Science.gov

Sample records for active wrist extension

  1. Activation of forearm muscles for wrist extension in patients affected by lateral epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Monica; Mañanas, Miquel A; Muller, Bertram; Chaler, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    Work related upper extremity disorders are associated with cumulative trauma resulting from the continuous use of forearm muscles rather than from a specific incident. The aim of this work is to compare wrist extensor muscles activation between patients with lateral epicondylitis and healthy subjects. Differences can be used in the design of rehabilitation or injury prevention programs according to biomechanical deficits. Surface EMG signals from three forearm extensor muscles (Carpi Radialis-ECR, Digitorum Communis-EDC and Carpi Ulnaris-ECU) were recorded by linear electrode arrays in wrist extension as well as during selective contractions. Average Rectified Values (ARV) were calculated in order to identify the contribution of each muscle to different tasks. On the other hand, Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity, Mean and Median Frequencies and also ARV were studied to obtain fatigue indexes related to metabolic changes in the muscles during a high force sustained contraction. Results showed muscular imbalance with lower ECR activity compensated by higher ECU activation, and higher fatigue indexes in patients with lateral epicondylitis.

  2. Physical activity using wrist-worn accelerometers: comparison of dominant and non-dominant wrist.

    PubMed

    Dieu, Olivier; Mikulovic, Jacques; Fardy, Paul S; Bui-Xuan, Gilles; Béghin, Laurent; Vanhelst, Jérémy

    2016-01-07

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in physical activity assessment between a wrist-worn accelerometer at the dominant or non-dominant arm. The secondary purpose was to assess the concurrent validity of measures of physical activity from the wrist-worn accelerometer and the waist-worn accelerometer. Forty adults wore three accelerometers simultaneously, one on the waist and one each on the non-dominant wrist and dominant wrist, respectively, for 24 consecutive hours of free-living conditions. Data were uploaded from the monitor to a computer following a 1-day test period. There were no significant differences in physical activity when comparing the dominant versus the non-dominant wrist, regardless of axis (P>0·05). Mean daily accelerometer output data from both wrists were strongly correlated with average counts per minute from the ActiGraph worn around the waist (r = 0·88, P<0·001). Findings suggest that the choice to wear the accelerometer on the non-dominant or dominant wrist has no impact on results. Data from this study contribute to the knowledge of how to best assess physical activity habits.

  3. In Vivo Kinematics of the Scaphoid, Lunate, Capitate, and Third Metacarpal in Extreme Wrist Flexion and Extension

    PubMed Central

    Rainbow, Michael J; Kamal, Robin N; Leventhal, Evan; Akelman, Edward; Moore, Douglas C; Wolfe, Scott W; Crisco, Joseph J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Insights into the complexity of active in vivo carpal motion have recently been gained using 3D imaging; however kinematics during extremes of motion have not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine motion of the carpus during extremes of wrist flexion and extension. Methods Computed tomography scans of 12 healthy wrists were obtained in neutral-grip, extreme loaded flexion, and extreme loaded extension. Three-dimensional bone surfaces and 6-degree-of-freedom kinematics were obtained for the radius and carpal bones. The flexion and extension rotation from neutral-grip to extreme flexion and extreme extension of the scaphoid and lunate was expressed as a percentage of capitate flexion and extension and then compared to previous studies of active wrist flexion and extension. We also tested the hypothesis that the capitate and third metacarpal function as a single rigid body. Finally, joint space metrics at the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints were used to describe arthrokinematics. Results In extreme flexion, the scaphoid and lunate flexed 70% and 46% of the amount the capitate flexed, respectively. In extreme extension, the scaphoid extended 74% and the lunate extended 42% of the amount the capitates extended, respectively. The third metacarpal extended 4° farther than the capitate in extreme extension. The joint contact area decreased at the radiocarpal joint during extreme flexion. The radioscaphoid joint contact center moved onto the radial styloid and volar ridge of the radius in extreme flexion from a more proximal and ulnar location in neutral. Conclusions The contributions of the scaphoid and lunate to capitate rotation were approximately 25% less in extreme extension compared to wrist motion through an active range of motion. More than half the motion of the carpus when the wrist was loaded in extension occured at the midcarpal joint. Clinical Relevance These findings highlight the difference in kinematics of the carpus during at

  4. Relationship between electromyographic activity and clinically assessed rigidity studied at the wrist joint in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Meara, R J; Cody, F W

    1992-08-01

    The electromyographic (EMG) patterns recorded from wrist muscles during manually applied, repetitive flexion and extension movements of the wrist joint, used for simultaneous clinical assessment of rigidity, were studied in patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy subjects. Recordings were made whilst patients/subjects attempted voluntarily to relax the muscle of the arm whose wrist joint was manipulated. Individual patients were investigated before and at varying times after their routine daily medication as their clinical rigidity underwent associated modulations. It was often possible to induce additional alterations in clinical rigidity by instructing patients to perform an activation or Jendrassik-like manoeuvre (clenching the contralateral fist). In rigid patients, the approximately sinusoidal wrist displacements (60 deg, 1-1.5 Hz) typically elicited pronounced, cyclic modulations of EMG activities in wrist flexors and extensors; increases in EMG activity were phase-locked to the respective periods of muscle stretch. Stretch-related EMG activity reduced or disappeared as rigidity was abolished by drug therapy. The EMG patterns of patients showing cogwheel rigidity featured discrete, phasic bursts superimposed upon more generalized stretch-related increases in activity. In healthy subjects, showing no clinical rigidity, the pronounced cyclic modulations of EMG activity characteristic of rigid patients were absent during similar manually applied wrist displacements. Quantitative EMG measurements for individual patients, made 'on' and 'off' medication and as their rigidity fluctuated, indicated that mild (grade 1) and moderate (grade 2) rigidity was consistently associated with increased stretch-related activity compared with non-rigid conditions. Pair-wise statistical analysis indicated such increases in EMG to be significant. Similarly, the ratios of EMG activities in the stretched versus released muscles were significantly greater for grades 1 and 2

  5. Active range of motion outcomes after reconstruction of burned wrist and hand deformities.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed M; Mahboub, Tarek A; Ibrahim Fouad, Amr; Azari, Kodi; Khalil, Haitham H; McCarthy, James E

    2016-06-01

    This works aim is to evaluate the efficacy of skin grafts and flaps in reconstruction of post-burn hand and wrist deformities. A prospective study of 57 burn contractures of the wrist and dorsum of the hand was performed. Flaps were used only if there was a non-vascularized structure after contracture release, otherwise a skin graft was used. Active range of motion (ROM) was used to assess hand function. The extension deformity cohort uniformly underwent skin graft following contracture release with a mean improvement of 71 degrees (p<0.0001). The flexion deformity cohort was treated with either skin grafts (8 patients) or flaps (9 patients) with a mean improvement of 44 degrees (p<0.0001). Skin grafts suffice for dorsal hand contractures to restore functional wrist ROM. For flexion contractures, flaps were more likely for contractures >6 months. Early release of burn contracture is advisable to avoid deep structure contracture.

  6. PREDICTION OF LIGAMENT LENGTH AND CARPAL BONE DIASTASIS DURING WRIST FLEXION EXTENSION AND AFTER SIMULATED SCAPHOLUNATE INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Rita M.; Yazaki, Naoya; Andersen, Clark R.; Viegas, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role of the carpal ligaments during wrist flexion/extension and to understand if maintaining integrity of only the dorsal scapholunate ligament is adequate for maintaining stability of the scapholunate joint. Methods This study combined motion analysis and manual digitization of ligament attachment regions to generate predictions of carpal ligament length and implied strain during wrist motion and length changes after simulated ligamentous injury. Results Thirteen ligaments and 22 ligament segments (sub portions) were modeled. Ligament length change with respect to wrist angle was measured. Eleven segments had minimum stretch or elongation from neutral wrist position over the entire wrist range of motion for any ligament cut condition. The remaining eleven segments had more than 10% stretch in some portion of flexion/extension. In general, ligaments had increased stretch during wrist flexion and after cutting the entire scapholunate ligament (SLL) and the dorsal intercarpal ligaments off the scaphoid. Conclusion Disruption of the membranous and palmar portions of the SLL and the dorsal intercarpal ligament off the scaphoid did not result in the development of an increased 3-dimensional scapholunate gap as measured by differences in ligament length calculations between the scaphoid and lunate. This may be indicative of a pre-dynamic instability condition (prior to clinical signs and x-ray findings) that is stabilized by the dorsal SLL preventing the increase in 3-dimensional scapholunate gap. This may also support surgical treatment recommendations, which suggest repair of the dorsal component only of the SLL will be effective. Disruption of the dorsal intercarpal ligament off the scaphoid or lunate did not result in further significant changes. Therefore the dorsal SLL has an important role in preventing scapholunate ligament instability. Clinical Relevance These results provide insight into the abnormal kinematics as various ligaments are

  7. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  8. 78 FR 44625 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... ``Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16.'' On June 18, 2013 (78 FR...

  9. 78 FR 36643 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900--NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW...

  10. 78 FR 36307 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW...

  11. Effects of combined wrist flexion/extension and forearm rotation and two levels of relative force on discomfort.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid Ali; O'Sullivan, Leonard; Gallwey, Timothy J

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated perceived discomfort in an isometric wrist flexion task. Independent variables were wrist flexion/extension (55%, 35% flexion, neutral, 35% and 55% extension ranges of motion (ROM)), forearm rotation (60%, 30% prone, neutral, 30% and 60% supine ROM) and two levels of flexion force (10% and 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)). Discomfort was significantly affected by flexion force, forearm rotation and a two-way interaction of force with forearm rotation (each p < 0.05). High force for 60%ROM forearm pronation and supination resulted in increasingly higher discomfort for these combinations. Flexion forces were set relative to the MVC in each wrist posture and this appears to be important in explaining a lack of significant effect (p = 0.34) for flexion/extension on discomfort. Regression equations predicting discomfort were developed and used to generate iso-discomfort contours, which indicate regions where the risk of injury should be low and others where it is likely to be high. Regression equations predicting discomfort and iso-discomfort contours are presented, which indicate combinations of upper limb postures for which discomfort is predicted to be low, and others where it is likely to be high. These are helpful in the study of limits for risk factors associated with upper limb musculoskeletal injury in industry.

  12. Estimating Activity and Sedentary Behavior From an Accelerometer on the Hip or Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Mary E.; Haskell, William L.; Albinali, Fahd; Mota, Selene; Nawyn, Jason; Intille, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Previously the National Health and Examination Survey measured physical activity with an accelerometer worn on the hip for seven days, but recently changed the location of the monitor to the wrist. PURPOSE This study compared estimates of physical activity intensity and type with an accelerometer on the hip versus the wrist. METHODS Healthy adults (n=37) wore triaxial accelerometers (Wockets) on the hip and dominant wrist along with a portable metabolic unit to measure energy expenditure during 20 activities. Motion summary counts were created, then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine sedentary and activity intensity thresholds. Ambulatory activities were separated from other activities using the coefficient of variation (CV) of the counts. Mixed model predictions were used to estimate activity intensity. RESULTS The ROC for determining sedentary behavior had greater sensitivity and specificity (71% and 96%) at the hip than the wrist (53% and 76%), as did the ROC for moderate to vigorous physical activity on the hip (70% and 83%) versus the wrist (30% and 69%). The ROC for the CV associated with ambulation had a larger AUC at the hip compared to the wrist (0.83 and 0.74). The prediction model for activity energy expenditure (AEE) resulted in an average difference of 0.55 (+/− 0.55) METs on the hip and 0.82 (+/− 0.93) METs on the wrist. CONCLUSIONS Methods frequently used for estimating AEE and identifying activity intensity thresholds from an accelerometer on the hip generally do better than similar data from an accelerometer on the wrist. Accurately identifying sedentary behavior from a lack of wrist motion presents significant challenges. PMID:23247702

  13. Effect of grip type, wrist motion, and resistance level on pressures within the carpal tunnel of normal wrists.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; Fallentin, Nils; Andersen, Johan H; Keir, Peter J; Hansen, Torben B; Pransky, Glenn; Lin, Jia-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Elevated carpal tunnel pressure (CTP) has been associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. This study systematically evaluated the effect of wrist motion resistance and grip type on CTP during wrist motion typical of occupational tasks. CTP during four wrist motion patterns, with and without resistance, and with and without gripping, was measured in vivo in 14 healthy individuals. CTP measured during compound motions fell between that measured in the cardinal planes of wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Generally, with no active gripping there was little pressure change due to wrist angular displacement or resistance level. However, concurrent active pinch or power grip increased CTP particularly in motions including extension. CTP typically did not increase during wrist flexion, and in fact often decreased. Extension motions against resistance when employing a pinch or power grip increase CTP more than motions with flexion. Results could help inform design or modification of wrist motion intensive occupational tasks. © 2014 The Authors.

  14. Evening physical activity alters wrist temperature circadian rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Sastre, Patricia; Gómez-Abellán, Purificación; Martinez-Nicolas, Antonio; Ordovás, José María; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Garaulet, Marta

    2014-03-01

    The adequate time to perform physical activity (PA) to maintain optimal circadian system health has not been defined. We studied the influence of morning and evening PA on circadian rhythmicity in 16 women with wrist temperature (WT). Participants performed controlled PA (45 min continuous-running) during 7 days in the morning (MPA) and evening (EPA) and results were compared with a no-exercise-week (C). EPA was characterized by a lower amplitude (evening: 0.028 ± 0.01 °C versus control: 0.038 ± 0.016 °C; p < 0.05) less pronounced second-harmonic (power) (evening: 0.41 ± 0.47 versus morning: 1.04 ± 0.59); and achrophase delay (evening: 06:35 ± 02:14 h versus morning: 04:51 ± 01:11 h; p < 0.05) as compared to MPA and C. Performing PA in the late evening might not be as beneficial as in the morning.

  15. Can Radiocarpal-Spanning Fixation Be Made More Functional by Placing the Wrist in Extension? A Biomechanical Study Under Physiologic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Tobias; Lee, Daniel J.; Dahl, Jason

    2016-01-01

    We investigate whether applying an internal radiocarpal-spanning plate with the wrist in slight extension affects the biomechanical stability of the construct. An unstable distal radius fracture was simulated in 10 cadaveric specimens and immobilized with a radiocarpal-spanning plate holding the wrist in a neutral position. This construct was then physiologically loaded through the wrist flexor and extensor tendons. The resulting motion at the fracture was captured with a displacement sensor. The plate was then extended using an in situ bending technique, placing the wrist in extension, and the experiment was repeated. No statistically significant difference in the biomechanical stability afforded by the radiocarpal-spanning plate was detected with the wrist in extension compared to that in the traditional neutral position. The radiocarpal-spanning plate fixation was more stable when loaded through the extensor tendons. We conclude that immobilizing a distal radius fracture with an internal radiocarpal-spanning plate that holds the wrist in extension does not compromise biomechanical stability. PMID:26929853

  16. Validity of wrist worn accelerometers and comparability between hip and wrist placement sites in estimating physical activity behaviour in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Hislop, Jane; Palmer, Nicole; Anand, Priya; Aldin, Tara

    2016-09-21

    Wrist-worn accelerometers can increase compliance with wearing accelerometers, however, several large scale studies continue to use hip-worn accelerometers and it is unclear how comparable data is from the two sites. The study aims were: to investigate agreement between wrist- and hip- worn accelerometers and to determine the validity of Johansson et al cut-points for wrist worn accelerometers in preschool children. A sample of 32 preschool children (21 boys, 4.2 (0.5) years, BMI 16.6 (1.1)) were videoed wearing GT3X+  accelerometers on their wrist and hip while they engaged in 1 h of free-play in their nursery. Children's activity were coded using, the children's activity rating scale (CARS): with CARS, level 1 'sedentary' and levels 2-5 were classified as time spent in total physical activity (TPA). Accelerometry data were processed using Johansson et al cut-points for the wrist data and Evenson et al cut-points for the hip data, into time spent in different intensities of physical activity (PA). The mean counts per minute (cpm) from the hip and wrist were compared. There was a strong correlation between the hip and wrist cpm (r  =  0.81, p  <  0.01) and total count data (r  =  0.83 p  <  0.01), however there was a large systematic bias with wide limits of agreement. Good agreement (mean difference (LOA) 1.1 (-9.9, 12.1) was found between the CARS estimate of TPA (29.5 (10.4) mins) and the wrist estimate, using the Johansson et al cut points (28.4 (9.8) mins). There was also a reasonable agreement between the hip estimates with the Evenson et al cut-points and Johansson et al estimate (mean difference (LOA):6.3 (-8.8, 21.4) mins. In conclusion, the findings suggest that the Johansson et al (2013 Pediatr. Obes. 10 1-6) cut-points applied to wrist worn accelerometers provides a valid estimate of TPA in preschool children and have reasonable agreement with Evenson et al cut-points applied to hip accelerometers.

  17. Effect of a modified grip angle of a walker on the wrist deviation angle, muscle activation and palmar load during walker-assisted gait in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Kim, Seon-Chill; Lee, Young-Ik

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to develop a new handle holder by modifying the inclination of the existing handle holder to reduce load on the wrist joints. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study consisted of 25 elderly people aged 65 years or older accustomed to a walker-assisted gait. Two types of handle holders ((1) standard handle holder (2) inclination handle holder) were applied to all subjects and their wrist joint movement and muscle activity were measured while they conducted 10 cycle walker-assisted gait. [Results] The use of an inclination handle holder during the walker-assisted gait decreased considerably the extensor carpi radialis longus activity and angles of the ulnar deviation and wrist extension. [Conclusion] Improvements in the overall structure of a walker may be a new tool for improving existing walker users but the replacement cost will be expensive. The inclination handle holder presented in this study decreases the burden on the wrist joints of walker users without any overall structural changes in the walker, thereby reducing the occurrence of musculoskeletal diseases of the wrist joint during the walker-assisted gait of elderly people. PMID:28356620

  18. Prototype of a mechanical assistance device for the wrists' flexion-extension movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politti, Julio C.; Puglisi, Lisandro J.; Farfán, Fernando D.

    2007-11-01

    Using CMU actuators, a Prototype of Mechanical Assistance Device for the Wrist's Flexion Movement (PMA) was developed and probed in a mechanical model, in order to be implemented in a future as a dynamic powered orthosis or as a rehabilitation assistant instrument. Two Mayor Actuators conformed by three CMU actuators arranged in a series configuration, allows to an artificial hand to be placed in four predefined positions: 0°, 20°, 40° and 60°. The synchronism and control of the actuators is achieved with the Programmable Control Module (PCM). It is capable to drive up to six CMU actuators, and possess two different modes of execution: a Manual mode and an Exercise mode. In the Manual Mode, the position of the hand responds directly to the commands of the keyboard of the front panel, and in the Exercise mode, the hand realizes a repetitive and programmed movement. The prototype was tested in 100 positions in the Manual Mode and for 225 works cycles in the Exercise Mode. The relative repetition error was less than 5% for both test. This prototype only consumes 4,15W, which makes it possible to be powered by small rechargeable batteries, allowing its use as a portable device.

  19. Estimation of Physical Activity Energy Expenditure during Free-Living from Wrist Accelerometry in UK Adults

    PubMed Central

    Westgate, Kate; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Brage, Soren

    2016-01-01

    Background Wrist-worn accelerometers are emerging as the most common instrument for measuring physical activity in large-scale epidemiological studies, though little is known about the relationship between wrist acceleration and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE). Methods 1695 UK adults wore two devices simultaneously for six days; a combined sensor and a wrist accelerometer. The combined sensor measured heart rate and trunk acceleration, which was combined with a treadmill test to yield a signal of individually-calibrated PAEE. Multi-level regression models were used to characterise the relationship between the two time-series, and their estimations were evaluated in an independent holdout sample. Finally, the relationship between PAEE and BMI was described separately for each source of PAEE estimate (wrist acceleration models and combined-sensing). Results Wrist acceleration explained 44–47% between-individual variance in PAEE, with RMSE between 34–39 J•min-1•kg-1. Estimations agreed well with PAEE in cross-validation (mean bias [95% limits of agreement]: 0.07 [-70.6:70.7]) but overestimated in women by 3% and underestimated in men by 4%. Estimation error was inversely related to age (-2.3 J•min-1•kg-1 per 10y) and BMI (-0.3 J•min-1•kg-1 per kg/m2). Associations with BMI were similar for all PAEE estimates (approximately -0.08 kg/m2 per J•min-1•kg-1). Conclusions A strong relationship exists between wrist acceleration and PAEE in free-living adults, such that irrespective of the objective method of PAEE assessment, a strong inverse association between PAEE and BMI was observed. PMID:27936024

  20. Effect of aviation snip design and task height on upper extremity muscular activity and wrist posture.

    PubMed

    Anton, Dan; Gerr, Fredric; Meyers, Alysha; Cook, Thomas M; Rosecrance, John C; Reynolds, Jonathan

    2007-02-01

    Hand tools described as ergonomic in design are intended to reduce exposure to physical risk factors associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Additionally, using the right tool for the job is believed to reduce exposure and, consequently, risk of disease. Sheet metal workers frequently use a cutting tool called aviation snips when fabricating and installing ductwork. The purpose of this laboratory simulation study was to determine the effect of (1) aviation snip design; and (2) work height on muscle activity, wrist posture, and user satisfaction among sheet metal workers. We hypothesized that specific aviation snips designs would be most appropriate for use at specific heights. Twenty-three sheet metal workers used three different designs of aviation snips to make curved cuts in sheet metal placed both at waist height and shoulder height. Conventional circular snips, straight snips, and an alternate design of offset snips were used. Upper extremity muscle activity was measured with surface electromyography, wrist posture was measured with electrogoniometry, and user satisfaction was rated by the participants on a survey. Statistically significant effects of snip design and task height on muscle activity, wrist posture, and user satisfaction were observed. However, no snip was preferable for all dependent variables. Work height had a greater effect on muscle activity and wrist posture than snip design. Field studies are indicated to determine the long-term effect of snip design on physical risk factors and risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

  1. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-03-24

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available.

  2. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2–30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  3. How Accurately Can Your Wrist Device Recognize Daily Activities and Detect Falls?

    PubMed Central

    Gjoreski, Martin; Gjoreski, Hristijan; Luštrek, Mitja; Gams, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    Although wearable accelerometers can successfully recognize activities and detect falls, their adoption in real life is low because users do not want to wear additional devices. A possible solution is an accelerometer inside a wrist device/smartwatch. However, wrist placement might perform poorly in terms of accuracy due to frequent random movements of the hand. In this paper we perform a thorough, large-scale evaluation of methods for activity recognition and fall detection on four datasets. On the first two we showed that the left wrist performs better compared to the dominant right one, and also better compared to the elbow and the chest, but worse compared to the ankle, knee and belt. On the third (Opportunity) dataset, our method outperformed the related work, indicating that our feature-preprocessing creates better input data. And finally, on a real-life unlabeled dataset the recognized activities captured the subject’s daily rhythm and activities. Our fall-detection method detected all of the fast falls and minimized the false positives, achieving 85% accuracy on the first dataset. Because the other datasets did not contain fall events, only false positives were evaluated, resulting in 9 for the second, 1 for the third and 15 for the real-life dataset (57 days data). PMID:27258282

  4. How Accurately Can Your Wrist Device Recognize Daily Activities and Detect Falls?

    PubMed

    Gjoreski, Martin; Gjoreski, Hristijan; Luštrek, Mitja; Gams, Matjaž

    2016-06-01

    Although wearable accelerometers can successfully recognize activities and detect falls, their adoption in real life is low because users do not want to wear additional devices. A possible solution is an accelerometer inside a wrist device/smartwatch. However, wrist placement might perform poorly in terms of accuracy due to frequent random movements of the hand. In this paper we perform a thorough, large-scale evaluation of methods for activity recognition and fall detection on four datasets. On the first two we showed that the left wrist performs better compared to the dominant right one, and also better compared to the elbow and the chest, but worse compared to the ankle, knee and belt. On the third (Opportunity) dataset, our method outperformed the related work, indicating that our feature-preprocessing creates better input data. And finally, on a real-life unlabeled dataset the recognized activities captured the subject's daily rhythm and activities. Our fall-detection method detected all of the fast falls and minimized the false positives, achieving 85% accuracy on the first dataset. Because the other datasets did not contain fall events, only false positives were evaluated, resulting in 9 for the second, 1 for the third and 15 for the real-life dataset (57 days data).

  5. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Marco; Celadon, Nicolò; Mastrapasqua, Davide; Paleari, Marco; Margaria, Valentina; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1) the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2) the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1) it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2) hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  6. The Impact of Patient Activity Level on Wrist Disability after Distal Radius Malunion in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Gregory N.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Osei, Daniel A.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if high-activity older adults are adversely affected by distal radius malunion. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Hand clinics at a tertiary institution. Participants 96 patients ≥60 years old at time of fracture evaluated at least 1 year following distal radius fracture. Intervention Physical Activity Scale of the Elderly (PASE) scores stratified participants into high- and low-activity groups. Malunions were defined radiographically by change of ≥20° of lateral tilt, ≥15° radial inclination, ≥4 mm of ulnar variance, or ≥4 mm intra-articular gap or step-off, compared to the uninjured wrist. Main Outcome Measure Patient-rated disability of the upper-extremity was measured by the QuickDASH and Visual Analog Scales (VAS) for pain/function. Strength and motion measurements objectively quantified wrist function. Results High-activity participants with a distal radius malunion were compared to high-activity participants with well-aligned fractures. There was no significant difference in QuickDASH scores, VAS function, strength, and wrist motion despite statistically, but not clinically relevant, increases in VAS pain scores (difference 0.5, p=0.04) between the groups. Neither PASE score (β= 0.001, 95%CI: −0.002 to 0.004) nor malunion (β=0.133, 95%CI: −0.26 to 0.52) predicted QuickDASH scores in regression modeling after accounting for age, sex, and treatment. Operative management failed to improve outcomes and resulted in decreased grip strength (p=0.05) and more frequent complications (26% vs 7%, p=0.01) when compared to nonoperatively management. Conclusion Even among highly active older adults, distal radius malunion does not impact functional outcomes. Judicious use of operative management is warranted provided heightened complication rates. PMID:25233158

  7. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline M; Tanaka, Denise M; Barbosa, Rafael I; Marcolino, Alexandre M; Elui, Valeria MC; Mazzer, Nilton

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis) and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis) during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05). A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32). Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary. PMID:26770674

  8. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6 min bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE.

  9. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6-minute bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE. PMID:25340969

  10. Model-based prediction of fusimotor activity and its effect on muscle spindle activity during voluntary wrist movements.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Bernard; Maier, Marc A

    2014-08-01

    Muscle spindles provide critical information about movement position and velocity. They have been shown to act as stretch receptors in passive muscle, however, during active movements their behavior is less clear. In particular, spindle responses have been shown to be out-of-phase or phase advanced with respect to their expected muscle length-sensitivity. Whether this apparent discrepancy of spindle responses between passive and active movements is due to fusimotor (γ-drive) remains unresolved, since the activity of fusimotor neurons during voluntary non-locomotor movements are largely unknown. We developed a computational model to predict fusimotor activity and to investigate whether fusimotor activity could explain the empirically observed phase advance of spindle responses. The model links a biomechanical wrist model to length- and γ-drive-dependent transfer functions of type Ia and type II muscle spindle activity. Our simulations of two wrist-movement tasks suggest that (i) experimentally observed type Ia and type II activity profiles can to a large part be explained by appropriate, i.e. strongly modulated and task-dependent, γ-drive. That (ii) the empirically observed phase advance of type Ia or of type II profiles during active movement can be similarly explained by appropriate γ-drive. In summary, the simulation predicts that a highly task-modulated activation of the γ-system is instrumental in producing a large part of the empirically observed muscle spindle activity for voluntary wrist movements.

  11. EFFECT OF USING WRIST ORTHOSES ON FOREARM FLEXOR AND EXTENSOR MUSCLE ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Novais Van Petten, Adriana Maria Valladão; Ávila, Antônio Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of using wrist immobilization orthoses made from different materials, on activation of the flexor and extensor musculature of the forearm while performing specific tasks. Methods: Twenty-six adults, with an average age of 26.2 years, underwent the Jebsen-Taylor functional hand test and the grip strength test (Jamar® dynamometer) under three conditions: free hand, wearing a composite orthosis and wearing a thermoplastic orthosis. The tests were carried out using the dominant hand only. During the tests, surface electrodes were attached to the flexor and extensor muscles of the forearm to record the muscle electrical activity. The results obtained under the three conditions were compared and analyzed using the Wilcoxon statistical test. Results: Significant differences in muscle activation were found between using the free hand and using any of the orthoses. There was no significant difference in muscle activation between the two types of orthosis. A decrease in activity of the extensor muscles of the forearm was observed during all the tasks, as well as an increase in activation of the flexor muscles with the use of the orthoses. Conclusion: These results are important for defining whether an orthosis should be prescribed during the rehabilitation process for a wide range of disorders, such as tendinitis of the flexors and extensors of the wrist and fingers, as well as for predicting the length of time for which these devices should be used. PMID:27022523

  12. Comparison of Muscle Activation during Dominant Hand Wrist Flexion when Writing.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohee

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the difference in muscle activation of the dominant upper extremity in right-handed and left-handed persons during writing. [Subjects] There were 36 subjects (16 left- handers/ 20 right- handers), and the study was conducted from 03/01/2012 to 30/3/2012. [Methods] Six electrodes were attached to the FCU (flexor carpi ulnaris), FCR (flexor carpi radialis), ECU (extensor carpi ulnaris), ECR (extensor carpi radialis), and both UT (upper trapezius) muscles. [Results] FCU muscle activation was 16.77±9.12% in left-handers and 10.29±4.13% (%MVIC) in right-handers. FCR muscle activation was 19.09±9.43% in left-handers and 10.64±5.03% in right-handers. In addition, the UT muscle activation on the writing hand side was 11.91±5.79% in left-handers and 1.66±1.19% in right-handers. [Conclusion] As a result of this study, it was discovered that left-handers used more wrist flexion in performance of the writing task with the dominant upper extremity than right-handers, and that the left-handers activated the wrist and shoulder muscles more than the right-handers. These results indicate a potential danger of musculoskeletal disease in left-hander.

  13. Comparison of Muscle Activation during Dominant Hand Wrist Flexion when Writing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soohee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the difference in muscle activation of the dominant upper extremity in right-handed and left-handed persons during writing. [Subjects] There were 36 subjects (16 left- handers/ 20 right- handers), and the study was conducted from 03/01/2012 to 30/3/2012. [Methods] Six electrodes were attached to the FCU (flexor carpi ulnaris), FCR (flexor carpi radialis), ECU (extensor carpi ulnaris), ECR (extensor carpi radialis), and both UT (upper trapezius) muscles. [Results] FCU muscle activation was 16.77±9.12% in left-handers and 10.29±4.13% (%MVIC) in right-handers. FCR muscle activation was 19.09±9.43% in left-handers and 10.64±5.03% in right-handers. In addition, the UT muscle activation on the writing hand side was 11.91±5.79% in left-handers and 1.66±1.19% in right-handers. [Conclusion] As a result of this study, it was discovered that left-handers used more wrist flexion in performance of the writing task with the dominant upper extremity than right-handers, and that the left-handers activated the wrist and shoulder muscles more than the right-handers. These results indicate a potential danger of musculoskeletal disease in left-hander. PMID:24409013

  14. Coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscle activity as a function of wrist joint angle during two-digit grasping

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jamie A.; Bobich, Lisa R.; Santello, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Fingertip forces result from activation of muscles that cross the wrist and muscles whose origins and insertions reside within the hand (extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles, respectively). Thus, tasks that involve changes in wrist angle affect the moment arm and length, hence the force-producing capabilities, of extrinsic muscles only. If a grasping task requires the exertion of constant fingertip forces, the Central Nervous System (CNS) may respond to changes in wrist angle by modulating the neural drive to extrinsic or intrinsic muscles only or by co-activating both sets of muscles. To distinguish between these scenarios, we recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles of the thumb and index finger as a function of wrist angle during a two-digit object hold task. We hypothesized that changes in wrist angle would elicit EMG amplitude modulation of the extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles. In one experimental condition we asked subjects to exert the same digit forces at each wrist angle, whereas in a second condition subjects could choose digit forces for holding the object. EMG activity was significantly modulated in both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a function of wrist angle (both p < 0.05) but only for the constant force condition. Furthermore, EMG modulation resulted from uniform scaling of EMG amplitude across all muscles. We conclude that the CNS controlled both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a muscle synergy. These findings are discussed within the theoretical frameworks of synergies and common neural input across motor nuclei of hand muscles. PMID:20227463

  15. Coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscle activity as a function of wrist joint angle during two-digit grasping.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jamie A; Bobich, Lisa R; Santello, Marco

    2010-04-26

    Fingertip forces result from the activation of muscles that cross the wrist and muscles whose origins and insertions reside within the hand (extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles, respectively). Thus, tasks that involve changes in wrist angle affect the moment arm and length, hence the force-producing capabilities, of extrinsic muscles only. If a grasping task requires the exertion of constant fingertip forces, the Central Nervous System (CNS) may respond to changes in wrist angle by modulating the neural drive to extrinsic or intrinsic muscles only or by co-activating both sets of muscles. To distinguish between these scenarios, we recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles of the thumb and index finger as a function of wrist angle during a two-digit object hold task. We hypothesized that changes in wrist angle would elicit EMG amplitude modulation of the extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles. In one experimental condition we asked subjects to exert the same digit forces at each wrist angle, whereas in a second condition subjects could choose digit forces for holding the object. EMG activity was significantly modulated in both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a function of wrist angle (both p<0.05) but only for the constant force condition. Furthermore, EMG modulation resulted from uniform scaling of EMG amplitude across all muscles. We conclude that the CNS controlled both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a muscle synergy. These findings are discussed within the theoretical frameworks of synergies and common neural input across motor nuclei of hand muscles.

  16. Wrist osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Laulan, J; Marteau, E; Bacle, G

    2015-02-01

    Painful wrist osteoarthritis can result in major functional impairment. Most cases are related to posttraumatic sequel, metabolic arthropathies, or inflammatory joint disease, although wrist osteoarthritis occurs as an idiopathic condition in a small minority of cases. Surgery is indicated only when conservative treatment fails. The main objective is to ensure pain relief while restoring strength. Motion-preserving procedures are usually preferred, although residual wrist mobility is not crucial to good function. The vast array of available surgical techniques includes excisional arthroplasty, limited and total fusion, total wrist denervation, partial and total arthroplasty, and rib-cartilage graft implantation. Surgical decisions rest on the cause and extent of the degenerative wrist lesions, degree of residual mobility, and patient's wishes and functional demand. Proximal row carpectomy and four-corner fusion with scaphoid bone excision are the most widely used surgical procedures for stage II wrist osteoarthritis secondary to scapho-lunate advanced collapse (SLAC) or scaphoid non-union advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist. Proximal row carpectomy is not indicated in patients with stage III disease. Total wrist denervation is a satisfactory treatment option in patients of any age who have good range of motion and low functional demands; furthermore, the low morbidity associated with this procedure makes it a good option for elderly patients regardless of their range of motion. Total wrist fusion can be used not only as a revision procedure, but also as the primary surgical treatment in heavy manual labourers with wrist stiffness or generalised wrist-joint involvement. The role for pyrocarbon implants, rib-cartilage graft implantation, and total wrist arthroplasty remains to be determined, given the short follow-ups in available studies.

  17. Comparison of Activity Type Classification Accuracy from Accelerometers Worn on the Hip, Wrists, and Thigh in Young, Apparently Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoye, Alexander H. K.; Pivarnik, James M.; Mudd, Lanay M.; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare accuracy of activity type prediction models for accelerometers worn on the hip, wrists, and thigh. Forty-four adults performed sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle, and exercise activities (14 total, 10 categories) for 3-10 minutes each in a 90-minute semi-structured laboratory protocol. Artificial neural…

  18. Different effects of age, adiposity and physical activity on the risk of ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Miranda E G; Cairns, Benjamin J; Banks, Emily; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K; Beral, Valerie

    2012-06-01

    While increasing age, decreasing body mass index (BMI), and physical inactivity are known to increase hip fracture risk, whether these factors have similar effects on other common fractures is not well established. We used prospectively-collected data from a large cohort to examine the role of these factors on the risk of incident ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women. 1,155,304 postmenopausal participants in the Million Women Study with a mean age of 56.0 (SD 4.8) years, provided information about lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive factors at recruitment in 1996-2001. All participants were linked to National Health Service cause-specific hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions. During follow-up for an average of 8.3 years per woman, 6807 women had an incident ankle fracture, 9733 an incident wrist fracture, and 5267 an incident hip fracture. Adjusted absolute and relative risks (RRs) for incident ankle, wrist, and hip fractures were calculated using Cox regression models. Age-specific rates for wrist and hip fractures increased sharply with age, whereas rates for ankle fracture did not. Cumulative absolute risks from ages 50 to 84 years per 100 women were 2.5 (95%CI 2.2-2.8) for ankle fracture, 5.0 (95%CI 4.4-5.5) for wrist fracture, and 6.2 (95%CI 5.5-7.0) for hip fracture. Compared with lean women (BMI<20 kg/m(2)), obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m(2)) had a three-fold increased risk of ankle fracture (RR=3.07; 95%CI 2.53-3.74), but a substantially reduced risk of wrist fracture and especially of hip fracture (RR=0.57; 0.51-0.64 and 0.23; 0.21-0.27, respectively). Physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture but was not associated with ankle or wrist fracture risk. Ankle, wrist and hip fractures are extremely common in postmenopausal women, but the associations with age, adiposity, and physical activity differ substantially between the three fracture sites.

  19. Different effects of age, adiposity and physical activity on the risk of ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Miranda E.G.; Cairns, Benjamin J.; Banks, Emily; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K.; Beral, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    While increasing age, decreasing body mass index (BMI), and physical inactivity are known to increase hip fracture risk, whether these factors have similar effects on other common fractures is not well established. We used prospectively-collected data from a large cohort to examine the role of these factors on the risk of incident ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women. 1,155,304 postmenopausal participants in the Million Women Study with a mean age of 56.0 (SD 4.8) years, provided information about lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive factors at recruitment in 1996–2001. All participants were linked to National Health Service cause-specific hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions. During follow-up for an average of 8.3 years per woman, 6807 women had an incident ankle fracture, 9733 an incident wrist fracture, and 5267 an incident hip fracture. Adjusted absolute and relative risks (RRs) for incident ankle, wrist, and hip fractures were calculated using Cox regression models. Age-specific rates for wrist and hip fractures increased sharply with age, whereas rates for ankle fracture did not. Cumulative absolute risks from ages 50 to 84 years per 100 women were 2.5 (95%CI 2.2–2.8) for ankle fracture, 5.0 (95%CI 4.4–5.5) for wrist fracture, and 6.2 (95%CI 5.5–7.0) for hip fracture. Compared with lean women (BMI < 20 kg/m2), obese women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) had a three-fold increased risk of ankle fracture (RR = 3.07; 95%CI 2.53–3.74), but a substantially reduced risk of wrist fracture and especially of hip fracture (RR = 0.57; 0.51–0.64 and 0.23; 0.21–0.27, respectively). Physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture but was not associated with ankle or wrist fracture risk. Ankle, wrist and hip fractures are extremely common in postmenopausal women, but the associations with age, adiposity, and physical activity differ substantially between the three fracture sites. PMID:22465850

  20. Three decades of continuous wrist-activity recording: analysis of sleep duration.

    PubMed

    Borbély, Alexander A; Rusterholz, Thomas; Achermann, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Motor activity recording by a wrist-worn device is a common method to monitor the rest-activity cycle. The first author wore an actimeter continuously for more than three decades, starting in 1982 at the age of 43.5 years. Until November 2006 analysis was performed on a 15-min time base, and subsequently on a 2-min time base. The timing of night-time sleep was determined from the cessation and re-occurrence of daytime-level activity. Sleep duration declined from an initial 6.8 to 6 h in 2004. The declining trend was reversed upon retirement, whereas the variance of sleep duration declined throughout the recording period. Before retirement, a dominant 7-day rhythm of sleep duration as well as an annual periodicity was revealed by spectral analysis. These variations were attenuated or vanished during the years after retirement. We demonstrate the feasibility of continuous long-term motor activity recordings to study age-related variations of the rest-activity cycle. Here we show that the embeddedness in a professional environment imparts a temporal structure to sleep duration.

