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Sample records for active-controlled parallel-group study

  1. Modified-release prednisone for polymyalgia rheumatica: a multicentre, randomised, active-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Hopp, Michael; Liebscher, Stefan; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Buttgereit, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of modified-release (MR) versus immediate-release (IR) prednisone in newly diagnosed glucocorticoid (GC)-naïve patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Methods Patients were randomised to double-blind MR prednisone (taken at approximately 22:00) or IR prednisone (taken in the morning), 15 mg/day for 4 weeks. The primary end point was complete response rate (≥70% reduction in PMR visual analogue scale, duration of morning stiffness and C reactive protein (CRP) (or CRP <2× upper limit of normal (ULN))) at week 4. Non-inferiority was decided if the lower 95% confidence limit (MR vs IR prednisone) was above −15%. 400 patients were planned but only 62 were enrolled due to difficulties in recruiting GC-naïve patients with PMR with CRP ≥2×ULN. Results The percentage of complete responders at week 4 was numerically greater for MR prednisone (53.8%) than for IR prednisone (40.9%). Non-inferiority of MR versus IR prednisone was not proven in the primary analysis on the per protocol population (N=48; treatment difference: 12.22%; 95% CI −15.82% to 40.25%). However, sensitivity analysis on the full analysis population showed an evident trend favouring MR prednisone (N=62; treatment difference: 15.56%; 95% CI −9.16% to 40.28%). Adverse events were generally mild and transient with no unexpected safety observations. Conclusions The study showed a clear trend for favourable short-term efficacy of MR prednisone versus IR prednisone in early treatment of PMR. Further studies are warranted. Trial registration number EudraCT number 2011-002353-57; Results.

  2. Metformin Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes in Pregnancy: An Active Controlled, Parallel-Group, Randomized, Open Label Study in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ainuddin, Jahan Ara; Karim, Nasim; Zaheer, Sidra; Ali, Syed Sanwer; Hasan, Anjum Ara

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To assess the effect of metformin and to compare it with insulin treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy in terms of perinatal outcome, maternal complications, additional insulin requirement, and treatment acceptability. Methods. In this randomized, open label study, 206 patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy who met the eligibility criteria were selected from the antenatal clinics. Insulin was added to metformin treatment when required, to maintain the target glycemic control. The patients were followed up till delivery. Maternal, and perinatal outcomes and pharmacotherapeutic characteristics were recorded on a proforma. Results. Maternal characteristics were comparable in metformin and insulin treated group. 84.9% patients in metformin group required add-on insulin therapy at mean gestational age of 26.58 ± 3.85 weeks. Less maternal weight gain (P < 0.001) and pregnancy induced hypertension (P = 0.029) were observed in metformin treated group. Small for date babies were more in metformin group (P < 0.01). Neonatal hypoglycemia was significantly less and so was NICU stay of >24 hours in metformin group (P < 0.01). Significant reduction in cost of treatment was found in metformin group. Conclusion. Metformin alone or with add-on insulin is an effective and cheap treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy. This trial is registered with clinical trial registration number: Clinical trials.gov NCT01855763. PMID:25874236

  3. Tretinoin Nanogel 0.025% Versus Conventional Gel 0.025% in Patients with Acne Vulgaris: A Randomized, Active Controlled, Multicentre, Parallel Group, Phase IV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekhar, B S; Anitha, M.; Ruparelia, Mukesh; Vaidya, Pradyumna; Aamir, Riyaz; Shah, Sunil; Thilak, S; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev; Pal, Sandeep; Saraswat, Abir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Conventional topical tretinoin formulation is often associated with local adverse events. Nanogel formulation of tretinoin has good physical stability and enables good penetration of tretinoin into the pilo-sebaceous glands. Aim: The present study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of a nanogel formulation of tretinoin as compared to its conventional gel formulation in the treatment of acne vulgaris of the face. Materials and Methods: This randomized, active controlled, multicentric, phase IV clinical trial evaluated the treatment of patients with acne vulgaris of the face by the two gel formulations locally applied once daily at night for 12 wk. Acne lesion counts (inflammatory, non-inflammatory & total) and severity grading were carried out on the monthly scheduled visits along with the tolerability assessments. Results: A total of 207 patients were randomized in the study. Reductions in the total (72.9% vs. 65.0%; p = 0.03) and inflammatory (78.1% vs. 66.9%; p = 0.02) acne lesions were reported to be significantly greater with the nanogel formulation as compared to the conventional gel formulation. Local adverse events were significantly less (p = 0.04) in the nanogel group (13.3%) as compared to the conventional gel group (24.7%). Dryness was the most common adverse event reported in both the treatment groups while peeling of skin, burning sensation and photosensitivity were reported in patients using the conventional gel only. Conclusion: In the treatment of acne vulgaris of the face, tretinoin nanogel formulation appears to be more effective and better tolerated than the conventional gel formulation. PMID:25738069

  4. Three-year outcomes after acute kidney injury: results of a prospective parallel group cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kerry L; Packington, Rebecca; Monaghan, John; Reilly, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Using a prospective study design, we aimed to characterise the effect of acute kidney injury (AKI) on long-term changes in renal function in a general hospital population. Participants Hospitalised patients with AKI (exposed) and hospitalised patients without AKI (non-exposed), recruited at 3 months after hospital admission. Design Prospective, matched parallel group cohort study, in which renal function and proteinuria were measured at 3 months, 1 year and 3 years. Setting Single UK centre. Clinical end points Clinical end points at 3 years were comparison of the following variables between exposed and non-exposed groups: renal function, prevalence of proteinuria and albuminuria and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression/development at each time point. CKD progression was defined as a decrease in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of ≥25% associated with a decline in eGFR stage. Results 300 exposed and non-exposed patients were successfully matched 1:1 for age and baseline renal function; 70% of the exposed group had AKI stage 1. During follow-up, the AKI group had lower eGFR than non-exposed patients at each time point. At 3 years, the mean eGFR was 60.7±21 mL/min/1.73 m2 in the AKI group compared with 68.4±21 mL/min/1.73 m2 in the non-exposed group, p=0.003. CKD development or progression at 3 years occurred in 30 (24.6%) of the AKI group compared with 10 (7.5%) of the non-exposed group, p<0.001. Albuminuria was more common in the AKI group, and increased with AKI severity. Factors independently associated with CKD development/progression after AKI were non-recovery at 90 days, male gender, diabetes and recurrent AKI. Conclusions AKI is associated with deterioration in renal function to 3 years, even in an unselected population with predominantly AKI stage 1. Non-recovery from AKI is an important factor determining long-term outcome. PMID:28360257

  5. Supervised Home Training of Dialogue Skills in Chronic Aphasia: A Randomized Parallel Group Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nobis-Bosch, Ruth; Springer, Luise; Radermacher, Irmgard; Huber, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to prove the efficacy of supervised self-training for individuals with aphasia. Linguistic and communicative performance in structured dialogues represented the main study parameters. Method: In a cross-over design for randomized matched pairs, 18 individuals with chronic aphasia were examined during 12 weeks of…

  6. Efficacy and tolerability of topical sertaconazole versus topical terbinafine in localized dermatophytosis: A randomized, observer-blind, parallel group study

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Dattatreyo; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Sen, Sukanta; Sarkar, Saswati; Hazra, Avijit; De, Radharaman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Epidermal dermatophyte infections most commonly manifest as tinea corporis or tinea cruris. Topical azole antifungals are commonly used in their treatment but literature suggests that most require twice-daily application and provide lower cure rates than the allylamine antifungal terbinafine. We conducted a head-to-head comparison of the effectiveness of the once-daily topical azole, sertaconazole, with terbinafine in these infections. Materials and Methods: We conducted a randomized, observer-blind, parallel group study (Clinical Trial Registry India [CTRI]/2014/09/005029) with adult patients of either sex presenting with localized lesions. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by potassium hydroxide smear microscopy of skin scrapings. After baseline assessment of erythema, scaling, and pruritus, patients applied either of the two study drugs once daily for 2 weeks. If clinical cure was not seen at 2 weeks, but improvement was noted, application was continued for further 2 weeks. Patients deemed to be clinical failure at 2 weeks were switched to oral antifungals. Results: Overall 88 patients on sertaconazole and 91 on terbinafine were analyzed. At 2 weeks, the clinical cure rates were comparable at 77.27% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.52%–86.03%) for sertaconazole and 73.63% (95% CI 64.57%–82.68%) for terbinafine (P = 0.606). Fourteen patients in either group improved and on further treatment showed complete healing by another 2 weeks. The final cure rate at 4 weeks was also comparable at 93.18% (95% CI 88.75%–97.62%) and 89.01% (95% CI 82.59%–95.44%), respectively (P = 0.914). At 2 weeks, 6 (6.82%) sertaconazole and 10 (10.99%) terbinafine recipients were considered as “clinical failure.” Tolerability of both preparations was excellent. Conclusion: Despite the limitations of an observer-blind study without microbiological support, the results suggest that once-daily topical sertaconazole is as effective as terbinafine in localized tinea

  7. Habitual cocoa intake reduces arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women regardless of intake frequency: a randomized parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Takanobu; Kobayashi, Ryota; Natsume, Midori; Nakazato, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is substantially higher in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women. Daily cocoa intake has been shown to reduce central arterial stiffness in health adults, regardless of age; however, the effect of cocoa-intake frequency on arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cocoa-intake frequency on arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women. A total of 26 postmenopausal women (mean age ± standard deviation 64±12 years) were randomly assigned to two groups with different cocoa-intake frequencies: one group ingested 17 g of cocoa once daily except on Sundays (every-day group, n=13), and the other ingested 17 g of cocoa twice daily every other day (every-other-day group, n=13). These intake regimens were maintained in both groups for 12 weeks. Carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity and femoral–ankle pulse-wave velocity were measured in both groups at baseline and again at the end of the 12-week study period. Compared to baseline, both pulse-wave velocities had significantly decreased after the 12-week study period in both groups (P<0.05). However, no significant difference in degree of change was observed between the two groups. Although this study did not include a sedentary control group, these results suggest that regardless of frequency, habitual cocoa intake reduces central and peripheral arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women. PMID:27881914

  8. Habitual cocoa intake reduces arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women regardless of intake frequency: a randomized parallel-group study.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takanobu; Kobayashi, Ryota; Natsume, Midori; Nakazato, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is substantially higher in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women. Daily cocoa intake has been shown to reduce central arterial stiffness in health adults, regardless of age; however, the effect of cocoa-intake frequency on arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cocoa-intake frequency on arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women. A total of 26 postmenopausal women (mean age ± standard deviation 64±12 years) were randomly assigned to two groups with different cocoa-intake frequencies: one group ingested 17 g of cocoa once daily except on Sundays (every-day group, n=13), and the other ingested 17 g of cocoa twice daily every other day (every-other-day group, n=13). These intake regimens were maintained in both groups for 12 weeks. Carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity and femoral-ankle pulse-wave velocity were measured in both groups at baseline and again at the end of the 12-week study period. Compared to baseline, both pulse-wave velocities had significantly decreased after the 12-week study period in both groups (P<0.05). However, no significant difference in degree of change was observed between the two groups. Although this study did not include a sedentary control group, these results suggest that regardless of frequency, habitual cocoa intake reduces central and peripheral arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women.

  9. A randomized, naturalistic, parallel-group study for the long-term treatment of panic disorder with clonazepam or paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Antonio E; Freire, Rafael C; Mochcovitch, Marina D; Amrein, Roman; Levitan, Michelle N; King, Anna L; Valença, Alexandre M; Veras, André B; Paes, Flávia; Sardinha, Aline; Nascimento, Isabella; de-Melo-Neto, Valfrido L; Dias, Gisele P; E Silva, Adriana Cardoso de O; Soares-Filho, Gastão L; da Costa, Rafael T; Mezzasalma, Marco A; de Carvalho, Marcele R; de Cerqueira, Ana C; Hallak, Jaime E; Crippa, José A; Versiani, Marcio

    2012-02-01

    This long-term extension of an 8-week randomized, naturalistic study in patients with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia compared the efficacy and safety of clonazepam (n = 47) and paroxetine (n = 37) over a 3-year total treatment duration. Target doses for all patients were 2 mg/d clonazepam and 40 mg/d paroxetine (both taken at bedtime). This study reports data from the long-term period (34 months), following the initial 8-week treatment phase. Thus, total treatment duration was 36 months. Patients with a good primary outcome during acute treatment continued monotherapy with clonazepam or paroxetine, but patients with partial primary treatment success were switched to the combination therapy. At initiation of the long-term study, the mean doses of clonazepam and paroxetine were 1.9 (SD, 0.30) and 38.4 (SD, 3.74) mg/d, respectively. These doses were maintained until month 36 (clonazepam 1.9 [SD, 0.29] mg/d and paroxetine 38.2 [SD, 3.87] mg/d). Long-term treatment with clonazepam led to a small but significantly better Clinical Global Impression (CGI)-Improvement rating than treatment with paroxetine (mean difference: CGI-Severity scale -3.48 vs -3.24, respectively, P = 0.02; CGI-Improvement scale 1.06 vs 1.11, respectively, P = 0.04). Both treatments similarly reduced the number of panic attacks and severity of anxiety. Patients treated with clonazepam had significantly fewer adverse events than those treated with paroxetine (28.9% vs 70.6%, P < 0.001). The efficacy of clonazepam and paroxetine for the treatment of panic disorder was maintained over the long-term course. There was a significant advantage with clonazepam over paroxetine with respect to the frequency and nature of adverse events.

  10. A Randomized, Prospective, Parallel Group Study of Laparoscopic vs. Laparoendoscopic Single Site Donor Nephrectomy for Kidney Donation

    PubMed Central

    Aull, Meredith J.; Afaneh, Cheguevara; Charlton, Marian; Serur, David; Douglas, Melissa; Christos, Paul J.; Kapur, Sandip; Del Pizzo, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Few prospective, randomized studies have assessed benefits of laparoendoscopic single site donor nephrectomy (LESS-DN) over laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN). Our center initiated such a trial in January 2011, following subjects randomized to LESS-DN vs. LDN from surgery through 5 years post-donation. Subjects complete recovery/satisfaction questionnaires at 2, 6, and 12 months post-donation; transplant recipient outcomes are also recorded. 100 subjects (49 LESS-DN, 51 LDN) underwent surgery; donor demographics were similar between groups, and included a predominance of female, living unrelated donors, mean age of 47 years who underwent left donor nephrectomy. Operative parameters (overall time, time to extraction, warm ischemia time, blood loss) were similar between groups. Conversion to hand-assist laparoscopy was required in 3 LESS-DN (6.1%) vs. 2 LDN (3.9%; P=0.67). Questionnaires revealed 97.2% of LESS-DN vs. 79.5% of LDN (P=0.03) were 100% recovered by two months after donation. No significant difference was seen in satisfaction scores between the groups. Recipient outcomes were similar between groups. Our randomized trial comparing LESS donor nephrectomy to LDN confirms that LESS-DN offers a safe alternative to conventional LDN in terms of intra- and post-operative complications. LDN and LESS-DN offer similar recovery and satisfaction after donation. PMID:24934732

  11. A randomized, prospective, parallel group study of laparoscopic versus laparoendoscopic single site donor nephrectomy for kidney donation.

    PubMed

    Aull, M J; Afaneh, C; Charlton, M; Serur, D; Douglas, M; Christos, P J; Kapur, S; Del Pizzo, J J

    2014-07-01

    Few prospective, randomized studies have assessed the benefits of laparoendoscopic single site donor nephrectomy (LESS-DN) over laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN). Our center initiated such a trial in January 2011, following subjects randomized to LESS-DN versus LDN from surgery through 5 years postdonation. Subjects complete recovery/satisfaction questionnaires at 2, 6 and 12 months postdonation; transplant recipient outcomes are also recorded. One hundred subjects (49 LESS-DN, 51 LDN) underwent surgery; donor demographics were similar between groups, and included a predominance of female, living-unrelated donors, mean age of 47 years who underwent left donor nephrectomy. Operative parameters (overall time, time to extraction, warm ischemia time, blood loss) were similar between groups. Conversion to hand-assist laparoscopy was required in 3 LESS-DN (6.1%) versus 2 LDN (3.9%; p = 0.67). Questionnaires revealed that 97.2% of LESS-DN versus 79.5% of LDN (p = 0.03) were 100% recovered by 2 months after donation. No significant difference was seen in satisfaction scores between the groups. Recipient outcomes were similar between groups. Our randomized trial comparing LESS donor nephrectomy to LDN confirms that LESS-DN offers a safe alternative to conventional LDN in terms of intra- and post-operative complications. LDN and LESS-DN offer similar recovery and satisfaction after donation.

