life and death are routinely made on the modern battlefield, where visual function of the individual soldier can be of critical importance in the decision-making process. Glasses in the combat environment have considerable disadvantages: degradation of short term visual performance can occur as dust and sweat accumulate on lenses during a mission or patrol; long term visual performance can diminish as lenses become increasingly scratched and pitted; during periods of intense physical trauma, glasses can be knocked off the soldier's face and lost or broken. Although refractive surgery offers certain benefits on the battlefield when compared to wearing glasses, it is not without potential disadvantages. As a byproduct of refractive surgery, elevated optical aberrations can be induced, causing decreases in contrast sensitivity and increases in the symptoms of glare, halos, and starbursts. Typically, these symptoms occur under low light level conditions, the same conditions under which most military operations are initiated. With the advent of wavefront aberrometry, we are now seeing correction not only of myopia and astigmatism but of other, smaller optical aberrations that can cause the above symptoms. In collaboration with the Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center (WRESP-RC) at Fort Belvoir and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), the overall objective of this study is to determine the impact of wavefront guided (WFG) versus wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) on military task visual performance. Psychophysical perception testing was conducted before and after surgery to measure each participant's performance regarding target detection and identification using thermal imagery. The results are presented here.

  12. Feedback controlled optics with wavefront compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, William G. (Inventor); Redding, David C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The sensitivity model of a complex optical system obtained by linear ray tracing is used to compute a control gain matrix by imposing the mathematical condition for minimizing the total wavefront error at the optical system's exit pupil. The most recent deformations or error states of the controlled segments or optical surfaces of the system are then assembled as an error vector, and the error vector is transformed by the control gain matrix to produce the exact control variables which will minimize the total wavefront error at the exit pupil of the optical system. These exact control variables are then applied to the actuators controlling the various optical surfaces in the system causing the immediate reduction in total wavefront error observed at the exit pupil of the optical system.

  13. Wavefront control for the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J; Dillon, D; Severson, S; Macintosh, B

    2006-04-14

    The wavefront control strategy for the proposed Gemini Planet Imager, an extreme adaptive optics coronagraph for planet detection, is presented. Two key parts of this strategy are experimentally verified in a testbed at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics, which features a 32 x 32 MEMS device. Detailed analytic models and algorithms for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor alignment and calibration are presented. It is demonstrated that with these procedures, the spatially filtered WFS and the Fourier Transform reconstructor can be used to flatten to the MEMS to 1 nm RMS in the controllable band. Performance is further improved using the technique of modifying the reference slopes using a measurement of the static wavefront error in the science leg.

  14. Asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiang; Wei, Hengzheng; Zhang, Peng

    2006-12-01

    A system of asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing (ACWS) is proposed for the first time to our knowledge. One of the most significant features of the asymmetric cryptography is that a trapdoor one-way function is required and constructed by analogy to wavefront sensing, in which the public key may be derived from optical parameters, such as the wavelength or the focal length, while the private key may be obtained from a kind of regular point array. The ciphertext is generated by the encoded wavefront and represented with an irregular array. In such an ACWS system, the encryption key is not identical to the decryption key, which is another important feature of an asymmetric cryptographic system. The processes of asymmetric encryption and decryption are formulized mathematically and demonstrated with a set of numerical experiments.

  15. Asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiang; Wei, Hengzheng; Zhang, Peng

    2006-12-15

    A system of asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing (ACWS) is proposed for the first time to our knowledge. One of the most significant features of the asymmetric cryptography is that a trapdoor one-way function is required and constructed by analogy to wavefront sensing, in which the public key may be derived from optical parameters, such as the wavelength or the focal length, while the private key may be obtained from a kind of regular point array. The ciphertext is generated by the encoded wavefront and represented with an irregular array. In such an ACWS system, the encryption key is not identical to the decryption key, which is another important feature of an asymmetric cryptographic system. The processes of asymmetric encryption and decryption are formulized mathematically and demonstrated with a set of numerical experiments. PMID:17130909

  16. Comparison between iterative wavefront control algorithm and direct gradient wavefront control algorithm for adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sheng-Yi; Liu, Wen-Jin; Chen, Shan-Qiu; Dong, Li-Zhi; Yang, Ping; Xu, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Among all kinds of wavefront control algorithms in adaptive optics systems, the direct gradient wavefront control algorithm is the most widespread and common method. This control algorithm obtains the actuator voltages directly from wavefront slopes through pre-measuring the relational matrix between deformable mirror actuators and Hartmann wavefront sensor with perfect real-time characteristic and stability. However, with increasing the number of sub-apertures in wavefront sensor and deformable mirror actuators of adaptive optics systems, the matrix operation in direct gradient algorithm takes too much time, which becomes a major factor influencing control effect of adaptive optics systems. In this paper we apply an iterative wavefront control algorithm to high-resolution adaptive optics systems, in which the voltages of each actuator are obtained through iteration arithmetic, which gains great advantage in calculation and storage. For AO system with thousands of actuators, the computational complexity estimate is about O(n2) ˜ O(n3) in direct gradient wavefront control algorithm, while the computational complexity estimate in iterative wavefront control algorithm is about O(n) ˜ (O(n)3/2), in which n is the number of actuators of AO system. And the more the numbers of sub-apertures and deformable mirror actuators, the more significant advantage the iterative wavefront control algorithm exhibits. Project supported by the National Key Scientific and Research Equipment Development Project of China (Grant No. ZDYZ2013-2), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11173008), and the Sichuan Provincial Outstanding Youth Academic Technology Leaders Program, China (Grant No. 2012JQ0012).

  17. Requirements for discrete actuator and segmented wavefront correctors for aberration compensation in two large populations of human eyes

    PubMed Central

    Doble, Nathan; Miller, Donald T.; Yoon, Geunyoung; Williams, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous types of wavefront correctors have been employed in adaptive optics (AO) systems for correcting the ocular wavefront aberration. While all have improved image quality, none have yielded diffraction-limited imaging for large pupils (≥6 mm), where the aberrations are most severe and the benefit of AO the greatest. To this end, we modeled the performance of discrete actuator, segmented piston-only, and segmented piston/tip/tilt wavefront correctors in conjunction with wavefront aberrations measured on normal human eyes in two large populations. The wavefront error was found to be as large as 53 μm, depending heavily on the pupil diameter (2–7.5 mm) and the particular refractive state. The required actuator number for diffraction-limited imaging was determined for three pupil sizes (4.5, 6, and 7.5 mm), three second-order aberration states, and four imaging wavelengths (0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 μm). The number across the pupil varied from only a few actuators in the discrete case to greater than 100 for the piston-only corrector. The results presented will help guide the development of wavefront correctors for the next generation of ophthalmic instrumentation. PMID:17579706

  18. Recent developments of interferometric wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Chen, Xiaoyu; Ling, Tong; Zhang, Lei; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing

    2015-08-01

    Recent trends of interferometric wavefront sensing tend to focus on high precision, anti-vibration, compact, along with much more involved of electric and computer technology. And the optical principles employed not only limit to interference but also include diffraction, scattering, polarization, etc. In this paper, some selected examples basing on the research works in our group will be given to illustrate the trends mentioned above. To achieve extra high accuracy, phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry (PS-PDI) is believed to be a good candidate as it employs a nearly perfect point diffraction spherical wavefront as the reference and also takes advantage of the high precision of phase-shifting algorithms. Cyclic radial shearing interferometry (C-RSI) successively demonstrate the anti-vibration characteristic and can diagnose transient wavefront with only one single shot by employing a three-mirror common-path configuration and a synchronizing system. In contrast sharply with those early interferometers, interferometers with very compact configuration are more suitable to develop portable wavefront sensing instruments. Cross-grating lateral shearing interferometer (CG-LSI) is a very compact interferometer that adopts a cross-grating of millimeters to produce lateral shearing of the diffraction wave of the test wavefront. Be aware that, computer technique has been used a lot in all of the above interferometers but the non-null annual sub-aperture stitching interferometer (NASSI) for general aspheric surface testing mostly relies on the computer model of the physical interferometer setup and iterative ray-tracing optimization. The principles of the above mentioned interferometric wavefront sensing methods would be given in detail.

  19. EIA Corrects Errors in Its Drilling Activity Estimates Series

    EIA Publications

    1998-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status.

  20. EIA Completes Corrections to Drilling Activity Estimates Series

    EIA Publications

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status.

  1. Hyperspectral imaging camera using wavefront division interference.

    PubMed

    Bahalul, Eran; Bronfeld, Asaf; Epshtein, Shlomi; Saban, Yoram; Karsenty, Avi; Arieli, Yoel

    2016-03-01

    An approach for performing hyperspectral imaging is introduced. The hyperspectral imaging is based on Fourier transform spectroscopy, where the interference is performed by wavefront division interference rather than amplitude division interference. A variable phase delay between two parts of the wavefront emanating from each point of an object is created by a spatial light modulator (SLM) to obtain variable interference patterns. The SLM is placed in the exit pupil of an imaging system, thus enabling conversion of a general imaging optical system into an imaging hyperspectral optical system. The physical basis of the new approach is introduced, and an optical apparatus is built. PMID:26974085

  2. Curvature sensor for ocular wavefront measurement.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Doutón, Fernando; Pujol, Jaume; Arjona, Montserrat; Luque, Sergio O

    2006-08-01

    We describe a new wavefront sensor for ocular aberration determination, based on the curvature sensing principle, which adapts the classical system used in astronomy for the living eye's measurements. The actual experimental setup is presented and designed following a process guided by computer simulations to adjust the design parameters for optimal performance. We present results for artificial and real young eyes, compared with the Hartmann-Shack estimations. Both methods show a similar performance for these cases. This system will allow for the measurement of higher order aberrations than the currently used wavefront sensors in situations in which they are supposed to be significant, such as postsurgery eyes. PMID:16832447

  3. The AOLI low-order non-linear curvature wavefront sensor: laboratory and on-sky results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; King, David; MacKay, Craig

    2014-08-01

    Many adaptive optics (AO) systems in use today require the use of bright reference objects to determine the effects of atmospheric distortions. Typically these systems use Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensors (SHWFS) to distribute incoming light from a reference object between a large number of sub-apertures. Guyon et al. evaluated the sensitivity of several different wavefront sensing techniques and proposed the non-linear Curvature Wavefront Sensor (nlCWFS) offering improved sensitivity across a range of orders of distortion. On large ground-based telescopes this can provide nearly 100% sky coverage using natural guide stars. We present work being undertaken on the nlCWFS development for the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI) project. The wavefront sensor is being developed as part of a low-order adaptive optics system for use in a dedicated instrument providing an AO corrected beam to a Lucky Imaging based science detector. The nlCWFS provides a total of four reference images on two photon-counting EMCCDs for use in the wavefront reconstruction process. We present results from both laboratory work using a calibration system and the first on-sky data obtained with the nlCWFS at the 4.2 metre William Herschel Telescope, La Palma. In addition, we describe the updated optical design of the wavefront sensor, strategies for minimising intrinsic effects and methods to maximise sensitivity using photon-counting detectors. We discuss on-going work to develop the high speed reconstruction algorithm required for the nlCWFS technique. This includes strategies to implement the technique on graphics processing units (GPUs) and to minimise computing overheads to obtain a prior for a rapid convergence of the wavefront reconstruction. Finally we evaluate the sensitivity of the wavefront sensor based upon both data and low-photon count strategies.

  4. Clinical Applications of Wavefront Refraction

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Adrian S.; Catania, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To determine normative reference ranges for higher-order wavefront error (HO-WFE), compare these values with those in common ocular pathologies, and evaluate treatments. Methods A review of 17 major studies on HO-WFE was made, involving data for a total of 31,605 subjects. The upper limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for HO-WFE was calculated from the most comprehensive of these studies using normal healthy patients aged 20 to 80 years. There were no studies identified using the natural pupil size for subjects, and for this reason, the HO-WFE was tabulated for pupil diameters of 3 to 7 mm. Effects of keratoconus, pterygium, cataract, and dry eye on HO-WFE were reviewed and treatment efficacy was considered. Results The calculated upper limit of the 95% CI for HO-WFE in a healthy normal 35-year-old patient with a mesopic pupil diameter of 6 mm would be 0.471 μm (471 nm) root-mean-square or less. Although the normal HO-WFE increases with age for a given pupil size, it is not yet completely clear how the concurrent influence of age-related pupillary miosis affects these findings. Abnormal ocular conditions such as keratoconus can induce a large HO-WFE, often in excess of 3.0 μm, particularly attributed to coma. For pterygium or cortical cataract, a combination of coma and trefoil was more commonly induced. Nuclear cataract can induce a negative spherical HO-WFE, usually in excess of 1.0 μm. Conclusions The upper limit of the 95% CI for HO-WFE root-mean-square is about 0.5 μm with normal physiological pupil sizes. With ocular pathologies, HO-WFE can be in excess of 1.0 μm, although many devices and therapeutic and surgical treatments are reported to be highly effective at minimizing HO-WFE. More accurate normative reference ranges for HO-WFE will require future studies using the subjects’ natural pupil size. PMID:25216319

  5. Advances in detector technologies for visible and infrared wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Kolb, Johann; Rothman, Johan; Fusco, Thierry; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Destefanis, Gérard; Lhermet, Nicolas; Pacaud, Olivier; Vuillermet, Michel; Kerlain, Alexandre; Hubin, Norbert; Reyes, Javier; Kasper, Markus; Ivert, Olaf; Suske, Wolfgang; Walker, Andrew; Skegg, Michael; Derelle, Sophie; Deschamps, Joel; Robert, Clélia; Vedrenne, Nicolas; Chazalet, Frédéric; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Preis, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the state of the art wavefront sensor detectors developments held in Europe for the last decade. The success of the next generation of instruments for 8 to 40-m class telescopes will depend on the ability of Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to provide excellent image quality and stability. This will be achieved by increasing the sampling, wavelength range and correction quality of the wave front error in both spatial and time domains. The modern generation of AO wavefront sensor detectors development started in the late nineties with the CCD50 detector fabricated by e2v technologies under ESO contract for the ESO NACO AO system. With a 128x128 pixels format, this 8 outputs CCD offered a 500 Hz frame rate with a readout noise of 7e-. A major breakthrough has been achieved with the recent development by e2v technologies of the CCD220. This 240x240 pixels 8 outputs EMCCD (CCD with internal multiplication) has been jointly funded by ESO and Europe under the FP6 programme. The CCD220 and the OCAM2 camera that operates the detector are now the most sensitive system in the world for advanced adaptive optics systems, offering less than 0.2 e readout noise at a frame rate of 1500 Hz with negligible dark current. Extremely easy to operate, OCAM2 only needs a 24 V power supply and a modest water cooling circuit. This system, commercialized by First Light Imaging, is extensively described in this paper. An upgrade of OCAM2 is foreseen to boost its frame rate to 2 kHz, opening the window of XAO wavefront sensing for the ELT using 4 synchronized cameras and pyramid wavefront sensing. Since this major success, new developments started in Europe. One is fully dedicated to Natural and Laser Guide Star AO for the E-ELT with ESO involvement. The spot elongation from a LGS Shack Hartman wavefront sensor necessitates an increase of the pixel format. Two detectors are currently developed by e2v. The NGSD will be a 880x840 pixels CMOS

  6. Large viewing field wavefront sensing by using a lightfield system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yang; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Ma, Haotong; Ning, Yu; Wang, Rui; Xu, Xiaojun

    2013-09-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, we developed a lightfield wavefront detection system, which is able to complete the large field of view, multi-perspective wavefront detection in a single photographic exposure. The lightfield wavefront detection system includes an imaging primary mirror, a lenslet array and a photosensitive device. The lenslet array is located on the imaging plane of the imaging primary mirror and the photosensitive device is located on the focal plane of the lenslet array. In this system, each lenslet reimages the aperture and forms a low-resolution image of the aperture. Compared with the Shack-Hartmann sensor, this lightfield measuring method can obtain imaging arrays in different perspectives. By comparing the array information with the standard information, we can obtain the slope matrix of the wavefront in different perspectives and restore the wavefront in a large field of view. Based on Fourier optics, we built the corresponding theoretical model and simulation system. By busing Meade telescope, turbulent phase screen, lenslet array and CCD camera, we founded the experimental lightfield wavefront measuring system. Numerical simulation results and experimental results show that this wavefront measuring method can effectively achieve the wavefront aberration information. This wavefront measurement method can realize the multi-perspective wavefront measurement, which is expected to solve the problem of large viewing field wavefront detection, and can be used for adaptive optics in giant telescopes.

  7. Real-Time Wavefront Control for the PALM-3000 High Order Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Tuan N.; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Dekany, Richard G.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Troy, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    We present a cost-effective scalable real-time wavefront control architecture based on off-the-shelf graphics processing units hosted in an ultra-low latency, high-bandwidth interconnect PC cluster environment composed of modules written in the component-oriented language of nesC. The architecture enables full-matrix reconstruction of the wavefront at up to 2 KHz with latency under 250 us for the PALM-3000 adaptive optics systems, a state-of-the-art upgrade on the 5.1 meter Hale Telescope that consists of a 64 x 64 subaperture Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a 3368 active actuator high order deformable mirror in series with a 241 active actuator tweeter DM. The architecture can easily scale up to support much larger AO systems at higher rates and lower latency.

  8. Design of Optical Systems with Extended Depth of Field: An Educational Approach to Wavefront Coding Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferran, C.; Bosch, S.; Carnicer, A.

    2012-01-01

    A practical activity designed to introduce wavefront coding techniques as a method to extend the depth of field in optical systems is presented. The activity is suitable for advanced undergraduate students since it combines different topics in optical engineering such as optical system design, aberration theory, Fourier optics, and digital image…

  9. Phase Contrast Wavefront Sensing for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.; Bloemhof, E. E.

    2004-01-01

    Most ground-based adaptive optics systems use one of a small number of wavefront sensor technologies, notably (for relatively high-order systems) the Shack-Hartmann sensor, which provides local measurements of the phase slope (first-derivative) at a number of regularly-spaced points across the telescope pupil. The curvature sensor, with response proportional to the second derivative of the phase, is also sometimes used, but has undesirable noise propagation properties during wavefront reconstruction as the number of actuators becomes large. It is interesting to consider the use for astronomical adaptive optics of the "phase contrast" technique, originally developed for microscopy by Zemike to allow convenient viewing of phase objects. In this technique, the wavefront sensor provides a direct measurement of the local value of phase in each sub-aperture of the pupil. This approach has some obvious disadvantages compared to Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing, but has some less obvious but substantial advantages as well. Here we evaluate the relative merits in a practical ground-based adaptive optics system.

  10. Method and apparatus for holographic wavefront diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1995-01-01

    A wavefront diagnostic apparatus has an optic and a measuring system. The optic forms a holographic image in response to a beam of light striking a hologram formed on a surface of the optic. The measuring system detects the position of the array of holographic images and compares the positions of the array of holographic images to a reference holographic image.

  11. Method and apparatus for holographic wavefront diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1995-04-25

    A wavefront diagnostic apparatus has an optic and a measuring system. The optic forms a holographic image in response to a beam of light striking a hologram formed on a surface of the optic. The measuring system detects the position of the array of holographic images and compares the positions of the array of holographic images to a reference holographic image. 3 figs.

  12. Implementation of a Wavefront-Sensing Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Dean, Bruce; Aronstein, David

    2013-01-01

    A computer program has been written as a unique implementation of an image-based wavefront-sensing algorithm reported in "Iterative-Transform Phase Retrieval Using Adaptive Diversity" (GSC-14879-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 4 (April 2007), page 32. This software was originally intended for application to the James Webb Space Telescope, but is also applicable to other segmented-mirror telescopes. The software is capable of determining optical-wavefront information using, as input, a variable number of irradiance measurements collected in defocus planes about the best focal position. The software also uses input of the geometrical definition of the telescope exit pupil (otherwise denoted the pupil mask) to identify the locations of the segments of the primary telescope mirror. From the irradiance data and mask information, the software calculates an estimate of the optical wavefront (a measure of performance) of the telescope generally and across each primary mirror segment specifically. The software is capable of generating irradiance data, wavefront estimates, and basis functions for the full telescope and for each primary-mirror segment. Optionally, each of these pieces of information can be measured or computed outside of the software and incorporated during execution of the software.

  13. Versatile approach for frequency resolved wavefront characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frumker, Eugene; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Niikura, Hiromichi; Villeneuve, David M.; Corkum, Paul B.

    2011-03-01

    Spatial characterization of high harmonics (HH) and XUV coherent radiation is of paramount importance, along with its temporal characterization. For many applications it will be necessary to accurately measure the beam properties, just as it is important to know the beam characteristics for many laser experiments. For example, high harmonics and attosecond pulses are being proposed as a front-end for the next generation X-ray free electron lasers. This oscillator-amplifier-like arrangement will require well characterized high harmonic sources. On the other hand, the electromagnetic radiation carries the combined signature of underlying quantum physical processes at the molecular level and of the cooperative phase matching. For example, accurate reconstruction of the high harmonic spatial wavefront, along with its temporal profile, gives us a complete range of tools to apply to the fundamental quantum properties and dynamics associated with high harmonic generation. We present a new concept of frequency resolved wavefront characterization that is particularly suitable for characterizing XUV radiation. In keeping with tradition in the area we give it an acronym - SWORD (Spectral Wavefront Optical Reconstruction by Diffraction). Our approach is based on an analysis of the diffraction pattern of a slit situated in front of a flat-field spectrometer. As the slit is scanned, the spectrally resolved diffraction pattern is recorded. Analyzing the measured diffractogram, we can reconstruct the wavefront. The technique can be easily extended beyond the XUV spectral region. When combined with temporal characterization techniques all information about the beam can be measured.

  14. 2D Wavefront Sensor Analysis and Control

    1996-02-19

    This software is designed for data acquisition and analysis of two dimensional wavefront sensors. The software includes data acquisition and control functions for an EPIX frame grabber to acquire data from a computer and all the appropriate analysis functions necessary to produce and display intensity and phase information. This software is written in Visual Basic for windows.

  15. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Chung; Su, Hung-Wei; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Cho, Keng-Chi; Yen, Wei-Chung; Xu, Chris; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Temporal profile distortions reduce excitation efficiency and image quality in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy. In order to compensate the distortions, a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system (AOS) was integrated into the microscope. The feedback control signal of the AOS was acquired from local image intensity maximization via a hill-climbing algorithm. The control signal was then utilized to drive a deformable mirror in such a way as to eliminate the distortions. With the AOS correction, not only is the axial excitation symmetrically refocused, but the axial resolution with full two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) intensity is also maintained. Hence, the contrast of the TPEF image of a R6G-doped PMMA thin film is enhanced along with a 3.7-fold increase in intensity. Furthermore, the TPEF image quality of 1μm fluorescent beads sealed in agarose gel at different depths is improved. PMID:24940539

  16. A multi-tiered wavefront sensor using binary optics

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Warren, M.E.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Smith, T.G.; Rosenthal, R.R.; McKechnie, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    Wavefront sensors have been used to make measurements in fluid- dynamics and for closed loop control of adaptive optics. In most common Shack-Hartmann wavefront wavefront sensors, the light is broken up into series of rectangular or hexagonal apertures that divide the light into a series of focal spots. The position of these focal spots is used to determine the wavefront slopes over each subaperture. Using binary optics technology, we have developed a hierarchical or fractal wavefront sensor that divides the subapertures up on a more optimal fashion. We have demonstrated this concept for up to four tiers and developed the wavefront reconstruction methods for both segmented adaptive optics and continous wavefront measurement.

  17. Real-time wavefront control for the PALM-3000 high order adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Tuan N.; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Dekany, Richard G.; Shelton, Jean C.; Troy, Mitchell; Angione, John R.; Burruss, Rick S.; Cromer, John L.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Roberts, Jennifer E.

    2008-07-01

    We present a cost-effective scalable real-time wavefront control architecture based on off-the-shelf graphics processing units hosted in an ultra-low latency, high-bandwidth interconnect PC cluster environment composed of modules written in the component-oriented language of nesC. We demonstrate the architecture is capable of supporting the most computation and memory intensive wavefront reconstruction method (vector-matrix-multiply) at frame rates up to 2 KHz with latency under 250 μs for the PALM-3000 adaptive optics systems, a state-of-the-art upgrade on the 5.1 meter Hale Telescope that consists of a 64x64 subaperture Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a 3368 active actuator high order deformable mirror in series with a 349 actuator "woofer" DM. This architecture can easily scale up to support larger AO systems at higher rates and lower latency.

  18. Two-Sided Pyramid Wavefront Sensor in the Direct Phase Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D; Baker, K

    2006-04-12

    The two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor has been extensively simulated in the direct phase mode using a wave optics code. The two-sided pyramid divides the focal plane so that each half of the core only interferes with the speckles in its half of the focal plane. A relayed image of the pupil plane is formed at the CCD camera for each half. Antipodal speckle pairs are separated so that a pure phase variation causes amplitude variations in the two images. The phase is reconstructed from the difference of the two amplitudes by transforming cosine waves into sine waves using the Hilbert transform. There are also other corrections which have to be applied in Fourier space. The two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor performs extremely well: After two or three iterations, the phase error varies purely in y. The two-sided pyramid pair enables the phase to be completely reconstructed. Its performance has been modeled closed loop with atmospheric turbulence and wind. Both photon noise and read noise were included. The three-sided and four-sided pyramid wavefront sensors have also been studied in direct phase mode. Neither performs nearly as well as does the two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor.

  19. Adaptive prediction of human eye pupil position and effects on wavefront errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Kulcsár, Caroline; Raynaud, Henri-François; El Mrabet, Yamina; Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara

    2011-03-01

    The effects of pupil motion on retinal imaging are studied in this paper. Involuntary eye or head movements are always present in the imaging procedure, decreasing the output quality and preventing a more detailed diagnostics. When the image acquisition is performed using an adaptive optics (AO) system, substantial gain is foreseen if pupil motion is accounted for. This can be achieved using a pupil tracker as the one developed by Imagine Eyes R®, which provides pupil position measurements at a 80Hz sampling rate. In any AO loop, there is inevitably a delay between the wavefront measurement and the correction applied to the deformable mirror, meaning that an optimal compensation requires prediction. We investigate several ways of predicting pupil movement, either by retaining the last value given by the pupil tracker, which is close to the optimal solution in the case of a pure random walk, or by performing position prediction thanks to auto-regressive (AR) models with parameters updated in real time. We show that a small improvement in prediction with respect to predicting with the latest measured value is obtained through adaptive AR modeling. We evaluate the wavefront errors obtained by computing the root mean square of the difference between a wavefront displaced by the assumed true position and the predicted one, as seen by the imaging system. The results confirm that pupil movements have to be compensated in order to minimize wavefront errors.

  20. Comparison between two different methods to obtain the wavefront aberration function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Félix, Angel S.; Ibarra, Jorge; López, Estela; Rosales, Marco A.; Tepichín, Eduardo

    2010-08-01

    The analysis and measurement of the wavefront aberration function are very important tools that allow us to evaluate the performance of any specified optical system. This technology has been adopted in visual optics for the analysis of optical aberrations in the human eye, before and after being subjected to laser refractive surgery. We have been working in the characterization and evaluation of the objective performance of human eyes that have been subjected to two different surface ablation techniques known as ASA and PASA1. However, optical aberrations in the human eye are time-dependent2 and, hence, difficult to analyze. In order to obtain a static profile from the post-operatory wavefront aberration function we applied these ablation techniques directly over hard contact lenses. In this work we show the comparison between two different methods to obtain the wavefront aberration function from a reference refractive surface, in order to generalize this method and being able to fully characterize hard contact lenses which have been subjected to different ablation techniques typically used in refractive surgery for vision correction. For the first method we used a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, and in the second method we used a Mach-Zehnder type interferometer. We show the preliminary results of this characterization.

  1. Depth aberrations characterization in linear and nonlinear microscopy schemes using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andilla, Jordi; Porcar-Guezenec, Rafael; Levecq, Xavier; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    The performance of imaging devices such as linear and nonlinear microscopes (NLM) can be limited by the optical properties of the imaged sample. Such an important aspect has already been described using theoretical models due to the difficulties of implementing a direct wavefront sensing scheme. However, these only stand for simple interfaces and cannot be generalized to biological samples given its structural complexity. This has leaded to the development of sensor-less adaptive optics (AO) implementations. In this approach, aberrations are iteratively corrected trough an image related parameter (aberrations are not measured), being prone of causing sample damage. In this work, we perform a practical implementation of a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor to compensate for sample induced aberrations, demonstrating its applicability in linear and NLM. We perform an extensive analysis of wavefront distortion effects through different depths employing phantom samples. Aberration effects originated by the refractive index mismatch and depth are quantified using the linear and nonlinear guide-star concept. More over we analyze offaxis aberrations in NLM, an important aspect that is commonly overlooked. In this case spherical aberration behaves similarly to the wavefront error compared with the on-axis case. Finally we give examples of aberration compensation using epi-fluorescence and nonlinear microscopy.

  2. Real-time wavefront reconstruction from intensity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Carlas; Marinica, Raluca; Verhaegen, Michel

    2013-12-01

    We propose an ecient approximation to the nonlinear phase diversity method for wavefront reconstruction method from intensity measurements in order to avoid the shortcomings of the nonlinear phase diversity method that prevent its real-time application, such as its computationally complex and the presence of local minima. The new method is called linear sequential phase diversity (LSPD). The method assumes that residual phase aberration is small and makes use of a rst order Taylor expansion of the point spread function (PSF). The Taylor expansion is performed in two dierent phase diversities, that can be arbitrary (large) pupil shapes in order to optimize the phase retrieval. For static aberrations LSPD makes use of two images that are collected at each iteration step of the algorithm. In each step the residual phase aberrations are estimated by solving a linear least squares problem, followed by the use of a deformable mirror to correct for the aberrations. The computational complexity of LSPD is O(m*m) - where m*m is the number of pixels. For the static case the convergence of the LSPD iterations have been studied and experimentally veried. In an extensive comparison the method is compared with the recently proposed method of [1]. This study demonstrates the improved performance both computationally and in accuracy with respect to existing competitors that also linearize the PSF. A further contribution of the paper is that we extend the static LSPD method to the case of dynamic wavefront reconstruction based on intensity measurements. Here the dynamics are assumed to be modelled standardly by a linear innovation model such that its spectrum e.g. approximates that given by Kolmogorov. The advantage of the application of the dynamic variant of the LSPD method is that in closed-loop the assumption that the residual phase aberration is small is justiable, since the goal of the controller is to reduce (minimize) the residual phase aberration. This unique contribution

  3. The elastic modulus correction term in creep activation energies Applied to oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malu, M.; Tien, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of elastic modulus and the temperature dependence of elastic modulus on creep activation energies for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base superalloy are investigated. This superalloy is commercially known as Inconel Alloy MA 753, strengthened both by gamma-prime precipitates and by yttria particles. It is shown that at intermediate temperatures, say below 1500 F, where elastic modulus is weakly dependent on temperature, the modulus correction term to creep activation energy is small. Accordingly, modulus corrections are insignificant for the superalloy considered, which shows high apparent creep activation energies at this temperature. On the contrary, at very high temperatures, the elastic modulus correction term can be significant, thus reducing the creep activation energy to that of vacancy self-diffusion. In order to obtain high-temperature creep resistance, a high-value elastic modulus with a weak dependence on temperature is required.

  4. High-resolution wavefront control using liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Brase, J M; Brown, C G; Cooke, J B; Kartz, M W; Olivier, S S; Pennington, D M; Silva, D A

    1999-07-20

    Liquid crystal spatial light modulator technology appropriate for high-resolution wavefront control has recently become commercially available. Some of these devices have several hundred thousand controllable degrees of freedom, more than two orders of magnitude greater than the largest conventional deformable mirror. We will present results of experiments to characterize the optical properties of these devices and to utilize them to correct aberrations in an optical system. We will also present application scenarios for these devices in high-power laser systems.

  5. Development of a Pyramid Wave-front Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hadi, Kacem; Vignaux, Mael; Fusco, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Within the framework of the E-ELT studies, several laboratories are involved on some instruments: HARMONY with its ATLAS adaptive optics [AO] system, EAGLE or EPICS. Most of the AO systems will probably integrate one or several pyramidal wavefront sensors, PWFS (R. Ragazzoni [1]). The coupling in an AO loop and the control in laboratory (then on sky) of this type of sensor is fundamental for the continuation of the projects related to OA systems on the E-ELT. LAM (Laboratory of Astrophysics of Marseille) is involved in particular in the VLT-SPHERE, ATLAS, EPICS projects. For the last few years, our laboratory has been carrying out different R&D activities in AO instrumentation for ELTs. An experimental AO bench is designed and being developed to allow the validation of new wave-front sensing and control concepts [2]. One the objectives of this bench, is the experimental validation of a pyramid WFS. Theoretical investigations on its behavior have been already made. The world's fastest and most sensitive camera system (OCAM2) has been recently developed at LAM (J.L Gach [3], First Light Imaging). Conjugating this advantage with the pyramid concept, we plan to demonstrate a home made Pyramid sensor for Adaptive Optics whose the speed and the precision are the key points. As a joint collaboration with ONERA and Shaktiware, our work aims at the optimization (measurement process, calibration and operation) in laboratory then on the sky of a pyramid sensor dedicated to the first generation instruments for ELTs. The sensor will be implemented on the ONERA ODISSEE AO bench combining thus a pyramid and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. What would give the possibility to compare strictly these two WFS types and make this bench unique in France and even in Europe. Experimental work on laboratory demonstration is undergoing. The status of our development will presented at the conference.

  6. A correction factor to f-chart predictions of active solar fraction in active-passive heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. L.; Beckman, W. A.; Duffie, J. A.; Mitchell, J. W.; Klein, S. A.

    1983-11-01

    The extent to which a passive system degrades the performance of an active solar space heating system was investigated, and a correction factor to account for these interactions was developed. The transient system simulation program TRNSYS is used to simulate the hour-by-hour performance of combined active-passive (hybrid) space heating systems in order to compare the active system performance with simplified design method predictions. The TRNSYS simulations were compared to results obtained using the simplified design calculations of the f-Chart method. Comparisons of TRNSYS and f-Chart were used to establish the accuracy of the f-Charts for active systems. A correlation was then developed to correct the monthly loads input into the f-Chart method to account for controller deadbands in both hybrid and active only buildings. A general correction factor was generated to be applied to the f-Chart method to produce more accurate and useful results for hybrid systems.

  7. Measurements of Pupillary Diameter and Wavefront Aberrations in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Altay, Mehmet Metin; Demirok, Gulizar; Balta, Ozgur; Bolu, Hulya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To show whether pregnancy affects the measurements of pupillary diameter and wavefront (WF) aberrations. Methods. This was a case-control study including 34 healthy pregnant women in the third trimester and age-matched 34 nonpregnant women. Only women who had no ocular abnormalities and no refractive error were included. We measured photopic and mesopic pupil diameter and WF aberrations at the third trimester and at the second postpartum month. Measurements of the right eyes were used in this study. The differences between groups were analysed by paired t-test and t-test. Results. Pregnant women's mean photopic pupil size in the third trimester was significantly higher than in postpartum period and in control group (3.74 ± 0.77, 3.45 ± 0.53, and 3.49 ± 0.15 mm, p < 0.05, resp.). Mesopic pupil size in the third trimester was also higher than in postpartum period and in control group (6.77 ± 0.52, 6.42 ± 0.55, and 6.38 ± 0.21 mm, p < 0.05, resp.). RMS-3 and RMS-5 values were higher in pregnancy but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion. Pregnancy increased photopic and mesopic pupil size significantly but did not increase wavefront aberrations notably. Increased pupil size may be due to increased sympathetic activity during pregnancy. And this activity can be noninvasively determined by measuring pupil size. PMID:26998383

  8. Towards real-time wavefront sensorless adaptive optics using a graphical processing unit (GPU) in a line scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, David P.; Patel, Ankit H.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Mujat, Mircea; Iftimia, Nicusor; Hammer, Daniel X.