  1. Wrist skin temperature, motor activity, and body position as determinants of the circadian pattern of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, A; Martinez-Nicolas, A; Salazar, F J; Rol, M A; Madrid, J A

    2012-07-01

    Although the circadian blood pressure (BP) pattern has been extensively studied, the determinants of this rhythm are not fully understood. Peripheral vasodilatation is a regulatory mechanism for BP maintenance. However, it remains to be established whether the increase of nocturnal distal skin temperature associated with heat loss could also reflect the dipping status. For the first time, this paper investigates the relationship between BP and skin wrist temperature (WT), to evaluate whether the WT circadian rhythm can serve as screening procedure to detect dipping/non-dipping BP patterns. In addition, the authors compare the relationship between WT and other variables previously described as determinants of the BP pattern, such as physical activity and body position. Measurements of WT, motor activity, and body position for 5 d, plus ambulatory BP for 24-h during that span, were obtained from 28 diurnally active normotensive volunteers. WT was negatively correlated, whereas activity and body position were positively correlated, with systolic and diastolic BPs. However, these relationships were stronger during the rest than activity phase. In addition, a 78.6% concordance was detected between the observed dips in BP and the predicted BP pattern calculated based on the WT rhythm. Thus, these results suggest that the increase in WT produced by heat loss during the rest phase through peripheral skin blood vessels is the result of blood vessel vasodilatation reflexes in response to a shift from a standing to a supine position, together with shift in the circadian sympathetic/parasympathetic balance (nocturnal parasympathetic activation). In conclusion, WT could be considered as a potential new screening procedure to implement the diagnosis of non-dipping BP pattern.

  2. Reliability and concurrent validity of a new iPhone(®) goniometric application for measuring active wrist range of motion: a cross-sectional study in asymptomatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Pourahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Bahramian, Mehrdad; Mohseni-Bandpei, Mohammad Ali; Rajabzadeh, Fatemeh; Taghipour, Morteza

    2017-03-01

    Measurement of wrist range of motion (ROM) is often considered to be an essential component of wrist physical examination. The measurement can be carried out through various instruments such as goniometers and inclinometers. Recent smartphones have been equipped with accelerometers and magnetometers, which, through specific software applications (apps) can be used for goniometric functions. This study, for the first time, aimed to evaluate the reliability and concurrent validity of a new smartphone goniometric app (Goniometer Pro©) for measuring active wrist ROM. In all, 120 wrists of 70 asymptomatic adults (38 men and 32 women; aged 18-40 years) were assessed in a physiotherapy clinic located at the School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Science and Health Services, Tehran, Iran. Following the recruitment process, active wrist ROM was measured using a universal goniometer and iPhone(®) 5 app. Two blinded examiners each utilized the universal goniometer and iPhone(®) to measure active wrist ROM using a volar/dorsal alignment technique in the following sequences: flexion, extension, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation. The second (2 h later) and third (48 h later) sessions were carried out in the same manner as the first session. All the measurements were conducted three times and the mean value of three repetitions for each measurement was used for analysis. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) models (3, k) and (2, k) were used to determine the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability, respectively. The Pearson correlation coefficients were used to establish concurrent validity of the iPhone(®) app. Good to excellent intra-rater and inter-rater reliability was demonstrated for the goniometer with ICC values of ≥ 0.82 and ≥ 0.73 and the iPhone(®) app with ICC values of ≥ 0.83 and ≥ 0.79, respectively. Minimum detectable change at the 95% confidence level (MDC95 ) was computed as 1.96 × standard error of measurement

  3. Physical activity levels in three Brazilian birth cohorts as assessed with raw triaxial wrist accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Inácio CM; van Hees, Vincent T; Ramires, Virgílio V; Knuth, Alan G; Bielemann, Renata M; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Soren; Hallal, Pedro C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on objectively measured physical activity are lacking in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to describe objectively measured overall physical activity and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in individuals from the Pelotas (Brazil) birth cohorts, according to weight status, socioeconomic status (SES) and sex. Methods: All children born in 1982, 1993 and 2004 in hospitals in the city of Pelotas, Brazil, constitute the sampling frame; of these 99% agreed to participate. The most recent follow-ups were conducted between 2010 and 2013. In total, 8974 individuals provided valid data derived from raw triaxial wrist accelerometry. The average acceleration is presented in milli-g (1 mg = 0.001g), and time (min/d) spent in MVPA (>100 mg) is presented in 5- and 10-min bouts. Results: Mean acceleration in the 1982 (mean age 30.2 years), 1993 (mean age 18.4 years) and 2004 (mean age 6.7 years) cohorts was 35 mg, 39 mg and 60 mg, respectively. Time spent in MVPA was 26 [95% confidence interval (CI) 25; 27], 43 (95% CI 42; 44) and 45 (95% CI 43; 46) min/d in the three cohorts, respectively, using 10-min bouts. Mean MVPA was on average 42% higher when using 5-min bouts. Males were more active than females and physical activity was inversely associated with age of the cohort and SES. Normal-weight individuals were more active than underweight, overweight and obese participants. Conclusions: Overall physical activity and time spent in MVPA differed by cohort (age), sex, weight status and SES. Higher levels of activity in low SES groups may be explained by incidental physical activity. PMID:25361583

  4. Gymnast Wrist

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    weakest layer with the least amount of collagen matrix and ossification.4,5 Chondrogenesis continues in the germinal zone, but does not fully...is recommended, and wrists should be taped or braced to inhibit extreme positioning.2 Military Medicine Radiology Corner, Volume 174, March

  5. Large Scale Population Assessment of Physical Activity Using Wrist Worn Accelerometers: The UK Biobank Study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Dan; Hammerla, Nils; Granat, Malcolm H.; van Hees, Vincent T.; Trenell, Michael I.; Owen, Christoper G.; Preece, Stephen J.; Peakman, Tim; Brage, Soren

    2017-01-01

    Background Physical activity has not been objectively measured in prospective cohorts with sufficiently large numbers to reliably detect associations with multiple health outcomes. Technological advances now make this possible. We describe the methods used to collect and analyse accelerometer measured physical activity in over 100,000 participants of the UK Biobank study, and report variation by age, sex, day, time of day, and season. Methods Participants were approached by email to wear a wrist-worn accelerometer for seven days that was posted to them. Physical activity information was extracted from 100Hz raw triaxial acceleration data after calibration, removal of gravity and sensor noise, and identification of wear / non-wear episodes. We report age- and sex-specific wear-time compliance and accelerometer measured physical activity, overall and by hour-of-day, week-weekend day and season. Results 103,712 datasets were received (44.8% response), with a median wear-time of 6.9 days (IQR:6.5–7.0). 96,600 participants (93.3%) provided valid data for physical activity analyses. Vector magnitude, a proxy for overall physical activity, was 7.5% (2.35mg) lower per decade of age (Cohen’s d = 0.9). Women had a higher vector magnitude than men, apart from those aged 45-54yrs. There were major differences in vector magnitude by time of day (d = 0.66). Vector magnitude differences between week and weekend days (d = 0.12 for men, d = 0.09 for women) and between seasons (d = 0.27 for men, d = 0.15 for women) were small. Conclusions It is feasible to collect and analyse objective physical activity data in large studies. The summary measure of overall physical activity is lower in older participants and age-related differences in activity are most prominent in the afternoon and evening. This work lays the foundation for studies of physical activity and its health consequences. Our summary variables are part of the UK Biobank dataset and can be used by researchers as

  6. Nonlinear Coupling between Cortical Oscillations and Muscle Activity during Isotonic Wrist Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuan; Solis-Escalante, Teodoro; van de Ruit, Mark; van der Helm, Frans C. T.; Schouten, Alfred C.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling between cortical oscillations and muscle activity facilitates neuronal communication during motor control. The linear part of this coupling, known as corticomuscular coherence, has received substantial attention, even though neuronal communication underlying motor control has been demonstrated to be highly nonlinear. A full assessment of corticomuscular coupling, including the nonlinear part, is essential to understand the neuronal communication within the sensorimotor system. In this study, we applied the recently developed n:m coherence method to assess nonlinear corticomuscular coupling during isotonic wrist flexion. The n:m coherence is a generalized metric for quantifying nonlinear cross-frequency coupling as well as linear iso-frequency coupling. By using independent component analysis (ICA) and equivalent current dipole source localization, we identify four sensorimotor related brain areas based on the locations of the dipoles, i.e., the contralateral primary sensorimotor areas, supplementary motor area (SMA), prefrontal area (PFA) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC). For all these areas, linear coupling between electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) is present with peaks in the beta band (15–35 Hz), while nonlinear coupling is detected with both integer (1:2, 1:3, 1:4) and non-integer (2:3) harmonics. Significant differences between brain areas is shown in linear coupling with stronger coherence for the primary sensorimotor areas and motor association cortices (SMA, PFA) compared to the sensory association area (PPC); but not for the nonlinear coupling. Moreover, the detected nonlinear coupling is similar to previously reported nonlinear coupling of cortical activity to somatosensory stimuli. We suggest that the descending motor pathways mainly contribute to linear corticomuscular coupling, while nonlinear coupling likely originates from sensory feedback. PMID:27999537

  7. Nonlinear Coupling between Cortical Oscillations and Muscle Activity during Isotonic Wrist Flexion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Solis-Escalante, Teodoro; van de Ruit, Mark; van der Helm, Frans C T; Schouten, Alfred C

    2016-01-01

    Coupling between cortical oscillations and muscle activity facilitates neuronal communication during motor control. The linear part of this coupling, known as corticomuscular coherence, has received substantial attention, even though neuronal communication underlying motor control has been demonstrated to be highly nonlinear. A full assessment of corticomuscular coupling, including the nonlinear part, is essential to understand the neuronal communication within the sensorimotor system. In this study, we applied the recently developed n:m coherence method to assess nonlinear corticomuscular coupling during isotonic wrist flexion. The n:m coherence is a generalized metric for quantifying nonlinear cross-frequency coupling as well as linear iso-frequency coupling. By using independent component analysis (ICA) and equivalent current dipole source localization, we identify four sensorimotor related brain areas based on the locations of the dipoles, i.e., the contralateral primary sensorimotor areas, supplementary motor area (SMA), prefrontal area (PFA) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC). For all these areas, linear coupling between electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) is present with peaks in the beta band (15-35 Hz), while nonlinear coupling is detected with both integer (1:2, 1:3, 1:4) and non-integer (2:3) harmonics. Significant differences between brain areas is shown in linear coupling with stronger coherence for the primary sensorimotor areas and motor association cortices (SMA, PFA) compared to the sensory association area (PPC); but not for the nonlinear coupling. Moreover, the detected nonlinear coupling is similar to previously reported nonlinear coupling of cortical activity to somatosensory stimuli. We suggest that the descending motor pathways mainly contribute to linear corticomuscular coupling, while nonlinear coupling likely originates from sensory feedback.

  8. Gymnast wrist.

    PubMed

    De Smet, L; Claessens, A; Fabry, G

    1993-01-01

    Excessive or repetitive loading of an immature joint can lead to premature closure of the growth plate. In gymnastics this event is known as the gymnast wrist, or the Madelung-like deformity. Six new cases are presented. All had an ulnar-plus variance and an increased sagittal angle of the distal radial epiphysis. Five of them preferred to stop their sports career one was successfully treated with an arthroscopic debridement of the TFCC.

  9. Wrist rhythm during wrist joint motion evaluated by dynamic radiography.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Tada, Kaoru; Suganuma, Seigo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Sanada, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that wrist joint motion involves a "wrist rhythm" similar to the scapulohumeral rhythm. Therefore, we used a flat-panel detector to evaluate the ratio of radiolunate and capitolunate joint motions during wrist joint motion by dynamic radiography. The subjects were 20 healthy men. Dynamic imaging of the wrist joint was performed during active exercise for a total of ten seconds. In this study, we defined the radiocarpal (RL angle) and midcarpal joint angle (CL angle) as the wrist joint angle in the obtained images and measured the variation of these angles. The average curve was plotted and regression lines calculated from the average curve. The ratio was calculated from the slopes of the regression lines of the RL CL angles. These findings indicated that the ratio of the RL and CL angle motions was approximately 1:4 during palmar flexion and approximately 2:1 during dorsiflexion.

  10. Effect of wrist-worn activity monitor feedback on physical activity behavior: A randomized controlled trial in Finnish young men

    PubMed Central

    Jauho, Anna-Maiju; Pyky, Riitta; Ahola, Riikka; Kangas, Maarit; Virtanen, Paula; Korpelainen, Raija; Jämsä, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the use of an activity monitor providing feedback has an effect on physical activity (PA) in young men. A population-based sample of 276 conscription-aged (mean = 17.9, SD = 0.7 years) men participated in a 3-month randomized controlled trial in Oulu in 2012. Participants were randomized to an intervention group (INT, N = 137) and a control group (CON, N = 139). INT received a wrist-worn monitor (Polar Active) showing daily activity, and CON received identical monitors without feedback. Main outcome was the change from baseline in objectively measured weekly time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and sedentary activity (SED), as assessed by generalized estimation equations (GEE). Other lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire at baseline and at 3 months. Weekly physical activity data (≥ 4 days with ≥ 8 h each) were obtained from 72 (53%) and 90 (65%) men in the INT and CON, respectively. Based on GEE, time spent in MVPA increased (p = 0.012) and SED decreased (p = 0.032) in the INT compared with the CON. During the first 7 weeks, the INT spent on average 1 h less sedentary than the CON (t-test, p < 0.05). During the first week, the INT showed 12 minutes more MVPA compared to the CON (t-test, p = 0.034). Based on questionnaire data, the proportion of the most sedentary men decreased in the INT (Wilcoxon test, 28% vs. 10%, p = 0.029), with no change in the CON (20% vs. 19%, p = 0.546). To conclude, a wrist-worn activity monitor providing feedback had a short-term positive effect on PA and SED in young men. Trial registration This is a pilot study for a larger randomized controlled trial registered to the clinical trials register NCT01376986. PMID:26844128

  11. Methods to estimate aspects of physical activity and sedentary behavior from high-frequency wrist accelerometer measurements

    PubMed Central

    He, Shai; Hickey, Amanda; Sasaki, Jeffer; Freedson, Patty

    2015-01-01

    This investigation developed models to estimate aspects of physical activity and sedentary behavior from three-axis high-frequency wrist-worn accelerometer data. The models were developed and tested on 20 participants (n = 10 males, n = 10 females, mean age = 24.1, mean body mass index = 23.9), who wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer on their dominant wrist and an ActiGraph GT3X on the hip while performing a variety of scripted activities. Energy expenditure was concurrently measured by a portable indirect calorimetry system. Those calibration data were then used to develop and assess both machine-learning and simpler models with fewer unknown parameters (linear regression and decision trees) to estimate metabolic equivalent scores (METs) and to classify activity intensity, sedentary time, and locomotion time. The wrist models, applied to 15-s windows, estimated METs [random forest: root mean squared error (rSME) = 1.21 METs, hip: rMSE = 1.67 METs] and activity intensity (random forest: 75% correct, hip: 60% correct) better than a previously developed model that used counts per minute measured at the hip. In a separate set of comparisons, the simpler decision trees classified activity intensity (random forest: 75% correct, tree: 74% correct), sedentary time (random forest: 96% correct, decision tree: 97% correct), and locomotion time (random forest: 99% correct, decision tree: 96% correct) nearly as well or better than the machine-learning approaches. Preliminary investigation of the models' performance on two free-living people suggests that they may work well outside of controlled conditions. PMID:26112238

  12. Positioning Commercial Pedometers to Measure Activity of Older Adults with Slow Gait: At the Wrist or at the Waist?

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Frederic; Weber, Chloe; Lovis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary behaviour is a major risk factor for chronic disease morbidity and mortality in aging. Measuring people activity through devices such as pedometers is a recognized intervention to motivate them for more physical activity. However, the feedback provided by these devices must be accurate in order to avoid overtraining and keep users' motivation alive. If the accuracy of pedometers has been validated for healthy people, their lack of accuracy for elderly people walking at slower pace has been reported in several studies. The emergence on the consumer's market of new devices that can be worn indifferently at the wrist or at the waist raises once more this concern. In order to evaluate whether pedometers' location influences their accuracy, we have tested three pedometers at different locations, and for several paces in a comparative study. Beyond confirming the decrease of pedometers' accuracy with speed reduction, our study reveals that pedometers should be worn at the waist rather than at the wrist. This leads us to recommend wearing pedometers at the waist when monitoring population with reduced mobility.

  13. Trends in Wrist Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Obdeijn, Miryam C.; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.; Mathoulin, Christophe; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Wrist arthroscopy plays a role in both the diagnosis and the treatment of wrist pathology. It has evolved in the last three decades. Questions The present status of wrist arthroscopy was investigated by answering the following questions: -What is its current position in the treatment wrist pathologies according to the literature? -What is its current position according to hand surgeons? Methods Analysis of the number of publications on wrist arthroscopy was performed and compared with the number of publications on other arthroscopy topics to assess the current position of wrist arthroscopy. The members of the EWAS (European Wrist Arthroscopy Society) and the members of eight national hand surgery societies were questioned on wrist arthroscopy in daily practice. Results From 1975 till now, 925 papers on wrist arthroscopy were found. The publications on wrist arthroscopy increased from an average of 8/year (1986) to 26/year (2012). More than half (56.9%) of the respondents of the EWAS perform fewer than 5 wrist arthroscopies per month, and only 7 (10.8%) indicate the performance of more than 10 wrist arthroscopies per month. Seventy-four percent of the orthopedic hand surgeons perform wrist arthroscopy (in 48.5% for therapeutic indications) against 36.8% of plastic surgery hand surgeons (in 23.1% for therapeutic indications). Conclusion Wrist arthroscopy has taken up a place in the armamentarium of the hand surgeon. The place of wrist arthroscopy in daily practice is related to the background of the hand surgeon. PMID:24436823

  14. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2015-11-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18-39, 40-64, 65 +  years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of -0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of -0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81-1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed.

  15. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age

    PubMed Central

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18–39, 40–64, 65 + years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of −0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of −0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81–1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed. PMID:26449155

  16. Extensor Tendoscopy of the Wrist.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-08-01

    Extensor tenosynovitis of the wrist can lead to rupture of the extensor tendons. Extensor tenosynovectomy is indicated if the tenosynovitis cannot be controlled by conservative measures. Open tenosynovectomy requires extensive dissection of soft tissue, including the extensor retinaculum. This article describes extensor tendoscopy of the wrist. This technique allows approach to the extensor compartments with small incisions and minimal soft tissue dissection. It is indicated when extensor tenosynovitis persists despite adequate medical treatments including medications, immobilization, and steroid injection. Synovectomy of the extensor compartments can be performed with preservation of the extensor retinaculum. This technique is contraindicated if the wrist cannot be flexed or there is severe tendinopathy of the extensor tendon that may need open reconstruction. The purpose of this technical note was to describe a minimally invasive approach of complete synovectomy of the extensor compartments with preservation of the extensor compartment.

  17. Evaluation and diagnosis of wrist pain: a case-based approach.

    PubMed

    Shehab, Ramsey; Mirabelli, Mark H

    2013-04-15

    Patients with wrist pain commonly present with an acute injury or spontaneous onset of pain without a definite traumatic event. A fall onto an outstretched hand can lead to a scaphoid fracture, which is the most commonly fractured carpal bone. Conventional radiography alone can miss up to 30 percent of scaphoid fractures. Specialized views (e.g., posteroanterior in ulnar deviation, pronated oblique) and repeat radiography in 10 to 14 days can improve sensitivity for scaphoid fractures. If a suspected scaphoid fracture cannot be confirmed with plain radiography, a bone scan or magnetic resonance imaging can be used. Subacute or chronic wrist pain usually develops gradually with or without a prior traumatic event. In these cases, the differential diagnosis is wide and includes tendinopathy and nerve entrapment. Overuse of the muscles of the forearm and wrist may lead to tendinopathy. Radial pain involving mostly the first extensor compartment is commonly de Quervain tenosynovitis. The diagnosis is based on history and examination findings of a positive Finkelstein test and a negative grind test. Nerve entrapment at the wrist presents with pain and also with sensory and sometimes motor symptoms. In ulnar neuropathies of the wrist, the typical presentation is wrist discomfort with sensory changes in the fourth and fifth digits. Activities that involve repetitive or prolonged wrist extension, such as cycling, karate, and baseball (specifically catchers), may increase the risk of ulnar neuropathy. Electrodiagnostic tests identify the area of nerve entrapment and the extent of the pathology.

  18. Wrist Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... runs through your wrist. That tube, called the carpal tunnel, has tendons and a nerve inside. It is ... sports or sewing can cause pain, or even carpal tunnel syndrome. Wrist pain with bruising and swelling can ...

  19. Wrist sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... begins to heal. This can improve with light stretching. Severe (grade 3) wrist sprains may need to ... times. Bend your wrist in the opposite direction, stretching downward and holding for 30 seconds. Relax your ...

  20. Hand and Wrist Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Hand Tumors and Wrist Tumors Email to a friend * ... are seen commonly. CAUSES Common Types of Wrist Hand Tumors Ganglion Cysts (Figure 1): This is the ...

  1. Comparison of children's free-living physical activity derived from wrist and hip raw accelerations during the segmented week.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Robert J; Boddy, Lynne M; Kim, Youngwon; Knowles, Zoe R; Fairclough, Stuart J

    2016-11-14

    This study assessed children's physical activity (PA) levels derived from wrist-worn GENEActiv and hip-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers and examined the comparability of PA levels between the two devices throughout the segmented week. One hundred and twenty-nine 9-10-year-old children (79 girls) wore a GENEActiv (GAwrist) and ActiGraph GT3X+ (AGhip) accelerometer on the left wrist and right hip, respectively, for 7 days. Mean minutes of light PA (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) per weekday (whole-day, before-school, school and after-school) and weekend day (whole-day, morning and afternoon-evening) segments were calculated, and expressed as percentage of segment time. Repeated measures analysis of variance examined differences in LPA and MVPA between GAwrist and AGhip for each time segment. Bland-Altman plots assessed between-device agreement for LPA and MVPA for whole weekday and whole weekend day segments. Correlations between GAwrist and AGhip were weak for LPA (r = 0.18-0.28), but strong for MVPA (r = 0.80-0.86). LPA and MVPA levels during all weekday and weekend day segments were significantly higher for GAwrist than AGhip (p < 0.001). The largest inter-device percent difference of 26% was observed in LPA during the school day segment. Our data suggest that correction factors are needed to improve raw PA level comparability between GAwrist and AGhip.

  2. The passive stiffness of the wrist and forearm

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Steven K.; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Hogan, Neville; Krebs, Hermano I.

    2012-01-01

    Because wrist rotation dynamics are dominated by stiffness (Charles SK, Hogan N. J Biomech 44: 614–621, 2011), understanding how humans plan and execute coordinated wrist rotations requires knowledge of the stiffness characteristics of the wrist joint. In the past, the passive stiffness of the wrist joint has been measured in 1 degree of freedom (DOF). Although these 1-DOF measurements inform us of the dynamics the neuromuscular system must overcome to rotate the wrist in pure flexion-extension (FE) or pure radial-ulnar deviation (RUD), the wrist rarely rotates in pure FE or RUD. Instead, understanding natural wrist rotations requires knowledge of wrist stiffness in combinations of FE and RUD. The purpose of this report is to present measurements of passive wrist stiffness throughout the space spanned by FE and RUD. Using a rehabilitation robot designed for the wrist and forearm, we measured the passive stiffness of the wrist joint in 10 subjects in FE, RUD, and combinations. For comparison, we measured the passive stiffness of the forearm (in pronation-supination), as well. Our measurements in pure FE and RUD agreed well with previous 1-DOF measurements. We have linearized the 2-DOF stiffness measurements and present them in the form of stiffness ellipses and as stiffness matrices useful for modeling wrist rotation dynamics. We found that passive wrist stiffness was anisotropic, with greater stiffness in RUD than in FE. We also found that passive wrist stiffness did not align with the anatomical axes of the wrist; the major and minor axes of the stiffness ellipse were rotated with respect to the FE and RUD axes by ∼20°. The direction of least stiffness was between ulnar flexion and radial extension, a direction used in many natural movements (known as the “dart-thrower's motion”), suggesting that the nervous system may take advantage of the direction of least stiffness for common wrist rotations. PMID:22649208

  3. The effects of electromechanical wrist robot assistive system with neuromuscular electrical stimulation for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Li, R; Xue, J J; Ho, S K; Chen, P

    2012-06-01

    An electromyography (EMG)-driven electromechanical robot system integrated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) was developed for wrist training after stroke. The performance of the system in assisting wrist flexion/extension tracking was evaluated on five chronic stroke subjects, when the system provided five different schemes with or without NMES and robot assistance. The tracking performances were measured by range of motion (ROM) of the wrist and root mean squared error (RMSE). The performance is better when both NMES and robot assisted in the tracking than those with either NMES or robot only (P<0.05). The muscle co-contractions in the upper limb measured by EMG were reduced when NMES provided assistance (P<0.05). All subjects also attended a 20-session wrist training for evaluating the training effects (3-5 times/week). The results showed improvements on the voluntary motor functions in the hand, wrist and elbow functions after the training, as indicated by the clinical scores of Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Action Research Arm Test, Wolf Motor Function Test; and also showed reduced spasticity in the wrist and the elbow as measured by the Modified Ashworth Score of each subject. After the training, the co-contractions were reduced between the flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis, and between the biceps brachii and triceps brachii. Assistance from the robot helped improve the movement accuracy; and the NMES helped increase the muscle activation for the wrist joint and suppress the excessive muscular activities from the elbow joint. The NMES-robot assisted wrist training could improve the hand, wrist, and elbow functions.

  4. Wrist activity monitoring in air crew members: a method for analyzing sleep quality following transmeridian and north-south flights.

    PubMed

    Buck, A; Tobler, I; Borbély, A A

    1989-01-01

    Home base recordings of motor activity during bedtime, and of subjective sleep parameters, were obtained from air crew members before and after the following routes with multiple flight segments: (1) south-north (SN) across 1 time zone; (2) west-east (WE) across 17 time zones; (3) east-west (EW) across 7 time zones. For the EW route, recordings were also obtained during layover. Only after return from the EW route was bedtime motor activity (measured by a wrist-worn ambulatory monitor) enhanced, was the percentage of bedtime immobility periods reduced, and were frequency and duration of self-assessed waking after sleep onset increased. The subjects rated their sleep as less quiet and felt less rested than during baseline. The various parameters gradually reverted toward baseline during the first 4 days at home. Although sleep showed only minor impairments during the EW route, the subjective jet-lag score was high during layover and after return to home base. Ambulatory activity monitoring is a useful method for assessing sleep quality after long-haul flights.

  5. Application of the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist rehabilitation training

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wei-Min; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Chen, Shih-Ching; Tan, Sun-Yen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yu-Luen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The introduction of emerging technologies such as the wireless Blobo bluetooth ball with multimedia features can enhance wrist physical therapy training, making it more fun and enhancing its effects. [Methods] Wrist injuries caused by fatigue at work, improper exercise, and other conditions are very common. Therefore, the reconstruction of wrist joint function is an important issue. The efficacy of a newly developed integrated wrist joint rehabilitation game using a Blobo bluetooth ball with C# software installed was tested in wrist rehabilitation (Flexion, Extension, Ulnar Deviation, Radial Deviation). [Results] Eight subjects with normal wrist function participated in a test of the system’s stability and repeatability. After performing the Blobo bluetooth ball wrist physical therapy training, eight patients with wrist dysfunction experienced approximately 10° improvements in range of motion (ROM) of flexion extension, and ulnar deviation and about 6° ROM improvement in radial deviation. The subjects showed progress in important indicators of wrist function. [Conclusion] This study used the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist physical therapy training and the preliminary results were encouraging. In the future, more diverse wrist or limb rehabilitation games should be developed to meet the needs of physical therapy training. PMID:26957723

  6. Application of the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist rehabilitation training.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wei-Min; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Chen, Shih-Ching; Tan, Sun-Yen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yu-Luen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The introduction of emerging technologies such as the wireless Blobo bluetooth ball with multimedia features can enhance wrist physical therapy training, making it more fun and enhancing its effects. [Methods] Wrist injuries caused by fatigue at work, improper exercise, and other conditions are very common. Therefore, the reconstruction of wrist joint function is an important issue. The efficacy of a newly developed integrated wrist joint rehabilitation game using a Blobo bluetooth ball with C# software installed was tested in wrist rehabilitation (Flexion, Extension, Ulnar Deviation, Radial Deviation). [Results] Eight subjects with normal wrist function participated in a test of the system's stability and repeatability. After performing the Blobo bluetooth ball wrist physical therapy training, eight patients with wrist dysfunction experienced approximately 10° improvements in range of motion (ROM) of flexion extension, and ulnar deviation and about 6° ROM improvement in radial deviation. The subjects showed progress in important indicators of wrist function. [Conclusion] This study used the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist physical therapy training and the preliminary results were encouraging. In the future, more diverse wrist or limb rehabilitation games should be developed to meet the needs of physical therapy training.

  7. Maximal dynamic grip force and wrist torque: the effects of gender, exertion direction, angular velocity, and wrist angle.

    PubMed

    Morse, Jonathan L; Jung, Myung-Chul; Bashford, Gregory R; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of gender, exertion direction, angular velocity and wrist angle on simultaneous grip force and wrist torque under the isokinetic condition. The study used 20 participants (10 males and 10 females) and included 6 angular velocities (15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 degrees /s) and 2 wrist exertion directions (flexion and extension) over the wrist range of motion of 70 degrees flexion to 60 degrees extension in 5 degrees increments. Similar to other studies, males and flexion exertion produced larger forces than females and extension exertion, respectively. However, the largest forces were generated at near extreme flexion of the wrist and the dependent variable of angular velocity was not practically significant. These results can contribute to the evaluation of cumulative trauma syndromes, but there is a need for more research on the dynamic measures of the hand and wrist complex and for standard development for dynamic force measurement.

  8. How accurate are the wrist-based heart rate monitors during walking and running activities? Are they accurate enough?

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyun-Sung; Dinkel, Danae M; Noble, John M; Lee, Jung-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart rate (HR) monitors are valuable devices for fitness-orientated individuals. There has been a vast influx of optical sensing blood flow monitors claiming to provide accurate HR during physical activities. These monitors are worn on the arm and wrist to detect HR with photoplethysmography (PPG) techniques. Little is known about the validity of these wearable activity trackers. Aim Validate the Scosche Rhythm (SR), Mio Alpha (MA), Fitbit Charge HR (FH), Basis Peak (BP), Microsoft Band (MB), and TomTom Runner Cardio (TT) wireless HR monitors. Methods 50 volunteers (males: n=32, age 19–43 years; females: n=18, age 19–38 years) participated. All monitors were worn simultaneously in a randomised configuration. The Polar RS400 HR chest strap was the criterion measure. A treadmill protocol of one 30 min bout of continuous walking and running at 3.2, 4.8, 6.4, 8.0, and 9.6 km/h (5 min at each protocol speed) with HR manually recorded every minute was completed. Results For group comparisons, the mean absolute percentage error values were: 3.3%, 3.6%, 4.0%, 4.6%, 4.8% and 6.2% for TT, BP, RH, MA, MB and FH, respectively. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r) was observed: r=0.959 (TT), r=0.956 (MB), r=0.954 (BP), r=0.933 (FH), r=0.930 (RH) and r=0.929 (MA). Results from 95% equivalency testing showed monitors were found to be equivalent to those of the criterion HR (±10% equivalence zone: 98.15–119.96). Conclusions The results demonstrate that the wearable activity trackers provide an accurate measurement of HR during walking and running activities. PMID:27900173

  9. Dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations.

    PubMed

    Peaden, Allan W; Charles, Steven K

    2014-08-22

    Human movement generally involves multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) coordinated in a graceful and seemingly effortless manner even though the underlying dynamics are generally complex. Understanding these dynamics is important because it exposes the challenges that the neuromuscular system faces in controlling movement. Despite the importance of wrist and forearm rotations in everyday life, the dynamics of movements involving wrist and forearm rotations are currently unknown. Here we present equations of motion describing the torques required to produce movements combining flexion-extension (FE) and radial-ulnar deviation (RUD) of the wrist and pronation-supination (PS) of the forearm. The total torque is comprised of components required to overcome the effects of inertia, damping, stiffness, and gravity. Using experimentally measured kinematic data and subject-specific impedance parameters (inertia, damping, and stiffness), we evaluated movement torques to test the following hypotheses: the dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations are (1) dominated by stiffness, not inertial or damping effects, (2) significantly coupled through interaction torques due to stiffness and damping (but not inertia), and (3) too complex to be well approximated by a simple, linear model. We found that (1) the dynamics of movements combining the wrist and forearm are similar to wrist rotations in that stiffness dominates over inertial and damping effects (p<0.0001) by approximately an order of magnitude, (2) the DOF of the wrist and forearm are significantly coupled through stiffness, while interactions due to inertia and damping are small, and (3) despite the complexity of the exact equations of motion, the dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations are well approximated by a simple, linear (but still coupled) model (the mean error in predicting torque was less than 1% of the maximum torque). The exact and approximate models are presented for modeling wrist and forearm rotations in future

  10. Proximal Row Carpectomy Combined with Wrist Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Culp, Randall W.; Bachoura, Abdo; Gelman, Scott E.; Jacoby, Sidney M.

    2012-01-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) combined with distal radius hemiarthroplasty is a relatively novel procedure that rivals total wrist arthrodesis and offers a new surgical treatment option for select patients with painful, end-stage wrist disease. We present our early experience with this procedure. A retrospective chart review was conducted for nonrheumatoid patients diagnosed with wrist arthritis and subsequently treated with wrist hemiarthroplasty combined with PRC. The minimum follow-up duration was 12 months. Preoperative and postoperative flexion, extension, and grip strength were recorded. Postoperative radiographic findings were assessed. The Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) questionnaire was administered to gauge postoperative pain and function. The records of 10 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 64 years and the mean postoperative follow-up duration was 19 months. Postoperative flexion, extension, and grip strength were all found to be less than the preoperative levels. The mean postoperative PRWE score for pain and function were 26 and 23, respectively. The complications were diverse and occurred at a relatively high rate. PRC combined with distal radius hemiarthroplasty is a novel procedure that offers a potential surgical option for the treatment of wrist arthritis in select patients. Our early experience has lead us to modify our technique with regard to the implant material, and at this stage, the surgical technique and the most appropriate implant may require further optimization. The level of evidence for this study is IV (therapeutic). PMID:23904978

  11. Linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel mechanomyographic recordings reveal heterogeneous activation of wrist extensors in presence of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst A; Samani, Afshin

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we applied multi-channel mechanomyographic (MMG) recordings in combination with linear and nonlinear analyses to investigate muscular and musculotendinous effects of high intensity eccentric exercise. Twelve accelerometers arranged in a 3 × 4 matrix over the dominant elbow muscles were used to detect MMG activity in 12 healthy participants. Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced by repetitive high intensity eccentric contractions of the wrist extensor muscles. Average rectified values (ARV) as well as percentage of recurrence (%REC) and percentage of determinism (%DET) extracted from recurrence quantification analysis were computed from data obtained during static-dynamic contractions performed before exercise, immediately after exercise, and in presence of muscle soreness. A linear mixed model was used for the statistical analysis. The ARV, %REC, and %DET maps revealed heterogeneous MMG activity over the wrist extensor muscles before, immediately after, and in presence of muscle soreness (P<0.01). The ARVs were higher while the %REC and %DET were lower in presence of muscle soreness compared with before exercise (P<0.05). The study provides new key information on linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel MMG recordings of the wrist extensor muscles following eccentric exercise that results in muscle soreness. Recurrence quantification analysis can be suggested as a tool for detection of MMG changes in presence of muscle soreness.

  12. Post-stroke wrist rehabilitation assisted with an intention-driven functional electrical stimulation (FES)-robot system.

    PubMed

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Li, R; Chen, M; Xue, J J; Ho, S K; Chen, P N

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a novel FES-robot system was developed for wrist rehabilitation training after stroke. The FES-robot system could be continuously controlled by electromyography (EMG) from the residual wrist muscles to facilitate wrist flexion and extension tracking tasks on a horizontal plane by providing assistance from both FES and robot parts. The system performance with five different assistive combinations from the FES and robot parts was evaluated by subjects with chronic stroke (n=5). The results suggested that the assistance from the robot part mainly improved the movement accuracy in the tracking tasks; and the assistance from the FES part mainly suppressed the excessive muscular activities from the elbow joint. The best combination was when the assistances from FES and robot was 1:1, and the results showed better wrist tracking performance with less muscle co-contraction from the elbow joint.

  13. Passive stiffness of coupled wrist and forearm rotations.

    PubMed

    Drake, Will B; Charles, Steven K

    2014-09-01

    Coordinated movement requires that the neuromuscular system account and compensate for movement dynamics. One particularly complex aspect of movement dynamics is the interaction that occurs between degrees of freedom (DOF), which may be caused by inertia, damping, and/or stiffness. During wrist rotations, the two DOF of the wrist (flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation, FE and RUD) are coupled through interaction torques arising from passive joint stiffness. One important unanswered question is whether the DOF of the forearm (pronation-supination, PS) is coupled to the two DOF of the wrist. Answering this question, and understanding the dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations in general, requires knowledge of the stiffness encountered during rotations involving all three DOF (PS, FE, and RUD). Here we present the first-ever measurement of the passive stiffness encountered during simultaneous wrist and forearm rotations. Using a wrist and forearm robot, we measured coupled wrist and forearm stiffness in 10 subjects and present it as a 3-by-3 stiffness matrix. This measurement of passive wrist and forearm stiffness will enable future studies investigating the dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations, exposing the dynamics for which the neuromuscular system must plan and compensate during movements involving the wrist and forearm.

  14. Effect of wrist posture on carpal tunnel pressure while typing.

    PubMed

    Rempel, David M; Keir, Peter J; Bach, Joel M

    2008-09-01

    Long weekly hours of keyboard use may lead to or aggravate carpal tunnel syndrome. The effects of typing on fluid pressure in the carpal tunnel, a possible mediator of carpal tunnel syndrome, are unknown. Twenty healthy subjects participated in a laboratory study to investigate the effects of typing at different wrist postures on carpal tunnel pressure of the right hand. Changes in wrist flexion/extension angle (p = 0.01) and radial/ulnar deviation angle (p = 0.03) independently altered carpal tunnel pressure; wrist deviations in extension or radial deviation were associated with an increase in pressure. The activity of typing independently elevated carpal tunnel pressure (p = 0.001) relative to the static hand held in the same posture. This information can guide the design and use of keyboards and workstations in order to minimize carpal tunnel pressure while typing. The findings may also be useful to clinicians and ergonomists in the management of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who use a keyboard.

  15. Exploring Extension Involvement in Farm to School Program Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    The study reported here examined Extension professionals' involvement in farm-to-school program activities. Results of an online survey distributed to eight state Extension systems indicate that on average, Extension professionals are involved with one farm to school program activity, with most supporting school or community garden programs.…

  16. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  17. Dexterous Humanoid Robotic Wrist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a torso, a pair of arms, a neck, a head, a wrist joint assembly, and a control system. The arms and the neck movably extend from the torso. Each of the arms includes a lower arm and a hand that is rotatable relative to the lower arm. The wrist joint assembly is operatively defined between the lower arm and the hand. The wrist joint assembly includes a yaw axis and a pitch axis. The pitch axis is disposed in a spaced relationship to the yaw axis such that the axes are generally perpendicular. The pitch axis extends between the yaw axis and the lower arm. The hand is rotatable relative to the lower arm about each of the yaw axis and the pitch axis. The control system is configured for determining a yaw angle and a pitch angle of the wrist joint assembly.