  12. The efficacy of lymphatic drainage and traditional massage in the prophylaxis of migraine: a randomized, controlled parallel group study.

    PubMed

    Happe, Svenja; Peikert, Andreas; Siegert, Rudolf; Evers, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at examining the efficacy of lymphatic drainage (LD) and traditional massage (TM) in the prophylactic treatment of migraine using controlled prospective randomized clinical trial of 64 patients (57 women, 45 ± 10 years) with migraine with and without aura. Patients were randomized into three groups: LD (n = 21); TM (n = 21); waiting group (WG, n = 22). After a 4-week-baseline, a treatment period of 8 weeks was applied followed by a 4-week observation period. The patients filled in a headache diary continuously; every 4 weeks they filled in the German version of the CES-D and the German version of the Headache Disability Inventory. The main outcome measure was migraine frequency per month. At the end of the observation period, the number of migraine attacks and days decreased in the LD group by 1.8 and 3.1, respectively, in the TM group by 1.3 and 2.4, and in the WG by 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. The differences between LD and WG were significant (p = 0.006 and p = 0.015, respectively) as well as the differences between TM und WG (p = 0.042 and p = 0.016, respectively). There was a significant decrease in the amount of analgesic intake in the LD group compared to the two other groups (p = 0.004). TM and LD resulted in a reduction of migraine attack frequency. The analgesic intake only decreased significantly during LD intervention. Useful effects were identified for LD and TM as compared to WG for the prophylaxis of migraine. LD was more efficacious in some parameters than TM.

  13. A comparative study of the clinical efficacy and safety of agomelatine with escitalopram in major depressive disorder patients: A randomized, parallel-group, phase IV study

    PubMed Central

    Urade, Chetan S.; Mahakalkar, Sunil M.; Tiple, Prashant G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of agomelatine with escitalopram in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), improve sleep in MDD patients and study the adverse effects of agomelatine. Materials and Methods: Randomized, parallel-group, open-label study. The primary efficacy outcome was change from baseline to last post-baseline value in Hamilton depression rating scale and Leeds sleep evaluation questionnaire scale. Both parametric and nonparametric tests were applied for analysis. Results: Within-group and between-groups comparison of the mean HAMD17 scores showed statistically significant changes (P < 0.0001). Escitalopram showed early onset of response and remission compared to agomelatine at 10th week (P < 0.0001) and 14th week (P < 0.0001), respectively. In agomelatine, within-group and between-groups change of the mean LSEQ score was statistically significant at subsequent follow-up visits (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Escitalopram is superior to agomelatine in efficacy, considering the early response, early remission, and better relief from symptoms of MDD in adults. Agomelatine may be preferred in MDD patients having insomnia as a predominant symptom. Liver function monitoring should be done in patients on long-term agomelatine therapy. PMID:26813706

  14. Randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbohydrate-derived fulvic acid in topical treatment of eczema

    PubMed Central

    Gandy, Justin J; Snyman, Jacques R; van Rensburg, Constance EJ

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbohydratederived fulvic acid (CHD-FA) in the treatment of eczema in patients two years and older. Methods In this single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study, 36 volunteers with predetermined eczema were randomly assigned to receive either the study drug or placebo twice daily for four weeks. Results All safety parameters remained within normal limits, with no significant differences in either group. Significant differences were observed for both severity and erythema in the placebo and CHD-FA treated groups, and a significant difference was observed for scaling in the placebo-treated group. With regard to the investigator assessment of global response to treatment, a significant improvement was observed in the CHD-FA group when compared with the placebo group. A statistically significant decrease in visual analog scale score was observed in both groups, when comparing the baseline with the final results. Conclusion CHD-FA was well tolerated, with no difference in reported side effects other than a short-lived burning sensation on application. CHD-FA significantly improved some aspects of eczema. Investigator assessment of global response to treatment with CHD-FA was significantly better than that with emollient therapy alone. The results of this small exploratory study suggest that CHD-FA warrants further investigation in the treatment of eczema. PMID:21931500

  15. The MANDELA study: A multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel group trial to refine the use of everolimus after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Deuse, Tobias; Bara, Christoph; Barten, Markus J; Hirt, Stephan W; Doesch, Andreas O; Knosalla, Christoph; Grinninger, Carola; Stypmann, Jörg; Garbade, Jens; Wimmer, Peter; May, Christoph; Porstner, Martina; Schulz, Uwe

    2015-11-01

    In recent years a series of trials has sought to define the optimal protocol for everolimus-based immunosuppression in heart transplantation, with the goal of minimizing exposure to calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) and harnessing the non-immunosuppressive benefits of everolimus. Randomized studies have demonstrated that immunosuppressive potency can be maintained in heart transplant patients receiving everolimus despite marked CNI reduction, although very early CNI withdrawal may be inadvisable. A potential renal advantage has been shown for everolimus, but the optimal time for conversion and the adequate reduction in CNI exposure remain to be defined. Other reasons for use of everolimus include a substantial reduction in the risk of cytomegalovirus infection, and evidence for inhibition of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, a major cause of graft loss. The ongoing MANDELA study is a 12-month multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study in which efficacy, renal function and safety are compared in approximately 200 heart transplant patients. Patients receive CNI therapy, steroids and everolimus or mycophenolic acid during months 3 to 6 post-transplant, and are then randomized at month 6 post-transplant (i) to convert to CNI-free immunosuppression with everolimus and mycophenolic acid or (ii) to continue reduced-exposure CNI, with concomitant everolimus. Patients are then followed to month 18 post-transplant The rationale and expectations for the trial and its methodology are described herein.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of serelaxin in patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis: A single-dose, open-label, parallel-group study.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Marion; Halabi, Atef; Canadi, Jasna; Tsubouchi, Chiaki; Machineni, Surendra; Pang, Yinuo

    2016-04-01

    Serelaxin, a recombinant human relaxin-2 hormone, is in clinical development for treating acute heart failure. This open-label, parallel-group study investigated serelaxin pharmacokinetics (PK) after a single 4-hour intravenous infusion (10 µg/kg) in patients with severe renal impairment (n = 6) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis (PK on the day of dialysis [n = 6] or during dialysis-free interval [n = 6]), compared with matched healthy subjects (n = 18). In all participants, serum serelaxin concentration peaked at the end of infusion and subsequently declined with mean terminal elimination half-life of 6.5-8.8 hours. Compared with healthy subjects, a moderate decrease in serelaxin systemic clearance (37%-52%) and increase in its exposure (30%-115%) were observed in all patients. During the 4-hour hemodialysis in ESRD patients, 30% serelaxin was removed, with hemodialysis clearance constituting approximately 52% of total systemic clearance. Serelaxin was well tolerated with no deaths, serious adverse events (AE), or AE-related discontinuations. Antiserelaxin antibodies were not detected in any participant. Given the shallow dose-response relationship observed with serelaxin in clinical studies and its wide therapeutic window, the observed PK differences in patients with severe renal impairment compared with healthy subjects are unlikely to pose a safety risk and do not warrant a predefined dosage adjustment in such patients.

  17. Comparison of efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of allergic rhinitis: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study

    PubMed Central

    Dakhale, Ganesh; Tathod, Yogesh; Patel, Seema; Pimpalkhute, Sonali; Raghute, Latesh; Khamkar, Ajita

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of allergic rhinitis (AR). Materials and Methods: A 2-week, single-centered, randomized, double-blind, parallel group comparative clinical study was conducted on patients with AR. Following inclusion and exclusion criteria, 67 patients were recruited and randomized to two treatment groups and received the respective drugs for 2 weeks. At follow-up, parameters assessed were total nasal symptom score (TNSS), change in total and differential count of eosinophil. Results: In olopatadine group, there was a significantly higher reduction in TNSS (P < 0.05) than that of rupatadine. Both the drugs significantly reduced the absolute eosinophil count, but olopatadine (P < 0.001) was found to be superior. The incidence of adverse effects was found to be less in olopatadine group when compared with rupatadine group. Conclusion: Olopatadine is a better choice in AR in comparison to rupatadine due to its better efficacy and safety profile. PMID:28163538

  18. Efficacy and safety of pioglitazone added to alogliptin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kaku, K; Katou, M; Igeta, M; Ohira, T; Sano, H

    2015-12-01

    A phase IV, multicentre, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative study was conducted in Japanese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who had inadequate glycaemic control, despite treatment with alogliptin in addition to diet and/or exercise therapy. Subjects with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations of 6.9-10.5% were randomized to receive 16 weeks' double-blind treatment with pioglitazone 15 mg, 30 mg once daily or placebo added to alogliptin 25 mg once daily. The primary endpoint was the change in HbA1c from baseline at the end of treatment period (week 16). Both pioglitazone 15 and 30 mg combination therapy resulted in a significantly greater reduction in HbA1c than alogliptin monotherapy [-0.80 and -0.90% vs 0.00% (the least squares mean using analysis of covariance model); p < 0.0001, respectively]. The overall incidence rates of treatment-emergent adverse events were similar among the treatment groups. Pioglitazone/alogliptin combination therapy was effective and generally well tolerated in Japanese subjects with T2DM and is considered to be useful in clinical settings.

  19. Randomised, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the analgesic efficacy and safety of VVZ-149 injections for postoperative pain following laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nedeljkovic, Srdjan S; Correll, Darin J; Bao, Xiaodong; Zamor, Natacha; Zeballos, Jose L; Zhang, Yi; Young, Mark J; Ledley, Johanna; Sorace, Jessica; Eng, Kristen; Hamsher, Carlyle P; Maniam, Rajivan; Chin, Jonathan W; Tsui, Becky; Cho, Sunyoung; Lee, Doo H

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In spite of advances in understanding and technology, postoperative pain remains poorly treated for a significant number of patients. In colorectal surgery, the need for developing novel analgesics is especially important. Patients after bowel surgery are assessed for rapid return of bowel function and opioids worsen ileus, nausea and constipation. We describe a prospective, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled randomised controlled trial testing the hypothesis that a novel analgesic drug, VVZ -149, is safe and effective in improving pain compared with providing opioid analgesia alone among adults undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Methods and analysis Based on sample size calculations for primary outcome, we plan to enrol 120 participants. Adult patients without significant medical comorbidities or ongoing opioid use and who are undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery will be enrolled. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either VVZ-149 with intravenous (IV) hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or the control intervention (IV PCA alone) in the postoperative period. The primary outcome is the Sum of Pain Intensity Difference over 8 hours (SPID-8 postdose). Participants receive VVZ-149 for 8 hours postoperatively to the primary study end point, after which they continue to be assessed for up to 24 hours. We measure opioid consumption, record pain intensity and pain relief, and evaluate the number of rescue doses and requests for opioid. To assess safety, we record sedation, nausea and vomiting, respiratory depression, laboratory tests and ECG readings after study drug administration. We evaluate for possible confounders of analgesic response, such as anxiety, depression and catastrophising behaviours. The study will also collect blood sample data and evaluate for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval of the study protocol has been obtained from

  20. Safety of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% as a prophylactic antibiotic following routine cataract surgery: results of a prospective, parallel-group, investigator-masked study

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ranjan; Gira, Joseph; Berdy, Gregg J; Brusatti, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% compared with moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution 0.5%, when used for infection prophylaxis following uncomplicated phacoemulsification clear cornea surgery using sutureless corneal incision. Methods This prospective, two-site, parallel-group, investigator-masked clinical study included patients aged ≥18 years scheduled to undergo phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation. Patients received one drop of either besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension or moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution four times daily, beginning 3 days prior to surgery, which was continued for 7 days postoperatively. The primary endpoint was the rate of adverse events. Secondary endpoints included endothelial cell count, central corneal thickness, and overall and central corneal staining measured on days 7 (±1 day) and 28 (±2 days) following surgery, and intraocular pressure and best-corrected visual acuity measured on days 1, 7 (±1 day), and 28 (±2 days) following surgery. Results Of the 60 patients enrolled, 58 (29 per treatment group) completed the study. No adverse events were reported in either treatment group. Changes in the central corneal thickness, endothelial cell count, and corneal staining were small and similar between treatments at follow-up visits (P ≥ 0.1549). Intraocular pressure was similar between treatment groups at each visit, as was the distribution of best-corrected visual acuity. The final best-corrected visual acuity was 20/30 or better in 85% of the patients. Conclusion In this study, besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% was well tolerated when used prophylactically to prevent postoperative endophthalmitis following sutureless cataract surgery. PMID:22701313

  1. Intake of black-vinegar-mash-garlic enhances salivary release of secretory IgA: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    NAKASONE, YASUSHI; SATO, NORIMASA; AZUMA, TAKAYUKI; HASUMI, KEIJI

    2016-01-01

    Several previous studies have provided evidence that suggests the beneficial effects of garlic and black vinegar on human health, including benefits to immune function. The preliminary study indicated that the intake of black-vinegar-mash-garlic-containing food, created from aged garlic pickled in the mash of black vinegar, enhanced the release of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in the saliva. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the food in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. The trial was conducted in subjects aged between 30 and 60 years whose rate of salivary sIgA release was moderately low. Subjects consumed 2.49 g of placebo or black-vinegar-mash-garlic-containing food (active food) daily for 8 weeks. The data obtained with 54 eligible subjects (n=28 and 26 for placebo and active, respectively) were analyzed for efficacy. The rates of salivary sIgA release in the active food group (35.9±84.6 and 47.9±123.4 µg/min at weeks 4 and 8 of intake; changes from pretrial value) were higher compared to the respective rates in the placebo food group (−12.3±72.1 and −3.2±85.9 µg/min, P=0.028 and 0.082, respectively). These findings indicate that intake of black-vinegar-mash-garlic-containing food enhanced the intraoral immune response. There was no adverse event associated with the intake of active food. PMID:27347407

  2. A Randomized Single Blind Parallel Group Study Comparing Monoherbal Formulation Containing Holarrhena Antidysenterica Extract with Mesalamine in Chronic Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Johari, Sarika; Gandhi, Tejal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Incidences of side effects and relapses are very common in chronic ulcerative colitis patients after termination of the treatment. Aims and Objectives: This study aims to compare the treatment with monoherbal formulation of Holarrhena antidysenterica with Mesalamine in chronic ulcerative colitis patients with special emphasis to side effects and relapse. Settings and Design: Patients were enrolled from an Ayurveda Hospital and a private Hospital, Gujarat. The study was randomized, parallel group and single blind design. Materials and Methods: The protocol was approved by Institutional Human Research Ethics Committee of Anand Pharmacy College on 23rd Jan 2013. Three groups (n = 10) were treated with drug Mesalamine (Group I), monoherbal tablet (Group II) and combination of both (Group III) respectively. Baseline characteristics, factors affecting quality of life, chronicity of disease, signs and symptoms, body weight and laboratory investigations were recorded. Side effects and complications developed, if any were recorded during and after the study. Statistical Analysis Used: Results were expressed as mean ± SEM. Data was statistically evaluated using t-test, Wilcoxon test, Mann Whitney U test, Kruskal Wallis test and ANOVA, wherever applicable, using GraphPad Prism 6. Results: All the groups responded positively to the treatments. All the patients were positive for occult blood in stool which reversed significantly after treatment along with rise in hemoglobin. Patients treated with herbal tablets alone showed maximal reduction in abdominal pain, diarrhea, and bowel frequency and stool consistency scores than Mesalamine treated patients. Treatment with herbal tablet alone and in combination with Mesalamine significantly reduced the stool infection. Patients treated with herbal drug alone and in combination did not report any side effects, relapse or complications while 50% patients treated with Mesalamine exhibited the relapse with diarrhea and

  3. A phase III randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study comparing SB4 with etanercept reference product in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis despite methotrexate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Paul; Vencovský, Jiří; Sylwestrzak, Anna; Leszczyński, Piotr; Porawska, Wieslawa; Baranauskaite, Asta; Tseluyko, Vira; Zhdan, Vyacheslav M; Stasiuk, Barbara; Milasiene, Roma; Barrera Rodriguez, Aaron Alejandro; Cheong, Soo Yeon; Ghil, Jeehoon