    2011-03-01

    Adaptive optics ophthalmic imaging systems that rely on a standalone wave-front sensor can be costly to build and difficult for non-technical personnel to operate. As an alternative we present a simplified wavefront sensorless adaptive optics laser scanning ophthalmoscope. This sensorless system is based on deterministic search algorithms that utilize the image's spatial frequency as an optimization metric. We implement this algorithm on a NVIDIA video card to take advantage of the graphics processing unit (GPU)'s parallel architecture to reduce algorithm computation times and approach real-time correction.

  9. Non-common path aberration correction in an adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sulai, Yusufu N.; Dubra, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The correction of non-common path aberrations (NCPAs) between the imaging and wavefront sensing channel in a confocal scanning adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is demonstrated. NCPA correction is achieved by maximizing an image sharpness metric while the confocal detection aperture is temporarily removed, effectively minimizing the monochromatic aberrations in the illumination path of the imaging channel. Comparison of NCPA estimated using zonal and modal orthogonal wavefront corrector bases provided wavefronts that differ by ~λ/20 in root-mean-squared (~λ/30 standard deviation). Sequential insertion of a cylindrical lens in the illumination and light collection paths of the imaging channel was used to compare image resolution after changing the wavefront correction to maximize image sharpness and intensity metrics. Finally, the NCPA correction was incorporated into the closed-loop adaptive optics control by biasing the wavefront sensor signals without reducing its bandwidth. PMID:25401020

  10. Adaptable Diffraction Gratings With Wavefront Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength. Traditional diffraction gratings have static planar, concave, or convex surfaces. However, if they could be made so that they can change the surface curvature at will, then they would be able to focus on particular segments, self-calibrate, or perform fine adjustments. This innovation creates a diffraction grating on a deformable surface. This surface could be bent at will, resulting in a dynamic wavefront transformation. This allows for self-calibration, compensation for aberrations, enhancing image resolution in a particular area, or performing multiple scans using different wavelengths. A dynamic grating gives scientists a new ability to explore wavefronts from a variety of viewpoints.

  11. Improvements to the modal holographic wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanpeng; Lambert, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The Zernike coefficients of a light wavefront can be calculated directly by intensity ratios of pairs of spots in the reconstructed image plane of a holographic wavefront sensor (HWFS). However, the response curve of the HWFS heavily depends on the position and size of the detector for each spot and the distortions introduced by other aberrations. In this paper, we propose a method to measure the intensity of each spot by setting a threshold to select effective pixels and using the weighted average intensity within a selected window. Compared with using the integral intensity over a small window for each spot, we show through a numerical simulation that the proposed method reduces the dependency of the HWFS's response curve on the selection of the detector window. We also recorded a HWFS on a holographic plate using a blue laser and demonstrated its capability to detect the strength of encoded Zernike terms in an aberrated beam. PMID:27140379

  12. Low Order Wavefront Sensing and Control for WFIRST-AFTA Coronagrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, FANG

    2016-01-01

    NASA's WFIRST-AFTA Coronagraph will be capable of directly imaging and spectrally characterizing giant exoplanets similar to Neptune and Jupiter, and possibly even super-Earths, around nearby stars. To maintain the required coronagraph performance in a realistic space environment, a Low Order Wavefront Sensing and Control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C will use the rejected stellar light to sense and suppress the telescope pointing drift and jitter as well as low order wavefront errors due to the changes in thermal loading of the telescope and the rest of the observatory. The measured wavefront information will also be used for the coronagraph data post-processing (PSF subtraction) needed to further remove the speckle field and enhance the contrast. The LOWFS/C uses a Zernike phase contrast wavefront sensor with the phase shifting disk combined with the stellar light rejecting occulting mask, a key concept to minimize the non-common path error. Developed as a part of the Dynamic High Contrast Imaging Testbed (DHCIT), the LOWFS/C subsystem also consists of an Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) simulator to generate the realistic wavefront error and line-of-sight (LoS) drift and jitter from WFIRST-AFTA telescope's vibration and thermal drift. The entire LOWFS/C subsystem have been integrated, calibrated, and tested in a dedicated LOWFS/C testbed. The test results have shown that the Zernike WFS have line-of-sight (LoS) tilt sensitivity better than 0.2 milli-arcsec and LoS post correct residual better than 0.5 milli-arcsec with the presence of the WFIRST-AFTA like LoS drift and jitter (14 milli-arcsec). In this poster we will describe the LOWFS/C subsystem and present the LOWFS/C performance test results as well as the progress of integration of LOWFS/C into the DHCIT.

  13. Prediction of Visual Acuity from Wavefront Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for generating a visual acuity metric, based on wavefront aberrations (WFAs), associated with a test subject and representing classes of imperfections, such as defocus, astigmatism, coma and spherical aberrations, of the subject's visual system. The metric allows choices of different image template, can predict acuity for different target probabilities, can incorporate different and possibly subject-specific neural transfer functions, can predict acuity for different subject templates, and incorporates a model of the optotype identification task.

  14. Determining the accommodative response from wavefront aberrations.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Janice; Roorda, Austin; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate some of the methods used to calculate objective refractions from wavefront aberrations, to determine their applicability for accommodation research. A wavefront analyzer was used to measure the ocular aberrations of 13 emmetropes and 17 myopes at distance, and 4 near target vergences: 2, 3, 4, and 5 D. The accommodative response was calculated using the following techniques: least squares fitting (Zernike defocus), paraxial curvature matching (Seidel defocus), and 5 optical quality metrics (PFWc, PFSc, PFCc, NS, and VSMTF). We also evaluated a task-specific method of determining optimum focus that used a through-focus procedure to select the image that best optimized both contrast amplitude and gradient (CAG). Neither Zernike nor Seidel defocus appears to be the best method for determining the accommodative response from wavefront aberrations. When the eye has negative spherical aberration, Zernike defocus tends to underestimate, whereas Seidel defocus tends to overestimate the accommodative response. A better approach is to first determine the best image plane using a suitable optical quality metric and then calculate the accommodative error relative to this plane. Of the metrics evaluated, both NS and VSMTF were reasonable choices, with the CAG algorithm being a less preferred alternate. PMID:20616123

  15. Robust Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2011-12-01

    Several planned future optical systems, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), rely on image-based wavefront sensing for alignment, testing, and control of optical surfaces during operation. The focus of this work is on characterizing the effects of various non-idealities on the performance of image-based wavefront sensing algorithms, developing techniques to mitigate those effects, and demonstrating these techniques in computer simulations and in the lab. Two new techniques for algorithmically determining the proper sampling factor for optical propagation are presented and tested against experimental data collected in the lab and during JWST ground-based testing. A new method for mitigating against the effects of vibration on phase retrieval is discussed, implemented, and tested in simulation. The use of an alternative type of diversity, called transverse translation, is explored for use in the JWST and shown to be a promising technique through simulation. A method for extending the capture range of phase retrieval algorithms is presented and tested both in simulation and with experimental data collected in the lab. A benchmark of a phase retrieval algorithm running on a graphics card is presented and the practical implications for JWST testing are discussed. Finally, phase retrieval results from a MEMS deformable mirror testbed are presented and compared against interferometry. The improved robustness resulting from this research will not only help to mitigate the risks associated with wavefront sensing for the JWST, but also serve as an enabling technology for future NASA missions.

  16. Wavefront Distortion Requirements for the LISA Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, P. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational wave mission will make use of laser measurements of changes in distance between test masses in spacecraft 5 million km apart. Distortions in the far field wavefronts can interact with jitter in the transmitted beam directions to give apparent variations in the distances between the test masses. About 400 mm diameter telescopes will be used to send the laser beams between the spacecraft. Stabilization of the beam pointing directions will be done using the light from the distant spacecraft as very bright beacons to lock on to. Earlier studies of the beam pointing requirements for the LISA mission assumed only simple waveform distortions, such as cylindrical distortion or astigmatism. The analysis has now been repeated, including defocus, spherical aberration, and two components each of astigmatism and coma. These lower order aberrations are expected to be among the most damaging ones near the beam axis for a given rms wavefront distortion amplitude. This is because the higher order ones will cause the laser energy to be diffracted away from the axis more. Most of the aberration amplitude is expected to come from the optics before the telescope, rather than from the telescope itself. A total wavefront distortion amplitude of 0.05 wavelength (50 nm) rms or less appears to be adequate.

  17. Accommodation to Wavefront Vergence and Chromatic Aberration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinan; Kruger, Philip B.; Li, James S.; Lin, Peter L.; Stark, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) provides a cue to accommodation with small pupils. However, large pupils increase monochromatic aberrations, which may obscure chromatic blur. In the present study, we examined the effect of pupil size and LCA on accommodation. Methods Accommodation was recorded by infrared optometer while observers (nine normal trichromats) viewed a sinusoidally moving Maltese cross target in a Badal stimulus system. There were two illumination conditions: white (3000 K; 20 cd/m2) and monochromatic (550 nm with 10 nm bandwidth; 20 cd/m2) and two artificial pupil conditions (3 mm and 5.7 mm). Separately, static measurements of wavefront aberration were made with the eye accommodating to targets between 0 and 4 D (COAS, Wavefront Sciences). Results Large individual differences in accommodation to wavefront vergence and to LCA are a hallmark of accommodation. LCA continues to provide a signal at large pupil sizes despite higher levels of monochromatic aberrations. Conclusions Monochromatic aberrations may defend against chromatic blur at high spatial frequencies, but accommodation responds best to optical vergence and to LCA at 3 c/deg where blur from higher order aberrations is less. PMID:21317666

  18. Wavefront reconstruction using computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Christian; Flamm, Daniel; Schmidt, Oliver A.; Duparré, Michael

    2012-02-01

    We propose a new method to determine the wavefront of a laser beam, based on modal decomposition using computer-generated holograms (CGHs). Thereby the beam under test illuminates the CGH with a specific, inscribed transmission function that enables the measurement of modal amplitudes and phases by evaluating the first diffraction order of the hologram. Since we use an angular multiplexing technique, our method is innately capable of real-time measurements of amplitude and phase, yielding the complete information about the optical field. A measurement of the Stokes parameters, respectively of the polarization state, provides the possibility to calculate the Poynting vector. Two wavefront reconstruction possibilities are outlined: reconstruction from the phase for scalar beams and reconstruction from the Poynting vector for inhomogeneously polarized beams. To quantify single aberrations, the reconstructed wavefront is decomposed into Zernike polynomials. Our technique is applied to beams emerging from different kinds of multimode optical fibers, such as step-index, photonic crystal and multicore fibers, whereas in this work results are exemplarily shown for a step-index fiber and compared to a Shack-Hartmann measurement that serves as a reference.

  19. A Wavefront Sensor to Detect Dim Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, M.; Guyon, O.; Hart, M.; Codona, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we present the progress made towards building the non-linear Curvature wavefront sensor (nlCWFS) to be used in an adaptive optics system for the direct imaging of exoplanets without the use of a laser guide star (LGS). Commonly used wavefront sensors such as the Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) do a good job of reconstructing high order modes but due to design limitations are poor at reconstructing low order modes. The nlCWFS is able to use the full spatial coherence of the pupil allowing it to reconstruct all spatial frequencies equally well. The nlCWFS senses at the diffraction limit as opposed to the SHWFS which senses at the seeing limit. This awards the nlCWFS a gain in flux of (D/r0)2. In this paper we present results from putting the nlCWFS on the 6.5m MMT Observatory and detail the progress being made to build the nlCWFS for the 1.5 m Air Force Research Laboratory/RDS Optics Division telescope.

  20. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  1. Helioseismology of sunspots: defocusing, folding, and healing of wavefronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Z.-C.; Gizon, L.; Schunker, H.; Philippe, T.

    2013-10-01

    We observe and characterize the scattering of acoustic wave packets by a sunspot in a regime where the wavelength is comparable to the size of the sunspot. Spatial maps of wave travel times and amplitudes are measured from the cross-covariance function of the random wave field observed by SOHO/MDI around the sunspot in active region NOAO 9787. We consider separately incoming plane wave packets consisting of f modes and p modes with radial orders up to four. Observations show that the travel-time perturbations diminish with distance far away from the sunspot - a finite-wavelength phenomenon known as wavefront healing in scattering theory. Observations also show a reduction of the amplitude of the waves after their passage through the sunspot. We suggest that a significant fraction of this amplitude reduction is due to the defocusing of wave energy by the fast wave-speed perturbation introduced by the sunspot. This "geometrical attenuation" will contribute to the wave amplitude reduction in addition to the physical absorption of waves by sunspots. We also observe an enhancement of wave amplitude away from the central path: diffracted rays intersect with unperturbed rays (caustics) and wavefronts fold and triplicate. Wave amplitude measurements in time-distance helioseismology provide independent information that can be used in concert with travel-time measurements.

  2. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy in the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Heidi; Sredar, Nripun; Queener, Hope; Li, Chaohong; Porter, Jason

    2011-07-01

    Wavefront sensor noise and fidelity place a fundamental limit on achievable image quality in current adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes. Additionally, the wavefront sensor `beacon' can interfere with visual experiments. We demonstrate real-time (25 Hz), wavefront sensorless adaptive optics imaging in the living human eye with image quality rivaling that of wavefront sensor based control in the same system. A stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm directly optimized the mean intensity in retinal image frames acquired with a confocal adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). When imaging through natural, undilated pupils, both control methods resulted in comparable mean image intensities. However, when imaging through dilated pupils, image intensity was generally higher following wavefront sensor-based control. Despite the typically reduced intensity, image contrast was higher, on average, with sensorless control. Wavefront sensorless control is a viable option for imaging the living human eye and future refinements of this technique may result in even greater optical gains.

  3. Wavefronts and mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idema, Timon; Dubuis, Julien; Manning, Lisa; Nelson, Philip; Liu, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Mitosis in the early syncytial Drosophila embryo has a high degree of spatial and temporal correlations, visible as mitotic wavefronts that travel across the embryo. This mitosis wavefront is preceded by another wavefront which corresponds to chromosome condensation. The two wavefronts are separated by a time interval that is independent of cell cycle and propagate at the same speed for a given embryo in a given cycle. We study the wavefronts in the context of excitable medium theory, using two different models, one with biochemical signaling and one with mechanical signaling. We find that the dependence of wavefront speed on cell cycle number is most naturally explained via a mechanical signaling, and that the entire process suggests a scenario in which biochemical and mechanical signaling are coupled.

  4. Wavefront Analysis of Adaptive Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Hillman, Lloyd

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for this work came from a NASA Headquarters interest in investigating design concepts for a large space telescope employing active optics technology. The development of telescope optical requirements and potential optical design configurations is reported.

  5. SAPHIRA detector for infrared wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Gert; Baker, Ian; Alvarez, Domingo; Ives, Derek; Mehrgan, Leander; Meyer, Manfred; Stegmeier, Jörg; Weller, Harald J.

    2014-08-01

    The only way to overcome the CMOS noise barrier of near infrared sensors used for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking is the amplification of the photoelectron signal inside the infrared pixel by means of the avalanche gain. In 2007 ESO started a program at Selex to develop near infrared electron avalanche photodiode arrays (eAPD) for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking. In a first step the cutoff wavelength was reduced from 4.5 micron to 2.5 micron in order to verify that the dark current scales with the bandgap and can be reduced to less than one electron/ms, the value required for wavefront sensing. The growth technology was liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) with annular diodes based on the loophole interconnect technology. The arrays required deep cooling to 40K to achieve acceptable cosmetic performance at high APD gain. The second step was to develop a multiplexer tailored to the specific application of the GRAVITY instrument wavefront sensors and the fringe tracker. The pixel format is 320x256 pixels. The array has 32 parallel video outputs which are arranged in such a way that the full multiplex advantage is available also for small subwindows. Nondestructive readout schemes with subpixel sampling are possible. This reduces the readout noise at high APD gain well below the subelectron level at frame rates of 1 KHz. The third step was the change of the growth technology from liquid phase epitaxy to metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). This growth technology allows the band structure and doping to be controlled on a 0.1μm scale and provides more flexibility for the design of diode structures. The bandgap can be varied for different layers of Hg(1-x)CdxTe. It is possible to make heterojunctions and apply solid state engineering techniques. The change to MOVPE resulted in a dramatic improvement in the cosmetic quality with 99.97 % operable pixels at an operating temperature of 85K. Currently this sensor is deployed in the 4 wavefront sensors and in the

  6. Adaptive Full Aperture Wavefront Sensor Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This grant and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and review of wavefront sensing techniques proposed by the Government and Contractors for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Program. A team developed the SSD concept. For completeness, some of the information included in this report has also been included in the final report of a follow-on contract (H-27657D) entitled "Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors". The original purpose of this GTRI study was to investigate how various wavefront sensing techniques might be most effectively employed with large (greater than 10 meter) aperture space based telescopes used for commercial and scientific purposes. However, due to changes in the scope of the work performed on this grant and in light of the initial studies completed for the NGST program, only a portion of this report addresses wavefront sensing techniques. The wavefront sensing techniques proposed by the Government and Contractors for the NGST were summarized in proposals and briefing materials developed by three study teams including NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, TRW, and Lockheed-Martin. In this report, GTRI reviews these approaches and makes recommendations concerning the approaches. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities: Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form a space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (greater than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or

  7. Corrective Feedback via Instant Messenger Learning Activities in NS-NNS and NNS-NNS Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotillo, Susana

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study examines corrective feedback in native speaker-nonnative speaker (NS-NNS) and NNS-NNS dyads while participants were engaged in communicative and problem-solving activities via "Yahoo! Instant Messenger" (YIM). As "negotiation of meaning" studies of the 1990s have shown, linguistic items which learners negotiate in…

  8. Possible Application of Wavefront Coding to the LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, Willy; /SLAC

    2006-06-30

    Wavefront Coding has been applied as a means to increase the effective depth of focus of optical systems. In this note I discuss the potential for this technique to increase the depth of focus of the LSST and the resulting advantages for the construction and operation of the facility, as well as possible drawbacks. It may be possible to apply Wavefront Coding without changing the current LSST design, in which case Wavefront Coding might merit further study as a risk mitigation strategy.

  9. Pyramid wavefront sensor for image quality evaluation of optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhendong

    2015-08-01

    When the pyramid wavefront sensor is used to evaluate the imaging quality, placed at the focal plane of the aberrated optical system e.g., a telescope, it splits the light into four beams. Four images of the pupil are created on the detector and the detection signals of the pyramid wavefront sensor are calculated with these four intensity patterns, providing information on the derivatives of the aberrated wavefront. Based on the theory of the pyramid wavefront sensor, we are going to develop simulation software and a wavefront detector which can be used to test the imaging quality of the telescope. In our system, the subpupil image intensity through the pyramid sensor is calculated to obtain the aberration of wavefront where the piston, tilt, defocus, spherical, coma, astigmatism and other high level aberrations are separately represented by Zernike polynomials. The imaging quality of the optical system is then evaluated by the subsequent wavefront reconstruction. The performance of our system is to be checked by comparing with the measurements carried out using Puntino wavefront instrument (the method of SH wavefront sensor). Within this framework, the measurement precision of pyramid sensor will be discussed as well through detailed experiments. In general, this project would be very helpful both in our understanding of the principle of the wavefront reconstruction and its future technical applications. So far, we have produced the pyramid and established the laboratory setup of the image quality detecting system based on this wavefront sensor. Preliminary results are obtained, in that we have obtained the intensity images of the four pupils. Additional work is needed to analyze the characteristics of the pyramid wavefront sensor.

  10. Deconvolution of partially compensated solar images from additional wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Miura, Noriaki; Oh-Ishi, Akira; Kuwamura, Susumu; Baba, Naoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    A technique for restoring solar images partially compensated with adaptive optics is developed. An additional wavefront sensor is installed in an adaptive optics system to acquire residual wavefront information simultaneously to a solar image. A point spread function is derived from the wavefront information and used to deconvolve the solar image. Successful image restorations are demonstrated when the estimated point spread functions have relatively high Strehl ratios. PMID:27139647

  11. Sub-pixel spatial resolution wavefront phase imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Mooney, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A phase imaging method for an optical wavefront acquires a plurality of phase images of the optical wavefront using a phase imager. Each phase image is unique and is shifted with respect to another of the phase images by a known/controlled amount that is less than the size of the phase imager's pixels. The phase images are then combined to generate a single high-spatial resolution phase image of the optical wavefront.

  12. Eye-pupil displacement and prediction: effects on residual wavefront in adaptive optics retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kulcsár, Caroline; Raynaud, Henri-François; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of pupil displacements on the best achievable performance of retinal imaging adaptive optics (AO) systems, using 52 trajectories of horizontal and vertical displacements sampled at 80 Hz by a pupil tracker (PT) device on 13 different subjects. This effect is quantified in the form of minimal root mean square (rms) of the residual phase affecting image formation, as a function of the delay between PT measurement and wavefront correction. It is shown that simple dynamic models identified from data can be used to predict horizontal and vertical pupil displacements with greater accuracy (in terms of average rms) over short-term time horizons. The potential impact of these improvements on residual wavefront rms is investigated. These results allow to quantify the part of disturbances corrected by retinal imaging systems that are caused by relative displacements of an otherwise fixed or slowy-varying subject-dependent aberration. They also suggest that prediction has a limited impact on wavefront rms and that taking into account PT measurements in real time improves the performance of AO retinal imaging systems. PMID:27231607

  13. Integration and bench testing for the GRAVITY Coudé IR adaptive optics (CIAO) wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deen, C.; Yang, P.; Huber, A.; Suarez-Valles, M.; Hippler, S.; Brandner, W.; Gendron, E.; Clénet, Y.; Kendrew, S.; Glauser, A.; Klein, R.; Laun, W.; Lenzen, R.; Neumann, U.; Panduro, J.; Ramos, J.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Salzinger, A.; Zimmerman, N.; Henning, T.; Perraut, K.; Perrin, G.; Straubmeier, C.; Amorim, A.; Eisenhauer, F.

    2014-08-01

    GRAVITY, a second generation instrument for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), will provide an astrometric precision of order 10 micro-arcseconds, an imaging resolution of 4 milli-arcseconds, and low/medium resolution spectro-interferometry. These improvements to the VLTI represent a major upgrade to its current infrared interferometric capabilities, allowing detailed study of obscured environments (e.g. the Galactic Center, young dusty planet-forming disks, dense stellar cores, AGN, etc...). Crucial to the final performance of GRAVITY, the Coudé IR Adaptive Optics (CIAO) system will correct for the effects of the atmosphere at each of the VLT Unit Telescopes. CIAO consists of four new infrared Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFS) and associated real-time computers/software which will provide infrared wavefront sensing from 1.45-2.45 microns, allowing AO corrections even in regions where optically bright reference sources are scarce. We present here the latest progress on the GRAVITY wavefront sensors. We describe the adaptation and testing of a light-weight version of the ESO Standard Platform for Adaptive optics Real Time Applications (SPARTA-Light) software architecture to the needs of GRAVITY. We also describe the latest integration and test milestones for construction of the initial wave front sensor.

  14. Eye-pupil displacement and prediction: effects on residual wavefront in adaptive optics retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Kulcsár, Caroline; Raynaud, Henri-François; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies the effect of pupil displacements on the best achievable performance of retinal imaging adaptive optics (AO) systems, using 52 trajectories of horizontal and vertical displacements sampled at 80 Hz by a pupil tracker (PT) device on 13 different subjects. This effect is quantified in the form of minimal root mean square (rms) of the residual phase affecting image formation, as a function of the delay between PT measurement and wavefront correction. It is shown that simple dynamic models identified from data can be used to predict horizontal and vertical pupil displacements with greater accuracy (in terms of average rms) over short-term time horizons. The potential impact of these improvements on residual wavefront rms is investigated. These results allow to quantify the part of disturbances corrected by retinal imaging systems that are caused by relative displacements of an otherwise fixed or slowy-varying subject-dependent aberration. They also suggest that prediction has a limited impact on wavefront rms and that taking into account PT measurements in real time improves the performance of AO retinal imaging systems. PMID:27231607

  15. Bottlenecks of the wavefront sensor based on the Talbot effect.

    PubMed

    Podanchuk, Dmytro; Kovalenko, Andrey; Kurashov, Vitalij; Kotov, Myhaylo; Goloborodko, Andrey; Danko, Volodymyr

    2014-04-01

    Physical constraints and peculiarities of the wavefront sensing technique, based on the Talbot effect, are discussed. The limitation on the curvature of the measurable wavefront is derived. The requirements to the Fourier spectrum of the periodic mask are formulated. Two kinds of masks are studied for their performance in the wavefront sensor. It is shown that the boundary part of the mask aperture does not contribute to the initial data for wavefront restoration. It is verified by experiment and computer simulation that the performance of the Talbot sensor, which meets established conditions, is similar to that of the Shack-Hartmann sensor. PMID:24787208

  16. FPGA-based slope computation for ELTs adaptive optics wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ramos, L. F.; Díaz Garcia, J. J.; Piqueras Meseguer, J. J.; Martin Hernando, Y.; Rodríguez Ramos, J. M.

    2008-07-01

    ELTs laser guide stars wavefront sensors are planned to have specifically developed sensor chips, which will probably include readout logic and D/A conversion, followed by a powerful FPGA slope computer located very close to it, but not inside for flexibility and simplicity reasons. This paper presents the architecture of an FPGA-based wavefront slope computer, capable of handling the sensor output stream in a massively parallel approach. It will feature the ability of performing dark and flat field correction, the flexibility needed for allocating complex processing schemes, the capability of undertaking all computations expected to be performed at maximum speed, even though they were not strictly related to the calculation of the slopes, and the necessary housekeeping controls to properly command it and evaluate its behaviour. Feasibility using today's technology is evaluated, clearly showing its viability, together with an analysis of the amount of external memory, power consumption and printed circuit board space needed.

  17. Performance simulation of the ERIS pyramid wavefront sensor module in the VLT adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Agapito, Guido; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the performance analysis based on numerical simulations of the Pyramid Wavefront sensor Module (PWM) to be included in ERIS, the new Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). We have analyzed the performance of the PWM working either in a low-order or in a high-order wavefront sensing mode of operation. We show that the PWM in the high-order sensing mode can provide SR > 90% in K band using bright guide stars under median seeing conditions (0.85 arcsec seeing and 15 m/s of wind speed). In the low-order sensing mode, the PWM can sense and correct Tip-Tilt (and if requested also Focus mode) with the precision required to assist the LGS observations to get an SR > 60% and > 20% in K band, using up to a ~16.5 and ~19.5 R-magnitude guide star, respectively.

  18. Non-uniform dispersion of the source-sink relationship alters wavefront curvature.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lucia; Trenor, Beatriz; Ferrero, Jose M; Starmer, C Frank

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of cellular source-sink relationships plays an important role in cardiac propagation. It can lead to conduction slowing and block as well as wave fractionation. It is of great interest to unravel the mechanisms underlying evolution in wavefront geometry. Our goal is to investigate the role of the source-sink relationship on wavefront geometry using computer simulations. We analyzed the role of variability in the microscopic source-sink relationship in driving changes in wavefront geometry. The electrophysiological activity of a homogeneous isotropic tissue was simulated using the ten Tusscher and Panfilov 2006 action potential model and the source-sink relationship was characterized using an improved version of the Romero et al. safety factor formulation (SFm2). Our simulations reveal that non-uniform dispersion of the cellular source-sink relationship (dispersion along the wavefront) leads to alterations in curvature. To better understand the role of the source-sink relationship in the process of wave formation, the electrophysiological activity at the initiation of excitation waves in a 1D strand was examined and the source-sink relationship was characterized using the two recently updated safety factor formulations: the SFm2 and the Boyle-Vigmond (SFVB) definitions. The electrophysiological activity at the initiation of excitation waves was intimately related to the SFm2 profiles, while the SFVB led to several counterintuitive observations. Importantly, with the SFm2 characterization, a critical source-sink relationship for initiation of excitation waves was identified, which was independent of the size of the electrode of excitation, membrane excitability, or tissue conductivity. In conclusion, our work suggests that non-uniform dispersion of the source-sink relationship alters wavefront curvature and a critical source-sink relationship profile separates wave expansion from collapse. Our study reinforces the idea that the safety factor

  19. Lens-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics swept source OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Ding, Weiguang; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Bonora, Stefano; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized modern ophthalmology, providing depth resolved images of the retinal layers in a system that is suited to a clinical environment. Although the axial resolution of OCT system, which is a function of the light source bandwidth, is sufficient to resolve retinal features at a micrometer scale, the lateral resolution is dependent on the delivery optics and is limited by ocular aberrations. Through the combination of wavefront sensorless adaptive optics and the use of dual deformable transmissive optical elements, we present a compact lens-based OCT system at an imaging wavelength of 1060 nm for high resolution retinal imaging. We utilized a commercially available variable focal length lens to correct for a wide range of defocus commonly found in patient’s eyes, and a novel multi-actuator adaptive lens for aberration correction to achieve near diffraction limited imaging performance at the retina. With a parallel processing computational platform, high resolution cross-sectional and en face retinal image acquisition and display was performed in real time. In order to demonstrate the system functionality and clinical utility, we present images of the photoreceptor cone mosaic and other retinal layers acquired in vivo from research subjects.

  20. Lens-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics swept source OCT

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Ding, Weiguang; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Bonora, Stefano; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized modern ophthalmology, providing depth resolved images of the retinal layers in a system that is suited to a clinical environment. Although the axial resolution of OCT system, which is a function of the light source bandwidth, is sufficient to resolve retinal features at a micrometer scale, the lateral resolution is dependent on the delivery optics and is limited by ocular aberrations. Through the combination of wavefront sensorless adaptive optics and the use of dual deformable transmissive optical elements, we present a compact lens-based OCT system at an imaging wavelength of 1060 nm for high resolution retinal imaging. We utilized a commercially available variable focal length lens to correct for a wide range of defocus commonly found in patient’s eyes, and a novel multi-actuator adaptive lens for aberration correction to achieve near diffraction limited imaging performance at the retina. With a parallel processing computational platform, high resolution cross-sectional and en face retinal image acquisition and display was performed in real time. In order to demonstrate the system functionality and clinical utility, we present images of the photoreceptor cone mosaic and other retinal layers acquired in vivo from research subjects. PMID:27278853

  1. Lens-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics swept source OCT.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Ding, Weiguang; Zawadzki, Robert J; Bonora, Stefano; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized modern ophthalmology, providing depth resolved images of the retinal layers in a system that is suited to a clinical environment. Although the axial resolution of OCT system, which is a function of the light source bandwidth, is sufficient to resolve retinal features at a micrometer scale, the lateral resolution is dependent on the delivery optics and is limited by ocular aberrations. Through the combination of wavefront sensorless adaptive optics and the use of dual deformable transmissive optical elements, we present a compact lens-based OCT system at an imaging wavelength of 1060 nm for high resolution retinal imaging. We utilized a commercially available variable focal length lens to correct for a wide range of defocus commonly found in patient's eyes, and a novel multi-actuator adaptive lens for aberration correction to achieve near diffraction limited imaging performance at the retina. With a parallel processing computational platform, high resolution cross-sectional and en face retinal image acquisition and display was performed in real time. In order to demonstrate the system functionality and clinical utility, we present images of the photoreceptor cone mosaic and other retinal layers acquired in vivo from research subjects. PMID:27278853

  2. Real time wavefront control system for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, George Z.; Xin, Bo; Claver, Charles; MacMartin, Douglas; Neill, Douglas; Britton, Matthew; Sebag, Jacques; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan

    2014-08-01

    The LSST is an integrated, ground based survey system designed to conduct a decade-long time domain survey of the optical sky. It consists of an 8-meter class wide-field telescope, a 3.2 Gpixel camera, and an automated data processing system. In order to realize the scientific potential of the LSST, its optical system has to provide excellent and consistent image quality across the entire 3.5 degree Field of View. The purpose of the Active Optics System (AOS) is to optimize the image quality by controlling the surface figures of the telescope mirrors and maintaining the relative positions of the optical elements. The basic challenge of the wavefront sensor feedback loop for an LSST type 3-mirror telescope is the near degeneracy of the influence function linking optical degrees of freedom to the measured wavefront errors. Our approach to mitigate this problem is modal control, where a limited number of modes (combinations of optical degrees of freedom) are operated at the sampling rate of the wavefront sensing, while the control bandwidth for the barely observable modes is significantly lower. The paper presents a control strategy based on linear approximations to the system, and the verification of this strategy against system requirements by simulations using more complete, non-linear models for LSST optics and the curvature wavefront sensors.

  3. Estimation of Organ Activity using Four Different Methods of Background Correction in Conjugate View Method.

    PubMed

    Shanei, Ahmad; Afshin, Maryam; Moslehi, Masoud; Rastaghi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    To make an accurate estimation of the uptake of radioactivity in an organ using the conjugate view method, corrections of physical factors, such as background activity, scatter, and attenuation are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four different methods for background correction in activity quantification of the heart in myocardial perfusion scans. The organ activity was calculated using the conjugate view method. A number of 22 healthy volunteers were injected with 17-19 mCi of (99m)Tc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) at rest or during exercise. Images were obtained by a dual-headed gamma camera. Four methods for background correction were applied: (1) Conventional correction (referred to as the Gates' method), (2) Buijs method, (3) BgdA subtraction, (4) BgdB subtraction. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, the results of the calculations using the above-mentioned methods were compared with the reference results. The calculated uptake in the heart using conventional method, Buijs method, BgdA subtraction, and BgdB subtraction methods was 1.4 ± 0.7% (P < 0.05), 2.6 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05), 1.3 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.3% (P < 0.05) of injected dose (I.D) at rest and 1.8 ± 0.6% (P > 0.05), 3.1 ± 0.8% (P > 0.05), 1.9 ± 0.8% (P < 0.05), and 1.2 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05) of I.D, during exercise. The mean estimated myocardial uptake of (99m)Tc-MIBI was dependent on the correction method used. Comparison among the four different methods of background activity correction applied in this study showed that the Buijs method was the most suitable method for background correction in myocardial perfusion scan. PMID:26955568

  4. Wavefront metrology for high resolution optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan H.

    Next generation extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical systems are moving to higher resolution optics to accommodate smaller length scales targeted by the semiconductor industry. As the numerical apertures (NA) of the optics become larger, it becomes increasingly difficult to characterize aberrations due to experimental challenges associated with high-resolution spatial filters and geometrical effects caused by large incident angles of the test wavefront. This dissertation focuses on two methods of wavefront metrology for high resolution optical systems. The first method, lateral shearing interferometry (LSI), is a self-referencing interferometry where the test wavefront is incident on a low spatial frequency grating, and the resulting interference between the diffracted orders is used to reconstruct the wavefront aberrations. LSI has many advantages over other interferometric tests such as phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) due to its experimental simplicity, stability, relaxed coherence requirements, and its ability to scale to high numerical apertures. While LSI has historically been a qualitative test, this dissertation presents a novel quantitative investigation of the LSI interferogram. The analysis reveals the existence of systematic aberrations due to the nonlinear angular response from the diffraction grating that compromises the accuracy of LSI at medium to high NAs. In the medium NA regime (0.15 < NA < 0.35), a holographic model is presented that derives the systematic aberrations in closed form, which demonstrates an astigmatism term that scales as the square of the grating defocus. In the high NA regime (0.35 < NA), a geometrical model is introduced that describes the aberrations as a system of transcendental equations that can be solved numerically. The characterization and removal of these systematic errors is a necessary step that unlocks LSI as a viable candidate for high NA EUV optical testing. The second method is a novel image

  5. Prospective active marker motion correction improves statistical power in BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Melvyn B.; Goldman, Robin I.; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J.; Sajda, Paul; Brown, Truman R.