  18. Implications for rehabilitation after total wrist arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Margery A

    2004-09-01

    Achieving satisfactory, long-term functional outcomes after total wrist arthroplasty surgery has proved more complicated than with arthroplasties in joints such as the hip or knee. However, improvements in implant design and surgical technique have resulted in recent successes and evidence that wrist arthroplasty may be an appropriate choice to improve function in select patients. This article reviews factors that therapists must consider in planning, implementing, and progressing individual patients' rehabilitation programs after wrist arthroplasty surgery. Therapists must be knowledgeable about the specifics of each patient's surgery so that the rehabilitation program can be customized appropriately and can contribute to achieving pain-free stable wrist movement that allows patients to perform their desired functional activities.

  19. Student Activities . . . an Extension of the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Joan B.

    1981-01-01

    Extracurricular activities in secondary schools are an important part of student preparation for adult life. This document presents guidelines on the components, administration, and evaluation of student activities. It suggests that a comprehensive activity program should include student government, publications, cultural activities, service…

  20. Ulnar impaction syndrome: Managed by wrist arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jiajie; Xu, Zhijie; Zhao, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of handicraft industry and increase of various such works that need a large amount of repeated wrist ulnar deviation strength, the incidence of ulnar impaction syndrome (UIS) is increasing, but the traditional simple ulnar shortening osteotomy has more complications. This study aimed to explore the early diagnostic criteria of UIS and its wrist arthroscopic treatment experience. Materials and Methods: 9 UIS patients were enrolled in this study. According to magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray and endoscopic features, the diagnostic criteria of UIS were summarized and the individualized treatment schedule was made. If the ulnar positive variance was less than 4 mm, the arthroscopic wafer resection was performed. If the ulnar positive variance was more than 4 mm, the arthroscopic resection of injury and degenerative triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar osteotomy were conducted. Results: In all patients, the wound healed without any complications. All patients returned to normal life and work, with no ulnar wrist pain again. One patient had wrist weakness. There was a significant difference of the wrist activity between the last followup and before operation (P < 0.05). According to the modified wrist function scoring system of Green and O’Brien, there were 6 cases of excellent, 2 cases of good and 1 case of appropriate and the overall excellent and good rate was 92.3%. Conclusion: In the treatment of UIS, the arthroscopy can improve the diagnosis rate, optimize the treatment plan, shorten the treatment cycle, with good treatment results. PMID:27053807

  1. Functional results after proximal row carpectomy to salvage a wrist.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Thomas; Sauerbier, Michael; Trankle, Markus; Dragu, Adrian; Germann, Guenter; Baumeister, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Proximal row carpectomy is a movement-preserving procedure in the treatment of arthrosis of the wrist. We have retrospectively assessed the objective and subjective functional results after proximal row carpectomy. Assessment of outcome included measurement of range of movement (ROM), grip strength and self-assessment of pain relief with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire. Results were graded using the Mayo and Krimmer wrist scores. Fourty-five patients (mean age 48 (30-67) years) were evaluated with a follow-up of 32 (8-115) months. Underlying conditions included: degenerative arthritis secondary to scapholunate advanced collapse deformity, or chronic scaphoid non-union (n=35), Kienbock disease stage III (n=4), chronic perilunate dislocation and fracture-dislocation (n=4), avascular necrosis of the scaphoid (n=1), and severe radiocarpal arthrosis secondary to distal radial fracture (n=1). Active ROM for wrist extension and flexion was 70 degrees and mean radial and ulnar deviation 30.8 degrees . Grip strength was 51% of the unaffected side. The average DASH score was 26. The intensity of the pain, measured by VAS, was reduced by 44% after strenuous activities and by 71% at rest. The Mayo and Krimmer wrist scores were 55 and 62 points indicating good results; 32 patients returned to work and 25 patients to their former occupation. Our results show that proximal row carpectomy is a technically easy operation that preserves a satisfying ROM and pain relief, and is recommended when the head of the capitate and the lunate fossa are not affected by arthrosis.

  2. A simple wrist arthroscopy tower: the wrist triangle.

    PubMed

    Sraj, Shafic A

    2013-12-01

    Several wrist arthroscopy towers are commercially available. In this report, the use of a triangular holder as a cheap, mobile, radiolucent tower for wrist arthroscopy is described, which can be useful in a cost-conscious surgical practice.

  3. Wrist Instability After Injury

    PubMed Central

    Muminagic, Sahib; Kapidzic, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    Fractures of the bones that make the wrist joint together with injury to the ligaments and joint capsules are frequent traumas. It can cause besides limited movement also the pathological mobility. These mild injuries often do not provide the degree of recognizable symptoms and signs. They are diagnosed by X-ray imaging, stress images. Before arthrography was an important method, but nowadays arthroscopy has the advantage. Fresh bone and ligament injuries can be and should be repaired in the early posttraumatic period. Unrecognized and undiagnosed injuries are leading to instability of the wrist, to motion abnormalities or impingement overload syndrome. In the treatment of instability important place have reconstruction of the ligaments and arthrodesis of the wrist. PMID:23678318

  4. Wrist deformities after fracture.

    PubMed

    Vanheest, Ann

    2006-02-01

    Wrist deformities can occur after fracture because of malunion of the fracture or injury to the growth plate leading to imbalance of growth. Prevention of malunion is paramount by early recognition with proper reduction and casting or fixation with casting. If a mal-union occurs, an osteotomy may be necessary if anticipated growth will not correct the deformity. Injury of the growth plate may lead to wrist deformity in two ways: angular growth or growth arrest. Angular growth deformities are corrected most commonly by osteotomy. Growth arrest of the radius or the ulna leads to an ulnar-positive or an ulnar-negative variance at the wrist. If the ulnar variance is symptomatic, treatment is centered on achieving a level joint. Options for joint leveling procedures include epiphysiodesis or physeal stapling of the longer bone, lengthening osteotomy of the shorter bone, or shortening osteotomy of the longer bone.

  5. 2007 IFSSH committee report of wrist biomechanics committee: biomechanics of the so-called dart-throwing motion of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Moritomo, Hisao; Apergis, Emmanuel P; Herzberg, Guillaume; Werner, Frederick W; Wolfe, Scott W; Garcia-Elias, Marc

    2007-11-01

    The dart-throwing motion (DTM) plane can be defined as a plane in which wrist functional oblique motion occurs, specifically from radial extension to ulnar flexion. Most activities of daily living are performed using a DTM. The DTM utilizes the midcarpal joint to a great extent. Scaphotrapezio-trapezoidal anatomy and kinematics may be important factors that cause a DTM to be a more stable and controlled motion. During a DTM, there is less scaphoid and lunate motion than during pure flexion-extension or radioulnar deviation. Clinically, a DTM at the plane approximately 30 degrees to 45 degrees from the sagittal plane allows continued functional wrist motion while minimizing radiocarpal motion when needed for rehabilitation.

  6. Scaphoid Fracture of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    .org Scaphoid Fracture of the Wrist Page ( 1 ) The scaphoid is one of the small bones in the wrist. It is ... that the scaphoid is injured. Cause A scaphoid fracture is usually caused by a fall on an ...

  7. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  8. Supinator Extender (SUE): a pneumatically actuated robot for forearm/wrist rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Allington, James; Spencer, Steven J; Klein, Julius; Buell, Meghan; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Bobrow, James

    2011-01-01

    The robot described in this paper, SUE (Supinator Extender), adds forearm/wrist rehabilitation functionality to the UCI BONES exoskeleton robot and to the ArmeoSpring rehabilitation device. SUE is a 2-DOF serial chain that can measure and assist forearm supination-pronation and wrist flexion-extension. The large power to weight ratio of pneumatic actuators allows SUE to achieve the forces needed for rehabilitation therapy while remaining lightweight enough to be carried by BONES and ArmeoSpring. Each degree of freedom has a range of 90 degrees, and a nominal torque of 2 ft-lbs. The cylinders are mounted away from the patient's body on the lateral aspect of the arm. This is to prevent the danger of a collision and maximize the workspace of the arm robot. The rotation axis used for supination-pronation is a small bearing just below the subject's wrist. The flexion-extension motion is actuated by a cantilevered pneumatic cylinder, which allows the palm of the hand to remain open. Data are presented that demonstrate the ability of SUE to measure and cancel forearm/wrist passive tone, thereby extending the active range of motion for people with stroke.

  9. Wrist and forearm postures and motions during typing.

    PubMed

    Serina, E R; Tal, R; Rempel, D

    1999-07-01

    Awkward upper extremity postures and repetitive wrist motions have been identified by some studies as risk factors for upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders during keyboard work. However, accurate body postures and joint motions of typists typing on standardized workstations are not known. A laboratory study was conducted to continuously measure wrist and forearm postures and motions of 25 subjects while they typed for 10-15 min at a standard computer workstation adjusted to the subjects' anthropometry. Electrogoniometers continuously recorded wrist and forearm angles. Joint angular velocities and accelerations were calculated from the postural data. The results indicate that wrist and forearm postures during typing were sustained at non-neutral angles; mean wrist extension angle was 23.4 +/- 10.9 degrees on the left and 19.9 +/- 8.6 degrees on the right. Mean ulnar deviation was 14.7 +/- 10.1 degrees on the left and 18.6 +/- 5.8 degrees on the right. More than 73% of subjects typed with the left or right wrist in greater than 15 degrees extension and more than 20% typed with the left or right wrist in greater than 20 degrees ulnar deviation. Joint angles and motions while typing on an adjusted computer workstation were not predictable based on anthropometry or typing speed and varied widely between subjects. Wrist motions are rapid and are similar in magnitude to wrist motions of industrial workers performing jobs having a high risk for developing cumulative trauma disorders. The magnitude of the dynamic components suggests that wrist joint motions may need to be evaluated as a risk factor for musculoskeletal disorders during typing.

  10. Pyrocarbon Interposition Wrist Arthroplasty in the Treatment of Failed Wrist Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Bellemère, Philippe; Maes-Clavier, Catherine; Loubersac, Thierry; Gaisne, Etienne; Kerjean, Yves; Collon, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of failures after prior wrist surgeries with major articular destruction is challenging. In most cases, total wrist fusion is the only possible salvage procedure. We propose a new interposition arthroplasty with a pyrocarbon implant called Amandys. A total of 16 patients, 14 men and 2 women, with a mean age of 56 years were operated on for a failure of wrist surgery performed previously, with an average time lapse of 12 years. The prior surgeries were partial wrist arthrodesis in seven cases, silicone implant interpositions in five cases, advanced Kienböck disease (Lichtman IV) treatment in two cases, proximal row carpectomy in one case, and an isolated scaphoidectomy in one case. A prospective study with clinical and radiological evaluation was performed with a mean follow-up of 24 months (6 to 41 months). Pain and function showed significant improvement. The mean pain score decreased from 7 of 10 to 4 of 10, postoperatively. The mean grip strength was 19 kg (53% of the contralateral side), and the mean range of motion in flexion extension was 68 degrees. Mean strength and range of motion did not change significantly with the operation. The mean QuickDASH (Disability Arm Shoulder and Hand) score decreased from 59 of 100 to 39 of 100. The mean Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation decreased from 57 of 100 to 33. Two patients (12.5%) required revision for implant repositioning. No dislocation or subsidence of the implant was noted. Pyrocarbon interposition arthroplasty is a new option for treatment of advanced wrist destruction. Preliminary short-term results suggest that it may be a reliable alternative to total wrist fusion. The level of evidence of this study is IV (therapeutic case series). PMID:23904977

  11. Using Non-Extension Volunteering as an Experiential Learning Activity for Extension Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Kevin B.; Lockett, Landry L.

    2013-01-01

    Extension professionals can gain much-needed competencies in volunteer administration through experiential learning by participating in volunteer activities. Experiential learning is a means of behavior change that allows the individual learner to reflect on, abstract, and apply their experiences to new situations. This article expands on…

  12. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Roper, Jaimie A; Shechtman, Orit; Otzel, Dana M; Hovis, Patty W; Tillman, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression.

  13. Design and Kinematic Evaluation of a Novel Joint-Specific Play Controller: Application for Wrist and Forearm Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Joel B.; Wilcox, Bethany; Costa, Laura; Kerman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background The wrist extensors and flexors are profoundly affected in most children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) and are the major target of physical therapists' and occupational therapists' efforts to restore useful hand functions. A limitation of any therapeutic or exercise program can be the level of the child's engagement or adherence. The proposed approach capitalizes on the primary learning avenue for children: toy play. Objective This study aimed to develop and evaluate the measurement accuracy of innovative, motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. Design Design objectives of the play controller included a cost-effective, home-based supplement to physical therapy, the ability to calibrate the controller so that play can be accomplished with any active range of motion, and the capability of logging play activity and wrist motion over week-long periods. Methods Accuracy of the play controller in measuring wrist flexion-extension was evaluated in 6 children who were developing in a typical manner, using optical motion capture of the wrist and forearm as the gold standard. Results The error of the play controller was estimated at approximately 5 degrees in both maximum wrist flexion and extension. Limitations Measurements were taken during a laboratory session, with children without CP, and no toy or computer game was interfaced with the play controller. Therefore, the potential engagement of the proposed approach for therapy remains to be evaluated. Conclusions This study presented the concept, development, and wrist tracking accuracy of an inexpensive approach to extremity therapy that may have a health benefit for children with hemiparesis, and potentially for patients of any age with a wide range of extremity neuromotor impairments. PMID:25573759

  14. Nonlinear viscosity of human wrist.

    PubMed

    Gielen, C C; Houk, J C

    1984-09-01

    Nonlinear viscous properties of stretch and unloading reflexes in the human wrist were examined using constant-velocity ramp stretches and releases in the range between 5 and 500 mm/s. Subjects were asked to oppose an initial flexor preload and were instructed not to intervene voluntarily when the changes in position were applied. Electromyographic (EMG) activity and net force exerted by the wrist were measured. Although subjects were instructed not to intervene to the applied stretches, even well-practiced subjects sometimes showed unintended triggered reactions, which character could be assisting or resisting. A trial comparison method was used to detect and eliminate responses contaminated by unintended reactions. Ramp stretches further loaded the preloaded flexor muscles. Responses of EMG and force increased steeply initially but after about 1-cm displacement, the slope of these responses decreased to a lower value and remained constant during the remainder of the 5-cm ramp. For higher stretch velocities, the magnitudes and slopes of the responses of EMG and force increased but less than proportionally with ramp velocity. Except for the initial transient, EMG in the loaded flexor muscles and force responses could be described by a product relationship between a linear position-related term and a low fractional power of velocity, after a correction was made for delays in the reflex arc. Mean value of the exponent in the power function of velocity was 0.3 for EMG and 0.17 for force. For higher preloads, incremental responses of force to constant-velocity stretches, plotted as a function of wrist position, shifted to higher values and the slope of increase of force with position became somewhat steeper. This upward shift of the force trace reflects a change of apparent threshold of the stretch reflex. Ramp releases shortened and unloaded the preloaded flexor muscles and stretched the initially inactive extensor muscles. Flexor EMG activity declined progressively

  15. Animation of Phoenix's Wrist Unlatching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This animation shows what happened underneath Phoenix's Robotic Arm wrist on Sol 3. The pin that goes through the loop is what holds the wrist in place. The rotation of the wrist pops the pin free.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Wrist postures in the general population of computer users during a computer task.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, Maurice F; O'Reilly, David S; Walsh, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Computer activities have commonly been linked to the development of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the upper limbs. However, to understand the effects computer use has on such disorders, it is necessary to identify and classify the movements involved in performing common computer tasks, one of these being typing. Motion analysis techniques were adopted to determine the movements involved during a typing task. This involved markers being placed on the knuckles, wrists and forearms of participants. This marker configuration allowed for the flexion, extension, radial deviation, ulnar deviation and a combination of these movements to be calculated. The results in one plane of motion show a mean extension|flexion and radial|ulnar deviation of 18.825° ± 10.013° and 5.228° ± 11.703° respectively. The most common position in two planes of motion was 20° extension with a simultaneous 20° ulnar deviation (10.72%). The results depict an alternative method of categorizing wrist positions in two planes during computer use. Coincident wrist postures should be addressed as opposed to motion in a single plane as these postures may result in different ergonomic risk factors developing.

  17. Proprioceptive control of wrist movements in Parkinson's disease. Reduced muscle vibration-induced errors.

    PubMed

    Rickards, C; Cody, F W

    1997-06-01

    The effects upon the trajectories of practised slow (approximately 9 degrees/s) voluntary wrist-extension movements of applying vibration to the tendon of an antagonist muscle (flexor carpi radialis) during the course of the movement have been studied in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and age-matched healthy individuals. In both patient and control groups, flexor vibration elicited undershooting of wrist-extension movements. Wrist extensor and flexor surface EMG recordings indicated that, in patients and controls, such undershooting resulted principally from sustained reductions in extensor (prime mover) activity. Small vibration reflexes were commonly elicited in the wrist flexors which, in both Parkinson's disease and healthy subjects, were usually otherwise virtually quiescent during these slow extension movements. The amplitudes of such vibration reflexes did not differ systematically between patient and control groups and appeared inadequate to have exerted an appreciable braking action upon the extension trajectories. However, the extent of vibration-induced undershooting was, on average, significantly less in the Parkinson's disease group. In a subgroup of patients with asymmetrical parkinsonism the effects of antagonist vibration upon wrist movements of the more and less affected limb were compared. The degree of vibration-induced undershooting was significantly smaller on the more affected side. This finding suggests that disturbed proprioceptive guidance of voluntary movements in Parkinson's disease is related to the severity of clinical motor deficits. A small number Parkinson's disease patients were studied 'ON' and 'OFF' their routine anti-parkinsonian medication. A non-significant tendency was found for vibration-induced errors to be less marked in the 'OFF' state. In a separate series of experiments, under isometric conditions, vibration-induced EMG changes were recorded whilst subjects attempted to maintain a steady (15% maximum

  18. SCRIPT passive orthosis: design and technical evaluation of the wrist and hand orthosis for rehabilitation training at home.

    PubMed

    Ates, Serdar; Lobo-Prat, Joan; Lammertse, Piet; van der Kooij, Herman; Stienen, Arno H A

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a new hand and wrist exoskeleton design, the SCRIPT Passive Orthosis (SPO), for the rehabilitation after stroke is presented. The SPO is a wrist, hand, and finger orthosis that assists individuals after stroke that suffer from impairments caused by spasticity and abnormal synergies. These impairments are characterized in the wrist and hand by excessive involuntary flexion torques that make the hand unable to be used for many activities in daily life. The SPO can passively offset these undesired torques, but it cannot actively generate or control movements. The user needs to use voluntary muscle activation to perform movements and thus needs to have some residual muscle control to successfully use the SPO. The SPO offsets the excessive internal flexion by applying external extension torques to the joints of the wrist and fingers. The SPO physically interacts with the users using the forearm shell, the hand plate and the digit caps from the Saebo Flex, but is otherwise a completely novel design. It applies the external extension torques via passive leaf springs and elastic tension cords. The amount of this support can be adjusted to provide more or less offset force to wrist, finger, or thumb extension, manually. The SPO is equipped with sensors that can give a rough estimate of the joint rotations and applied torques, sufficient to make the orthosis interact with our interactive gaming environment. Integrated inertial and gyroscopic sensors provide limited information on the user's forearm posture. The first home-based patient experiences have already let to several issues being resolved, but have also made it clear that many improvement are still to be made.

  19. Establishing a reproducible protocol for measuring index active extension strength.

    PubMed

    Matter-Parrat, V; Hidalgo Diaz, J J; Collon, S; Salazar Botero, S; Prunières, G; Ichihara, S; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study was to establish a reproducible protocol to measure active extension strength in the index finger. The secondary objectives consisted in correlating the independent or associated index extension strength to the other fingers force of contraction of the extensor indicis propius with hand dominance. The population studied consisted of 24 healthy volunteers, including 19 women and 20 right-handed individuals. The independent and dependent index extension strength in each hand was measured three times with a dynamometer by three examiners at Day 0 and again at Day 7. Intra and inter-examiner reproducibility were, respectively, >0.90 and >0.75 in all cases. The independent extension strength was lower than the dependent one. There was no difference between the independent index extension strength on the dominant and non-dominant sides. The same was true for the dependent strength. Our results show that our protocol is reproducible in measuring independent and dependent index extension strength. Dominance did not come into account.

  20. Wrist Proprioception: Amplitude or Position Coding?

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    This work examines physiological mechanisms underlying the position sense of the wrist, namely, the codification of proprioceptive information related to pointing movements of the wrist toward kinesthetic targets. Twenty-four healthy subjects participated to a robot-aided assessment of their wrist proprioceptive acuity to investigate if the sensorimotor transformation involved in matching targets located by proprioceptive receptors relies on amplitude or positional cues. A joint position matching test was performed in order to explore such dichotomy. In this test, the wrist of a blindfolded participant is passively moved by a robotic device to a preset target position and, after a removal movement from this position, the participant has to actively replicate and match it as accurately as possible. The test involved two separate conditions: in the first, the matching movements started from the same initial location; in the second one, the initial location was randomly assigned. Target matching accuracy, precision, and bias in the two conditions were then compared. Overall results showed a consistent higher performance in the former condition than in the latter, thus supporting the hypothesis that the joint position sense is based on vectorial or amplitude coding rather than positional. PMID:27807417

  1. Tests of the Extension and Deadbolt Models of Integrin Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jieqing; Boylan, Brian; Luo, Bing-Hao; Newman, Peter J.; Springer, Timothy A.

    2007-01-01

    Despite extensive evidence that integrin conformational changes between bent and extended conformations regulate affinity for ligands, an alternative hypothesis has been proposed in which a “deadbolt” can regulate affinity for ligand in the absence of extension. Here, we tested both the deadbolt and the extension models. According to the deadbolt model, a hairpin loop in the β3 tail domain could act as a deadbolt to restrain the displacement of the β3 I domain β6-α7 loop and maintain integrin in the low affinity state. We found that mutating or deleting the β3 tail domain loop has no effect on ligand binding by either αIIbβ3 or αVβ3 integrins. In contrast, we found that mutations that lock integrins in the bent conformation with disulfide bonds resist inside-out activation induced by cytoplasmic domain mutation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that extension is required for accessibility to fibronectin but not smaller fragments. The data demonstrate that integrin extension is required for ligand binding during integrin inside-out signaling and that the deadbolt does not regulate integrin activation. PMID:17301049

  2. The effects of finger extension on shoulder muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae-Woo; Shin, Ju-Yong; Kim, Youn-Joung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to examine the effects of the extension of the fingers (distal upper limb) on the activity of the shoulder muscles (proximal upper limb). [Subjects and Methods] This study involved 14 healthy male adults with no musculoskeletal disorder or pain related to the shoulders and hands. The subjects in a sitting posture abducted the angle of the shoulder joints at 60° and had their palms in the front direction. Electromyography (EMG) was comparatively analyzed to look at the activities of the infraspinatus (IS) and rhomboid major (RM) when the fingers were extended and relaxed. [Results] The activity of the IS was statistically significantly higher when the fingers were extended than when they were relaxed. [Conclusion] According to the result of this study, finger extension is considered to affect the muscles for connected shoulder joint stability. PMID:26504277

  3. A novel method for the automatic segmentation of activity data from a wrist worn device: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Amor, James D; Ahanathapillai, Vijayalakshmi; James, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Activity monitoring is used in a number of fields in order to assess the physical activity of the user. Applications include health and well-being, rehabilitation and enhancing independent living. Data are often gathered from multiple accelerometers and analysis focuses on multi-parametric classification. For longer term monitoring this is unsuitable and it is desirable to develop a method for the precise analysis of activity data with respect to time. This paper presents the initial results of a novel approach to this problem which is capable of segmenting activity data collected from a single accelerometer recording naturalized activity.

  4. Effects of grip force on median nerve deformation at different wrist angles

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of grip on changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameter in the radial-ulnar direction (D1) and dorsal-palmar direction (D2) at three wrist angles. Twenty-nine healthy participants (19 men [mean age, 24.2 ± 1.6 years]; 10 women [mean age, 24.0 ± 1.6 years]) were recruited. The median nerve was examined at the proximal carpal tunnel region in three grip conditions, namely finger relaxation, unclenched fist, and clenched fist. Ultrasound examinations were performed in the neutral wrist position (0°), at 30°wrist flexion, and at 30°wrist extension for both wrists. The grip condition and wrist angle showed significant main effects (p < 0.01) on the changes in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. Furthermore, significant interactions (p < 0.01) were found between the grip condition and wrist angle for the MNCSA, D1, and D2. In the neutral wrist position (0°), significant reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2 were observed when finger relaxation changed to unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Clenched fist condition caused the highest deformations in the median nerve measurements (MNCSA, approximately −25%; D1, −13%; D2, −12%). The MNCSA was significantly lower at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension than in the neutral wrist position (0°) at unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Notably, clenched fist condition at 30°wrist flexion showed the highest reduction of the MNCSA (−29%). In addition, 30°wrist flexion resulted in a lower D1 at clenched fist condition. In contrast, 30°wrist extension resulted in a lower D2 at both unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Our results suggest that unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions cause reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. More importantly, unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension can lead to further deformation of the median nerve. PMID:27688983

  5. Efficacy of Kinesiology Taping for Recovery from Occupational Wrist Disorders Experienced by a Physical Therapist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this paper was to report the efficacy of kinesiology taping for recovery from wrist pain and limited range of motion (ROM) in a physical therapist with repetitive strain injuries. [Subjects] A 32 year-old male physical therapist developed recurring severe pain in the dominant wrist and limited active ROM with extremely painful supination. [Methods] The kinesiology tape was applied to the lumbricals, musculi interossei dorsales, palmares, the wrist extensor and flexor muscles, and the wrist joint for 3 weeks for an average of 10 h/day. [Results] After application of the kinesiology tape, the Numeric Pain Rating Scale and Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation scores decreased, and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale score increased in comparison with the initial score. [Conclusion] Repeated kinesiology taping of the wrist muscles and joint could be an effective method for recovery from occupational wrist disorders experienced by physical therapists. PMID:25013301

  6. A Fungal Endoglucanase with Plant Cell Wall Extension Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sheng; Wu, Yajun; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    We have identified a wall hydrolytic enzyme from Trichoderma reesei with potent ability to induce extension of heat-inactivated type I cell walls. It is a small (23-kD) endo-1,4-β-glucanase (Cel12A) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 12. Extension of heat-inactivated walls from cucumber (Cucumis sativus cv Burpee Pickler) hypocotyls was induced by Cel12A after a distinct lag time and was accompanied by a large increase in wall plasticity and elasticity. Cel12A also increased the rate of stress relaxation of isolated walls at very short times (<200 ms; equivalent to reducing t0, a parameter that estimates the minimum relaxation time). Similar changes in wall plasticity and elasticity were observed in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Pennmore Winter) coleoptile (type II) walls, which showed only a negligible extension in response to Cel12A treatment. Thus, Cel12A modifies both type I and II walls, but substantial extension is found only in type I walls. Cel12A has strong endo-glucanase activity against xyloglucan and (1→3,1→4)-β-glucan, but did not exhibit endo-xylanase, endo-mannase, or endo-galactanase activities. In terms of kinetics of action and effects on wall rheology, wall loosening by Cel12A differs qualitatively from the action by expansins, which induce wall extension by a non-hydrolytic polymer creep mechanism. The action by Cel12A mimics some of the changes in wall rheology found after auxin-induced growth. The strategy used here to identify Cel12A could be used to identify analogous plant enzymes that cause auxin-induced changes in cell wall rheology. PMID:11553760

  7. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  12. Characteristics, Views Held of Agricultural Extension Activities, and Communication Behavior of Hsien Extension Supervisors in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Pi-Feng

    Government agencies in Taiwan have carried out agricultural extension programs since 1910, with the assistance of Farmers' Associations. Programs have been expanded since 1953, and now include both general extension (subsidy programs) and educational extension. Comparison of personal characteristics of hsien (county) Farmers' Association…

  13. Transverse ultrasound assessment of median nerve deformation and displacement in the human carpal tunnel during wrist movements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexiang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Passe, Sandra M; Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, a compression neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, are aggravated by wrist motion, but the effect of these motions on median nerve motion are unknown. To better understand the biomechanics of the abnormal nerve, it is first necessary to understand normal nerve movement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deformation and displacement of the normal median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel level on transverse ultrasound images during different wrist movements, to have a baseline for comparison with abnormal movements. Dynamic ultrasound images of both wrists of 10 asymptomatic volunteers were obtained during wrist maximal flexion, extension and ulnar deviation. To simplify the analysis, the initial and final shape and position of the median nerve were measured and analyzed. The circularity of the median nerve was significantly increased and the aspect ratio and perimeter were significantly decreased in the final image compared with the first image during wrist flexion with finger extension, wrist flexion with finger flexion and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (p < 0.01). There were significant differences in median nerve displacement vector between finger flexion, wrist flexion with finger extension and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (all p's < 0.001). The mean amplitudes of median nerve motion in wrist flexion with finger extension (2.36 ± 0.79 normalized units [NU]), wrist flexion with finger flexion (2.46 ± 0.84 NU) and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (2.86 ± 0.51 NU) were higher than those in finger flexion (0.82 ± 0.33 NU), wrist extension with finger extension (0.77 ± 0.46 NU) and wrist extension with finger flexion (0.81 ± 0.58 NU) (p < 0.0001). In the normal carpal tunnel, wrist flexion and ulnar deviation could induce significant transverse displacement and deformation of the median nerve.

  14. Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is o en started to help improve the motion and function of the injured wrist. Surgical Treatment ... casting, it is important that you achieve full motion of your fingers as soon as possible. If ...

  15. Kinematics of Hooke universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, William S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The singularity problem associated with wrist mechanisms commonly found on industrial manipulators can be alleviated by redesigning the wrist so that it functions as a three-axis gimbal system. This paper discussess the kinematics of gimbal robot wrists made of one and two Hooke universal joints. Derivations of the resolved rate motion control equations for the single and double Hooke universal joint wrists are presented using the three-axis gimbal system as a theoretical wrist model.

  16. Partial arthrodeses of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, A; Cristiani, G; Castagnini, L; Castagnetti, C; Caroli, A

    1995-01-01

    The authors report 16 cases of partial arthrodeses of the wrist for the treatment of Kienboeck's disease, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, rotatory subluxation of the scaphoid, rheumatoid arthritis, etc. Based on the good results obtained (76.6%) the authors believe that partial arthrodeses constitute the type of treatment indicated for the treatment of pathologies that involve only some of the carpal bones, and they also emphasize that this type of surgery represents a valid alternative to total arthrodesis of the wrist.

  17. Small Business Innovations (Robotic Wrist)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Under a Langley Research Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. Minneapolis, MN, developed the Omni-Wrist actuator, which has a 25-pound capacity, 180 degrees of pitch/yaw, and 360 degrees of roll. Company literature calls it "the first successful singularity-free high-precision (robotic) wrist." Applications include spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, welding and a variety of nuclear industry, aerospace and military uses.

  18. A Robot for Wrist Rehabilitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    7 illustrates how the patient’s hand, wrist and upper forearm will be held on the device via a series of velcro straps: two straps over the back of...the palm, a single strap over the proximal or middle phalanges, two straps to the wrist connection piece, and a strap over the forearm . Also shown is a... Anthropometric Source Book Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, Scientific and Technical Information Office, Yellow Springs, Ohio, 1978

  19. Characterization of wrist-wearable activity measurement using whole body calorimetry in semi-free living conditions.

    PubMed

    Amor, James D; Hattersley, John G; Barber, Thomas M; James, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Physical activity (PA) is a significant factor in a number of health conditions and monitoring PA can play a significant role in the treatment of, or research into, these conditions. For longitudinal monitoring of PA, unobtrusive devices are often used and there is a need for the development of energy expenditure (EE) estimation techniques from single-device systems. This paper presents an experiment designed to characterize the relationship between a previously described technique, the activity score (AS) and EE obtained from whole-room indirect calorimetry. The study used 8 participants over a 24-hr period with interspersed exercise periods to observe physical movement with wearable devices and EE in 5 minute epochs. Results show that AS and EE are correlated with a Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.775 with p <; 0.001.

  20. Wrist ROM and Motion Frequency during Toy and Game Play with a Joint-Specific Controller Specially Designed to Provide Neuromuscular Therapy: A proof of concept study in typically developing children

    PubMed Central

    Crisco, Joseph J.; Schwartz, Joel B.; Wilcox, Bethany; Brideau, Holly; Basseches, Benjamin; Kerman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Upper extremities affected by hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) and other neuromuscular disorders have been demonstrated to benefit from therapy, and the greater the duration of the therapy, the greater the benefit. A great motivator for participating in and extending the duration of therapy with children is play. Our focus is on active motion therapy of the wrist and forearm. In this study we examine the wrist motions associated with playing with two toys and three computer games controlled by a specially-designed play controller. Twenty children (ages 5-11) with no diagnosis of a muscular disorder were recruited. The play controller was fitted to the wrist and forearm of each child and used to measure and log wrist flexion and extension. Play activity and enjoyment were quantified by average wrist range of motion (ROM), motion frequency measures, and a discrete visual scale. We found significant differences in the average wrist ROM and motion frequency among the toys and games, yet there were no differences in the level of enjoyment across all toys and games, which was high. These findings indicate which toys and games may elicit the greater number of goal-directed movements, and lay the foundation for our long-term goal to develop and evaluate innovative motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. PMID:25935686

  1. Wrist range of motion and motion frequency during toy and game play with a joint-specific controller specially designed to provide neuromuscular therapy: A proof of concept study in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Crisco, Joseph J; Schwartz, Joel B; Wilcox, Bethany; Brideau, Holly; Basseches, Benjamin; Kerman, Karen

    2015-08-20

    Upper extremities affected by hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) and other neuromuscular disorders have been demonstrated to benefit from therapy, and the greater the duration of the therapy, the greater the benefit. A great motivator for participating in and extending the duration of therapy with children is play. Our focus is on active motion therapy of the wrist and forearm. In this study we examine the wrist motions associated with playing with two toys and three computer games controlled by a specially-designed play controller. Twenty children (ages 5-11) with no diagnosis of a muscular disorder were recruited. The play controller was fitted to the wrist and forearm of each child and used to measure and log wrist flexion and extension. Play activity and enjoyment were quantified by average wrist range of motion (ROM), motion frequency measures, and a discrete visual scale. We found significant differences in the average wrist ROM and motion frequency among the toys and games, yet there were no differences in the level of enjoyment across all toys and games, which was high. These findings indicate which toys and games may elicit the greater number of goal-directed movements, and lay the foundation for our long-term goal to develop and evaluate innovative motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP.

  2. 75 FR 13568 - MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0142, Decommissioning Activities, Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Minerals Management Service MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0142, Decommissioning Activities, Extension of a Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION... comments to the Department of the Interior; Minerals Management Service; Attention: Cheryl Blundon;...

  3. Three determinants in ezrin are responsible for cell extension activity.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, M; Roy, C; Montcourrier, P; Sahuquet, A; Mangeat, P

    1997-01-01

    The ERM proteins--ezrin, radixin, and moesin--are key players in membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. In insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses, amino acids 1-115 of ezrin were shown to inhibit an actin- and tubulin-dependent cell-extension activity located in ezrin C-terminal domain (ezrin310-586), whereas full-length ezrin1-586 did not induce any morphological change. To refine the mapping of functional domains of ezrin, 30 additional constructs were overexpressed in Sf9 cells, and the resulting effect of each was qualitatively and semiquantitatively compared. The removal of amino acids 13-30 was sufficient to release a cell-extension phenotype. This effect was abrogated if the 21 distal-most C-terminal amino acids were subsequently deleted (ezrin31-565), confirming the existence of a head-to-tail regulation in the whole molecule. Surprisingly, the deletion in full-length ezrin of the same 21 amino acids provided strong cell-extension competence to ezrin1-565, and this property was recovered in N-terminal constructs as short as ezrin1-310. Within ezrin1-310, amino acid sequences 13-30 and 281-310 were important determinants and acted in cooperation to induce cytoskeleton mobilization. In addition, these same residues are part of a new actin-binding site characterized in vitro in ezrin N-terminal domain. Images PMID:9285824

  4. Wrist Fracture and Risk of Subsequent Fracture: Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative Study

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Carolyn J.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Cauley, Jane A.; Andrews, Christopher A.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wright, Nicole C.; Li, Wenjun; LeBoff, Meryl S.

    2015-01-01

    Wrist fractures are common in postmenopausal women and are associated with functional decline. Fracture patterns after wrist fracture are unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the frequency and types of fractures that occur after a wrist fracture among postmenopausal women. We carried out a post-hoc analysis of data from the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study and Clinical Trials (1993–2010) carried out at 40 U.S. clinical centers. Participants were postmenopausal women aged 50–79 at baseline. Mean follow-up duration was 11.8 years. Main measures included incident wrist, clinical spine, humerus, upper extremity, lower extremity, hip, and total non-wrist fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) in a subset. Among women who experienced wrist fracture, 15.5% subsequently experienced non-wrist fracture. The hazard for non-wrist fractures was higher among women who had experienced previous wrist fracture than among women who had not experienced wrist fracture: non-wrist fracture overall (hazard ratio [HR] 1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33–1.48), spine (HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.32–1.66), humerus (HR 1.78, 95% CI 1.57–2.02), upper extremity (non-wrist) (HR 1.88, 95% CI 1.70–2.07), lower extremity (non-hip) (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.26–1.48), and hip (HR 1.50, 95% CI 1.32–1.71) fracture. Associations persisted after adjustment for BMD, physical activity, and other risk factors. Risk of non-wrist fracture was higher in women who were younger when they experienced wrist fracture (interaction p-value 0.02). Associations between incident wrist fracture and subsequent non-wrist fracture did not vary by baseline BMD category (normal, low bone density, osteoporosis). A wrist fracture is associated with increased risk of subsequent hip, vertebral, upper extremity, and lower extremity fractures. There may be substantial missed opportunity for intervention in the large number of women who present with wrist fractures. PMID:25990562

  5. Surgical Treatment of Pediatric Upper Limb Spasticity: The Wrist and Hand

    PubMed Central

    Seruya, Mitchel; Dickey, Ryan M.; Fakhro, Abdulla

    2016-01-01

    The wrist and hand are essential in the placement of the upper extremity in a functional position for grasp, pinch, and release activities. This depends on the delicate balance between the extrinsic and intrinsic muscles of the wrist and hand. Spasticity alters this equilibrium, limiting the interaction of the upper limb with the environment. Classically, pediatric patients with upper limb spasticity present with a flexed wrist, thumb-in-palm, and flexed finger posture. These contractures are typically secondary to spasticity of the extrinsic flexor muscles of the wrist and hand and intrinsic muscles of the thumb and digits. Tendon release, lengthening, or transfer procedures may help correct the resultant abnormal postures. A total wrist arthrodesis with or without proximal row carpectomy may help address the severely flexed wrist deformity. With proper diagnosis, a well-executed surgical plan, and a consistent hand rehabilitation regimen, successful surgical outcomes can be achieved. PMID:26869861

  6. [Ligament injuries of the wrist].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, R

    2016-12-01

    The distal radioulnar joint, the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and the wrist are stabilized by many ligaments allowing not only a wide range of motion but also providing sufficient stability. The complex arrangement of carpal ligaments and prosupination around the forearm joint enables multiaxial motion patterns. In the wrist, intra-articular ligaments can be differentiated from extra-articular capsular ligaments as well as intrinsic and extrinsic ligament courses. Imaging is essential for classification of dynamic and static instability patterns. This review article illustrates the ligamentous anatomy of the wrist, the symptoms of carpal instability as well as the diagnostic capability of projection radiography, cinematography, computed tomography (CT) arthrography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography.