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy and safety of SB4 (an etanercept biosimilar) with reference product etanercept (ETN) in patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate (MTX) therapy. Methods This is a phase III, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, multicentre study with a 24-week primary endpoint. Patients with moderate to severe RA despite MTX treatment were randomised to receive weekly dose of 50 mg of subcutaneous SB4 or ETN. The primary endpoint was the American College of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response at week 24. Other efficacy endpoints as well as safety, immunogenicity and pharmacokinetic parameters were also measured. Results 596 patients were randomised to either SB4 (N=299) or ETN (N=297). The ACR20 response rate at week 24 in the per-protocol set was 78.1% for SB4 and 80.3% for ETN. The 95% CI of the adjusted treatment difference was −9.41% to 4.98%, which is completely contained within the predefined equivalence margin of −15% to 15%, indicating therapeutic equivalence between SB4 and ETN. Other efficacy endpoints and pharmacokinetic endpoints were comparable. The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was comparable (55.2% vs 58.2%), and the incidence of antidrug antibody development up to week 24 was lower in SB4 compared with ETN (0.7% vs 13.1%). Conclusions SB4 was shown to be equivalent with ETN in terms of efficacy at week 24. SB4 was well tolerated with a lower immunogenicity profile. The safety profile of SB4 was comparable with that of ETN. Trial registration numbers NCT01895309, EudraCT 2012-005026-30. PMID:26150601

  4. Rationale and design of Short-Term EXenatide therapy in Acute ischaemic Stroke (STEXAS): a randomised, open-label, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Rachel T; Hocking, Samantha L; Priglinger, Miriam; Day, Susan; Herkes, Geoffrey K; Krause, Martin; Fulcher, Gregory R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Both hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia in acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) are associated with increased infarct size and worse functional outcomes. Thus, therapies that can maintain normoglycaemia during stroke are clinically important. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues, including exenatide, are routinely used in the treatment of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, but data on the usefulness of this class of agents in the management of elevated glucose levels in AIS are limited. Owing to their glucose-dependent mechanism of action, GLP-1 analogues are associated with a low risk of hypoglycaemia, which may give them an advantage over intensive insulin therapy in the acute management of hyperglycaemia in this setting. Methods and analysis The Short-Term EXenatide therapy in Acute ischaemic Stroke study is a randomised, open-label, parallel-group pilot study designed to investigate the efficacy of exenatide at lowering blood glucose levels in patients with hyperglycaemia with AIS. A total of 30 patients presenting with AIS and blood glucose levels >10 mmol/L will be randomised to receive the standard therapy (intravenous insulin) or intravenous exenatide for up to 72 h. Outcomes including blood glucose levels within the target range (5–10 mmol/L), the incidence of hypoglycaemia and the feasibility of administering intravenous exenatide in this patient population will be assessed. A follow-up visit at 3 months will facilitate evaluation of neurological outcomes post-stroke. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the local Institutional Review Board (Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee). The study results will be communicated via presentations at scientific conferences and through publication in peer-reviewed journals. Conclusions As GLP-1 analogues require elevated glucose levels to exert their insulin potentiating activity, the use of exenatide in the management of hyperglycaemia in AIS may

  5. Central corneal thickness changes in bevel-up versus bevel-down phacoemulsification cataract surgery: study protocol for a randomised, triple-blind, parallel group trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaup, Soujanya; KS, Divyalakshmi; Arunachalam, Cynthia; Varghese, Rejitha Chinnu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Corneal endothelial damage following phacoemulsification is still one of the major concerns of modern day cataract surgery. Although many techniques have been proposed, the risks of posterior capsular rupture and corneal endothelium damage persist. In theory, damage to the corneal endothelium is minimised by delivering the lowest phaco energy only in the direction necessary to emulsify the lens nucleus. Hence, it is believed that the bevel of the needle should be turned towards the nucleus or the nuclear fragment (ie, bevel-down. However, there is a difference of opinion among ophthalmologists with reference to the phaco tip's position (bevel-up vs bevel-down) during phacoemulsification. This subject has not been extensively studied earlier. Methods and analysis This is a prospective, triple-blinded (trial participant, outcome assessor and the data analyst), randomised controlled trial with 2 parallel groups and with an allocation ratio of 1:1. It will be conducted in a tertiary care hospital, Mangaluru, India. The objective is to compare the postoperative central corneal thickness changes between the bevel-up and bevel-down techniques of phacoemulsification. Patients aged >18 years with immature cataract undergoing phacoemulsification will be selected for the study. The important exclusion criteria are the history of previous significant ocular trauma or intraocular surgery, corneal pathology, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, intraocular inflammation, a preoperative fully dilated pupil <6 mm, anterior chamber depth <2.5 mm and nuclear sclerosis grade >4. After randomisation, patients will undergo phacoemulsification surgery either by a bevel-up or bevel-down procedure. With an estimated power of 80%, the calculated sample size is 55 patients in each group. The recruitment will start from April 2016. Ethics and dissemination Yenepoya University Ethics Committee, India has approved the study protocol (YUEC/148/2016 on 18 February 2016). It complies

  6. A multicentre, double-blind, randomised, controlled, parallel-group study of the effectiveness of a pharmacist-acquired medication history in an emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Admission to an emergency department (ED) is a key vulnerable moment when patients are at increased risk of medication discrepancies and medication histories are an effective way of ensuring that fewer errors are made. This study measured whether a pharmacist-acquired medication history in an ED focusing on a patient’s current home medication regimen, and available to be used by a doctor when consulting in the ED, would reduce the number of patients having at least 1 medication discrepancy related to home medication. Methods This multicentre, double-blind, randomised, controlled parallel-group study was conducted at 3 large teaching hospitals. Two hundred and seventy participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 134) or a standard care (n = 136) arm. All consecutive patients >18 years old admitted through the ED were eligible. The intervention consisted of pharmacists conducting a standardised comprehensive medication history interview focusing on a patient’s current home medication regimen, prior to being seen by a doctor. Data recorded on the admission medication order form was available to be used by a doctor during consultation in the ED. The admission medication order form was given to doctors at a later stage in the control arm for them to amend prescriptions. The effect of the intervention was assessed primarily by comparing the number of patients having at least 1 admission medication discrepancy regarding medication being taken at home. Secondary outcomes concerned the characteristics and clinical severity of such medication discrepancies. Results The intervention reduced discrepancies occurring by 33% (p < 0.0001; 0.1055 odds ratio, 0.05-0.24 95% confidence interval), despite recall bias. Regarding total discrepancies, omitting medication occurred most frequently (55.1%) and most discrepancies (42.7%) were judged to have the potential to cause moderate discomfort or clinical deterioration. Conclusions A pharmacist

  7. The effect of umeclidinium added to inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist in patients with symptomatic COPD: a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Ana R; Riley, John H; Church, Alison; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Punekar, Yogesh S; Fahy, William A

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of triple therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA), added to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/long-acting β2-agonist (LABA), have been demonstrated. Limited data assessing the efficacy of the LAMA umeclidinium (UMEC) added to ICS/LABA are available. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of UMEC added to ICS/LABAs in patients with moderate-to-very-severe COPD. This is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study. Patients were symptomatic (modified Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale score ⩾2), despite receiving ICS/LABA (fluticasone propionate/salmeterol (FP/SAL, branded) 500/50 mcg, budesonide/formoterol (BD/FOR, branded) 200/6 mcg or 400/12 mcg, or other ICS/LABAs) ⩾30 days before the run-in (7±2 days). Patients were randomised 1:1 to once-daily UMEC 62.5 mcg or placebo (PBO), added to twice-daily open-label ICS/LABA for 12 weeks. Primary end point was trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at Day 85; secondary end point was weighted mean (WM) 0–6 h FEV1 at Day 84; other end points included COPD Assessment Test (CAT) score and Transition Dyspnoea Index (TDI) score. Adverse events (AEs) were investigated. In the UMEC+ICS/LABA and PBO+ICS/LABA groups, 119 and 117 patients were randomised, respectively. Patients received FP/SAL (40%), BD/FOR (43%) and other ICS/LABAs (17%). UMEC+ICS/LABA resulted in significant improvements in trough FEV1 (Day 85) and in WM 0–6 h FEV1 (Day 84) versus PBO+ICS/LABA (difference: 123 and 148 ml, respectively, both P<0.001). Change from baseline for UMEC+ICS/LABA versus PBO+ICS/LABA was significantly different for CAT score at Day 84 (−1.31, P<0.05), but not for TDI score (0.40, P=0.152). AE incidence was similar with UMEC+ICS/LABA (38%) and PBO+ICS/LABA (42%). UMEC+ICS/LABA improved lung function and CAT score in patients with symptomatic COPD versus PBO+ICS/LABA (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02257372). PMID:27334739

  8. Umeclidinium/vilanterol as step-up therapy from tiotropium in patients with moderate COPD: a randomized, parallel-group, 12-week study

    PubMed Central

    Kerwin, Edward M; Kalberg, Chris J; Galkin, Dmitry V; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Church, Alison; Riley, John H; Fahy, William A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Patients with COPD who remain symptomatic on long-acting bronchodilator monotherapy may benefit from step-up therapy to a long-acting bronchodilator combination. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of umeclidinium (UMEC)/vilanterol (VI) in patients with moderate COPD who remained symptomatic on tiotropium (TIO). Methods In this randomized, blinded, double-dummy, parallel-group study (NCT01899742), patients (N=494) who were prescribed TIO for ≥3 months at screening (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1]: 50%–70% of predicted; modified Medical Research Council [mMRC] score ≥1) and completed a 4-week run-in with TIO were randomized to UMEC/VI 62.5/25 µg or TIO 18 µg for 12 weeks. Efficacy assessments included trough FEV1 at Day 85 (primary end point), 0–3 h serial FEV1, rescue medication use, Transition Dyspnea Index (TDI), St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and COPD Assessment Test (CAT). Safety evaluations included adverse events (AEs). Results Compared with TIO, UMEC/VI produced greater improvements in trough FEV1 (least squares [LS] mean difference: 88 mL at Day 85 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 45–131]; P<0.001) and FEV1 after 5 min on Day 1 (50 mL [95% CI: 27–72]; P<0.001). Reductions in rescue medication use over 12 weeks were greater with UMEC/VI versus TIO (LS mean change: −0.1 puffs/d [95% CI: −0.2–0.0]; P≤0.05). More patients achieved clinically meaningful improvements in TDI score (≥1 unit) with UMEC/VI (63%) versus TIO (49%; odds ratio at Day 84=1.78 [95% CI: 1.21–2.64]; P≤0.01). Improvements in SGRQ and CAT scores were similar between treatments. The incidence of AEs was similar with UMEC/VI (30%) and TIO (31%). Conclusion UMEC/VI step-up therapy provides clinical benefit over TIO monotherapy in patients with moderate COPD who are symptomatic on TIO alone. PMID:28280319

  9. A double blind, randomised, parallel group study on the efficacy and safety of treating acute lateral ankle sprain with oral hydrolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoffs, G; Struijs, P; de Wit, C; Rahlfs, V; Zwipp, H; van Dijk, C N

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness and safety of the triple combination Phlogenzym (rutoside, bromelain, and trypsin) with double combinations, the single substances, and placebo. Design: Multinational, multicentre, double blind, randomised, parallel group design with eight groups structured according to a factorial design. Setting: Orthopaedic surgery and emergency departments in 27 European hospitals. Participants: A total of 721 patients aged 16–53 years presenting with acute unilateral sprain of the lateral ankle joint. Primary efficacy criteria: (a) Pain on walking one or two steps, as defined by the patient on a visual analogue scale. (b) The range of motion, as measured by the investigator and expressed as a sum of flexion and extension. (c) The volume of the injured ankle measured with a volometer. Results: At the primary end point at seven days, the greatest reduction in pain was in the bromelain/trypsin group (73.7%). The Phlogenzym group showed a median reduction of 60.3%, and the placebo group showed a median reduction of 73.3%. The largest increase in range of motion (median) was in the placebo group (60% change from baseline). The Phlogenzym group showed a median increase of 42.9%. The biggest decrease in swelling was in the trypsin group (3.9% change from baseline). The Phlogenzym group showed a –2.30% change from baseline and the placebo group a –2.90% change. In the subgroup analysis of patients who did not use a Caligamed brace, Phlogenzym was superior to placebo for the summarising directional test of the primary efficacy criteria (MW = 0.621; LB-CI 0.496; p = 0.029; one sided Wei-Lachin procedure). The vast majority of doctors and patients rated the tolerability of all treatments tested as very good or at least good. Conclusions: Phlogenzym was not found to be superior to the three two-drug combinations, the three single substances, or placebo for treatment of patients with acute unilateral sprain of the lateral ankle joint. The small

  10. Comparison of usual podiatric care and early physical therapy intervention for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a parallel-group randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A significant number of individuals suffer from plantar heel pain (PHP) and many go on to have chronic symptoms and continued disability. Persistence of symptoms adds to the economic burden of PHP and cost-effective solutions are needed. Currently, there is a wide variation in treatment, cost, and outcomes of care for PHP with limited information on the cost-effectiveness and comparisons of common treatment approaches. Two practice guidelines and recent evidence of effective physical therapy intervention are available to direct treatment but the timing and influence of physical therapy intervention in the multidisciplinary management of PHP is unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to compare the outcomes and costs associated with early physical therapy intervention (ePT) following initial presentation to podiatry versus usual podiatric care (uPOD) in individuals with PHP. Methods A parallel-group, block-randomized clinical trial will compare ePT and uPOD. Both groups will be seen initially by a podiatrist before allocation to a group that will receive physical therapy intervention consisting primarily of manual therapy, exercise, and modalities, or podiatric care consisting primarily of a stretching handout, medication, injections, and orthotics. Treatment in each group will be directed by practice guidelines and a procedural manual, yet the specific intervention for each participant will be selected by the treating provider. Between-group differences in the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure 6 months following the initial visit will be the primary outcome collected by an independent investigator. In addition, differences in the European Quality of Life – Five Dimensions, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC), health-related costs, and cost-effectiveness at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year will be compared between groups. The association between successful outcomes based on GROC score and participant expectations of recovery

  11. Bronchodilator efficacy of 18 μg once-daily tiotropium inhalation via Discair® versus HandiHaler® in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: randomized, active-controlled, parallel-group, open-label, Phase IV trial

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Pinar; Bayraktaroglu, Mesut; Gorgun, Didem; Secik, Funda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the bronchodilator efficacy of 18 μg once-daily tiotropium inhalation administered via Discair® versus HandiHaler® in adults with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients and methods Fifty-eight patients with moderate-to-severe COPD were enrolled in this randomized, active-controlled, parallel-group, open-label, Phase IV non-inferiority trial. Patients were randomly assigned to a test group (n=29, inhalation with Discair) or a reference group (n=29, inhalation with HandiHaler). The primary efficacy parameter was the average maximum change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, in L). Change in forced vital capacity (FVC, in L), %FEV1 and %FVC, the standardized area under the response–time curve (AUC) for the absolute change in FEV1 and FVC, time to onset and peak of response, and safety data were also evaluated. Results The test inhaler was non-inferior to the reference inhaler in terms of maximum change in FEV1 at 24 h (unadjusted change: 0.0017 L [95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.0777, 0.0812]; change adjusted for time to reach maximum change in FEV1 and smoking in pack-years: 0.0116 L [95% CI: −0.0699, 0.0931]), based on a non-inferiority margin of 0.100 L. There were also no significant differences between the two groups in maximum change in FVC value from baseline (0.3417 L vs 0.4438 L, P=0.113), percent change from baseline (22.235 vs 20.783 for FEV1, P=0.662; 16.719 vs 20.337 for FVC, P=0.257), and AUC0–24 h (2.949 vs 2.833 L for FEV1, P=0.891; 2.897 vs 4.729 L for FVC, P=0.178). There were no adverse events, serious adverse events, or deaths. Conclusion Our findings show that the Discair was non-inferior to the HandiHaler. More specifically, these devices had similar clinical efficacy in terms of time-dependent response over 24 h for patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. PMID:27920513

  12. Semi Active Control of Civil Structures, Analytical and Numerical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerboua, M.; Benguediab, M.; Megnounif, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Kaoulala, F.