    2013-01-01

    Group level statistical maps of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals acquired using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have become a basic measurement for much of systems, cognitive and social neuroscience. A challenge in making inferences from these statistical maps is the noise and potential confounds that arise from the head motion that occurs within and between acquisition volumes. This motion results in the scan plane being misaligned during acquisition, ultimately leading to reduced statistical power when maps are constructed at the group level. In most cases, an attempt is made to correct for this motion through the use of retrospective analysis methods. In this paper, we use a prospective active marker motion correction (PRAMMO) system that uses radio frequency markers for real-time tracking of motion, enabling on-line slice plane correction. We show that the statistical power of the activation maps is substantially increased using PRAMMO compared to conventional retrospective correction. Analysis of our results indicates that the PRAMMO acquisition reduces the variance without decreasing the signal component of the BOLD (beta). Using PRAMMO could thus improve the overall statistical power of fMRI based BOLD measurements, leading to stronger inferences of the nature of processing in the human brain. PMID:23220430

  6. A Method for Lung Boundary Correction Using Split Bregman Method and Geometric Active Contour Model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Changli; Zhang, Jianxun; Liang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In order to get the extracted lung region from CT images more accurately, a model that contains lung region extraction and edge boundary correction is proposed. Firstly, a new edge detection function is presented with the help of the classic structure tensor theory. Secondly, the initial lung mask is automatically extracted by an improved active contour model which combines the global intensity information, local intensity information, the new edge information, and an adaptive weight. It is worth noting that the objective function of the improved model is converted to a convex model, which makes the proposed model get the global minimum. Then, the central airway was excluded according to the spatial context messages and the position relationship between every segmented region and the rib. Thirdly, a mesh and the fractal theory are used to detect the boundary that surrounds the juxtapleural nodule. Finally, the geometric active contour model is employed to correct the detected boundary and reinclude juxtapleural nodules. We also evaluated the performance of the proposed segmentation and correction model by comparing with their popular counterparts. Efficient computing capability and robustness property prove that our model can correct the lung boundary reliably and reproducibly. PMID:26089976

  7. FPGA-accelerated adaptive optics wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, S.; Reger, J.; Reinlein, C.; Appelfelder, M.; Goy, M.; Beckert, E.; Tünnermann, A.

    2014-03-01

    The speed of real-time adaptive optical systems is primarily restricted by the data processing hardware and computational aspects. Furthermore, the application of mirror layouts with increasing numbers of actuators reduces the bandwidth (speed) of the system and, thus, the number of applicable control algorithms. This burden turns out a key-impediment for deformable mirrors with continuous mirror surface and highly coupled actuator influence functions. In this regard, specialized hardware is necessary for high performance real-time control applications. Our approach to overcome this challenge is an adaptive optics system based on a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) with a CameraLink interface. The data processing is based on a high performance Intel Core i7 Quadcore hard real-time Linux system. Employing a Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGA, an own developed PCie card is outlined in order to accelerate the analysis of a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor. A recently developed real-time capable spot detection algorithm evaluates the wavefront. The main features of the presented system are the reduction of latency and the acceleration of computation For example, matrix multiplications which in general are of complexity O(n3 are accelerated by using the DSP48 slices of the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as well as a novel hardware implementation of the SHWFS algorithm. Further benefits are the Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE) which intensively use the parallelization capability of the processor for further reducing the latency and increasing the bandwidth of the closed-loop. Due to this approach, up to 64 actuators of a deformable mirror can be handled and controlled without noticeable restriction from computational burdens.

  8. Advanced Techniques for Fourier Transform Wavefront Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A

    2002-08-05

    The performance of Fourier transform (FT) reconstructors in large adaptive optics systems with Shack-Hartmann sensors and a deformable mirror is analyzed. FT methods, which are derived for point-based geometries, are adapted for use on the continuous systems. Analysis and simulation show how to compensate for effects such as misalignment of the deformable mirror and wavefront sensor gain. Further filtering methods to reduce noise and improve performance are presented. All these modifications can be implemented at the filtering stage, preserving the speed of FT reconstruction. Simulation of a large system shows how compensated FT methods can have equivalent or better performance to slower vector-matrix-multiply reconstructions.

  9. Distributed wavefront coding for wide angle imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larivière-Bastien, Martin; Zhang, Hu; Thibault, Simon

    2011-10-01

    The emerging paradigm of imaging systems, known as wavefront coding, which employs joint optimization of both the optical system and the digital post-processing system, has not only increased the degrees of design freedom but also brought several significant system-level benefits. The effectiveness of wavefront coding has been demonstrated by several proof-of-concept systems in the reduction of focus-related aberrations and extension of depth of focus. While previous research on wavefront coding was mainly targeted at imaging systems having a small or modest field of view (FOV), we present a preliminary study on wavefront coding applied to panoramic optical systems. Unlike traditional wavefront coding systems, which only require the constancy of the modulation transfer function (MTF) over an extended focus range, wavefront-coded panoramic systems particularly emphasize the mitigation of significant off-axis aberrations such as field curvature, coma, and astigmatism. The restrictions of using a traditional generalized cubic polynomial pupil phase mask for wide angle systems are studied in this paper. It is shown that a traditional approach can be used when the variation of the off-axis aberrations remains modest. Consequently, we propose to study how a distributed wavefront coding approach, where two surfaces are used for encoding the wavefront, can be applied to wide angle lenses. A few cases designed using Zemax are presented and discussed

  10. Corrective Optics For Camera On Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macenka, Steven A.; Meinel, Aden B.

    1994-01-01

    Assembly of tilted, aspherical circularly symmetric mirrors used as corrective optical subsystem for camera mounted on telescope exhibiting both large spherical wave-front error and inherent off-axis astigmatism. Subsystem provides unobscured camera aperture and diffraction-limited camera performance, despite large telescope aberrations. Generic configuration applied in other optical systems in which aberations deliberately introduced into telescopes and corrected in associated cameras. Concept of corrective optical subsystem provides designer with additional degrees of freedom used to optimize optical system.

  11. Time-resolved measurement of thermally induced aberrations in a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG slab with a wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikocinski, P.; Novak, O.; Smrz, M.; Pilar, J.; Jambunathan, V.; Jelínková, H.; Endo, A.; Lucianetti, A.; Mocek, T.

    2016-04-01

    The time-resolved measurements of thermally induced wavefront aberrations in a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG crystal are presented in dependence on temperature in the range between 250 and 130 K under non-lasing condition. A wavefront sensor was utilized to determine the wavefront aberrations. The wavefront distortions were experimentally studied for a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG crystal in detail for the first time. The wavefront aberrations were significantly reduced at cryogenic temperatures including defocus which was the dominant aberration and which was responsible for the so-called thermal lensing effect. We found that defocus aberration is caused not only by thermally induced effects (responsible for thermal lens), but also by electronically induced change in the refractive index due to excitation of ion activators which is responsible for the electronic lensing. Nevertheless, at pumping intensity of 6.3 kW/cm2 and repetition rate of 100 Hz thermal effects were the dominant one. In addition, an improvement in the Strehl ratio along with an increase in absorbed pump energy was observed while the temperature of the gain medium was decreased. The measurements clearly show the advantages of cryogenic cooling of laser-active media for beam quality improvement.

  12. High-resolution wavefront control of high-power laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J; Brown, C; Carrano, C; Kartz, M; Olivier, S; Pennington, D; Silva, D

    1999-07-08

    Nearly every new large-scale laser system application at LLNL has requirements for beam control which exceed the current level of available technology. For applications such as inertial confinement fusion, laser isotope separation, laser machining, and laser the ability to transport significant power to a target while maintaining good beam quality is critical. There are many ways that laser wavefront quality can be degraded. Thermal effects due to the interaction of high-power laser or pump light with the internal optical components or with the ambient gas are common causes of wavefront degradation. For many years, adaptive optics based on thing deformable glass mirrors with piezoelectric or electrostrictive actuators have be used to remove the low-order wavefront errors from high-power laser systems. These adaptive optics systems have successfully improved laser beam quality, but have also generally revealed additional high-spatial-frequency errors, both because the low-order errors have been reduced and because deformable mirrors have often introduced some high-spatial-frequency components due to manufacturing errors. Many current and emerging laser applications fall into the high-resolution category where there is an increased need for the correction of high spatial frequency aberrations which requires correctors with thousands of degrees of freedom. The largest Deformable Mirrors currently available have less than one thousand degrees of freedom at a cost of approximately $1M. A deformable mirror capable of meeting these high spatial resolution requirements would be cost prohibitive. Therefore a new approach using a different wavefront control technology is needed. One new wavefront control approach is the use of liquid-crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology for the controlling the phase of linearly polarized light. Current LC SLM technology provides high-spatial-resolution wavefront control, with hundreds of thousands of degrees of freedom, more

  13. Mitotic wavefronts mediated by mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Idema, Timon; Liu, Andrea; Lubensky, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo demonstrates spatial and temporal correlations in the form of wavefronts that travel across the embryo in each cell cycle. This coordinated phenomenon requires a signaling mechanism, which we suggest is mechanical in origin. We have constructed a theoretical model that supports nonlinear wavefront propagation in a mechanically-excitable medium. Previously, we have shown that this model captures quantitatively the wavefront speed as it varies with cell cycle number, for reasonable values of the elastic moduli and damping coefficient of the medium. Now we show that our model also captures the displacements of cell nuclei in the embryo in response to the traveling wavefront. This new result further supports that mechanical signaling may play an important role in mediating mitotic wavefronts.

  14. POP-ART: thermodynamically correct activated event sampling in complex materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubynsky, M. V.; Vocks, Henk; Mousseau, Normand; Barkema, G. T.

    2006-03-01

    Dynamics of complex systems with a rugged energy landscape can be represented as a sequence of rare activated events during which the system jumps between different potential energy minima. The activation-relaxation technique (ART) [1] is an efficient method of sampling such events; however, because of an unknown bias in selecting these events it cannot easily provide thermodynamical information. We present a modification of ART, the properly obeying probability ART (POP-ART) [2]. POP-ART combines short molecular dynamics runs with ART-like activated moves, with an additional accept/reject step designed to satisfy detailed balance and thus reproduce correct thermodynamics. Both correctness and efficiency of the method have been tested using a variety of systems. We mention briefly some ways of extending the approach to obtain correct dynamics as well.[1] G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4358 (1996)[2] H. Vocks, M.V. Chubynsky, G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, J. Chem. Phys., accepted

  15. Pyramidal Wavefront Sensor Demonstrator at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Olivier; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Anctil, Geneviève; Bourqui, Pascal; Châteauneuf, François; Gauvin, Jonny; Goyette, Philippe; Lagacé, François; Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min

    2014-08-01

    Wavefront sensing is one of the key elements of an Adaptive Optics System. Although Shack-Hartmann WFS are the most commonly used whether for astronomical or biomedical applications, the high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range of the Pyramid-WFS (P-WFS) technology is promising and needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) applications. At INO, center for applied research in optics and technology transfer in Quebec City, Canada, we have recently set to develop a Pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS), an option for which no other research group in Canada had any experience. A first version had been built and tested in 2013 in collaboration with NRC-HIA Victoria. Here we present a second iteration of demonstrator with an extended spectral range, fast modulation capability and low-noise, fast-acquisition EMCCD sensor. The system has been designed with compactness and robustness in mind to allow on-sky testing at Mont Mégantic facility, in parallel with a Shack- Hartmann sensor so as to compare both options.

  16. Wavefront distortion and beam pointing for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Peter L.

    2005-05-01

    The dc pointing directions for the LISA laser beams will be chosen to minimize the sensitivity of the measured arm lengths to jitter in the beam pointing. The earliest studies of the effects of wavefront distortion included only astigmatism and defocus, so that the desired dc beam pointing directions were on the axis for the transmitting telescopes. But, if other aberrations cause the dc pointing directions to be considerably off axis, some of the laser beam intensity will be lost. A brief study of this effect has been carried out. As examples, several cases with defocus, spherical aberration, and two components each of astigmatism and coma have been investigated. Within this class of models, pure astigmatism turned out to give the maximum sensitivity to beam pointing jitter, for a given rms wavefront distortion. Although further study is needed, it appears that the usually quoted requirements of 3 × 10-8 rad for the dc beam pointing offsets and 8 × 10-9 rad Hz-1/2 for the pointing jitter are probably reasonable choices.

  17. Wavefront Compensation Segmented Mirror Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, David C.; Lou, John Z.; Kissil, Andrew; Bradford, Charles M.; Woody, David; Padin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The primary mirror of very large submillimeter-wave telescopes will necessarily be segmented into many separate mirror panels. These panels must be continuously co-phased to keep the telescope wavefront error less than a small fraction of a wavelength, to ten microns RMS (root mean square) or less. This performance must be maintained continuously across the full aperture of the telescope, in all pointing conditions, and in a variable thermal environment. A wavefront compensation segmented mirror sensing and control system, consisting of optical edge sensors, Wavefront Compensation Estimator/Controller Soft ware, and segment position actuators is proposed. Optical edge sensors are placed two per each segment-to-segment edge to continuously measure changes in segment state. Segment position actuators (three per segment) are used to move the panels. A computer control system uses the edge sensor measurements to estimate the state of all of the segments and to predict the wavefront error; segment actuator commands are computed that minimize the wavefront error. Translational or rotational motions of one segment relative to the other cause lateral displacement of the light beam, which is measured by the imaging sensor. For high accuracy, the collimator uses a shaped mask, such as one or more slits, so that the light beam forms a pattern on the sensor that permits sensing accuracy of better than 0.1 micron in two axes: in the z or local surface normal direction, and in the y direction parallel to the mirror surface and perpendicular to the beam direction. Using a co-aligned pair of sensors, with the location of the detector and collimated light source interchanged, four degrees of freedom can be sensed: transverse x and y displacements, as well as two bending angles (pitch and yaw). In this approach, each optical edge sensor head has a collimator and an imager, placing one sensor head on each side of a segment gap, with two parallel light beams crossing the gap. Two sets

  18. In vivo imaging of human photoreceptor mosaic with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kevin S K; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-02-01

    Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (WSAO-OCT) is a novel imaging technique for in vivo high-resolution depth-resolved imaging that mitigates some of the challenges encountered with the use of sensor-based adaptive optics designs. This technique replaces the Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor used to measure aberrations with a depth-resolved image-driven optimization algorithm, with the metric based on the OCT volumes acquired in real-time. The custom-built ultrahigh-speed GPU processing platform and fast modal optimization algorithm presented in this paper was essential in enabling real-time, in vivo imaging of human retinas with wavefront sensorless AO correction. WSAO-OCT is especially advantageous for developing a clinical high-resolution retinal imaging system as it enables the use of a compact, low-cost and robust lens-based adaptive optics design. In this report, we describe our WSAO-OCT system for imaging the human photoreceptor mosaic in vivo. We validated our system performance by imaging the retina at several eccentricities, and demonstrated the improvement in photoreceptor visibility with WSAO compensation. PMID:25780747

  19. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser pointing, wavefront control, and phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, K. L.; Stappaerts, E. A.; Homoelle, D. C.; Henesian, M. A.; Bliss, E. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2009-02-01

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50%(4.0 kJ) of their total energy(7.96 kJ) within a 40 μm diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and RMS tip/tilt errors of approximately one μrad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  20. Interferometric adaptive optics for high power laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Homoelle, D C; Henesian, M A; Bliss, E S; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-01-21

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50% (4.0 kJ) of their total energy (7.96 kJ) within a 40 {micro}m diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and rms tip/tilt errors of approximately one {micro}rad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  1. In vivo imaging of human photoreceptor mosaic with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kevin S. K.; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2015-01-01

    Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (WSAO-OCT) is a novel imaging technique for in vivo high-resolution depth-resolved imaging that mitigates some of the challenges encountered with the use of sensor-based adaptive optics designs. This technique replaces the Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor used to measure aberrations with a depth-resolved image-driven optimization algorithm, with the metric based on the OCT volumes acquired in real-time. The custom-built ultrahigh-speed GPU processing platform and fast modal optimization algorithm presented in this paper was essential in enabling real-time, in vivo imaging of human retinas with wavefront sensorless AO correction. WSAO-OCT is especially advantageous for developing a clinical high-resolution retinal imaging system as it enables the use of a compact, low-cost and robust lens-based adaptive optics design. In this report, we describe our WSAO-OCT system for imaging the human photoreceptor mosaic in vivo. We validated our system performance by imaging the retina at several eccentricities, and demonstrated the improvement in photoreceptor visibility with WSAO compensation. PMID:25780747

  2. An efficient means to mitigate wavefront curvature effects in polar format processed SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnehan, Robert; Yasuda, Mark; Doerry, Armin

    2012-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images processed using the polar format algorithm (PFA) may exhibit distortion if the curvature of the spherical wavefronts are not accounted for. The distortion manifests in geometric shifts and defocusing of targets, and intensifies as distances between pixels and the scene reference position increase. In this work, we demonstrate a method to mitigate the effects of wavefront curvature by applying localized (space-variant) phase corrections to sub-regions selected from the polar format processed image. The modified sub-images are then reassembled into a full image. To minimize discontinuities in the reconstructed image, the spatially variant phase adjustments are made to regions larger than the sub-images, and pared down before being reinserted into the complete image. The result is a SAR process that retains the efficiency of the PFA, yet avoids scene size limitations due to wavefront curvature distortions. The method is illustrated and validated using simulations and real data collected by the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Lynx® Multi-mode Radar System.

  3. Optimization of the dynamic wavefront control of a pulsed kilojoule/nanosecond-petawatt laser facility.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ji-Ping; Sautivet, Anne-Marie; Fils, Jérôme; Martin, Luc; Abdeli, Kahina; Sauteret, Christian; Wattellier, Benoit

    2008-02-10

    The wavefront aberrations in a large-scale, flash-lamp-pumped, high-energy, high-power glass laser system can degrade considerably the quality of the final focal spot, and limit severely the repetition rate. The various aberrations induced on the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), laser facility (LULI2000) throughout the amplification are identified and analyzed in detail. Based on these analyses, an optimized procedure for dynamic wavefront control is then designed and implemented. The lower-order Zernike aberrations can be effectively reduced by combining an adaptive-optics setup, comprising a bimorph deformable mirror and a four-wave lateral shearing interferometer, with a precise alignment system. This enables the laser chain to produce a reproducible focal spot close to the diffraction limit (Strehl ratio approximately 0.7). This allows also to increase the repetition rate, initially limited by the recovery time of the laser amplifiers, by a factor of 2 (one shot per hour). The proposed procedure provides an attractive alternative for dynamic correction of the wavefront aberrations of a laser facility as complex as the LULI2000. PMID:18268782

  4. Optimization of the dynamic wavefront control of a pulsed kilojoule/nanosecond-petawatt laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ji-Ping; Sautivet, Anne-Marie; Fils, Jérôme; Martin, Luc; Abdeli, Kahina; Sauteret, Christian; Wattellier, Benoit

    2008-02-01

    The wavefront aberrations in a large-scale, flash-lamp-pumped, high-energy, high-power glass laser system can degrade considerably the quality of the final focal spot, and limit severely the repetition rate. The various aberrations induced on the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), laser facility (LULI2000) throughout the amplification are identified and analyzed in detail. Based on these analyses, an optimized procedure for dynamic wavefront control is then designed and implemented. The lower-order Zernike aberrations can be effectively reduced by combining an adaptive-optics setup, comprising a bimorph deformable mirror and a four-wave lateral shearing interferometer, with a precise alignment system. This enables the laser chain to produce a reproducible focal spot close to the diffraction limit (Strehl ratio ~0.7). This allows also to increase the repetition rate, initially limited by the recovery time of the laser amplifiers, by a factor of 2 (one shot per hour). The proposed procedure provides an attractive alternative for dynamic correction of the wavefront aberrations of a laser facility as complex as the LULI2000.

  5. Field depth extension of 2D barcode scanner based on wavefront coding and projection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingyu; Ye, Zi; Zhang, Wenzi; Huang, Weiwei; Yu, Feihong

    2008-03-01

    Wavefront coding (WFC) used in 2D barcode scanners can extend the depth of field into a great extent with simpler structure compared to the autofocus microscope system. With a cubic phase mask (CPM) employed in the STOP, blurred images will be obtained in charge coupled device (CCD), which can be restored by digital filters. Direct methods are used widely in real-time restoration with good computational efficiency but with details smoothed. Here, the results of direct method are firstly filtered by hard-threshold function. The positions of the steps can be detected by simple differential operators. With the positions corrected by projection algorithm, the exact barcode information is restored. A wavefront coding system with 7mm effective focal length and 6 F-number is designed as an example. Although with the different magnification, images of different object distances can be restored by one point spread function (PSF) with 200mm object distance. A QR code (Quickly Response Code) of 31mm X 27mm is used as a target object. The simulation results showed that the sharp imaging objective distance is from 80mm to 355mm. The 2D barcode scanner with wavefront coding extends field depth with simple structure, low cost and large manufacture tolerance. This combination of the direct filter and projection algorithm proposed here could get the exact 2D barcode information with good computational efficiency.

  6. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with large dynamic range by adaptive spot search method.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Hironobu; Saita, Yusuke; Nomura, Takanori

    2016-07-10

    A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) that consists of a microlens array and an image sensor has been used to measure the wavefront aberrations of human eyes. However, a conventional SHWFS has finite dynamic range depending on the diameter of the each microlens. The dynamic range cannot be easily expanded without a decrease of the spatial resolution. In this study, an adaptive spot search method to expand the dynamic range of an SHWFS is proposed. In the proposed method, spots are searched with the help of their approximate displacements measured with low spatial resolution and large dynamic range. By the proposed method, a wavefront can be correctly measured even if the spot is beyond the detection area. The adaptive spot search method is realized by using the special microlens array that generates both spots and discriminable patterns. The proposed method enables expanding the dynamic range of an SHWFS with a single shot and short processing time. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of a conventional SHWFS by optical experiments. Furthermore, the dynamic range of the proposed method is quantitatively evaluated by numerical simulations. PMID:27409319

  7. Active self-correction of back posture in children instructed with 'straighten your back' command.

    PubMed

    Czaprowski, Dariusz; Pawłowska, Paulina; Stoliński, Lukasz; Kotwicki, Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    The ability to adopt the properly corrected body posture is one of the factors determining the effectiveness of therapeutic programmes. This study determined the active self-correction expressed by the change of sagittal spinal curvatures (in standing and sitting positions) in 249 children (136 females, 113 males, aged 10-14 years) instructed with 'straighten your back' command (SYB). Spinal curvatures (sacral slope-SS, lumbar lordosis-LL, global, lower and upper thoracic kyphosis-TK, LK, UK, respectively) were assessed using Saunders inclinometer. The assessment was done in spontaneous standing and sitting positions and in the positions adopted after the SYB. In a standing position SYB led to the significant (P < 0.001) increase in SS, and the significant (P < 0.01) decrease in LL, TK, LK, UK. In a sitting position SYB led to significant changes (P < 0.001) from kyphotic to lordotic position of SS and LL and to the significant (P < 0.001) reduction of TK (36.5° ± 10.8 vs. 23.5° ± 11) and the flattening of LK (15.2° ± 8.7 vs. 1.0° ± 8.4). There were gender-based discrepancy regarding active self-correction only for LL in a standing and UK in a sitting position. Females demonstrated a significant decrease in LL (P < 0.001). UK significantly increased only in males (P < 0.001). The 'straighten your back' command leads to moving the spine away from mid-range towards end range of motion. Therefore, the command should not be used to elicit the most optimal back posture. Further studies are needed to determine if the active self-correction is different in females and males. PMID:24246905

  8. Surprisingly correct: unexpectedness of observed actions activates the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Anne-Marike; Krause, Kim H; Schubotz, Ricarda I

    2014-04-01

    Not only committing errors, but also observing errors has been shown to activate the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, particularly BA 8 and adjacent rostral cingulate zone (RCZ). Currently, there is a debate on whether this activity reflects a response to the incorrectness of the committed action or to its unexpectedness. This article reports two studies investigating whether activity in BA 8/RCZ is due to the unexpectedness of observed errors or the incorrectness of the specific observed action. Both studies employed an action observation paradigm reliant on the observation of an actor tying sailing knots. The reported behavioral experiment delivered evidence that the paradigm successfully induced the expectation of incorrect actions as well as the expectation of correct actions. The functional magnetic resonance imaging study revealed that unexpectedly correct as well as unexpectedly incorrect actions activate the BA 8/RCZ. The same result was confirmed for a coordinate in the vicinity that has been previously reported to be activated in separate studies either by the error observation or by the unexpectedness of committed errors, and has been associated with the error-related negativity. The present results suggest that unexpectedness has an impact on the medial prefrontal correlate of observed errors. PMID:23670963

  9. Implementation of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for the measurement of embryo-induced aberrations using fluorescent microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azucena, Oscar; Kubby, Joel; Crest, Justin; Cao, Jian; Sullivan, William; Kner, Peter; Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren; Olivier, Scot

    2009-02-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) improves the quality of astronomical imaging systems by using real time measurement of the turbulent medium in the optical path using a guide star (natural or artificial) as a point source reference beacon. AO has also been applied to vision science to improve the current view of the human eye. This paper will address our current research focused on the improvement of fluorescent microscopy for biological imaging utilizing current AO technology. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) was used to measure the aberration introduced by a Drosophila Melanogaster embryo with an implanted 1 micron fluorescent bead that serves as a point source reference beacon. The measurements show an average peak-to-valley and root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront error of 0.77 micrometers and 0.15 micrometers, respectively. The Zernike coefficients have been measured for these aberrations which indicate that the correction of the first 14 Zernike coefficients should be sufficient to correct the aberrations we have obtained. These results support the utilization of SHWS for biological imaging applications and that a MEMS deformable mirror with 1 micron of stroke and 100 actuators will be sufficient to correct these aberrations. The design, assembly and initial results for the use of a MEMS deformable mirror, SHWS and implanted fluorescent reference beacon for wavefront correction will also be discussed.

  10. Adaptive correction of the focused beam in conditions with strong fluctuations of intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vladimir P.; Fortes, Boris V.

    2000-07-01

    The adaptive correction was frequently treated as straightening of wavefront, if deal with receiving of the deformed wave. For adaptive focusing of beams the correction was considered as predistortion of wavefront. However with infringement of a condition smoothness of wavefront, the situation varies. It is known, that dislocations of wavefront conterminous to points where instant meaning of intensity equal to zero, arise with distances approximately equal diffraction length. With presence of such points the wavefront of a reference wave cannot be determined as a smooth one-coherent surface, therefore efficiency of adaptive systems with flexible mirrors begins to be reduced. At the same time, the numerical experiment with model of a compound phase corrector has shown, that its efficiency practically does not change with transition in area of strong fluctuations of intensity. We have found out, that the efficiency of adaptive system with a compound corrector does not vary with transition from area weak fluctuations of intensity in area strong fluctuations.

  11. Calibration correction of an active scattering spectrometer probe to account for refractive index of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Overbeck, V. R.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Russell, P. B.; Ferry, G. V.

    1990-01-01

    The use of the active scattering spectrometer probe (ASAS-X) to measure sulfuric acid aerosols on U-2 and ER-2 research aircraft has yielded results that are at times ambiguous due to the dependence of particles' optical signatures on refractive index as well as physical dimensions. The calibration correction of the ASAS-X optical spectrometer probe for stratospheric aerosol studies is validated through an independent and simultaneous sampling of the particles with impactors; sizing and counting of particles on SEM images yields total particle areas and volumes. Upon correction of calibration in light of these data, spectrometer results averaged over four size distributions are found to agree with similarly averaged impactor results to within a few percent: indicating that the optical properties or chemical composition of the sample aerosol must be known in order to achieve accurate optical aerosol spectrometer size analysis.

  12. On-Orbit Multi-Field Wavefront Control with a Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, John; Sigrist, Norbert; Basinger, Scott; Redding, David

    2008-01-01

    A document describes a multi-field wavefront control (WFC) procedure for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) on-orbit optical telescope element (OTE) fine-phasing using wavefront measurements at the NIRCam pupil. The control is applied to JWST primary mirror (PM) segments and secondary mirror (SM) simultaneously with a carefully selected ordering. Through computer simulations, the multi-field WFC procedure shows that it can reduce the initial system wavefront error (WFE), as caused by random initial system misalignments within the JWST fine-phasing error budget, from a few dozen micrometers to below 50 nm across the entire NIRCam Field of View, and the WFC procedure is also computationally stable as the Monte-Carlo simulations indicate. With the incorporation of a Kalman Filter (KF) as an optical state estimator into the WFC process, the robustness of the JWST OTE alignment process can be further improved. In the presence of some large optical misalignments, the Kalman state estimator can provide a reasonable estimate of the optical state, especially for those degrees of freedom that have a significant impact on the system WFE. The state estimate allows for a few corrections to the optical state to push the system towards its nominal state, and the result is that a large part of the WFE can be eliminated in this step. When the multi-field WFC procedure is applied after Kalman state estimate and correction, the stability of fine-phasing control is much more certain. Kalman Filter has been successfully applied to diverse applications as a robust and optimal state estimator. In the context of space-based optical system alignment based on wavefront measurements, a KF state estimator can combine all available wavefront measurements, past and present, as well as measurement and actuation error statistics to generate a Maximum-Likelihood optimal state estimator. The strength and flexibility of the KF algorithm make it attractive for use in real-time optical system

  13. EEG activity represents the correctness of perceptual decisions trial-by-trial

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Vazquez, Jose L.; Padrón, Isabel; Fernández-Rey, José; Acuña, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Performance monitoring is an executive function, which we depend on for detecting and evaluating the consequences of our behavior. Although event related potentials (ERPs) have revealed the existence of differences after correct and incorrect decisions, it is not known whether there is a trial-by-trial representation of the accuracy of the decision. We recorded the electroencephalographic activity (EEG) while participants performed a perceptual discrimination task, with two levels of difficulty, in which they received immediate feedback. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses were used to reveal two components that convey trial-by-trial representations of the correctness of the decisions. Firstly, the performance monitoring-related negativity (PM-N), a negative deflection whose amplitude is higher (more negative) after incorrect trials. Secondly, the performance monitoring-related positivity (PM-P), a positive deflection whose amplitude is higher after incorrect trials. During the time periods corresponding to these components, trials can be accurately categorized as correct or incorrect by looking at the EEG activity; this categorization is more accurate when based on the PM-P. We further show that the difficulty of the discrimination task has a different effect on each component: after easy trials the latency of the PM-N is shorter and the amplitude of the PM-P is higher than after difficult trials. Consistent with previous interpretations of performance-related ERPs, these results suggest a functional differentiation between these components. The PM-N could be related to an automatic error detection system, responsible for fast behavioral corrections of ongoing actions, while the PM-P could reflect the difference between expected and actual outcomes and be related to long-term changes in the decision process. PMID:24734012

  14. AIS wavefront sensor: a robust optical test of exposure tools using localized wavefront curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan; Zhou, Xibin; Goldstein, Michael; Ashworth, Dominic; Cummings, Kevin; Fan, Yu-Jen; Shroff, Yashesh; Denbeaux, Greg; Kandel, Yudhi; Naulleau, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    We present an update of the AIS wavefront sensor, a diagnostic sensor set for insertion in the upgraded 0.5 NA SEMATECH Albany and Berkeley METs. AIS works by using offset monopole illumination to probe localized regions of the test optic pupil. Variations in curvature manifest as focus shifts, which are measured using a photodiode- based grating-on- grating contrast monitor, and the wavefront aberrations are reconstructed using a least-squares approach. We present results from an optical prototype of AIS demonstrating an accuracy of better than λ/30 rms for Zernike polynomials Z4 through Z10. We also discuss integration strategies and requirements as well as specifications on system alignment.

  15. Wavefront conjugation using electron-gun-controlled piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, George C.; Main, John A.; Martin, Jeffrey W.

    2000-07-01

    Current adaptive optics designs often rely upon multiple actuators to mechanically deform mirrored surfaces. The spatial resolution of control is dependent upon the physical size of these actuators and the number of actuators present. Piezoelectric materials may be used for actuation however the classical control methods of these materials also rely on discrete areas of actuation and require lead wiring for each electrode, patch, or stack utilized. Electron gun control of piezoelectric materials eliminates the need for discrete, segmented electrodes and their associated lead wiring. This method also holds the potential for much finer control resolution since the restraining parameter is beam size. Lightweight piezoelectric ceramics may possibly be used as wavefront conjugating mirrors. Piezo-ceramic plates can be actuated with an electron gun and a single distributed electrode of optical quality. The electron gun functions as a pointing device while varying the potential, referred to as backpressure, of the single electrode controls the magnitude of actuation. By using this method, future corrective optics may significantly surpass current design performance without significantly increasing system complexity.

  16. Preliminary Investigation of an Active PLZT Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, W. D.; Peters, B. R.; Reardon, P. J.; Wong, J. K.

    2001-01-01

    The design, analysis and preliminary testing of a prototype Adjustable Focus Optical Correction Lens (AFOCL) is described. The AFOCL is an active optical component composed of solid state lead lanthanum-modified zirconate titanate (PLZT) ferroelectric ceramic with patterned indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent surface electrodes that modulate the refractive index of the PLZT to function as an electro-optic lens. The AFOCL was developed to perform optical re-alignment and wavefront correction to enhance the performance of Ultra-Lightweight Structures and Space Observatories (ULSSO). The AFOCL has potential application as an active optical component within a larger optical system. As such, information from a wavefront sensor would be processed to provide input to the AFOCL to drive the sensed wavefront to the desired shape and location. While offering variable and rapid focussing capability (controlled wavefront manipulation) similar to liquid crystal based spatial light modulators (SLM), the AFOCL offers some potential advantages because it is a solid-state, stationary, low-mass, rugged, and thin optical element that can produce wavefront quality comparable to the solid refractive lens it replaces. The AFOCL acts as a positive or negative lens by producing a parabolic phase-shift in the PLZT material through the application of a controlled voltage potential across the ITO electrodes. To demonstrate the technology, a 4 mm diameter lens was fabricated to produce 5-waves of optical power operating at 2.051 micrometer wavelength. Optical metrology was performed on the device to measure focal length, optical quality, and efficiency for a variety of test configurations. The data was analyzed and compared to theoretical data available from computer-based models of the AFOCL.

  17. Wavefront sensing applications of binary optics

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Warren, M.E.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1994-02-01

    The advent of micro- or binary optics technology has made possible the fabrication of a variety of new optical devices. Optical fabrication is no longer limited by surfaces that can be made by grinding and polishing, or even diamond turning. In fact, optics with no symmetry, no smooth surfaces, and that perform multiple functions can be readily fabricated. While these optics have a large number of applications, they are extremely useful for systems that require arrays of small optics or aperture multiplexing, since these are fabricated using computer controlled photo-lithography and etching processes. We have applied binary optics technology to construct various wavefront sensing using four mask processes to create 16 level optics. They are binary in the sense that they use discrete phase levels, not in the sense of using only two levels (they might more properly be called digital optics). We have found that 16 levels is adequate for most systems, giving greater than 99% of efficiency.

  18. Constrained least squares estimation incorporating wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Stephen D.; Welsh, Byron M.; Roggemann, Michael C.

    1998-11-01

    We address the optimal processing of astronomical images using the deconvolution from wave-front sensing technique (DWFS). A constrained least-squares (CLS) solution which incorporates ensemble-averaged DWFS data is derived using Lagrange minimization. The new estimator requires DWFS data, noise statistics, optical transfer function statistics, and a constraint. The constraint can be chosen such that the algorithm selects a conventional regularization constant automatically. No ad hoc parameter tuning is necessary. The algorithm uses an iterative Newton-Raphson minimization to determine the optimal Lagrange multiplier. Computer simulation of a 1m telescope imaging through atmospheric turbulence is used to test the estimation scheme. CLS object estimates are compared with the corresponding long exposure images. The CLS algorithm provides images with superior resolution and is computationally inexpensive, converging to a solution in less than 10 iterations.

  19. The influence of triple energy window scatter correction on activity quantification for 1 7 7Lu molecular radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Andrew P.; Tipping, Jill; Cullen, David M.; Hamilton, David

    2016-07-01

    Accurate activity quantification is the foundation for all methods of radiation dosimetry for molecular radiotherapy (MRT). The requirements for patient-specific dosimetry using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are challenging, particularly with respect to scatter correction. In this paper data from phantom studies, combined with results from a fully validated Monte Carlo (MC) SPECT camera simulation, are used to investigate the influence of the triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction on SPECT activity quantification for {{}1 7 7} Lu MRT. Results from phantom data show that; (1) activity quantification for the total counts in the SPECT field-of-view demonstrates a significant overestimation in total activity recovery when TEW scatter correction is applied at low activities (≤slant 200 MBq). (2) Applying the TEW scatter correction to activity quantification within a volume-of-interest with no background activity provides minimal benefit. (3) In the case of activity distributions with background activity, an overestimation of recovered activity of up to 30% is observed when using the TEW scatter correction. Data from MC simulation were used to perform a full analysis of the composition of events in a clinically reconstructed volume of interest. This allowed, for the first time, the separation of the relative contributions of partial volume effects (PVE) and inaccuracies in TEW scatter compensation to the observed overestimation of activity recovery. It is shown, that even with perfect partial volume compensation, TEW scatter correction can overestimate activity recovery by up to 11%. MC data is used to demonstrate that even a localized and optimized isotope-specific TEW correction cannot reflect a patient specific activity distribution without prior knowledge of the complete activity distribution. This highlights the important role of MC simulation in SPECT activity quantification.