  7. A National Perspective on the Current Evaluation Activities in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Alexa J.; Israel, Glenn D.; Diehl, David

    2013-01-01

    In order to enhance Extension evaluation efforts it is important to understand current practices. The study reported here researched the evaluation behaviors of county-based Extension professionals. Extension professionals from eight states (n = 1,173) responded to a survey regarding their evaluation data collection, analysis, and reporting…

  8. Characteristic alterations in responses to imposed wrist displacements in parkinsonian rigidity and dystonia musculorum deformans.

    PubMed

    Tatton, W G; Bedingham, W; Verrier, M C; Blair, R D

    1984-05-01

    The amplitude and temporal modulation of the segmented EMG activity in flexor carpi radialis, evoked by imposed angular wrist extension, was studied with respect to the level of pre-existing background activity in rigid parkinsonian (PK) and dystonia musculorum deformans (DMD) patients. The interdependence of the evoked M1 and M2-3 segments on pre-existing background EMG activity and initial velocity of imposed displacement was established previously for a normal population. Individual responses of 21 parkinsonian and 12 dystonic patients were compared to the established normal "response volume". The augmented magnitude of the M2-3 segment in rigid PK patients, which correlates to the measure of rigidity, could not be accounted for by the low level of pre-existing EMG activity. Therefore, increased descending facilitation does not impinge directly on alpha motoneurons. Paradoxical excitation in the shortened muscle and resetting of tonic tremor of the stretched muscle by the imposed wrist extension are two other demonstrated abnormalities which may also contribute to PK rigidity. In contrast, DMD patients demonstrated normal amplitude modulation of the M1 and M2-3 segments, but exhibited a disturbance of normal temporal mechanisms that result in constant duration of the M1 and M2-3 responses with imposed force step loads.

  9. Damping of the wrist joint during voluntary movement.

    PubMed

    Milner, T E; Cloutier, C

    1998-10-01

    Damping characteristics of the musculoskeletal system were investigated during rapid voluntary wrist flexion movements. Oscillations about the final position were induced by introducing a load with the characteristics of negative damping, which artificially reduced the damping of the wrist. Subjects responded to increases in the negatively damped load by stronger cocontraction of wrist flexor and extensor muscles during the stabilization phase of the movement. However, their ability to counteract the effects of the negatively damped load diminished as the negative damping increased. Consequently, the number and frequency of oscillations increased. The oscillations were accompanied by phase-locked muscle activity superimposed on underlying tonic muscle activation. The wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased with the increased cocontraction that accompanied more negatively damped loads, although changes in the damping coefficient were less systematic than the stiffness. Analysis of successive half-cycles of the oscillation revealed that the wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased, despite decreasing muscle activation, as oscillation amplitude and velocity declined. This indicates that the inverse dependence of the damping coefficient on oscillation velocity contributes significantly to damping of joint motion. It is suggested that this property helps to offset a negative contribution to damping from the stretch reflex.

  10. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissues and the ends of the forearm bones (radius and ulna) and eight small wrist bones (carpal bones). The X-ray image is black and white. Dense structures that block the passage of the X-ray beam through the body, such as the bones, appear white on the image. Softer ...

  11. Transverse extension of Guatemala active margin: implications for accretion

    SciTech Connect

    McMillen, K.J.

    1987-05-01

    The inner trench wall of the Middle America Trench off Guatemala does not show evidence of accretion, based on DSDP Legs 67 and 84. The presence of normal faults on the lower inner trench slope has resulted in various subsidence models for the margin. Fault traces would be expected to trend parallel to the margin (northwest-southeast) if margin subsidence had occurred. Instead, the faults trend north-south and occur in groups of faults downdropped to the east and to the west. The faults do not seem to be related to margin subsidence but rather to previously proposed Cenozoic Central American rifting. The rifting resulted from crustal bending as the Central American block rounded southern Mexico during differential North American/Caribbean plate motion. The rifts, which extend nearly to the trench axis, underlie the San Jose submarine canyon and align with the Guatemala City graben. Possible east-west accommodation zones, between fault zones that dip in opposite directions, exist near the shelf edge. These accommodation zones may have formed along lines of weakness where oceanic crust was previously emplaced into the margin during or prior to the Eocene. These rifts show that compressional and extension features can occur simultaneously with underthrusting on active margins.

  12. The influence of wrist posture on the time and frequency EMG signal measures of forearm muscles.

    PubMed

    Roman-Liu, Danuta; Bartuzi, Paweł

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates how altering wrist posture influences the relationship between the time and frequency measures of the electromyography (EMG) signal of extensor digitorum communis (EDC) and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU). Thirteen participants exerted handgrip force related to maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in four tests: 20%MVC and 50%MVC in neutral wrist posture and 20%MVC in full wrist flexion and extension. EMG measurements from EDC and FCU were used to calculate normalized values of amplitude (nRMS) and mean and median frequency of the power spectrum (nMPF, nMF). During muscle shortening (wrist flexion for FCU and wrist extension for EDC) nRMS was approximately twofold higher than in neutral posture for FCU and fourfold for EDC. All measures obtained at 20%MVC in neutral posture were significantly different from 20%MVC in wrist flexion for FCU and 20%MVC in wrist extension for EDC (p<0.05). Differences between 50%MVC and 20%MVC at neutral posture (nRMS) were significant for both muscles, although in nMPF and nMF for EDC only. Muscle shortening changed the pattern of statistical significance when the time and frequency domain measures were compared, whereas muscle lengthening did not. It can be concluded that muscle shortening caused by altering wrist posture influences the relationship between the time and frequency measures in both muscles. This suggests that in studies using EMG in different wrist postures, changes in the relationship between the time and the frequency measures should be considered.

  13. Prediction of Energy Expenditure from Wrist Accelerometry in People with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Motl, Robert W.; Foley, John T.; Fernhall, Bo

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between energy expenditure and wrist accelerometer output during walking in persons with and without Down syndrome (DS). Energy expenditure in metabolic equivalent units (METs) and activity-count rate were respectively measured with portable spirometry and a uniaxial wrist accelerometer in 17 persons with DS…

  14. Performance adaptive training control strategy for recovering wrist movements in stroke patients: a preliminary, feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In the last two decades robot training in neuromotor rehabilitation was mainly focused on shoulder-elbow movements. Few devices were designed and clinically tested for training coordinated movements of the wrist, which are crucial for achieving even the basic level of motor competence that is necessary for carrying out ADLs (activities of daily life). Moreover, most systems of robot therapy use point-to-point reaching movements which tend to emphasize the pathological tendency of stroke patients to break down goal-directed movements into a number of jerky sub-movements. For this reason we designed a wrist robot with a range of motion comparable to that of normal subjects and implemented a self-adapting training protocol for tracking smoothly moving targets in order to facilitate the emergence of smoothness in the motor control patterns and maximize the recovery of the normal RoM (range of motion) of the different DoFs (degrees of Freedom). Methods The IIT-wrist robot is a 3 DoFs light exoskeleton device, with direct-drive of each DoF and a human-like range of motion for Flexion/Extension (FE), Abduction/Adduction (AA) and Pronation/Supination (PS). Subjects were asked to track a variable-frequency oscillating target using only one wrist DoF at time, in such a way to carry out a progressive splinting therapy. The RoM of each DoF was angularly scanned in a staircase-like fashion, from the "easier" to the "more difficult" angular position. An Adaptive Controller evaluated online performance parameters and modulated both the assistance and the difficulty of the task in order to facilitate smoother and more precise motor command patterns. Results Three stroke subjects volunteered to participate in a preliminary test session aimed at verify the acceptability of the device and the feasibility of the designed protocol. All of them were able to perform the required task. The wrist active RoM of motion was evaluated for each patient at the beginning and at the end

  15. Combined Treatment of Wrist and Trapeziometacarpal Joint Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Waitzenegger, Thomas; Leclercq, Caroline; Masmejean, Emmanuel; Lenoir, Hubert; Harir, Amir; Coulet, Bertrand; Chammas, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined thumb basal and wrist joint arthritis (excluding scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis) is rare considering the frequency of arthritis of either joint alone. Combined surgical treatment has never been described in the literature. Furthermore, the scaphoidectomy common to all interventions for Watson stage 2 or 3 wrist arthritis theoretically makes it impossible to perform a trapeziectomy for thumb basal joint arthritis. Question/Purpose The aim of this study was to present and analyze the results of two types of surgical treatment when both wrist and thumb arthritis was present. Materials and Methods Our retrospective series included 11 patients suffering from Eaton Stage III thumb basal joint arthritis and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) II and III-type wrist arthritis. Five patients (group A) underwent trapeziectomy and palliative surgery for their wrist with conservation of the distal pole of the scaphoid (one proximal row carpectomy [PRC] and four four-corner fusions), and six (group B) patients had a trapeziometacarpal arthroplasty either with PRC (two cases) or four-corner arthrodesis (four cases) including total scaphoidectomy. Results The mean follow-up was 57 months. The overall visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain was 1.5 at rest, with no difference between the trapeziectomy and arthroplasty groups. The average Kapandji score was 9.3 (9 in group A and 9.5 in group B). The flexion/extension range of motion for the wrist was 64° following four-corner arthrodesis and 75° following PRC. Only one case of algodystrophy was observed. The radiological analysis revealed no complications. Discussion This study shows that thumb basal joint arthritis and SLAC type wrist arthritis may be treated by combined treatment during the same intervention without any complications. The results of palliative surgery for the wrist, either with trapeziectomy or with a trapeziometacarpal arthroplasty, are comparable. With a trapeziectomy, the

  16. Midcarpal Hemiarthroplasty for Wrist Arthritis: Rationale and Early Results

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Michael C.; Packer, Greg; Tan, David; Crisco, J.J. Trey; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    Midcarpal hemiarthroplasty is a novel motion-preserving treatment for radiocarpal arthritis and is an alternative to current procedures that provide pain relief at the expense of wrist biomechanics and natural motion. It is indicated primarily in active patients with a well-preserved distal row and debilitating arthritic symptoms. By resurfacing the proximal carpal row, midcarpal arthroplasty relieves pain while preserving the midcarpal articulation and the anatomic center of wrist rotation. This technique has theoretical advantages when compared with current treatment options (i.e., arthrodesis and total wrist arthroplasty) since it provides coupled wrist motion, preserves radial length, is technically simple, and avoids the inherent risks of nonunion and distal component failure. The KinematX midcarpal hemiarthroplasty has an anatomic design and does not disrupt the integrity of the wrist ligaments. We have implanted this prosthesis in nine patients with promising early results. The indications for surgery were as follows: scapholunate advanced collapse wrist (three), posttraumatic osteoarthritis (three), inflammatory arthritis (two), and Keinböck disease (one). Prospective data has been collected and the results are preliminary given the infancy of the procedure. The mean follow-up was 30.9 weeks (range: 16 to 56 weeks). The mean Mayo wrist score increased from 31.9 preoperatively to 58.8 (p < 0.05) and the mean DASH score improved significantly from 47.8 preoperatively to 28.7 (p < 0.05). There was a trend toward increased motion but statistical significance was not reached. Two patients required manipulation for wrist stiffness. There was no evidence of prosthetic loosening or capitolunate narrowing. The procedure is simple (average surgical time was 49 minutes) and maintains coupled wrist motion through preservation of the midcarpal articulation. The preliminary data show that it appears safe but considerably longer follow-up is required before

  17. Neural and Nonneural Contributions to Wrist Rigidity in Parkinson's Disease: An Explorative Study Using the NeuroFlexor

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, H.; Frykberg, G. E.; Gäverth, J.; Lindberg, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The NeuroFlexor is a novel method incorporating a biomechanical model for the measurement of neural and nonneural contributions to resistance induced by passive stretch. In this study, we used the NeuroFlexor method to explore components of passive movement resistance in the wrist and finger muscles in subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. A cross-sectional comparison was performed in twenty-five subjects with PD with clinically identified rigidity and 14 controls. Neural (NC), elastic (EC), and viscous (VC) components of the resistance to passive extension of the wrist were calculated using the NeuroFlexor. Measurements were repeated during a contralateral activation maneuver. Results. PD subjects showed greater total resistance (P < 0.001) and NC (P = 0.002) compared to controls. EC and VC did not differ significantly between groups. Contralateral activation maneuver resulted in increased NC in the PD group but this increase was due to increased resting tension. Total resistance and NC correlated with clinical ratings of rigidity and with bradykinesia. Conclusions. The findings suggest that stretch induced reflex activity, but not nonneural resistance, is the major contributor to rigidity in wrist muscles in PD. The NeuroFlexor is a potentially valuable clinical and research tool for quantification of rigidity. PMID:25685778

  18. [Ganglion--cysts of the hand and wrist].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Niels H Søe; Jensen, Nina Vendel

    2007-04-02

    Ganglion cysts of the hand and wrist occur most frequently during the second through fourth decade and women are more frequently affected than men. Ganglion cysts may arise in any location in the hand and wrist but are usually adjacent to joins or tendons and sometimes bones. Patients often present with a history of an asymptomatic mass and many patients seek the advice of a physician because of the cosmetic appearance of the cyst. Observation is acceptable in most instances. Indication for operative treatment includes pain, interference with activity, nerve compression and ulceration of the mucous cysts.

  19. [Wrist pain of uncertain genesis].

    PubMed

    Strassmair, M; Wilhelm, K

    2003-09-25

    The leading symptom wrist pain may be caused by a number of different pathologies. These cover traumatic and non-traumatic changes to the bone (including primary arthrosis, chronic polyarthritis, aseptic bone necroses, e.g. Kienböck's disease). Other possible sources of pain may be the capsule/ligament structures of the wrist, the predominant condition in terms of incidence and severity being injuries to the scapholunar ligament. In young women in particular, differential diagnostic considerations should include instability of the wrist. The diagnostic work-up comprises history-taking, physical examination including function tests and a mandatory x-ray. An MR tomogram and interventional procedures (e.g. arthroscopy) where indicated, can provide additional information. At the center of the management plan is amelioration of pain and restoration of function. For this purpose, a range of curative or palliative, conservative or operative measures are available. Early referral to the hand surgeon may avoid secondary sequelae resulting from long-lasting complaints.

  20. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Blisters associated with elective wrist surgery.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Tsipora; Chernofsky, Michael A; Luria, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Blistering of the skin has been reported after high energy trauma or arthroplasties of large joints. It is rare in wrist trauma and seldom reported following elective wrist surgery. We present three cases of skin blistering after elective wrist surgery. Two female patients aged 18 and 35 years and one male patient aged 53 years were treated with total wrist fusion, carpometacarpal fusion, and open wrist ligament repair. They reported burning pain at the blister site. The blisters were clear and treated with dressing changes. There were no infections or wound complications and all blisters resolved without sequelae. These complications were probably due to a combination of factors, including swelling, compression from dressing and splint, multiple surgical incisions, and the use of adhesive dressing. Reassurance and proper wound care are recommended for the complication of clear blistering following elective wrist surgery.

  2. Relating Wrist Accelerometry Measures to Disability in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Huisingh-Scheetz, Megan J; Kocherginsky, Masha; Magett, Elizabeth; Rush, Patricia; Dale, William; Waite, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Objective This analysis assessed the extent to which: 1) wrist accelerometer measures were associated with difficulty performing specific activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living and 2) these measures contributed important information about disability beyond a typical self-reported vigorous activity frequency question. Methods We used data from the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP) accelerometry sub-study (n=738). Activity was assessed using two wrist-accelerometer measures assessed over 3 days (routine activity expressed as mean count/15 second epoch during wake time, and immobile time expressed as the proportion of wake time spent immobile), and self-reported average vigorous activity frequency. The association between routine activity, immobile time and difficulty performing fourteen activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) plus two summary measures (any ADL or IADL difficulty), was assessed using logistic regression models, with and without controlling for self-reported vigorous activity. Results Self-reported activity was mildly correlated with routine activity (r = 0.27) and immobile time (r = −0.21). Routine activity, immobile time, and self-reported vigorous activity were significantly associated with twelve, ten, and fourteen disability measures, respectively. After controlling for self-reported activity, significant associations remained between routine activity and eight disabilities, and immobile time and six disabilities. Conclusion Wrist accelerometry measures were associated with many ADL and IADL disabilities among older adults. Wrist acclerometry in older adults may be useful to help assess disability risks and set individualized physical activity targets. PMID:26452423

  3. Effect of wrist angle on median nerve appearance at the proximal carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension.

  4. Carpal instability of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Nicholas; Matullo, Kristofer S

    2014-01-01

    The scaphoid is stabilized by the scapholunate ligament (directly) and lunotriquetral ligament (indirectly). Disruption of either of these ligaments leads to a pattern of instability that, left untreated, leads to altered mechanics of the wrist and ultimately debilitating arthritis and collapse. Although arthroscopy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of these injuries, plain films and advanced imaging are useful adjuncts. In the acute setting, conservative treatment may be attempted, but recalcitrant cases require surgical stabilization. Salvage procedures are also available for those patients who fail initial stabilization or present with late degeneration.

  5. Measuring Sleep by Wrist Actigraph.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    4 FIGURES 1 AND 2 5-7 FIGURE 3 8 EXPERIMENT 3: TRANSDUCER ORIENTATION 9 EXPERIMENT 4: TRANSDUCER PLACEMENT 9 FIGURE 4 10 FIGURE 5 11 EXPERIMENT 5...FIGURE 9 23 SLEEP RECOGNITION SOFTWARE 24 ASSESSMENT OF VALIDATION 25 TABLE 3 26 FIGURE 10 27 TABLE 4 28 HARDWARE SPECIFICATIONS OF A WRIST-WEARABLE...4.4 z 1.7 ca) and connected .e "he our channels of a Medilog recorder. line subjects completed o" 9 ., .o_ _ TRANSDUCER - ACCELER -OMETER 5SOC Figure 4

  6. Passive resting state and history of antagonist muscle activity shape active extensions in an insect limb

    PubMed Central

    Ache, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Limb movements can be driven by muscle contractions, external forces, or intrinsic passive forces. For lightweight limbs like those of insects or small vertebrates, passive forces can be large enough to overcome the effects of gravity and may even generate limb movements in the absence of active muscle contractions. Understanding the sources and actions of such forces is therefore important in understanding motor control. We describe passive properties of the femur-tibia joint of the locust hind leg. The resting angle is determined primarily by passive properties of the relatively large extensor tibiae muscle and is influenced by the history of activation of the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron. The resting angle is therefore better described as a history-dependent resting state. We selectively stimulated different flexor tibiae motor neurons to generate a range of isometric contractions of the flexor tibiae muscle and then stimulated the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron to elicit active tibial extensions. Residual forces in the flexor muscle have only a small effect on subsequent active extensions, but the effect is larger for distal than for proximal flexor motor neurons and varies with the strength of flexor activation. We conclude that passive properties of a lightweight limb make substantial and complex contributions to the resting state of the limb that must be taken into account in the patterning of neuronal control signals driving its active movements. Low variability in the effects of the passive forces may permit the nervous system to accurately predict their contributions to behavior. PMID:22357791

  7. Ergonomic risk factors for the wrists of hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsieh-Ching; Chang, Cha-Mei; Liu, Yung-Ping; Chen, Chih-Yong

    2010-01-01

    This study utilized a portable data logger to measure the wrist angles and forearm flexor and extensor electromyography (EMG) of 21 hairstylists. The hairstylists were divided into two groups, one with 11 barbers (9 males and 2 females) specializing in men's hairdressing, and one with 10 hairdressers (2 males and 8 females) specializing in women's hairdressing. The standard haircut task was divided into three subtasks: hair cutting, washing and blow-drying. The mechanical exposures of the overall task and subtasks were quantified to compare how subtasks, occupational groups, and gender groups differ. Experimental results show that the average time to finish a woman's haircut (51.4min) is significantly longer than that for a man's haircut (35.6min) (p<0.005). Female hairstylists had significantly greater EMG activity than male hairstylists did (p<0.001). The non-dominant hands of hairdressers have significantly higher overall wrist velocity than those of barbers (p<0.005). Analytical results suggest that the relatively higher force exertion and wrist velocity of female hairstylists combined with prolonged exposure may account for the higher rate of hand/wrist pain in female hairdressers than in male barbers.

  8. An Extensible, User- Modifiable Framework for Planning Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshing, Joseph C.; Abramyan, Lucy; Mickelson, Megan C.; Wallick, Michael N.; Kurien, James A.; Crockett, Thomasa M.; Powell, Mark W.; Pyrzak, Guy; Aghevli, Arash

    2013-01-01

    This software provides a development framework that allows planning activities for the Mars Science Laboratory rover to be altered at any time, based on changes of the Activity Dictionary. The Activity Dictionary contains the definition of all activities that can be carried out by a particular asset (robotic or human). These definitions (and combinations of these definitions) are used by mission planners to give a daily plan of what a mission should do. During the development and course of the mission, the Activity Dictionary and actions that are going to be carried out will often be changed. Previously, such changes would require a change to the software and redeployment. Now, the Activity Dictionary authors are able to customize activity definitions, parameters, and resource usage without requiring redeployment. This software provides developers and end users the ability to modify the behavior of automatically generated activities using a script. This allows changes to the software behavior without incurring the burden of redeployment. This software is currently being used for the Mars Science Laboratory, and is in the process of being integrated into the LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) mission, as well as the International Space Station.

  9. Differentiating common causes of radial wrist pain.

    PubMed

    Shuaib, Waqas; Mohiuddin, Zia; Swain, Freddie R; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-09-01

    Radial wrist pain is a common patient complaint with a broad differential. Because treatment and prognosis differ, determining the underlying cause is key. This article reviews a case of intersection syndrome and compares it to other causes of radial wrist pain.

  10. Life Extension Activities for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walyus, Keith D.; Pepe, Joyce A. K.; Prior, Michael

    2004-01-01

    With the cancellation of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission 4 (SM4), the HST Project will face numerous challenges to keep the Telescope operating during the remainder of the decade. As part of the SM4, the HST Project had planned to install various upgrades to the Telescope including the installation of new batteries and new rate integrating gyros. Without these upgrades, reliability analysis indicates that the spacecraft will lose the capability to conduct science operations later this decade. The HST team will be severely challenged to maximize the Telescope's remaining operational lifetime, while still trying to maximize - its science output and quality. Two of the biggest areas of concern are the age and condition of the batteries and gyros. Together they offer the largest potential extension in Telescope lifetime and present the biggest challenges to the HST team. The six Ni-H batteries on HST are the original batteries from launch. With fourteen years of operational life, these batteries have collectively lasted longer than any other comparable mission. Yet as with all batteries, their capacity has been declining. Engineers are examining various methods to prolong the life of these mission critical batteries, and retard the rate of degradation. This paper will focus on these and other efforts to prolong the life of the HST, thus enabling it to remain a world-class observatory for as long as possible.

  11. The effect of strapping on the motor performance of the ankle and wrist joints.

    PubMed

    Kauranen, K; Siira, P; Vanharanta, H

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of strapping on different components of motor performance of wrist and ankle joints. The subjects were 14 healthy volunteers (12 females, two males), aged 21-33 years, with no known previous injuries of the ankle and wrist joints. The measurements were made with the HPM/BEP system and Isokinetic Lido Active Multi-joint system. First, the subjects performed the test without strapping and then, on the following day, with strapped right wrist and ankle joints. The strapping of the wrist increased the simple reaction time by 9%, choice reaction time by 9% and decreased the wrist tapping speed by 21%. Wrist strength decreased in flexion (180 degrees/s) by 14% and ulnar deviation (180 degrees/s) by 8%. The strapping of the ankle increased the simple reaction time by 12%, choice reaction time by 9% and decreased foot tapping speed by 14%. Ankle strength in plantar flexion decreased in 60 degrees/s by 22% and 180 degrees/s by 14% and in inversion in 60 degrees/s by 28% and 180 degrees/s by 15%. These results suggest the strapping of ankle and wrist joints reduces motor performance in the above-mentioned directions as measured by the following parameters: simple reaction time, choice reaction time, tapping speed, and muscle strength.

  12. 76 FR 68786 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of a Currently Approved Collection; Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... annual progress report is 2,556 hours. If additional information is required contact: Jerri Murray... Activities: Extension of a Currently Approved Collection; Annual Progress Report for the STOP Formula Grants... Information Collection: Extension of a currently approved collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection:...

  13. Hand/Wrist Disorders among Sign Language Communicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Susan M.; Kress, Tyler A.; Hart, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A study assessed the frequency of self-reported hand/wrist problems among 184 sign-language communicators. Fifty-nine percent reported experiencing hand/wrist problems, 26 percent reported experiencing hand/wrist problems severe enough to limit their ability to work, and 18 percent reported a medical diagnosis of wrist tendinitis, carpal tunnel…

  14. Qualifying CT for wrist arthroplasty: extending techniques for total hip arthroplasty to total wrist arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, Yvonne; Olivecrona, Henrik; Olivecrona, Lotta; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Sollerman, Christer

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous work to detect migration of total wrist arthroplasty non-invasively, and with greater accuracy. Two human cadaverous arms, each with a cemented total wrist implant, were used in this study. In one of the arms, 1 mm tantalum balls were implanted, six in the carpal bones and five in the radius. Five CT scans of each arm were acquired, changing the position of the arm each time to mimic different positions patients might take on repeated examinations. Registration of CT volume data sets was performed using an extensively validated, 3D semi-automatic volume fusion tool in which co-homologous point pairs (landmarks) are chosen on each volume to be registered. Three sets of ten cases each were obtained by placing landmarks on 1) bone only (using only arm one), 2) tantalum implants only, and 3) bone and tantalum implants (both using only arm two). The accuracy of the match was assessed visually in 2D and 3D, and numerically by calculating the distance difference between the actual position of the transformed landmarks and their ideal position (i.e., the reference landmark positions). All cases were matched visually within one width of cortical bone and numerically within one half CT voxel (0.32 mm, p = 0.05). This method matched only the bone/arm and not the prosthetic component per se, thus making it possible to detect prosthetic movement and wear. This method was clinically used for one patient with pain. Loosening of the carpal prosthetic component was accurately detected and this was confirmed at surgery.

  15. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  16. Chronic wrist pain: diagnosis and management. Development and use of a new algorithm

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, R. M; Bijlsma, J.; van Vugt, A. C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Chronic wrist pain can be difficult to manage and the differential diagnosis is extensive. To provide guidelines for assessment of the painful wrist an algorithm was developed to encourage a structured approach to the diagnosis and management of these patients.
METHODS—A review of the literature on causes of chronic wrist pain was undertaken; history taking, physical examination and imaging studies were evaluated systematically to determine which of the many potential conditions was the cause of the wrist pain. Chronic wrist pain was subdivided into pain of probable intra-articular or extra-articular origin. By means of this classification a clinical algorithm was developed to establish a diagnosis and its clinical usefulness was tested in a prospective study of 84 patients presenting to our outpatient clinic.
RESULTS—A definite diagnosis could be established in 59% (49 of 84) of the cases by careful history taking, extensive physical examination, plain radiographs, ultrasound examination and bone scintigraphy. In 19% of the cases (16 of 84) a probable diagnosis was made resulting in a total figure 78% (65 of 84). Additional imaging studies (arthrography, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography) increased the definite diagnoses to 70% (59 of 84).
CONCLUSION—The algorithm proved easy to use and by the use of careful history taking, thorough physical examination and simple imaging techniques (ultrasonography and scintigraphy) a diagnosis was made in 78% of cases.

 PMID:10531069

  17. The proto-type wrist joint assembly TACPAW (Triple Axis Common Pivot Arm Wrist), phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersten, L.

    1978-01-01

    A wrist joint assembly is described for use with a mechanical manipulator arm for finely positioning an end-effector carried by the wrist joint on the terminal end of the manipulator arm. The wrist joint assembly is pivotable about a first axis to produce a yaw motion, a second axis to produce a pitch motion, and a third axis to produce a roll motion. The performance of the wrist configuration is indicative of the capability to produce the 15 ft lb torque in either one of the three motions and the smoothness of operation is notable.

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  1. 76 FR 38410 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-0057, Pollution Prevention and Control, Extension of...

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  20. Wrist Blood Pressure Monitors: Are They Accurate?

    MedlinePlus

    ... be at heart level. Even then, blood pressure measurements taken at the wrist are usually higher and ... a very large arm or find blood pressure measurements painful. In these cases, measuring blood pressure at ...

  1. Falls and Wrist Fracture: Relationship to Women's Functional Status after Age 50.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Catherine M; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina P M; Farthing, Jonathan P; Crockett, Katie L; Haver, Charlene R A; Johnston, Geoffrey; Basran, Jenny

    2016-09-01

    Women experience a rapid rise in the incidence of wrist fracture after age 50. Accordingly, this study aimed to (1) determine the internal and environmental fall-related circumstances resulting in a wrist fracture, and (2) examine the relationship of functional status to these circumstances. Women aged 50 to 94 years reported on the nature of the injury (n = 99) and underwent testing for physical activity status, balance, strength, and mobility (n = 72). The majority of falls causing wrist fracture occurred outdoors, during winter months, as a result of a slip or trip while walking. Half of these falls resulted in other injuries including head, neck, and spine injuries. Faster walking speed, lower grip strength, and higher balance confidence were significantly associated with outdoor versus indoor falls and slips and trips versus other causes. This study provides insights into potential screening and preventive measures for fall-related wrist fractures in women.

  2. Dorsal wrist joint pain in tetraplegic patients during and after rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yukihiro

    2003-03-01

    In a study of 42 tetraplegic patients, physiological, neurological, electrophysiological and radiological examinations were made in 11 patients with complete tetraplegia who had wrist pain after rehabilitation. Pain relief produced by a selective, posterior interosseous nerve lidocaine block indicated distal posterior interosseous nerve syndrome. This syndrome can sometimes be treated conservatively, but surgical excision was required after nerve scarification. Repetitive dorsiflexion, as in wheelchair handling, transfer and tenodesis-like movement, compresses the distal posterior interosseous nerve in some tetraplegic patients. Moreover, weakness of the wrist joint stabilizing muscles is likely to contribute to an increased weight load on the wrist joints. The aetiology of wrist pain in tetraplegia should be considered when there is carpal tunnel syndrome, Wartenberg syndrome, Kienböck syndrome or distal posterior interosseous nerve syndrome. The causes need to be adequately treated to reduce the negative impact of the resultant pain on carrying out the activities of daily life.

  3. Tendinopathies of the Hand and Wrist.

    PubMed

    Adams, Julie E; Habbu, Rohan

    2015-12-01

    Tendinopathies involving the hand and wrist are common. Many are diagnosed easily, and in many cases, the management is straightforward, provided the pathology and principles are understood. Common conditions involving the tendons of the hand and wrist include trigger finger, tenosynovitis of the first through sixth dorsal extensor compartments, and flexor carpi radialis tendonitis. Management strategies include nonsurgical treatments, such as splinting, injection, or therapy, and surgical techniques such as tendon release.

  4. Lumbar paraspinal electromyographic activity during trunk extension exercises on two types of exercise machines.

    PubMed

    Walsworth, M

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare lumbar paraspinal muscle activity during trunk extension exercises on two lumbar extension machines with different types of pelvic stabilization mechanisms. Thirteen healthy male (n = 9) and female (n = 4) volunteers aged 21-24 (22.6 +/- 1.4) were recruited in a university setting. Surface electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally from the L3-4 paraspinal region during trunk extension exercises performed on two different exercise machines. One machine, the MedX, has a complex pelvic stabilization mechanism. The other machine, the Cybex, has a relatively simple pelvic stabilization mechanism. There was no significant difference between lumbar paraspinal electromyographic activity during trunk extension on the MedX compared to the Cybex dynamic variable resistance trunk extension machine. These results suggest that a complex pelvic stabilization mechanism does not significantly enhance the level of activation of the lumbar paraspinal muscles during lumbar extension exercises. Thus, a less expensive trunk extension machine with a less sophisticated pelvic stabilization mechanism, such as the Cybex, can be used to train the lumbar paraspinal muscles. This is important to rehabilitation clinicians because these machines are often more readily available and easier for patients to use. Further research is warranted to determine the applicability of these findings to a patient population.

  5. Evaluation of effects of different treatments for the wrist joints of subdominant hands using joint proprioception and writing time.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Hu, Yue; Rongming, Xia; Li, Zhou; Xiaojiao, Fu; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine immediate effects of strength training and NJF distal resistance training in wrist joints by using writing time and evaluation of proprioception using the JPE test. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 young healthy people (24.2 ± 3.1 y, 169.7 ± 6.5 cm, 65.3 ± 12.6 kg). Two isotonic contraction techniques were applied on the wrist joint: wrist joint extension muscle strength training (MST) and the wrist joint extension pattern of NJF. The uppercase English alphabet writing time and joint position errors of the left upper limb were measured before and after one intervention session of MST and NJF. [Results] The decrease in errors in wrist extension angle repetition and the writing time represented the improvement resulting from NJF. [Conclusion] This result suggests that the subdominant hands wrist joint proprioception and writing function can be improved by NJF together with proximal resistance training.

  6. Classification accuracy of the wrist-worn GENEA accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Whitney A.; Bassett, David R.; Thompson, Dixie L.; Freedson, Patty S.; Staudenmayer, John W.; John, Dinesh; Steeves, Jeremy A.; Conger, Scott A.; Ceaser, Tyrone; Howe, Cheryl A.; Sasaki, Jeffer E.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether the published left-wrist cut-points for the triaxial GENEA accelerometer, are accurate for predicting intensity categories during structured activity bouts. Methods A convenience sample of 130 adults wore a GENEA accelerometer on their left wrist while performing 14 different lifestyle activities. During each activity, oxygen consumption was continuously measured using the Oxycon mobile. Statistical analysis used Spearman's rank correlations to determine the relationship between measured and estimated intensity classifications. Cross tabulation tables were constructed to show under- or over-estimation of misclassified intensities. One-way chi-square tests were used to determine whether the intensity classification accuracy for each activity differed from 80%. Results For all activities the GENEA accelerometer-based physical activity monitor explained 41.1% of the variance in energy expenditure. The intensity classification accuracy was 69.8% for sedentary activities, 44.9% for light activities, 46.2% for moderate activities, and 77.7% for vigorous activities. The GENEA correctly classified intensity for 52.9% of observations when all activities were examined; this increased to 61.5% with stationary cycling removed. Conclusion A wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer has modest intensity classification accuracy across a broad range of activities, when using the cut-points of Esliger et al. Although the sensitivity and specificity are less than those reported by Esliger et al., they are generally in the same range as those reported for waist-worn, uniaxial accelerometer cut-points. PMID:23584403

  7. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0–10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance

  8. Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Joseph, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Objectives: This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. Patients and Methods: A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 years old, SD = 1.6) were randomly divided into the sauna group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). In the sauna group, subjects received sauna before eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor. The eccentric exercises were conducted on the non-dominant arm by using an isokinetic dynamometer. Pain Intensity (PI), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and passive range of motion of wrist flexion (PF-ROM) and extension (PE-ROM) were measured as pain variables. Grip Strength (GS) and Wrist Extension Strength (WES) were measured as variables of wrist extensor muscle function. All the measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage. Results: The sauna group significantly demonstrated a lower deficit in ROM (passive flexion and passive extension), GS and WES following exercise than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Sauna application prior to the exercise-induced muscle damage demonstrated effectiveness in reduction of sensory impairment (PF-ROM and PE-ROM) and improvement of muscle functions (GS, and WES) in wrist extensor muscle group. PMID:26446307

  9. [Carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger wrist" revealing a tendinous sheath fibroma].

    PubMed

    Benhima, M A; Ait Essi, F; Abkari, I; Najeb, Y; Fikry, T

    2014-02-01

    The tendinous sheath fibroma (TSF) is a rare benign tumor, exceptionally responsible for carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger" wrist: we found this association less than ten times in the English and French literature. We report the case of a 63-year-old right-handed carpenter who featured a triggering phenomenon of the right wrist during the flexion-extension movements and compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel, secondary to a TSF of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The diagnosis was suspected at the sonography and MRI, the tumor was excised and proven histologically to be a TSF. One year later, the patient remained free of symptoms.

  10. Kinesthetic Feedback during 2DOF Wrist Movements via a Novel MR-Compatible Robot.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Andrew; O'Malley, Marcia; Ress, David; Sergi, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate the interaction control capabilities of the MR-SoftWrist, a novel MR-compatible robot capable of applying accurate kinesthetic feedback to wrist pointing movements executed during fMRI. The MR-SoftWrist, based on a novel design that combines parallel piezoelectric actuation with compliant force feedback, is capable of delivering 1.5 N·m of torque to the wrist of an interacting subject about the flexion/extension and radial/ulnar axes. The robot workspace, defined by admissible wrist rotation angles, fully includes a circle with a 20 deg radius. Via dynamic characterization, we demonstrate capability for transparent operation with low (10% of maximum torque output) backdrivability torques at nominal speeds. Moreover, we demonstrate a 5.5 Hz stiffness control bandwidth for a 14 dB range of virtual stiffness values, corresponding to 25-125% of the device's physical reflected stiffness in the nominal configuration. We finally validate the possibility of operation during fMRI via a case study involving one healthy subject. Our validation experiment demonstrates the capability of the device to apply kinesthetic feedback to elicit distinguishable kinetic and neural responses without significant degradation of image quality or task-induced head movements. With this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of MR-compatible devices like the MR-SoftWrist to be used in support of motor control experiments investigating wrist pointing under robot-applied force fields. Such future studies may elucidate fundamental neural mechanisms enabling robot-assisted motor skill learning, which is crucial for robot-aided neurorehabilitation.

  11. Development of wrist rehabilitation robot and interface system.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ikuo; Matsui, Miki; Inagawa, Naohiro; Hachisuka, Kenji; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Akiko; Saeki, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The authors have developed a practical wrist rehabilitation robot for hemiplegic patients. It consists of a mechanical rotation unit, sensor, grip, and computer system. A myoelectric sensor is used to monitor the extensor carpi radialis longus/brevis muscle and flexor carpi radialis muscle activity during training. The training robot can provoke training through myoelectric sensors, a biological signal detector and processor in advance, so that patients can undergo effective training of extention and flexion in an excited condition. In addition, both-wrist system has been developed for mirror effect training, which is the most effective function of the system, so that autonomous training using both wrists is possible. Furthermore, a user-friendly screen interface with easily recognizable touch panels has been developed to give effective training for patients. The developed robot is small size and easy to carry. The developed aspiring interface system is effective to motivate the training of patients. The effectiveness of the robot system has been verified in hospital trails.

  12. The Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for posttraumatic wrist disorders: further experience.

    PubMed

    De Smet, L A; Van Ransbeeck, H

    2000-06-01

    A prospective survey was conducted to evaluate the outcome of the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for posttraumatic wrist disorders. Eighty four patients were treated, all with posttraumatic disorders of the distal radioulnar joint, 73 as an isolated procedure, 11 in combination with another wrist procedure. There was significant pain decrease and high patient satisfaction (74%). The range of motion increased in the flexion/extension arc from 109 degrees to 124 degrees (p = 0.006) and, in those with limited forearm rotation, from 71 degrees to 134 degrees (p = 0.006). According to the Mayo Clinic wrist score, we obtained 20 excellent, 34 good, 18 fair and 12 poor results. Complications were rare.