    Structural control for civil structures was born out of a need to provide safer and more efficient designs with the reality of limited resources. The purpose of structural control is to absorb and to reflect the energy introduced by dynamic loads such as winds, waves, earthquakes, and traffic. Today, the protection of civil structures from severe dynamic loading is typically achieved by allowing the structures to be damaged. Semi-active control devices, also called "smart" control devices, assume the positive aspects of both the passive and active control devices. A semi-active control strategy is similar to the active control strategy. Only here, the control actuator does not directly apply force to the structure, but instead it is used to control the properties of a passive energy device, a controllable passive damper. Semi-active control strategies can be used in many of the same civil applications as passive and active control. One method of operating smart cable dampers is in a purely passive capacity, supplying the dampers with constant optimal voltage. The advantages to this strategy are the relative simplicity of implementing the control strategy as compared to a smart or active control strategy and that the dampers are more easily optimally tuned in- place, eliminating the need to have passive dampers with unique optimal damping coefficients. This research investigated semi-active control of civil structures for natural hazard mitigation. The research has two components, the seismic protection of buildings and the mitigation of wind-induced vibration in structures. An ideal semi-active motion equation of a composite beam that consists of a cantilever beam bonded with a PZT patch using Hamilton's principle and Galerkin's method was treated. A series R-L and a parallel R-L shunt circuits are coupled into the motion equation respectively by means of the constitutive relation of piezoelectric material and Kirchhoff's law to control the beam vibration. A

  13. An investigator-blind, single-center, controlled, parallel group study to confirm the suitability of sanitary pads for menstrual protection in an ethnic nigerian population.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Angela; Tischler, Heiko; Wambebe, Charles; Osisanya, Tolu; Farage, Miranda A

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the suitability of a widely used brand of sanitary pad with a formed film top sheet (study pad) for comfort, protection from soiling, and fit to underwear in a local female Nigerian population compared to a leading nonwoven product (reference pad) marketed in Nigeria. Two hundred eighty-nine healthy Nigerian women 18-45 years of age were randomized to wear one of the brands over two menstrual cycles. Both groups reported comparable (yet few) sensations of itching, rubbing/chafing, redness/rash, and burning/stinging. Participants rated menstrual protection of the study pad statistically significantly better for 88% of questions on a rating form. The percentage of negative comments regarding leakage and pad slip was statistically significantly lower for the study pad than for the reference product. There were no pad-related adverse events. These results show that the study pad was preferred in terms of comfort, protection from soiling, and fit to underwear. Further, top sheet technologies do not differ from nonwoven products in terms of compatibility to skin during use.

  14. Choice of Moisturiser for Eczema Treatment (COMET): feasibility study of a randomised controlled parallel group trial in children recruited from primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ridd, Matthew J; Garfield, Kirsty; Gaunt, Daisy M; Redmond, Niamh M; Powell, Kingsley; Wilson, Victoria; Guy, Richard H; Ball, Nicola; Shaw, Lindsay; Purdy, Sarah; Metcalfe, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of ‘leave on’ emollients for children with eczema. Design Single-centre, pragmatic, 4-arm, observer-blinded, parallel, randomised feasibility trial. Setting General practices in the UK. Participants Children with eczema aged 1 month to <5 years. Outcome measures Primary outcome—proportion of parents who reported use of the allocated study emollient every day for the duration of follow-up (12 weeks). Other feasibility outcomes—participant recruitment and retention, data collection and completeness and blinding of observers to allocation. Interventions Aveeno lotion, Diprobase cream, Doublebase gel, Hydromol ointment. Results 197 children were recruited—107 by self-referral (mainly via practice mail-outs) and 90 by inconsultation (clinician consenting and randomising) pathways. Participants recruited inconsultation were younger, had more severe Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure scores and were more likely to withdraw than self-referrals. Parents of 20 (10%) of all the randomised participants reported using the allocated emollient daily for 84 days. The use of other non-study emollients was common. Completeness of data collected by parent-held daily diaries and at monthly study visits was good. Daily diaries were liked (81%) but mainly completed on paper rather than via electronic (‘app’) form. Major costs drivers were general practitioner consultations and eczema-related prescriptions. Observer unblinding was infrequent, and occurred at the baseline or first follow-up visit through accidental disclosure. Conclusions It is feasible in a primary care setting to recruit and randomise young children with eczema to emollients, follow them up and collect relevant trial data, while keeping observers blinded to their allocation. However, reported use of emollients (study and others) has design implications for future trials. Trial registration number ISRCTN21828118/EudraCT2013

  15. Fixed combination of cinnarizine and dimenhydrinate versus betahistine dimesylate in the treatment of Ménière's disease: a randomized, double-blind, parallel group clinical study.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Miroslav; Kostrica, Rom

    2002-01-01

    In a randomized, double-blind clinical study, we evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of the fixed combination of cinnarizine, 20 mg, and dimenhydrinate, 40 mg (Arlevert [ARL]) in comparison to betahistine dimesylate (12 mg) in 82 patients suffering from Ménière's disease for at least 3 months and showing the characteristic triad of symptoms (paroxysmal vertigo attacks, cochlear hearing loss, and tinnitus). The treatment (one tablet three times daily) extended to 12 weeks, with control visits at 1, 3, 6, and 12 weeks after drug intake. The study demonstrated for both the fixed-combination ARL and for betahistine a highly efficient reduction of vertigo symptoms in the course of the 12 weeks of treatment; however, no statistically significant difference between the two treatment groups could be established. Similar results were found for tinnitus (approximately 60% reduction) and for the associated vegetative symptoms (almost complete disappearance). Vestibulospinal reactions, recorded by means of craniocorpography, also improved distinctly, with a statistically significant superiority of ARL versus betahistine (p < .042) for the parameter of lateral sway (Unterberger's test). The caloric tests (electronystagmography) showed only minor changes for both treatment groups in the course of the study. A statistically significant improvement of hearing function of the affected ear (p = .042) was found for the combination preparation after 12 weeks of treatment. The tolerability was judged by the vast majority of patients (97.5%) in both groups to be very good. Only one patient (betahistine group) reported a nonserious adverse event, and two betahistine patients did not complete the study. In conclusion, the combination preparation proved to be a highly efficient and safe treatment option for Ménière's disease and may be used both in the management of acute episodes and in long-term treatment. Efficacy and safety were found to be similar to the widely used standard

  16. A Multiple-Dose, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-Group QT/QTc Study to Evaluate the Electrophysiologic Effects of THC/CBD Spray.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Edward M; Schoedel, Kerri; Bartlett, Cindy; Romach, Myroslava; Russo, Ethan B; Stott, Colin G; Wright, Stephen; White, Linda; Duncombe, Paul; Chen, Chien-Feng

    2013-07-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray has proved efficacious in the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis and chronic pain. A thorough QT/QTc study was performed to investigate the effects of THC/CBD spray on electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters in compliance with regulatory requirements, evaluating the effect of a recommended daily dose (8 sprays/day) and supratherapeutic doses (24 or 36 sprays/day) of THC/CBD spray on the QT/QTc interval in 258 healthy volunteers. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profile of THC/CBD spray were also evaluated. Therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses of THC/CBD spray had no effect on cardiac repolarization with primary and secondary endpoints of QTcI and QTcF/QTcB, respectively, showing similar results. There was no indication of any effect on heart rate, atrioventricular conduction, or cardiac depolarization and no new clinically relevant morphological changes were observed. Overall, 19 subjects (25.0%) in the supratherapeutic (24/36 daily sprays of THC/CBD spray) dose group and one (1.6%) in the moxifloxacin group withdrew early due to intolerable AEs. Four psychiatric serious adverse events (AEs) in the highest dose group resulted in a reduction in the surpatherapeutic dose to 24 sprays/day. In conclusion, THC/CBD spray does not significantly affect ECG parameters. Additionally, THC/CBD spray is well tolerated at therapeutic doses with an AE profile similar to previous clinical studies.

  17. Efficacy and safety of ofloxacin and its combination with dexamethasone in chronic suppurative otitis media. A randomised, double blind, parallel group, comparative study.

    PubMed

    Panchasara, A; Singh, A; Mandavia, D; Jha, S; Tripathi, C

    2015-02-01

    The role of corticosteroid in patients of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is unknown. In the present study, the efficacy and safety of ofloxacin alone (OA) and the ofloxacin + dexamethasone combination (ODC) is compared by studying clinical cure rates and adverse drug reactions in patients with CSOM. After prior permission from the Institutional Review Board and written informed consent from patients, pre-treatment clinical assessment and bacteriology of the middle ear discharge were done. The middle ear was categorised into active, mucoid or inactive according to the type of discharge. Grades of otorrhoea and size of tympanic membrane perforation were noted. CSOM with organisms sensitive to ofloxacin were treated either with OA or ODC eardrops for a period of 15 days. Post-treatment clinical cure (when grade of otorrhoea become 0) was recorded on the 5(th), 10(th) and 15(th) days and bacteriological assessment was recorded at the last visit. All parameters were analysed using Fisher's exact test. A total 110 patients were randomised. The most common microorganism associated with CSOM was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (45.45 %). Clinical improvement was seen in 84.61% and 86.79% of cases, but bacteriological improvement in only 82.69% and 77.35% of cases treated with OA and ODC, respectively. Shift of middle ear discharge from active to inactive was noted in 71.15% and 64.15% patients by the 10th day in the OA and ODC groups, respectively. As there was no difference in clinical or bacteriological improvement, it may be unnecessary to combine steroids with topical antibiotic preparations for management of CSOM.

  18. Itolizumab in combination with methotrexate modulates active rheumatoid arthritis: safety and efficacy from a phase 2, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, dose-ranging study.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Arvind; Chandrashekara, S; Iyer, Rajgopalan; Rajasekhar, Liza; Shetty, Naresh; Veeravalli, Sarathchandra Mouli; Ghosh, Alakendu; Merchant, Mrugank; Oak, Jyotsna; Londhey, Vikram; Barve, Abhijit; Ramakrishnan, M S; Montero, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of itolizumab with methotrexate in active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who had inadequate response to methotrexate. In this open-label, phase 2 study, 70 patients fulfilling American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and negative for latent tuberculosis were randomized to four arms: 0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 mg/kg itolizumab weekly combined with oral methotrexate, and methotrexate alone (2:2:2:1). Patients were treated for 12 weeks, followed by 12 weeks of methotrexate alone during follow-up. Twelve weeks of itolizumab therapy was well tolerated. Forty-four patients reported adverse events (AEs); except for six severe AEs, all others were mild or moderate. Infusion-related reactions mainly occurred after the first infusion, and none were reported after the 11th infusion. No serum anti-itolizumab antibodies were detected. In the full analysis set, all itolizumab doses showed evidence of efficacy. At 12 weeks, 50 % of the patients achieved ACR20, and 58.3 % moderate or good 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS-28) response; at week 24, these responses were seen in 22 and 31 patients. Significant improvements were seen in Short Form-36 Health Survey and Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index scores. Overall, itolizumab in combination with methotrexate was well tolerated and efficacious in RA for 12 weeks, with efficacy persisting for the entire 24-week evaluation period. (Clinical Trial Registry of India, http://ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/login.php , CTRI/2008/091/000295).

  19. Safety and Effectiveness of Continuation Antidepressant Versus Mood Stabilizer Monotherapy for Relapse-prevention of Bipolar II Depression: A Randomized, Double-blind, Parallel-group, Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Amsterdam, Jay D.; Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo; Soeller, Irene; Li, Susan Qing; Mao, Jun J.; DeRubeis, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Compare the safety and effectiveness of continuation antidepressant versus mood stabilizer monotherapy for preventing depressive relapse in bipolar II disorder. Methods Subjects ≥18 years old with bipolar II depression (n=129) were randomized to double-blind venlafaxine or lithium monotherapy for 12 weeks. Responders with a ≥50% reduction in depression score were continued for an additional 6 months of relapse-prevention monotherapy. Primary outcome was depressive relapse during continuation monotherapy. Secondary outcomes included sustained response rate from initiation of treatment to study end-point, relapse hazard, time to relapse, change in mania ratings, and frequency of treatment-emergent sub-syndromal hypomania and/or depressive episodes. Results Venlafaxine produced greater sustained response rate versus lithium (p<0.0001); however, there was no difference in relapse rate for venlafaxine (7.5%) versus lithium (26.7%) (p=0.079); relapse hazard (p=0.073), or time to relapse (p=0.090) between treatment conditions during continuation monotherapy. There were no group differences in mania rating scores over time and no difference in frequency or duration of syndromal or sub-syndromal hypomanic episodes. There were more sub-syndromal depressive episodes during lithium monotherapy (p=0.03). Limitations Sample size was limited by the lower sustained response rate for lithium versus venlafaxine; study was not specifically powered to detect differences in treatment-emergent hypomanic or depressive episodes between groups. Conclusion Results suggest that continuation venlafaxine monotherapy may provide similar prophylactic effectiveness relative to lithium, with no difference in treatment-emergent hypomanic episodes and without the need for frequent serum lithium level and metabolic monitoring. Larger, prospective trials are needed to confirm these observations. PMID:26143402

  20. Efficacy of Diosmectite (Smecta)® in the Treatment of Acute Watery Diarrhoea in Adults: A Multicentre, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Khediri, Faouzi; Mrad, Abdennebi Ilhem; Azzouz, Moussadek; Doughi, Hedi; Najjar, Taoufik; Mathiex-Fortunet, Hélène; Garnier, Philippe; Cortot, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Background. Although diosmectite has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of acute watery diarrhoea in children, its efficacy in adults still needs to be assessed. The objective of this study was therefore to assess the efficacy of diosmectite on the time to recovery in adults with acute diarrhoea. Methods. A total of 346 adults with at least three watery stools per day over a period of less than 48 hours were prospectively randomized to diosmectite (6 g tid) or placebo during four days. The primary endpoint was time to diarrhoea recovery. Results. In the intention-to-treat population, median time to recovery was 53.8 hours (range [3.7–167.3]) with diosmectite (n = 166) versus 69.0 hours [2.2–165.2] with placebo, (n = 163; P = .029), which corresponds to a difference of 15.2 hours. Diosmectite was well tolerated. Conclusion. Diosmectite at 6 g tid was well tolerated and reduced the time to recovery of acute watery diarrhoea episode in a clinically relevant manner. PMID:21760777

  1. Duloxetine and pregabalin: high-dose monotherapy or their combination? The "COMBO-DN study"--a multinational, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Wilhelm, Stefan; Lledo, Alberto; Schacht, Alexander; Tölle, Thomas; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Skljarevski, Vladimir; Freynhagen, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    This multicentre, double-blind, parallel-group study in diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain addressed whether, in patients not responding to standard doses of duloxetine or pregabalin, combining both medications is superior to increasing each drug to its maximum recommended dose. For initial 8-week therapy, either 60 mg/day duloxetine (groups 1, 2) or 300 mg/day pregabalin (groups 3, 4) was given. Thereafter, in the 8-week combination/high-dose therapy period, only nonresponders received 120 mg/day duloxetine (group 1), a combination of 60 mg/day duloxetine and 300 mg/day pregabalin (groups 2, 3), or 600 mg/day pregabalin (group 4). Primary outcome (Brief Pain Inventory Modified Short Form [BPI-MSF] 24-hour average pain change after combination/high-dose therapy) was analyzed comparing combination (groups 2, 3 pooled) with high-dose monotherapy (groups 1, 4 pooled). Secondary end points included response rates, BPI-MSF severity items, and comparison of duloxetine and pregabalin in BPI-MSF average pain. Eight hundred four patients were evaluated for initial therapy and 339 for combination/high-dose therapy. There were no significant differences between combination and high-dose monotherapy regarding BPI-MSF average pain (mean change: combination: -2.35; high-dose monotherapy: -2.16; P = 0.370) and most secondary end points, which, however, consistently favoured combination therapy. Fifty-percent response rates were 52.1% for combination and 39.3% for high-dose monotherapy (P = 0.068). In exploratory analyses of the initial 8-week therapy uncorrected for multiple comparisons, 60 mg/day duloxetine was found superior to 300 mg/day pregabalin (P < 0.001). Both drugs and their combination were well tolerated. Although not significantly superior to high-dose monotherapy, combination therapy was considered to be effective, safe, and well tolerated.