  20. The influence of triple energy window scatter correction on activity quantification for (1 7 7)Lu molecular radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew P; Tipping, Jill; Cullen, David M; Hamilton, David

    2016-07-21

    Accurate activity quantification is the foundation for all methods of radiation dosimetry for molecular radiotherapy (MRT). The requirements for patient-specific dosimetry using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are challenging, particularly with respect to scatter correction. In this paper data from phantom studies, combined with results from a fully validated Monte Carlo (MC) SPECT camera simulation, are used to investigate the influence of the triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction on SPECT activity quantification for [Formula: see text]Lu MRT. Results from phantom data show that; (1) activity quantification for the total counts in the SPECT field-of-view demonstrates a significant overestimation in total activity recovery when TEW scatter correction is applied at low activities ([Formula: see text]200 MBq). (2) Applying the TEW scatter correction to activity quantification within a volume-of-interest with no background activity provides minimal benefit. (3) In the case of activity distributions with background activity, an overestimation of recovered activity of up to 30% is observed when using the TEW scatter correction. Data from MC simulation were used to perform a full analysis of the composition of events in a clinically reconstructed volume of interest. This allowed, for the first time, the separation of the relative contributions of partial volume effects (PVE) and inaccuracies in TEW scatter compensation to the observed overestimation of activity recovery. It is shown, that even with perfect partial volume compensation, TEW scatter correction can overestimate activity recovery by up to 11%. MC data is used to demonstrate that even a localized and optimized isotope-specific TEW correction cannot reflect a patient specific activity distribution without prior knowledge of the complete activity distribution. This highlights the important role of MC simulation in SPECT activity quantification. PMID:27351914

  1. Implementation of advanced matrix corrections for active interrogation of waste drums using the CTEN instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, S.; Estep, R.; Hollas, C.

    1998-12-31

    The combined thermal/epithermal neutron instrument (CTEN) was designed at Los Alamos to improve measurement accuracy and mitigate self shielding effects inherent in the differential dieaway technique (DDT). A major goal in this research effort has been the development of a calibration technique that incorporates recently developed matrix and self-shielding corrections using data generated from additional detectors and new acquisition techniques. A comprehensive data set containing both active and passive measurements was generated using 26 different matrices and comprising a total of 1,400 measurements. In all, 31 flux-and-matrix-dependent parameters, 24 positional parameters, two dieaway times, and a correlated ratio were determined from each of the over 1,400 measurements. A reduced list of matrix indicators, prioritized using the alternating conditional expectation (ACE) algorithm, was used to train a neural network using a generalized regression technique (GRNN) to determine matrix- and position-corrected calibration factors. This paper describes the experimental, analytical, and empirical techniques used to determine the corrected calibration factor for an unknown waste drum. Results from a range of cases are compared with those obtained using a mobile DDT instrument and traditional DDT algorithms.

  2. Prospective Real-Time Correction for Arbitrary Head Motion Using Active Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Melvyn B.; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J.; Swaminathan, Srirama V.; Brown, Truman R.

    2011-01-01

    Patient motion during an MRI exam can result in major degradation of image quality, and is of increasing concern due to the aging population and its associated diseases. This work presents a general strategy for real-time, intra-image compensation of rigid-body motion that is compatible with multiple imaging sequences. Image quality improvements are established for structural brain MRI acquired during volunteer motion. A headband integrated with three active markers is secured to the forehead. Prospective correction is achieved by interleaving a rapid track-and-update module into the imaging sequence. For every repetition of this module, a short tracking pulse-sequence re-measures the marker positions; during head motion, the rigid-body transformation that realigns the markers to their initial positions is fed back to adaptively update the image-plane – maintaining it at a fixed orientation relative to the head – before the next imaging segment of k-space is acquired. In cases of extreme motion, corrupted lines of k-space are rejected and re-acquired with the updated geometry. High precision tracking measurements (0.01 mm) and corrections are accomplished in a temporal resolution (37 ms) suitable for real-time application. The correction package requires minimal additional hardware and is fully integrated into the standard user interface, promoting transferability to clinical practice. PMID:19488989

  3. Telescope Multi-Field Wavefront Control with a Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, John Z.; Redding, David; Sigrist, Norbert; Basinger, Scott

    2008-01-01

    An effective multi-field wavefront control (WFC) approach is demonstrated for an actuated, segmented space telescope using wavefront measurements at the exit pupil, and the optical and computational implications of this approach are discussed. The integration of a Kalman Filter as an optical state estimator into the wavefront control process to further improve the robustness of the optical alignment of the telescope will also be discussed. Through a comparison of WFC performances between on-orbit and ground-test optical system configurations, the connection (and a possible disconnection) between WFC and optical system alignment under these circumstances are analyzed. Our MACOS-based computer simulation results will be presented and discussed.

  4. Initial Performance of the Keck AO Wavefront Controller System

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E M; Acton, D S; An, J R; Avicola, K; Beeman, B V; Brase, J M; Carrano, C J; Gathright, J; Gavel, D T; Hurd, R L; Lai, O; Lupton, W; Macintosh, B A; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Shelton, J C; Stomski, P J; Tsubota, K; Waltjen, K E; Watson, J A; Wizinowich, P L

    2001-03-01

    The wavefront controller for the Keck Observatory AO system consists of two separate real-time control loops: a tip-tilt control loop to remove tilt from the incoming wavefront, and a deformable mirror control loop to remove higher-order aberrations. In this paper, we describe these control loops and analyze their performance using diagnostic data acquired during the integration and testing of the AO system on the telescope. Disturbance rejection curves for the controllers are calculated from the experimental data and compared to theory. The residual wavefront errors due to control loop bandwidth are also calculated from the data, and possible improvements to the controller performance are discussed.

  5. Propagation of aberrated wavefronts using a ray transfer matrix.

    PubMed

    Raasch, Thomas W

    2014-05-01

    A ray transfer matrix is used to calculate the propagation of aberrated wavefronts across a homogeneous refractive index. The wavefront is represented by local surface normals, i.e., by a ray bundle, and the propagation is accomplished by transferring those rays across the space. Wavefront shape is generated from the slopes and positions of the collection of rays. Calculation methods are developed for the paraxial case, for higher-order expansions, and for the exact tangent case. A numerical example is used to compare results between an analytical method and the methods developed here. PMID:24979628

  6. Musculoskeletal modelling of muscle activation and applied external forces for the correction of scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study uses biomechanical modelling and computational optimization to investigate muscle activation in combination with applied external forces as a treatment for scoliosis. Bracing, which incorporates applied external forces, is the most popular non surgical treatment for scoliosis. Non surgical treatments which make use of muscle activation include electrical stimulation, postural control, and therapeutic exercises. Electrical stimulation has been largely dismissed as a viable treatment for scoliosis, although previous studies have suggested that it can potentially deliver similarly effective corrective forces to the spine as bracing. Methods The potential of muscle activation for scoliosis correction was investigated over different curvatures both with and without the addition of externally applied forces. The five King’s classifications of scoliosis were investigated over a range of Cobb angles. A biomechanical model of the spine was used to represent various scoliotic curvatures. Optimization was applied to the model to reduce the curves using combinations of both deep and superficial muscle activation and applied external forces. Results Simulating applied external forces in combination with muscle activation at low Cobb angles (< 20 degrees) over the 5 King’s classifications, it was possible to reduce the magnitude of the curve by up to 85% for classification 4, 75% for classifications 3 and 5, 65% for classification 2, and 60% for classification 1. The reduction in curvature was less at larger Cobb angles. For King’s classifications 1 and 2, the serratus, latissimus dorsi, and trapezius muscles were consistently recruited by the optimization algorithm for activation across all Cobb angles. When muscle activation and external forces were applied in combination, lower levels of muscle activation or less external force was required to reduce the curvature of the spine, when compared with either muscle activation or external force applied

  7. Quantitative Measurement of Protease-Activity with Correction of Probe Delivery and Tissue Absorption Effects

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Christopher D.; Reynolds, Fred; Tam, Jenny M.; Josephson, Lee; Mahmood, Umar

    2009-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of pathologies from heart disease to cancer. Quantitative measurement of protease activity is possible using a novel spectrally matched dual fluorophore probe and a small animal lifetime imager. The recorded fluorescence from an activatable fluorophore, one that changes its fluorescent amplitude after biological target interaction, is also influenced by other factors including imaging probe delivery and optical tissue absorption of excitation and emission light. Fluorescence from a second spectrally matched constant (non-activatable) fluorophore on each nanoparticle platform can be used to correct for both probe delivery and tissue absorption. The fluorescence from each fluorophore is separated using fluorescence lifetime methods. PMID:20161242

  8. Treg activation defect in type 1 diabetes: correction with TNFR2 agonism

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Yoshiaki; Torrey, Heather; Butterworth, John; Zheng, Hui; Faustman, Denise L

    2016-01-01

    Activated T-regulatory cells (aTregs) prevent or halt various forms of autoimmunity. We show that type 1 diabetics (T1D) have a Treg activation defect through an increase in resting Tregs (rTregs, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+CD45RA) and decrease in aTregs (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+CD45RO) (n= 55 T1D, n=45 controls, P=0.01). The activation defect persists life long in T1D subjects (T1D=45, controls=45, P=0.01, P=0.04). Lower numbers of aTregs had clinical significance because they were associated with a trend for less residual C-peptide secretion from the pancreas (P=0.08), and poorer HbA1C control (P=0.03). In humans, the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is obligatory for Treg induction, maintenance and expansion of aTregs. TNFR2 agonism is a method for stimulating Treg conversion from resting to activated. Using two separate in vitro expansion protocols, TNFR2 agonism corrected the T1D activation defect by triggering conversion of rTregs into aTregs (n=54 T1D, P<0.001). TNFR2 agonism was superior to standard protocols and TNF in proliferating Tregs. In T1D, TNFR2 agonist-expanded Tregs were homogeneous and functionally potent by virtue of suppressing autologous cytotoxic T cells in a dose-dependent manner comparable to controls. Targeting the TNFR2 receptor for Treg expansion in vitro demonstrates a means to correct the activation defect in T1D. PMID:26900470

  9. Application of adaptive optics to scintillation correction in phased array high-frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theurer, Timothy E.; Bristow, William A.

    2015-06-01

    At high frequency, diffraction during ionospheric propagation can yield wavefronts whose amplitude and phase fluctuate over the physical dimensions of phased array radars such as those of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). Distortion in the wavefront introduces amplitude and phase scintillation into the geometric beamformed signal while reducing radar performance in terms of angular resolution and achieved array gain. A scintillation correction algorithm based on adaptive optics techniques is presented. An experiment conducted using two SuperDARN radars is presented that quantifies the effect of wavefront distortion and demonstrates a reduction in observed scintillation and improvement in radar performance post scintillation correction.

  10. Biotransformation and adsorption of pharmaceutical and personal care products by activated sludge after correcting matrix effects.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Li, Bing; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong

    2016-02-15

    This study reported significant suppressive matrix effects in analyses of six pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in activated sludge, sterilized activated sludge and untreated sewage by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Quantitative matrix evaluation on selected PPCPs supplemented the limited quantification data of matrix effects on mass spectrometric determination of PPCPs in complex environment samples. The observed matrix effects were chemical-specific and matrix-dependent, with the most pronounced average effect (-55%) was found on sulfadiazine in sterilized activated sludge. After correcting the matrix effects by post-spiking known amount of PPCPs, the removal mechanisms and biotransformation kinetics of selected PPCPs in activated sludge system were revealed by batch experiment. Experimental data elucidated that the removal of target PPCPs in the activated sludge process was mainly by biotransformation while contributions of adsorption, hydrolysis and volatilization could be neglected. High biotransformation efficiency (52%) was observed on diclofenac while other three compounds (sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole and roxithromycin) were partially biotransformed by ~40%. The other two compounds, trimethoprim and carbamazepine, showed recalcitrant to biotransformation of the activated sludge. PMID:26706769

  11. Wavefront curvature of an opticaly pumped waveguide laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tacke, M.

    1983-05-01

    The influence of inhomogeneous gain on the wavefront shape is discussed for waveguide lasers. As an example, the curvature of the EH(11) mode of an optically pumped FIR laser is computed, its influence on the output beam is discussed.

  12. Wavefront shaping through emulated curved space in waveguide settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Chong; Bekenstein, Rivka; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-02-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in wavefront shaping, including shaping of beams in free space, of plasmonic wavepackets and of electronic wavefunctions. In all of these, the wavefront shaping was achieved by external means such as masks, gratings and reflection from metasurfaces. Here, we propose wavefront shaping by exploiting general relativity (GR) effects in waveguide settings. We demonstrate beam shaping within dielectric slab samples with predesigned refractive index varying so as to create curved space environment for light. We use this technique to construct very narrow non-diffracting beams and shape-invariant beams accelerating on arbitrary trajectories. Importantly, the beam transformations occur within a mere distance of 40 wavelengths, suggesting that GR can inspire any wavefront shaping in highly tight waveguide settings. In such settings, we demonstrate Einstein's Rings: a phenomenon dating back to 1936.

  13. Adaptive wavefront sensor based on the Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podanchuk, Dmytro V.; Kurashov, Vitaliy N.; Kovalenko, Andrey V.; Dan'ko, Volodymyr P.; Kotov, Myhailo M.; Goloborodko, Nataliya S.

    2015-11-01

    The possibilities of wavefront curvature measuring by Talbot sensor are theoretically and experimentally investigated. A new method of wavefront aberrations measurement is proposed and demonstrated. It is based on the observation of the Talbot effect when the diffraction grating is adapted to the wavefront curvature of the analyzed wave. Herewith, the observation plane stay fixed and corresponds to the Talbot length for a plane wave. It is shown that the measurement range can be made several times wider, with the help of the adaptive Talbot sensor, by retaining the required angular sensitivity. A possibility of self-reproduction of the rectangular grating (with different periods along the axes) by the astigmatic wavefront is experimentally demonstrated. The possibility of the experimental realization of the adaptive Talbot sensor using the dynamic spatial light modulator is demonstrated.

  14. Application of L3 technology to wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulloch, Simon M.

    2004-10-01

    The new L3 Technology CCDs from E2V combine sub-electron read noise with high pixel rates. This makes them ideal candidates for wavefront sensing. ING's NAOMI adaptive optics instrument is currently limited by the readout noise of its wavefront sensor CCDs. Upgrading to L3 detectors has the potential to give a large increase in performance; simulations suggest a 2 magnitude improvement to the guide star limit. At ING we have explored the behaviour of various L3 devices in applications ranging from fast photometry, fast spectroscopy through to wavefront sensing. The investigations have been done using our own cryogenic cameras containing L3 devices coupled to an SDSU controller. An integral Peltier packaged CCD60 has also been purchased specifically for the WFS upgrade. This paper describes the progress we have made to date on the L3 wavefront sensor upgrade and our future plans for its use with a Rayleigh laser beacon.

  15. Wavefront shaping through emulated curved space in waveguide settings

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Chong; Bekenstein, Rivka; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in wavefront shaping, including shaping of beams in free space, of plasmonic wavepackets and of electronic wavefunctions. In all of these, the wavefront shaping was achieved by external means such as masks, gratings and reflection from metasurfaces. Here, we propose wavefront shaping by exploiting general relativity (GR) effects in waveguide settings. We demonstrate beam shaping within dielectric slab samples with predesigned refractive index varying so as to create curved space environment for light. We use this technique to construct very narrow non-diffracting beams and shape-invariant beams accelerating on arbitrary trajectories. Importantly, the beam transformations occur within a mere distance of 40 wavelengths, suggesting that GR can inspire any wavefront shaping in highly tight waveguide settings. In such settings, we demonstrate Einstein's Rings: a phenomenon dating back to 1936. PMID:26899285

  16. Wavefront shaping through emulated curved space in waveguide settings.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chong; Bekenstein, Rivka; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in wavefront shaping, including shaping of beams in free space, of plasmonic wavepackets and of electronic wavefunctions. In all of these, the wavefront shaping was achieved by external means such as masks, gratings and reflection from metasurfaces. Here, we propose wavefront shaping by exploiting general relativity (GR) effects in waveguide settings. We demonstrate beam shaping within dielectric slab samples with predesigned refractive index varying so as to create curved space environment for light. We use this technique to construct very narrow non-diffracting beams and shape-invariant beams accelerating on arbitrary trajectories. Importantly, the beam transformations occur within a mere distance of 40 wavelengths, suggesting that GR can inspire any wavefront shaping in highly tight waveguide settings. In such settings, we demonstrate Einstein's Rings: a phenomenon dating back to 1936. PMID:26899285

  17. Zonal wavefront estimation using an array of hexagonal grating patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Biswajit E-mail: brboruah@iitg.ernet.in; Boruah, Bosanta R. E-mail: brboruah@iitg.ernet.in

    2014-10-15

    Accuracy of Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensors depends on the shape and layout of the lenslet array that samples the incoming wavefront. It has been shown that an array of gratings followed by a focusing lens provide a substitution for the lensslet array. Taking advantage of the computer generated holography technique, any arbitrary diffraction grating aperture shape, size or pattern can be designed with little penalty for complexity. In the present work, such a holographic technique is implemented to design regular hexagonal grating array to have zero dead space between grating patterns, eliminating the possibility of leakage of wavefront during the estimation of the wavefront. Tessellation of regular hexagonal shape, unlike other commonly used shapes, also reduces the estimation error by incorporating more number of neighboring slope values at an equal separation.

  18. Zonal wavefront estimation using an array of hexagonal grating patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2014-10-01

    Accuracy of Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensors depends on the shape and layout of the lenslet array that samples the incoming wavefront. It has been shown that an array of gratings followed by a focusing lens provide a substitution for the lensslet array. Taking advantage of the computer generated holography technique, any arbitrary diffraction grating aperture shape, size or pattern can be designed with little penalty for complexity. In the present work, such a holographic technique is implemented to design regular hexagonal grating array to have zero dead space between grating patterns, eliminating the possibility of leakage of wavefront during the estimation of the wavefront. Tessellation of regular hexagonal shape, unlike other commonly used shapes, also reduces the estimation error by incorporating more number of neighboring slope values at an equal separation.

  19. Manipulating Acoustic Wavefront by Inhomogeneous Impedance and Steerable Extraordinary Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators. PMID:23985717

  20. Manipulating acoustic wavefront by inhomogeneous impedance and steerable extraordinary reflection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators. PMID:23985717

  1. Manipulating Acoustic Wavefront by Inhomogeneous Impedance and Steerable Extraordinary Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-08-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators.

  2. Multi-layer surface profiling using gated wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Nordin, Nur Dalilla; Tik, Eddy Chow Mun; Tan, ChingSeong; Chew, Kuew Wai; Menoni, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Recently, multi-layer surface profiling and inspection has been considered an emerging topic that can be used to solve various manufacturing inspection problems, such as graded index lenses, TSV (Thru-Silicon Via), and optical coating. In our study, we proposed a gated wavefront sensing approach to estimate the multi-layer surface profile. In this paper, we set up an experimental platform to validate our theoretical models and methods. Our test bed consists of pulse laser, collimator, prism, well-defined focusing lens, testing specimen, and gated wavefront sensing assembly (e.g., lenslet and gated camera). Typical wavefront measurement steps are carried out for the gated system, except the reflectance is timed against its time of flight as well as its intensity profile. By synchronizing the laser pulses to the camera gate time, it is possible to discriminate a multi-layer wavefront from its neighbouring discrete layer reflections.

  3. Active optics correction forces for the VST 2.6m primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Perrotta, F.; Marty, L.

    2006-06-01

    In active optics systems obviously a fundamental role is played be the choice of polynomials to describe the primary mirror deformations. The well known Zernike polynomials are widely used because of their immediate interpretation in terms of optical aberrations. Nevertheless in an active optics correction system context, the choice of the so called "minimum energy modes" as the polynomials to represent the mechanical deformations is best justified by their derivation from mechanical properties. This is the approach followed for the 2.6m primary mirror of the VST telescope, to be hosted on top of the Cerro Paranal ESO observatory. The calibration forces to compensate a given amount of each aberration mode are computed and discussed.

  4. Correction: Chemopreventive activity of ellagitannins and their derivatives from black raspberry seeds on HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunnho; Jung, Hana; Lee, Heejae; Yi, Hae Chang; Kwak, Ho-Kyung; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2015-08-01

    Correction for 'Chemopreventive activity of ellagitannins and their derivatives from black raspberry seeds on HT-29 colon cancer cells' by Hyunnho Cho et al., Food Funct., 2015, 6, 1675-1683. PMID:26211477

  5. Correction: Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Manjula; Shaham-Waldmann, Nurit; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Rajeshwar, Krishnan; Paz, Yaron

    2016-09-14

    Correction for 'Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface' by Manjula Pandiri et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18575-18583. PMID:27509005

  6. Guaranteeing Failsafe Operation of Extended-Scene Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erikin

    2009-01-01

    A Shack-Hartmann sensor (SHS) is an optical instrument consisting of a lenslet array and a camera. It is widely used for wavefront sensing in optical testing and astronomical adaptive optics. The camera is placed at the focal point of the lenslet array and points at a star or any other point source. The image captured is an array of spot images. When the wavefront error at the lenslet array changes, the position of each spot measurably shifts from its original position. Determining the shifts of the spot images from their reference points shows the extent of the wavefront error. An adaptive cross-correlation (ACC) algorithm has been developed to use scenes as well as point sources for wavefront error detection. Qualifying an extended scene image is often not an easy task due to changing conditions in scene content, illumination level, background, Poisson noise, read-out noise, dark current, sampling format, and field of view. The proposed new technique based on ACC algorithm analyzes the effects of these conditions on the performance of the ACC algorithm and determines the viability of an extended scene image. If it is viable, then it can be used for error correction; if it is not, the image fails and will not be further processed. By potentially testing for a wide variety of conditions, the algorithm s accuracy can be virtually guaranteed. In a typical application, the ACC algorithm finds image shifts of more than 500 Shack-Hartmann camera sub-images relative to a reference sub -image or cell when performing one wavefront sensing iteration. In the proposed new technique, a pair of test and reference cells is selected from the same frame, preferably from two well-separated locations. The test cell is shifted by an integer number of pixels, say, for example, from m= -5 to 5 along the x-direction by choosing a different area on the same sub-image, and the shifts are estimated using the ACC algorithm. The same is done in the y-direction. If the resulting shift

  7. High contrast imaging with an arbitrary aperture: active correction of aperture discontinuities: fundamental limits and practical trade- offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Élodie; Hoffmann, Jordan; Carlotti, Alexis; Mawet, Dimitri

    2014-08-01

    We present a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach relies on using two sequential Deformable Mirrors to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and / or segment gaps. We solve the highly non-linear Monge-Ampere equation that is the fundamental equation describing the physics of phase induced amplitude modulation. We determine the optimum configuration for our two sequential Deformable Mirror system and show that high-throughput and high contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies. We name this process Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD). We show that for geometries similar to JWST, ACAD can attain at least 10-7 in contrast and an order of magnitude higher for future Extremely Large Telescopes, even when the pupil features a "missing segment" . Because the converging non-linear mappings resulting from our Deformable Mirror shapes damps near-field diffraction artifacts in the vicinity of the discontinuities this solution is particularly appealing in terms of spectral bandwidth. We present preliminary results that illustrate the performances of ACAD in the presence of diffraction for apertures for with secondary support structures of varying width and argue that the ultimate contrast achieved can by combining ACAD with modern wavefront control algorithms.

  8. Optical differentiation wavefront sensor based on binary pixelated transmission filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, J.; Travinsky, A.; Ding, G.; Dorrer, C.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution wavefront sensors are used in a wide range of applications. The Shack-Hartmann sensor is the industry standard and mostly used for this kind of analysis. However, with this sensor the analysis can only be performed for narrowband radiation, the recoverable curvature of the wavefront slopes is also restricted by the size of a single lens in the microlens array. The high-resolution Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (>128×128) is also significantly expensive. The optical differentiation wavefront sensor, on the other hand, consists of only simple and therefore inexpensive components, offers greater signal to noise ratio, allows for high-resolution analysis of wavefront curvature, and is potentially capable of performing broadband measurements. When a transmission mask with linear attenuation along a spatial direction modulates the far field of an optical wave, the spatial wavefront slope along that direction can be recovered from the fluence in the near field after modulation. With two orthogonal measurements one can recover the complete wavefront of the optical wave. In this study the characteristics of such a wavefront sensor are investigated when the linear transmission modulation is implemented with a pixelated binary filter. Such a filter can be produced as a gray-scale quasi-continuous transmission pattern constructed using arrays of small (e.g., 10-micron) transparent or opaque pixels and therefore it can simply be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques. Simulations demonstrate the potential ability of such a pixelated filter to match the performance of a filter with continuously varying transmission, while offering the advantage of better transmission control and reduction of fabrication costs.

  9. High frame-rate, large field wavefront sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Avicola, K.; Salmon, J.T.; Brase, J.; Waltjen, K.; Presta, R. ); Balch, K.S. )

    1992-03-01

    A two-stage intensified 192 {times} 239 pixel imager developed by Eastman Kodak for motion analysis was used to construct a 1 kHz frame-rate Hartmann wavefront sensor. The sensor uses a monolithic array of lenslets with a focal length that is adjusted by an index fluid between the convex surface and an optical flat. The accuracy of the calculated centroid position, which is related to wavefront measurement accuracy, was obtained as a function of spot power and spot size. The sensor was then dynamically tested at a 1 kHz frame-rate with a 9 {times} 9 lenslet array and a fast steering mirror, which swept a plane wavefront across the wavefront sensor. An 8 cm diameter subaperture will provide a return signal (589 nm) level of about 1000 photons/ms using the AVLIS 1 kW laser (stretched pulse) as guide star source, which is sufficient to yield a wavefront measurement of better than {gamma}/10 rms. If an area of 6 {times} 6 pixels per Hartmann spot were allocated, this wavefront sensor could support a 32 {times} 32, or 1024, element deformable mirror.

  10. Wave-front measurement errors from restricted concentric subdomains.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, K A; Geary, K

    2001-09-01

    In interferometry and optical testing, system wave-front measurements that are analyzed on a restricted subdomain of the full pupil can include predictable systematic errors. In nearly all cases, the measured rms wave-front error and the magnitudes of the individual aberration polynomial coefficients underestimate the wave-front error magnitudes present in the full-pupil domain. We present an analytic method to determine the relationships between the coefficients of aberration polynomials defined on the full-pupil domain and those defined on a restricted concentric subdomain. In this way, systematic wave-front measurement errors introduced by subregion selection are investigated. Using vector and matrix representations for the wave-front aberration coefficients, we generalize the method to the study of arbitrary input wave fronts and subdomain sizes. While wave-front measurements on a restricted subdomain are insufficient for predicting the wave front of the full-pupil domain, studying the relationship between known full-pupil wave fronts and subdomain wave fronts allows us to set subdomain size limits for arbitrary measurement fidelity. PMID:11551047

  11. Advanced wavefront measurement and analysis of laser system modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Auerback, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    High spatial resolution measurements of the reflected or transmitted wavefronts of large aperture optical components used in high peak power laser systems is now possible. These measurements are produced by phase shifting interferometry. The wavefront data is in the form of 3-D phase maps that reconstruct the wavefront shape. The emphasis of this work is on the characterization of wavefront features in the mid-spatial wavelength range (from 0.1 to 10.0 mm) and has been accomplished for the first time. Wavefront structure from optical components with spatial wavelengths in this range are of concern because their effects in high peak power laser systems. At high peak power, this phase modulation can convert to large magnitude intensity modulation by non-linear processes. This can lead to optical damage. We have developed software to input the measured phase map data into beam propagation codes in order to model this conversion process. We are analyzing this data to: (1) Characterize the wavefront structure produced by current optical components, (2) Refine our understanding of laser system performance, (3) Develop a database from which future optical component specifications can be derived.

  12. Asymmetric wavefront aberrations and pupillary shapes induced by electrical stimulation of ciliary nerve in cats measured with compact wavefront aberrometer.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Suguru; Mihashi, Toshifumi; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Hirohara, Yoko; Endo, Takao; Morimoto, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Fujikado, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the changes in the wavefront aberrations and pupillary shape in response to electrical stimulation of the branches of the ciliary nerves in cats. Seven eyes of seven cats were studied under general anesthesia. Trains of monophasic pulses (current, 0.1 to 1.0 mA; duration, 0.5 ms/phase; frequency, 5 to 40 Hz) were applied to the lateral or medial branch of the short ciliary nerve near the posterior pole of the eye. A pair of electrodes was hooked onto one or both branch of the short ciliary nerve. The electrodes were placed about 5 mm from the scleral surface. The wavefront aberrations were recorded continuously for 2 seconds before, 8 seconds during, and for 20 seconds after the electrical stimulation. The pupillary images were simultaneously recorded during the stimulation period. Both the wavefront aberrations and the pupillary images were obtained 10 times/sec with a custom-built wavefront aberrometer. The maximum accommodative amplitude was 1.19 diopters (D) produced by electrical stimulation of the short ciliary nerves. The latency of the accommodative changes was very short, and the accommodative level gradually increased up to 4 seconds and reached a plateau. When only one branch of the ciliary nerve was stimulated, the pupil dilated asymmetrically, and the oblique astigmatism and one of the asymmetrical wavefront terms was also altered. Our results showed that the wavefront aberrations and pupillary dilations can be measured simultaneously and serially with a compact wavefront aberrometer. The asymmetric pupil dilation and asymmetric changes of the wavefront aberrations suggest that each branch of the ciliary nerve innervates specific segments of the ciliary muscle and dilator muscle of the pupil. PMID:25144536

  13. Assisting people with multiple disabilities actively correct abnormal standing posture with a Nintendo Wii balance board through controlling environmental stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Shih, Ching-Tien; Chu, Chiung-Ling

    2010-01-01

    The latest researches adopted software technology turning the Nintendo Wii Balance Board into a high performance change of standing posture (CSP) detector, and assessed whether two persons with multiple disabilities would be able to control environmental stimulation using body swing (changing standing posture). This study extends Wii Balance Board functionality for standing posture correction (i.e., actively adjust abnormal standing posture) to assessed whether two persons with multiple disabilities would be able to actively correct their standing posture by controlling their favorite stimulation on/off using a Wii Balance Board with a newly developed standing posture correcting program (SPCP). The study was performed according to an ABAB design, in which A represented baseline and B represented intervention phases. Data showed that both participants significantly increased time duration of maintaining correct standing posture (TDMCSP) to activate the control system to produce environmental stimulation during the intervention phases. Practical and developmental implications of the findings were discussed. PMID:20381997

  14. Pharmacological activation of myosin II paralogs to correct cell mechanics defects.

    PubMed

    Surcel, Alexandra; Ng, Win Pin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ren, Yixin; Avery, Lindsay B; Krenc, Agata K; Meyers, David J; Rock, Ronald S; Anders, Robert A; Freel Meyers, Caren L; Robinson, Douglas N

    2015-02-01

    Current approaches to cancer treatment focus on targeting signal transduction pathways. Here, we develop an alternative system for targeting cell mechanics for the discovery of novel therapeutics. We designed a live-cell, high-throughput chemical screen to identify mechanical modulators. We characterized 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), which enhances the cortical localization of the mechanoenzyme myosin II, independent of myosin heavy-chain phosphorylation, thus increasing cellular cortical tension. To shift cell mechanics, 4-HAP requires myosin II, including its full power stroke, specifically activating human myosin IIB (MYH10) and human myosin IIC (MYH14), but not human myosin IIA (MYH9). We further demonstrated that invasive pancreatic cancer cells are more deformable than normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, a mechanical profile that was partially corrected with 4-HAP, which also decreased the invasion and migration of these cancer cells. Overall, 4-HAP modifies nonmuscle myosin II-based cell mechanics across phylogeny and disease states and provides proof of concept that cell mechanics offer a rich drug target space, allowing for possible corrective modulation of tumor cell behavior. PMID:25605895

  15. Pharmacological activation of myosin II paralogs to correct cell mechanics defects

    PubMed Central

    Surcel, Alexandra; Ng, Win Pin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ren, Yixin; Avery, Lindsay B.; Krenc, Agata K.; Meyers, David J.; Rock, Ronald S.; Anders, Robert A.; Freel Meyers, Caren L.; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to cancer treatment focus on targeting signal transduction pathways. Here, we develop an alternative system for targeting cell mechanics for the discovery of novel therapeutics. We designed a live-cell, high-throughput chemical screen to identify mechanical modulators. We characterized 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), which enhances the cortical localization of the mechanoenzyme myosin II, independent of myosin heavy-chain phosphorylation, thus increasing cellular cortical tension. To shift cell mechanics, 4-HAP requires myosin II, including its full power stroke, specifically activating human myosin IIB (MYH10) and human myosin IIC (MYH14), but not human myosin IIA (MYH9). We further demonstrated that invasive pancreatic cancer cells are more deformable than normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, a mechanical profile that was partially corrected with 4-HAP, which also decreased the invasion and migration of these cancer cells. Overall, 4-HAP modifies nonmuscle myosin II-based cell mechanics across phylogeny and disease states and provides proof of concept that cell mechanics offer a rich drug target space, allowing for possible corrective modulation of tumor cell behavior. PMID:25605895

  16. In-flight aberrations corrections for large space telescopes using active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Lemaitre, G.

    2010-07-01

    The need for both high quality images and light structures is a constant concern in the conception of space telescopes. The goal here is to determine how an active optics system could be embarked on a satellite in order to correct the wave front deformations of the optical train. The optical aberrations appearing in a space environment are due to mirrors' deformations, with three main origins: the thermal variations, the weightlessness in space with respect to the Assemblage, Integration and Testing (AIT) conditions on ground and the use of large weightlighted primary mirrors. We are developing a model of deformable mirror as minimalist as possible, especially in term of number of actuators, which is able to correct the first Zernike polynomials in the specified range of amplitude and precision. Flight constraints as weight, volume and power consumption have to be considered. Firstly, such a system is designed according to the equations from the elasticity theory: we determine the geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the mirror, the location of the forces to be applied and the way to apply them. The concept is validated with a Finite Element Analysis (FEA), allowing optimizing the system by taking into account parameters absent from the theory. At the end of the program the mirror will be realized and characterized in a representative optical configuration.

  17. Active correction of aperture discontinuities (ACAD) for space telescope pupils: a parametic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall; Choquet, Élodie; Carlotti, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    As the performance of coronagraphs improves, the achievable contrast is more and more dependent of the shape of the pupil. The future generation of space and ground based coronagraphic instruments will have to achieve high contrast levels on on-axis and/or segmented telescopes. To correct for the high amplitude aberrations introduced by secondary mirror structures and segmentation of the primary mirror, we explore a two deformable mirror (DM) method. The major difficulty of several DM methods is the non-linear relation linking actuator strokes to the point spread function in the coronagraph focal plane. The Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) method is achieving this minimization by solving a non linear differential Monge Ampere equation. Once this open loop method have reached the minimum, a close-loop stroke minimization method can be applied to correct for phase and amplitude aberrations to achieve the ultimate contrast. In this paper, I describe the results of the parametric analysis that that I have undertaken on this method. After recalling the principle of the method, I will described the explored parameter space (deformable mirror set-up, shape of the pupil, bandwidth, coronagraph designs). I will precisely described the way I simulated the Vortex coronagraph for this numerical simulation. Finally I will present the preliminary results of this parametric analysis for space telescope pupils only.