  13. Evaluation of wrist and forearm motion in college-aged baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Solomito, Matthew J; Garibay, Erin J; Woods, Jessica R; Ounpuu, Sylvia; Nissen, Carl W

    2014-11-01

    Current pitching literature focuses primarily on the elbow and glenohumeral joints. This has led to a paucity of information regarding the forearm and wrist, and the limited data available are inconsistent. Therefore, this article seeks to provide a comprehensive description of the kinematics and kinetics of the wrist and forearm for the fastball, curveball, slider/cutter, and change-up for college-level baseball pitchers. Thirty-six collegiate pitchers were evaluated using motion analysis techniques. Results indicated that pitching the curveball generated the greatest forearm supination (16 ± 13°) compared with the other three pitch types (p < 0.05). The curveball and slider/cutter were pitched with less wrist extension and greater ulnar deviation compared with the fastball and change-up. The curveball was found to produce the greatest ulnar moment (7.3 ± 2.2 Nm) and was significantly different from the moments noted when pitching the fastball and change-up (5.1 ± 1.9 and 4.9 ± 1.9 Nm, respectively; p < 0.05). These results indicate that it may be possible to objectively determine pitch type from kinematic data of the wrist and forearm. It may also be possible that coaches may be able to identify abnormal pitching mechanics from more proximal segments by understanding the motion of the wrist.

  14. Measurement of intraarticular wrist joint biomechanics with a force controlled system.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Stefanie; Lutz, Martin; Arora, Rohit; Schmoelz, Werner

    2012-09-01

    Pathologies of the wrist, such as fractures or instabilities, can lead to alterations in joint biomechanics. Accurate treatment of these pathologies is a frequent challenge for the surgeon. For biomechanical investigations, a test-setup that applies physiological loading of the wrist joint is necessary. A force controlled test-bench with agonistic and antagonistic muscle forces was built to move six fresh frozen human upper extremities through flexion and extension of the wrist joint. Tendon forces, range of motion, intraarticular contact area and contact pressure of the lunate and scaphoid facet as well as tendon excursion were investigated and compared with the current literature. During wrist motion the extensors exerted double the force of the flexors. Capsulotomy and sensor insertion decreased the range of motion from 63.4° (SD 14.1) to 45.9° (SD 23.7). The ratio of force transmitted through the radius and ulna was 77:23 and pressure distribution between the scaphoid and lunate facet showed a 70:30 relationship. The obtained data indicate a good agreement with the available literature. Therefore, the force controlled test-bench in combination with intraarticular radiocarpal measurements can be used to investigate the influence of wrist pathologies on joint biomechanics.

  15. Health-related impact of deployment extensions on spouses of active duty army personnel.

    PubMed

    SteelFisher, Gillian K; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Blendon, Robert J

    2008-03-01

    This study examined problems pertaining to the health and well-being of Army spouses during deployment, comparing those whose experienced extensions of their partners' deployments with those whose partners returned home on time or early. It used data from a 2004 survey of 798 spouses of active duty personnel. Controlling for demographic and deployment characteristics, spouses who experienced extensions fared worse on an array of measures, including mental well-being (e.g., feelings of depression), household strains (e.g., problems with household and car maintenance), and some areas of their jobs (having to stop work or to work fewer hours). There were no statistically significant differences regarding problems pertaining to their overall health, marriage, other work issues, finances, relationships with Army families, or safety. However, spouses who experienced extensions were more likely to perceive the Army negatively during deployment. These findings suggest that deployment extensions may exacerbate certain problems and frustrations for Army spouses.

  16. De quervain tenosynovitis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Asif M; Ilyas, Asif; Ast, Michael; Schaffer, Alyssa A; Thoder, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    De quervain disease, or stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, is a common wrist pathology. Pain results from resisted gliding of the abductor pollicis longus and the extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the fibro-osseus canal. de Quervain tenosynovitis of the wrist is more common in women than men. Diagnosis may be made on physical examination. Radiographs are helpful in ruling out offending bony pathology. Nonsurgical management, consisting of corticosteroid injections and supportive thumb spica splinting, is usually successful. In resistant cases, surgical release of the first dorsal compartment is done, taking care to protect the radial sensory nerve and identify all accessory compartments. Repair of the extensor retinaculum by step-cut lengthening or other techniques is rarely required.

  17. Ultrasonography of the hand, wrist, and elbow.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Marko; Fullerton, Brad

    2010-08-01

    High-frequency diagnostic ultrasonography of the hand, wrist and elbow has significant potential to improve the quality of diagnosis and care provided by neuromuscular and musculoskeletal specialists. In patients referred for weakness, pain and numbness of the hand, wrist or elbow, diagnostic ultrasonography can be an adjunct to electrodiagnosis and help in identifying ruptured tendons and treating conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome or trigger finger. Use of a small high-frequency (>10-15 MHz) transducer, an instrument with a blunt pointed tip to enhance sonopalpation and a model of the hand, wrist and elbow is advised to enhance visualization of small anatomical structures and complex bony contours. A range of conditions, including tendon and ligament ruptures, trigger finger, de Quervain tenosynovitis, intersection syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and osteoarthritis, is described along with detailed ultrasonography-guided injection techniques for carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger.

  18. Can Total Wrist Arthroplasty Be an Option in the Treatment of the Severely Destroyed Posttraumatic Wrist?

    PubMed Central

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, Guillaume; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen; Axelsson, Peter; Krøner, Karsten; Liverneaux, Philippe A.; Obert, Laurent; Merser, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Background Severely destroyed posttraumatic wrists are usually treated by partial or total wrist fusion or proximal row carpectomy. The indications for and longevity of total wrist arthroplasty (TWA) are still unclear. Case Description The aim of this study was to analyze a series in which one last-generation total wrist arthroplasty was used as a salvage procedure for wrists with severe arthritis due to traumatic causes. The data were prospectively recorded in a web-based registry. Seven centers participated. Thirty-five cases had a minimum follow-up time of 2 years. Average follow-up was 39 (24–96) months. Pain had improved significantly at follow-up, mobility remained unchanged. The total revision rate was 3.7%, and the implant survival was 92% at 4–8 years. Literature Review Very few studies have described specific results after TWA in posttraumatic cases and almost none using classical “third-generation” implants. The number of cases and the follow-up in the published series are small. Clinical Relevance Although painful posttraumatic wrists with severe joint destruction can be salvaged by partial or total fusion, we found that, evaluated at short- to midterm, total wrist arthroplasty can be an alternative procedure and gives results that are comparable to those obtained in rheumatoid cases. Level IV Case series PMID:24436837

  19. The effect of radioscapholunate fusion on wrist movement and the subsequent effects of distal scaphoidectomy and triquetrectomy.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, M J; Shaw, M N; Berglund, L J; An, K N; Berger, R A; Ritt, M J P F

    2010-11-01

    Radioscapholunate arthrodesis is a salvage procedure indicated for osteoarthritis of the radiocarpal joint involving the lunate facet of the radius. This cadaver study examines changes in wrist motion resulting from radioscapholunate arthrodesis, and the effects of surgical techniques to improve the range of motion. Simulated radioscapholunate arthrodesis, distal scaphoidectomy and triquetrectomy were carried out sequentially on six cadaver forearms and measurements (maximum flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation) were taken in the intact situation and after each surgical step using a magnetic tracking device. Radioscapholunate arthrodesis diminishes the amplitudes of movements of the wrist in all directions, but range of motion in the radioscapholunate fused wrist improves after scaphoidectomy and improves further after triquetrectomy (88% of original flexion/extension and 98% of original radial/ulnar deviation). Radioscapholunate arthrodesis causes a significant change in kinematics between the hamate and the triquetrum in flexion/extension.

  20. Compliant Robot Wrist Senses Deflections And Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R.; Strempek, Franklin; Premack, Timothy

    1989-01-01

    Precise parts assembled without damage. Goddard Space Flight Center developed compliant wrist that moves in any direction and rotates about any axis in response to applied forces. Deflection calibrated and instrumented so control computer measures degree of deflection and derives magnitude and direction of applied forces and torques. Compliant wrist brings to robots important capabilities humans use in manipulating objects. Helps prevent damage to precise, delicate parts during assembly by robot. Rod lengths, spring stiffnesses, and type of displacement sensor changed to suit different applications.

  1. [Ganglion cysts of the hand and wrist].

    PubMed

    Sarig, Oren; Hass, Avraham; Oron, Amir

    2013-10-01

    Ganglion cysts are considered the most common tumor of the wrist and hand. They are most common between the second and fourth decades of life. The most common anatomical location is the dorsal wrist. This article includes a general review of these cysts including symptoms, pathology and methods of diagnosis, as well as a review of these cysts in specific anatomic locations. The article also includes an updated review of the literature comparing open surgery vs. arthroscopic treatment. The authors believe that arthroscopic surgery of ganglion cysts will gain an important role in the treatment of these cysts.

  2. Research and development of compact wrist rehabilitation robot system.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ikuo; Inagawa, Naohiro; Matsui, Miki; Hachisuka, Kenji; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    Compact rehabilitation robot system which can support movement of the wrist of patients has been developed. The robot system can detect and analyze the patient's intention to move the wrist by such a biological signal as muscle potential, then, assist the wrist exercise of patients. Also, both-wrist rehabilitation robot system by mirror effect has been successfully developed for practical use in the hospital and at home.

  3. 78 FR 12789 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Extension of a Currently Approved Collection: Office on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... Information Collection Activities; Extension of a Currently Approved Collection: Office on Violence Against Women Solicitation Template ACTION: 60-Day Notice. The Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against... Cathy Poston, Office on Violence Against Women, at 202-514-5430. Written comments and suggestions...

  4. 75 FR 28818 - Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of a Currently... Report for the Technical Assistance Program. ] The Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against...- 0017. U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (4) Affected public who will...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  6. 75 FR 57049 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Office of Law Enforcement...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... collection. OMB Control Number: 1652-0001. Forms(s): TSA-Form-2502. Affected Public: Air carriers. Abstract... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under...: Transportation Security Administration, DHS. ACTION: 30-day notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces that...

  8. 78 FR 14402 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Extension of a Currently Approved Collection: Driver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  9. 77 FR 40371 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Extension... Security (DHS) invites the general public to comment on the data collection form for the DHS Science...)). The FRCoP web based tool collects profile information from first responders and select authorized...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Extension... Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-day Notice and request for comment. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security...)). The FRCoP web based tool collects profile information from first responders and select authorized...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Extension... Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 30-day Notice and request for comment. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security...)). The FRCoP web based tool collects profile information from first responders and select authorized...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  14. 7 CFR 3400.22 - Merit review for education and extension activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... GRANTS PROGRAM Peer and Merit Review Arranged by Grantees § 3400.22 Merit review for education and extension activities. Merit review is an evaluation of a proposed project or elements of a proposed program... shall be performed by peers and other individuals with expertise appropriate to evaluate the...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    2011-05-17

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  20. 78 FR 48720 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  1. 77 FR 4833 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested: Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested: Extension of a Currently Approved Collection; Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees as of October 31 ACTION: 30-day Notice...

  2. Developing L2 Listening Fluency through Extended Listening-Focused Activities in an Extensive Listening Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Anna C-S.; Millett, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects on developing L2 listening fluency through doing extended listening-focused activities after reading and listening to audio graded readers. Seventy-six EFL university students read and listened to a total of 15 graded readers in a 15-week extensive listening programme. They were divided into three groups (Group…

  3. 75 FR 62857 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension With Change of a Previously Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... National Drug Intelligence Center Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension With Change... Intelligence Center (NDIC), will be submitting the following information collection request to the Office of... intelligence analysts. The NDIC has determined that some SENTRY information may be of interest to members...

  4. How to Avoid Ulnar Nerve Injury When Setting the 6U Wrist Arthroscopy Portal.

    PubMed

    Esplugas, Mireia; Lluch, Alex; Garcia-Elias, Marc; Llusà-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) is at risk in setting the 6U wrist arthroscopy portal. Although surgeons know the risk and are careful when they set the 6U portal, DSBUN injuries still occur. The purpose of the present anatomical study was to evaluate the possibility that DSBUN undergoes dynamic anatomical variations in its location during wrist arthroscopy. The goal of the study was to clarify (1) whether the nerve-to-portal (NTP) distance changes with flexion/extension wrist and/or hand/forearm rotation, and (2) whether there is any particular combination of flexion-extension/hand-forearm rotation where the NTP distance is maximal. Six fresh cadaver arms were suspended in a traction tower with forearm rotation locked, the skin and subcutaneous tissue around the ulnar head was removed, and the NTP distance measured in three predetermined loading/positional conditions. Of all options, the one that consistently showed the longest and safest NTP distance involved wrist flexion and radiocarpal supination when forearm rotation is limited. In conclusion, when an arthroscopic traction device restricts the forearm rotation, the 6U portal should not be set under traction with the hand passively pronated. Failure to observe this precaution can result in serious neuropathic pain.

  5. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  10. An Exoskeleton Robot for Human Forearm and Wrist Motion Assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranathunga Arachchilage Ruwan Chandra Gopura; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    The exoskeleton robot is worn by the human operator as an orthotic device. Its joints and links correspond to those of the human body. The same system operated in different modes can be used for different fundamental applications; a human-amplifier, haptic interface, rehabilitation device and assistive device sharing a portion of the external load with the operator. We have been developing exoskeleton robots for assisting the motion of physically weak individuals such as elderly or slightly disabled in daily life. In this paper, we propose a three degree of freedom (3DOF) exoskeleton robot (W-EXOS) for the forearm pronation/ supination motion, wrist flexion/extension motion and ulnar/radial deviation. The paper describes the wrist anatomy toward the development of the exoskeleton robot, the hardware design of the exoskeleton robot and EMG-based control method. The skin surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of muscles in forearm of the exoskeletons' user and the hand force/forearm torque are used as input information for the controller. By applying the skin surface EMG signals as main input signals to the controller, automatic control of the robot can be realized without manipulating any other equipment. Fuzzy control method has been applied to realize the natural and flexible motion assist. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed exoskeleton robot and its control method.

  11. Contribution of arthroscopy in case of septic appearance arthritis of the wrist: a nine cases series.

    PubMed

    Hariri, A; Lebailly, F; Zemirline, A; Hendriks, S; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2013-09-01

    Septic arthritis of the wrist is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency. Synovectomy and lavage by arthrotomy is often followed by stiffness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic contribution of emergency arthroscopic synovectomy with intraarticular lavage. Nine patients were operated on for wrist pathology with septic appearance. All had signs of local inflammation, three showed locoregional inflammation, three were febrile. In one patient several joints were involved. Seven patients presented with inflammatory or degenerative arthritis. All patients underwent emergency surgery using radiocarpal joint puncture, arthroscopic exploration, intraarticular lavage and synovectomy at both the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The results were evaluated by pain, Quick DASH, grip strength, and wrist range of motion. In three cases, joint fluid appeared clear, in three it was turbid, and in three purulent. Gram stain and culture revealed bacteria in four cases. Synovitis was radiocarpal four times, radiocarpal and midcarpal once. In one case, there was radiocarpal and midcarpal chondritis. Average pain was 5.3/10 preoperatively and 2/10 at the last clinical follow-up visit. Mean grip strength was 23.3 kg on the involved side vs. 33.5 kg on the opposite one. Mean flexion was 55° for the involved wrist vs. 68°; mean extension was 52° for the affected wrist vs. 59°. No patient was reoperated on. In all cases, there was no sign of local inflammation, regional lymphadenopathy or systemic infection at the last follow-up. One patient died of colon metastatic cancer. Another patient developed a severe Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS1). Our results suggest three principles of management of wrist arthritis with septic appearance: extended surgical indication, emergency operation and arthroscopic procedure.

  12. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or Huntington’s disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.—Chondrogianni, N., Georgila, K., Kourtis, N

  13. Development and performance of a new prosthesis system using ultrasonic sensor for wrist movements: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The design and performance of a new development prosthesis system known as biomechatronics wrist prosthesis is presented in this paper. The prosthesis system was implemented by replacing the Bowden tension cable of body powered prosthesis system using two ultrasonic sensors, two servo motors and microcontroller inside the prosthesis hand for transradial user. Methods The system components and hand prototypes involve the anthropometry, CAD design and prototyping, biomechatronics engineering together with the prosthetics. The modeler construction of the system develop allows the ultrasonic sensors that are placed on the shoulder to generate the wrist movement of the prosthesis. The kinematics of wrist movement, which are the pronation/supination and flexion/extension were tested using the motion analysis and general motion of human hand were compared. The study also evaluated the require degree of detection for the input of the ultrasonic sensor to generate the wrist movements. Results The values collected by the vicon motion analysis for biomechatronics prosthesis system were reliable to do the common tasks in daily life. The degree of the head needed to bend to give the full input wave was about 45° - 55° of rotation or about 14 cm – 16 cm. The biomechatronics wrist prosthesis gave higher degree of rotation to do the daily tasks but did not achieve the maximum degree of rotation. Conclusion The new development of using sensor and actuator in generating the wrist movements will be interesting for used list in medicine, robotics technology, rehabilitations, prosthetics and orthotics. PMID:24755242

  14. MR Imaging and US of the Wrist Tendons.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Benjamin; Sampath, Srihari C; Sampath, Srinath C; Motamedi, Kambiz

    2016-10-01

    The tendons of the wrist are commonly symptomatic. They can be injured, infected, or inflamed. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are useful tools for evaluating the wrist. Pathologic conditions of the wrist tendons include de Quervain tenosynovitis, extensor carpi ulnaris tendinopathy, rheumatoid tenosynovitis, infectious synovitis, tendon tears, hydroxyapatite deposition disease, intersection syndrome, tenosynovial giant cell tumor, and fibroma of the tendon sheath. In this article, we review the normal appearance of the wrist tendons, discuss relevant anatomy, and give an overview of common pathologic conditions affecting the wrist tendons. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  15. Effects of strength training aided by electrical stimulation on wrist muscle characteristics and hand function of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Daniela Virgínia; Mancini, Marisa Cotta; da Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira; Arantes, Nayara Flamini; Pinto, Tatiana Pessoa da Silva; de Araújo, Priscila Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    Nine children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy underwent 24 sessions of wrist muscles strengthening in the extended wrist range aided by electrostimulation. Isometric strength of flexors and extensors was registered in three wrist positions (30 degrees of flexion, neutral, and 30 degrees of extension) to infer on angle-torque curves. Passive stiffness of wrist flexors and wrist flexion angle during manual tasks and hand function were also documented. Significant strength gains were observed at 30 degrees of wrist extension for flexors (p= 0.029) and extensors (p= 0.024). No gains were observed at 30 degrees of flexion. The difference in extensor strength between the three test positions changed after intervention (p< 0.034), suggesting a shift in the angle-torque curve. No changes were observed in passive stiffness (p= 0.506), wrist angle (p< 0.586), or hand function (p= 0.525). Strength training in specific joint ranges may alter angle-torque relationships. For functional gains to be observed, however, a more aggressive intervention and contextualized task training would probably be needed.

  16. “Remotion” Total Wrist Arthroplasty: Preliminary Results of a Prospective International Multicenter Study of 215 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, Guillaume; Boeckstyns, Michel; Sorensen, Allan Ibsen; Axelsson, Peter; Kroener, Karsten; Liverneaux, Philippe; Obert, Laurent; Merser, Soren

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the current results of an international multicenter study of one last generation total wrist arthroplasty (TWA) (“ReMotion,” Small Bone Innovation, Morristown, PA). The two first authors (G.H. and M.B.) built a Web-based prospective database including clinical and radiological preoperative and postoperative reports of “ReMotion” TWA at regular intervals. The cases of 7 centers with more than 15 inclusions were considered for this article. A total of 215 wrists were included. In the rheumatoid arthritis (RA; 129 wrists) and nonrheumatoid arthritis (non-RA; 86 wrists) groups, there were respectively 5 and 6% complications requiring implant revision with a survival rate of 96 and 92%, respectively, at an average follow-up of 4 years. Within the whole series, only one dislocation was observed in one non-RA wrist. A total of 112 wrists (75 rheumatoid and 37 nonrheumatoid) had more than 2 years of follow-up (minimum: 2 years, maximum: 8 years). In rheumatoid and non-RA group, visual analog scale (VAS) pain score improved by 48 and 54 points, respectively, and QuickDASH score improved by 20 and 21 points, respectively, with no statistical differences. Average postoperative arc of wrist flexion–extension was 58 degrees in rheumatoid wrists (loss of 1 degree) compared with 63 degrees in non-RA wrists (loss of 9 degrees) with no statistical differences. Grip strength improved respectively by 40 and 19% in rheumatoid and non-RA groups (p = 0.033). Implant loosening was observed in 4% of the rheumatoid wrists and 3% of the non-RA wrists with no statistical differences. A Web-based TWA international registry was presented. Our results suggest that the use of the “ReMotion” TWA is feasible in the midterm both for rheumatoid and non-RA patients. This is a significant improvement compared with the previous generation TWA. The level of evidence for this study is IV. PMID:23904975

  17. Kinematic analysis of wrist motion during simulated colonoscopy in first-year gastroenterology fellows

    PubMed Central

    Ratuapli, Shiva K; Ruff, Kevin C; Ramirez, Francisco C; Wu, Qing; Mohankumar, Deepika; Santello, Marco; Fleischer, David E

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastroenterology trainees acquire skill and proficiency in performing colonoscopies at different rates. The cause for heterogeneous competency among the trainees is unclear. Kinematic analysis of the wrist joint while performing colonoscopy can objectively assess the variation in wrist motion. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that the time spent by the trainees in extreme ranges of wrist motion will decrease as the trainees advance through the fellowship year. Subjects and methods: Five first-year gastroenterology fellows were prospectively studied at four intervals while performing simulated colonoscopies. The setting was an endoscopy simulation laboratory at a tertiary care center. Kinematic assessment of wrist motion was done using a magnetic position/orientation tracker held in place by a custom-made arm sleeve and hand glove. The main outcome measure was time spent performing each of four ranges of wrist motion (mid, center, extreme, and out) for each wrist degree of freedom (pronation/supination, flexion/extension, and adduction/abduction). Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the time spent for wrist movements across the three degrees of freedom throughout the study period. However, fellows spent significantly less time in extreme range (1.47 ± 0.34 min vs. 2.44 ± 0.34 min, P = 0.004) and center range (1.02 ± 0.34 min vs 1.9 ± 0.34 min, P = 0.01) at the end of the study compared to the baseline evaluation. The study was limited by the small number of subjects and performance of colonoscopies on a simulator rather than live patients. Conclusions: Gastroenterology trainees alter the time spent at the extreme range of wrist motion as they advance through training. Endoscopy training during the first 10 months of fellowship may have beneficial effects on learning ergonomically correct motion patterns. PMID:26716123

  18. Assessing adult leisure activities: an extension of a self-report activity questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Jopp, Daniela S; Hertzog, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value, as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, the authors enhanced the content validity of the Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire by adding items on physical and social activities and validated a shortened version of the questionnaire. The proposed leisure activity model included 11 activity categories: 3 types of social activities (i.e., activities with close social partners, group-centered public activity, religious activities), physical activities, developmental activities, experiential activities, crafts, game playing, TV watching, travel, and technology use. Confirmatory factor analyses validated the proposed factor structure in 2 independent samples. A higher order model with a general activity factor fitted the activity factor correlations with relatively little loss of fit. Convergent and discriminant validity for the activity scales were supported by patterns of their correlations with education, health, depression, cognition, and personality. In sum, the scores derived from of the augmented Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire demonstrate good reliability, and validity evidence supports their use as measures of leisure activities in young, middle-aged, and older individuals.

  19. Assessing Adult Leisure Activities: An Extension of a Self-Report Activity Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Jopp, Daniela; Hertzog, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, we enhanced the content validity of the Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire by adding items on physical and social activities, and validated a shortened version of the questionnaire. Our proposed leisure activity model included 11 activity categories: three types of social activities (i.e., activities with close social partners, group-centered public activity, religious activities), physical, developmental, and experiential activities, crafts, game playing, TV watching, travel, and technology use. Confirmatory factor analyses validated the proposed factor structure in two independent samples. A higher-order model with a general activity factor fitted the activity factor correlations with relatively little loss of fit. Convergent and discriminant validity for the activity scales were supported by patterns of their correlations with education, health, depression, cognition, and personality. In sum, the scores derived from of the augmented VLS activity questionnaire demonstrate good reliability, and validity evidence supports their use as measure of leisure activities in young, middle-aged, and older individuals. PMID:20230157

  20. Active simultaneous uplift and margin-normal extension in a forearc high, Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallen, S. F.; Wegmann, K. W.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Pazzaglia, F. J.; Brandon, M. T.; Fassoulas, C.

    2014-07-01

    The island of Crete occupies a forearc high in the central Hellenic subduction zone and is characterized by sustained exhumation, surface uplift and extension. The processes governing orogenesis and topographic development here remain poorly understood. Dramatic topographic relief (2-6 km) astride the southern coastline of Crete is associated with large margin-parallel faults responsible for deep bathymetric depressions known as the Hellenic troughs. These structures have been interpreted as both active and inactive with either contractional, strike-slip, or extensional movement histories. Distinguishing between these different structural styles and kinematic histories here allows us to explore more general models for improving our global understanding of the tectonic and geodynamic processes of syn-convergent extension. We present new observations from the south-central coastline of Crete that clarifies the role of these faults in the late Cenozoic evolution of the central Hellenic margin and the processes controlling Quaternary surface uplift. Pleistocene marine terraces are used in conjunction with optically stimulated luminesce dating and correlation to the Quaternary eustatic curve to document coastal uplift and identify active faults. Two south-dipping normal faults are observed, which extend offshore, offset these marine terrace deposits and indicate active N-S (margin-normal) extension. Further, marine terraces preserved in the footwall and hanging wall of both faults demonstrate that regional net uplift of Crete is occurring despite active extension. Field mapping and geometric reconstructions of an active onshore normal fault reveal that the subaqueous range-front fault of south-central Crete is synthetic to the south-dipping normal faults on shore. These findings are inconsistent with models of active horizontal shortening in the upper crust of the Hellenic forearc. Rather, they are consistent with topographic growth of the forearc in a viscous orogenic

  1. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S

    2015-02-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.

  2. PERSISTENT WRIST PAIN IN A MATURE GOLFER

    PubMed Central

    Hazle, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Clients presenting with ulnar-sided wrist pain can provide diagnostic and management challenges for physical therapists. Symptoms in this region may originate from multiple structures. Integration of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging results is often required for optimal decision-making and patient management. To obtain the most informative imaging results, practitioners need an understanding of injury patterns and their detection by various imaging modalities. This case describes a mature golfer who presented with persistent ulnar-sided wrist pain and was eventually determined to have a fracture of the hook of the hamate accompanied by neighboring soft tissue involvement also contributing to his symptom complex. His history and the diagnostic process are detailed along with a brief discussion of his subsequent management post-operatively. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case Report) PMID:22893862

  3. Radiological intervention of the hand and wrist

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Annu; Rowbotham, Emma L

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiological guided intervention is integral in the management of patients with musculoskeletal pathologies. The key to image-guided procedures is to achieve an accurately placed intervention with minimal invasion. This review article specifically concentrates on radiological procedures of the hand and wrist using ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. A systematic literature review of the most recent publications relevant to image-guided intervention of the hand and wrist was conducted. During this search, it became clear that there is little consensus regarding all aspects of image-guided intervention, from the technique adopted to the dosage of injectate and the specific drugs used. The aim of this article is to formulate an evidence-based reference point which can be utilized by radiologists and to describe the most commonly employed techniques. PMID:26313500

  4. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures for Hand and Wrist Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Dacombe, Peter Jonathan; Amirfeyz, Rouin; Davis, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are important tools for assessing outcomes following injuries to the hand and wrist. Many commonly used PROMs have no evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a hand and wrist trauma population. This systematic review examines the PROMs used in the assessment of hand and wrist trauma patients, and the evidence for reliability, validity, and responsiveness of each measure in this population. Methods: A systematic review of Pubmed, Medline, and CINAHL searching for randomized controlled trials of patients with traumatic injuries to the hand and wrist was carried out to identify the PROMs. For each identified PROM, evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness was identified using a further systematic review of the Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, and reverse citation trail audit procedure. Results: The PROM used most often was the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire; the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), Gartland and Werley score, Michigan Hand Outcomes score, Mayo Wrist Score, and Short Form 36 were also commonly used. Only the DASH and PRWE have evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in patients with traumatic injuries to the hand and wrist; other measures either have incomplete evidence or evidence gathered in a nontraumatic population. Conclusions: The DASH and PRWE both have evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a hand and wrist trauma population. Other PROMs used to assess hand and wrist trauma patients do not. This should be considered when selecting a PROM for patients with traumatic hand and wrist pathology. PMID:27418884

  5. Rnd1 regulates axon extension by enhancing the microtubule destabilizing activity of SCG10.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Hua; Ghavampur, Sharang; Bondallaz, Percy; Will, Lena; Grenningloh, Gabriele; Püschel, Andreas W

    2009-01-02

    The GTPase Rnd1 affects actin dynamics antagonistically to Rho and has been implicated in the regulation of neurite outgrowth, dendrite development, and axon guidance. Here we show that Rnd1 interacts with the microtubule regulator SCG10. This interaction requires a central domain of SCG10 comprising about 40 amino acids located within the N-terminal-half of a putative alpha-helical domain and is independent of phosphorylation at the four identified phosphorylation sites that regulate SCG10 activity. Rnd1 enhances the microtubule destabilizing activity of SCG10 and both proteins colocalize in neurons. Knockdown of Rnd1 or SCG10 by RNAi suppressed axon extension, indicating a critical role for both proteins during neuronal differentiation. Overexpression of Rnd1 in neurons induces the formation of multiple axons. The effect of Rnd1 on axon extension depends on SCG10. These results indicate that SCG10 acts as an effector downstream of Rnd1 to regulate axon extensions by modulating microtubule organization.

  6. The "Conflicted Dying": The Active Search for Life Extension in Advanced Cancer Through Biomedical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Shan; Peter, Elizabeth; Gastaldo, Denise; Howell, Doris

    2016-03-01

    Using a poststructural perspective, we examine the subjectivities that are produced when advanced cancer patients seek life extension through biomedical treatments. Seven case studies were developed that included 20 interviews with patients, family, nurses, and physicians recruited from a tertiary hospital in Canada, 30 documents, and 5 hours of participant observation. We identify seven types of subjectivity: (a) the Desperate Subject, (b) the Cancer Expert Subject, (c) the Proactive Subject, (d) the Productive Subject, (e) the Mistrusting Subject, (f) the Model Patient Subject, and (g) the Suffering Subject. We characterize the "conflicted dying," a contemporary figure who holds multiple perspectives about seeking curative treatment despite the acknowledgment of death. Using active strategies to gain access to treatment, this figure resists traditional arrangements of power/knowledge established by health care providers. We suggest that the search for life extension is a process of shaping the self to fit certain aesthetical traits associated with surviving cancer.

  7. Systematic Review of Physical Activity Objectives in Extension Strategic Plans: Findings and Implications for Improved Public Health Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Samantha M.; Lindsay, Anne; Everette, Alicia; Gunter, Katherine B.

    2016-01-01

    Extension programming that incorporates both physical activity and dietary behaviors is necessary for the prevention of certain chronic diseases, including obesity. The purpose of the study presented here was to systematically identify the presence of physical activity objectives in the strategic plan for each Extension system in the United…

  8. Non-extensivity and complexity in the earthquake activity at the West Corinth rift (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michas, Georgios; Vallianatos, Filippos; Sammonds, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Earthquakes exhibit complex phenomenology that is revealed from the fractal structure in space, time and magnitude. For that reason other tools rather than the simple Poissonian statistics seem more appropriate to describe the statistical properties of the phenomenon. Here we use Non-Extensive Statistical Physics [NESP] to investigate the inter-event time distribution of the earthquake activity at the west Corinth rift (central Greece). This area is one of the most seismotectonically active areas in Europe, with an important continental N-S extension and high seismicity rates. NESP concept refers to the non-additive Tsallis entropy Sq that includes Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy as a particular case. This concept has been successfully used for the analysis of a variety of complex dynamic systems including earthquakes, where fractality and long-range interactions are important. The analysis indicates that the cumulative inter-event time distribution can be successfully described with NESP, implying the complexity that characterizes the temporal occurrences of earthquakes. Further on, we use the Tsallis entropy (Sq) and the Fischer Information Measure (FIM) to investigate the complexity that characterizes the inter-event time distribution through different time windows along the evolution of the seismic activity at the West Corinth rift. The results of this analysis reveal a different level of organization and clusterization of the seismic activity in time. Acknowledgments. GM wish to acknowledge the partial support of the Greek State Scholarships Foundation (IKY).

  9. A New Myohaptic Instrument to Assess Wrist Motion Dynamically

    PubMed Central

    Manto, Mario; Van Den Braber, Niels; Grimaldi, Giuliana; Lammertse, Piet

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiological assessment of joint properties and voluntary motion in neurological patients remains a challenge. This is typically the case in cerebellar patients, who exhibit dysmetric movements due to the dysfunction of cerebellar circuitry. Several tools have been developed, but so far most of these tools have remained confined to laboratories, with a lack of standardization. We report on a new device which combines the use of electromyographic (EMG) sensors with haptic technology for the dynamic investigation of wrist properties. The instrument is composed of a drivetrain, a haptic controller and a signal acquisition unit. Angular accuracy is 0.00611 rad, nominal torque is 6 N·m, maximal rotation velocity is 34.907 rad/sec, with a range of motion of −1.0472 to +1.0472 rad. The inertia of the motor and handgrip is 0.004 kg·m2. This is the first standardized myohaptic instrument allowing the dynamic characterization of wrist properties, including under the condition of artificial damping. We show that cerebellar patients are unable to adapt EMG activities when faced with an increase in damping while performing fast reversal movements. The instrument allows the extraction of an electrophysiological signature of a cerebellar deficit. PMID:22319293

  10. The prevalence, variety and impact of wrist problems in elite professional golfers on the European Tour

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Roger; O'Connor, Phil; Campbell, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Golf is a popular sport played by an estimated 57 million people. Previous studies on wrist injuries in elite golfers have been of simple design and have demonstrated such injuries to be frequent, although no studies report the incidence, variety, severity or impact on the activity of wrist injuries in detail. This prospective cross-sectional study assesses these factors in a cohort of elite professional golfers. Methods European Tour golfers eligible to compete at the 2009 BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth were studied. Study design involved the completion of a structured questionnaire supplemented by interview and examination when required, with performance statistics provided by the European Tour. The severity of injury was assessed by the number of missed tournaments and the amount of time of missed practice. Results 128 of 153 eligible golfers, (84%) completed the study with 38 golfers (30%) reporting 43 problems. The majority of injuries (67%) occurred in the leading wrist at the most common location, the ulnar side of the wrist (35%). 87% of all ulnar-sided and 100% of radial-sided problems were in the leading wrist. Conclusions There were clear side differences reported by the players with the lead wrist demonstrating much higher injury rates in all areas. The most significant injury, in terms of absence from competition, was extensor carpi ulnaris tendon subluxation. Specific injuries are explained in relation to the biomechanics of the golf swing. Most structural injuries have a specific treatment and rehabilitation plan, which can involve significant periods of time away from the sport, while the management of many of the more minor problems is through alterations in technique or practice regimes, aiming to keep a golfer playing during recovery. PMID:24014125

  11. Wrist ultrasound examination – scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 1: Dorsal wrist

    PubMed Central

    Łasecki, Mateusz; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is superior to other imaging methods in many aspects, such as multidimensional character of imaging, possibility of dynamic evaluation and precise assessment of soft tissues. Moreover, it is a safe and relatively inexpensive method, broadly available and well-tolerated by patients. A correctly conducted ultrasound examination of the wrist delivers detailed information concerning the condition of tendons, muscles, ligaments, nerves and vessels. However, the knowledge of anatomy is crucial to establish a correct ultrasound diagnosis, also in wrist assessment. An ultrasound examination of the wrist is one of the most common US examinations conducted in patients with rheumatological diseases. Ultrasonographic signs depend on the advancement of the disease. The examination is equally frequently conducted in patients with pain or swelling of the wrist due to non-rheumatological causes. The aim of this publication was to present ultrasound images and anatomic schemes corresponding to them. The correct scanning technique of the dorsal part of the wrist was discussed and some practical tips, thanks to which highly diagnostic images can be obtained, were presented. The following anatomical structures should be visualized in an ultrasound examination of the dorsal wrist: distal radio-ulnar joint, radiocarpal joint, midcarpal joint, carpometacarpal joints, dorsal radiocarpal ligament, compartments of extensor tendons, radial artery, cephalic vein, two small branches of the radial nerve: superficial and deep, as well as certain midcarpal ligaments, particularly the scapholunate ligament and lunotriquetral ligament. The paper was distinguished in 2014 as the “poster of the month” (poster number C-1896) during the poster session of the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna. PMID:26675810

  12. Reconstructing the rheumatoid wrist: a utility analysis comparing total wrist fusion and total wrist arthroplasty from the perspectives of rheumatologists and hand surgeons.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Christi M; Oppenheimer, Adam J; Chung, Kevin C

    2010-03-01

    Rheumatologists and hand surgeons have historically demonstrated strikingly divergent attitudes toward the benefits of surgical intervention, either total wrist fusion or total wrist arthroplasty, for the rheumatoid wrist. A utility analysis was conducted to compare a national random sample of hand surgeons and rheumatologists regarding their opinions about surgical management of severe rheumatoid wrist disease. A web-based trade-off utility survey was developed, and participants were presented with survey scenarios comparing well-controlled rheumatoid arthritis with operative and non-operative management. Utility values were calculated for each scenario, and a decision analytic model was constructed. Utility values for rheumatologists and hand surgeons did not differ significantly for any scenario. Total wrist arthroplasty was associated with the highest expected gain in quality-adjusted life-years for each subgroup. This decision analytic model demonstrates similar opinions between two subspecialties that have historically demonstrated divergent attitudes towards rheumatoid hand surgery.

  13. 75 FR 54363 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-0142, Decommissioning Activities, Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... information. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: 30 CFR 250, subpart Q, Decommissioning Activities. OMB Control... prevent or minimize the likelihood of blowouts, loss of well control, fires, spillages, physical... equipment and subsea protective covering; or other departures. Subtotal 50 responses 150...

  14. Comparison of trunk muscle reflex activation patterns between active and passive trunk flexion-extension loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael W

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of trunk flexion-extension loading on the neuromuscular reflexive latencies and amplitude responses of the trunk musculature. Eighteen male and female subjects (18-27yrs) participated in active and passive trunk flexion extension, performed ∼7days apart. Subjects performed 60 trunk flexion-extension repetitions. Surface electromyography (EMG) was collected bilaterally from paraspinal and abdominal muscles. In the active condition, subjects volitionally moved their trunks, while in the passive condition the dynamometer controlled the movements. The trunk was perturbed before and immediately after 30 repetitions. Latency of muscle onset, latency of first peak, latency of maximum peak, and peak EMG amplitude were evaluated. No differences between conditions, sides, or perturbation session were apparent. Overall latencies were shorter in females (p<.05) and abdominal muscles compared to paraspinals (p<.05). Thoracic paraspinal muscle amplitudes were greater than all other muscles (p<.05). Based upon the present results, the neuromuscular system engages trunk flexor muscles prior to the paraspinals in order to provide possible stabilization of the trunk when flexor moments are generated. Overall, the results indicate no difference in response of the neuromuscular system to active or passive repetitive loading.

  15. Wrist dermatitis: contact allergy to neoprene in a keyboard wrist rest.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R C; Elston, D M

    1997-09-01

    A case of allergic contact dermatitis to a keyboard wrist rest containing neoprene is reported. The patient, who had a history of sensitivity to rubber products, developed an acute vesicular reaction of the palmar aspects of her distal wrists, followed by eczematous patches of her extremities and face. Treatment with prednisone, a 3-week tapering dose (60, 40, 20 mg), cleared the dermatitis. The widespread uses of neoprene are discussed and suggest that neoprene will become a common source of contact dermatitis as the potential sources of exposure increase.