  2. Twelve-week, multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative phase II/III study of benzoyl peroxide gel in patients with acne vulgaris: A secondary publication.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Makoto; Sato, Shinichi; Furukawa, Fukumi; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Igarashi, Atsuyuki; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Nagare, Toshitaka; Katsuramaki, Tsuneo

    2017-03-11

    A placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative, multicenter study was conducted to investigate the efficacy and safety of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) gel, administrated once daily for 12 weeks to Japanese patients with acne vulgaris. Efficacy was evaluated by counting all inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions. Safety was evaluated based on adverse events, local skin tolerability scores and laboratory test values. All 609 subjects were randomly assigned to receive the study products (2.5% and 5% BPO and placebo), and 607 subjects were included in the full analysis set, 544 in the per protocol set and 609 in the safety analyses. The median rates of reduction from baseline to the last evaluation of the inflammatory lesion counts, the primary end-point, in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups were 72.7% and 75.0%, respectively, and were significantly higher than that in the placebo group (41.7%). No deaths or other serious adverse events were observed. The incidences of adverse events in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups were 56.4% and 58.8%, respectively; a higher incidence than in the placebo group, but there was no obvious difference between the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups. All adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Most adverse events did not lead to study product discontinuation. The results suggested that both 2.5% and 5% BPO are useful for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

  3. Safety and pharmacokinetics of single and multiple intravenous bolus doses of diclofenac sodium compared with oral diclofenac potassium 50 mg: A randomized, parallel-group, single-center study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Munjal, Sagar; Gautam, Anirudh; Okumu, Franklin; McDowell, James; Allenby, Kent

    2016-01-01

    In a randomized, parallel-group, single-center study in 42 healthy adults, the safety and pharmacokinetic parameters of an intravenous formulation of 18.75 and 37.5 mg diclofenac sodium (DFP-08) following single- and multiple-dose bolus administration were compared with diclofenac potassium 50 mg oral tablets. Mean AUC0-inf values for a 50-mg oral tablet and an 18.75-mg intravenous formulation were similar (1308.9 [393.0]) vs 1232.4 [147.6]). As measured by the AUC, DFP-08 18.75 mg and 37.5 mg demonstrated dose proportionality for extent of exposure. One subject in each of the placebo and DFP-08 18.75-mg groups and 2 subjects in the DFP-08 37.5-mg group reported adverse events that were considered by the investigator to be related to the study drug. All were mild in intensity and did not require treatment. Two subjects in the placebo group and 1 subject in the DFP-08 18.75-mg group reported grade 1 thrombophlebitis; no subjects reported higher than grade 1 thrombophlebitis after receiving a single intravenous dose. The 18.75- and 37.5-mg doses of intravenous diclofenac (single and multiple) were well tolerated for 7 days. Additional efficacy and safety studies are required to fully characterize the product.

  4. Effects on hemodynamics and gas exchange of omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsion in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, Joan; Masclans, Joan Ramon; Sacanell, Judit; Chacon, Pilar; Sabin, Pilar; Planas, Merce

    2008-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the effects on hemodynamics and gas exchange of a lipid emulsion enriched with omega-3 fatty acids in patients with ARDS. Methods The design was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study in our Intensive Medicine Department of Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona-Spain). We studied 16 consecutive patients with ARDS and intolerance to enteral nutrition (14 men and 2 women; mean age: 58 ± 13 years; APACHE II score: 17.8 ± 2.3; Lung Injury Score: 3.1 ± 0.5; baseline PaO2/FiO2 ratio: 149 ± 40). Patients were randomized into 2 groups: Group A (n = 8) received the study emulsion Lipoplus® 20%, B.Braun Medical (50% MCT, 40% LCT, 10% ω-3); Group B (n = 8) received the control emulsion Intralipid® Fresenius Kabi (100% LCT). Lipid emulsions were administered during 12 h at a dose of 0.12 g/kg/h. Measurements of the main hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters were made at baseline (immediately before administration of the lipid emulsions), every hour during the lipid infusion, at the end of administration, and six hours after the end of administration lipid infusion. Results No statistically significant changes were observed in the different hemodynamic values analyzed. Likewise, the gas exchange parameters did not show statistically significant differences during the study. No adverse effect attributable to the lipid emulsions was seen in the patients analyzed. Conclusion The lipid emulsion enriched with omega-3 fatty acids was safe and well tolerated in short-term administration to patients with ARDS. It did not cause any significant changes in hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters. Trial registration ISRCTN63673813 PMID:18947396

  5. Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of THC:CBD extract and THC extract in patients with intractable cancer-related pain.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy R; Burnell-Nugent, Mary; Lossignol, Dominique; Ganae-Motan, Elena Doina; Potts, Richard; Fallon, Marie T

    2010-02-01

    This study compared the efficacy of a tetrahydrocannabinol:cannabidiol (THC:CBD) extract, a nonopioid analgesic endocannabinoid system modulator, and a THC extract, with placebo, in relieving pain in patients with advanced cancer. In total, 177 patients with cancer pain, who experienced inadequate analgesia despite chronic opioid dosing, entered a two-week, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. Patients were randomized to THC:CBD extract (n = 60), THC extract (n = 58), or placebo (n = 59). The primary analysis of change from baseline in mean pain Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) score was statistically significantly in favor of THC:CBD compared with placebo (improvement of -1.37 vs. -0.69), whereas the THC group showed a nonsignificant change (-1.01 vs. -0.69). Twice as many patients taking THC:CBD showed a reduction of more than 30% from baseline pain NRS score when compared with placebo (23 [43%] vs. 12 [21%]). The associated odds ratio was statistically significant, whereas the number of THC group responders was similar to placebo (12 [23%] vs. 12 [21%]) and did not reach statistical significance. There was no change from baseline in median dose of opioid background medication or mean number of doses of breakthrough medication across treatment groups. No significant group differences were found in the NRS sleep quality or nausea scores or the pain control assessment. However, the results from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Cancer Questionnaire showed a worsening in nausea and vomiting with THC:CBD compared with placebo (P = 0.02), whereas THC had no difference (P = 1.0). Most drug-related adverse events were mild/moderate in severity. This study shows that THC:CBD extract is efficacious for relief of pain in patients with advanced cancer pain not fully relieved by strong opioids.

  6. A 12-week, randomized, parallel-group, proof-of-concept study of tulobuterol patch and salmeterol inhaler as add-on therapy in adult-onset mild-to-moderate asthma.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hideki; Niimi, Akio; Matsumoto, Hisako; Ito, Isao; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Otsuka, Kojiro; Takeda, Tomoshi; Nakaji, Hitoshi; Tajiri, Tomoko; Iwata, Toshiyuki; Nagasaki, Tadao; Mishima, Michiaki

    2017-01-01

    Patch formulation of tulobuterol has been used in asthma treatment as a long-acting β2 -agonist (LABA) through sustained skin absorption. Its treatment efficacy, especially in small airways, remains poorly understood. The study aim was to investigate LABA add-on effects of tulobuterol patch (TP) and salmeterol inhaler (SA) on pulmonary function, asthma control and health status. Patients who had adult-onset under-control asthma, despite taking inhaled corticosteroids, were enrolled in a randomized, open-label, parallel-group, proof-of-concept study of 12-week add-on treatment with TP (n=16) or SA (n=17). Spirometry, impulse oscillometry (IOS), exhaled nitric oxide levels, and clinical questionnaires of asthma control, health status (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire: SGRQ), and symptoms were evaluated every 4 weeks. Add-on treatment of SA significantly improved the spirometric indices of small airway obstruction (forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC: FEF25-75 , and maximum expiratory flow at 25% of FVC: MEF25 ) and IOS indices of whole respiratory resistance (resistance at 5 Hz) as compared to TP. In intra-group comparisons, add-on treatment of TP improved the scores of the asthma control test and the total SGRQ, as well as the symptom and impact components of the SGRQ. SA add-on treatment improved FEV1 and IOS parameters of resistance at 20 Hz and reactance at 5 Hz. Neither of the treatments improved exhaled nitric oxide levels. In conclusion, add-on treatment of TP improved asthma control and health status, whereas SA improved pulmonary function measures associated with large and small airway involvement among patients with adult-onset mild-to-moderate asthma.

  7. Efficacy and safety of Postoperative Intravenous Parecoxib sodium Followed by ORal CElecoxib (PIPFORCE) post-total knee arthroplasty in patients with osteoarthritis: a study protocol for a multicentre, double-blind, parallel-group trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Qianyu; Bian, Yanyan; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Jingmei; Feng, Bin; Sun, Tiezheng; Lin, Jianhao; Zhang, Miaofeng; Yan, Shigui; Shen, Bin; Pei, Fuxing; Weng, Xisheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been regarded as a most painful orthopaedic surgery. Although many surgeons sequentially use parecoxib and celecoxib as a routine strategy for postoperative pain control after TKA, high quality evidence is still lacking to prove the effect of this sequential regimen, especially at the medium-term follow-up. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to evaluate efficacy and safety of postoperative intravenous parecoxib sodium followed by oral celecoxib in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) undergoing TKA. The hypothesis is that compared to placebo with opioids as rescue treatment, sequential use of parecoxib and celecoxib can achieve less morphine consumption over the postoperative 2 weeks, as well as better pain control, quicker functional recovery in the postoperative 6 weeks and less opioid-related adverse events during the 12-week recovery phase. Methods and analysis This study is designed as a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group and placebo-controlled trial. The target sample size is 246. All participants who meet the study inclusion and exclusion criteria will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either the parecoxib/celecoxib group or placebo group. The randomisation and allocation will be study site based. The study will consist of three phases: an initial screening phase; a 6-week double-blind treatment phase; and a 6-week follow-up phase. The primary end point is cumulative opioid consumption during 2 weeks postoperation. Secondary end points consist of the postoperative visual analogue scale score, knee joint function, quality of life, local skin temperature, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, cytokines and blood coagulation parameters. Safety end points will be monitored too. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval for this study has been obtained from the Ethics Committee, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, China (Protocol number: S-572) Study results will be

  8. Effects of an omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsion on eicosanoid synthesis in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): A prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of lipid emulsions has been associated with changes in lung function and gas exchange which may be mediated by biologically active metabolites derived from arachidonic acid. The type and quantity of the lipid emulsions used could modulate this response, which is mediated by the eicosanoids. This study investigates the use of omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsions in ARDS patients and their effects on eicosanoid values. Methods Prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study carried out at the Intensive Medicine Department of Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona-Spain). We studied 16 consecutive patients with ARDS and intolerance to enteral nutrition (14 men; age: 58 ± 13 years; APACHE II score 17.8 ± 2.3; Lung Injury Score: 3.1 ± 0.5; baseline PaO2/FiO2 ratio: 149 ± 40). Patients were randomized into two groups: Group A (n = 8) received the study emulsion Lipoplus® 20%, B. Braun Medical (50% MCT, 40% LCT, 10% fish oil (FO)); Group B (n = 8) received the control emulsion Intralipid® Fresenius Kabi (100% LCT). Lipid emulsions were administered for 12 h at a dose of 0.12 g/kg/h. We measured LTB4, TXB2, and 6-keto prostaglandin F1α values at baseline [immediately before the administration of the lipid emulsions (T-0)], at the end of the administration (T-12) and 24 hours after the beginning of the infusion (T 24) in arterial and mixed venous blood samples. Results In group A (FO) LTB4, TXB2, 6-keto prostaglandin F1α levels fell during omega-3 administration (T12). After discontinuation (T24), levels of inflammatory markers (both systemic and pulmonary) behaved erratically. In group B (LCT) all systemic and pulmonary mediators increased during lipid administration and returned to baseline levels after discontinuation, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. There was a clear interaction between the treatment in group A (fish oil) and changes in LTB4 over time. Conclusions Infusion of lipids enriched

  9. A randomized, parallel-group study to evaluate the efficacy of umeclidinium/vilanterol 62.5/25 μg on health-related quality of life in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Siler, Thomas M; Donald, Alison C; O’Dell, Dianne; Church, Alison; Fahy, William A

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of the inhaled muscarinic antagonist umeclidinium (UMEC) with the long-acting β2-agonist vilanterol (VI) has been shown to provide significant improvements in lung function compared with UMEC, VI, or placebo (PBO) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study was specifically designed to support these findings by assessing health-related quality of life and symptomatic outcomes in a similar population. Methods This was a 12-week multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study. Eligible patients were randomized 1:1 to receive once-daily UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg (via ELLIPTA® dry powder inhaler) or PBO for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score at day 84. Secondary efficacy endpoints included rescue albuterol use (puffs/day) over weeks 1–12 and trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second on day 84. Adverse events were also assessed. Results A total of 496 patients were included in the intent-to-treat population in the UMEC/VI (n=248) and PBO (n=248) treatment groups. UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg provided a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in SGRQ total score at day 84 versus PBO (difference between treatments in SGRQ total score change from baseline: −4.03 [95% confidence interval {CI}: −6.28, −1.79]; P<0.001). UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg resulted in a statistically significant reduction in rescue albuterol use versus PBO (−0.7 puffs/day [95% CI: −1.1, −0.4]; P<0.001). UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg provided a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second on day 84 versus PBO (122 mL [95% CI: 71, 172]; P<0.001). The incidence of adverse events was similar between treatments (32% and 30% of patients in the UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg and PBO groups, respectively). Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that treatment with UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg provides clinically important

  10. Long-term efficacy and safety of incobotulinumtoxinA and conventional treatment of poststroke arm spasticity: a prospective, non-interventional, open-label, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Dressler, Dirk; Rychlik, Reinhard; Kreimendahl, Fabian; Schnur, Nicole; Lambert-Baumann, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of incobotulinumtoxinA with conventional antispastic therapy for poststroke arm spasticity in routine clinical practice over a 1-year period. Design Prospective, non-interventional, open-label, parallel-group study. Setting 47 centres in Germany. Participants Patients with poststroke arm spasticity; 108 receiving incobotulinumtoxinA, 110 conventional therapy. Intervention Conventional antispastic treatment including oral antispastic medications, physiotherapy and occupational therapy or 3-monthly incobotulinumtoxinA injections plus conventional therapy if required. Main outcome measures The main outcome measure was changes in muscle tone (Ashworth Scale) over the 1-year treatment period. Changes in functional disability (Disability Assessment Scale) and quality of life (Short-Form-12 Health Survey) were additionally assessed. Ratings for therapy outcome (Goal Attainment Scale), and efficacy and tolerability of treatment (Global Clinical Impression Scale) were also obtained. Results Muscle tone improved for all spasticity patterns with the Ashworth Scale responder rates between 63% and 86% (incobotulinumtoxinA) and 16–27% (conventional therapy). Median improvement in functional disability was –1.0 (incobotulinumtoxinA) and 0.0 (conventional measures) for all domains. Treatment goals were attained by 93% of incobotulinumtoxinA patients and 30% of patients under conventional therapy. Most physicians (93%) and patients (90%) rated efficacy as good or very good under incobotulinumtoxinA; the proportions were much lower under conventional therapy (36% and 37%). Tolerability under incobotulinumtoxinA was considered good or very good by 99% of physicians and patients (76% and 66%, respectively, under conventional therapy). Quality of life under incobotulinumtoxinA improved by 8.0 (physical score) and 10.8 (mental score) and by 0.8 and 5.7, respectively, under conventional therapy. Conclusions IncobotulinumtoxinA combined

  11. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of THC/CBD oromucosal spray in combination with the existing treatment regimen, in the relief of central neuropathic pain in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Langford, R M; Mares, J; Novotna, A; Vachova, M; Novakova, I; Notcutt, W; Ratcliffe, S

    2013-04-01

    Central neuropathic pain (CNP) occurs in many multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The provision of adequate pain relief to these patients can very difficult. Here we report the first phase III placebo-controlled study of the efficacy of the endocannabinoid system modulator delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray (USAN name, nabiximols; Sativex, GW Pharmaceuticals, Salisbury, Wiltshire, UK), to alleviate CNP. Patients who had failed to gain adequate analgesia from existing medication were treated with THC/CBD spray or placebo as an add-on treatment, in a double-blind manner, for 14 weeks to investigate the efficacy of the medication in MS-induced neuropathic pain. This parallel-group phase of the study was then followed by an 18-week randomized-withdrawal study (14-week open-label treatment period plus a double-blind 4-week randomized-withdrawal phase) to investigate time to treatment failure and show maintenance of efficacy. A total of 339 patients were randomized to phase A (167 received THC/CBD spray and 172 received placebo). Of those who completed phase A, 58 entered the randomized-withdrawal phase. The primary endpoint of responder analysis at the 30 % level at week 14 of phase A of the study was not met, with 50 % of patients on THC/CBD spray classed as responders at the 30 % level compared to 45 % of patients on placebo (p = 0.234). However, an interim analysis at week 10 showed a statistically significant treatment difference in favor of THC/CBD spray at this time point (p = 0.046). During the randomized-withdrawal phase, the primary endpoint of time to treatment failure was statistically significant in favor of THC/CBD spray, with 57 % of patients receiving placebo failing treatment versus 24 % of patients from the THC/CBD spray group (p = 0.04). The mean change from baseline in Pain Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) (p = 0.028) and sleep quality NRS (p = 0.015) scores, both secondary endpoints in phase B, were also statistically