  18. THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2012-06-19

    Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of Gd

  19. Manipulation of wavefront using helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhaokun; Tao, Huan; Zhao, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Helical metamaterials, a kind of 3-dimensional structure, has relatively strong coupling effect among the helical nano-wires. Therefore, it is expected to be a good candidate for generating phase shift and controlling wavefront with high efficiency. In this paper, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we studied the phase shift properties in the helical metamaterials. It is found that the phase shift occurs for both transmitted and reflected light waves. And the maximum of reflection coefficients can reach over 60%. In addition, the phase shift (φ) is dispersionless in the range of 600 nm to 860 nm, that is, it is only dominated by the initial angle (θ) of the helix. The relationship between them is φ = ± 2θ. Using Jones calculus we give a further explanation for these properties. Finally, by arranging the helixes in an array with a constant phase gradient, the phenomenon of anomalous refraction was also observed in a broad wavelength range. PMID:27505790

  20. Improved estimation of solubility and partitioning through correction of UNIFAC-derived activity coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Howard, P.H.

    1988-07-01

    Octanol-water partition coefficients (K/sub ow/) of 75 compounds ranging over 9 orders of magnitude are correlated by log K/sub ow/ = -0.40 + 0.73 log (..gamma../sub W/)/sub U/ -0.39 log (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/ (r = 0.98), where (..gamma..//sub W/)/sub U/ and (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/ are UNIFAC-derived activity coefficients in water and octanol, respectively. The constants 0.73 and -0.39 are obtained empirically and are intended to compensate for group nonadditivity. Correction factors of similar magnitude are obtained in independent correlations of water solubility with (..gamma../sub W/)/sub U/ and of octanol solubility with (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/, thereby confirming the validity of the approach.

  1. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  2. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic{sup 18}F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R{sup 2} = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast.

  3. Subaperture test of wavefront error of large telescopes: error sources and stitching performance simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shanyong; Li, Shengyi; Wang, Guilin

    2014-11-01

    The wavefront error of large telescopes requires to be measured to check the system quality and also estimate the misalignment of the telescope optics including the primary, the secondary and so on. It is usually realized by a focal plane interferometer and an autocollimator flat (ACF) of the same aperture with the telescope. However, it is challenging for meter class telescopes due to high cost and technological challenges in producing the large ACF. Subaperture test with a smaller ACF is hence proposed in combination with advanced stitching algorithms. Major error sources include the surface error of the ACF, misalignment of the ACF and measurement noises. Different error sources have different impacts on the wavefront error. Basically the surface error of the ACF behaves like systematic error and the astigmatism will be cumulated and enlarged if the azimuth of subapertures remains fixed. It is difficult to accurately calibrate the ACF because it suffers considerable deformation induced by gravity or mechanical clamping force. Therefore a selfcalibrated stitching algorithm is employed to separate the ACF surface error from the subaperture wavefront error. We suggest the ACF be rotated around the optical axis of the telescope for subaperture test. The algorithm is also able to correct the subaperture tip-tilt based on the overlapping consistency. Since all subaperture measurements are obtained in the same imaging plane, lateral shift of the subapertures is always known and the real overlapping points can be recognized in this plane. Therefore lateral positioning error of subapertures has no impact on the stitched wavefront. In contrast, the angular positioning error changes the azimuth of the ACF and finally changes the systematic error. We propose an angularly uneven layout of subapertures to minimize the stitching error, which is very different from our knowledge. At last, measurement noises could never be corrected but be suppressed by means of averaging and

  4. In vivo correction of COX deficiency by activation of the AMPK/PGC-1α axis.

    PubMed

    Viscomi, Carlo; Bottani, Emanuela; Civiletto, Gabriele; Cerutti, Raffaele; Moggio, Maurizio; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Schon, Eric A; Lamperti, Costanza; Zeviani, Massimo

    2011-07-01

    Increased mitochondrial biogenesis by activation of PPAR- or AMPK/PGC-1α-dependent homeostatic pathways has been proposed as a treatment for mitochondrial disease. We tested this hypothesis on three recombinant mouse models characterized by defective cytochrome c-oxidase (COX) activity: a knockout (KO) mouse for Surf1, a knockout/knockin mouse for Sco2, and a muscle-restricted KO mouse for Cox15. First, we demonstrated that double-recombinant animals overexpressing PGC-1α in skeletal muscle on a Surf1 KO background showed robust induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and increase of mitochondrial respiratory chain activities, including COX. No such effect was obtained by treating both Surf1(-/-) and Cox15(-/-) mice with the pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate, which instead showed adverse effects in either model. Contrariwise, treatment with the AMPK agonist AICAR led to partial correction of COX deficiency in all three models, and, importantly, significant motor improvement up to normal in the Sco2(KO/KI) mouse. These results open new perspectives for therapy of mitochondrial disease. PMID:21723506

  5. Aligning a more than 100 degrees of freedom wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafatto, Luca; Bergomi, Maria; Brunelli, Alessandro; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Farisato, Giancarlo; Lessio, Luigi; Magrin, Demetrio; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Viotto, Valentina; Bertram, Thomas; Bizenberger, Peter; Brangier, Matthieu; Briegel, Florian; Conrad, Albert; De Bonis, Fulvio; Herbst, Tom; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer

    2012-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is the Fizeau beam combiner for the LBT, with the aim to retrieve the sensitivity of a 12m telescope and the spatial resolution of a 22.8m one. Despite being only one of the four wavefront sensors of a layer-oriented MCAO system, the GWS, which is retrieving the deformation introduced by the lower atmosphere, known to be the main aberration source, reveals a noticeable internal opto-mechanical complexity. The presence of 12 small devices used to select up to the same number of NGSs, with 3 optical components each, moving in a wide annular 2'-6' arcmin Field of View and sending the light to a common pupil re-imager, and the need to obtain and keep a very good super-imposition of the pupil images on the CCD camera, led to an overall alignment procedure in which more than a hundred of degrees of freedom have to be contemporary adjusted. The rotation of the entire WFS to compensate for the sky movement, moreover, introduces a further difficulty both in the alignment and in ensuring the required pupil superposition stability. A detailed description of the alignment procedure is presented here, together with the lessons learned managing the complexity of such a WFS, which led to considerations regarding future instruments, like a possible review of numerical versus optical co-add approach, above all if close to zero read-out noise detectors will be soon available. Nevertheless, the GWS AIV has been carried out and the system will be soon mounted at LBT to perform what is called the Pathfinder experiment, which consists in ground-layer correction, taking advantage of the Adaptive Secondary deformable Mirror.

  6. An adaptive optics approach for laser beam correction in turbulence utilizing a modified plenoptic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jonathan; Wu, Chensheng; Davis, Christopher C.

    2015-09-01

    Adaptive optics has been widely used in the field of astronomy to correct for atmospheric turbulence while viewing images of celestial bodies. The slightly distorted incoming wavefronts are typically sensed with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and then corrected with a deformable mirror. Although this approach has proven to be effective for astronomical purposes, a new approach must be developed when correcting for the deep turbulence experienced in ground to ground based optical systems. We propose the use of a modified plenoptic camera as a wavefront sensor capable of accurately representing an incoming wavefront that has been significantly distorted by strong turbulence conditions (C2n <10-13 m- 2/3). An intelligent correction algorithm can then be developed to reconstruct the perturbed wavefront and use this information to drive a deformable mirror capable of correcting the major distortions. After the large distortions have been corrected, a secondary mode utilizing more traditional adaptive optics algorithms can take over to fine tune the wavefront correction. This two-stage algorithm can find use in free space optical communication systems, in directed energy applications, as well as for image correction purposes.

  7. Beamlet pulse-generation and wavefront-control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Salmon, J.T.; Wilcox, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    The Beamlet pulse-generation system (or {open_quotes}front end{close_quotes}) refers to the laser hardware that generates the spatially and temporally shaped pulse that is injected into the main laser cavity. All large ICF lasers have pulse-generation systems that typically consist of a narrow-band oscillator, elector-optic modulators for temporal and bandwidth shaping, and one or more preamplifiers. Temporal shaping is used to provide the desired laser output pulse shape and also to compensate for gain saturation effects in the large-aperture amplifiers. Bandwidth is applied to fulfill specific target irradiation requirements and to avoid stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in large-aperture laser components. Usually the sharp edge of the beam`s spatial intensity profile is apodized before injection in the main amplifier beam line. This prevents large-amplitude ripples on the intensity profile. Here the authors briefly review the front-end design and discuss improvements to the oscillator and modulator systems. Their main focus, however, is to describe Beamlet`s novel beam-shaping and wavefront-control systems that have recently been fully activated and tested.

  8. Study on test metrology of large aperture optical system wavefront

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiying; Fu, Yuegang; Gao, Tianyuan; Wang, Zhijian

    2009-05-01

    Large aperture optical system test has been a key problem for a long time. It could be solved by sub-aperture stitching method after the sub-apertures are tested. Sub-aperture stitching technology is a feasible method for testing large diameter optical system with small diameter interferometer sub-aperture stitching. Auto-collimating component will be needed with interferometer stitching method. Auto-collimating component is defined that the image could be kept stable when the optical component rotates about any axis in space. And the beam could be back along original optical path. By this means, auto collimation could be realized. The auto-collimating component is smaller than the test system. The whole wavefront of large aperture system could be tested through the method that the auto-collimating component moves along the guide rail and rotates about optical axis. A right angle roof prism is chosen as the auto-collimating component due to its character of easier manufacture. The active matrix, characteristic orientation and extreme axial is deduced with dynamic optics. The sub-aperture stitching testing process is simulated by ZEMAX in detail. The test result by stitching method is compared with that by directive test method for large aperture optical system. It is shown that the relative test error is less than 4.3λ 0/00. The sub -aperture stitching test method is verified.

  9. Activity of red nucleus neurons in the cat during postural corrections

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, P. V.; Beloozerova, I. N.; Sirota, M. G.; Orlovsky, G. N.; Deliagina, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    The dorsal-side-up body posture in standing quadrupeds is maintained by the postural system, which includes spinal and supraspinal mechanisms driven by somatosensory inputs from the limbs. A number of descending tracts can transmit suprasinal commands for postural corrections. The first aim of this study was to understand whether the rubrospinal tract participates in their transmission. We recorded activity of red nucleus neurons (RNNs) in the cat maintaining balance on the periodically tilting platform. Most neurons were identified as rubrospinal ones. It was found that many RNNs were profoundly modulated by tilts, suggesting that they transmit postural commands. The second aim of this study was to examine the contribution of sensory inputs from individual limbs to posture-related RNNs modulation. Each RNN was recorded during standing on all four limbs, as well as when two or three limbs were lifted from the platform and could not signal platform displacements. By comparing RNN responses in different tests, we found that the amplitude and phase of responses in the majority of RNNs were determined primarily by sensory input from the corresponding (fore or hind) contralateral limb, whereas inputs from other limbs made a much smaller contribution to RNNs modulation. These findings suggest that the rubrospinal system is primarily involved in the intra-limb postural coordination, i.e., in the feedback control of the corresponding limb and, to a lesser extent, in the inter-limb coordination. This study provides a new insight into the formation of supraspinal motor commands for postural corrections. PMID:20980611

  10. Optical focusing in scattering media with photoacoustic wavefront shaping (PAWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Puxiang; Tay, Jian Wei; Wang, Lidai; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Controllable light delivery to the region of interest is essential to biomedical optical imaging methods like photoacoustic microscopy. It is, however, challenging beyond superficial depths in biological tissue (~1 mm beneath human skin) due to the strong scattering of light that scrambles the photon propagation paths. Recently, optical wavefront shaping has been proposed to modulate the incident light wavefront to compensate for the scattering-induced phase distortions, and consequentially, convey light optimally to a desired location behind or inside turbid media. To reach an optimum wavefront, a searching algorithm is usually required to optimize a feedback signal. In this work, we present our latest explorations, which use photoacoustic signals as the feedback to remotely and non-invasively guide the wavefront shaping process. Our method does not require direct optical access to the target region or the invasive embedding of fluorescence probes inside turbid media. Experimentally, we have demonstrated that diffuse light can be converged to the ultrasound focus by maximizing the amplitude of photoacoustic emissions from the intended absorbing site. Moreover, we show that wavefront-shaped light focusing can enhance existing optical imaging modalities like photoacoustic microscopy, in regard to signal-to-noise ratio, imaging depth, and potentially, resolution.

  11. Aero-optical jitter estimation using higher-order wavefronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Matthew R.; Goorskey, David J.; Drye, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Wavefront measurements from wind tunnel or flight testing of an optical system are affected by jitter sources due to the measurement platform, system vibrations, or aero-mechanical buffeting. Depending on the nature of the testing, the wavefront jitter will be a composite of several effects, one of which is the aero-optical jitter; i.e., the wavefront tilt due to random air density fluctuations. To isolate the aero-optical jitter component from recent testing, we have developed an estimation technique that uses only higher-order wavefront measurements to determine the jitter. By analogy with work done previously with free-stream turbulence, we have developed a minimum mean-square error estimator using higher-order wavefront modes to compute the current-frame tilt components through a linear operation. The estimator is determined from computational fluid dynamics evaluation of aero-optical disturbances, but does not depend on the strength of such disturbances. Applying this technique to turret flight test data, we found aero-optical jitter to be 7.7±0.8 μrad and to scale with (ρ/ρSL)M2 (˜1 μrad in the actual test cases examined). The half-power point of the aero-optical jitter variance was found to be ˜2u∞/Dt and to roll off in temporal frequency with a power law between f and f.

  12. Phase unwrapping with a virtual Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Akondi, Vyas; Falldorf, Claas; Marcos, Susana; Vohnsen, Brian

    2015-10-01

    The use of a spatial light modulator for implementing a digital phase-shifting (PS) point diffraction interferometer (PDI) allows tunability in fringe spacing and in achieving PS without the need for mechanically moving parts. However, a small amount of detector or scatter noise could affect the accuracy of wavefront sensing. Here, a novel method of wavefront reconstruction incorporating a virtual Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor is proposed that allows easy tuning of several wavefront sensor parameters. The proposed method was tested and compared with a Fourier unwrapping method implemented on a digital PS PDI. The rewrapping of the Fourier reconstructed wavefronts resulted in phase maps that matched well the original wrapped phase and the performance was found to be more stable and accurate than conventional methods. Through simulation studies, the superiority of the proposed virtual HS phase unwrapping method is shown in comparison with the Fourier unwrapping method in the presence of noise. Further, combining the two methods could improve accuracy when the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high. PMID:26480061

  13. Direct-Solve Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    A method of wavefront sensing (more precisely characterized as a method of determining the deviation of a wavefront from a nominal figure) has been invented as an improved means of assessing the performance of an optical system as affected by such imperfections as misalignments, design errors, and fabrication errors. The method is implemented by software running on a single-processor computer that is connected, via a suitable interface, to the image sensor (typically, a charge-coupled device) in the system under test. The software collects a digitized single image from the image sensor. The image is displayed on a computer monitor. The software directly solves for the wavefront in a time interval of a fraction of a second. A picture of the wavefront is displayed. The solution process involves, among other things, fast Fourier transforms. It has been reported to the effect that some measure of the wavefront is decomposed into modes of the optical system under test, but it has not been reported whether this decomposition is postprocessing of the solution or part of the solution process.

  14. Comparison of wavefront sensor models for simulation of adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiwen; Enmark, Anita; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Andersen, Torben

    2009-10-26

    The new generation of extremely large telescopes will have adaptive optics. Due to the complexity and cost of such systems, it is important to simulate their performance before construction. Most systems planned will have Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Different mathematical models are available for simulation of such wavefront sensors. The choice of wavefront sensor model strongly influences computation time and simulation accuracy. We have studied the influence of three wavefront sensor models on performance calculations for a generic, adaptive optics (AO) system designed for K-band operation of a 42 m telescope. The performance of this AO system has been investigated both for reduced wavelengths and for reduced r(0) in the K band. The telescope AO system was designed for K-band operation, that is both the subaperture size and the actuator pitch were matched to a fixed value of r(0) in the K-band. We find that under certain conditions, such as investigating limiting guide star magnitude for large Strehl-ratios, a full model based on Fraunhofer propagation to the subimages is significantly more accurate. It does however require long computation times. The shortcomings of simpler models based on either direct use of average wavefront tilt over the subapertures for actuator control, or use of the average tilt to move a precalculated point spread function in the subimages are most pronounced for studies of system limitations to operating parameter variations. In the long run, efficient parallelization techniques may be developed to overcome the problem. PMID:19997286

  15. Accelerated wavefront determination technique for optical imaging through scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hexiang; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront shaping applied on scattering light is a promising optical imaging method in biological systems. Normally, optimized modulation can be obtained by a Liquid-Crystal Spatial Light Modulator (LC-SLM) and CCD hardware iteration. Here we introduce an improved method for this optimization process. The core of the proposed method is to firstly detect the disturbed wavefront, and then to calculate the modulation phase pattern by computer simulation. In particular, phase retrieval method together with phase conjugation is most effective. In this way, the LC-SLM based system can complete the wavefront optimization and imaging restoration within several seconds which is two orders of magnitude faster than the conventional technique. The experimental results show good imaging quality and may contribute to real time imaging recovery in scattering medium.

  16. Wavefront optimized nonlinear microscopy of ex vivo human retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Bueno, Juan M.; Artal, Pablo

    2010-03-01

    A multiphoton microscope incorporating a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor to control the ultrafast laser beam's wavefront aberrations has been developed. This instrument allowed us to investigate the impact of the laser beam aberrations on two-photon autofluorescence imaging of human retinal tissues. We demonstrated that nonlinear microscopy images are improved when laser beam aberrations are minimized by realigning the laser system cavity while wavefront controlling. Nonlinear signals from several human retinal anatomical features have been detected for the first time, without the need of fixation or staining procedures. Beyond the improved image quality, this approach reduces the required excitation power levels, minimizing the side effects of phototoxicity within the imaged sample. In particular, this may be important to study the physiology and function of the healthy and diseased retina.

  17. Hartmann wavefront sensors and their application at FLASH.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Barbara; Plönjes, Elke; Kreis, Svea; Kuhlmann, Marion; Tiedtke, Kai; Mey, Tobias; Schäfer, Bernd; Mann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Different types of Hartmann wavefront sensors are presented which are usable for a variety of applications in the soft X-ray spectral region at FLASH, the free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg. As a typical application, online measurements of photon beam parameters during mirror alignment are reported on. A compact Hartmann sensor, operating in the wavelength range from 4 to 38 nm, was used to determine the wavefront quality as well as aberrations of individual FEL pulses during the alignment procedure. Beam characterization and alignment of the focusing optics of the FLASH beamline BL3 were performed with λ(13.5 nm)/116 accuracy for wavefront r.m.s. (w(rms)) repeatability, resulting in a reduction of w(rms) by 33% during alignment. PMID:26698044

  18. Miniaturized Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors for starbugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Michael; Richards, Samuel; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Argyros, Alexander; Alcalde, Belen

    2014-07-01

    The ability to position multiple miniaturized wavefront sensors precisely over large focal surfaces are advantageous to multi-object adaptive optics. The Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO) has prototyped a compact and lightweight Shack-Hartmann wavefront-sensor that fits into a standard Starbug parallel fibre positioning robot. Each device makes use of a polymer coherent fibre imaging bundle to relay an image produced by a microlens array placed at the telescope focal plane to a re-imaging camera mounted elsewhere. The advantages of the polymer fibre bundle are its high-fill factor, high-throughput, low weight, and relatively low cost. Multiple devices can also be multiplexed to a single lownoise camera for cost efficiencies per wavefront sensor. The use of fibre bundles also opens the possibility of applications such as telescope field acquisition, guiding, and seeing monitors to be positioned by Starbugs. We present the design aspects, simulations and laboratory test results.

  19. Reflected wavefront manipulation based on ultrathin planar acoustic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Gu, Zhong-ming; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of metasurfaces has renewed the Snell's law and opened up new degrees of freedom to tailor the optical wavefront at will. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the generalized Snell's law can be achieved for reflected acoustic waves based on ultrathin planar acoustic metasurfaces. The metasurfaces are constructed with eight units of a solid structure to provide discrete phase shifts covering the full 2π span with steps of π/4 by coiling up the space. By careful selection of the phase profiles in the transverse direction of the metasurfaces, some fascinating wavefront engineering phenomena are demonstrated, such as anomalous reflections, conversion of propagating waves into surface waves, planar aberration-free lens and nondiffracting Bessel beam generated by planar acoustic axicon. Our results could open up a new avenue for acoustic wavefront engineering and manipulations. PMID:23986034

  20. Wavefront Sensing for WFIRST with a Linear Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurling, Alden S.; Content, David A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop methods to use a linear optical model to capture the field dependence of wavefront aberrations in a nonlinear optimization-based phase retrieval algorithm for image-based wavefront sensing. The linear optical model is generated from a ray trace model of the system and allows the system state to be described in terms of mechanical alignment parameters rather than wavefront coefficients. This approach allows joint optimization over images taken at different field points and does not require separate convergence of phase retrieval at individual field points. Because the algorithm exploits field diversity, multiple defocused images per field point are not required for robustness. Furthermore, because it is possible to simultaneously fit images of many stars over the field, it is not necessary to use a fixed defocus to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratio despite having images with high dynamic range. This allows high performance wavefront sensing using in-focus science data. We applied this technique in a simulation model based on the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Intermediate Design Reference Mission (IDRM) imager using a linear optical model with 25 field points. We demonstrate sub-thousandth-wave wavefront sensing accuracy in the presence of noise and moderate undersampling for both monochromatic and polychromatic images using 25 high-SNR target stars. Using these high-quality wavefront sensing results, we are able to generate upsampled point-spread functions (PSFs) and use them to determine PSF ellipticity to high accuracy in order to reduce the systematic impact of aberrations on the accuracy of galactic ellipticity determination for weak-lensing science.

  1. Study of an instrument for sensing errors in a telescope wavefront

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, P. N.

    1974-01-01

    Focal plane sensors for determining the error in a telescope wavefront were investigated. The construction of three candidate test instruments and their evaluation in terms of small wavefront error aberration measurements are described. A laboratory wavefront simulator was designed and fabricated to evaluate the test instruments. The laboratory wavefront error simulator was used to evaluate three tests; a Hartmann test, a polarization shearing interferometer test, and an interferometric Zernike test.

  2. Control of Dual-Opposed Stirling Convertors with Active Power Factor Correction Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    When using recently-developed active power factor correction (APFC) controllers in power systems comprised of dual-opposed free-piston Stirling convertors, a variety of configurations of the convertors and controller(s) can be considered, with configuration ultimately selected based on benefits of efficiency, reliability, and robust operation. The configuration must not only achieve stable control of the two convertors, but also synchronize and regulate motion of the pistons to minimize net dynamic forces. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) System Dynamic Model (SDM) was used to study ten configurations of dual-opposed convertor systems. These configurations considered one controller with the alternators connected in series or in parallel, and two controllers with the alternators not connected (isolated). For the configurations where the alternators were not connected, several different approaches were evaluated to synchronize the two convertors. In addition, two thermodynamic configurations were considered: two convertors with isolated working spaces and convertors with a shared expansion space. Of the ten configurations studied, stable operating modes were found for four. Three of those four had a common expansion space. One stable configuration was found for the dual-opposed convertors with separate working spaces. That configuration required isochronous control of both convertors, and two APFC controllers were used to accomplish this. A frequency/phase control loop was necessary to allow each APFC controller to synchronize its associated convertor with a common frequency.

  3. Control of Dual-Opposed Stirling Convertors with Active Power Factor Correction Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    When using recently-developed active power factor correction (APFC) controllers in power systems comprised of dual-opposed free-piston Stirling convertors, a variety of configurations of the convertors and controller(s) can be considered, with configuration ultimately selected based on benefits of efficiency, reliability, and robust operation. The configuration must not only achieve stable control of the two convertors, but also synchronize and regulate motion of the pistons to minimize net dynamic forces. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) System Dynamic Model (SDM) was used to study ten configurations of dual-opposed convertor systems. These configurations considered one controller with the alternators connected in series or in parallel, and two controllers with the alternators not connected (isolated). For the configurations where the alternators were not connected, several different approaches were evaluated to synchronize the two convertors. In addition, two thermodynamic configurations were considered: two convertors with isolated working spaces and convertors with a shared expansion space. Of the ten configurations studied, stable operating modes were found for four. Three of those four had a common expansion space. One stable configuration was found for the dual-opposed convertors with separate working spaces. That configuration required isochronous control of both convertors, and two APFC controllers were used to accomplish this. A frequency/phase control loop was necessary to allow each APFC controller to synchronize its associated convertor with a common frequency.

  4. Subwavelength-grating-induced wavefront aberrations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Karlton; Chipman, Russell A.

    2007-01-01

    The on-axis wavefront aberrations of a one-dimensional sub-wavelength grating anti-reflection coating on a f/1.7 lens surface is dominated by defocus, astigmatism, and piston. The astigmatism is 0.02 waves and the magnitude of the piston approaches 1 wave peak-to-valley. The difference in aberrations between orthogonally polarized wavefronts, or the retardance aberration, shows 0.01 waves of astigmatism like variation and more than 0.01 waves of retardance induced defocus like variation.

  5. Broadband manipulation of acoustic wavefronts by pentamode metasurface

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Wei, Qi Cheng, Ying; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-11-30

    An acoustic metasurface with a sub-wavelength thickness can manipulate acoustic wavefronts freely by the introduction of abrupt phase variation. However, the existence of a narrow bandwidth and a low transmittance limits further applications. Here, we present a broadband and highly transparent acoustic metasurface based on a frequency-independent generalized acoustic Snell's law and pentamode metamaterials. The proposal employs a gradient velocity to redirect refracted waves and pentamode metamaterials to improve impedance matching between the metasurface and the background medium. Excellent wavefront manipulation based on the metasurface is further demonstrated by anomalous refraction, generation of non-diffracting Bessel beam, and sub-wavelength flat focusing.

  6. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with adaptive holographic lenslet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podanchuk, Dmytro V.; Dan'ko, Volodymyr P.; Goloborodko, Andrey A.; Sutyagina, Natalia S.

    2009-10-01

    The method of the dynamic range expansion of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is discussed. It's based on the use of nonlinear dual focus holographic lenslet arrays with the aberration precompensation. The data concerning the optical setup and the technique of adaptive lenslet array producing based on nonlinear holographic recording phenomenon are represented. On the example of spherical wavefronts it is shown, that the use of three lenslet arrays with different amount of the aberration precompensation allows expanding approximately in five times the dynamic range of the sensor four times greater with preserving the specified sensitivity in comparison with the corresponding refractive lenslet array.

  7. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.; Michie, R.B.

    1996-02-20

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems. 8 figs.

  8. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.; Michie, Robert B.

    1996-01-01

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems.

  9. Broadband manipulation of acoustic wavefronts by pentamode metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-11-01

    An acoustic metasurface with a sub-wavelength thickness can manipulate acoustic wavefronts freely by the introduction of abrupt phase variation. However, the existence of a narrow bandwidth and a low transmittance limits further applications. Here, we present a broadband and highly transparent acoustic metasurface based on a frequency-independent generalized acoustic Snell's law and pentamode metamaterials. The proposal employs a gradient velocity to redirect refracted waves and pentamode metamaterials to improve impedance matching between the metasurface and the background medium. Excellent wavefront manipulation based on the metasurface is further demonstrated by anomalous refraction, generation of non-diffracting Bessel beam, and sub-wavelength flat focusing.

  10. Stationary phase analysis of generalized cubic phase mask wavefront coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Hui, Mei; Jia, Wei

    2013-07-01

    The modified generalized cubic phase mask (GCPM) has recently been applied in wavefront coding systems including infrared imaging and microscopy. In this paper, the stationary phase method is employed to analyze the GCPM characteristics. The SPA of the modulation transfer function (MTF) under misfocus aberration is derived for a wavefront coding system with a GCPM. The approximation corresponds with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach. On the basis of this approximation, we compare the characteristics of GCPM and cubic phase masks (CPM). A GCPM design approach based on stationary phase approximation is presented which helps to determine the initial parameter of phase mask, significantly decreasing the computational time required for numerical simulation.

  11. Generation of atmospheric wavefronts using binary micromirror arrays.

    PubMed

    Anzuola, Esdras; Belmonte, Aniceto

    2016-04-10

    To simulate in the laboratory the influence that a turbulent atmosphere has on light beams, we introduce a practical method for generating atmospheric wavefront distortions that considers digital holographic reconstruction using a programmable binary micromirror array. We analyze the efficiency of the approach for different configurations of the micromirror array and experimentally demonstrate the benchtop technique. Though the mirrors on the digital array can only be positioned in one of two states, we show that the holographic technique can be used to devise a wide variety of atmospheric wavefront aberrations in a controllable and predictable way for a fraction of the cost of phase-only spatial light modulators. PMID:27139872

  12. Response analysis of holography-based modal wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shihao; Haist, Tobias; Osten, Wolfgang; Ruppel, Thomas; Sawodny, Oliver

    2012-03-20

    The crosstalk problem of holography-based modal wavefront sensing (HMWS) becomes more severe with increasing aberration. In this paper, crosstalk effects on the sensor response are analyzed statistically for typical aberrations due to atmospheric turbulence. For specific turbulence strength, we optimized the sensor by adjusting the detector radius and the encoded phase bias for each Zernike mode. Calibrated response curves of low-order Zernike modes were further utilized to improve the sensor accuracy. The simulation results validated our strategy. The number of iterations for obtaining a residual RMS wavefront error of 0.1λ is reduced from 18 to 3. PMID:22441478

  13. Multi time-step wavefront reconstruction for tomographic adaptive-optics systems.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoshito H; Akiyama, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Lardiére, Olivier; Andersen, David R; Correia, Carlos; Jackson, Kate; Bradley, Colin

    2016-04-01

    In tomographic adaptive-optics (AO) systems, errors due to tomographic wavefront reconstruction limit the performance and angular size of the scientific field of view (FoV), where AO correction is effective. We propose a multi time-step tomographic wavefront reconstruction method to reduce the tomographic error by using measurements from both the current and previous time steps simultaneously. We further outline the method to feed the reconstructor with both wind speed and direction of each turbulence layer. An end-to-end numerical simulation, assuming a multi-object AO (MOAO) system on a 30 m aperture telescope, shows that the multi time-step reconstruction increases the Strehl ratio (SR) over a scientific FoV of 10 arc min in diameter by a factor of 1.5-1.8 when compared to the classical tomographic reconstructor, depending on the guide star asterism and with perfect knowledge of wind speeds and directions. We also evaluate the multi time-step reconstruction method and the wind estimation method on the RAVEN demonstrator under laboratory setting conditions. The wind speeds and directions at multiple atmospheric layers are measured successfully in the laboratory experiment by our wind estimation method with errors below 2  ms-1. With these wind estimates, the multi time-step reconstructor increases the SR value by a factor of 1.2-1.5, which is consistent with a prediction from the end-to-end numerical simulation. PMID:27140785

  14. Intelligent error correction method applied on an active pixel sensor based star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    Star trackers are opto-electronic sensors used on-board of satellites for the autonomous inertial attitude determination. During the last years star trackers became more and more important in the field of the attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) sensors. High performance star trackers are based up today on charge coupled device (CCD) optical camera heads. The active pixel sensor (APS) technology, introduced in the early 90-ties, allows now the beneficial replacement of CCD detectors by APS detectors with respect to performance, reliability, power, mass and cost. The company's heritage in star tracker design started in the early 80-ties with the launch of the worldwide first fully autonomous star tracker system ASTRO1 to the Russian MIR space station. Jena-Optronik recently developed an active pixel sensor based autonomous star tracker "ASTRO APS" as successor of the CCD based star tracker product series ASTRO1, ASTRO5, ASTRO10 and ASTRO15. Key features of the APS detector technology are, a true xy-address random access, the multiple windowing read out and the on-chip signal processing including the analogue to digital conversion. These features can be used for robust star tracking at high slew rates and under worse conditions like stray light and solar flare induced single event upsets. A special algorithm have been developed to manage the typical APS detector error contributors like fixed pattern noise (FPN), dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU) and white spots. The algorithm works fully autonomous and adapts to e.g. increasing DSNU and up-coming white spots automatically without ground maintenance or re-calibration. In contrast to conventional correction methods the described algorithm does not need calibration data memory like full image sized calibration data sets. The application of the presented algorithm managing the typical APS detector error contributors is a key element for the design of star trackers for long term satellite applications like

  15. Wavefront-Guided Laser in Situ Keratomileusis (Lasik) versus Wavefront-Guided Photorefractive Keratectomy (Prk): A Prospective Randomized Eye-to-Eye Comparison (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Manche, Edward E.; Haw, Weldon W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare the safety and efficacy of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) vs photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in a prospective randomized clinical trial. Methods A cohort of 68 eyes of 34 patients with −0.75 to −8.13 diopters (D) of myopia (spherical equivalent) were randomized to receive either wavefront-guided PRK or LASIK in the fellow eye using the VISX CustomVue laser. Patients were evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, and months 1, 3, 6, and 12. Results At 1 month, uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), 5% and 25% contrast sensitivity, induction of higher-order aberrations (HOAs), and subjective symptoms of vision clarity, vision fluctuation, ghosting, and overall self-assessment of vision were worse (P<0.05) in the PRK group. By 3 months, these differences had resolved (P>0.05). At 1 year, mean spherical equivalent was reduced 94% to −0.27 ± 0.31 D in the LASIK group and reduced 96% to −0.17 ± 0.41 D in the PRK group. At 1 year, 91% of eyes were within ±0.50 D and 97 % were within ±1.0 D in the PRK group. At 1 year, 88% of eyes were within ±0.50 D and 97% were within ±1.0 D in the LASIK group. At 1 year, 97% of eyes in the PRK group and 94% of eyes in the LASIK group achieved an UCVA of 20/20 or better (P=0.72). Refractive stability was achieved in both PRK and LASIK groups after 1 month. There were no intraoperative or postoperative flap complications in the LASIK group. There were no instances of corneal haze in the PRK group. Conclusions Wavefront-guided LASIK and PRK are safe and effective at reducing myopia. At 1 month postoperatively, LASIK demonstrates an advantage over PRK in UCVA, BSCVA, low-contrast acuity, induction of total HOAs, and several subjective symptoms. At postoperative month 3, these differences between PRK and LASIK results had resolved. PMID:22253488

  16. Case study of an approved corrective action integrating active remediation with intrinsic remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Teets, D.B.; Guest, P.R.; Blicker, B.R.

    1996-12-01

    Parsons Engineering Science, Inc., performed UST removals and/or site assessments at UST system locations at a former US Air Force Base (AFB) in Denver, Colorado. Four UST systems, incorporating 17 USTs, were located within the petroleum, oils, and lubricants bulk storage yard (POL Yard) of the former AFB. During the tank removals and subsequent site investigations, petroleum hydrocarbon contamination was found in soils at each site. Significant releases from two of the UST systems resulted in a dissolved benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) plume in the groundwater, and smear-zone contamination of soils beneath the majority of the POL Yard. Because of the close proximity of the UST systems, and the presence of the groundwater plume beneath the POL Yard, a corrective action plan (CAP) was prepared that encompassed all four UST systems. An innovative, risk-based CAP integrated active remediation of petroleum-contaminated soils with intrinsic remediation of groundwater. A natural attenuation evaluation for the dissolved BTEX was performed to demonstrate that natural attenuation processes are providing adequate remediation of groundwater and to predict the fate of the groundwater plume. BTEX concentrations versus distance were regressed to obtain attenuation rates, which were then used to calculate BTEX degradation rates using a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical solution. Additionally, electron acceptor concentrations in groundwater were compared to BTEX concentrations to provide evidence that natural attenuation of BTEX compounds was occurring. The natural attenuation evaluation was used in the CAP to support the intrinsic remediation with long-term monitoring alternative for groundwater, thereby avoiding the installation of an expensive groundwater remediation system.