  16. Modeling of micromagnetic Barkhausen activity using a stochastic process extension to the theory of hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiles, D.C. ); Sipahi, L.B. ); Williams, G. )

    1993-05-15

    Recent work by Bertotti [IEEE Trans. Magn. [bold MAG]-[bold 24], 621 (1988)] and others has shown that it is possible to model the micromagnetic Barkhausen discontinuities at the coercive point using a two-parameter stochastic model. However, the present formulation of the model is restricted to limited regions of the hysteresis curve over which [ital dM]/[ital dH] is approximately constant and when [ital dH]/[ital dt] is held at a constant rate. A natural extension of this model is to take the basic result, in which the level of Barkhausen activity in one time period is related to the activity in the previous time period, and increment it by a small amount which is dependent on the differential permeability. The extension of the model proposed here uses the theory of ferromagnetic hysteresis to determine the differential permeability at any point of the hysteresis loop. The Barkhausen activity is then assumed to vary in proportion to the differential permeability. The resulting model allows the Barkhausen sum of discontinuous changes in magnetization to be modelled around the entire hysteresis loop, leading to an important generalization of the basic model.

  17. Muscle activity patterns during quick increase of movement amplitude in rapid elbow extensions.

    PubMed

    Takatoku, Nozomi; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we investigated a motor strategy for increasing the amplitude of movement in rapid extensions at the elbow joint. This study focused on the changes in a triphasic electromyographic (EMG) pattern, i.e., the first agonist burst (AG1), the second agonist burst (AG2) and the antagonist burst (ANT), for increasing the amplitude of movement required after the initiation of movement. Subjects performed 40 degrees (Basic task) and 80 degrees of extension (Wide task). These tasks were performed under two conditions; performing a predetermined task (SF condition) and performing a task in response to a visual stimulus immediately after movement commencement (ST condition). Kinematic parameters and EMG activity from the agonist (triceps brachii) and the antagonist (biceps brachii) muscles were recorded. As a result, the onset latency of AG1 and AG2 and the duration of AG1 were longer under the ST condition than the SF condition. No difference was observed between the SF and ST condition with respect to ANT activity. It is concluded that the motor strategy for increasing the amplitude of movement after the initiation of movement was to control the movement velocity and the timing to stop movement by the coactivation duration of AG1 and ANT and to stop the desired position accurately by AG2 activity.

  18. Rehabilitation of the wrist and hand following sports injury.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Carrie A; Krause, Michelle; Brown, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In sports, wrist and hand injuries are commonplace. Too often, injuries to these areas can be under-treated and left for further complications to arise. While some injuries to the wrist and hand can be treated conservatively with immediate return to play, others require a more in-depth assessment prior to return to play. This article describes the most common wrist and hand injuries in sport, and provides information related to current treatment approaches.

  19. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance.

  20. Assessing Adult Leisure Activities: An Extension of a Self-Report Activity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jopp, Daniela S.; Hertzog, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value, as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, the authors enhanced…

  1. Three d.o.f. Robotic Wrist Actuator Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Tom; Tamasi, Gabor

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the efforts to redesign, fabricate, assemble and test the wrist actuators on the Automated Tile Processing System (ATPS). The ATPS is a robotic system being developed at Kennedy Space Center to inspect and rewaterproof thermal protection tiles on the space shuttle orbiter prior to launch. The objective of the redesign was to eliminate backlash and provide adequate pitch and yaw actuator force. The wrist actuators have been successfully redesigned, fabricated, tested, and installed. The redesigned wrist actuators meet or exceed all design requirements. The wrist has been reinstalled on the tile processing robot and will be further evaluated during operational testing of the system.

  2. [Tremor Suppression on Multi-DoF Wrist Joint Based on Functional Electrical Stimulation: A Simulation Study].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Dingguo; Liu, Jianrong

    2015-04-01

    An automatic control system was designed to suppress pathological tremor on wrist joint with two degrees of freedom (DoF) using functional electrical stimulation (FES). The tremor occurring in the wrist flexion-extension and adduction-abduction was expected to be suppressed. A musculoskeletal model of wrist joint was developed to serve as the control plant, which covered four main muscles (extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris). A second-order mechanical impedance model was used to describe the wrist skeletal dynamics. The core work was to design the controller and a hybrid control strategy was proposed, which combined inverse model based on feed forward control and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control. Performance of the system was tested under different input conditions (step signal, sinusoidal signal, and real data of a patient)., The results indicated that the proposed hybrid controller could attenuate over 94% of the tremor amplitude on multi-DoF wrist joint.

  3. Personal technique for wrist dorsal approach.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, A; Leigheb, M; Russomando, A; Landi, A

    2014-09-24

    In hand disorders surgical procedures are more and more widely used and often it's necessary to approach the wrist by the dorsal way. Beneath anatomy of this region is well known, there is still room enough to develop new surgical exposure techniques mostly related to physiology and biomechanics. Our goals are to present an innovative surgical dorsal exposure of the wrist, to show its use for different problems solving, and to evaluate its mini-invasive and functional outcome. Our inedited surgical technique is presented. Since November 1999 to February 2008, this technique has been used by the same surgeon in 60 cases for different pathologies and procedures: 14 SNAC-SLAC wrists III-IV treated by proximal row resection and Resurface-Capitate Pyrocarbon Implant (RCPI), 2 Fenton syndromes by bone graft and RCPI, 6 SNACSLAC II by proximal row resection +/- radial styloidectomy, 2 SLAC III by scaphoidectomy and capito-lunate arthrodesis, 12 scapho-lunate recent dissociations by ligamentoplasty (double approach), 4 scapho-lunate inveterate dissociations by Cuenod Saffar-Romano modified technique and 4 by synthetic ligaments, 1 fracture of the scaphoid proximal pole by synthesis-revascularization-S.L.ligament reconstruction, 15 Kienbock's diseases revascularized by II m.c. artery +/- radial osteotomy. Patients have been evaluated at follow up through the DASH disability questionnaire, the Mayo score for the force, ROM, pain, satisfaction grade. Results are good and encouraging for these applications. In conclusion this new technique with its limited exposure permits an early mobilization with a lower risk of stiffness and can be considered mini-invasive.

  4. Extensive mutagenesis of a transcriptional activation domain identifies single hydrophobic and acidic amino acids important for activation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, M B; Goff, S A; Chandler, V L

    1997-01-01

    C1 is a transcriptional activator of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes of the maize anthocyanin pigment pathway. C1 has an amino terminus homologous to Myb DNA-binding domains and an acidic carboxyl terminus that is a transcriptional activation domain in maize and yeast cells. To identify amino acids critical for transcriptional activation, an extensive random mutagenesis of the C1 carboxyl terminus was done. The C1 activation domain is remarkably tolerant of amino acid substitutions, as changes at 34 residues had little or no effect on transcriptional activity. These changes include introduction of helix-incompatible amino acids throughout the C1 activation domain and alteration of most single acidic amino acids, suggesting that a previously postulated amphipathic alpha-helix is not required for activation. Substitutions at two positions revealed amino acids important for transcriptional activation. Replacement of leucine 253 with a proline or glutamine resulted in approximately 10% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Leucine 253 is in a region of C1 in which several hydrophobic residues align with residues important for transcriptional activation by the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. However, changes at all other hydrophobic residues in C1 indicate that none are critical for C1 transcriptional activation. The other important amino acid in C1 is aspartate 262, as a change to valine resulted in only 24% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Comparison of our C1 results with those from VP16 reveal substantial differences in which amino acids are required for transcriptional activation in vivo by these two acidic activation domains. PMID:8972191

  5. Tendon disorders of the hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    McAuliffe, John A

    2010-05-01

    The terminology used to describe most common tendon disorders in the hand and wrist suggests that they are inflammatory in nature, although current evidence indicates that mechanical and degenerative factors are more important. Corticosteroid injections provide relief in 60% or more of cases; however, the duration of their effectiveness remains uncertain. Surgical release of the stenotic pulley or sheath is curative in well over 90% of cases; complications of surgery are rare, and relief is long-lasting. Enlightened management of these common problems demands evidence-based guidelines defining indications for surgery that will maximize outcomes and minimize costs.

  6. Septic arthritis of the hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    Murray, P M

    1998-11-01

    Septic arthritis of the hand and wrist is relatively uncommon. The most common cause is penetrating trauma such as a human or animal bite. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. Septic arthritis caused by Streptococcal species. Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia species, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Pasteurella multocida, Eikenella corrodens, and Mycobacterium marinum also may occur in specific clinical settings. The best clinical results occur following an accurate diagnosis, prompt surgical drainage, and debridement in concert with appropriate antibiotics and early postoperative range of motion. A delay in diagnosis or treatment is associated with an unsatisfactory outcome.

  7. Volar Central Portal in Wrist Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Corella, F.; Ocampos, M.; Cerro, M. Del; Larrainzar-Garijo, R.; Vázquez, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nowadays, the wrist is not limited to a dorsal visualization; the joint can be thought of as a “box,” which can be visualized from almost every perspective. The purpose of this study was to describe a new volar central portal for the wrist, following three principles: a single incision that allows access to both the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints, centered on the lunate, with the volar structures at risk protected not only by retractors, but also by tendons. Description of Technique The incision begins in the distal wrist crease and extended 1.5 cm proximally up to the proximal wrist crease, following the axis of the third intermetacarpal space. The flexor superficialis tendons are identified and retracted toward the radial side. Next, the fourth and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons are retracted toward the ulnar side, while the third and second tendons are retracted toward the radial side. The volar central midcarpal portal is performed under direct vision just over the anterior horn of the lunate through the Poirier space. The volar central radiocarpal portal is created under the lunate through the interval between the ulnocarpal ligaments and the short radioulnar ligament. Methods An anatomical study was performed on 14 cadaver specimens. Two data were recorded: iatrogenic injuries of the structures at risk and the distances to the structures at risk. Results The median (interquartile range [IQR]) distances from the volar central radiocarpal portal to the median nerve, palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, and ulnar neurovascular bundle were 10.5 (7.8–15.0), 18.5 (15.8–20.3), and 7.0 (5.0–10.5) mm, respectively. The median (IQR) distances from the volar central midcarpal portal to the median nerve, palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, and ulnar neurovascular bundle were 7.0 (4.8–10.3), 16.0 (14.8–19.0), and 4.5 (3.8–9.0) mm, respectively. No iatrogenic injuries were observed. Conclusion The volar

  8. Volar Central Portal in Wrist Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Corella, F; Ocampos, M; Cerro, M Del; Larrainzar-Garijo, R; Vázquez, T

    2016-03-01

    Background Nowadays, the wrist is not limited to a dorsal visualization; the joint can be thought of as a "box," which can be visualized from almost every perspective. The purpose of this study was to describe a new volar central portal for the wrist, following three principles: a single incision that allows access to both the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints, centered on the lunate, with the volar structures at risk protected not only by retractors, but also by tendons. Description of Technique The incision begins in the distal wrist crease and extended 1.5 cm proximally up to the proximal wrist crease, following the axis of the third intermetacarpal space. The flexor superficialis tendons are identified and retracted toward the radial side. Next, the fourth and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons are retracted toward the ulnar side, while the third and second tendons are retracted toward the radial side. The volar central midcarpal portal is performed under direct vision just over the anterior horn of the lunate through the Poirier space. The volar central radiocarpal portal is created under the lunate through the interval between the ulnocarpal ligaments and the short radioulnar ligament. Methods An anatomical study was performed on 14 cadaver specimens. Two data were recorded: iatrogenic injuries of the structures at risk and the distances to the structures at risk. Results The median (interquartile range [IQR]) distances from the volar central radiocarpal portal to the median nerve, palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, and ulnar neurovascular bundle were 10.5 (7.8-15.0), 18.5 (15.8-20.3), and 7.0 (5.0-10.5) mm, respectively. The median (IQR) distances from the volar central midcarpal portal to the median nerve, palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, and ulnar neurovascular bundle were 7.0 (4.8-10.3), 16.0 (14.8-19.0), and 4.5 (3.8-9.0) mm, respectively. No iatrogenic injuries were observed. Conclusion The volar central portal is

  9. Correlated activity of cortical neurons survives extensive removal of feedforward sensory input

    PubMed Central

    Shapcott, Katharine A.; Schmiedt, Joscha T.; Saunders, Richard C.; Maier, Alexander; Leopold, David A.; Schmid, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental property of brain function is that the spiking activity of cortical neurons is variable and that some of this variability is correlated between neurons. Correlated activity not due to the stimulus arises from shared input but the neuronal circuit mechanisms that result in these noise correlations are not fully understood. Here we tested in the visual system if correlated variability in mid-level area V4 of visual cortex is altered following extensive lesions of primary visual cortex (V1). To this end we recorded longitudinally the neuronal correlations in area V4 of two behaving macaque monkeys before and after a V1 lesion while the monkeys fixated a grey screen. We found that the correlations of neuronal activity survived the lesions in both monkeys. In one monkey, the correlation of multi-unit spiking signals was strongly increased in the first week post-lesion, while in the second monkey, correlated activity was slightly increased, but not greater than some week-by-week fluctuations observed. The typical drop-off of inter-neuronal correlations with cortical distance was preserved after the lesion. Therefore, as V4 noise correlations remain without feedforward input from V1, these results suggest instead that local and/or feedback input seem to be necessary for correlated activity. PMID:27721468

  10. Investigation of Cervical Fleksor and Extensor Muscle Activation During Isometric Neck Extension Applied by Therraband

    PubMed Central

    Önal, Sercan; Can, Filiz; Yakut, Yavuz; Baltacı, Gül

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Therrabands are commonly used for resistive exercises, streching and stabilization exercises and also isometric exercises. However, principles of practice of therrabands are mostly focused on exercise variety. Likewise it is only given point to exercise variety during therrabands’ usage at cervical region. Nevertheless, for effective usage of therrabands and for proper assessment of effectiveness response, it is necessary to know the amount of resistance being given or muscle activation response against the resistance given. The aim of this study was to compare activations of cervical flexor and extensor muscles during isometric extension exercise against the resistance of therraband in healthy individuals. Methods: 14 healthy subjects (8 female,6 male)aged between 19-32 have been included in the study. Subjects with neck problems, systemic diseases, history of trauma or operation were excluded. Neck isometric exercises with therraband was 2 sets with 2 minutes’ intervals and EMG records have been taken during exercises. After preparation of the skin, surface electrodes placed on the motor points of sternocleidomastoideus(SCM) and erector spinae(ES) muscles. After taking the average of 3 measures, the first 10 seconds of muscular activations were recorded. The average of integrated EMG(iEMG) values of each records was used for statistical data. Independent T test and Mann Whitney U test were used for the analysis of findings. Results: There was no significant difference between the right ES and left ES’s mean iEMG during isometric neck extension against therraband (p=0.06). Although there was no difference between right SCM and right ES muscles action potentials(t=-0.895; p=0.379), there was a significant difference between left SCM and left ES muscles’ action potentials (z= -2.435; p=0.01). When all the right and left SCM and ES muscle activations were compared, a significant difference was detected in favour of ES muscles ( t= -2.133; p= 0

  11. Extensive screening for edible herbal extracts with potent scavenging activity against superoxide anions.

    PubMed

    Saito, Keita; Kohno, Masahiro; Yoshizaki, Fumihiko; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2008-06-01

    To search for edible herbal extracts with potent antioxidant activity, we conducted a large scale screening based on the superoxide scavenging activity. That is, scavenging activity against superoxide anions were extensively screened from ethanol extracts of approximately 1,000 kinds of herbs by applying an electron spin resonance (ESR)-spin trapping method. Among them we chose four edible herbal extracts with prominently potent ability to reduce the signal intensity of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO)-OOH, a spin adduct formed by DMPO and superoxide anion. They are the extracts from Punica granatum (Peel), Syzygium aromaticum (Bud), Mangifera indica (Kernel), and Phyllanthus emblica (Fruit), and are allowed to be used as foodstuffs according to the Japanese legal regulation. The ESR-spin trapping method coupled with steady state kinetic analysis showed that all of the four extracts directly scavenge superoxide anions, and that the superoxide scavenging potential of any of the extracts was comparable to that of L-ascorbic acid. Furthermore, polyphenol determination indicates that the activity is at least in part attributable to polyphenols. These results with such large scale screening might give useful information when choosing a potent antioxidant as a foodstuff.

  12. Exploring the Gap for Effective Extension of Professional Active Life in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Will; Afsarmanesh, Hamideh; Msanjila, Simon S.; Playfoot, Jim

    Extending Professional Active Life (ePAL [2]) of elder people in Europe is affected by a number of factors in the market and society, which have the potential to either positively and negatively influence it. Current practices indicate that the European society, while started to act on this subject, is still slow to recognize the rationale behind and importance of fully supporting the extension of active professional life of seniors. Similarly, the capacity of the service sector to fully support the involvement of seniors in economical activities is at present limited, given the huge number of these seniors in different countries who need to be mobilized. This paper seeks to highlight the identified gaps related to effective mechanisms by which Europe can support its willing senior professionals to remain active. The study on gap identification addresses relevant technological, social, and organizational factors and external influences which have the potential to impact successful future life of elderly population. It also presents the methodology that is applied in our study to identify and analyze the gaps between the current practices in this area, the so-called baseline [2], and the desired future for this area as inspired in the ePAL vision [1] addressed in other research.

  13. Nuclear Energy Gradients for Internally Contracted Complete Active Space Second-Order Perturbation Theory: Multistate Extensions.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Shiozaki, Toru

    2016-08-09

    We report the development of the theory and computer program for analytical nuclear energy gradients for (extended) multistate complete active space perturbation theory (CASPT2) with full internal contraction. The vertical shifts are also considered in this work. This is an extension of the fully internally contracted CASPT2 nuclear gradient program recently developed for a state-specific variant by us [MacLeod and Shiozaki, J. Chem. Phys. 2015, 142, 051103]; in this extension, the so-called λ equation is solved to account for the variation of the multistate CASPT2 energies with respect to the change in the amplitudes obtained in the preceding state-specific CASPT2 calculations, and the Z vector equations are modified accordingly. The program is parallelized using the MPI3 remote memory access protocol that allows us to perform efficient one-sided communication. The optimized geometries of the ground and excited states of a copper corrole and benzophenone are presented as numerical examples. The code is publicly available under the GNU General Public License.

  14. Tactile spatial acuity is reduced by skin stretch at the human wrist.

    PubMed

    Cody, Frederick W J; Idrees, Raheel; Spilioti, Diamantina X; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2010-10-22

    The skin is an elastic organ that is continuously distorted as our limbs move. The hypothesis that the precision of human tactile localisation is reduced when the skin is stretched, with concurrent expansion of receptive fields (RFs) was tested. Locognosic acuity over the dorsal wrist area was quantified during application of background stretch by (a) Wrist-Bend (skin stretch combined with non-cutaneous proprioceptor activation) and (b) Skin-Pull (skin stretch alone). Participants identified the perceived direction (distal or proximal) of brief test stimuli, applied along a 7-point linear array, relative to a central reference locus. Performance was significantly reduced during the large amplitude compared to the small amplitude of tonic skin stretch, but there was no effect of stretch mode (Wrist-Bend, Skin-Pull), nor was the effect of stretch amplitude modulated by the mode of stretch. Locognosic acuity was poorer than baseline accuracy for the large amplitude skin stretches, for both application modes, but did not differ significantly from baseline for either of the small amplitude stretches. We interpret these observations as corroborating the long-held assumption that tactile localisation is primarily dependent upon the RF dimensions, and associated innervation densities, of regional touch units. The finding that performance was reduced to a similar extent under Skin-Pull and Wrist-Bend conditions suggests that non-cutaneous proprioceptors had rather little tonic modulatory effect.

  15. A closer look at hand and wrist complaints.

    PubMed

    Zychowicz, Michael E

    2013-03-10

    Hand or wrist pain is a common complaint in primary care. This pain can be very disabling and can significantly impair a person's quality of life. With the appropriate clinical knowledge and skills, nurse practitioners can effectively evaluate, diagnose, and treat many of the common hand and wrist complaints seen in primary care.

  16. Ossified Dorsal Wrist Ganglion Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Juana; Rivlin, Michael; Chan, Joanna; Beredjiklian, Pedro K.

    2016-01-01

    Ganglion cysts are the most common wrist tumors, and 60 -70% originate dorsally from the scapholunate interval. Ossification of these lesions is exceedingly rare, with only one such lesion located in the finger reported in the literature. We present a case of an ossified dorsal wrist ganglion in a 68-year-old woman. PMID:27847858

  17. Wrist level and proximal-upper extremity replantation.

    PubMed

    Hanel, Douglas P; Chin, Simon H

    2007-02-01

    Since Malt and McKhan's first successful arm replantation in 1962, upper extremity replantation surgery techniques have been refined and spread worldwide. Nevertheless, replantation at or proximal to the wrist, referred to as wrist-proximal replants, remains a daunting challenge that presents the hand surgeon with an array of difficulties distinct from digital replantation.

  18. Ossified Dorsal Wrist Ganglion Cyst: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Medina, Juana; Rivlin, Michael; Chan, Joanna; Beredjiklian, Pedro K

    2016-10-01

    Ganglion cysts are the most common wrist tumors, and 60 -70% originate dorsally from the scapholunate interval. Ossification of these lesions is exceedingly rare, with only one such lesion located in the finger reported in the literature. We present a case of an ossified dorsal wrist ganglion in a 68-year-old woman.

  19. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one’s thermal environment. PMID:27023538

  20. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-03-23

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one's thermal environment.

  1. 76 FR 43654 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of... the antidumping duty administrative review on certain activated carbon from the People's Republic of... preliminary results by 120 days to April 30, 2011. See Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic...

  2. 75 FR 61126 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of... the antidumping duty administrative review on certain activated carbon from the People's Republic of... results of this review. See Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Notice...

  3. 75 FR 39916 - Certain Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... International Trade Administration A-570-904 Certain Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China... initiation of the antidumping duty administrative review on certain activated carbon from the People's... Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limits for Preliminary Results...

  4. 75 FR 61697 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limits for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of... activated carbon from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') covering the period April 1, 2009, through... Administrative Review of Certain Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China: Selection of...

  5. Defective DNA repair increases susceptibility to senescence through extension of Chk1-mediated G2 checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    Johmura, Yoshikazu; Yamashita, Emiri; Shimada, Midori; Nakanishi, Keiko; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to senescence caused by defective DNA repair is a major hallmark of progeroid syndrome patients, but molecular mechanisms of how defective DNA repair predisposes to senescence are largely unknown. We demonstrate here that suppression of DNA repair pathways extends the duration of Chk1-dependent G2 checkpoint activation and sensitizes cells to senescence through enhancement of mitosis skipping. Extension of G2 checkpoint activation by introduction of the TopBP1 activation domain and the nondegradable mutant of Claspin sensitizes cells to senescence. In contrast, a shortening of G2 checkpoint activation by expression of SIRT6 or depletion of OTUB2 reduces susceptibility to senescence. Fibroblasts from progeroid syndromes tested shows a correlation between an extension of G2 checkpoint activation and an increase in the susceptibility to senescence. These results suggest that extension of G2 checkpoint activation caused by defective DNA repair is critical for senescence predisposition in progeroid syndrome patients. PMID:27507734

  6. Extensive Submarine Active Fault and the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, T.; Kumamoto, T.; Muroi, S.; Watanabe, M.

    2013-12-01

    Active faults observed on seafloor along Japan Trench are resultants of repeated large earthquakes. We discuss on the relation between large earthquakes and their source faults based on a detailed active fault map along Japan Trench. Judging from location and continuation of active faults in the earthquake source area, we consider that one of the extensive thrust faults which extends from off-Sanriku to off-Ibaraki for about 500km, is directly related to the source fault of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. The 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake (Mw9.0) generated large tsunami with massive pulsating pattern of waves (Maeda et al. 2011). A leading hypothesis believed among many seismologists that an earthquake source fault that generated the earthquake, caused the near-surface fault rupture along the axis of Japan Trench, and large displacement ~50m eastward and ~7 to ~10m upward was estimated from comparison of data obtained before and after the earthquake in 2004 and 2011 by multibeam bathymetric surveys across the trench (Fujiwara et al. 2011). Satake et al. (2011) explained the large tsunami height by simultaneous faulting on two different fault planes, one on subducting plate boundary and the other near the trench axis. Since most of the workers hypothesized without any doubt believed that the earthquake was caused by the fault ruptured up to the trench axis, existence of submarine active fault is rather overlooked so far. However, we consider the large displacement is due to landslide and do not find any extensive fault scarp on the trench axis. We simulated pattern of seafloor deformation associated with the earthquake using a simple dislocation model for a single fault plane with uniform slip that dips 14 degree in depth and 33.6 degree beneath the tectonic bulge related to the extensive active fault. A result shows that an area of large uplift agrees more or less with the location of tectonic bulge with width of about 20km

  7. IMU-Based Wrist Rotation Control of a Transradial Myoelectric Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Daniel A; Goldfarb, Michael

    2017-03-15

    This paper describes a control method intended to fa-cilitate improved control of a myoelectric prosthesis containing a wrist rotator. Rather than exclusively utilize electromyogram (EMG) for the control of all myoelectric components (e.g., a hand and a wrist), the proposed controller utilizes inertial measurement (from 6-axis inertial measurement unit, or IMU) to sense upper arm ab/adduction, and uses this input to command a wrist rotation velocity. As such, the controller essentially substitutes shoulder ab/adduction in place of agonist/antagonist EMG to control wrist angular velocity, which preserves EMG for control of the hand (or other arm components). As a preliminary assessment of efficacy, the control method was implemented on a transradial prosthesis prototype with a powered wrist rotator and hand, and experimen-tally assessed on five able-bodied subjects who wore the prototype using an able-bodied adaptor and one transradial amputee subject while performing assessments representative of activities of daily living (ADLs). The assessments compared the (timed) perfor-mance of the combined EMG/IMU-based control method with a (conventional) sequential EMG control approach. Results of the assessment indicate that able-bodied subjects were able to perform the tasks 33% faster on average with the EMG/IMU-based method, relative to a conventional sequential EMG method. The same assessment was subsequently conducted using a single transradial amputee subject, which resulted in similar perfor-mance trends, although with a somewhat lessened effect size - spe-cifically, the amputee subject was on average 22% faster in per-forming tasks with the IMU-based controller.

  8. Calibration and Validation of a Wrist- and Hip-Worn Actigraph Accelerometer in 4-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Elin; Larisch, Lisa-Marie; Marcus, Claude; Hagströmer, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To determine time spent at different physical activity intensities, accelerometers need calibration. The aim of this study was to develop and cross-validate intensity thresholds for the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer for wrist and hip placement in four-year-old children. Methods In total 30 children (49 months, SD 3.7) were recruited from five preschools in Stockholm. Equipped with an accelerometer on the wrist and another on the hip, children performed three indoor activities and one free-play session while being video recorded. Subsequently, physical activity intensity levels were coded every 5th second according to the Children’s Activity Rating Scale. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves was used to develop wrist and hip intensity thresholds, the upper threshold for sedentary, and lower threshold for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), for the vertical axis (VA) and for the vector magnitude (VM). A leave-one-out method was used to cross-validate the thresholds. Results Intensity thresholds for wrist placement were ≤ 178 (VA) and ≤ 328 (VM) for sedentary and ≥ 871 (VA) and ≥ 1393 (VM) counts/5 seconds for MVPA. The corresponding thresholds for hip placement were ≤ 43 (VA) and ≤ 105 (VM) for sedentary and ≥ 290 (VA) and ≥ 512 (VM) for MVPA. The quadratic weighted Kappa was 0.92 (95% CI 0.91–0.93) (VA) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.94–0.96) (VM) for the wrist-worn accelerometer and 0.76 (98% CI 0.74–0.77) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.85–0.87) for the hip-worn. Conclusion Using wrist placement and the VM when measuring physical activity with accelerometry in 4-year-old children is recommended. PMID:27617962

  9. Development of a "Neuro-orthosis" for the control of wrist movements in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ugurlu, U; Ozkan, M; Ozdogan, A H

    2007-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common, painful condition. Treatment is indicated when the symptoms of the disease interferes with the usual daily activities. The use of orthoses is advocated in the treatment of mild and moderate CTS. The rationale for using neutral wrist orthoses lies on the relation of the disease with the increased intracarpal pressure. It was demonstrated that the intracarpal pressure is minimum when the wrist is in neutral position. In spite of their proven therapeutic effects, long-term or improper use of static orthoses may lead to unwanted side effects such as muscle atrophy and discomfort during forceful activities. To overcome the problems caused by a static neutral wrist orthosis, a prototype control system was developed to control the wrist movements via electrical stimulation. At this control system, wrist movements in two planes are controlled by means of electrical stimulation of the antagonistic muscles. The effect of the new control system on hand function and dexterity was compared with those obtained with rigid orthosis and no orthosis.

  10. Active shallow extension in central and eastern Betic Cordillera from CGPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Zaldivar, J.; Gil, A. J.; Sanz de Galdeano, C.; Lacy, M. C.; García-Armenteros, J. A.; Ruano, P.; Ruiz, A. M.; Martínez-Martos, M.; Alfaro, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Betic Cordillera is an Alpine belt formed in the western Mediterranean by the westward displacement of the Alboran Domain in between the Eurasian and African convergent plates. New CGPS data from the central and eastern Betic Cordillera and its foreland-obtained mainly from the Topo-Iberia project-allowed us to precisely determine the rate of tectonic deformation. Most of the displacements of the central and eastern Betics are westward, with a variable southwestward component, in relation to the Eurasian stable plate. While in the Iberian foreland the displacements are extremely low, some deformation related to low compressional deformation occurs in the easternmost foreland basin and eastern Betic Cordillera. The displacement increases substantially southwards and westwards in relation to present-day extensional deformation. Major active discontinuities correspond to the NW-SE normal fault zones, which dip westwards; they are located in Almeria-Tabernas; Balanegra, and western Sierra de Gador; whereas the Padul fault zone located west of Sierra Nevada extends northwards to the Granada Basin. NW-SE extensional faults are also observed to the north, in the Baza Basin. Moreover, the activity of dextral faults along the Sorbas-Tabernas-Alpujarras-Guajares band, generally considered as a transfer fault zone, is evidenced by the displacement data. These results come to demonstrate the low activity or inactivity of the large northern E-W oriented folds of the central and eastern Internal Zone, such as the Sierra de Los Filabres antiform. They also point to the possible residual activity of the northern part of the NE-SW Sierra Nevada antiform, where the maximum relief of the Cordillera is found. Altogether, our data support a heterogeneous present-day westward extension that affects the upper crust of the Betic Cordillera and increases towards the thinned continental crust of the Alboran Sea and towards the west, which is compatible with roll-back subduction along

  11. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex induces opposite modulation of reciprocal inhibition in wrist extensor and flexor.

    PubMed

    Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Klomjai, Wanalee; Bussel, Bernard; Katz, Rose; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-09-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is used as a noninvasive tool to modulate brain excitability in humans. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that tDCS applied over the motor cortex also modulates spinal neural network excitability and therefore can be used to explore the corticospinal control acting on spinal neurons. Previously, we showed that reciprocal inhibition directed to wrist flexor motoneurons is enhanced during contralateral anodal tDCS, but it is likely that the corticospinal control acting on spinal networks controlling wrist flexors and extensors is not similar. The primary aim of the study was to explore the effects of anodal tDCS on reciprocal inhibition directed to wrist extensor motoneurons. To further examine the supraspinal control acting on the reciprocal inhibition between wrist flexors and extensors, we also explored the effects of the tDCS applied to the ipsilateral hand motor area. In healthy volunteers, we tested the effects induced by sham and anodal tDCS on reciprocal inhibition pathways innervating wrist muscles. Reciprocal inhibition directed from flexor to extensor muscles and the reverse situation, i.e., reciprocal inhibition, directed from extensors to flexors were studied in parallel with the H reflex technique. Our main finding was that contralateral anodal tDCS induces opposing effects on reciprocal inhibition: it decreases reciprocal inhibition directed from flexors to extensors, but it increases reciprocal inhibition directed from extensors to flexors. The functional result of these opposite effects on reciprocal inhibition seems to favor wrist extension excitability, suggesting an asymmetric descending control onto the interneurons that mediate reciprocal inhibition.

  12. Southeast Papuan crustal tectonics: Imaging extension and buoyancy of an active rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, G. A.; Eilon, Z.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.; Kim, YH.; Obrebski, M.; Dieck, C.

    2016-02-01

    Southeast Papua hosts the world's youngest ultra-high-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks. These rocks are found in an extensional setting in metamorphic core complexes. Competing theories of extensional shear zones or diapiric upwelling have been suggested as driving their exhumation. To test these theories, we analyze the CDPAPUA temporary array of 31 land and 8 seafloor broadband seismographs. Seismicity shows that deformation is being actively accommodated on the core complex bounding faults, offset by transfer structures in a manner consistent with overall north-south extension rather than radial deformation. Rayleigh wave dispersion curves are jointly inverted with receiver functions for crustal velocity structure. They show crustal thinning beneath the core complexes of 30-50% and very low shear velocities at all depths beneath the core complexes. On the rift flanks velocities resemble those of normal continents and increase steadily with depth. There is no evidence for velocity inversions that would indicate that a major density inversion exists to drive crustal diapirs. Also, low-density melt seems minor within the crust. Together with the extension patterns apparent in seismicity, these data favor an extensional origin for the core complexes and limit the role of diapirism as a secondary exhumation mechanism, although deeper mantle diapirs may be undetected. A small number of intermediate-depth earthquakes, up to 120 km deep, are identified for the first time just northeast of the D'Entrecasteaux Islands. They occur at depths similar to those recorded by UHP rocks and similar temperatures, indicating that the modern seismicity occurs at the setting that generates UHP metamorphism.

  13. Pairing broadband noise with cortical stimulation induces extensive suppression of ascending sensory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovitz, Craig D.; Hogan, Patrick S.; Wesen, Kyle A.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The corticofugal system can alter coding along the ascending sensory pathway. Within the auditory system, electrical stimulation of the auditory cortex (AC) paired with a pure tone can cause egocentric shifts in the tuning of auditory neurons, making them more sensitive to the pure tone frequency. Since tinnitus has been linked with hyperactivity across auditory neurons, we sought to develop a new neuromodulation approach that could suppress a wide range of neurons rather than enhance specific frequency-tuned neurons. Approach. We performed experiments in the guinea pig to assess the effects of cortical stimulation paired with broadband noise (PN-Stim) on ascending auditory activity within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC), a widely studied region for AC stimulation paradigms. Main results. All eight stimulated AC subregions induced extensive suppression of activity across the CNIC that was not possible with noise stimulation alone. This suppression built up over time and remained after the PN-Stim paradigm. Significance. We propose that the corticofugal system is designed to decrease the brain’s input gain to irrelevant stimuli and PN-Stim is able to artificially amplify this effect to suppress neural firing across the auditory system. The PN-Stim concept may have potential for treating tinnitus and other neurological disorders.

  14. Pairing broadband noise with cortical stimulation induces extensive suppression of ascending sensory activity

    PubMed Central

    Markovitz, Craig D.; Hogan, Patrick S.; Wesen, Kyle A.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The corticofugal system can alter coding along the ascending sensory pathway. Within the auditory system, electrical stimulation of the auditory cortex (AC) paired with a pure tone can cause egocentric shifts in the tuning of auditory neurons, making them more sensitive to the pure tone frequency. Since tinnitus has been linked with hyperactivity across auditory neurons, we sought to develop a new neuromodulation approach that could suppress a wide range of neurons rather than enhance specific frequency-tuned neurons. Approach We performed experiments in the guinea pig to assess the effects of cortical stimulation paired with broadband noise (PN-Stim) on ascending auditory activity within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC), a widely studied region for AC stimulation paradigms. Main results All eight stimulated AC regions induced extensive suppression of activity across the CNIC that was not possible with noise stimulation alone. This suppression built up over time and remained after the PN-Stim paradigm. Significance We propose that the corticofugal system is designed to decrease the brain’s input gain to irrelevant stimuli and PN-Stim is able to artificially amplify this effect to suppress neural firing across the auditory system. The PN-Stim concept may have potential for treating tinnitus and other neurological disorders. PMID:25686163

  15. Psychomotor capacity and occurrence of wrist tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Viikari-Juntura, E; Hietanen, M; Kurppa, K; Huuskonen, M; Kuosma, E; Mutanen, P

    1994-01-01

    A case-referent study was carried out among meatcutters, sausage markers, and packers in a large meat-processing plant to investigate the association between psychomotor capacity and occurrence of tenosynovitis. Reaction time, movement time, manual dexterity, visual attention and visuospatial ability were measured in 26 cases with a history of two or more episodes of tenosynovitis and 26 referents of similar gender, occupation, age, and job seniority with no episodes of the disease. No differences were found between the cases and the referents in any of the tests of psychomotor capacity. The results suggest that psychomotor capacity, as measured with the tests of this study, is a poor predictor of wrist tenosynovitis.

  16. Harmonic analysis of wrist mechanism of robot manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Shaik; Navuri, Karteek; Eswara Kumar, A.; Prakash, D.

    2016-09-01

    Wrist mechanism is a part of robot manipulator which is used to provide the pitch and yaw motions to the end effectors for orienting the loads carried by the end effectors. The wrist mechanism is subjected to different types of vibrations because of the various working conditions. Due to these vibrations wrist mechanism experience higher deformations and stresses; this causes failure of wrist mechanism. It is important to study the dynamic behaviour of the wrist mechanism under different loads before adopting in the application. The structure of the wrist mechanism is modelled in the ANSYS Workbench software and analysed for harmonic loads. Proper boundary conditions, mesh and connections between links& pins are assigned to the wrist mechanism assembly. From the present work, peak deformations of links and pins are occurred at 569.83Hz. Further, the link are analysed with 3D composites those are carbon epoxy and E-glass epoxy. It is observed that carbon epoxy shows better stiffness than E-Glass epoxy and it has weight reduction of 13.76% compared with metals.

  17. Extension joints: a tool to infer the active stress field orientation (case study from southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Guidi, Giorgio; Caputo, Riccardo; Scudero, Salvatore; Perdicaro, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    An intense tectonic activity in eastern Sicily and southern Calabria is well documented by the differential uplift of Late Quaternary coastlines and by the record of the strong historical earthquakes. The extensional belt that crosses this area is dominated by a well established WNW-ESE-oriented extensional direction. However, this area is largely lacking of any structural analysis able to define the tectonics at a more local scale. In the attempt to fill this gap of knowledge, we carried out a systematic analysis of extension joint sets. In fact, the systematic field collection of these extensional features, coupled with an appropriate inversion technique, allows to determine the characteristic of the causative tectonic stress field. Joints are defined as outcrop-scale mechanical discontinuities showing no evidence of shear motion and being originated as purely extensional fractures. Such tectonic features are one of the most common deformational structures in every tectonic environment and particularly abundant in the study area. A particular arrangement of joints, called "fracture grid-lock system", and defined as an orthogonal joint system where mutual abutting and crosscutting relationships characterize two geologically coeval joint sets, allow to infer the direction and the magnitude of the tectonic stress field. We performed the analyses of joints only on Pleistocene deposits of Eastern Sicily and Southern Calabria. Moreover we investigated only calcarenite sediments and cemented deposits, avoiding claysh and loose matrix-supported clastic sediments where the deformation is generally accomodated in a distributed way through the relative motion between the single particles. In the selection of the sites, we also took into account the possibility to clearly observe the geometric relationships among the joints. For this reason we chose curvilinear road cuts or cliffs, wide coastal erosional surfaces and quarries. The numerical inversions show a similar stress

  18. Prediction of the Wrist Joint Position During a Postural Tremor Using Neural Oscillators and an Adaptive Controller

    PubMed Central

    Kobravi, Hamid Reza; Ali, Sara Hemmati; Vatandoust, Masood; Marvi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the joint angle position, especially during tremor bursts, can be useful for detecting, tracking, and forecasting tremors. Thus, this research proposes a new model for predicting the wrist joint position during rhythmic bursts and inter-burst intervals. Since a tremor is an approximately rhythmic and roughly sinusoidal movement, neural oscillators have been selected to underlie the proposed model. Two neural oscillators were adopted. Electromyogram (EMG) signals were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis and flexor carpi radialis muscles concurrent with the joint angle signals of a stroke subject in an arm constant-posture. The output frequency of each oscillator was equal to the frequency corresponding to the maximum value of power spectrum related to the rhythmic wrist joint angle signals which had been recorded during a postural tremor. The phase shift between the outputs of the two oscillators was equal to the phase shift between the muscle activation of the wrist flexor and extensor muscles. The difference between the two oscillators’ output signals was considered the main pattern. Along with a proportional compensator, an adaptive neural controller has adjusted the amplitude of the main pattern in such a way so as to minimize the wrist joint prediction error during a stroke patient's tremor burst and a healthy subject's generated artificial tremor. In regard to the range of wrist joint movement during the observed rhythmic motions, a calculated prediction error is deemed acceptable. PMID:27186540

  19. Wrist Pulse Rate Monitor Using Self-Injection-Locked Radar Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Kang; Tang, Mu-Cyun; Su, Sheng-Chao; Horng, Tzyy-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    To achieve sensitivity, comfort, and durability in vital sign monitoring, this study explores the use of radar technologies in wearable devices. The study first detected the respiratory rates and heart rates of a subject at a one-meter distance using a self-injection-locked (SIL) radar and a conventional continuous-wave (CW) radar to compare the sensitivity versus power consumption between the two radars. Then, a pulse rate monitor was constructed based on a bistatic SIL radar architecture. This monitor uses an active antenna that is composed of a SIL oscillator (SILO) and a patch antenna. When attached to a band worn on the subject’s wrist, the active antenna can monitor the pulse on the subject’s wrist by modulating the SILO with the associated Doppler signal. Subsequently, the SILO’s output signal is received and demodulated by a remote frequency discriminator to obtain the pulse rate information. PMID:27792176

  20. Wrist Pulse Rate Monitor Using Self-Injection-Locked Radar Technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Kang; Tang, Mu-Cyun; Su, Sheng-Chao; Horng, Tzyy-Sheng

    2016-10-26

    To achieve sensitivity, comfort, and durability in vital sign monitoring, this study explores the use of radar technologies in wearable devices. The study first detected the respiratory rates and heart rates of a subject at a one-meter distance using a self-injection-locked (SIL) radar and a conventional continuous-wave (CW) radar to compare the sensitivity versus power consumption between the two radars. Then, a pulse rate monitor was constructed based on a bistatic SIL radar architecture. This monitor uses an active antenna that is composed of a SIL oscillator (SILO) and a patch antenna. When attached to a band worn on the subject's wrist, the active antenna can monitor the pulse on the subject's wrist by modulating the SILO with the associated Doppler signal. Subsequently, the SILO's output signal is received and demodulated by a remote frequency discriminator to obtain the pulse rate information.