  12. Comparison of the effects of bimatoprost and timolol on intraocular pressure and pulsatile ocular blood flow in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma: A prospective, open-label, randomized, two-arm, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Vetrugno, Michele; Cardascia, Nicola; Cantatore, Francesco; Sborgia, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background: The current objective of antiglaucomatous therapy is to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP), and thus to preserve visual function. Many ophthalmologists believe this objective is best achieved by methods that improve ocular blood flow to the optic nerve head. Beta-blockers are effective ocular hypotensive agents, but they can reduce choroidal blood flow. Bimatoprost, a new prostamide analogue, has been shown to have a better IOP-lowering effect compared with the nonselective beta-adrenergic receptor blocker timolol maleate, but little is known about its effects on the vascular bed of the eye. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of bimatoprost and timolol on IOP and choroidal blood flow (as measured using pulsatile ocular blood flow [pOBF]) in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods: This prospective, open-label, randomized, 2-arm, parallel-group study was conducted at the Glaucoma Research Centre, Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Bari, Bari, Italy. Patients with POAG having well-controlled IOP (<16 mm Hg) on monotherapy with timolol 0.5% ophthalmic solution (2 drops per affected eye BID) for ≥12 months but with a progressive decrease in pOBF during the same time period were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups. One group continued monotherapy with timolol, 2 drops per affected eye BID. The other group was switched (without washout) to bimatoprost 0.3% ophthalmic solution (2 drops per affected eye QD [9 pm]). Treatment was given for 180 days. IOP and pOBF were assessed at the diagnostic visit (pre-timolol), baseline (day 0), and treatment days 15, 30, 60, 90, and 180. Primary adverse effects (AEs) (ie, conjunctival hyperemia, conjunctival papillae, stinging, burning, foreign body sensation, and pigmentation of periorbital skin) were monitored throughout the study. Results: Thirty-eight patients were enrolled (22 men, 16 women; mean [SD] age, 51.7 [4.8] years; 19 patients per

  13. Quality of life in patients with functional dyspepsia: Short- and long-term effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication with pantoprazole, amoxicillin, and clarithromycin or cisapride therapy: A prospective, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Buzás, György M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QOL) is impaired in functional dyspepsia (FD). Little is known about the effects of different therapies on the QOL profile in patients with this condition. Objectives: The aims of this study were to measure baseline QOL in patients with FD and to assess changes in QOL over time associated with Helicobacter pylori eradication and prokinetic treatment. The primary and secondary end points were the improvement in QOL 6 weeks and 1 year after successful eradication of the infection or prokinetic therapy. Methods: This 1-year, single-center, prospective, open-label, controlled, parallel-group trial was conducted at the Department of Gastroenterology, Ferencvdros Health Centre, Budapest, Hungary. The Functional Digestive Disorder Quality of Life (FDDQoL) Questionnaire (MAPI Research Institute, Lyon, France) was translated and validated previously in Hungarian. Male and female subjects aged 20 to 60 years were enrolled and classified as H pylori positive (HP+), H pylori negative (HP-) with FD, or healthy (control group). The HP+ patients received pantoprazole 40 mg BID + amoxicillin 1000 mg BID + clarithromycin 500 mg BID for 7 days, followed by on-demand ranitidine (150–300 mg/d) for 1 year. The HP- patients received the prokinetic cisapride 10 mg TID for 1 month, followed by on-demand cisapride (10–20 mg/d) for 1 year. The FDDQoL questionnaire was completed by all 3 groups on enrollment, at 6 weeks, and 1 year. Results: A total of 101 HP+ patients, 98 HP- patients, and 123 healthy controls were included in the study (185 women, 137 men; mean age, 39.0 ears). The mean (SD) baseline QOL scores were significantly lower in the HP+ group (53.3 [9.6]; 95% CI, 54.4-58.2) and the HP- groups (50.0 [9.8]; 95% CI, 58.0–62.0) compared with that in healthy controls (76.2 [8.7]; 95% CI, 74.6–77.8) (both, P < 0.001). Analysis of the short-term domain scores found that the HP+ group had significantly decreased scores in 6 of 8 domains: daily

  14. A cluster-randomised, parallel group, controlled intervention study of genetic prostate cancer risk assessment and use of PSA tests in general practice—the ProCaRis study: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Pia; Vedsted, Peter; Edwards, Adrian; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Bro, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Unsystematic screening for prostate cancer (PCa) is common, causing a high number of false-positive results. Valid instruments for assessment of individual risk of PCa have been called for. A DNA-based genetic test has been tested retrospectively. The clinical use of this test needs further investigation. The primary objective is to evaluate the impact on the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests of introducing genetic PCa risk assessment in general practice. The secondary objectives are to evaluate PCa-related patient experiences, and to explore sociocultural aspects of genetic risk assessment in patients at high PCa risk. Methods and analysis The study is a cluster-randomised, controlled intervention study with practice as the unit of randomisation. We expect 140 practices to accept participation and include a total of 1244 patients in 4 months. Patients requesting a PSA test in the intervention group practices will be offered a genetic PCa risk assessment. Patients requesting a PSA test in the control group practices will be handled according to current guidelines. Data will be collected from registers, patient questionnaires and interviews. Quantitative data will be analysed according to intention-to-treat principles. Baseline characteristics will be compared between groups. Longitudinal analyses will include time in risk, and multivariable analysis will be conducted to evaluate the influence of general practitioner and patient-specific variables on future PSA testing. Interview data will be transcribed verbatim and analysed from a social-constructivist perspective. Ethics and dissemination Consent will be obtained from patients who can withdraw from the study at any time. The study provides data to the ongoing conceptual and ethical discussions about genetic risk assessment and classification of low-risk and high-risk individuals. The intervention model might be applicable to other screening areas regarding risk of cancer with identified

  15. An exploratory, randomized, parallel-group, open-label, relative bioavailability study with an additional two-period crossover food-effect study exploring the pharmacokinetics of two novel formulations of pexmetinib (ARRY-614)

    PubMed Central

    Wollenberg, Lance A; Corson, Donald T; Nugent, Courtney A; Peterson, Farran L; Ptaszynski, Ann M; Arrigo, Alisha; Mannila, Coralee G; Litwiler, Kevin S; Bell, Stacie J

    2015-01-01

    Background Pexmetinib (ARRY-614) is a dual inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and Tie2 signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. Previous clinical experience in a Phase I dose-escalation study of myelodysplastic syndrome patients using pexmetinib administered as neat powder-in-capsule (PIC) exhibited high variability in pharmacokinetics and excessive pill burden, prompting an effort to improve the formulation of pexmetinib. Methods A relative bioavailability assessment encompassed three parallel treatment cohorts of unique subjects comparing the two new formulations (12 subjects per cohort), a liquid oral suspension (LOS) and liquid-filled capsule (LFC) and the current clinical PIC formulation (six subjects) in a fasted state. The food-effect assessment was conducted as a crossover of the LOS and LFC formulations administered under fed and fasted conditions. Subjects were divided into two groups of equal size to evaluate potential period effects on the food-effect assessment. Results The geometric mean values of the total plasma exposures based upon area-under-the-curve to the last quantifiable sample (AUClast) of pexmetinib were approximately four- and twofold higher after administration of the LFC and LOS formulations, respectively, than after the PIC formulation, when the formulations were administered in the fasted state. When the LFC formulation was administered in the fed state, pexmetinib AUClast decreased by <5% compared with the fasted state. After administration of the LOS formulation in the fed state, pexmetinib AUClast was 34% greater than observed in the fasted state. Conclusion These results suggest that the LFC formulation of pexmetinib may achieve greater exposures with lower doses due to the greater bioavailability compared to the PIC, and remain unaffected by coadministration with food. PMID:26491375

  16. A randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study of the safety and efficacy of subcutaneous tocilizumab versus intravenous tocilizumab in combination with traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (SUMMACTA study)

    PubMed Central

    Burmester, Gerd R; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Cantagrel, Alain; Hall, Stephen; Leszczynski, Piotr; Feldman, Daniel; Rangaraj, Madura J; Roane, Georgia; Ludivico, Charles; Lu, Peng; Rowell, Lucy; Bao, Min; Mysler, Eduardo F

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study compared the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous (SC) versus intravenous (IV) formulations of tocilizumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD). Methods Patients (n=1262) were randomly assigned to receive tocilizumab-SC 162 mg weekly+placebo-IV every 4 weeks or tocilizumab-IV 8 mg/kg every 4 weeks+placebo-SC weekly in combination with traditional DMARD. The primary outcome was to demonstrate the non-inferiority of tocilizumab-SC to tocilizumab-IV with regard to the proportion of patients in each group achieving an American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 response at week 24 using a 12% non-inferiority margin (NIM). Secondary outcomes were disease activity score using 28 joints (DAS28), ACR responses, health assessment questionnaire scores and safety assessments. Results At week 24, 69.4% (95% CI 65.5 to 73.2) of tocilizumab-SC-treated patients versus 73.4% (95% CI 69.6 to 77.1) of tocilizumab-IV-treated patients achieved an ACR20 response (weighted difference between groups −4.0%, 95% CI −9.2 to 1.2); the 12% NIM was met. ACR50/70 responses, DAS28 and physical function improvements were comparable between the tocilizumab-SC and tocilizumab-IV groups. The safety profiles of tocilizumab-SC and tocilizumab-IV were similar, and the most common adverse event was infection. Injection-site reactions (ISR) occurred more frequently in the tocilizumab-SC group than in the tocilizumab-IV (placebo-SC) group. No anaphylaxis was reported over the 24 weeks. Conclusions Tocilizumab-SC 162 mg weekly demonstrated comparable efficacy to tocilizumab-IV 8 mg/kg. The safety profile of tocilizumab-SC is consistent with the known and well-established safety profile of tocilizumab-IV, with the exception of a higher incidence of ISR, which were more common with tocilizumab-SC administration. PMID:23904473

  17. 78 FR 63477 - Guidance for Industry on Active Controls in Studies To Demonstrate Effectiveness of a New Animal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... investigators who conduct studies using active controls and have a basic understanding of statistical principles... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Active Controls in Studies To... the availability of a guidance for industry 204 entitled ``Active Controls in Studies to...

  18. Positive imagery cognitive bias modification (CBM) and internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) versus control CBM and iCBT for depression: study protocol for a parallel-group randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alishia D; Blackwell, Simon E; Holmes, Emily A; Andrews, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The current randomised controlled trial will evaluate the efficacy of an internet-delivered positive imagery cognitive bias modification (CBM) intervention for depression when compared with an active control condition and help establish the additive benefit of positive imagery CBM when delivered in combination with internet cognitive behavioural therapy for depression. Methods and analysis Patients meeting diagnostic criteria for a current major depressive episode will be recruited through the research arm of a not-for-profit clinical and research unit in Australia. The minimum sample size for each group (α set at 0.05, power at 0.80) was identified as 29, but at least 10% more will be recruited to hedge against expected attrition. We will measure the impact of CBM on primary measures of depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory—second edition (BDI-II), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9)) and interpretive bias (ambiguous scenarios test-depression), and on a secondary measure of psychological distress (Kessler-10 (K10)) following the 1-week CBM intervention. Secondary outcome measures of psychological distress (K10), as well as disability (WHO disability assessment schedule-II), repetitive negative thinking (repetitive thinking questionnaire), and anxiety (state trait anxiety inventory-trait version) will be evaluated following completion of the 11-week combined intervention, in addition to the BDI-II and PHQ9. Intent-to-treat marginal and mixed effect models using restricted maximum likelihood estimation will be used to evaluate the primary hypotheses. Clinically significant change will be defined as high-end state functioning (a BDI-II score <14) combined with a total score reduction greater than the reliable change index score. Maintenance of gains will be assessed at 3-month follow-up. Ethics and dissemination The current trial protocol has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of St Vincent's Hospital and the University of

  19. Designing dose-finding studies with an active control for exponential families

    PubMed Central

    Dette, H.; Kettelhake, K.; Bretz, F.

    2015-01-01

    Optimal design of dose-finding studies with an active control has only been considered in the literature for regression models with normally distributed errors and known variances, where the focus is on estimating the smallest dose that achieves the same treatment effect as the active control. This paper discusses such dose-finding studies from a broader perspective. We consider a general class of optimality criteria and models arising from an exponential family. Optimal designs are constructed for several situations and their efficiency is illustrated with examples. PMID:26989261

  20. Spline-based procedures for dose-finding studies with active control

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Hans-Joachim; Benda, Norbert; Zinserling, Jörg; Kneib, Thomas; Friede, Tim

    2015-01-01

    In a dose-finding study with an active control, several doses of a new drug are compared with an established drug (the so-called active control). One goal of such studies is to characterize the dose–response relationship and to find the smallest target dose concentration d*, which leads to the same efficacy as the active control. For this purpose, the intersection point of the mean dose–response function with the expected efficacy of the active control has to be estimated. The focus of this paper is a cubic spline-based method for deriving an estimator of the target dose without assuming a specific dose–response function. Furthermore, the construction of a spline-based bootstrap CI is described. Estimator and CI are compared with other flexible and parametric methods such as linear spline interpolation as well as maximum likelihood regression in simulation studies motivated by a real clinical trial. Also, design considerations for the cubic spline approach with focus on bias minimization are presented. Although the spline-based point estimator can be biased, designs can be chosen to minimize and reasonably limit the maximum absolute bias. Furthermore, the coverage probability of the cubic spline approach is satisfactory, especially for bias minimal designs. © 2014 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25319931

  1. Spline-based procedures for dose-finding studies with active control.

    PubMed

    Helms, Hans-Joachim; Benda, Norbert; Zinserling, Jörg; Kneib, Thomas; Friede, Tim

    2015-01-30

    In a dose-finding study with an active control, several doses of a new drug are compared with an established drug (the so-called active control). One goal of such studies is to characterize the dose-response relationship and to find the smallest target dose concentration d(*), which leads to the same efficacy as the active control. For this purpose, the intersection point of the mean dose-response function with the expected efficacy of the active control has to be estimated. The focus of this paper is a cubic spline-based method for deriving an estimator of the target dose without assuming a specific dose-response function. Furthermore, the construction of a spline-based bootstrap CI is described. Estimator and CI are compared with other flexible and parametric methods such as linear spline interpolation as well as maximum likelihood regression in simulation studies motivated by a real clinical trial. Also, design considerations for the cubic spline approach with focus on bias minimization are presented. Although the spline-based point estimator can be biased, designs can be chosen to minimize and reasonably limit the maximum absolute bias. Furthermore, the coverage probability of the cubic spline approach is satisfactory, especially for bias minimal designs.

  2. LDL-cholesterol lowering activity of a blend of rice bran oil and safflower oil (8:2) in patients with hyperlipidaemia: a proof of concept, double blind, controlled, randomised parallel group study.

    PubMed

    Malve, Harshad; Kerkar, Prafulla; Mishra, Nidheesh; Loke, Sanjita; Rege, N N; Marwaha-Jaspal, Ankita; Jainani, Kiran J

    2010-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases have emerged as major health burden worldwide in recent times. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) serves as the primary marker for cardiovascular diseases. Reports suggest that rice bran oil has antihyperlipidaemic properties. However, current evidence suggests that no single oil can provide the recommended dietary fat ratio. Hence the present study was undertaken in patients with hyperlipidaemia to study effects of substitution of the cooking oil with a blend of 80% rice bran oil and 20% safflower oil on LDL-C levels. The selected patients (n = 73) were randomly assigned either to the study oil group (blend under study) or control oil group (the oil which the patient was using before). The lipid profile was monitored monthly in these patients for 3 months during which they consumed the oil as per the randomisation. At each follow up, LDL-C levels showed a significant reduction from baseline in the study oil group and reduction was more than that observed in the control group. It was also observed that the percentage of the respondents was higher in the study oil group. At the end of the study period, 82% patients from this group had LDL levels less than 150 mg% as against 57% in the control group. Thus, the substitution of usual cooking oil with a blend of rice bran oil and safflower oil (8:2) was found to exert beneficial effects on the LDL-C levels shifting them to low-risk lipid category.