  17. Two Improved Algorithms for Envelope and Wavefront Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumfert, Gary; Pothen, Alex

    1997-01-01

    Two algorithms for reordering sparse, symmetric matrices or undirected graphs to reduce envelope and wavefront are considered. The first is a combinatorial algorithm introduced by Sloan and further developed by Duff, Reid, and Scott; we describe enhancements to the Sloan algorithm that improve its quality and reduce its run time. Our test problems fall into two classes with differing asymptotic behavior of their envelope parameters as a function of the weights in the Sloan algorithm. We describe an efficient 0(nlogn + m) time implementation of the Sloan algorithm, where n is the number of rows (vertices), and m is the number of nonzeros (edges). On a collection of test problems, the improved Sloan algorithm required, on the average, only twice the time required by the simpler Reverse Cuthill-Mckee algorithm while improving the mean square wavefront by a factor of three. The second algorithm is a hybrid that combines a spectral algorithm for envelope and wavefront reduction with a refinement step that uses a modified Sloan algorithm. The hybrid algorithm reduces the envelope size and mean square wavefront obtained from the Sloan algorithm at the cost of greater running times. We illustrate how these reductions translate into tangible benefits for frontal Cholesky factorization and incomplete factorization preconditioning.

  18. Wavefront error simulator for evaluating optical testing instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    A wavefront error simulator has been designed and fabricated to evaluate experimentally test instrumentation for the Large Space Telescope (LST) program. The principal operating part of the simulator is an aberration generator that introduces low-order aberrations of several waves magnitude with an incremented adjustment capability of lambda/100. Each aberration type can be introduced independently with any desired spatial orientation.

  19. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  20. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  1. Effects of Active Student Response during Error Correction on the Acquisition, Maintenance, and Generalization of Science Vocabulary by Elementary Students: A Systematic Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drevno, Gregg E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study compared active student response (ASR) error correction and no-response (NR) error correction while teaching science terms to five elementary students. When a student erred, the teacher modeled the definition and the student either repeated it (ASR) or not (NR). ASR error correction was superior on each of seven dependent variables.…

  2. Design of an input filter for power factor correction (PFC) AC to DC converters employing an active ripple cancellation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.Y.; Cho, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    An active input filter for power factor correction (PFC) circuit employing ripple current cancellation is proposed to reduce the filter`s size and cost.Switching ripple current can be filtered by an active circuit from the line current. A single stage passive filter with the active filter compensation circuit, a high filter can be synthesized to meet the electromagnetic interference (EMI) and power factor requirements. Analysis of the active filter and design procedure are detailed. Simulation result is presented to verify the high order filter characteristics of proposed scheme.

  3. Wavefront Derived Refraction and Full Eye Biometry in Pseudophakic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xinjie; Banta, James T.; Ke, Bilian; Jiang, Hong; He, Jichang; Liu, Che; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess wavefront derived refraction and full eye biometry including ciliary muscle dimension and full eye axial geometry in pseudophakic eyes using spectral domain OCT equipped with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Methods Twenty-eight adult subjects (32 pseudophakic eyes) having recently undergone cataract surgery were enrolled in this study. A custom system combining two optical coherence tomography systems with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was constructed to image and monitor changes in whole eye biometry, the ciliary muscle and ocular aberration in the pseudophakic eye. A Badal optical channel and a visual target aligning with the wavefront sensor were incorporated into the system for measuring the wavefront-derived refraction. The imaging acquisition was performed twice. The coefficients of repeatability (CoR) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated. Results Images were acquired and processed successfully in all patients. No significant difference was detected between repeated measurements of ciliary muscle dimension, full-eye biometry or defocus aberration. The CoR of full-eye biometry ranged from 0.36% to 3.04% and the ICC ranged from 0.981 to 0.999. The CoR for ciliary muscle dimensions ranged from 12.2% to 41.6% and the ICC ranged from 0.767 to 0.919. The defocus aberrations of the two measurements were 0.443 ± 0.534 D and 0.447 ± 0.586 D and the ICC was 0.951. Conclusions The combined system is capable of measuring full eye biometry and refraction with good repeatability. The system is suitable for future investigation of pseudoaccommodation in the pseudophakic eye. PMID:27010674

  4. Muscle activation characteristics of the front leg during baseball swings with timing correction for sudden velocity decrease.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings. PMID:25918848

  5. Muscle Activation Characteristics of the Front Leg During Baseball Swings with Timing Correction for Sudden Velocity Decrease

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings. PMID:25918848

  6. Measuring aberrations in the rat brain by coherence-gated wavefront sensing using a Linnik interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyu; Léger, Jean-François; Binding, Jonas; Boccara, A. Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations limit the resolution, signal intensity and achievable imaging depth in microscopy. Coherence-gated wavefront sensing (CGWS) allows the fast measurement of aberrations in scattering samples and therefore the implementation of adaptive corrections. However, CGWS has been demonstrated so far only in weakly scattering samples. We designed a new CGWS scheme based on a Linnik interferometer and a SLED light source, which is able to compensate dispersion automatically and can be implemented on any microscope. In the highly scattering rat brain tissue, where multiply scattered photons falling within the temporal gate of the CGWS can no longer be neglected, we have measured known defocus and spherical aberrations up to a depth of 400 µm. PMID:23082292

  7. Sensing the wavefront of x-ray free-electron lasers using aerosol spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, N.Duane; Starodub, Dimitri; Lomb, Lukas; Hampton, Christina Y.; Martin, Andrew V.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Rudek, Benedikt; Foucar, Lutz

    2014-04-22

    Characterizing intense, focused x-ray free electron laser (FEL) pulses is crucial for their use in diffractive imaging. We describe how the distribution of average phase tilts and intensities on hard x-ray pulses with peak intensities of 10 21 W/m2 can be retrieved from an ensemble of diffraction patterns produced by 70 nm-radius polystyrene spheres, in a manner that mimics wave-front sensors. Besides showing that an adaptive geometric correction may be necessary for diffraction data from randomly injected sample sources, the paper demonstrates the possibility of collecting statistics on structured pulses using only the diffraction patterns they generate and highlights the imperative to study its impact on single-particle diffractive imaging.

  8. High contrast imaging with an arbitrary aperture: active correction of aperture discontinuities: fundamental limits and practical trades offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin Arthur; Soummer, Remi; Perrin, Marshall D.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper we discussed a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach, named Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) relies on two sequential Deformable Mirrors to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of Deformable Mirror Surfaces that yield high contrast Point Spread Functions is not linear, and non-linear methods are needed to find the true minimum. In particular we showed that broadband high contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies for a variety of telescope pupil geometries. In this paper we first focus on the fundamental limits and practical trade-offs associated with ACAD. In a first part we will study the fundamental limits and practical tradeoffs associated with ACAD, regardless of the downstream coronagraphic architecture. The mathematical techniques to finding ACAD DM shapes require to solve a complex differential equation. We will first discuss the scaling laws underlying this non-linear solution and their impact of DM placement and geometry wishing the optical design of an instrument. We will then consider the sensitivity to low order aberrations: in principle an ACAD solution that comprises large strokes will be more sensitive to these aberrations than one with smaller strokes. As a consequence, we will quantify this sensitive both using analytical models and numerical simulations. We will present diffractive end to end simulations and quantify the ultimate contrast and bandwidth achievable with ACAD, which can be reached by superposing using a classical linear wavefront control algorithms on top of the Monge Ampere solution. Finally, recent work has shown that coronagraph designs can also accommodate for secondary support structures and/or segments gaps, at a

  9. 78 FR 9455 - Agency Information Collection (eBenefits Portal) Activity Under OMB Review; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ...The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) published a collection of information notice in the Federal Register on January 31, 2013, that contained an error. The notice incorrectly identified the responsible VA organization. This document corrects that error by removing ``Office of Information and Technology'' and adding, in its place, ``Veterans Benefits...

  10. 78 FR 46003 - Agency Information Collection (Special Notice) Activities Under OMB Review; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... Register on July 16, 2013 (78 FR 42593), that contained several errors. The notice announced that the...., Washington, DC 20420, at (202) 632-7492. Correction In FR Doc. 2013-17023, published on July 16, 2013, at... have removed ``(previously 852.210-74)'' from the title. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  11. 76 FR 9611 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Friday. Correction In the Federal Register of January 31, 2011, in FR Doc. 2011-1960, on page 5406, first... in the Federal Register of January 31, 2011, in FR Doc. 2011- 1960, on page 5407, third column... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE...

  12. 75 FR 26962 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ..., Washington, DC 20580, (202) 326-2509. Correction In the Federal Register of April 15, 2010, in FR Doc. 2010... information collection requirements associated with the Contact Lens Rule (the Rule), 16 CFR part 315. The...-0127. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information or copies of the...

  13. Broadband Phase Retrieval for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A focus-diverse phase-retrieval algorithm has been shown to perform adequately for the purpose of image-based wavefront sensing when (1) broadband light (typically spanning the visible spectrum) is used in forming the images by use of an optical system under test and (2) the assumption of monochromaticity is applied to the broadband image data. Heretofore, it had been assumed that in order to obtain adequate performance, it is necessary to use narrowband or monochromatic light. Some background information, including definitions of terms and a brief description of pertinent aspects of image-based phase retrieval, is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of the present development. Phase retrieval is a general term used in optics to denote estimation of optical imperfections or aberrations of an optical system under test. The term image-based wavefront sensing refers to a general class of algorithms that recover optical phase information, and phase-retrieval algorithms constitute a subset of this class. In phase retrieval, one utilizes the measured response of the optical system under test to produce a phase estimate. The optical response of the system is defined as the image of a point-source object, which could be a star or a laboratory point source. The phase-retrieval problem is characterized as image-based in the sense that a charge-coupled-device camera, preferably of scientific imaging quality, is used to collect image data where the optical system would normally form an image. In a variant of phase retrieval, denoted phase-diverse phase retrieval [which can include focus-diverse phase retrieval (in which various defocus planes are used)], an additional known aberration (or an equivalent diversity function) is superimposed as an aid in estimating unknown aberrations by use of an image-based wavefront-sensing algorithm. Image-based phase-retrieval differs from such other wavefront-sensing methods, such as interferometry, shearing interferometry, curvature

  14. Clinical outcomes of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis to treat moderate-to-high astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Schallhorn, Steven C; Venter, Jan A; Hannan, Stephen J; Hettinger, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the refractive and visual outcomes of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in eyes with myopic astigmatism and cylindrical component ≥2.0 diopter (D). Methods In this retrospective study, 611 eyes that underwent LASIK for simple or compound myopic astigmatism were analyzed. Preoperative refractive cylinder ranged from −2.00 D to −6.00 D (mean −2.76±0.81 D), and the sphere was between 0.00 D and −9.75 D (mean −2.79±2.32 D). Predictability, visual outcomes, and vector analysis of changes in refractive astigmatism were evaluated. Results At 3 months after LASIK, 83.8% of eyes had uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/20 or better, 90.3% had manifest spherical equivalent within ±0.50 D, and 79.1% had residual refractive cylinder within ±0.50 D of intended correction. The mean correction ratio for refractive cylinder was 0.92±0.14, the mean error of angle was −0.45°±2.99°, and the mean error vector was 0.37±0.38 D. A statistically significant correlation was found between the error of magnitude (arithmetic difference in the magnitudes between surgically induced refractive correction and intended refractive correction) and the intended refractive correction (r=0.26, P<0.01). Conclusion Wavefront-guided LASIK for the correction of myopic astigmatism is safe, effective, and predictable. PMID:26203219

  15. Myopic aberrations: Simulation based comparison of curvature and Hartmann Shack wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basavaraju, Roopashree M.; Akondi, Vyas; Weddell, Stephen J.; Budihal, Raghavendra Prasad

    2014-02-01

    In comparison with a Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor, the curvature wavefront sensor is known for its higher sensitivity and greater dynamic range. The aim of this study is to numerically investigate the merits of using a curvature wavefront sensor, in comparison with a Hartmann Shack (HS) wavefront sensor, to analyze aberrations of the myopic eye. Aberrations were statistically generated using Zernike coefficient data of 41 myopic subjects obtained from the literature. The curvature sensor is relatively simple to implement, and the processing of extra- and intra-focal images was linearly resolved using the Radon transform to provide Zernike modes corresponding to statistically generated aberrations. Simulations of the HS wavefront sensor involve the evaluation of the focal spot pattern from simulated aberrations. Optical wavefronts were reconstructed using the slope geometry of Southwell. Monte Carlo simulation was used to find critical parameters for accurate wavefront sensing and to investigate the performance of HS and curvature sensors. The performance of the HS sensor is highly dependent on the number of subapertures and the curvature sensor is largely dependent on the number of Zernike modes used to represent the aberration and the effective propagation distance. It is shown that in order to achieve high wavefront sensing accuracy while measuring aberrations of the myopic eye, a simpler and cost effective curvature wavefront sensor is a reliable alternative to a high resolution HS wavefront sensor with a large number of subapertures.

  16. On-Sky Demonstration of Low-Order Wavefront Sensing and Control with Focal Plane Phase Mask Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Garima; Lozi, Julien; Guyon, Olivier; Baudoz, Pierre; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Martinache, Frantz; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Serabyn, Eugene; Kuhn, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    The ability to characterize exoplanets by spectroscopy of their atmospheres requires direct imaging techniques to isolate planet signal from the bright stellar glare. One of the limitations with the direct detection of exoplanets, either with ground- or space-based coronagraphs, is pointing errors and other low-order wavefront aberrations. The coronagraphic detection sensitivity at the diffraction limit therefore depends on how well low-order aberrations upstream of the focal plane mask are corrected. To prevent starlight leakage at the inner working angle of a phase mask coronagraph, we have introduced a Lyot-based low-order wavefront sensor (LLOWFS), which senses aberrations using the rejected starlight diffracted at the Lyot plane. In this article, we present the implementation, testing, and results of LLOWFS on the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics system (SCExAO) at the Subaru Telescope. We have controlled 35 Zernike modes of a H-band vector vortex coronagraph in the laboratory and 10 Zernike modes on-sky with an integrator control law. We demonstrated a closed-loop pointing residual of 0.02 mas in the laboratory and 0.15 mas on-sky for data sampled using the minimal 2-s exposure time of the science camera. We have also integrated the LLOWFS in the visible high-order control loop of SCExAO, which in closed-loop operation has validated the correction of the noncommon path pointing errors between the infrared science channel and the visible wavefront sensing channel with pointing residual of 0.23 mas on-sky.

  17. Surface temperature correction for active infrared reflectance measurements of natural materials.

    PubMed

    Snyder, W C; Wan, Z

    1996-05-01

    Land surface temperature algorithms for the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer satellite instrument will require the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of natural surfaces in the thermal infrared. We designed the spectral infrared bidirectional reflectance and emissivity instrument to provide such measurements by the use of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. A problem we encountered is the unavoidable surface heating caused by the source irradiance. For our system, the effects of the heating can cause a 30% error in the measured BRDF The error caused by heating is corrected by temporally curve fitting the radiance signal. This curve-fitting technique isolates the radiance caused by reflected irradiance. With this correction, other factors dominate the BRDF error. It is now ~5% and can be improved further. The method is illustrated with measurements of soil BRDF. PMID:21085353

  18. 78 FR 76613 - Registration Applications for Pesticide Products Containing New Active Ingredients; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ...-OPP-2012-0391. In FR Doc. 2012-19989, published in the Federal Register of August 14, 2012 (77 FR...-Hv1a-SEQ2'' to read ``GS-omega/kappa-Hxtx-Hv1a.'' 2. EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0391. In FR Doc. 2012-19989, published in the Federal Register of August 14, 2012 (77 FR 48519) (FRL-9357-7), is corrected as follows:...

  19. Subwavelength-grating-induced wavefront aberrations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Karlton; Chipman, Russell A.

    2007-07-01

    The on-axis wavefront aberrations of a one-dimensional subwavelength-grating antireflection coating on an f/1.7 lens surface are shown to be small with noticeable contributions of defocus, astigmatism, and piston. The astigmatism is 0.02 wave, and the magnitude of the piston approaches one wave peak-to-valley. The difference in aberrations between orthogonally polarized wavefronts, or the retardance aberration, shows 0.01 wave of astigmatismlike variation and more than 0.01 wave of retardance-induced defocuslike variation. A small coupling between polarization states occurs in the form of the familiar Maltese cross, yielding a maximum of 3% coupling in the four diagonal edges of the pupil.

  20. A miniature curvature wavefront sensor with coherent fiber image bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jessica; Richards, Samuel; Goodwin, Michael; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Argyros, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    A miniature curvature wavefront sensor with a coherent fiber image bundle is proposed in which a miniature lateral displacement beamsplitter is designed to obtain the intra- and extra- focus images from a telescope simultaneously at its exit. The two images are received and relayed by two coherent fiber image bundles. The relayed images are then re-imaged to one camera and processed to obtain the input wavefront at telescope pupil. The whole device is quite compact and can be driven by a "Starbug" fiber positioning device currently under development within the Australian Astronomical Observatory. In this paper, the performance of the proposed sensor is investigated in details by applying a simulated atmospheric turbulence at the telescope pupil plane. We study the offset distance of two image measurement planes, fiber core size, fiber fill factor and the magnitude of natural guide star effects to its performance. This study provides guidance to the sensor design.

  1. Synthetic holography in microscopy: opportunities arising from advanced wavefront shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesacher, Alexander; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The advent of computer-generated or synthetic holography has created a wealth of possibilities for wavefront shaping in optics. We discuss the impact this has had on optical microscopy. Synthetic Holographic Microscopy utilises wavefront shaping by a computer-generated 'hologram' (CGH) to modify light on the illumination or the detection side, or both. This enables modifications of the general sample appearance concerning contrast, resolution and other aspects. Multiplexing CGHs can perform several tasks at once, for instance splitting the image into sub-images corresponding to different depths in the sample, or displaying differently contrasted images of the sample, e.g. bright field, darkfield or (spiral) phase contrast, in different sub-images. We give an overview of the options and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using programmable holographic elements inside an optical microscope.

  2. Common-Path Interferometric Wavefront Sensing for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James Kent

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an optical configuration for a common-path phase-shifting interferometric wavefront sensor.1 2 This sensor has a host of attractive features which make it well suited for space-based adaptive optics. First, it is strictly reflective and therefore operates broadband, second it is common mode and therefore does not suffer from systematic errors (like vibration) that are typical in other interferometers, third it is a phase-shifting interferometer and therefore benefits from both the sensitivity of interferometric sensors as well as the noise rejection afforded by synchronous detection. Unlike the Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor, it has nearly uniform sensitivity to all pupil modes. Optical configuration, theory and simulations for such a system will be discussed along with predicted performance.

  3. Applications of ultrafast wavefront rotation in highly nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéré, F.; Vincenti, H.; Borot, A.; Monchocé, S.; Hammond, T. J.; Taec Kim, Kyung; Wheeler, J. A.; Zhang, Chunmei; Ruchon, T.; Auguste, T.; Hergott, J. F.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Lopez-Martens, R.

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of ultrafast wavefront rotation of femtosecond laser pulses and its various applications in highly nonlinear optics, focusing on processes that lead to the generation of high-order harmonics and attosecond pulses. In this context, wavefront rotation can be exploited in different ways, to obtain new light sources for time-resolved studies, called ‘attosecond lighthouses’, to perform time-resolved measurements of nonlinear optical processes, using ‘photonic streaking’, or to track changes in the carrier-envelope relative phase of femtosecond laser pulses. The basic principles are explained qualitatively from different points of view, the experimental evidence obtained so far is summarized, and the perspectives opened by these effects are discussed.

  4. Terahertz wavefront control by tunable metasurface made of graphene ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yatooshi, Takumi; Ishikawa, Atsushi Tsuruta, Kenji

    2015-08-03

    We propose a tunable metasurface consisting of an array of graphene ribbons on a silver mirror with a SiO{sub 2} gap layer to control reflected wavefront at terahertz frequencies. The graphene ribbons exhibit localized plasmon resonances depending on their Fermi levels to introduce abrupt phase shifts along the metasurface. With interference of the Fabry-Perot resonances in the SiO{sub 2} layer, phase shift through the system is largely accumulated, covering the 0-to-2π range for full control of the wavefront. Numerical simulations prove that wide-angle beam steering up to 53° with a high reflection efficiency of 60% is achieved at 5 THz within a switching time shorter than 0.6 ps.

  5. Adaptive wavefront sensor based on the Talbot phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Podanchuk, Dmytro V; Goloborodko, Andrey A; Kotov, Myhailo M; Kovalenko, Andrey V; Kurashov, Vitalij N; Dan'ko, Volodymyr P

    2016-04-20

    A new adaptive method of wavefront sensing is proposed and demonstrated. The method is based on the Talbot self-imaging effect, which is observed in an illuminating light beam with strong second-order aberration. Compensation of defocus and astigmatism is achieved with an appropriate choice of size of the rectangular unit cell of the diffraction grating, which is performed iteratively. A liquid-crystal spatial light modulator is used for this purpose. Self-imaging of rectangular grating in the astigmatic light beam is demonstrated experimentally. High-order aberrations are detected with respect to the compensated second-order aberration. The comparative results of wavefront sensing with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and the proposed sensor are adduced. PMID:27140122

  6. Application of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing technology to transmissive optic metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammage, Ron R.; Neal, Daniel R.; Copland, Richard J.

    2002-11-01

    Human vision correction optics must be produced in quantity to be economical. At the same time every human eye is unique and requires a custom corrective solution. For this reason the vision industries need fast, versatile and accurate methodologies for characterizing optics for production and research. Current methods for measuring these optics generally yield a cubic spline taken from less than 10 points across the surface of the lens. As corrective optics have grown in complexity this has become inadequate. The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is a device that measures phase and irradiance of light in a single snapshot using geometric properties of light. Advantages of the Shack-Hartmann sensor include small size, ruggedness, accuracy, and vibration insensitivity. This paper discusses a methodology for designing instruments based on Shack-Hartmann sensors. The method is then applied to the development of an instrument for accurate measurement of transmissive optics such as gradient bifocal spectacle lenses, progressive addition bifocal lenses, intrarocular devices, contact lenses, and human corneal tissue. In addition, this instrument may be configured to provide hundreds of points across the surface of the lens giving improved spatial resolution. Methods are explored for extending the dynamic range and accuracy to meet the expanding needs of the ophthalmic and optometric industries. Data is presented demonstrating the accuracy and repeatability of this technique for the target optics.

  7. Modeling of Optical Aberration Correction using a Liquid Crystal Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xinghua, Wang; Bin, Wang; McManamon, Paul F.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    Gruneisen (sup 1-3), has shown that small, light weight, liquid crystal based devices can correct for the optical distortion caused by an imperfect primary mirror in a telescope and has discussed the efficiency of this correction. In this paper we expand on that work and propose a semi-analytical approach for quantifying the efficiency of a liquid crystal based wavefront corrector for this application.

  8. Wavefront Sensing Using a Multi-Object Spectrograph (NIRSpec)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.; Boucarut, Rene; Hadjimichael, Theo; Smith, Scott

    2004-01-01

    An analysis is presented that illustrates how the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) fine-phasing process can be carried out using the Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) data collected at the science focal plane. The analysis considers a multi-plane diffraction model which properly accounts for the microshutter diffractive element placed at the first relay position of the spectrograph. Wavefront sensing results are presented based on data collected from the NASA Goddard Microshutter Testbed.

  9. Ophthalmic Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor Applications - Oral Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most common applications of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is to measure the human eye. There are a number of instruments that have been designed for this purpose and are used extensively in laser refractive surgery. While conceptually the sensor is similar to those used for astronomy applications, there are key differences adaptive optic and measurement sensors. These sensors have led to a range of applications and diagnostics that are providing key new information about how the eye functions.

  10. One dimensional wavefront sensor development for tomographic flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.; Pierson, R.; Chen, E.

    1995-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because they generally have high inherent bandwidth, and are non-intrusive. However, since optical probe measurements inherently integrate all information along the optical path, it is often difficult to isolate out-of-plane components in 3-dimensional flow events. It is also hard to make independent measurements of internal flow structure. Using an arrangement of one-dimensional wavefront sensors, we have developed a system that uses tomographic reconstruction to make two-dimensional measurements in an arbitrary flow. These measurements provide complete information in a plane normal to the flow. We have applied this system to the subsonic free jet because of the wide range of flow scales available. These measurements rely on the development of a series of one-dimensional wavefront sensors that are used to measure line-integral density variations in the flow of interest. These sensors have been constructed using linear CCD cameras and binary optics lenslet arrays. In designing these arrays, we have considered the coherent coupling between adjacent lenses and have made comparisons between theory and experimental noise measurements. The paper will present examples of the wavefront sensor development, line-integral measurements as a function of various experimental parameters, and sample tomographic reconstructions.

  11. Common-Path Wavefront Sensing for Advanced Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Serabyn, Eugene; Mawet, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    Imaging of faint companions around nearby stars is not limited by either intrinsic resolution of a coronagraph/telescope system, nor is it strictly photon limited. Typically, it is both the magnitude and temporal variation of small phase and amplitude errors imparted to the electric field by elements in the optical system which will limit ultimate performance. Adaptive optics systems, particularly those with multiple deformable mirrors, can remove these errors, but they need to be sensed in the final image plane. If the sensing system is before the final image plane, which is typical for most systems, then the non-common path optics between the wavefront sensor and science image plane will lead to un-sensed errors. However, a new generation of high-performance coronagraphs naturally lend themselves to wavefront sensing in the final image plane. These coronagraphs and the wavefront sensing will be discussed, as well as plans for demonstrating this with a high-contrast system on the ground. Such a system will be a key system-level proof for a future space-based coronagraph mission, which will also be discussed.

  12. On Sky Test of the Pyramid Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghedina, Adriano; Cecconi, Massimo; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Baruffolo, Andrea; Crimi, Giuseppe; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Esposito, Simone; Fini, Luca; Ghigo, Mauro; Marchetti, Enrico; Niero, Tiziano; Puglisi, Alfio

    2003-02-01

    The Adaptive Optics for the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo module (namely AdOpt@TNG) implements the pyramid wavefront sensor as a unique feature. This allows to get valuable information on its performance on the sky. An updated overview of the results obtained so far is shown, including a discussion on the sources of errors in the closed loop operation, distinguishing them between the ones specific of the pyramid wavefront sensor and the one more related to the system as a whole. This system allows also for a number of experiments and check of the sensitivity of such a wavefront sensor, especially in comparison with other types of sensing units. The ways to accomplish such an experiment in a convincing way are shown along with the first results obtained so far. Finally, we describe how and up to which extent a number of practical problems encountered in the near past can be solved implementing the recent new ideas on the pyramid theme, many of which popped up from our "lessons learned".

  13. LINC-NIRVANA: mechanical challanges of the MCAO wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soci, Roberto; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Herbst, Thomas M.; Farinato, Jacopo; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Baumeister, Harald; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Xu, Wenli; Andersen, David R.; Egner, Sebastian E.; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Lombini, Matteo; Ebert, Monica; Boehm, Armin; Muench, Norbert; Xompero, Marco

    2004-10-01

    Several multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems using the layer-oriented approach are under construction and will soon be tested at different facilities in several instruments. One of these instruments is LINC-NIRVANA, a Fizeau interferometer for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). This instrument uses a ground layer wavefront sensor (GWS) and a combined mid-high layer wavefront sensor (MHWS) with different fields of view (concept of multiple field of view), a 2-6 arcmin annular ring for the GWS and a 2 arcmin diameter central field of view for the MHWS. Both sensors are Pyramid wavefront sensors which optically co-add light from multiple natural guide stars. The opto-mechanical problems concerning these sensors are related to the fast focal ratio of the beam on the pyramids coupled with the available pixelscale of detectors. This leads to very tight requirements on the moving systems (linear stages) for the star enlargers (SE) used to pick off the light of individual stars. As there are 40 star enlargers in the overall system, additional efforts were put into the alignment system of the optics of the star enlargers and the reduction in size of the star enlargers to minimize the distance between available guide stars.

  14. Research on technique of wavefront retrieval based on Foucault test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lvjun; Wu, Zhonghua

    2010-05-01

    During finely grinding the best fit sphere and initial stage of polishing, surface error of large aperture aspheric mirrors is too big to test using common interferometer. Foucault test is widely used in fabricating large aperture mirrors. However, the optical path is disturbed seriously by air turbulence, and changes of light and dark zones can not be identified, which often lowers people's judging ability and results in making mistake to diagnose surface error of the whole mirror. To solve the problem, the research presents wavefront retrieval based on Foucault test through digital image processing and quantitative calculation. Firstly, real Foucault image can be gained through collecting a variety of images by CCD, and then average these image to eliminate air turbulence. Secondly, gray values are converted into surface error values through principle derivation, mathematical modeling, and software programming. Thirdly, linear deviation brought by defocus should be removed by least-square method to get real surface error. At last, according to real surface error, plot wavefront map, gray contour map and corresponding pseudo color contour map. The experimental results indicates that the three-dimensional wavefront map and two-dimensional contour map are able to accurately and intuitively show surface error on the whole mirrors under test, and they are beneficial to grasp surface error as a whole. The technique can be used to guide the fabrication of large aperture and long focal mirrors during grinding and initial stage of polishing the aspheric surface, which improves fabricating efficiency and precision greatly.

  15. Tests and evaluation of a variable focus liquid lens for curvature wavefront sensors in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Fernández, Jorge; Cuevas, Salvador; Álvarez-Nuñez, Luis C; Watson, Alan

    2013-10-20

    Curvature wavefront sensors (WFSs), which obtain the wavefront aberrations from two defocused intensity images at each side of the pupil plane, have shown to be highly efficient for astronomical applications. We propose here an alternative defocusing mechanism for curvature sensors, based on an electrowetting-based variable focus liquid lens. Typically, the sampling rates of a WFS for active optics are of the order of 0.01 Hz, and the focus modulation can be done by simply moving the detector back and forth. On the other hand, adaptive optics may require speeds of up to several hundred hertz, and the modulation is then done by using a fast vibrating membrane mirror. We believe variable focus liquid lenses may be able to perform this focus modulation, reducing the overall size of the system and without the need of extra moving parts. We have done a full characterization of the Varioptic Arctic 416 liquid lens, and we have evaluated its potential performance in different curvature configurations. PMID:24216579

  16. Efficient irregular wavefront propagation algorithms on Intel® Xeon Phi™

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Jeremias M.; Teodoro, George; de Melo, Alba; Kong, Jun; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the execution of the Irregular Wavefront Propagation Pattern (IWPP), a fundamental computing structure used in several image analysis operations, on the Intel® Xeon Phi™ co-processor. An efficient implementation of IWPP on the Xeon Phi is a challenging problem because of IWPP’s irregularity and the use of atomic instructions in the original IWPP algorithm to resolve race conditions. On the Xeon Phi, the use of SIMD and vectorization instructions is critical to attain high performance. However, SIMD atomic instructions are not supported. Therefore, we propose a new IWPP algorithm that can take advantage of the supported SIMD instruction set. We also evaluate an alternate storage container (priority queue) to track active elements in the wavefront in an effort to improve the parallel algorithm efficiency. The new IWPP algorithm is evaluated with Morphological Reconstruction and Imfill operations as use cases. Our results show performance improvements of up to 5.63× on top of the original IWPP due to vectorization. Moreover, the new IWPP achieves speedups of 45.7× and 1.62×, respectively, as compared to efficient CPU and GPU implementations. PMID:27298591

  17. Real-time simulation of ultrasound refraction phenomena using ray-trace based wavefront construction method.

    PubMed

    Szostek, Kamil; Piórkowski, Adam

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the most popular techniques used in clinical diagnosis, mainly due to lack of adverse effects on patients and the simplicity of US equipment. However, the characteristics of the medium cause US imaging to imprecisely reconstruct examined tissues. The artifacts are the results of wave phenomena, i.e. diffraction or refraction, and should be recognized during examination to avoid misinterpretation of an US image. Currently, US training is based on teaching materials and simulators and ultrasound simulation has become an active research area in medical computer science. Many US simulators are limited by the complexity of the wave phenomena, leading to intensive sophisticated computation that makes it difficult for systems to operate in real time. To achieve the required frame rate, the vast majority of simulators reduce the problem of wave diffraction and refraction. The following paper proposes a solution for an ultrasound simulator based on methods known in geophysics. To improve simulation quality, a wavefront construction method was adapted which takes into account the refraction phenomena. This technique uses ray tracing and velocity averaging to construct wavefronts in the simulation. Instead of a geological medium, real CT scans are applied. This approach can produce more realistic projections of pathological findings and is also capable of providing real-time simulation. PMID:27586490

  18. Probability of the residual wavefront variance of an adaptive optics system and its application.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Liu, Chao; Deng, Ke; Yao, Zhousi; Xian, Hao; Li, Xinyang

    2016-02-01

    For performance evaluation of an adaptive optics (AO) system, the probability of the system residual wavefront variance can provide more information than the wavefront variance average. By studying the Zernike coefficients of an AO system residual wavefront, we derived the exact expressions for the probability density functions of the wavefront variance and the Strehl ratio, for instantaneous and long-term exposures owing to the insufficient control loop bandwidth of the AO system. Our calculations agree with the residual wavefront data of a closed loop AO system. Using these functions, we investigated the relationship between the AO system bandwidth and the distribution of the residual wavefront variance. Additionally, we analyzed the availability of an AO system for evaluating the AO performance. These results will assist in designing and probabilistic analysis of AO systems. PMID:26906850

  19. Performance of a phase-conjugate-engine implementing a finite-bit phase correction

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Wilks, S; Young, P; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Olivier, S

    2003-10-23

    This article examines the achievable Strehl ratio when a finite-bit correction to an aberrated wave-front is implemented. The phase-conjugate-engine (PCE) used to measure the aberrated wavefront consists of a quadrature interferometric wave-front sensor, a liquid-crystal spatial-light-modulator and computer hardware/software to calculate and apply the correction. A finite-bit approximation to the conjugate phase is calculated and applied to the spatial light modulator to remove the aberrations from the optical beam. The experimentally determined Strehl ratio of the corrected beam is compared with analytical expressions for the expected Strehl ratio and shown to be in good agreement with those predictions.

  20. Measurement of wavefront aberrations and lens deformation in the accommodated eye with optical coherence tomography-equipped wavefront system.