  1. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  2. Extensive neurite outgrowth and active synapse formation on self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Holmes, T C; de Lacalle, S; Su, X; Liu, G; Rich, A; Zhang, S

    2000-06-06

    A new type of self-assembling peptide (sapeptide) scaffolds that serve as substrates for neurite outgrowth and synapse formation is described. These peptide-based scaffolds are amenable to molecular design by using chemical or biotechnological syntheses. They can be tailored to a variety of applications. The sapeptide scaffolds are formed through the spontaneous assembly of ionic self-complementary beta-sheet oligopeptides under physiological conditions, producing a hydrogel material. The scaffolds can support neuronal cell attachment and differentiation as well as extensive neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, they are permissive substrates for functional synapse formation between the attached neurons. That primary rat neurons form active synapses on such scaffold surfaces in situ suggests these scaffolds could be useful for tissue engineering applications. The buoyant sapeptide scaffolds with attached cells in culture can be transported readily from one environment to another. Furthermore, these peptides did not elicit a measurable immune response or tissue inflammation when introduced into animals. These biological materials created through molecular design and self assembly may be developed as a biologically compatible scaffold for tissue repair and tissue engineering.

  3. Extensive Reading in the EFL Classroom: Benefits of a Face-to-Face Collaboration Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchhoff, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Extensive reading is an approach to language education that has shown great promise for foreign language learners to acquire language; however, implementation reveals difficulty in maintaining student motivation to read over long periods of time. This study investigates students' experience of face-to-face talk about books in an extensive reading…

  4. 78 FR 11216 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ...: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of... Managment, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 801 I Street NW., Stop 5800, Washington, DC 20536; (202... This Information Collection (1) Type of Information Collection: Extension, without change, of...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  10. Septic arthritis of the wrist caused by Mycobacterium intracellulare: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Kenji; Yajima, Hiroshi; Omokawa, Shohei; Maegawa, Naoki; Shimizu, Takamasa; Nakanishi, Yasuaki; Kira, Tsutomu; Onishi, Tadanobu; Hayami, Naoki; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Septic arthritis of the wrist is rare entity, especially; atypical mycobacterial infection of the wrist is extremely rare. We report a case of septic arthritis of the wrist caused by Mycobacterium intracellulare, which was successfully treated by radical debridement followed by wrist arthrodesis using vascularised fibular grafting. PMID:27990457

  11. The effect of wheelchair propulsion style on changes in time spent in extreme wrist orientations after a bout of fatiguing propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Hass, Chris J; Shechtman, Orit; Christou, Evangelos A; Tillman, Mark D

    2017-03-21

    This study compared how wheelchair propulsion styles affect changes in percentage of time spent in extreme wrist orientations, which have been associated with median nerve injury, after a fatiguing bout of propulsion. Twenty novice, non-disabled adult males learned arcing (ARC) and semicircular (SEMI) propulsion styles and utilised each to perform a wheelchair fatigue protocol. ARC and SEMI did not significantly differ in terms of changes after the fatigue protocol in percentage of time spent in extreme flexion/extension or radial/ulnar deviation at the push phase beginning or end. A pattern was observed, although not significant, of greater increases in percentage of time spent in extreme wrist extension and ulnar deviation during the push phase beginning and ulnar deviation during the push phase end while utilising SEMI relative to ARC. This study evinces that individual differences are greater than observed changes in extreme wrist orientations for both propulsion styles. Practitioner Summary: How wheelchair propulsion styles change with fatigue in terms of extreme wrist orientations was examined. This study evinces that individual differences are greater than observed changes in extreme wrist orientations for both propulsion styles and point towards the need for future research on individual differences utilising propulsion styles.

  12. Electromyography of wrist and finger flexor muscles in olive baboons (Papio anubis).

    PubMed

    Patel, Biren A; Larson, Susan G; Stern, Jack T

    2012-01-01

    Some non-human primates use digitigrade hand postures when walking slowly on the ground. As a component of an extended limb, a digitigrade posture can help minimize wrist joint moments thereby requiring little force production directly from wrist flexors (and/or from the assistance of finger flexors) to maintain limb posture. As a consequence, less active muscle volume would be required from these anti-gravity muscles and overall metabolic costs associated with locomotion could be reduced. To investigate whether the use of digitigrade hand postures during walking in primates entails minimal use of anti-gravity muscles, this study examined electromyography (EMG) patterns in both the wrist and finger flexor muscles in facultatively digitigrade olive baboons (Papio anubis) across a range of speeds. The results demonstrate that baboons can adopt a digitigrade hand posture when standing and moving at slow speeds without requiring substantial EMG activity from distal anti-gravity muscles. Higher speed locomotion, however, entails increasing EMG activity and is accompanied by a dynamic shift to a more palmigrade-like limb posture. Thus, the ability to adopt a digitigrade hand posture by monkeys is an adaptation for ground living, but it was never co-opted for fast locomotion. Rather, digitigrady in primates appears to be related to energetic efficiency for walking long distances.

  13. Finger motion capture from wrist-electrode contact resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Shunsuke; Kawaguchi, Junki; Imura, Masataka; Oshiro, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Hand motion capture is an important yet challenging topic for biomechanics and human computer interaction. We proposed a novel electrical sensing technology for capturing the finger angles from the variation of the wrist shape. The proposed device detects the signal related to the wrist-electrode contact resistances, which change according to the variation of the wrist shape accompanying finger movements. The developed sensing device consists of a wrist band, sixteen electrodes and a sensing circuit of contact resistances. We investigated the relationships between the finger angles and the system outputs by using a glove-type joint angle sensor. As a result, we confirmed high correlations of the system outputs with the finger angles for several electrodes. Therefore, we conclude that the proposed system can be used for the estimation of the finger joint angles.

  14. Pseudotumoral form of soft-tissue tuberculosis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Benzarti, Sofien; Msek, Hichem; Boussen, Monia; Khorbi, Adel

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in developing countries. Hand and wrist is a rare localization for extra-pulmonary tuberculosis, a pseudotumoral form of soft tissue tuberculosis of the wrist is exceptional. We report the case of a 45-year-old male presenting with a painful swelling of the dorsal aspect of the right wrist evolving for six months. Clinical study was evoking a ganglion cyst of the wrist. Intraoperatively a pseudotumoral mass with rice bodies was found, suggesting tuberculous tenosynovitis. The histopathological study revealed caseating giant cell granulomas with epithelioid cells. Cultures on Löwenstein-Jensen medium detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Synovectomy with removal of all the rice bodies followed by anti-tuberculous chemotherapy provided uneventful recovery.

  15. 76 FR 12751 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-589, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... notice should only be used to submit comments concerning the extension of this information collection... in the United States is classified as a refugee, and is eligible to remain in the United States....

  16. Goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Jeffrey; Gribble, Paul L; Pruszynski, J Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that muscle activity 50-100 ms after a mechanical perturbation (i.e., the long-latency stretch response) can be modulated in a manner that reflects voluntary motor control. These previous studies typically assessed modulation of the long-latency stretch response from individual muscles rather than how this response is concurrently modulated across multiple muscles. Here we investigated such concurrent modulation by having participants execute goal-directed reaches to visual targets after mechanical perturbations of the shoulder, elbow, or wrist while measuring activity from six muscles that articulate these joints. We found that shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response, that the relative magnitude of participants' goal-dependent activity was similar across muscles, that the temporal onset of goal-dependent muscle activity was not reliably different across the three joints, and that shoulder muscles displayed goal-dependent activity appropriate for counteracting intersegmental dynamics. We also observed that the long-latency stretch response of wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after elbow perturbations and that the long-latency stretch response of elbow muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after wrist perturbations. This pattern likely arises because motion at either joint could bring the hand to the visual target and suggests that the nervous system rapidly exploits such simple kinematic redundancy when processing sensory feedback to support goal-directed actions.

  17. Goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Paul L.; Pruszynski, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that muscle activity 50–100 ms after a mechanical perturbation (i.e., the long-latency stretch response) can be modulated in a manner that reflects voluntary motor control. These previous studies typically assessed modulation of the long-latency stretch response from individual muscles rather than how this response is concurrently modulated across multiple muscles. Here we investigated such concurrent modulation by having participants execute goal-directed reaches to visual targets after mechanical perturbations of the shoulder, elbow, or wrist while measuring activity from six muscles that articulate these joints. We found that shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response, that the relative magnitude of participants' goal-dependent activity was similar across muscles, that the temporal onset of goal-dependent muscle activity was not reliably different across the three joints, and that shoulder muscles displayed goal-dependent activity appropriate for counteracting intersegmental dynamics. We also observed that the long-latency stretch response of wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after elbow perturbations and that the long-latency stretch response of elbow muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after wrist perturbations. This pattern likely arises because motion at either joint could bring the hand to the visual target and suggests that the nervous system rapidly exploits such simple kinematic redundancy when processing sensory feedback to support goal-directed actions. PMID:26445871

  18. Painful locking of the wrist in a patient with pseudoachondroplasia confirmed by COMP mutation

    PubMed Central

    Ideta, Hirokazu; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Hayashi, Masanori; Kosho, Tomoki; Nakamura, Yukio; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old woman with pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), with a heterozygous mutation (c.806A > G, p.Asp269Gly) located in the Type 3 repeats domain of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene, who complained of the unusual symptom of painful locking of the wrist. Her condition was caused by a non-traumatic enlargement of the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB) tendons along with bulbous swelling of the synoviums around them. Surgical treatment resolved these unusual tendon-related symptoms. Repetitive mechanical loading of the wrist in daily activities, including distal intersection tenosynovitis between the extensor pollicis longus tendon and ECRL and ECRB tendons, may have contributed to changes in the structural integrity of the tendons. We should pay more attention to tendon-related symptoms in patients with PSACH. PMID:28044000

  19. Prior estimation of motion using recursive perceptron with sEMG: a case of wrist angle.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Takeshi; Imura, Masataka; Oshiro, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Muscle activity is followed by myoelectric potentials. Prior estimation of motion by surface electromyography can be utilized to assist the physically impaired people as well as surgeon. In this paper, we proposed a real-time method for the prior estimation of motion from surface electromyography, especially in the case of wrist angle. The method was based on the recursive processing of multi-layer perceptron, which is trained quickly. A single layer perceptron calculates quasi tensional force of muscles from surface electromyography. A three-layer perceptron calculates the wrist's change in angle. In order to estimate a variety of motions properly, the perceptron was designed to estimate motion in a short time period, e.g. 1ms. Recursive processing enables the method to estimate motion in the target time period, e.g. 50ms. The results of the experiments showed statistical significance for the precedence of estimated angle to the measured one.

  20. Wrist actigraphic measures of sleep in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Rose, L. R.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To determine whether wrist actigraphy is useful as a tool for space-based sleep research. Specifically, to determine whether bedtimes and waketimes can be identified from the actigraphic record, and whether actigraphic measures of sleep in space are related to polysomnographic (PSG) ones. DESIGN AND SETTING: Actigraphy, sleep diary, and Polysomnographic (PSG) measures of sleep were obtained from four subjects in two 72h measurement blocks occurring 2d and 12d into a 17d Space Shuttle mission in orbiting the earth in microgravity. PATIENTS: Four healthy male astronauts aged 38y - 47y. INTERVENTIONS: NA. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Sleep onset and offset at "night" could be quite clearly identified from the actigraphic record and were better estimated by actigraph than by diary. There was a high correlation between actigraphic and PSG estimates of sleep duration (r = 0.96) and sleep efficiency (r = 0.88), and a similarity in the mean estimates obtained. On a minute-by-minute basis, there was a good correlation between sleep stage and actigraphic movement counts, with a higher level of counts per minute recorded in epochs with lighter PSG sleep stages. There was also a high correlation (r = 0.90) between minutes of stage 0 (wake) occurring between bedtime and wake time, and number of non-zero actigraph epochs during the same interval. CONCLUSIONS: Actigraphy worked well in space both as a way of detecting bedtimes and waketimes, and as an indicant of sleep restlessness.

  1. Construct validity of the Chinese version of the Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation Questionnaire (PRWE-Hong Kong Version).

    PubMed

    Wah, Josephine Wong Man; Wang, Mike Kwan Wing; Ping, Cecilia Li-Tsang Wai

    2006-01-01

    With increasing economic globalization, including health care, it is important to use standardized outcome measures applicable to a broad spectrum of patients in a wide array of countries. The purpose of this study was to verify construct and content validity and reliability of the Chinese version of the Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation Questionnaire (PRWE-Hong Kong version). The PRWE was translated into Chinese, and face validity was established by inviting experts and patients to participate in the panel review of the questionnaire. A correlation field study was performed using a convenience sample of 47 patients with wrist injuries. Patients were assessed at baseline and six weeks after the initial measurement. The following measures were taken: the Chinese version of the PRWE and the Medical Outcome Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain, active wrist range of motion, grip strength, and the Jebsen Hand Function Test. Statistical analysis consisted of Pearson correlation coefficients (convergent validity), factor analysis (content validity), paired t-test (convergent validity), and the Cronbach alpha (internal consistency). Clinically relevant correlations existed between "Pain at rest" and the VAS "resting pain" (r=0.785, p<0.0001) as well as between "Pain on repeated wrist movement" and the VAS "exertion pain" (r=0.872, p<0.0001). The "Physical Component Summary" of the SF-36 was found significantly correlated with the PRWE function subset total score (r=-0.618, p<0.0001), and the PRWE total score (r=-0.645, p<0.0001). The specific function subset score also correlated with the wrist flexion range (r=-0.308, p<0.0001) and the grip strength (r=-0.488, p=0.035). Two factors were found that accounted for 61% of the variance. The Cronbach alpha coefficients ranged from 0.7805 to 0.9502, indicating that the internal consistency of the questionnaire items was sound and reliable. Positive correlations between the wrist ranges of

  2. Coordinating long-latency stretch responses across the shoulder, elbow, and wrist during goal-directed reaching.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Jeffrey; Saravanamuttu, James; Gribble, Paul L; Pruszynski, J Andrew

    2016-11-01

    The long-latency stretch response (muscle activity 50-100 ms after a mechanical perturbation) can be coordinated across multiple joints to support goal-directed actions. Here we assessed the flexibility of such coordination and whether it serves to counteract intersegmental dynamics and exploit kinematic redundancy. In three experiments, participants made planar reaches to visual targets after elbow perturbations and we assessed the coordination of long-latency stretch responses across shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscles. Importantly, targets were placed such that elbow and wrist (but not shoulder) rotations could help transport the hand to the target-a simple form of kinematic redundancy. In experiment 1 we applied perturbations of different magnitudes to the elbow and found that long-latency stretch responses in shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscles scaled with perturbation magnitude. In experiment 2 we examined the trial-by-trial relationship between long-latency stretch responses at adjacent joints and found that the magnitudes of the responses in shoulder and elbow muscles, as well as elbow and wrist muscles, were positively correlated. In experiment 3 we explicitly instructed participants how to use their wrist to move their hand to the target after the perturbation. We found that long-latency stretch responses in wrist muscles were not sensitive to our instructions, despite the fact that participants incorporated these instructions into their voluntary behavior. Taken together, our results indicate that, during reaching, the coordination of long-latency stretch responses across multiple joints counteracts intersegmental dynamics but may not be able to exploit kinematic redundancy.

  3. A New Total Wrist Fusion Locking Plate for Patients with Small Hands or with Failed Partial Wrist Fusion: Preliminary Experience

    PubMed Central

    del Pino, Juan González

    2014-01-01

    The author has designed a custom-made titanium plate for total wrist fusion for small-handed persons or patients with failed partial wrist fusions. From May 2011 to April 2013, this plate was used on 13 wrists, 5 of them with a minimum follow-up of 1 year. This implant is downsized compared with the standard wrist fusion plate: lower in profile, shorter in length, and narrower than the standard one. It is fixed to the radius by means of 2.7-mm screws and to the capitate and third metacarpal with 2.4-mm screws. In the curved plate all the screws are locked to the plate with a predetermined coaxial angle. The plate has a curvature to fit the dorsum of the carpus; it is 10° dorsally extended and has undercuts on the contact areas at the radius and third metacarpal dorsal surface. The indication for this implant is a short-statured patient for whom the standard plate is too large and bulky; a failed partial wrist fusion or proximal row carpectomy, for which a shorter plate is needed because only one articulation should be fused (midcarpal or radiocapitate joint); or both. The five wrists (two primary fusions and three failed radioscapholunate [RSL] fusions) healed between 11 and 14 weeks. No plate loosening was observed, and none of the patients felt painful prominence to the distal end of the plate on the dorsum of the hand. PMID:24872923

  4. Read Alouds and Beyond: The Effects of Read Aloud Extension Activities on Vocabulary in Head Start Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Rebecca; Crandell, Jennifer DiBara; Carlis, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted in 26 Head Start classrooms with 264 children to compare the effect of a read aloud plus extension activities intervention over a control group to the effect of a read aloud only intervention over a control group on preschool children's vocabulary. Children were assessed before and after the intervention on target vocabulary…

  5. 76 FR 27077 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and Form AR-11SR, Extension of an Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and Form AR- 11SR, Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection under Review: Form AR- 11 and Form AR-11SR, Alien's Change of Address...

  6. Application of winglets and/or wing tip extensions with active load control on the Boeing 747

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, R. L.; Perkin, B. R.; Schoenman, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The application of wing tip modifications and active control technology to the Boeing 747 airplane for the purpose of improving fuel efficiency is considered. Wing tip extensions, wing tip winglets, and the use of the outboard ailerons for active wing load alleviation are described. Modest performance improvements are indicated. A costs versus benefits approach is taken to decide which, if any, of the concepts warrant further development and flight test leading to possible incorporation into production airplanes.

  7. Effects of hand and knee positions on muscular activity during trunk extension exercise with the Roman chair.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-yeon; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-12-01

    This experimental study was performed to investigate the effects of hand and knee positions on muscular activity during back extension exercises with the Roman chair. Eighteen asymptomatic male amateur athletes performed four prone back extension exercises with two hand positions (crossed-arms and behind-the-head), and two knee positions (extended knee and 90° flexed knee). Surface electromyography (sEMG) was performed to collect data from the lower trapezius (LT), latissimus dorsi (LD), erector spinae in the T12 paraspinal region (ES-T12), erector spinae at the L3 level (ES-L3), gluteus maximus (GM), and biceps femoris (BF). Two-way repeated analysis of variance with two within-subject factors (two hand positions and two knee positions) was used to determine the significance of differences between the exercise conditions, and which hand and knee positions resulted in greater activation with exercise variation. The root mean square sEMG values were normalized using the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and represented as the % of the maximum EMG (%mEMG). There was no significant interaction between knee and hand positions in the %mEMG data. The results showed that the hand position affected the normalized activation of LT; the behind-the-head position resulted in significantly greater muscle activation than the crossed-arms hand position (P<0.05). The activations of the LD, ES-T10, ES-L4, and GM were greater in the 90° flexed-knee position compared to the extended-knee position (P<0.05). Although back extension exercise using the Roman chair has been shown to effectively activate the extensor musculature, our results indicated that changing the knee and hand positions could activate specific muscles differently. To achieve greater activation of trunk extensor muscle during extension exercise with the Roman chair, the flexed-knee position is a useful means of increasing resistance.

  8. Impairment of gradual muscle adjustment during wrist circumduction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Toxopeus, Carolien M; de Jong, Bauke M; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Leenders, Klaus L; Maurits, Natasha M

    2011-01-01

    Purposeful movements are attained by gradually adjusted activity of opposite muscles, or synergists. This requires a motor system that adequately modulates initiation and inhibition of movement and selectively activates the appropriate muscles. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) initiation and inhibition of movements are impaired which may manifest itself in e.g. difficulty to start and stop walking. At single-joint level, impaired movement initiation is further accompanied by insufficient inhibition of antagonist muscle activity. As the motor symptoms in PD primarily result from cerebral dysfunction, quantitative investigation of gradually adjusted muscle activity during execution of purposeful movement is a first step to gain more insight in the link between impaired modulation of initiation and inhibition at the levels of (i) cerebrally coded task performance and (ii) final execution by the musculoskeletal system. To that end, the present study investigated changes in gradual adjustment of muscle synergists using a manipulandum that enabled standardized smooth movement by continuous wrist circumduction. Differences between PD patients (N = 15, off-medication) and healthy subjects (N = 16) concerning the relation between muscle activity and movement performance in these groups were assessed using kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) recordings. The variability in the extent to which a particular muscle was active during wrist circumduction--defined as muscle activity differentiation--was quantified by EMG. We demonstrated that more differentiated muscle activity indeed correlated positively with improved movement performance, i.e. higher movement speed and increased smoothness of movement. Additionally, patients employed a less differentiated muscle activity pattern than healthy subjects. These specific changes during wrist circumduction imply that patients have a decreased ability to gradually adjust muscles causing a decline in movement

  9. Impairment of Gradual Muscle Adjustment during Wrist Circumduction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toxopeus, Carolien M.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    Purposeful movements are attained by gradually adjusted activity of opposite muscles, or synergists. This requires a motor system that adequately modulates initiation and inhibition of movement and selectively activates the appropriate muscles. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) initiation and inhibition of movements are impaired which may manifest itself in e.g. difficulty to start and stop walking. At single-joint level, impaired movement initiation is further accompanied by insufficient inhibition of antagonist muscle activity. As the motor symptoms in PD primarily result from cerebral dysfunction, quantitative investigation of gradually adjusted muscle activity during execution of purposeful movement is a first step to gain more insight in the link between impaired modulation of initiation and inhibition at the levels of (i) cerebrally coded task performance and (ii) final execution by the musculoskeletal system. To that end, the present study investigated changes in gradual adjustment of muscle synergists using a manipulandum that enabled standardized smooth movement by continuous wrist circumduction. Differences between PD patients (N = 15, off-medication) and healthy subjects (N = 16) concerning the relation between muscle activity and movement performance in these groups were assessed using kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) recordings. The variability in the extent to which a particular muscle was active during wrist circumduction – defined as muscle activity differentiation - was quantified by EMG. We demonstrated that more differentiated muscle activity indeed correlated positively with improved movement performance, i.e. higher movement speed and increased smoothness of movement. Additionally, patients employed a less differentiated muscle activity pattern than healthy subjects. These specific changes during wrist circumduction imply that patients have a decreased ability to gradually adjust muscles causing a decline in movement

  10. Active crustal extension in the Central Apennines (Italy) inferred from GPS measurements in the interval 1994-1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, N.; Giuliani, R.; Mattone, M.; Bonci, L.

    We present the first GPS estimate of crustal extension in the central Apennines (Italy) through the analysis of the deformation of a sub-network of the National GPS Geodetic network IGM95 in the interval 1994-1999. The selected sub-network spans the entire active deformation belt perpendicularly to its axis and allows the evaluation of (1) the total extension rate absorbed in this sector of the Apennines and (2) the seismogenic potential of the normal faults active in the Late Pleistocene-Holocene interval within the network. Results of this reoccupation are consistent with an extensional strain rate of 0.18 × 10-6 yr-1 concentrated in an area of about 35 km width, giving an average extension rate of 6±2 mm/yr across the central Apennines. The pattern of active deformation suggests active elastic strain accumulation on the westernmost of the two fault systems active in the Late Pleistocene-Holocene interval and may also suggest the presence of another active fault system not recognized so far.

  11. Joint preservation of the wrist using articulated distraction arthroplasty: a case report of a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Matt D A

    2015-01-01

    Distraction arthroplasty of the ankle, elbow, and hip has become widely accepted and used within the orthopaedic community with excellent initial results which appear sustained. To date it has not been applied to the wrist in the same manner. A novel technique, drawn upon past success of articulated ankle distraction and static wrist distraction, was devised and evaluated by application of articulated wrist distraction performed over a 12-week period in a patient with poor functional outcome following limited wrist fusion. Posttreatment results showed improvement in range of motion (100-degree arc), subjective pain, and functional outcome measures (DASH 21.7, Mayo Wrist Score 80) comparable or better than either limited wrist fusion or proximal row carpectomy. Articulated wrist distraction initially appears to be a promising therapeutic option for the management of the stiff and painful wrist to maintain maximal function for which formal wrist arthrodesis may be the only alternative.

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  19. Enhancing Extension and Research Activities through the Use of Web GIS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estwick, Noel M.; Griffin, Richard W.; James, Annette A.; Roberson, Samuel G.

    2016-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts aimed at improving geographic literacy in order to address societal challenges. Extension educators can use geographic information system (GIS) technology to help their clients cultivate spatial thinking skills and solve problems. Researchers can use it to model relationships and better answer questions. A program…

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  9. Amplitude- and Velocity-Dependency of Rigidity Measured at the Wrist in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Douglas; Threlkeld, A. Joseph; Fang, Xiang; Muthumani, Anburaj; Xia, Rui-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Objective Quantify the effects of increased amplitude and rate of muscle stretch on parkinsonian rigidity. Methods Eighteen subjects with Parkinson’s disease participated in this study. Subjects’ tested hand was passively displaced through 60° and 90° ranges of wrist flexion and extension at velocities of 50°/s and 280°/s in both treated and untreated conditions. Joint angular position, resistance torque, and surface electromyography (EMG) of the wrist flexors and extensors were recorded. Rigidity was quantified by normalized work scores and normalized angular impulses for flexion and extension, separately. Reflex responses of stretched and shortened muscles were quantified by mean EMG and EMG ratio. A series of ANOVAs was performed to determine the effect of amplitude, velocity and medication on selected variables. Results Both work scores and angular impulses revealed that the larger displacement amplitude and the higher velocity were associated with significantly greater rigidity, increased EMG ratio and mean EMG of stretched muscles. Dopaminergic medication was not associated with a reduction in rigidity. Conclusions Parkinsonian rigidity is modulated by the amplitude and rate of muscle stretch. Significance These findings shed light on the biomechanical underpinnings and physiological characteristics of rigidity and may inform clinical rigidity assessment in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:21890404

  10. [Movements of the pisiform and triquetrum bones and their significance for kinematics of the ulnar wrist].

    PubMed

    Beckers, A G; Bade, H; Koebke, J

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate carpal kinematics with respect to the pisotriquetral joint, before and after pisi-form excision. Five cadaver-hands were studied and a custom-designed plexi-glass-fixation device was used to standardize the wrists for exact passive movements in flexion and extension as well as in ulnar and radial abduction. Five sets of motion were registered before and after excision of the pisiform. Motion of the triquetrum and pisiform were studied by 3D-Motion Analysing Software System (peak 54). The results indicated that the excision of the pisiform does have an influence on the kinematics of the wrist. The movement of the triquetrum was increased after removal of the pisiform. Although the differences in measurement were only a few of millimetres and degrees, we know from the dorsal and palmar intercalated segment instabilities that even minor instabilities can act as a predisposing factor for arthrosis. Therefore, the excision of pisiform must be carefully considered. The common joint between the triquetrum and pisiform supports and indicates relation of their movements. However, the correlation for flexion/extension and radial deviation was high, an obvious correlation of the movements for ulnar deviation was not verifiable.

  11. Solar powered wrist worn acquisition system for continuous photoplethysmogram monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dieffenderfer, James P; Beppler, Eric; Novak, Tristan; Whitmire, Eric; Jayakumar, Rochana; Randall, Clive; Qu, Weiguo; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Bozkurt, Alper

    2014-01-01

    We present a solar-powered, wireless, wrist-worn platform for continuous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters during the activities of daily life. In this study, we demonstrate the capability to produce photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals using this platform. To adhere to a low power budget for solar-powering, a 574 nm green light source is used where the PPG from the radial artery would be obtained with minimal signal conditioning. The system incorporates two monocrystalline solar cells to charge the onboard 20 mAh lithium polymer battery. Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is used to tether the device to a smartphone that makes the phone an access point to a dedicated server for long term continuous storage of data. Two power management schemes have been proposed depending on the availability of solar energy. In low light situations, if the battery is low, the device obtains a 5-second PPG waveform every minute to consume an average power of 0.57 mW. In scenarios where the battery is at a sustainable voltage, the device is set to enter its normal 30 Hz acquisition mode, consuming around 13.7 mW. We also present our efforts towards improving the charge storage capacity of our on-board super-capacitor.

  12. Kinematic synthesis of bevel-gear-type robotic wrist mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen-Chou

    Bevel-gear-type robotic wrist mechanisms are commonly used in industry. The reasons for their popularity are that they are compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. However, there are singularities in their workspace, which substantially degrade their manipulative performance. The objective of this research is to develop an atlas of three-degree-of-freedom bevel-gear-type wrist mechanisms, and through dimensional synthesis to improve their kinematic performance. The dissertation contains two major parts: the first is structural analysis and synthesis, the other is kinematic analysis and dimensional synthesis. To synthesize the kinematic structures of bevel-gear-type wrist mechanisms, the kinematic structures are separated from their functional considerations. All kinematic structures which satisfy the mobility condition are enumerated in an unbiased, systematic manner. Then the bevel-gear-type wrist mechanisms are identified by applying the functional requirements. Structural analysis shows that a three-degree-of-freedom wrist mechanism usually consists of non-fractionated, two degree-of-freedom epicyclic gear train jointed with the base link. Therefore, the structural synthesis can be simplified into a problem of examining the atlas of non-fractionated, two-degree-of-freedom epicyclic gear trains. The resulting bevel-gear-type wrist mechanism has been categorized and evaluated. It is shown that three-degree-of-freedom, four-jointed wrist mechanisms are promising for further improving the kinematic performance. It is found that a spherical planetary gear train is necessarily imbedded in a three-degree-of-freedom, four-jointed wrist mechanism. Therefore, to study the workspace and singularity problems of three-degree-of-freedom four-jointed spherical wrist mechanisms, we have to study the trajectories of spherical planetary gear trains. The parametric equations of the trajectories and some useful geometric properties for the analysis and synthesis of

  13. Across-muscle coherence is modulated as a function of wrist posture during two-digit grasping

    PubMed Central

    Jesunathadas, Mark; Laitano, Juan; Hamm, Thomas; Santello, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which correlated neural inputs, quantified as EMG-EMG coherence across intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles, varied as a function of wrist angle during a constant force precision grip task. Eight adults (5 males; mean age 29 years) participated in the experiment. Subjects held an object using a two-digit precision grip at a constant force at a flexed, neutral, and extended wrist posture, while the EMG activity from intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles was recorded through intramuscular fine-wire electrodes. The integral of z-transformed coherence computed across muscles pairs was greatest in the flexed wrist posture and significantly greater than EMG-EMG coherence measured in the neutral and extended wrist posture (P< 0.01 and 0.05, respectively). Furthermore, EMG-EMG coherence did not differ statistically between the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle pairs, even though it tended to be greater for the extrinsic muscle pair (P ≥ 0.063). These findings lend support to the notion of a functional role of correlated neural inputs to hand muscles for the task-dependent coordination of hand muscle activity that is likely mediated by somatosensory feedback. PMID:23958501

  14. Across-muscle coherence is modulated as a function of wrist posture during two-digit grasping.

    PubMed

    Jesunathadas, Mark; Laitano, Juan; Hamm, Thomas M; Santello, Marco

    2013-10-11

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which correlated neural inputs, quantified as EMG-EMG coherence across intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles, varied as a function of wrist angle during a constant force precision grip task. Eight adults (5 males; mean age 29 years) participated in the experiment. Subjects held an object using a two-digit precision grip at a constant force at a flexed, neutral, and extended wrist posture, while the EMG activity from intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles was recorded through intramuscular fine-wire electrodes. The integral of z-transformed coherence computed across muscles pairs was greatest in the flexed wrist posture and significantly greater than EMG-EMG coherence measured in the neutral and extended wrist posture (P < 0.01 and 0.05, respectively). Furthermore, EMG-EMG coherence did not differ statistically between the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle pairs, even though it tended to be greater for the extrinsic muscle pair (P ≥ 0.063). These findings lend support to the notion of a functional role of correlated neural inputs to hand muscles for the task-dependent coordination of hand muscle activity that is likely mediated by somatosensory feedback.

  15. Physical Examination of the Wrist: Useful Provocative Maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, William B

    2015-07-01

    Chronic wrist pain resulting from partial interosseous ligament injury remains a diagnostic dilemma for many hand and orthopedic surgeons. Overuse of costly diagnostic studies including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography scans, and bone scans can be further frustrating to the clinician because of their inconsistent specificity and reliability in these cases. Physical diagnosis is an effective (and underused) means of establishing a working diagnosis of partial ligament injury to the wrist. Carefully performed provocative maneuvers can be used by the clinician to reproduce the precise character of a patient's problem, reliably establish a working diagnosis, and initiate a plan of treatment. Using precise physical examination techniques, the examiner introduces energy into the wrist in a manner that puts load on specific support ligaments of the carpus, leading to an accurate diagnosis. This article provides a broad spectrum of physical diagnostic tools to help the surgeon develop a working diagnosis of partial wrist ligament injuries in the face of chronic wrist pain and normal x-rays.

  16. [Four corner fusion in patients with wrist arthritis].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Alonso, María Francisca; Viñas-Silva, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Scapholunate advance collapse (SLAC) and Scaphoid nonunion advance collapse (SNAC), are the two most common patterns of postraumatic wrist arthritis. SLAC wrist develops after attenuation, either traumatically or atraumatically, of the scapholunate ligament. Atraumatic causes of SLAC wrist include calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate deposition disease, reumathoid arthritis, neuropathic diseases, and b2-microglobulin asociated amyloid deposition diseases. On the other hand, SNAC wrist develops following a scahpoid fracture that has progressed to a nonunion. Both of these processes lead to abnormal joint kinematics, since the lunate is unrestrained by the distal scaphoid and, therefore, assumes an extended posture. Over time, this may result in Dorsal intercalated segment instability (DISI) deformity, which invariably progresses to degenerative arthritis of the radioescaphoid articulation, followed by carpal collapse and midcarpal arthritis. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the functional outcome and pain relief in SLAC/SNAC wrist, after four corner fusion. This study was made in 52 patients of the Hospital de Traumatología y Ortopedia Lomas Verdes, these patients undergone four corner fusion surgery, in a period january 2007 to december 2014. We used Quick Dash Questionary to evaluate functional outcome and pain relief in these patients.

  17. Mosaic Activating Mutations in GNA11 and GNAQ Are Associated with Phakomatosis Pigmentovascularis and Extensive Dermal Melanocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anna C.; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; O’Shaughnessy, Ryan; Al-Olabi, Lara; St.-Onge, Judith; Atherton, David J.; Aubert, Hélène; Bagazgoitia, Lorea; Barbarot, Sébastien; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Chiaverini, Christine; Chong, W. Kling; Duffourd, Yannis; Glover, Mary; Groesser, Leopold; Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Hamm, Henning; Happle, Rudolf; Mushtaq, Imran; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Waelchli, Regula; Wobser, Marion; Vabres, Pierre; Patton, E. Elizabeth; Kinsler, Veronica A.

    2016-01-01

    Common birthmarks can be an indicator of underlying genetic disease but are often overlooked. Mongolian blue spots (dermal melanocytosis) are usually localized and transient, but they can be extensive, permanent, and associated with extracutaneous abnormalities. Co-occurrence with vascular birthmarks defines a subtype of phakomatosis pigmentovascularis, a group of syndromes associated with neurovascular, ophthalmological, overgrowth, and malignant complications. Here, we discover that extensive dermal melanocytosis and phakomatosis pigmentovascularis are associated with activating mutations in GNA11 and GNAQ, genes that encode Gα subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. The mutations were detected at very low levels in affected tissues but were undetectable in the blood, indicating that these conditions are postzygotic mosaic disorders. In vitro expression of mutant GNA11R183C and GNA11Q209L in human cell lines demonstrated activation of the downstream p38 MAPK signaling pathway and the p38, JNK, and ERK pathways, respectively. Transgenic mosaic zebrafish models expressing mutant GNA11R183C under promoter mitfa developed extensive dermal melanocytosis recapitulating the human phenotype. Phakomatosis pigmentovascularis and extensive dermal melanocytosis are therefore diagnoses in the group of mosaic heterotrimeric G-protein disorders, joining McCune-Albright and Sturge-Weber syndromes. These findings will allow accurate clinical and molecular diagnosis of this subset of common birthmarks, thereby identifying infants at risk for serious complications, and provide novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26778290

  18. Acute effects of blood flow restriction on muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing dynamic knee extensions at low load.

    PubMed

    Wernbom, Mathias; Järrebring, Rickard; Andreasson, Mikael A; Augustsson, Jesper

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing low-intensity dynamic knee extension exercise with and without blood flow restriction. Eleven healthy subjects with strength training experience performed 3 sets of unilateral knee extensions with no relaxation between repetitions to concentric torque failure at 30% of the 1 repetition maximum. One leg was randomized to exercise with cuff occlusion and the other leg to exercise without occlusion. The muscle activity in the quadriceps was recorded with electromyography (EMG). Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and acute pain were collected immediately, and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was rated before and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. The results demonstrated high EMG levels in both experimental conditions, but there were no significant differences regarding maximal muscle activity, except for a higher EMG in the eccentric phase in set 3 for the nonoccluded condition (p = 0.005). Significantly more repetitions were performed with the nonoccluded leg in every set (p < 0.05). The RPE and acute pain ratings were similar, but DOMS was higher in the nonoccluded leg (p < 0.05). We conclude that blood flow restriction during low-intensity dynamic knee extension decreases the endurance but does not increase the maximum muscle activity compared with training without restriction when both regimes are performed to failure. The high levels of muscle activity suggest that performing low-load dynamic knee extensions in a no-relaxation manner may be a useful method in knee rehabilitation settings when large forces are contraindicated. However, similarly to fatiguing blood flow restricted exercise, this method is associated with ischemic muscle pain, and thus its applications may be limited to highly motivated individuals.