  3. A Phase III Randomized, Double-blind, Parallel-group Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Acarmet (Metformin HCl 500 mg Plus Acarbose 50 mg Tablets) Versus Acarbose Alone in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-11-19

    The Objectives of the Study is to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Acarmet (Metformin HCl 500 mg; Plus Acarbose 50 mg Tablets) Thrice Daily Versus Acarbose 50 mg Thrice Daily Over 16 Weeks in; Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

  4. Double-masked, randomized, parallel-group study comparing olopatadine 0.1% ophthalmic solution with cromolyn sodium 2% and levocabastine 0.05% ophthalmic preparations in children with seasonal allergic conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Ciprandi, Giorgio; Turner, Darell; Gross, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is estimated that >50% of medications have not been tested in children. Physicians need pediatric data to guide them in treating children. Olopatadine hydrochloride ophthalmic solution 0.1% is a topical antiallergic agent that is both an antihistamine with high affinity and selectivity for the histamine H1 receptor and a mast cell stabilizer that inhibits the release of histamine and other proinflammatory mediators from human conjunctival mast cells. The efficacy and tolerability of olopatadine has been demonstrated by comparative studies in adults and children with seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC). Objective: Pediatric patient data were extracted from 2 clinical trials to assess the efficacy and tolerability of olopatadine hydrochloride ophthalmic solution 0.1% compared with those of cromolyn sodium ophthalmic solution 2% and levocabastine ophthalmic solution 0.05% as treatment for SAC in children. Methods: In study 1, conducted at 15 centers in 7 countries (Europe and Australia) from October 1995 to December 1997, olopatadine was instilled BID and placebo (vehicle) BID for 6 weeks and compared with cromolyn instilled QID. Study 2, conducted at 17 centers in 8 countries (Europe and Australia) from November 1998 to June 2000, compared olopatadine BID with levocabastine BID. In both studies, children of either sex and any race, aged 4 to 11 years, and having proven grass pollen allergies were assigned to treatment in a double-masked, randomized fashion. Slit-lamp examination, the physician's impression scale, and self-ratings were used to obtain efficacy data. Data analyses were based on pollen concentrations. The tolerability assessments were based on visual acuity, pupil diameter, intraocular pressure, and a dilated fundus examination. Results: Study 1 comprised 30 children (olopatadine [n = 13] and cromolyn sodium [n = 17]; 18 boys, 12 girls; mean age, 7.9 years [range, 4–11 years]). Study 2 comprised 22 children (olopatadine [n = 10] and

  5. Protocol for an investigator-blinded, randomised, 3-month, parallel-group study to compare the efficacy of intraoperative tendon sheath irrigation only with both intraoperative and postoperative irrigation in the treatment of purulent flexor tenosynovitis

    PubMed Central

    Jokihaara, Jarkko; Kaivorinne, Antti; Havulinna, Jouni; Göransson, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of purulent flexor tenosynovitis of the hand consists of surgical debridement followed by antibiotic treatment. Usually, the debridement is carried out by irrigating the tendon sheath in a proximal to distal direction facilitated by two small incisions. It is unclear whether intraoperative irrigation by itself is adequate for healing or if it should be combined with postoperative irrigation in the ward. The hypothesis of this prospective randomised trial is that intraoperative catheter irrigation alone is as effective as a combination of intraoperative and postoperative intermittent catheter irrigation in the treatment of purulent flexor tenosynovitis. Methods and analysis In this investigator-blinded, prospective randomised trial, 48 patients suffering from purulent flexor tenosynovitis are randomised in two groups. Intraoperative catheter irrigation of the flexor tendon sheath and antibiotic treatment is identical in both groups, whereas only the patients in one group are subjected to intermittent postoperative catheter irrigation three times a day for 3 days. The primary outcome measure is total active range of movement of the affected finger after 3 months of surgery. The secondary outcome is the need for reoperation. Ethics and dissemination The research ethics committee of Pirkanmaa Hospital District has approved the study protocol. The protocol has been registered with ClinicalTrials.gov registry (#NCT02320929). All participants will give written informed consent. The study results will elucidate the role of postoperative irrigation, which can be criticised as being labour consuming and unpleasant to the patient. The results of the study will be disseminated as a published article in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number: NCT02320929; pre-results. PMID:26671952

  6. Efficacy and safety of guaifenesin for upper back, neck, and shoulder pain: a Phase II proof-of-concept, multicenter, placebo-controlled, repeat-dose, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Collaku, Agron; Yue, Yong; Reed, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Background/objective Guaifenesin, an over-the-counter (OTC) expectorant, has exhibited muscle relaxant effects preclinically and clinically. This proof-of-principle study explored whether OTC doses of guaifenesin can provide relief from acute upper back, neck, or shoulder muscle spasm and pain. Methods This multicenter, placebo-controlled, repeat-dose, parallel study randomly assigned adults experiencing acute pain and muscle spasm in their upper back, neck, or shoulder to guaifenesin 600 or 1200 mg or matched placebo twice daily (BID) in a 2:2:1:1 ratio for 7 days. The primary end point was the change from baseline in muscle spasm relief, measured using an 11-point numeric rating scale (0=not present to 10=unbearable) recorded twice daily and averaged over the 7-day treatment period. Analyses were performed using a linear mixed model that included treatment as a fixed effect and site as a random effect. Results A total of 77 subjects were included in the 4 treatment groups. Least squares mean muscle spasm score over 7 days was 1.77 with guaifenesin 1200 mg, 1.42 with its matched placebo, 1.53 with guaifenesin 600 mg, and 1.74 with its matched placebo. Treatment with guaifenesin 1200 mg BID provided 25% greater reduction in mean muscle spasm over its matched placebo and 16% greater reduction than guaifenesin 600 mg BID. These differences were not statistically significant. Based on comparisons of absolute mean values, a consistent directional change in effect was observed, suggesting some benefit from placebo to lower-to-upper doses of guaifenesin with regard to muscle spasm, tension, pain, discomfort, and relaxation. No severe or serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion Results suggest the potential for OTC dose of guaifenesin 1200 mg BID to provide symptomatic relief of upper back musculoskeletal pain and spasm. Confirmation of this preliminary result in a larger, adequately powered study is needed. PMID:28356767

  7. A double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, flexible-dose study to evaluate the tolerability, efficacy and effects of treatment discontinuation with escitalopram and paroxetine in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Cooper, James A; Huusom, Anna K T; Hindmarch, Ian

    2006-05-01

    This multinational, randomized, double-blind, flexible-dose study evaluated the short- and long-term antidepressant tolerability and efficacy of escitalopram and paroxetine. Tolerability was assessed by monitoring adverse events throughout the study, and discontinuation events during brief treatment interruption and tapered withdrawal. Discontinuation-emergent effects were evaluated in two separate double-blind periods. First, to mimic the consequences of non-compliance, patients were randomized to one of two treatment interruption periods (placebo-substitution for 3-5 days). Second, patients were randomized to a 1-2-week tapered withdrawal period randomly scheduled between weeks 28 and 31. The pre-specified primary efficacy endpoint was the mean change from baseline in total Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score at week 8, using the principle of last observation carried forward. A total of 323 patients entered 8 weeks of double-blind treatment and received at least one flexible dose of escitalopram (10-20 mg/day) or paroxetine (20-40 mg/day). Patients who demonstrated evidence of a significant clinical improvement (Clinical Global Impression-Improvement of 1 or 2) at week 8 entered a 19-week, double-blind maintenance period during which they were treated with the same dose they received at week 8, followed by a 1-2-week tapered withdrawal period. A total of 89 patients (28%) withdrew during the study; significantly (P<0.01) more patients withdrew from the paroxetine group (34%) than from the escitalopram group (21%), and significantly (P<0.05) more paroxetine patients withdrew due to lack of efficacy. The mean MADRS total score improved for both treatment groups from baseline to week 8, with no statistical difference between groups. In severely depressed patients (baseline MADRS total score >or=30), escitalopram was superior (P<0.05) to paroxetine at week 27 (end of maintenance treatment). There was a high prevalence of sexual dysfunction at

  8. Agrobacterium sp.-derived β-1,3-glucan enhances natural killer cell activity in healthy adults: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Paik, Doo-Jin; Kwon, Dae Young; Yang, Hye Jeong

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The present study investigated the hypothesis that a highly pure linear β-1,3-glucan produced by Agrobacterium sp. R259 enhances human natural killer (NK) cell activity and suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines. SUBJECTS/METHODS In an eight-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 83 healthy adults with white blood cell counts of 4,000-8,000 cells/µL were participated and randomly assigned to take two capsules per day containing either 350 mg β-1,3-glucan or placebo. Six participants withdrew their study consent or were excluded due to NK cell activity levels outside the normal range. NK cell activity and serum levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and cytokines, such as interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured. RESULTS NK cell activity and the serum levels of IL-10 were significantly higher from baseline to week 8 in the β-glucan group compared with the placebo group (P = 0.048, P = 0.029). Consumption of β-1,3-glucan also significantly increased NK cell activity compared with placebo after adjusting for smoking and stress status (P = 0.009). In particular, the effect of β-1,3-glucan on NK cell activity was greater in participants with severe stress than in those experiencing mild stress. However, the administration β-1,3-glucan did not significantly modulate the levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α and IgG compared with the placebo. CONCLUSION The results showed that supplementation with bacterial β-1,3-glucan significantly increased NK cell activity without causing any adverse effects. Additionally, the beneficial effect of β-1,3-glucan on NK cell activity was greater in participants experiencing severe stress. PMID:28194264

  9. Is benzoyl peroxide 3% topical gel effective and safe in the treatment of acne vulgaris in Japanese patients? A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled, parallel-group study.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Makoto; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Alio Sáenz, Alessandra B; Ono, Makoto; Yamada, Masahiro

    2014-09-01

    Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as an anti-acne medication is not yet approved in Japan. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a once-daily topical application of BPO 3% gel versus an inert vehicle gel in Japanese acne patients. Three hundred and sixty patients were randomized to receive BPO 3% or vehicle for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy end-point was absolute change in number of total lesions (TL) from baseline to week 12 to demonstrate the superiority of BPO 3% versus vehicle. Secondary efficacy end-points were absolute and percent change in TL, inflammatory lesions (IL), non-inflammatory lesions (non-IL) and Investigator's Static Global Assessment (ISGA). Change in TL counts from baseline to week 12 for BPO 3% was superior to vehicle (difference, -21.0; P < 0.001). Absolute and percent reductions in TL, IL and non-IL counts were greater for BPO 3% at all study visits. The proportion of patients with improvement in ISGA scores was significantly higher with BPO 3% than with vehicle from week 2. All adverse events were mild or moderate. Adverse drug-related reactions were higher for BPO 3% (30%) than with vehicle (5%). Local tolerability scores of grade 1 or more (slight to moderate) were more frequent with BPO 3% than vehicle with the most significant differences observed in dryness (56% vs 27% at week 1-4), peeling (19% vs 9% at week 1-2) and burning/stinging (58% vs 15% at week 1-12). These results indicate that BPO 3% is effective while maintaining a favorable safety and tolerability profile in Japanese acne patients.

  10. Comparative study of the efficacy and safety between blonanserin and risperidone for the treatment of schizophrenia in Chinese patients: A double-blind, parallel-group multicenter randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Huafang; Yao, Chen; Shi, Jianguo; Yang, Fude; Qi, Shuguang; Wang, Lili; Zhang, Honggeng; Li, Jie; Wang, Chuanyue; Wang, Chuansheng; Liu, Cui; Li, Lehua; Wang, Qiang; Li, Keqing; Luo, Xiaoyan; Gu, Niufan

    2015-10-01

    This randomized, double-blind study compared the efficacy and safety of blonanserin and risperidone to treat Chinese schizophrenia patients aged ≥18 and < 65 years. Patients with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total scores ≥70 and ≤ 120 were randomized to receive blonanserin or risperidone using a gradual dose-titration method (blonanserin tablets: 8-24 mg/day; risperidone tablets: 2-6 mg/day), twice daily. Treatment populations consisted of 128 blonanserin-treated patients and 133 risperidone-treated patients. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed using the last observation carried forward method. Reductions of PANSS total scores by blonanserin and risperidone treatment were -30.59 and -33.56, respectively. Risperidone treatment was associated with elevated levels of serum prolactin (67.16% risperidone versus 52.31% blonanserin) and cardiac-related abnormalities (22.39% risperidone versus 12.31% blonanserin), and blonanserin patients were more prone to extrapyramidal side effects (48.46% blonanserin versus 29.10% risperidone). In conclusion, blonanserin was as effective as risperidone for the treatment of Chinese patients with schizophrenia. The overall safety profiles of these drugs are comparable, although blonanserin was associated with a higher incidence of EPS and risperidone was associated with a higher incidence of prolactin elevation and weight gain. Thus, blonanserin is useful for the treatment of Chinese schizophrenia patients.

  11. The effect of addition of low dose fentanyl to epidural bupivacaine (0.5%) in patients undergoing elective caesarean section: A randomized, parallel group, double blind, placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Parate, LH; Manjrekar, SP; Anandaswamy, TC; Manjunath, B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Opioids have synergistic action with local anesthetics which may alter characteristics of epidural block. Giving opioids to mother before delivery of baby is still fully not accepted with some fearing risk of neonatal depression. Aims: Our primary aim was to evaluate the analgesic effect of addition of 50 μg fentanyl to epidural 0.5% bupivacaine in patients undergoing elective caesarean section using visual analog scale. The secondary aim was to assess onset of analgesia, volume of drug required to achieve T6 level, grade and duration of motor block and Apgar score. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study 64 patients scheduled for elective caesarean section under epidural anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups of 32 each. The fentanyl group received 1ml of 50 μg fentanyl and the saline group received 1ml of normal saline mixed with 10ml of 0.5% bupivacaine for epidural anesthesia. VAS score, time to achieve T6 level, dose of bupivacaine, intraoperative analgesic consumption and duration of analgesia, grade and duration of motor block and any adverse maternal and neonatal effects were noted. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using Students t test, chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U-test. The values of P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Fentanyl improved the VAS score significantly (1.6 ± 1.32) compared to the saline group (3.77 ± 1.0, P < 0.0001). It also reduced the intraoperaitve analgesic supplementation compared to the saline group. (P = 0.031). The postoperative duration of analgesia was prolonged in the fentanyl group (275.80 ± 13.61 min) compared to the saline group (191.47 ± 12.16 min, P < 0.0001). The other characteristics of epidural block were unaltered. Conclusion: Addition of 50 μg fentanyl to epidural 0.5% bupivacaine significantly reduces the VAS score. It also reduces intra-operative analgesia supplementation and prolongs the duration

  12. Rationale and design of the HepZero study: a prospective, multicenter, international, open, randomized, controlled clinical study with parallel groups comparing heparin-free dialysis with heparin-coated dialysis membrane (Evodial) versus standard care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation for chronic dialysis patients with contraindications to heparin administration is challenging. Current guidelines state that in patients with increased bleeding risks, strategies that can induce systemic anticoagulation should be avoided. Heparin-free dialysis using intermittent saline flushes is widely adopted as the method of choice for patients at risk of bleeding, although on-line blood predilution may also be used. A new dialyzer, Evodial (Gambro, Lund, Sweden), is grafted with unfractionated heparin during the manufacturing process and may allow safe and efficient heparin-free hemodialysis sessions. In the present trial, Evodial was compared to standard care with either saline flushes or blood predilution. Methods The HepZero study is the first international (seven countries), multicenter (10 centers), randomized, controlled, open-label, non-inferiority (and if applicable subsequently, superiority) trial with two parallel groups, comprising 252 end-stage renal disease patients treated by maintenance hemodialysis for at least 3 months and requiring heparin-free dialysis treatments. Patients will be treated during a maximum of three heparin-free dialysis treatments with either saline flushes or blood predilution (control group), or Evodial. The first heparin-free dialysis treatment will be considered successful when there is: no complete occlusion of air traps or dialyzer rendering dialysis impossible; no additional saline flushes to prevent clotting; no change of dialyzer or blood lines because of clotting; and no premature termination (early rinse-back) because of clotting. The primary objectives of the study are to determine the effectiveness of the Evodial dialyzer, compared with standard care in terms of successful treatments during the first heparin-free dialysis. If the non-inferiority of Evodial is demonstrated then the superiority of Evodial over standard care will be tested. The HepZero study results may have major clinical

  13. A study for active control research and validation using the Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. T. N.; Daughaday, H.; Andrisani, D., II; Till, R. D.; Weingarten, N. C.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study and preliminary design for active control research and validation using the Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) aircraft are documented. Active control functions which can be demonstrated on the TIFS aircraft and the cost of preparing, equipping, and operating the TIFS aircraft for active control technology development are determined. It is shown that the TIFS aircraft is as a suitable test bed for inflight research and validation of many ACT concepts.