    PubMed

    He, Ji C; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-04-21

    To quantitatively approach the relationship between optical changes in an accommodated eye and the geometrical deformation of its crystalline lens, a long scan-depth anterior segment OCT equipped wavefront sensor was developed and integrated with a Badal system. With this system, accommodation was stimulated up to 6.0D in the left eye and also measured in the same eye for three subjects. High correlations between the accommodative responses of refractive power and the radius of the anterior lens surface were found for the three subjects (r>0.98). The change in spherical aberration was also highly correlated with the change in lens thickness (r>0.98). The measurement was very well repeated at a 2nd measurement session on the same day for the three subjects and after two weeks for one subject. The novelty of incorporating the Badal system into the OCT equipped wavefront sensor eliminated axial misalignment of the measurement system with the test eye due to accommodative vergence, as in the contralateral paradigm. The design also allowed the wavefront sensor to capture conjugated sharp Hartmann-Shack images in accommodated eyes to accurately analyze wavefront aberrations. In addition, this design extended the accommodation range up to 10.0D. By using this system, for the first time, we demonstrated linear relationships of the changes between the refractive power and the lens curvature and also between the spherical aberration and the lens thickness during accommodation in vivo. This new system provides an accurate and useful technique to quantitatively study accommodation. PMID:24787861

  1. Correct disulfide pairing is required for the biological activity of crustacean androgenic gland hormone (AGH): synthetic studies of AGH.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu; Hojo, Hironobu; Ohira, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Akira; Nozaki, Takamichi; Goto, Kiyomi; Nakahara, Yuko; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Hasegawa, Yuriko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Nakahara, Yoshiaki

    2010-03-01

    Androgenic gland hormone (AGH) of the woodlouse, Armadillidium vulgare, is a heterodimeric glycopeptide. In this study, we synthesized AGH with a homogeneous N-linked glycan using the expressed protein ligation method. Unexpectedly, disulfide bridge arrangement of a semisynthetic peptide differed from that of a recombinant peptide prepared in a baculovirus expression system, and the semisynthetic peptide showed no biological activity in vivo. To confirm that the loss of biological activity resulted from disulfide bond isomerization, AGH with a GlcNAc moiety was chemically synthesized by the selective disulfide formation. This synthetic AGH showed biological activity in vivo. These results indicate that the native conformation of AGH is not the most thermodynamically stable form, and correct disulfide linkages are important for conferring AGH activity. PMID:20092253

  2. Wavefront Sensing With Switched Lenses for Defocus Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    In an alternative hardware design for an apparatus used in image-based wavefront sensing, defocus diversity is introduced by means of fixed lenses that are mounted in a filter wheel (see figure) so that they can be alternately switched into a position in front of the focal plane of an electronic camera recording the image formed by the optical system under test. [The terms image-based, wavefront sensing, and defocus diversity are defined in the first of the three immediately preceding articles, Broadband Phase Retrieval for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing (GSC-14899-1).] Each lens in the filter wheel is designed so that the optical effect of placing it at the assigned position is equivalent to the optical effect of translating the camera a specified defocus distance along the optical axis. Heretofore, defocus diversity has been obtained by translating the imaging camera along the optical axis to various defocus positions. Because data must be taken at multiple, accurately measured defocus positions, it is necessary to mount the camera on a precise translation stage that must be calibrated for each defocus position and/or to use an optical encoder for measurement and feedback control of the defocus positions. Additional latency is introduced into the wavefront sensing process as the camera is translated to the various defocus positions. Moreover, if the optical system under test has a large focal length, the required defocus values are large, making it necessary to use a correspondingly bulky translation stage. By eliminating the need for translation of the camera, the alternative design simplifies and accelerates the wavefront-sensing process. This design is cost-effective in that the filterwheel/lens mechanism can be built from commercial catalog components. After initial calibration of the defocus value of each lens, a selected defocus value is introduced by simply rotating the filter wheel to place the corresponding lens in front of the camera. The rotation of the

  3. Efficient ray tracing algorithms based on wavefront construction and model based interpolation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung Jin

    Understanding and modeling seismic wave propagation is important in regional and exploration seismology. Ray tracing is a powerful and popular method for this purpose. Wavefront construction (WFC) method handles wavefronts instead of individual rays, thereby controlling proper ray density on the wavefront. By adaptively controlling rays over a wavefront, it efficiently models wave propagation. Algorithms for a quasi-P wave wavefront construction method and a new coordinate system used to generate wavefront construction mesh are proposed and tested for numerical properties and modeling capabilities. Traveltimes, amplitudes, and other parameters, which can be used for seismic imaging such as migrations and synthetic seismograms, are computed from the wavefront construction method. Modeling with wavefront construction code is applied to anisotropic media as well as isotropic media. Synthetic seismograms are computed using the wavefront construction method as a new way of generating synthetics. To incorporate layered velocity models, the model based interpolation (MBI) ray tracing method, which is designed to take advantage of the wavefront construction method as well as conventional ray tracing methods, is proposed and experimental codes are developed for it. Many wavefront construction codes are limited to smoothed velocity models for handling complicated problems in layered velocity models and the conventional ray tracing methods suffer from the inability to control ray density during wave propagation. By interpolating the wavefront near model boundaries, it is possible to handle the layered velocity model as well as overcome ray density control problems in conventional methods. The test results revealed this new method can be an effective modeling tool for accurate and effective computing.

  4. Volumetric imaging of fast biological dynamics in deep tissue via wavefront engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    To reveal fast biological dynamics in deep tissue, we combine two wavefront engineering methods that were developed in our laboratory, namely optical phase-locked ultrasound lens (OPLUL) based volumetric imaging and iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique (IMPACT). OPLUL is used to generate oscillating defocusing wavefront for fast axial scanning, and IMPACT is used to compensate the wavefront distortions for deep tissue imaging. We show its promising applications in neuroscience and immunology.

  5. Using an active primary surface to correct for low-order manufacturing errors in secondary mirrors of large reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes-Medellin, German; Lovell, Amy J.; Enriquez, Rogerio; Smith, David R.

    2004-09-01

    In the fabrication of high-performance, low-cost secondary reflectors for radio telescopes, it is a significant challenge to avoid introduction of low-order surface errors such as astigmatism or coma. This arises primarily because low-order surface errors are easily induced by support structure placement or simple thermal variations in the manufacturing process. It is, of course, possible to bring these errors to within the required tolerance, but if an active primary reflector is present, it may be possible to relax the requirements on the secondary and perhaps lower its cost. In this paper, we take the Large Millimeter-wave Telescope (LMT/GTM) as an example system. We model the effects of correcting a deformed sub-reflector by using the existing segmented active primary. The sub-reflector deformation patterns employed are low-order (e.g., astigmatism or coma), but are allowed significant excursions from the nominal surface figure. For each case, we demonstrate the best theoretical performance, using the active primary to correct for the errors. Additionally, to determine whether such an approach would be practical, we also demonstrate the likely performance improvement that could be achieved using brief measurements on an astronomical source. In this approach, we introduce varying amounts of known low-order deformation patterns into the active primary and seek the combination that results in the maximum signal. Finally, we compare this result to the theoretical maximum and make recommendations on the practical utility of the approach.

  6. Warm-up with weighted bat and adjustment of upper limb muscle activity in bat swinging under movement correction conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    The effects of weighted bat warm-up on adjustment of upper limb muscle activity were investigated during baseball bat swinging under dynamic conditions that require a spatial and temporal adjustment of the swinging to hit a moving target. Seven male college baseball players participated in this study. Using a batting simulator, the task was to swing the standard bat coincident with the arrival timing and position of a moving target after three warm-up swings using a standard or weighted bat. There was no significant effect of weighted bat warm-up on muscle activity before impact associated with temporal or spatial movement corrections. However, lower inhibition of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle activity was observed in a velocity-changed condition in the weighted bat warm-up, as compared to a standard bat warm-up. It is suggested that weighted bat warm-up decreases the adjustment ability associated with inhibition of muscle activation under movement correction conditions. PMID:24724516

  7. Wavefront Imaging in Fractured Transversely-Isotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Fractures in the Earth's crust are a source of stress-dependent mechanical anisotropy that affect seismic wave attenuation and velocity. While many theoretical and experimental studies have investigated seismic wave propagation in single or multi- fractured isotropic rocks, few studies have examined the seismic response of a fractured anisotropic medium. Fractures and layering each contribute to the mechanical anisotropy of the crust. The coexistence of these two sources of anisotropy complicates the interpretation of the seismic properties of crustal rock. In this study, laboratory wavefront imaging was performed to capture the seismic response of layered media containing multiple parallel fractures. We determined that whether the observed anisotropy is dominated by the matrix anisotropy or by the fracture orientation depends on the applied stress and that late-arriving guided-modes provide information on the orientation of the fractures. Four cubic garolite samples (~102 mm on edge) each containing 5 parallel fractures were used in this study. The fractures were oriented normal, parallel or at acute angles (30 degrees, 60 degrees) to the layering. The fracture and layer spacing were approximately 10mm and 0.5mm, respectively. An intact sample containing no fractures was used as a standard orthorhombic medium for reference. Stress was applied to the samples with a servo-controlled loading machine. Two spherically-focused water-coupled transducers (central frequency 1MHz) were used; one as a fixed-source and the other as a translating receiver. Each sample was scanned over a 60mm×60mm region in 1 mm increments to map out the arriving wavefront (i.e. 3600 signals were recorded) as a function of time. The measured wavefront in the intact reference sample (which contained no fractures) was elliptical with the major axis parallel to the layers as expected and was stress-independent. When the fracture samples were subjected to low stress (<4 MPa), the observed seismic

  8. Breadboard Testing of a Phase Conjugate Engine with an Interferometric Wave-Front Sensor and a MEMS-Based Spatial Light Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J; Olsen, J; Minden, M L; Gavel, D; Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Wilks, S C; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S; Young, P E; Kartz, M W; Flath, L M; Azucena, O

    2003-12-08

    Laboratory breadboard results of a high-speed adaptive optics system are presented. The wave-front sensor for the adaptive optics system is based on a quadrature interferometer, which directly measures the turbulence induced phase aberrations. The laboratory experiments were conducted using Kolmogorov phase screens to simulate atmospheric phase distortions with the characterization of these plates presented below. The spatial light modulator used in the phase conjugate engine was a MEMS-based piston-only correction device with 1024 actuators. The overall system achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 hz and Strehl ratios greater than 0.5 with the Kolmogorov phase screens.

  9. A Phase-Shifting Zernike Wavefront Sensor for the Palomar P3K Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Crawford, Sam; Loya, Frank; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    A phase-shifting Zernike wavefront sensor has distinct advantages over other types of wavefront sensors. Chief among them are: 1) improved sensitivity to low-order aberrations and 2) efficient use of photons (hence reduced sensitivity to photon noise). We are in the process of deploying a phase-shifting Zernike wavefront sensor to be used with the realtime adaptive optics system for Palomar. Here we present the current state of the Zernike wavefront sensor to be integrated into the high-order adaptive optics system at Mount Palomar's Hale Telescope.

  10. Determination of the focal length of microlens array by spherical wavefronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Marimuthu Senthil; Sharma, Rahul; Narayanamurthy, Chittur Subramanian; Kumar, Alur Seelin Kiran

    2014-06-01

    We propose an experimental method consisting of a standard Fizeau interferometer with transmission sphere (TS) for the determination of the focal length of microlens array (MLA) by spherical wavefronts. The TS is axially translated to produce a spherical wavefront of different curvatures with respect to the MLA. The align mode provision of the interferometer helps to monitor the tilt of the MLA with respect to the spherical wavefront. The focal length is determined from the measured distance of adjacent image spots for various spherical wavefronts at the focal plane of the MLA. Error analysis and experimental demonstration with an off-the-shelf MLA are addressed here.

  11. Visualization of cardiac wavefronts using data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kynor, David B.; Dietz, Anthony; Friets, Eric; Peterson, Jon; Bergstrom, Ursula; Triedman, John; Hammer, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as a highly effective treatment for arrhythmias that are constrained by known, easily located, anatomic landmarks. However, this treatment has enjoyed limited success for arrhythmias that are characterized by complex activation patterns or are not anatomically constrained. This class of arrhythmias, which includes atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia resulting from ischemic heart disease, demands improved mapping tools. Current technology forces the cardiologist to view cardiac anatomy independently from the functional information contained in the electrical activation patterns. This leads to difficulties in interpreting the large volumes of data provided by high-density recording catheters and in mapping patients with abnormal anatomy (e.g., patients with congenital heart disease). The goal of this is work is development of new data processing and display algorithms that will permit the clinician to view activation sequences superimposed onto existing fluoroscopic images depicting the location of recording catheters within the heart. In cases where biplane fluoroscopic images and x-ray camera position data are available, the position of the catheters can be reconstructed in three-dimensions.

  12. Correction method of secondary reflection effects in measurement of electro-optic coefficient in optically active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Ph.; Georges, M.

    1992-07-01

    The propagation of light in linearly birefringent and optically active media, such as Bi 12SiO 20 crystals (BSO), has been widely studied by several workers. Various measurement methods of the electro-optic coefficient r41 have been described. One family of those methods consisting in measurement of the light polarization ellipticity after through the crystal has been analysed. Due to the high reflectivity of such crystals, we show that the effect of the secondary reflections can not be neglected. We present the theoretical description and analysis of this effect for one of these methods and we propose a corrective algorithm.

  13. Activation of the biochemical processes in an oil-contaminated soil using a light-correcting film and humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, D. A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Svarovskaya, L. I.; Yudina, N. V.

    2011-02-01

    It was shown that the use of a light-correcting film as a covering material for an oil-contaminated soil in combination with humic acids increased the number of the main physiological groups of the soil microorganisms responsible for the development of the soil's fertility (heterotrophic bacteria, actinomycetes, and micromycetes) by 60-100 times. The activity of the soil enzymes (catalase, dehydrogenase, polyphenoloxidase, peroxidase, and urease) increased by 3-6 times. The biochemical oxidation of oil hydrocarbons in the soil became significantly more intense.

  14. Reducing depth induced spherical aberration in 3D widefield fluorescence microscopy by wavefront coding using the SQUBIC phase mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwary, Nurmohammed; Doblas, Ana; King, Sharon V.; Preza, Chrysanthe

    2014-03-01

    Imaging thick biological samples introduces spherical aberration (SA) due to refractive index (RI) mismatch between specimen and imaging lens immersion medium. SA increases with the increase of either depth or RI mismatch. Therefore, it is difficult to find a static compensator for SA1. Different wavefront coding methods2,3 have been studied to find an optimal way of static wavefront correction to reduce depth-induced SA. Inspired by a recent design of a radially symmetric squared cubic (SQUBIC) phase mask that was tested for scanning confocal microscopy1 we have modified the pupil using the SQUBIC mask to engineer the point spread function (PSF) of a wide field fluorescence microscope. In this study, simulated images of a thick test object were generated using a wavefront encoded engineered PSF (WFEPSF) and were restored using space-invariant (SI) and depth-variant (DV) expectation maximization (EM) algorithms implemented in the COSMOS software4. Quantitative comparisons between restorations obtained with both the conventional and WFE PSFs are presented. Simulations show that, in the presence of SA, the use of the SIEM algorithm and a single SQUBIC encoded WFE-PSF can yield adequate image restoration. In addition, in the presence of a large amount of SA, it is possible to get adequate results using the DVEM with fewer DV-PSFs than would typically be required for processing images acquired with a clear circular aperture (CCA) PSF. This result implies that modification of a widefield system with the SQUBIC mask renders the system less sensitive to depth-induced SA and suitable for imaging samples at larger optical depths.

  15. Wavefront sensorless approaches to adaptive optics for in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Daniel J.; Bonora, Stefano; Mata, Oscar S.; Haunerland, Bengt K.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.; Jian, Yifan

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is necessary to correct aberrations when imaging the mouse eye with high numerical aperture. In order to obtain cellular resolution, we have implemented wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse retina. Our approach includes a lens-based system and MEMS deformable mirror for aberration correction. The AO system was constructed with a reflectance channel for structural images and fluorescence channel for functional images. The structural imaging was used in real-time for navigation on the retina using landmarks such as blood vessels. We have also implemented a tunable liquid lens to select the retinal layer of interest at which to perform the optimization. At the desired location on the mouse retina, the optimization algorithm used the fluorescence image data to drive a modal hill-climbing algorithm using an intensity or sharpness image quality metric. The optimization requires ~30 seconds to complete a search up to the 20th Zernike mode. In this report, we have demonstrated the AO performance for high-resolution images of the capillaries in a fluorescence angiography. We have also made progress on an approach to AO with pupil segmentation as a possible sensorless technique suitable for small animal retinal imaging. Pupil segmentation AO was implemented on the same ophthalmic system and imaging performance was demonstrated on fluorescent beads with induced aberrations.

  16. Wide-field wavefront sensing in solar adaptive optics : modeling and effects on reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchet, Clémentine; Tallon, Michel; Montilla, Icíar; Langlois, Maud

    2013-12-01

    The planned 4-meter diameter of the European Solar Telescope (EST) is aimed at providing high spatial resolution and large photon collecting area, in order to understand in particular the mechanisms of magnetic coupling in the chromosphere and the photosphere. To reach its goals in the visible and the near-infrared, EST is designed with both a conventional and a multi-conjugate adaptive optics (AO) of similar complexity than the ones featured for the Extremely Large Telescopes. In addition, the AO on EST has to face a particularity of solar AO: the wavefront sensing on extended sources with measurement fields of about 10'' in size. Reviewing recent literature together with an independent analysis, we investigate the impact of extended-field sensing in AO for large solar telescopes. Sensing modeling and its effect on reconstruction performance are analyzed, thanks to simulations performed with the Fractal Iterative Method for tomography (FRiM-3D), showing the difficulty to correct high altitude turbulence. We introduce a new approximate direct model of extended-source sensing which greatly improves the quality of the end-to-end simulations for EST AO. Next, we try to improve the conventional solar AO correction by using this new model in the reconstruction. Our simulations do not show significant benefits from using such tomographic model in this conventional AO configuration and under typical atmospheric conditions.

  17. FPGA-accelerated adaptive optics wavefront control part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, S.; Barth, A.; Reger, J.; Reinlein, C.; Appelfelder, M.; Beckert, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present progressive work that is based on our recently developed rapid control prototyping system (RCP), designed for the implementation of high-performance adaptive optical control algorithms using a continuous de-formable mirror (DM). The RCP system, presented in 2014, is resorting to a Xilinx Kintex-7 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), placed on a self-developed PCIe card, and installed on a high-performance computer that runs a hard real-time Linux operating system. For this purpose, algorithms for the efficient evaluation of data from a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) on an FPGA have been developed. The corresponding analog input and output cards are designed for exploiting the maximum possible performance while not being constrained to a specific DM and control algorithm due to the RCP approach. In this second part of our contribution, we focus on recent results that we achieved with this novel experimental setup. By presenting results which are far superior to the former ones, we further justify the deployment of the RCP system and its required time and resources. We conducted various experiments for revealing the effective performance, i.e. the maximum manageable complexity in the controller design that may be achieved in real-time without performance losses. A detailed analysis of the hidden latencies is carried out, showing that these latencies have been drastically reduced. In addition, a series of concepts relating the evaluation of the wavefront as well as designing and synthesizing a wavefront are thoroughly investigated with the goal to overcome some of the prevalent limitations. Furthermore, principal results regarding the closed-loop performance of the low-speed dynamics of the integrated heater in a DM concept are illustrated in detail; to be combined with the piezo-electric high-speed actuators in the next step

  18. An AP endonuclease functions in active DNA demethylation and gene imprinting in Arabidopsis [corrected].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Qian, Weiqiang; Zhu, Xiaohong; Tang, Kai; Zhang, Huiming; Ariza, Rafael R; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair, beginning with removal of methylated cytosine by the ROS1/DME subfamily of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases. Active DNA demethylation in animals requires the DNA glycosylase TDG or MBD4, which functions after oxidation or deamination of 5-methylcytosine, respectively. However, little is known about the steps following DNA glycosylase action in the active DNA demethylation pathways in plants and animals. We show here that the Arabidopsis APE1L protein has apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities and functions downstream of ROS1 and DME. APE1L and ROS1 interact in vitro and co-localize in vivo. Whole genome bisulfite sequencing of ape1l mutant plants revealed widespread alterations in DNA methylation. We show that the ape1l/zdp double mutant displays embryonic lethality. Notably, the ape1l+/-zdp-/- mutant shows a maternal-effect lethality phenotype. APE1L and the DNA phosphatase ZDP are required for FWA and MEA gene imprinting in the endosperm and are important for seed development. Thus, APE1L is a new component of the active DNA demethylation pathway and, together with ZDP, regulates gene imprinting in Arabidopsis. PMID:25569774

  19. Sensory feedback, error correction, and remapping in a multiple oscillator model of place-cell activity.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Joseph D; Knierim, James J; Zhang, Kechen

    2011-01-01

    Mammals navigate by integrating self-motion signals ("path integration") and occasionally fixing on familiar environmental landmarks. The rat hippocampus is a model system of spatial representation in which place cells are thought to integrate both sensory and spatial information from entorhinal cortex. The localized firing fields of hippocampal place cells and entorhinal grid-cells demonstrate a phase relationship with the local theta (6-10 Hz) rhythm that may be a temporal signature of path integration. However, encoding self-motion in the phase of theta oscillations requires high temporal precision and is susceptible to idiothetic noise, neuronal variability, and a changing environment. We present a model based on oscillatory interference theory, previously studied in the context of grid cells, in which transient temporal synchronization among a pool of path-integrating theta oscillators produces hippocampal-like place fields. We hypothesize that a spatiotemporally extended sensory interaction with external cues modulates feedback to the theta oscillators. We implement a form of this cue-driven feedback and show that it can retrieve fixed points in the phase code of position. A single cue can smoothly reset oscillator phases to correct for both systematic errors and continuous noise in path integration. Further, simulations in which local and global cues are rotated against each other reveal a phase-code mechanism in which conflicting cue arrangements can reproduce experimentally observed distributions of "partial remapping" responses. This abstract model demonstrates that phase-code feedback can provide stability to the temporal coding of position during navigation and may contribute to the context-dependence of hippocampal spatial representations. While the anatomical substrates of these processes have not been fully characterized, our findings suggest several signatures that can be evaluated in future experiments. PMID:21994494

  20. Holographic imaging with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hai; Soloviev, Oleg; Wilding, Dean; Pozzi, Paolo; Verhaegen, Michel; Vdovin, Gleb

    2016-06-27

    A high-resolution Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor has been used for coherent holographic imaging, by computer reconstruction and propagation of the complex field in a lensless imaging setup. The resolution of the images obtained with the experimental data is in a good agreement with the diffraction theory. Although a proper calibration with a reference beam improves the image quality, the method has a potential for reference-less holographic imaging with spatially coherent monochromatic and narrowband polychromatic sources in microscopy and imaging through turbulence. PMID:27410536

  1. Lateral shearing interferometry of high-harmonic wavefronts.

    PubMed

    Austin, Dane R; Witting, Tobias; Arrell, Christopher A; Frank, Felix; Wyatt, Adam S; Marangos, Jon P; Tisch, John W G; Walmsley, Ian A

    2011-05-15

    We present a technique for frequency-resolved wavefront characterization of high harmonics based on lateral shearing interferometry. Tilted replicas of the driving laser pulse are produced by a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, producing separate focii in the target. The interference of the resulting harmonics on a flat-field extreme ultraviolet spectrometer yields the spatial phase derivative. A comprehensive set of spatial profiles, resolved by harmonic order, validate the technique and reveal the interplay of single-atom and macroscopic effects. PMID:21593877

  2. Managing the wavefront for exoplanet imaging with a space coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, John T.; Moody, Dwight; Krist, John; Gordon, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We update the designs, demonstrations, and science prospects for the direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of exoplanetary systems with the hybrid Lyot coronagraph. We compare model predictions for exoplanet science performance with the flagship AFTA/WFIRST mission and dedicated smaller-class space observatories. Together with a pair of deformable mirrors for optical wavefront control, the hybrid Lyot coronagraph creates high contrast dark fields of view extending to within angular separations of 2.5 lambda/D from the central star at visible wavelengths. Performance metrics and design trades are presented, including image contrast, spectral bandwidth, overall efficiency and throughput, and model-validating laboratory demonstrations.

  3. Analysis of non-linearity in differential wavefront sensing technique.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hui-Zong; Liang, Yu-Rong; Yeh, Hsien-Chi

    2016-03-01

    An analytical model of a differential wavefront sensing (DWS) technique based on Gaussian Beam propagation has been derived. Compared with the result of the interference signals detected by quadrant photodiode, which is calculated by using the numerical method, the analytical model has been verified. Both the analytical model and numerical simulation show milli-radians level non-linearity effect of DWS detection. In addition, the beam clipping has strong influence on the non-linearity of DWS. The larger the beam clipping is, the smaller the non-linearity is. However, the beam walking effect hardly has influence on DWS. Thus, it can be ignored in laser interferometer. PMID:26974079

  4. Wavefront reversal technique for self-referencing collimation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hii, King Ung; Kwek, Kuan Hiang

    2010-02-01

    We present a wavefront reversal technique to produce a dual-field fringe pattern for self-referencing collimation testing in wedge-plate lateral-shear interferometry. The method requires only a suitably placed cubic beam splitter to produce two replicas of the fringe field formed by the wedge-plate lateral-shear interferometer. One of the replicas has a fringe pattern that is the reverse of the other. With these two fringe fields, the collimation testing has a built-in reference, and the detection sensitivity is twice that of a single-wedge-plate technique.

  5. Towards feasible and effective predictive wavefront control for adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J

    2008-06-04

    We have recently proposed Predictive Fourier Control, a computationally efficient and adaptive algorithm for predictive wavefront control that assumes frozen flow turbulence. We summarize refinements to the state-space model that allow operation with arbitrary computational delays and reduce the computational cost of solving for new control. We present initial atmospheric characterization using observations with Gemini North's Altair AO system. These observations, taken over 1 year, indicate that frozen flow is exists, contains substantial power, and is strongly detected 94% of the time.

  6. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans. PMID:24814483

  7. [Variable magnetic field of 8 Hz corrects the opioid system activity in mollusks behind the ferromagnetic screening].

    PubMed

    Temur'iants, N A; Kostiuk, A S

    2014-01-01

    The three phases of mollusk nociception alteration as a result of extended ferromagnetic screening combined with exposure to a variable magnetic field of 8 Hz correlated with phase changes in the opioid system activity (OSA) deduced from the naloxone action on the thermal avoidance response. On phase I, OSA inactivation was inhibited and, consequently, hyperalgesia progression was expedited. On phase II, OSA rose so that naloxone annulled completely the antinociceptive effect produced by the ferromagnetic screening. On phase III, OSA declined progressively, as naloxone merely reduced the antinociceptive effect because of apparently, growing OSA tolerance to the ferromagnetic screening. Phase I was absent when mollusks were exposed to the ferromagnetic screening and variable magnetic field; however, OSA changes on phases II and III were present. It was concluded that the variable magnetic field of 8 Hz can be used for correcting changes in the opioid system activity in mollusks behind the ferromagnetic screening. PMID:25163338

  8. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Parapat, Riny Y; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    Correction for 'Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805. PMID:26961853

  9. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parapat, Riny Y.; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-03-01

    Correction for `Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805.

  10. Horizon: A Proposal for Large Aperture, Active Optics in Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Jenstrom, Del

    2000-01-01

    In 1999, NASA's New Millennium Program called for proposals to validate new technology in high-earth orbit for the Earth Observing-3 (NMP EO3) mission to fly in 2003. In response, we proposed to test a large aperture, active optics telescope in geosynchronous orbit. This would flight-qualify new technologies for both Earth and Space science: 1) a future instrument with LANDSAT image resolution and radiometric quality watching continuously from geosynchronous station, and 2) the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) for deep space imaging. Six enabling technologies were to be flight-qualified: 1) a 3-meter, lightweight segmented primary mirror, 2) mirror actuators and mechanisms, 3) a deformable mirror, 4) coarse phasing techniques, 5) phase retrieval for wavefront control during stellar viewing, and 6) phase diversity for wavefront control during Earth viewing. Three enhancing technologies were to be flight- validated: 1) mirror deployment and latching mechanisms, 2) an advanced microcontroller, and 3) GPS at GEO. In particular, two wavefront sensing algorithms, phase retrieval by JPL and phase diversity by ERIM International, were to sense optical system alignment and focus errors, and to correct them using high-precision mirror mechanisms. Active corrections based on Earth scenes are challenging because phase diversity images must be collected from extended, dynamically changing scenes. In addition, an Earth-facing telescope in GEO orbit is subject to a powerful diurnal thermal and radiometric cycle not experienced by deep-space astronomy. The Horizon proposal was a bare-bones design for a lightweight large-aperture, active optical system that is a practical blend of science requirements, emerging technologies, budget constraints, launch vehicle considerations, orbital mechanics, optical hardware, phase-determination algorithms, communication strategy, computational burdens, and first-rate cooperation among earth and space scientists, engineers and managers

  11. 78 FR 45051 - Small Business Size Standards; Support Activities for Mining; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... June 20, 2013 (78 FR 37404). The document amended SBA's Small Business Size Regulations by increasing.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR Doc. 2013-14712 appearing on page 37404 in the June 20, 2013 Federal Register... ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 121 RIN 3245-AG44 Small Business Size Standards; Support Activities for...

  12. Activation of the melastatin-related cation channel TRPM3 by D-erythro-sphingosine [corrected].

    PubMed

    Grimm, Christian; Kraft, Robert; Schultz, Günter; Harteneck, Christian

    2005-03-01

    TRPM3, a member of the melastatin-like transient receptor potential channel subfamily (TRPM), is predominantly expressed in human kidney and brain. TRPM3 mediates spontaneous Ca2+ entry and nonselective cation currents in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Using measurements with the Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2 and the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we found that D-erythro-sphingosine, a metabolite arising during the de novo synthesis of cellular sphingolipids, activated TRPM3. Other transient receptor potential (TRP) channels tested [classic or canonical TRP (TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5), vanilloid-like TRP (TRPV4, TRPV5, TRPV6), and melastatin-like TRP (TRPM2)] did not significantly respond to application of sphingosine. Sphingosine-induced TRPM3 activation was not mediated by inhibition of protein kinase C, depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, and intracellular conversion of sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate. Although sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramides had no effect, two structural analogs of sphingosine, dihydro-D-erythro-sphingosine and N,N-dimethyl-D-erythro-sphingosine, also activated TRPM3. Sphingolipids, including sphingosine, are known to have inhibitory effects on a variety of ion channels. Thus, TRPM3 is the first ion channel activated by sphingolipids. PMID:15550678

  13. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  14. Improving the Sensitivity of Astronomical Curvature Wavefront Sensor Using Dual-Stroke Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Blain, Celia; Takami, Hideki; Hayano, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2008-06-01

    Curvature wavefront sensors measure wavefront phase aberration by acquiring two intensity images on either side of the pupil plane. Low-order adaptive optics (AO) systems using curvature wavefront sensing (CWFS) have proved to be highly efficient for astronomical applications: they are more sensitive, use fewer detector elements, and achieve, for the same number of actuators, higher Strehl ratios than AO systems using more traditional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. In higher-order systems, however, curvature wavefront sensors lose sensitivity to low spatial frequencies wavefront aberrations. This effect, often described as "noise propagation," limits the usefulness of curvature wavefront sensing for high-order AO systems and/or large telescopes. In this paper, we first explain how this noise propagation effect occurs and then show that this limitation can be overcome by acquiring four defocused images of the pupil instead of two. This solution can be implemented without significant technology development and can run with a simple linear wavefront reconstruction algorithm at >kHz speed. We have successfully demonstrated in the laboratory that the four conjugation planes can be sequentially obtained at >kHz speed using a speaker-vibrating membrane assembly commonly used in current curvature AO systems. Closed loop simulations show that implementing this scheme is equivalent to making the guide star 1 to 1.5 magnitude brighter for the configuration tested (188 actuator elements on 8-m telescope). Higher sensitivity gains are expected on curvature systems with higher number of actuators.

  15. Study of an instrument for sensing errors in a telescope wavefront

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Partial results are presented of theoretical and experimental investigations of different focal plane sensor configurations for determining the error in a telescope wavefront. The coarse range sensor and fine range sensors are used in the experimentation. The design of a wavefront error simulator is presented along with the Hartmann test, the shearing polarization interferometer, the Zernike test, and the Zernike polarization test.

  16. Playback of beyond high definition video signal in holographic data storage system with wavefront compensation and parallel signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Kikuchi, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a holographic data storage system that can demonstrate real-time playback of beyond high definition video signals. In the proposed system, to increase the data-transfer rate of the reproduced data, we focused on improving the SNR of the reproduced data and on improving the signal processing speed, which the SNR of the reproduced data has a significant effect on. One of the factors that deteriorate the SNR is shrinkage in the medium. This shrinkage distorts recorded holograms and degrades the quality of the reproduced data. We investigated wavefront compensation as a means to improve the SNR of reproduced data degraded by hologram distortion and found that controlling the defocus component of the reference beam is effective. We have also been developing parallel signal processing to increase the data-transfer rate. We placed three GPUs in the signal processing unit: one for the reproduced data detection from the reconstructed image and two for the LDPC decoding for error correction of the reproduced data. The LDPC decoding required a lot more time than the data detection, so we designed a signal processing in which detected data in the GPU for the data detection were sent to the two GPUs for the LDPC decoding alternatively. We implemented wavefront compensation for the defocus component and developed parallel signal processing with three GPUs for our holographic data storage system. Using this system, we demonstrated real-time playback of beyond high definition video signals with 50 Mbps.

  17. Modal wavefront reconstruction over general shaped aperture by numerical orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jingfei; Li, Xinhua; Gao, Zhishan; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Wenqing; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Qun

    2015-03-01

    In practical optical measurements, the wavefront data are recorded by pixelated imaging sensors. The closed-form analytical base polynomial will lose its orthogonality in the discrete wavefront database. For a wavefront with an irregularly shaped aperture, the corresponding analytical base polynomials are laboriously derived. The use of numerical orthogonal polynomials for reconstructing a wavefront with a general shaped aperture over the discrete data points is presented. Numerical polynomials are orthogonal over the discrete data points regardless of the boundary shape of the aperture. The performance of numerical orthogonal polynomials is confirmed by theoretical analysis and experiments. The results demonstrate the adaptability, validity, and accuracy of numerical orthogonal polynomials for estimating the wavefront over a general shaped aperture from regular boundary to an irregular boundary.

  18. Two-dimension lateral shearing interferometry for microscope objective wavefront metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Xing, Tingwen; Jiang, Yadong; Lv, Baobin; Xu, Fuchao

    2014-11-01

    Lateral shearing interferometry was an attractive technique to measure the wavefront aberration of high numerical aperture microscope objective lens. A two-dimension lateral shearing interferometer based on chessboard grating was designed for microscope objective wavefront metrology. By positioning the chessboard grating at the Talbot distance of the objective focal plane, the wavefront was divided and sheared in two-dimension. By applying two-dimensional Fourier transform method and differential Zernike polynomial fitting, Zernike coefficients of the wavefront were obtained. A 10x, NA0.25 microscope objective was measured at 632.8nm wavelength, the results showed that the wavefront of the objective was 0.755λ PV, 0.172λ RMS, the repeatability(3σ) of RMS at random grating position was 2.3mλ, the repeatability(3σ) of Z5 to Z36 at random grating position were better than 17mλ.

  19. Motion blurred image restoration based on Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuhua; Dong, Wende; Feng, Huajun; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi

    2012-10-01

    When relative motion between the target and the camera occurs, the captured images would be blurred. Due to the arbitrariness of the motion, it is of great difficulty to restore the degraded images. In this paper, a new method based on Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor is proposed to deblur the degraded image of the extended target caused by arbitrary motion. Relevant theoretical analysis is given and a corresponding experimental system is built. During the exposure time, image sequences are obtained by the Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor to calculate the displacement vectors, from which the Point Spread Function (PSF) is estimated to restore the blurred image. Experimental results show that the proposed method can efficiently restore the degraded image of the target. So the application of Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor can be extended to detect the motion of target, which means we can deal with wavefront distortion and motion blur using Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor simultaneously.

  20. Wavefront-error evaluation by mathematical analysis of experimental Foucault-test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The diffraction theory of the Foucault test provides an integral formula expressing the complex amplitude and irradiance distribution in the Foucault pattern of a test mirror (lens) as a function of wavefront error. Recent literature presents methods of inverting this formula to express wavefront error in terms of irradiance in the Foucault pattern. The present paper describes a study in which the inversion formulation was applied to photometric Foucault-test measurements on a nearly diffraction-limited mirror to determine wavefront errors for direct comparison with ones determined from scatter-plate interferometer measurements. The results affirm the practicability of the Foucault test for quantitative wavefront analysis of very small errors, and they reveal the fallacy of the prevalent belief that the test is limited to qualitative use only. Implications of the results with regard to optical testing and the potential use of the Foucault test for wavefront analysis in orbital space telescopes are discussed.

  1. Binary hologram based high speed zonal wavefront sensing with reduced estimation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2016-03-01

    Reduced wavefront estimation time in a Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensor plays an important role in any high speed application of the sensor. Exploiting computer generated holography technique, one can generate an array of binary diffraction grating pattern to produce an array of focal spots, similar to that in a Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS). The transmittance functions of each of such a grating pattern can be configured to produce a one dimensional (1D) array of focal spots of a desired order. In this paper, we show that the formation of 1D array, further facilitates in the process of single indexed wavefront estimation in its true sense that considerably reduces the wavefront estimation time.

  2. Improved zonal wavefront reconstruction algorithm for Hartmann type test with arbitrary grid patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengyang; Li, Dahai; Zhang, Chen; E, Kewei; Hong, Zhihan; Li, Chengxu

    2015-08-01

    Zonal wavefront reconstruction by use of the well known Southwell algorithm with rectangular grid patterns has been considered in the literature. However, when the grid patterns are nonrectangular, modal wavefront reconstruction has been extensively used. We propose an improved zonal wavefront reconstruction algorithm for Hartmann type test with arbitrary grid patterns. We develop the mathematical expressions to show that the wavefront over arbitrary grid patterns, such as misaligned, partly obscured, and non-square mesh grids, can be estimated well. Both iterative solution and least-square solution for the proposed algorithm are described and compared. Numerical calculation shows that the zonal wavefront reconstruction over nonrectangular profile with the proposed algorithm results in a significant improvement in comparison with the Southwell algorithm.