  19. The Cooperative Extension System's Use of USDA's Online Food and Physical Activity Tracker-Supertracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hongu, Nobuko; Martinez, Cathy L.; Billias, Natalia N.; Wyatt, Melissa A.; Turner, Rachel J.; Manore, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition professionals within the Cooperative Extension system use the USDA's interactive online tool SuperTracker, which is designed to help individuals track diet and physical activity (PA) to apply healthy eating patterns and improve PA. An investigation of all 50 states' Extension websites and interviews of Extension educators…

  20. A Wrist for Needle-Sized Surgical Robots

    PubMed Central

    York, Peter A.; Swaney, Philip J.; Gilbert, Hunter B.; Webster, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The needle-sized surgical tools used in arthroscopy, otolaryngology, and other surgical fields could become even more valuable to surgeons if endowed with the ability to navigate around sharp corners to manipulate or visualize tissue. We present a needle-sized wrist design that grants this ability. It can be easily interfaced with manual tools or concentric tube robots and is straightforward and inexpensive to manufacture. The wrist consists of a nitinol tube with several asymmetric cutouts, actuated by a tendon. Perhaps counter-intuitively, within this seemingly simple design concept, design optimization is challenging due to the number of parameters available and nonlinearities in material properties. In this paper, we examine a subset of possible geometries and derive kinematic and static models. Experimental results with a 1.16 mm diameter prototype validate the models. Lastly, we provide a discussion summarizing the lessons learned in our early experience designing and fabricating wrists of this type. PMID:26405562

  1. A Wrist for Needle-Sized Surgical Robots.

    PubMed

    York, Peter A; Swaney, Philip J; Gilbert, Hunter B; Webster, Robert J

    2015-05-01

    The needle-sized surgical tools used in arthroscopy, otolaryngology, and other surgical fields could become even more valuable to surgeons if endowed with the ability to navigate around sharp corners to manipulate or visualize tissue. We present a needle-sized wrist design that grants this ability. It can be easily interfaced with manual tools or concentric tube robots and is straightforward and inexpensive to manufacture. The wrist consists of a nitinol tube with several asymmetric cutouts, actuated by a tendon. Perhaps counter-intuitively, within this seemingly simple design concept, design optimization is challenging due to the number of parameters available and nonlinearities in material properties. In this paper, we examine a subset of possible geometries and derive kinematic and static models. Experimental results with a 1.16 mm diameter prototype validate the models. Lastly, we provide a discussion summarizing the lessons learned in our early experience designing and fabricating wrists of this type.

  2. A randomized single blind crossover trial comparing leather and commercial wrist splints for treating chronic wrist pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Jill; Nimmo, Rachel; Rowell, Wendy; Quinn, Stephen; Jones, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Background To compare the effectiveness of a custom-made leather wrist splint (LS) with a commercially available fabric splint (FS) in adults with chronic wrist pain. Methods Participants (N = 25, mean age = 54) were randomly assigned to treatment order in a 2-phase crossover trial. Splints were worn for 2 weeks, separated by a one-week washout period. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after each splint phase using the Australian/Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN), the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Jamar dynamometer by an observer blinded to treatment allocation. Results Both styles of wrist splint significantly reduced pain (effect size LS 0.79, FS 0.43), improved hand function and increased grip strength compared to baseline (all p < 0.05) with no increase in wrist stiffness. There was a consistent trend for the LS to be superior to the FS but this was statistically significant only for patient perceived occupational performance (p = 0.008) and satisfaction (p = 0.015). Lastly, 72% of patients preferred the custom-made leather splint compared to the commercially available splint. Conclusion Leather wrist splints were superior to a commercially available fabric splint for the short-term relief of pain and dysfunction. PMID:19843345

  3. Muscular Activation Pattern of Bilateral Extensors Response to Asymmetric Hand Lifting During Trunk Flexion-extension Performance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ying; Shan, Xinhai

    2016-10-14

    The authors' purpose was to test the effect of asymmetric hand lifting on muscular activation patterns of 3 bilateral extensors. Eighteen male university students without back pain were volunteered. Each performed flexion-extension randomly with conditions of right lifting, left lifting, and nonlifting. Surface electromyography from bilateral thoracic, lumbar erector spinae, and hamstring was recorded. The cross-correlation and relative intensity in paired muscles of bilateral extensors was calculated in flexion as well as extension period. The results showed that the cross-correlation coefficient was decreased and the phase lag as well as the relative intensity of bilateral extensors was increased significantly in thoracic level. The phase lag as well as the relative intensity of bilateral extensors was increased significantly in lumbar level. It was concluded that asymmetric lifting has a significant effect on muscular activation of bilateral extensors in thorax level, which causes the ipsilateral extensor to activate larger and longer. Asymmetric lifting also has some effect on muscular activation of bilateral extensors in lumbar level but with less extent than in thorax level, which causes contralateral extensor to activate larger and longer. Asymmetric lifting seems to have no significant effect on muscular activation of bilateral hamstring.

  4. Longevity extension of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) by royal jelly: optimal dose and active ingredient

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mingfeng

    2017-01-01

    In the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, queens and workers have different longevity although they share the same genome. Queens consume royal jelly (RJ) as the main food throughout their life, including as adults, but workers only eat worker jelly when they are larvae less than 3 days old. In order to explore the effect of RJ and the components affecting longevity of worker honey bees, we first determined the optimal dose for prolonging longevity of workers as 4% RJ in 50% sucrose solution, and developed a method of obtaining long lived workers. We then compared the effects of longevity extension by RJ 4% with bee-collected pollen from rapeseed (Brassica napus). Lastly, we determined that a water soluble RJ protein obtained by precipitation with 60% ammonium sulfate (RJP60) contained the main component for longevity extension after comparing the effects of RJ crude protein extract (RJCP), RJP30 (obtained by precipitation with 30% ammonium sulfate), and RJ ethanol extract (RJEE). Understanding what regulates worker longevity has potential to help increase colony productivity and improve crop pollination efficiency. PMID:28367370

  5. Longevity extension of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) by royal jelly: optimal dose and active ingredient.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenchao; Tian, Yuanyuan; Han, Mingfeng; Miao, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    In the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, queens and workers have different longevity although they share the same genome. Queens consume royal jelly (RJ) as the main food throughout their life, including as adults, but workers only eat worker jelly when they are larvae less than 3 days old. In order to explore the effect of RJ and the components affecting longevity of worker honey bees, we first determined the optimal dose for prolonging longevity of workers as 4% RJ in 50% sucrose solution, and developed a method of obtaining long lived workers. We then compared the effects of longevity extension by RJ 4% with bee-collected pollen from rapeseed (Brassica napus). Lastly, we determined that a water soluble RJ protein obtained by precipitation with 60% ammonium sulfate (RJP60) contained the main component for longevity extension after comparing the effects of RJ crude protein extract (RJCP), RJP30 (obtained by precipitation with 30% ammonium sulfate), and RJ ethanol extract (RJEE). Understanding what regulates worker longevity has potential to help increase colony productivity and improve crop pollination efficiency.

  6. Passive mechanical properties of the wrist and physiological tremor.

    PubMed Central

    Lakie, M; Walsh, E G; Wright, G W

    1986-01-01

    Observations on wrist tremor have been made in the horizontal plane using a tremorograph of new design. A small tap to the hand gave rise to a decrementing series of oscillations at about 9 Hz; as these effects were seen in relaxed and in anaesthetised subjects they were not due to neural reflexes. With the fingers partially extended the spontaneous tremor increased markedly and taps again gave rise to a series of oscillations. Under these circumstances there was no modulation of the EMG. It is accordingly concluded that mechanical wrist resonance plays a major role in the forms of tremor studied. Images PMID:3734824

  7. Hand and Wrist Injuries in Boxing and the Martial Arts.

    PubMed

    Drury, Benjamin Todd; Lehman, Thomas P; Rayan, Ghazi

    2017-02-01

    Hand and wrist injuries in martial arts are typically a reflection of the combat nature of this discipline. In striking sports, the axial load mechanism of injury is common and causes fractures and dislocations; in grappling sports, sprain injuries and degenerative changes predominate. There is clear evidence to support that hand protection reduces the risk of hand injury. Traditional training in martial arts on proper technique and target selection in striking sports reduces the risk of hand injury, and is an important component of hand and wrist injury prevention.

  8. Management of complications of ligament injuries of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Gella, Sreenadh; Giuffre, Jennifer L; Clark, Tod A

    2015-05-01

    Despite advances in understanding the anatomy and biomechanics of wrist motion, intrinsic carpal ligament injuries are difficult to diagnose and treat. Even when an accurate diagnosis is made, there is no consensus on the most appropriate and reliable treatment. Injury predisposes to a progressive decline in wrist function and a predictable pattern of degenerative arthritis. To prevent inadequate outcomes, many treatment options exist, all having inherent benefits and complications. This article reviews the complications of intrinsic carpal ligament injuries and complications of their treatment. Methods to prevent and principles to manage the complications are discussed.

  9. 78 FR 68905 - Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB... Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie, Enterprise Records... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Wrist Conditions Disability...

  10. Synovectomy combined with the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for the rheumatoid wrist.

    PubMed

    Chantelot, C; Fontaine, C; Flipo, R M; Migaud, H; Le Coustumer, F; Duquennoy, A

    1999-08-01

    The aim of synovectomy-stabilization (synovectomy combined with the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure) of the rheumatoid wrist is to obtain a stable painless wrist, retaining enough mobility for function. Thirty-nine wrists were retrospectively examined, at a mean follow up of 64.8 months. The improvement in pain was very significant. We noticed a decrease in wrist motion affecting both flexion and radial deviation. The arthritic change in the wrist continued to increase. We noticed a mean ulnar shift of 2.2 mm and a mean increase in the radial deviation of the wrist of 7 degrees. Only transfer of the extensor carpi radialis longus tendon to the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon was effective in correcting radial deviation of the carpus. Ninety-seven per cent of patients were very satisfied or satisfied. These encouraging results, even at advanced stages of wrist arthritis, have prompted us to lessen the indications for wrist arthrodesis.

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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  13. Clinical and radiological manifestations of the rheumatoid wrist after the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure.

    PubMed

    Momohara, Shigeki; Mamizuka, Kyoko; Yonemoto, Kouichi; Tomatsu, Taisuke; Inoue, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to investigate the clinical and radiological results of the Sauvé-Kapandji (S-K) procedure for the rheumatoid wrist. One hundred and eight rheumatoid wrists in 98 patients were operated on in our institute from 1992 to 2000, and in 82 wrists we used the S-K procedure. In other cases, synovectomy alone was performed on 16 wrists, and partial and total arthrodeses were performed concurrently on 5 wrists each. Carpal bones and/or radiocarpal joints in which the union could not be assessed radiologically were found in 49 wrists (59.8%) after the S-K procedure, and among them there was definite non-fusion of the carpal bone and radiocarpal joints in 29 wrists (35.4%). However, definite fusion of carpal bones and/or radiocarpal joints was found in 33 wrists (40.2%). The formation of carpal bones and partial radiocarpal fusion with some mobility was detected in some cases. Therefore, the S-K procedure may stabilize the carpus in the rheumatoid wrist to some extent while maintaining a functionally important range of motion and relieving pain. However, it does not stop the disease process and cannot reestablish or maintain carpal height. We concluded that the S-K procedure is the treatment of choice for the rheumatoid wrist, and if the wrist is unstable, as seen with arthritis mutilans, we then perform either radio-lunate partial arthrodesis or total wrist arthrodesis.

  14. Technical tip: coverage of the wrist arthroscopy tower using a sterile concentrical endoscopy camera drape.

    PubMed

    Saour, Samer; Saour, Tania; Cerovac, Sonja

    2012-12-01

    Wrist arthroscopy allows complete visualization under magnification and is essentially a diagnostic and therapeutic tool. The first wrist arthroscopy was described by Chen in 1979. Since then, the indications and applications for wrist arthroscopy continue to expand as new techniques and instrumentation evolve.

  15. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3790 Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3790 Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3790 Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3790 Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3790 Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is...

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  4. Radiographic indices in one hundred fifty normal Iranian wrists

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Davood; Taheri, Hamid; Shariatzade, Hooman; Mazhar, Farid Najd; Ghahramani, Mohamad

    2012-01-01

    Background Radiography is the most widely available imaging modality. Precise evaluations of wrist x-ray can help diagnosis and evaluate the prognosis of many wrist disorders. Methods We measured length, angles and indices in 150 posteroanterior and lateral wrist x-rays to determine normal dimensions and variations according to age and sex. All x-rays were made with standard exposure, with the wrist and forearm in a neutral position. Results The average carpal height ratio was 0.52±0.03 with the Youm method and 1.5±0.09 with the Nattrass method. Mean ulnar variance was +0.99±1.6 mm and mean radial inclination was 25±4 degrees. The average radial tilt was 10±5.1 degrees. Mean scapholunate angle was 50±8.4 degrees (normal range 40-60). Conclusion Carpal height, third metacarpal and capitate length were smaller in women than in men. There was a significant positive relationship between all dimensions. Our data base may be used to follow-up in conditions such as carpal instability, osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis, as well as for clinical research. PMID:23482869

  5. New wrist bones of the Malagasy giant subfossil lemurs.

    PubMed

    Hamrick, M W; Simons, E L; Jungers, W L

    2000-05-01

    Recently discovered wrist bones of the Malagasy subfossil lemurs Babakotia radofilai, Palaeopropithecus ingens, Mesopropithecus dolichobrachion, and Megaladapis madagascariensis shed new light on the postcranial morphologies and positional behaviors that characterized these extinct primates. Wrist bones of P. ingens resemble those of certain modern hominoids in having a relatively enlarged ulnar head and dorsally extended articular surface on the hamate, features related to a large range of rotation at the inferior radioulnar and midcarpal joints. The scaphoid of P. ingens is also similar to that of the extant tree sloth Choloepus in having an elongate, palmarly directed tubercle forming a deep radial margin of the carpal tunnel for the passage of large digital flexors. In contrast, wrist remains of Megaladapis edwardsi and M. madagascariensis exhibit traits observed in the hands of extant pronograde, arboreal primates; these include a dorsopalmarly expanded pisiform and well-developed "spiral" facet on the hamate. Moreover, Megaladapis spp. and Mesopropithecus dolichobrachion possess bony tubercles (e.g., scaphoid tubercle and hamate hamulus) forming the carpal tunnel that are relatively similar in length to those of modern pronograde lemurs. Babakotia and Mesopropithecus differ from Megaladapis in exhibiting features of the midcarpal joint related to frequent supination and radioulnar deviation of the hand characteristic of animals that use vertical and quadrumanous climbing in their foraging behaviors. Comparative analysis of subfossil lemur wrist morphology complements and expands upon prior inferences based on other regions of the postcranial skeleton, and suggests a considerable degree of locomotor and postural heterogeneity among these recently extinct primates.

  6. MDCT of hand and wrist infections: emphasis on compartmental anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S; Corl, F M; LaPorte, D M; Fishman, E K; Fayad, L M

    2017-04-01

    Hand and wrist infections can present with a spectrum of manifestations ranging from cellulitis to deep-space collections. The various infectious processes can be categorised as superficial or deep infections based on their respective locations relative to the tendons. Superficial hand infections are located superficial to the tendons and are comprised of cellulitis, lymphangitis, paronychia, pulp-space infections, herpetic whitlow, and include volar as well as dorsal subcutaneous abscesses. Deep hand infections are located deep to the tendon sheaths and include synovial space infections, such as infectious tenosynovitis, deep fascial space infections, septic arthritis, necrotising fasciitis, and osteomyelitis. Knowledge of hand and wrist compartmental anatomy is essential for the accurate diagnosis and management of hand infections. Although early and superficial infections of the hand may respond to non-surgical management, most hand infections are surgical emergencies. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), with its muliplanar reformation (MPR) and three-dimensional (3D) capabilities, is a powerful tool in the emergency setting for the evaluation of acute hand and wrist pathology. The clinical and imaging features of hand and wrist infections as evident on MDCT will be reviewed with emphasis on contiguous and closed synovial and deep fascial spaces. Knowledge of hand compartmental anatomy enables accurate characterisation of the infectious process and localise the extent of disease in the acute setting.

  7. Wrist Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... All Topics All Wrist Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) French (français) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Arabic (العربية) ...

  8. Performance of repetitive wrist movements in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pastor, M A; Jahanshahi, M; Artieda, J; Obeso, J A

    1992-06-01

    The timing of repetitive alternating 80 degrees flexion-extension movements of the right wrist was studied in 42 patients with Parkinson's disease, tested while not receiving dompaminergic medication and 20 age- and sex-matched controls. Five rates of movement (0.5 Hz, 1 Hz, 1.5 Hz, 2 Hz, 2.5 Hz) were examined. The interval between two successive flexion movements, as measured from the electromyography (EMG) records was taken as the unit of analysis or inter-response interval (IRI). At 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz and 1.5 Hz there were no differences between groups in mean IRIs. At higher rates of movement (2 Hz and 2.5 Hz), however, the controls were significantly more accurate in timing of repetitive movements than the patients. At all five frequencies, the patients with moderate or severe Parkinson's disease were less accurate in timing of repetitive movements than those with mild disease, although the differences were not significant. In nine patients tested in the 'on' and 'off' medication states, administration of 250 mg of levodopa/carbidopa resulted in significantly more accurate timing of repetitive movements. Wing and Kristofferson's (1973b) two-process model of repetitive movements was applied to the IRI data. At various rates of movement, the primary prediction of the model that lag 1 autocorrelations should be in the 0 to -0.5 range was violated in 40-70% of the patient and controls. For those subjects who had lag 1 autocorrelations in the expected range, IRI variability was to break down into a timekeeper and a motor delay variance. At all frequencies, the patients had significantly higher variance for IRI, timekeeper and motor delay than the controls. Although not significant, more severe Parkinson's disease was associated with greater IRI, timekeeper and motor delay variance, while administration of levodopa resulted in reduction of the three types of variance. The validity of the Wing and Kristofferson model for the analysis of this type of movement is discussed.

  9. Preparatory band specific premotor cortical activity differentiates upper and lower extremity movement.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Lewis A; Carpenter, Mackenzie; Mizelle, J C; Forrester, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Event related desynchronization (ERD) allows evaluation of brain signals in multiple frequency dimensions. The purpose of this study was to determine left hemispheric non-primary motor cortex differences at varying frequencies of premovement ERD for similar movements by end-effectors of the upper and lower extremities. We recorded 32-channel electroencephalography (EEG) while subjects performed self-paced right ankle dorsiflexion and wrist extension. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded over the tibialis anterior and extensor carpi ulnaris. EEG was analyzed for premovement ERD within the alpha (8-12 Hz), low beta (13-18 Hz) and high beta (18-22 Hz) frequencies over the premotor, motor, and sensory areas of the left and mesial cortex from -1.5 to 0 s before movement. Within the alpha and high beta bands, wrist movements showed limited topography, but greater ERD over posterior premotor cortex areas. Alpha ERD was also significantly greater over the lateral motor cortex for wrist movements. In the low beta band, wrist movements provided extensive ERD differences to include the left motor and mesial/lateral premotor areas, whereas ankle movements showed only limited ERD activity. Overall, alpha and high beta activity demonstrated distinctions that are consistent with mapping of wrist and ankle representations over the sensorimotor strip, whereas the low beta representation demonstrated the clearest distinctions between the limbs over widespread brain areas, particularly the lateral premotor cortex. This suggests limited leg premovement activity at the dorsolateral premotor cortex. Low beta ERD may be reflect joint or limb specific preparatory activity in the premotor area. Further work is required to better evaluate the extent of this low beta activity for multiple comparative joints.

  10. Role of imaging in spine, hand, and wrist osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Feydy, Antoine; Pluot, Etienne; Guerini, Henri; Drapé, Jean-Luc

    2009-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the wrist is mainly secondary to traumatic ligamentous or bone injuries. Involvement of the radiocarpal joint occurs early on in the disease, whereas the mediocarpal joint is involved at a later stage. Metabolic diseases may also involve the wrist and affect specific joints such as the scapho-trapezio-trapezoid joint. Although OA of the wrist is routinely diagnosed on plain films, a thorough assessment of cartilage injuries on computed tomographic arthrography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or MR arthrography remains necessary before any surgical procedure. OA of the fingers is frequently encountered in postmenopausal women. Distal interphalangeal joints and trapezio-metacarpal joint are the most frequently involved joints. Whereas the clinical diagnosis of OA of the wrist and hand is straightforward, the therapeutic management of symptomatic forms remains unclear, with no clear guidelines. OA of the spine is related to degenerative changes of the spine involving the disc space, vertebral endplates, the facet joints, or the supportive and surrounding soft tissues. The sequelae of disc degeneration are among the leading causes of functional incapacity in both sexes, and are a common source of chronic disability in the working years. Disc degeneration involves structural disruption and cell-mediated changes in composition. Radiography remains usually the first-line imaging method. MRI is ideally suited for delineating the presence, extent, and complications of degenerative spinal disease. Other imaging modalities such as computed tomography, dynamic radiography, myelography, and discography may provide complementary information in selected cases, especially before an imaging-guided percutaneous treatment or spinal surgery. The presence of degenerative changes on imaging examinations is by no means an indicator of symptoms, and there is a high prevalence of lesions in asymptomatic individuals. This article focuses on imaging of OA of the

  11. 75 FR 13776 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-300; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-300... Collection Under Review; Form N- 300, Application to File Declaration of Intention; OMB Control No. 1615-0078... this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-300. Should USCIS decide...

  12. 76 FR 17144 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-300; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    2011-03-28

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-300... Collection Under Review; Form N- 300, Application to File Declaration of Intention; OMB Control No. 1615-0078... this 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-300. Should USCIS decide...

  13. 76 FR 36560 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Form N-300; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities; Form N-300... Collection Under Review; Form N- 300, Application to File Declaration of Intention; OMB Control No. 1615-0078... Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-300; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

  14. 75 FR 13777 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-824; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    2010-03-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-824... Collection Under Review; Form I- 824; Application for Action on an Approved Application; OMB Control No. 1615... this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form I-824. Should USCIS decide...

  15. 77 FR 12072 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-824; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    2012-02-28

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-824... Collection Under Review; Form I- 824; Application for Action on an Approved Application. The Department..., 2012. During this 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form I-824....

  16. 77 FR 27241 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-824; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-824... Collection Under Review; Form I- 824; Application for Action on an Approved Application. The Department of... collection: Form I-824; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will...

  17. 75 FR 32801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-824; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-824... Collection Under Review; Form I- 824; Application for Action on an Approved Application; OMB Control No. 1615... Security sponsoring the collection: Form I-824; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)....

  18. 76 FR 39419 - Information Collection Activity: Plans and Information, Extension of a Collection; Comment Request

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    ... seafloor in deep water. MMS-0142 (Environmental Impact Analysis Worksheet) is a fill in the blank form that..., production, and pipeline activities are conducted in a safe and acceptable manner for the location and water... Deepwater Horizon and Macondo well incident, we reevaluated procedures for reviewing blowout scenarios...

  19. 77 FR 27474 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-687; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-687...-687. The Department Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has...-687; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  20. 77 FR 27473 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-924; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    2012-05-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-924... Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitted... sponsoring the collection: Form I-924; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (4) Affected public...

  1. 76 FR 31971 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-212; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    2011-06-02

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-212.... Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the following information collection request... Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form I-212; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

  2. 78 FR 45550 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

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    2013-07-29

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... 1653-0048. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will... addressed to the OMB Desk Officer for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of...

  3. 77 FR 16047 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-589; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-589.... 1615-0067. The Department Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be...: Form I-589; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  4. 76 FR 70747 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-526, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-526... Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the following... Immigration Services. (4) Affected public who will be asked or required to respond, as well as a...

  5. 77 FR 34053 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-590, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-590... of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the...-590; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  6. 75 FR 65022 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-751, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-751.... 1615- 0038. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will...-751; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  7. 75 FR 65022 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-698, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-698... Resident; OMB Control No. 1615-0035. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration... Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked or required to respond, as well as a...

  8. 77 FR 34398 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565... Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the following information collection request to the Office of... the collection: Form N-565; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public...

  9. 75 FR 70277 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-336, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-336... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 336, Request for Hearing on a Decision in Naturalization... collection: Form N-336; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will...

  10. 77 FR 18255 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565... collection under review; Form N- 565, Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document; OMB... until May 29, 2012. During this 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form...

  11. 75 FR 5098 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565... information collection under review: Form N- 565, Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship... Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-565; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

  12. 75 FR 51095 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-336; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-336... Collection under Review; Form N- 336, Request for Hearing on a Decision in Naturalization Proceedings Under... the Form N-336. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-336 we will advise the public when we publish...

  13. 75 FR 51096 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400... Collection Under Review; Form N- 400, Application for Naturalization; OMB Control No. 1615-0052. The... 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-400. Should USCIS decide...

  14. 75 FR 51096 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-470; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-470... Collection Under Review; Form N- 470, Application To Preserve Residence for Naturalization; OMB Control No... until October 18, 2010. During this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form...

  15. 76 FR 11807 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 565, Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship..., and the applicable component of the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form...

  16. 75 FR 41216 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615... N-644; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  17. 76 FR 39415 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615... Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-644; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

  18. 75 FR 51094 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600... Collection under Review; Form N- 600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615- 0057..., 2010. During this 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-600....

  19. 75 FR 21013 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644... Collection Under Review; Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615-0059. The..., USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-644. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-644...

  20. 75 FR 71451 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-470, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-470... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 470, Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization; OMB... collection: Form N-470; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will...

  1. 75 FR 70277 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 400, Application for Naturalization; OMB Control No. 1615-0052... applicable component of the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-400;...

  2. 76 FR 69275 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 400, Application for Naturalization; OMB Control No. 1615-0052... the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-400. U.S. Citizenship...

  3. 76 FR 58029 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600K, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600K... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 600K; Application for Citizenship and Issuance of Certificate... collection: Form N-600K; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  4. 75 FR 70278 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600, Extension of a Currently Approved...

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    2010-11-17

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship; OMB Control No..., and the applicable component of the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form...

  5. 77 FR 24507 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-25, Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-25... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 25, Request for Verification of Naturalization. The Department of... component of the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: Form N-25. U.S. Citizenship...

  6. 75 FR 32800 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-300; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-300... Collection Under Review; Form N- 300, Application To File Declaration of Intention; OMB Control No. 1615-0078... collection: Form N-300; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will...

  7. 76 FR 21913 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644... Collection Under Review: Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615-0059. The..., USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-644. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-644...

  8. 75 FR 80835 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    2010-12-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-565... Collection Under Review; Form N- 565, Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document; OMB... N-565. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-565 we will advise the public when we publish the...

  9. 76 FR 57081 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments... directed to Mr. Gregory E. Scarbro, Unit Chief, Federal Bureau of Investigation, CJIS Division, Module E-3..., Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Justice. (4) Affected public who will be asked or...

  10. 77 FR 38307 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition, Extension, Without...

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    2012-06-27

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Refugee/Asylee... Information Collection Under Review: Form I- 730, Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition; OMB Control No. 1615-0037.... (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition. (3) Agency form number, if...

  11. 78 FR 41062 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Existing Collection; Emergency Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... for the use by federal agencies in gathering data on the race, sex and national origin status of... practices through the collection and analysis of data on the race, national origin, sex and disability... activities are effectively reaching all segments of the relevant labor pool, to gauge progress and...

  12. 78 FR 44141 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Affidavit of Support, Form I-134; Extension, Without...

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    2013-07-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Affidavit of.... SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS... accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including...

  13. 78 FR 5477 - Agency Information Collection Activities: InfoPass System, No Form Number; Extension, Without...

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    2013-01-25

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: InfoPass... Collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: InfoPass System. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the.... The InfoPass system allows an applicant or petitioner to schedule an interview appointment with...

  14. 75 FR 19630 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 80); Comment Request; Extension

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    ... will send an automatic acknowledgement to the sender's e-mail address upon receipt of eFiled comments... receiving automatic notification of activity in this docket may do so through eSubscription at http://www..., printed or downloaded remotely through FERC's eLibrary at:...

  15. 75 FR 42817 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Notice of Request for Extension of Currently Approved...

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    2010-07-22

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael Koontz, 202-366-2076, Office of Natural and Human Environment, Federal Highway... projected air quality benefits, financial information, a brief description of projects, and several other... Federal Highway Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Notice of Request for...

  16. 76 FR 43336 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11, Extension of an Existing Information...

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    2011-07-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11... Collection under Review: Form AR- 11, Alien's Change of Address Card; OMB Control No. 1615-0007. The... applicable component of the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring this collection: Form AR-11....

  17. 76 FR 48874 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-884, Extension of an Existing Information...

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    2011-08-09

    ... SECURITY Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-884... Collection Under Review: Form G- 884, Request for the Return of Original Document(s). The Department of..., e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Overview of This Information Collection...

  18. 76 FR 28444 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-884, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-884... information collection under review: Form G- 884, Request for the Return of Original Documents; OMB Control No... July 18, 2011. During this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form...

  19. 75 FR 47822 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639, Extension of a Currently Approved...

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    2010-08-09

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639... Information Collection Under Review: Form G- 639, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Request; OMB Control No... other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Overview...

  20. 76 FR 24908 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639; Extension of an Existing Information...

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    2011-05-03

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639... Collection Under Review; Form G- 639, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Request; OMB Control No. 1615- 0102.... During this 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form G-639. Should USCIS...

  1. 75 FR 23785 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639... Collection Under Review; Form G- 639, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Request; OMB Control No. 1615- 0102... this 60 day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form G-639. Should USCIS decide...

  2. 77 FR 35418 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Biographic Information, Extension, Without Change of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Biographic.... (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Biographic Information. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring the collection: G-325,...

  3. 76 FR 11255 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...-0026. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will be... Financial Officer/OAA/Records Branch, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 500 12th Street, SW.,...

  4. 77 FR 15115 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, without Change, of an Existing Information...

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    2012-03-14

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... Comments should be addressed to OMB Desk Officer, for United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement... abstract: Primary: State, Local or Tribal Government. Section 404(b) of the Immigration and Nationality...

  5. 77 FR 65901 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

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    2012-10-31

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... should be addressed to OMB Desk Officer, for United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement... dependent (F-2, M-2 or J-2) is admitted to the United States as a nonimmigrant alien under section...

  6. 77 FR 42322 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...: State, Local, or Tribal Government. Section 404(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101... immigration emergency. This collection of information allows for State or local governments to...

  7. 77 FR 49823 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

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    2012-08-17

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... Information Collection; I-395; Affidavit in Lieu of Lost Receipt of United States ICE for Collateral Accepted... collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Affidavit in Lieu of Lost Receipt of United States...

  8. 78 FR 32429 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

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    2013-05-30

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... determining whether or not a state or local law enforcement ] officer will be granted Federal immigration.... The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), will submit...

  9. 78 FR 28894 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

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    2013-05-16

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... 1653-0048. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will... Homeland Security (DHS), Scott Elmore, Forms Manager, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 801...

  10. 77 FR 35704 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... return of cash or United States bonds or notes deposited to secure an immigration bond upon the... of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit the...

  11. 77 FR 11148 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...-0026. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit... Homeland Security (DHS), John Ramsay, Program (Forms) Manager, U.S. Immigration and Customs...

  12. 75 FR 41214 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of a Currently Approved Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... United States or abroad regarding the whereabouts of the alien. (5) An estimate of the total number of... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), will be submitting...

  13. 77 FR 50145 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... visitor (J- 1), or dependent (F-2, M-2 or J-2) is admitted to the United States as a nonimmigrant alien... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit the...

  14. 77 FR 50146 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, With Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit the following... Mattison, Chief, Records Management, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 500 12th Street SW.,...

  15. 77 FR 11147 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... Officer, for United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security, and sent... Information Collection Under Review; Form 70- 003, 70-004, IDENT/IAFIS Interoperability State Department...

  16. 76 FR 36562 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Extension of a Currently Approved Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities..., Office of Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to OMB Desk Officer, for United States... Control No. 1653-0034. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement...

  17. 77 FR 38651 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...: State, Local, or Tribal Government. Section 404(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101... immigration emergency. This collection of information allows for State or local governments to...

  18. 75 FR 68372 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... Collection for Review; Immigration Bond; OMB Control No. 1653-0022. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), will be submitting the following information collection...

  19. 75 FR 68371 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... Government. Section 404(b) of the Immigration and Naturalization Act provides for the reimbursement to States...-0019. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will...

  20. 76 FR 4930 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities..., Office of Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to OMB Desk Officer, for United States... Collection for Review; Immigration Bond; OMB Control No. 1653-0022. The Department of Homeland Security,...

  1. 75 FR 2881 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...-0026. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), has... of Homeland Security (DHS), Joseph M. Gerhart, Chief, Records Management Branch, U.S. Immigration...

  2. 75 FR 16158 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...-0026. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), has... should be addressed to OMB Desk Officer, for U. S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department...

  3. 77 FR 50147 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... for an applicant's request for removal from the United States. (5) An estimate of the total number of... Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit the following...

  4. 78 FR 18620 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), will submit the...), Scott Elmore, Forms Manager, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 801 I Street NW., Mailstop...

  5. 77 FR 47656 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...: Primary: State, Local, or Tribal Government. Section 404(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S... meeting an immigration emergency. This collection of information allows for State or local governments...

  6. 76 FR 36561 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Extension of a Currently Approved Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... addressed to OMB Desk Officer, for United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will be submitting...

  7. 76 FR 36562 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Extension of a Currently Approved Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... of persons in the United States or abroad regarding the whereabouts of the alien. (5) An estimate of... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will be submitting...

  8. 77 FR 65901 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... addressed to OMB Desk Officer, for United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland... his or her whereabouts. Form G-146 is used to inquire of persons in the United States or...

  9. 77 FR 50147 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... information collection; I-395; Affidavit in Lieu of Lost Receipt of United States ICE for Collateral Accepted... collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Affidavit in Lieu of Lost Receipt of United States...

  10. 75 FR 41214 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of a Currently Approved Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...-0021. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), has... of Homeland Security (DHS), Joseph M. Gerhart, Chief, Records Management Branch, U.S. Immigration...

  11. 75 FR 24720 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), has submitted the following information collection request for... Management Branch, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 500 12th Street, SW., Room 3138, Washington,...

  12. 77 FR 38651 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, With Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities...: Primary: State, Local, or Tribal Government. Section 404(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S... meeting an immigration emergency. This collection of information allows for State or local governments...

  13. 77 FR 50148 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities.... Comments should be addressed to OMB Desk Officer, for United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement... Control No. 1653-0026. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement...

  14. 77 FR 50148 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension, Without Change, of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... of persons in the United States or abroad regarding the whereabouts of the alien. (5) An estimate of... Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), will submit the following...

  15. 75 FR 24721 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of an Existing Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... SECURITY United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency Information Collection Activities... or school; and at the time they leave the United States. (5) An estimate of the total number of.... The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE), will...

  16. Effect of Behavioral Activation Treatment on Chronic Fibromyalgia Pain: Replication and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Talley, Chris; Buermann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A multiple-baseline-across two behavior sets and positions (reclined, upright) was used to experimentally examine the effect of Behavioral Activation Treatment for Pain (BAT-P) on pain-related behavior of a 44-year-old woman with a 22-year history of fibromyalgia (FM). BAT-P, based on the matching law, is comprised of Behavioral Relaxation…

  17. 75 FR 54366 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-0086, Sulphur Operations, Extension of a Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... source of information to evaluate the performance of drilling rigs under various weather and ocean... Bureau of Ocean Management, Regulation and Enforcement BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-0086...; Comment Request AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE),...

  18. The C-terminal extension of PrhG impairs its activation of hrp expression and virulence in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Luo, Feng; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori; Yasuo, Igarashi; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    2015-04-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the second most destructive bacterial plant pathogens worldwide and HrpG is the master regulator of its pathogenicity. PrhG is a close paralogue of HrpG and both belong to OmpR/PhoB family of two-component response regulators. Despite a high similarity (72% global identity and 96% similarity in helix-loop-helix domain), they display distinct roles in pathogenicity. HrpG is necessary for the bacterial growth in planta and pathogenicity, while PrhG is dispensable for bacterial growth in planta and contributes little to pathogenicity. The main difference between HrpG and PrhG is the 50-amino-acid-long C-terminal extension in PrhG (amino-acid residues 230-283), which is absent in HrpG. When this extension is deleted, truncated PrhGs (under the control of its native promoter) allowed complete recovery of bacterial growth in planta and wild-type virulence of hrpG mutant. This novel finding demonstrates that the extension region in PrhG is responsible for the functional difference between HrpG and PrhG, which may block the binding of PrhG to target promoters and result in impaired activation of hrp expression by PrhG and reduced virulence of R. solanacearum.

  19. Extensive beta-glucuronidase activity in murine central nervous system after adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to brain.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, A; Stein, C; Derksen, T; Yang, G; Anderson, R D; Davidson, B L

    1998-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII), caused by beta-glucuronidase deficiency, is a classic lysosomal storage disease. In the central nervous system (CNS), there is widespread pathology with distention of vacuoles in neurons and glia. An approach to therapy for MPS VII would require extensive delivery of enzyme to the CNS and subsequent uptake by the affected cells. In this study we show that intrastriatal injection of recombinant adenovirus encoding beta-glucuronidase (Ad betagluc) to MPS VII or wild-type mice results in focal, intense beta-glucuronidase mRNA expression near the injection site. Further, histochemical staining for enzyme activity showed that beta-glucuronidase activity extended well beyond transduced cells. Activity was detected throughout the ipsilateral striatum as well as in the corpus callosum, ventricles, and bilateral neocortex. Similarly, after injection into the right lateral ventricle or cisterna magna, enzyme activity was present in the ependymal cells of the ventricles, in the subarachnoid spaces, and also in the underlying cortex (150-500 microm from ependyma). The distribution of enzyme was most extensive 21 days after gene transfer to normal mouse brain, with more than 50% of the hemisphere positive for beta-glucuronidase activity. Eighty-four days after adenovirus injection a substantial level of enzyme expression remained (>40% of hemisphere positive for beta-glucuronidase activity). Histological sections from striatum of beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice injected with Ad betagluc showed a marked reduction in the number of distended vacuoles in both neurons and glia, as compared with uninjected striatum. Importantly, correction was noted in both hemispheres. Our finding that a relatively small number of transduced cells produce enzyme that reaches a large proportion of the CNS has favorable implications in developing direct gene transfer therapies for lysosomal storage disorders.

  20. Comprehensive program and plan for federal energy education, extension, and information activities: Fiscal Year 1981. Fifth report to congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The activities conducted solely in Fiscal Year (FY) 1981 in the areas of Federal energy education, extension service, and information dissemination are reported. The broad purpose of the FY 1981 activities addressed has been to inform governmental and private sectors about the methods and technologies to conserve energy and to utilize renewable energy sources. With the increase in awareness on the part of energy users and decisionmakers, as well as additional information sources available from the private sector, the emphasis of the various Federal energy information activities is being focused on reporting results of Federal programs. The course of activities related to conservation and renewable energy information has been one of consolidation, both in terms of programmatic substance and methods. The practical impetus has been the redirection of Federal progrms and related budgetary revisions for FY 1981 and FY 1982. Further, products conveying information on conservation and renewable energy technologies have been examined extensively, pursuant to the Administration's directive in April 1981 on elimination of wasteful spending on periodicals, audiovisuals and similar materials. Efforts in coordination of conservation and renewable energy information activities of the Department of Energy (DOE) as well as other Federal agencies have adjusted to timetables for review and redirection of programs initially planned for FY 1981. Mechanisms to coordinate existing Federal energy information activities employed in previous fiscal years were continued in FY 1981 to the extent applicable under current Administration policy and the above-noted circumstances of redirection. Coordinating actions requiring convening of groups were held in abeyance pending resolution of programmatic issues.