  3. Mechanisms by Which Interleukin-12 Corrects Defective NK Cell Anticryptococcal Activity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Stephen K.; Ogbomo, Henry; Li, ShuShun; Timm-McCann, Martina; Xiang, Richard F.; Huston, Shaunna M.; Ganguly, Anutosh; Colarusso, Pina; Gill, M. John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast and a leading cause of life-threatening meningitis in AIDS patients. Natural killer (NK) cells are important immune effector cells that directly recognize and kill C. neoformans via a perforin-dependent cytotoxic mechanism. We previously showed that NK cells from HIV-infected patients have aberrant anticryptococcal killing and that interleukin-12 (IL-12) restores the activity at least partially through restoration of NKp30. However, the mechanisms causing this defect or how IL-12 restores the function was unknown. By examining the sequential steps in NK cell killing of Cryptococcus, we found that NK cells from HIV-infected patients had defective binding of NK cells to C. neoformans. Moreover, those NK cells that bound to C. neoformans failed to polarize perforin-containing granules to the microbial synapse compared to healthy controls, suggesting that binding was insufficient to restore a defect in perforin polarization. We also identified lower expression of intracellular perforin and defective perforin release from NK cells of HIV-infected patients in response to C. neoformans. Importantly, treatment of NK cells from HIV-infected patients with IL-12 reversed the multiple defects in binding, granule polarization, perforin content, and perforin release and restored anticryptococcal activity. Thus, there are multiple defects in the cytolytic machinery of NK cells from HIV-infected patients, which cumulatively result in defective NK cell anticryptococcal activity, and each of these defects can be reversed with IL-12. PMID:27555306

  4. A laser guide star wavefront sensor bench demonstrator for TMT.

    PubMed

    Lardiere, Olivier; Conan, Rodolphe; Bradley, Colin; Jackson, Kate; Herriot, Glen

    2008-04-14

    Sodium laser guide stars (LGSs) allow, in theory, Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to reach a full sky coverage, but they have their own limitations. The artificial star is elongated due to the sodium layer thickness, and the temporal and spatial variability of the sodium atom density induces changing errors on wavefront measurements, especially with Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) for which the LGS elongation is larger. In the framework of the Thirty-Meter-Telescope project (TMT), the AO-Lab of the University of Victoria (UVic) has built an LGS-simulator test bed in order to assess the performance of new centroiding algorithms for LGS Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (SH-WFS). The design of the LGS-bench is presented, as well as laboratory SH-WFS images featuring 29x29 radially elongated spots, simulated for a 30-m pupil. The errors induced by the LGS variations, such as focus and spherical aberrations, are characterized and discussed. This bench is not limited to SH-WFS and can serve as an LGS-simulator test bed to any other LGS-AO projects for which sodium layer fluctuations are an issue. PMID:18542656

  5. X-ray pulse wavefront metrology using speckle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Berujon, Sebastien; Ziegler, Eric; Cloetens, Peter

    2015-01-01

    An instrument allowing the quantitative analysis of X-ray pulsed wavefronts is presented and its processing method explained. The system relies on the X-ray speckle tracking principle to accurately measure the phase gradient of the X-ray beam from which beam optical aberrations can be deduced. The key component of this instrument, a semi-transparent scintillator emitting visible light while transmitting X-rays, allows simultaneous recording of two speckle images at two different propagation distances from the X-ray source. The speckle tracking procedure for a reference-less metrology mode is described with a detailed account on the advanced processing schemes used. A method to characterize and compensate for the imaging detector distortion, whose principle is also based on speckle, is included. The presented instrument is expected to find interest at synchrotrons and at the new X-ray free-electron laser sources under development worldwide where successful exploitation of beams relies on the availability of an accurate wavefront metrology. PMID:26134791

  6. Wavefront shaping based on three-dimensional optoacoustic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. L.; Estrada, Héctor; Ozbek, Ali; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Wavefront shaping techniques have recently evolved as a promising tool to control the light distribution in optically-scattering media. These techniques are based on spatially-modulating the phase of an incident light beam to create positive interference (focusing) at specific locations in the speckle pattern of the scattered wavefield. The optimum phase distribution (mask) of the spatial light modulator that allows focusing at the target location(s) is determined iteratively by monitoring the light intensity at such target. In this regard, optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging may provide the convenient advantage of simultaneous feedback information on light distribution in an entire region of interest. Herein, we showcase that volumetric optoacoustic images can effectively be used as a feedback mechanism in an iterative optimization algorithm allowing controlling the light distribution after propagation through a scattering sample. Experiments performed with absorbing microparticles distributed in a three-dimensional region showcase the feasibility of enhancing the light intensity at specific points. The advantages provided by optoacoustic imaging in terms of spatial and temporal resolution anticipate new capabilities of wavefront shaping techniques in biomedical optics.

  7. X-ray pulse wavefront metrology using speckle tracking.

    PubMed

    Berujon, Sebastien; Ziegler, Eric; Cloetens, Peter

    2015-07-01

    An instrument allowing the quantitative analysis of X-ray pulsed wavefronts is presented and its processing method explained. The system relies on the X-ray speckle tracking principle to accurately measure the phase gradient of the X-ray beam from which beam optical aberrations can be deduced. The key component of this instrument, a semi-transparent scintillator emitting visible light while transmitting X-rays, allows simultaneous recording of two speckle images at two different propagation distances from the X-ray source. The speckle tracking procedure for a reference-less metrology mode is described with a detailed account on the advanced processing schemes used. A method to characterize and compensate for the imaging detector distortion, whose principle is also based on speckle, is included. The presented instrument is expected to find interest at synchrotrons and at the new X-ray free-electron laser sources under development worldwide where successful exploitation of beams relies on the availability of an accurate wavefront metrology. PMID:26134791

  8. Coronagraph-integrated wavefront sensing with a sparse aperture mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Hari; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Cavanagh, Kathleen; Riggs, A. J. Eldorado

    2015-07-01

    Stellar coronagraph performance is highly sensitive to optical aberrations. In order to effectively suppress starlight for exoplanet imaging applications, low-order wavefront aberrations entering a coronagraph, such as tip-tilt, defocus, and coma, must be determined and compensated. Previous authors have established the utility of pupil-plane masks (both nonredundant/sparse-aperture and generally asymmetric aperture masks) for wavefront sensing (WFS). Here, we show how a sparse aperture mask (SAM) can be integrated with a coronagraph to measure low-order differential phase aberrations. Starlight rejected by the coronagraph's focal plane stop is collimated to a relay pupil, where the mask forms an interference fringe pattern on a subsequent detector. Our numerical Fourier propagation models show that the information encoded in the fringe intensity distortions is sufficient to accurately discriminate and estimate Zernike phase modes extending from tip-tilt up to radial degree n=5, with amplitude up to λ/20 RMS. The SAM sensor can be integrated with both Lyot and shaped pupil coronagraphs at no detriment to the science beam quality. We characterize the reconstruction accuracy and the performance under low flux/short exposure time conditions, and place it in context of other coronagraph WFS schemes.

  9. Mirror actively deformed and regulated for applications in space: design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Hourtoule, Claire; Singer, Christian; Devilliers, Christophe; Lopez, Céline; Chazallet, Frédéric

    2013-09-01

    The need for both high quality images and lightweight structures is one of the main drivers in space telescope design. An efficient wavefront control system will become mandatory in future large observatories, retaining performance while relaxing specifications in the global system's stability. We present the mirror actively deformed and regulated for applications in space project, which aims to demonstrate the applicability of active optics for future space instrumentation. It has led to the development of a 24-actuator, 90-mm-diameter active mirror, able to compensate for large lightweight primary mirror deformations in the telescope's exit pupil. The correcting system has been designed for expected wavefront errors from 3-m-class lightweight primary mirrors, while also taking into account constraints for space use. Finite element analysis allowed an optimization of the system in order to achieve a precision of correction better than 10 nm rms. A dedicated testbed has been designed to fully characterize the integrated system performance in representative operating conditions. It is composed of: a telescope simulator, an active correction loop, a point spread function imager, and a Fizeau interferometer. All conducted tests demonstrated the correcting mirror performance and has improved this technology maturity to a TRL4.

  10. Dual-mode wavefront detection sensor based on liquid crystal microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Pan, Fan; Liu, Kan; Wu, Yuntao; Zhang, Yanduo; Xie, Xiaolin

    2014-10-01

    Based on a proposed electrically tunable liquid crystal (LC) micro-lens array (MLA) instead of a commonly used microlens array with fixed focal length in a conventional type, a new prototyped Shack-Hartmann sensor is reported. The LCMLA with 128 × 128 elements is fabricated by the methods of photolithography and hydrochloric acid etching. Composed of the proposed LC-MLA and a CCD, a new type Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is got. This kind sensor can solve problems of the tradition wavefront sensor that the larger measurement range and high measurement accurate can't be realized by the same device. Except for adaptive switching the two working modes, this wavefront sensor also has a dual-mode imaging feature with obtaining wavefront information of the target and it's two-dimensional optical intensity image at the same time. In order to verify it's characteristics, an extreme experiment is designed, which introduces a distortion wavefront. At this circumstanc, the traditional wavefront sensor can't get anything. However, with proposed wavefront sensor, this situation can be solved by adjusting the applied voltage of LC-MLA to change it's focal length. With a reconstruction method, the three-dimensional information of the wavefront can be got. At the same time, the two-dimensional optical intensity image is also got. From the experiments, we can prove that it can effectively improve detection sensitivity and dynamic measurement range of wavefront. Results of the prototype demonstrated qualitatively verify this feasibility. This kind new type wavefront sensor will have a wide variety of applications in adaptive optics.

  11. Transmit B1 Field Correction at 7T using Actively Tuned Coupled Inner Elements

    PubMed Central

    Merkle, Hellmut; Murphy-Boesch, Joseph; van Gelderen, Peter; Wang, Shumin; Li, Tie-Qiang; Koretsky, Alan P.; Duyn, Josef H.

    2011-01-01

    When volume coils are used for 1H imaging of the human head at 7T, wavelength effects in tissue cause intensity variations that are typically brighter at the center of the head and darker in the periphery. Much of this image non-uniformity can be attributed to variation in the effective transmit B1 field, which falls by about 50% to the left and right of center at mid-elevation in the brain. Because most of this B1 loss occurs in the periphery of the brain, we have explored use of actively controlled, off-resonant loop elements to locally enhance the transmit B1 field in these regions. When tuned to frequencies above the NMR frequency, these elements provide strong local enhancement of the B1 field of the transmit coil. Because they are tuned off-resonance, some volume coil detuning results, but resistive loading of the coil mode remains dominated by the sample. By digitally controlling their frequency offsets, the field enhancement of each inner element can be placed under active control. Using an array of eight, digitally-controlled elements placed around a custom-built head phantom, we demonstrate the feasibility of improving the B1 homogeneity of a transmit/receive volume coil without the need for multiple RF transmit channels. PMID:21437974

  12. Expression and purification of correctly processed, active human TACE catalytic domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Clarke, H R; Wolfson, M F; Rauch, C T; Castner, B J; Huang, C P; Gerhart, M J; Johnson, R S; Cerretti, D P; Paxton, R J; Price, V L; Black, R A

    1998-06-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) converting enzyme (TACE) releases soluble TNF alpha from cells. It is a member of the adamalysin family of metalloproteases. A truncated form of TACE cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified to homogeneity in order to study TACE structure and function. Recombinant TACE was expressed as a preproprotein including the pro- and catalytic (PROCAT) domains fused to the yeast alpha-factor leader. A C-terminal immunoreactive FLAG peptide was added for Western blot detection and anti-FLAG antibody column purification. We constructed two glycosylation mutant PROCAT TACE isoforms to facilitate purification. A PROCAT isoform, mutated to eliminate two N-linked glycosylation sites, was buffer exchanged and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange chromatography and an anti-FLAG antibody affinity step. N-terminal sequence analysis showed that the mutant preproprotein was processed in yeast at the furin protease cleavage site and yielded an active catalytic domain which has TNF alpha peptide-specific protease activity. Mass spectrometry of the purified catalytic domain showed that removal of both N-linked sites results in a homogeneous sized polypeptide lacking further posttranslational modifications. PMID:9631522

  13. MAGNETIC LIQUID DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATIONS: ACTIVE CORRECTION OF OPTICAL ABERRATIONS FROM LOWER-GRADE OPTICS AND SUPPORT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high-amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has the advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper, we demonstrate extremely high strokes and interactuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91 actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror uses a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field on the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberrations of large and lower optical quality primary mirrors held by simple support systems. We estimate basic parameters of the needed MLDMs, obtaining reasonable values.

  14. Wavefront-Guided Photorefractive Keratectomy with the Use of a New Hartmann-Shack Aberrometer in Patients with Myopia and Compound Myopic Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Schallhorn, Steven C.; Venter, Jan A.; Hannan, Stephen J.; Hettinger, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess refractive and visual outcomes and patient satisfaction of wavefront-guided photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in eyes with myopia and compound myopic astigmatism, with the ablation profile derived from a new Hartmann-Shack aberrometer. Methods. In this retrospective study, 662 eyes that underwent wavefront-guided PRK with a treatment profile derived from a new generation Hartmann-Shack aberrometer (iDesign aberrometer, Abbott Medical Optics, Inc., Santa Ana, CA) were analyzed. The preoperative manifest sphere ranged from −0.25 to −10.75 D, and preoperative manifest cylinder was between 0.00 and −5.25 D. Refractive and visual outcomes, vector analysis of the change in refractive cylinder, and patient satisfaction were evaluated. Results. At 3 months, 91.1% of eyes had manifest spherical equivalent within 0.50 D. The percentage of eyes achieving uncorrected distance visual acuity 20/20 or better was 89.4% monocularly and 96.5% binocularly. The mean correction ratio of refractive cylinder was 1.02 ± 0.43, and the mean error of angle was 0.00 ± 14.86° at 3 months postoperatively. Self-reported scores for optical side effects, such as starburst, glare, halo, ghosting, and double vision, were low. Conclusion. The use of a new Hartmann-Shack aberrometer for wavefront-guided photorefractive keratectomy resulted in high predictability, efficacy, and patient satisfaction. PMID:26504595

  15. Single-Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Onar, Omer C; Miller, John M; Tang, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance. To understand the power flow through the system this paper presents a novel approach to the system model and the impact of different control parameters on the load power. The implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation is also discussed.

  16. [Losartan for the correction of thrombocyte activity in patients suffering from arterial hypertension with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, V B; medvedev, i N; Kumova, T A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate therapeutic effects of losartan on intravascular thrombocyte activity (ITA) in patients suffering from arterial hypertension with metabolic syndrome (MS). The subjects of the study were 35 patients administered losartan 50 mg a day for 4 months. The dynamics of the following parameters were evaluated: anthropometric parameters, blood lipids, lipid peroxidation in blood plasma and thrombocytes, the anti-oxidative protection of the liquid part of blood and platelets, and ITA. Student criterion was used for statistical analysis. In patients with AH and MS losartan had a positive effect on peroxidation syndrome and optimized ITA. To maintain the positive effects, prolonged administration of losartan is needed. In order to lower body mass in AH patients with MS losartan should be used in combination with non-drug means. PMID:18326282

  17. Second-order perturbative corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction with the hole and particle approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, David

    2014-04-01

    Second-order corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction (RASCI) with the hole and particle truncation of the excitation operator are developed. Theoretically, the computational cost of the implemented perturbative approach, abbreviated as RASCI(2), grows like its single reference counterpart in MP2. Two different forms of RASCI(2) have been explored, that is the generalized Davidson-Kapuy and the Epstein-Nesbet partitions of the Hamiltonian. The preliminary results indicate that the use of energy level shift of a few tenths of a Hartree might systematically improve the accuracy of the RASCI(2) energies. The method has been tested in the computation of the ground state energy profiles along the dissociation of the hydrogen fluoride and N2 molecules, the computation of correlation energy in the G2/97 molecular test set, and in the computation of excitation energies to low-lying states in small organic molecules.

  18. Second-order perturbative corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction with the hole and particle approach

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, David

    2014-04-14

    Second-order corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction (RASCI) with the hole and particle truncation of the excitation operator are developed. Theoretically, the computational cost of the implemented perturbative approach, abbreviated as RASCI(2), grows like its single reference counterpart in MP2. Two different forms of RASCI(2) have been explored, that is the generalized Davidson-Kapuy and the Epstein-Nesbet partitions of the Hamiltonian. The preliminary results indicate that the use of energy level shift of a few tenths of a Hartree might systematically improve the accuracy of the RASCI(2) energies. The method has been tested in the computation of the ground state energy profiles along the dissociation of the hydrogen fluoride and N{sub 2} molecules, the computation of correlation energy in the G2/97 molecular test set, and in the computation of excitation energies to low-lying states in small organic molecules.

  19. Harmonic and power factor correction by means of active line conditioners with adaptive estimation control

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the proliferation of power electronic devices in recent years, the amount of harmonic current injected into power systems is on the increase causing undesirable voltage waveform distortion. A new type of versatile Active Power Line Conditioner able to supply a DC load while generating useful harmonics which help reduce the voltage distortion at the connected bus was designed, built and analyzed. The optimum design was obtained by means of an economic study that considers the power loss, the cost of an RFI filter and the effect of the switching rate. An adaptive methodology, requiring only knowledge of the bus voltage distortion, was developed and applied to adjust the amplitudes and phase angles of the injected harmonic currents. This novel approach is based on reducing the voltage Total Harmonic Distortion by minimizing the individual harmonic voltages in an error signal using a gradient method. Through successive adjustments, the difference between the actual bus voltage and the desired bus voltage is minimized. The proposed method can be successfully applied in low and medium voltage networks with multiple nonlinear loads scattered among linear loads.

  20. High Contrast Imaging with an Arbitrary Aperture: Active Correction of Aperture Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; Soummer, Remi; Perrin, Marshall; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie

    2013-12-01

    We discuss the application of a new method to achieve high-contrast images with Extremely Large Telescopes. Our approach relies on using two sequential Deformable Mirrors to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of Deformable Mirror Surfaces that yield high contrast Point Spread Functions is not linear, and non-linear methods are needed to find the true minimum in the optimization topology. We solve the highly non-linear Monge-Ampere equation that is the fundamental equation describing the physics of phase induced amplitude modulation. We determine the optimum configuration for our two sequential Deformable Mirror system and show that high-throughput and high contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies. We name this process Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD). We quantify the performances of this technique on various ELTs geometries. We illustrate its application when seeking to maintain high contrast in the configuration for which some of the primary mirror's segments might be missing.

  1. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuan; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic 18F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R2 = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast. PMID:24694141

  2. Study of optimal wavefront sensing with elongated laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. J.; Adkins, S.; Gavel, D.; Fusco, T.; Michau, V.

    2008-06-01

    Over the past decade, adaptive optics (AO) has become an established method for overcoming the effects of atmospheric turbulence on both astronomical imaging and spectroscopic observations. These systems are now beginning to make extensive use of laser guide star (LGS) techniques to improve performance and provide increased sky coverage. Sodium LGS AO employs one or more lasers at 589-nm wavelength to produce an artificial guide star through excitation of sodium atoms in the mesosphere (90 km altitude). Because of its dependence on the abundance and distribution of sodium atoms in the mesosphere, this approach has its own unique set of difficulties not seen with natural stars. The sodium layer exhibits time-dependent variations in density and altitude, and since it is at a finite range, the LGS images become elongated due to the thickness of the layer and the offset between the laser projection point and the subapertures of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS). Elongation causes the LGS image to be spread out resulting in a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio which, in turn, leads to an increase in SHWFS measurement error and therefore an increased error in wavefront phase reconstruction. To address the problem of elongation, and also to provide a higher level of readout performance and reduced readout noise, a new type of charge-coupled device (CCD) is now under development for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing called the polar coordinate CCD. In this device, discrete imaging arrays are provided in each SHWFS subaperture and the size, shape and orientation of each discrete imaging array are adjusted to optimally sample the LGS image. The device is referred to as the polar coordinate CCD because the location of each imager is defined by a polar coordinate system centred on the laser guide star projection point. This concept is especially suited to Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) where the effect of perspective elongation is a significant factor. In this

  3. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques. PMID:27304296

  4. Wavefront control in high average-power multi-slab laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilar, Jan; Bonora, Stefano; Divoky, Martin; Phillips, Jonathan; Smith, Jodie; Ertel, Klaus; Collier, John; Jelinkova, Helena; Lucianetti, Antonio; Mocek, TomáÅ.¡

    2015-03-01

    A high average power cryogenically-cooled diode-pumped solid-state laser system for Hilase centre in Czech Republic is being developed by Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, England in collaboration with Hilase team. The system will deliver pulses with energy of 100 J at 10 Hz repetition rate and will find applications in research and industry. The laser medium and other elements of the system are subject to heavy thermal loading which causes serious optical aberrations and degrade the output beam quality. To meet the stringent laser requirements of this kWclass laser, it is necessary to implement adaptive optics system, which will correct for these aberrations. During our research the sources of aberrations have been identified and analyzed. Based on this analysis, a suitable adaptive optics system was proposed. After finalizing numerical models, simulations and optimizations, the adaptive optics system was developed, characterized and installed in a cryogenically-cooled multi-slab laser system running up to 6 J and 10 Hz. The adaptive optics system consists of 6x6 actuator bimorph deformable mirror and wavefront sensor based on quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry operated in closed loop. The functionality of the system was demonstrated at full power.

  5. Pyramid wavefront sensing with a laser guide star for an ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Brice

    2010-07-01

    The wavefront sensor [WFS] is a key element of an Adaptive Optics [AO] system. It gives access to a direct measurement of the turbulent phase, its curvature or its slope, from which the mirror voltages are computed. The ability of the system to correct efficiently the atmospheric turbulence is strongly dependent on the performance of the WFS in estimating the turbulent phase. The Shack-Hartmann [SH] WFS has been for a long time the standard used in AO systems. In 1996, it has been proposed1 a new generation WFS, the pyramid WFS. It is a focal plane WFS, based on the principle of a Foucault knife-edge. It has been demonstrated that it provides a consistent gain with respect to the Shack-Hartmann.2,5-7 More recently, improvements were proposed to increase the pyramid performance.3, 4 On the framework of the developpement of extremely large telescopes, the interest of a pyramid wave front sensor appears clearly. But its behaviour with laser guide stars [LGS], most probably necessary in any Extremely Large Telescope [ELT], is still relatively unknown. Some WFS dedicated to LGS wave front sensing has already been proposed8,9 but a full study of the pyramid WFS behaviour is still necessary. This work's aim is to bring answers to this topic.

  6. Integration and laboratory characterization of the ARGOS laser guide star wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busoni, Lorenzo; Bonaglia, Marco; Carbonaro, Luca; Mazzoni, Tommaso; Antichi, Jacopo; Esposito, Simone; Orban De Xivry, Gilles; Rabien, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    The integration status of the ARGOS wavefront sensors is presented. ARGOS is the laser guide star AO program for the LBT. It will implement a Ground Layer AO correction for the instruments LUCI, an infrared imaging and spectrograph camera, using 3 pulsed low-altitudes Rayleigh beacons for each LBT's eye. It profits of the LBT's adaptive secondary mirrors and of FLAO's pyramid unit for NGS sensing. Each LGS is independently stabilized for on-sky jitter and range-gated using custom Pockels cells and then sensed by a 15x15 SH sensor. The 3 pupil images are reimaged on a single lenslet array and a single detector. In the WFS are also installed 3 patrol cameras for the acquisition of the laser beacons, a system for the stabilization of the pupil images on the lenslet array and an internal source for calibration purposes. The two units are now completing the integration phase in Arcetri premises. We describe the characterization of the units and the closed-loop test realized using a deformable MEMS mirror.

  7. Design principles and limitations of wave-front guided contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Thibos, Larry N; Cheng, Xu; Bradley, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the wave-front guided design of contact lenses is presented from three vantage points: ray optics, wave front aberrations, and optical path-length errors. We argue that the goal of contact lenses is to make all of the optical paths from a distant object to the retina equal in length, regardless of where the path intersects the plane of the eye's pupil. The aberration map of an eye is a prescription for such a lens. Unfortunately, variability of measured aberration maps is a fundamental limit to our knowledge of the true aberration structure of an eye. Variability arises because the eye is a biologic system that changes over time for normal, physiologic reasons. Furthermore, uncertainty in our measurement of the aberration map because of such variable factors, such as alignment of the aberrometer to the eye by the clinician or small fixation errors committed by the patient, will make it difficult to achieve a full measure of success with aberration-correcting contact lenses. The clinical implication of these findings is that multiple measurements of the aberration map should be collected using a protocol that includes realignment of the instrument and then averaging the aberration maps to reduce the level of uncertainty associated with any single measurement. PMID:12772758

  8. The ARGOS wavefront sensor pnCCD camera for an ELT: characteristics, limitations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Xivry, G. Orban; Ihle, S.; Ziegleder, J.; Barl, L.; Hartmann, R.; Rabien, S.; Soltau, H.; Strueder, L.

    2011-09-01

    From low-order to high-order AO, future wave front sensors on ELTs require large, fast, and low-noise detectors with high quantum efficiency and low dark current. While a detector for a high-order Shack-Hartmann WFS does not exist yet, the current CCD technology pushed to its limits already provides several solutions for the ELT AO detector requirements. One of these devices is the new WFS pnCCD camera of ARGOS, the Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics system (GLAO) for LUCIFER at LBT. Indeed, with its 264x264 pixels, 48 mu m pixel size and 1kHz frame rate, this camera provides a technological solution to different needs of the AO systems for ELTs, such as low-order but as well possibly higher order correction using pyramid wavefront sensing. In this contribution, we present the newly developped WFS pnCCD camera of ARGOS and how it fulfills future detector needs of AO on ELTs.

  9. High resolution retinal image restoration with wavefront sensing and self-extracted filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuyu; Erry, Gavin; Nemeth, Sheila; Mitra, Sunanda; Soliz, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy commonly rely on a clear view of the retina. The challenge in obtaining high quality retinal image lies in the design of the imaging system that can reduce the strong aberrations of the human eye. Since the amplitudes of human eye aberrations decrease rapidly as the aberration order goes up, it is more cost-effective to correct low order aberrations with adaptive optical devices while process high order aberrations through image processing. A cost effective fundus imaging device that can capture high quality retinal images with 2-5 times higher resolution than conventional retinal images has been designed [1]. This imager improves image quality by attaching complementary adaptive optical components to a conventional fundus camera. However, images obtained with the high resolution camera are still blurred due to some uncorrected aberrations as well as defocusing resulting from non-isoplanatic effect. Therefore, advanced image restoration algorithms have been employed for further improvement in image quality. In this paper, we use wavefront-based and self-extracted blind deconvolution techniques to restore images captured by the high resolution fundus camera. We demonstrate that through such techniques, pathologies that are critical to retinal disease diagnosis but not clear or not observable in the original image can be observed clearly in the restored images. Image quality evaluation is also used to finalize the development of a cost-effective, fast, and automated diagnostic system that can be used clinically.

  10. Large-Actuator-Number Horizontal Path Correction of Atmospheric Turbulence utilizing an Interferometric Phase Conjugate Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D A; Wilks, S C; Olivier, S S; Olsen, J

    2004-08-25

    An adaptive optical system used to correct horizontal beam propagation paths has been demonstrated. This system utilizes an interferometric wave-front sensor and a large-actuator-number MEMS-based spatial light modulator to correct the aberrations incurred by the beam after propagation along the path. Horizontal path correction presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short atmospheric transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by laser propagation along these paths. Unlike wave-front sensors that detect phase gradients, however, the interferometric wave-front sensor measures the wrapped phase directly. Because the system operates with nearly monochromatic light and uses a segmented spatial light modulator, it does not require that the phase be unwrapped to provide a correction and it also does not require a global reconstruction of the wave-front to determine the phase as required by gradient detecting wave-front sensors. As a result, issues with branch points are eliminated. Because the atmospheric probe beam is mixed with a large amplitude reference beam, it can be made to operate in a photon noise limited regime making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The MEMS-based spatial light modulator in the system contains 1024 pixels and is controlled to speeds in excess of 800 Hz, enabling its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. In this article results are shown of both atmospheric characterization with the system and open loop horizontal path correction of a 1.53 micron laser by the system. To date Strehl ratios of greater than 0.5 have been achieved.

  11. Design and fabrication of a pyramid wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aina; Yao, Jun; Cai, Dongmei; Ren, Hao

    2010-07-01

    A new pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS), which utilizes a reflective pyramid mirror instead of a refractive pyramid prism at the focus of a telescope, is presented. As a key optical component in this PWFS, the pyramid mirror requires accurate microfabrication for excellent quality of the tip, the turned edges, and the surfaces. The moving mask lithography process is proposed for its economic, simple, and precise control to make the cross-sectional shape of the structure. The completed pyramid mirror has a square base of 1-mm length and four side facets inclined to the base at 3.7 deg. The sizes of the pyramid tip and turned edges are both about 6 μm, which show excellent aspects of sharpening-tip and knife-edges. The root mean square of four facets is approximately 70 nm, and the maximum profile deviation is 0.2 μm.

  12. Amplitude-masked photoacoustic wavefront shaping and application in flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Jian Wei; Liang, Jinyang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic flowmetry allows non-invasive single-cell flow measurements. However, its operational depth is limited by optical diffusion, which prevents focusing beyond shallow depths in scattering media, as well as reducing the measurement signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To overcome this limitation, we used binary-amplitude wavefront shaping to enhance light focusing in the presence of scattering. Here, the transmission modes that contributed constructively to the intensity at the optical focus were identified and selectively illuminated, resulting in a 14-fold intensity increase and a corresponding increase in SNR. This technique can potentially extend the operational depth of optical-resolution photoacoustic flowmetry beyond 1 mm in tissue. PMID:25360912

  13. Superresolved imaging in digital holography by superposition of tilted wavefronts.

    PubMed

    Mico, Vicente; Zalevsky, Zeev; García-Martínez, Pascuala; García, Javier

    2006-02-10

    A technique based on superresolution by digital holographic microscopic imaging is presented. We used a two dimensional (2-D) vertical-cavity self-emitting laser (VCSEL) array as spherical-wave illumination sources. The method is defined in terms of an incoherent superposition of tilted wavefronts. The tilted spherical wave originating from the 2-D VCSEL elements illuminates the target in transmission mode to obtain a hologram in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration. Superresolved images of the input object above the common lens diffraction limit are generated by sequential recording of the individual holograms and numerical reconstruction of the image with the extended spatial frequency range. We have experimentally tested the approach for a microscope objective with an exact 2-D reconstruction image of the input object. The proposed approach has implementation advantages for applications in biological imaging or the microelectronic industry in which structured targets are being inspected. PMID:16512523

  14. TRL-6 for JWST Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Smith, Scott; Aronstein, David; Shiri, Ron; Lyon, Rick; Hayden, Bill; Bowers, Chuck; Acton, D. Scott; Shields, Duncan; Sabatke, Erin; Schwenker, John; Towell, Tim; Carey, Larkin; Contos, Adam; Shi, Fang; Mesa, Luis

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Technology Readiness Level (TRL)-6 is documented for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Wavefront Sensing and Control (WFSC) subsystem. The WFSC subsystem is needed to align the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) after all deployments have occurred, and achieves that requirement through a robust commissioning sequence consisting of unique commissioning algorithms, all of which are part of the WFSC algorithm suite. This paper identifies the technology need, algorithm heritage, describes the finished TRL-6 design platform, and summarizes the TRL-6 test results and compliance. Additionally, the performance requirements needed to satisfy JWST science goals as well as the criterion that relate to the TRL-6 Testbed Telescope (TBT) performance requirements are discussed

  15. Polarization-Independent Silicon Metadevices for Efficient Optical Wavefront Control.

    PubMed

    Chong, Katie E; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony; Dominguez, Jason; Liu, Sheng; Campione, Salvatore; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Luk, Ting S; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2015-08-12

    We experimentally demonstrate a functional silicon metadevice at telecom wavelengths that can efficiently control the wavefront of optical beams by imprinting a spatially varying transmittance phase independent of the polarization of the incident beam. Near-unity transmittance efficiency and close to 0-2π phase coverage are enabled by utilizing the localized electric and magnetic Mie-type resonances of low-loss silicon nanoparticles tailored to behave as electromagnetically dual-symmetric scatterers. We apply this concept to realize a metadevice that converts a Gaussian beam into a vortex beam. The required spatial distribution of transmittance phases is achieved by a variation of the lattice spacing as a single geometric control parameter. PMID:26192100

  16. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications. PMID:25418084

  17. Broadband reflected wavefronts manipulation using structured phase gradient metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Peng; Wan, Le-Le; Chen, Tian-Ning; Song, Ai-Ling; Du, Xiao-Wen

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic metasurface (AMS) is a good candidate to manipulate acoustic waves due to special acoustic performs that cannot be realized by traditional materials. In this paper, we design the AMS by using circular-holed cubic arrays. The advantages of our AMS are easy assemble, subwavelength thickness, and low energy loss for manipulating acoustic waves. According to the generalized Snell's law, acoustic waves can be manipulated arbitrarily by using AMS with different phase gradients. By selecting suitable hole diameter of circular-holed cube (CHC), some interesting phenomena are demonstrated by our simulations based on finite element method, such as the conversion of incoming waves into surface waves, anomalous reflections (including negative reflection), acoustic focusing lens, and acoustic carpet cloak. Our results can provide a simple approach to design AMSes and use them in wavefront manipulation and manufacturing of acoustic devices.

  18. Analysis of stellar interferometers as wave-front sensors.

    PubMed

    Hénault, François

    2005-08-01

    The basic principle and theoretical relationships of an original method are presented that allow the wave-front errors of a ground or spaceborne telescope to be retrieved when its main pupil is combined with a second, decentered reference optical arm. The measurement accuracy of such a telescope-interferometer is then estimated by means of various numerical simulations, and good performance is demonstrated, except in limited areas near the telescope pupil's rim. In particular, it permits direct phase evaluation (thus avoiding the use of first- or second-order derivatives), which will be of special interest for the cophasing of segmented mirrors in future giant-telescope projects. Finally, the useful practical domain of the method is defined, which seems to be better suited for periodic diagnostics of space- or ground-based telescopes or to real-time scientific observations in some specific cases (e.g., the central star in instruments that search for extrasolar planets). PMID:16075886

  19. Polarization-independent silicon metadevices for efficient optical wavefront control

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Katie E.; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony Randolph; Dominguez, Jason James; Liu, Sheng; Campione, Salvatore; Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian; Luk, Ting S.; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-07-20

    In this study, we experimentally demonstrate a functional silicon metadevice at telecom wavelengths that can efficiently control the wavefront of optical beams by imprinting a spatially varying transmittance phase independent of the polarization of the incident beam. Near-unity transmittance efficiency and close to 0–2π phase coverage are enabled by utilizing the localized electric and magnetic Mie-type resonances of low-loss silicon nanoparticles tailored to behave as electromagnetically dual-symmetric scatterers. We apply this concept to realize a metadevice that converts a Gaussian beam into a vortex beam. The required spatial distribution of transmittance phases is achieved by a variation of the lattice spacing as a single geometric control parameter.

  20. System and Method for Null-Lens Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter C. (Inventor); Thompson, Patrick L. (Inventor); Aronstein, David L. (Inventor); Bolcar, Matthew R. (Inventor); Smith, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of measuring aberrations in a null-lens including assembly and alignment aberrations. The null-lens may be used for measuring aberrations in an aspheric optic with the null-lens. Light propagates from the aspheric optic location through the null-lens, while sweeping a detector through the null-lens focal plane. Image data being is collected at locations about said focal plane. Light is simulated propagating to the collection locations for each collected image. Null-lens aberrations may extracted, e.g., applying image-based wavefront-sensing to collected images and simulation results. The null-lens aberrations improve accuracy in measuring aspheric optic aberrations.