  14. Some experiences using wind-tunnel models in active control studies. [minimization of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Abel, I.; Ruhlin, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A status report and review of wind tunnel model experimental techniques that have been developed to study and validate the use of active control technology for the minimization of aeroelastic response are presented. Modeling techniques, test procedures, and data analysis methods used in three model studies are described. The studies include flutter mode suppression on a delta-wing model, flutter mode suppression and ride quality control on a 1/30-size model of the B-52 CCV airplane, and an active lift distribution control system on a 1/22 size C-5A model.

  15. GPU-based parallel group ICA for functional magnetic resonance data.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yanshan; Zeng, Weiming; Wang, Nizhuan; Ren, Tianlong; Shi, Yingchao; Yin, Jun; Xu, Qi

    2015-04-01

    The goal of our study is to develop a fast parallel implementation of group independent component analysis (ICA) for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data using graphics processing units (GPU). Though ICA has become a standard method to identify brain functional connectivity of the fMRI data, it is computationally intensive, especially has a huge cost for the group data analysis. GPU with higher parallel computation power and lower cost are used for general purpose computing, which could contribute to fMRI data analysis significantly. In this study, a parallel group ICA (PGICA) on GPU, mainly consisting of GPU-based PCA using SVD and Infomax-ICA, is presented. In comparison to the serial group ICA, the proposed method demonstrated both significant speedup with 6-11 times and comparable accuracy of functional networks in our experiments. This proposed method is expected to perform the real-time post-processing for fMRI data analysis.

  16. An Exploratory Simulator Study on the Use of Active Control Devices in Car Driving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-04

    system to the driver and therefore concurrently serve as a proprioceptive -tactual display (RPihmann, 1981). The term "tactual" is used in the meaning of...displayed proprioceptive -tactual cues (see common coding approach in information processing, Prinz, 1990). The control loop for an active control...KlMckner & St6cker; 1990). In its present form the accelerator hardly pvrode- any systematic proprioceptive - tactual feedback to the driver abot.t the

  17. Requirements and feasibility study of flight demonstration of Active Controls Technology (ACT) on the NASA 515 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, C. K.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary design study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of the NASA 515 airplane as a flight demonstration vehicle, and to develop plans, schedules, and budget costs for fly-by-wire/active controls technology flight validation in the NASA 515 airplane. The preliminary design and planning were accomplished for two phases of flight validation.

  18. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 1; Flyover System Noise Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Robert E.; Janardan, B. A.; Kontos, G. C.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    A study has been completed to examine the potential reduction of aircraft flyover noise by the method of active noise control (ANC). It is assumed that the ANC system will be designed such that it cancels discrete tones radiating from the engine fan inlet or fan exhaust duct. Thus, without considering the engineering details of the ANC system design, tone levels are arbitrarily removed from the engine component noise spectrum and the flyover noise EPNL levels are compared with and without the presence of tones. The study was conducted for a range of engine cycles, corresponding to fan pressure ratios from 1.3 to 1.75. The major conclusions that can be drawn are that, for a fan pressure ratio of 1.75, ANC of tones gives about the same suppression as acoustic treatment without ANC, and for a fan pressure ratio of 1.45, ANC appears to offer less effectiveness than passive treatment. Additionally, ANC appears to be more effective at sideline and cutback conditions than at approach. Overall EPNL suppressions due to tone removal range from about 1 to 3 dB at takeoff engine speeds and from 1 to 5 db at approach speeds. Studies of economic impact of the installation of an ANC system for the four engine cases indicate increases of DOC ranging from 1 to 2 percent, favoring the lower fan pressure ratio engines. Further study is needed to confirm the results by examining additional engine data, particularly at low fan pressure ratios, and studying the details of the current results to obtain a more complete understanding. Further studies should also include determining the effects of combining passive and active treatment.

  19. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 4; Flyover System Noise Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Janardan, B. A.; Gliebe, P. R.; Kontos, G. C.

    1996-01-01

    An extension of a prior study has been completed to examine the potential reduction of aircraft flyover noise by the method of active noise control (ANC). It is assumed that the ANC system will be designed such that it cancels discrete tones radiating from the engine fan inlet or fan exhaust duct, at least to the extent that they no longer protrude above the surrounding broadband noise levels. Thus, without considering the engineering details of the ANC system design, tone levels am arbitrarily removed from the engine component noise spectrum and the flyover noise EPNL levels are compared with and without the presence of tones. The study was conducted for a range of engine cycles, corresponding to fan pressure ratios of 1.3, 1.45, 1.6, and 1.75. This report is an extension of an effort reported previously. The major conclusions drawn from the prior study, which was restricted to fan pressure ratios of 1.45 and 1.75, are that, for a fan pressure ratio of 1.75, ANC of tones gives about the same suppression as acoustic treatment without ANC. For a fan pressure ratio of 1.45, ANC appears to offer less effectiveness from passive treatment. In the present study, the other two fan pressure ratios are included in a more detailed examination of the benefits of the ANC suppression levels. The key results of this extended study are the following observations: (1) The maximum overall benefit obtained from suppression of BPF alone was 2.5 EPNdB at high fan speeds. The suppression benefit increases with increase in fan pressure ratio (FPR), (2) The maximum overall benefit obtained from suppression of the first three harmonics was 3 EPNdB at high speeds. Suppression benefit increases with increase in FPR, (3) At low FPR, only about 1.0 EPNdB maximum reduction was obtained. Suppression is primarily from reduction of BPF at high FPR values and from the combination of tones at low FPR, (4) The benefit from ANC is about the same as the benefit from passive treatment at fan pressure

  20. Experimental Study of the Temporal Nature of an Actively Controlled Three Dimensional Turret Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Patrick; Glauser, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Experimental measurements have been performed to characterize the actively controlled wake of a three-dimensional, non- conformal turret which is a bluff body commonly used for housing optical systems on airborne platforms. As a bluff body, turrets can generate strong turbulent flow fields that degrade the performance of the optical systems and the aircraft. Experiments were performed in a low-speed wind tunnel at Syracuse University using particle image velocimetry and dynamic pressure measurements with the objective of developing a better understanding of the spatial and temporal nature of the wake flow field. Active control was achieved using dynamic suction in the vicinity of the turret aperture and was found to have a significant impact on the structure of the wake as well as the temporal characteristics of the flow field. With a better understanding of the wake characteristics, closed-loop, active flow control systems will be developed to help reduce fluctuating loading and aero- optical distortions associated with the turbulent flow field.

  1. Parallel group independent component analysis for massive fMRI data sets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaojie; Huang, Lei; Qiu, Huitong; Nebel, Mary Beth; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Pekar, James J; Lindquist, Martin A; Eloyan, Ani; Caffo, Brian S

    2017-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is widely used in the field of functional neuroimaging to decompose data into spatio-temporal patterns of co-activation. In particular, ICA has found wide usage in the analysis of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) data. Recently, a number of large-scale data sets have become publicly available that consist of rs-fMRI scans from thousands of subjects. As a result, efficient ICA algorithms that scale well to the increased number of subjects are required. To address this problem, we propose a two-stage likelihood-based algorithm for performing group ICA, which we denote Parallel Group Independent Component Analysis (PGICA). By utilizing the sequential nature of the algorithm and parallel computing techniques, we are able to efficiently analyze data sets from large numbers of subjects. We illustrate the efficacy of PGICA, which has been implemented in R and is freely available through the Comprehensive R Archive Network, through simulation studies and application to rs-fMRI data from two large multi-subject data sets, consisting of 301 and 779 subjects respectively.

  2. Parallel group independent component analysis for massive fMRI data sets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Qiu, Huitong; Nebel, Mary Beth; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Pekar, James J.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Eloyan, Ani; Caffo, Brian S.

    2017-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is widely used in the field of functional neuroimaging to decompose data into spatio-temporal patterns of co-activation. In particular, ICA has found wide usage in the analysis of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) data. Recently, a number of large-scale data sets have become publicly available that consist of rs-fMRI scans from thousands of subjects. As a result, efficient ICA algorithms that scale well to the increased number of subjects are required. To address this problem, we propose a two-stage likelihood-based algorithm for performing group ICA, which we denote Parallel Group Independent Component Analysis (PGICA). By utilizing the sequential nature of the algorithm and parallel computing techniques, we are able to efficiently analyze data sets from large numbers of subjects. We illustrate the efficacy of PGICA, which has been implemented in R and is freely available through the Comprehensive R Archive Network, through simulation studies and application to rs-fMRI data from two large multi-subject data sets, consisting of 301 and 779 subjects respectively. PMID:28278208

  3. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Wing planform study and final configuration selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the Wing Planform Study Task and Final Configuration Selection of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program. Application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span resulted in significant improvements over the Conventional Baseline Configuration (Baseline) and the Initial ACT Configuration previously established. The configurations use the same levels of technology (except for ACT), takeoff gross weight, and payload as the Baseline. The Final ACT Configuration (Model 768-107) incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail sizes), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle-of-attack limiter, and wing-load alleviation. Flutter-mode control was not beneficial for this configuration. This resulted in an 890 kg (1960 lb) reduction in airplane takeoff gross weight and a 9.8% improvement in cruise lift/drag. At the Baseline mission range (3590 km) (1938 nmi), this amounts to 10% block fuel reduction. Good takeoff performance at high-altitude airports on a hot day was also achieved. Results of this task strongly indicate that the IAAC Project should proceed with the Final ACT evaluation and begin the required control system development and testing.

  4. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Wing planform study and final configuration selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Wing Planform Study and Final Configuration Selection Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is documented. Application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span resulted in significant improvements over the Conventional Baseline Configuration (Baseline) and the Initial ACT Configuration previously established. The configurations use the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, and payload as the Baseline. The Final ACT Configuration (Model 768-107) incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 44% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle-of-attack limiter, and wing-load alleviation. Flutter-mode control was not beneficial for this configuration. This resulted in an 890 kg (1960 lb) reduction in airplane takeoff gross weight and a 9.8% improvement in cruise lift/drag. At the Baseline mission range (3589 km 1938 nmi), this amounts to 10% block-fuel reduction. Results of this task strongly indicate that the IAAC Project should proceed with the Final ACT evaluation, and begin the required control system development and test.

  5. Actuator Feasibility Study for Active Control of Ducted Axial Fan Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, John C.

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study was performed to investigate actuator technology which is relevant for a particular application of active noise control for gas turbine stator vanes. This study investigated many different classes of actuators and ranked them on the order of applicability. The most difficult requirements the actuators had to meet were high frequency response, large amplitude deflections, and a thin profile. Based on this assessment, piezoelectric type actuators were selected as the most appropriate actuator class. Specifically, Rainbows (a new class of high performance piezoelectric actuators), and unimorphs (a ceramic/metal composite) appeared best suited to the requirements. A benchtop experimental study was conducted. The performance of a variety of different actuators was examined, including high polymer films, flextensional actuators, miniature speakers, unimorphs, and Rainbows. The displacement/frequency response and phase characteristics of the actuators were measured. Physical limitations of actuator operation were also examined. This report includes the first known, high displacement, dynamic data obtained for Rainbow actuators. A new "hard" ceramic Rainbow actuator which does not appear to be limited in operation by self heating as "soft" ceramic Rainbows was designed, constructed and tested. The study concludes that a suitable actuator for active noise control in gas turbine engines can be achieved with state of the art materials and processing.

  6. Comparative study on semi-active control algorithms for piezoelectric friction dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chaoqiang; Chen, Genda

    2004-07-01

    A semi-active Tri-D algorithm combining Coulomb, Reid and viscous damping mechanisms has recently been developed by the authors to drive piezoelectric friction dampers. The objective of this study is to analytically compare its performance with those of bang-bang control, clipped-optimal control, modulated homogeneous control, and a modified clipped-optimal control. Two far-field and two near-field historical earthquake records with various intensities and dominant frequencies were used in this study. All algorithms were evaluated with a ¼ scale 3-story frame structure in terms of reductions in peak inter-story drift ratio and peak floor acceleration. A piezoelectric friction damper was considered to be installed between a bracing support and the first floor of the frame structure. Both advantages and disadvantages of each control algorithm were discussed with numerical simulations. At near resonance, both bang-bang and clipped-optimal algorithms are more effective in drift reduction, and the modified clipped-optimal algorithm is more effective in acceleration reduction than both Tri-D and modulated homogeneous algorithms. But the latter requires less control force on the average. For a non-resonant case, the Tri-D and modulated homogeneous algorithms are more effective in acceleration reduction than others even with less control force required. Overall, the Tri-D and modulated homogeneous controls are effective in response reduction, adaptive, and robust to earthquake characteristics.

  7. Observation of EHO in NSTX and Theoretical Study of its Active Control Using HHFW Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    J.-K. Park, et. al.

    2013-01-14

    Two important topics in the tokamak ELM control, using the non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic perturbations, are studied in NSTX and combined envisioning ELM control in the future NSTX-U operation: Experimental observations of the edge harmonic oscillation in NSTX (not necessarily the same as EHOs in DIII-D), and theoretical study of its external drive using the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) antenna as a 3D field coil. Edge harmonic oscillations were observed particularly well in NSTX ELM-free operation with low n core modes, with various diagnostics confirming n = 4 ~ 6 edge-localized and coherent oscillations in 2 ~ 8kHz frequency range. These oscillations seem to have a favored operational window in rotational shear, similarly to EHOs in DIII-D QH modes . However, in NSTX, they are not observed to provide particle or impurity control, possibly due to their weak amplitudes, of a few mm displacements, as measured by reflectometry. The external drive of these modes has been proposed in NSTX, by utilizing audio-frequency currents in the HHFW antenna straps. Analysis shows that the HHFW straps can be optimized to maximize n = 4 ~ 6 while minimizing n = 1 ~ 3. Also, IPEC calculations show that the optimized configuration with only 1kAt current can produce comparable or larger displacements than the observed internal modes. If this optimized external drive can be constructively combined, or further resonated with the internal modes, the edge harmonic oscillations in NSTX may be able to produce sufficient particle control to modify ELMs.

  8. Prevention and Treatment of Lower Limb Deep Vein Thrombosis after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation: Results of a Prospective active controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan; Zhang, Bao-jian; Zhang, Bao-ku; Ma, Jun; Liu, Xu-zheng; Jiang, Shu-bin

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, single-center, active controlled study from July 2013 to January 2015, in Chinese patients with rapid ventricular arrhythmia who had received radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) treatment to determine formation of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (LDVT) post RFCA procedure, and evaluated the effect of rivaroxaban on LDVT. Patients with asymptomatic pulmonary thromboembolism who had not received any other anticoagulant and had received no more than 36 hours of treatment with unfractionated heparin were included. Post RFCA procedure, patients received either rivaroxaban (10 mg/d for 14 days beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 86) or aspirin (100 mg/d for 3 months beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 90). The primary outcome was a composite of LDVT occurrence, change in diameter of femoral veins, and safety outcomes that were analyzed based on major or minor bleeding events. In addition, blood flow velocity was determined. No complete occlusive thrombus or bleeding events were reported with either of the group. The lower incidence rate of non-occluded thrombus in rivaroxaban (5.8%) compared to the aspirin group (16.7%) indicates rivaroxaban may be administered post-RFCA to prevent and treat femoral venous thrombosis in a secure and effective way with a faster inset of action than standard aspirin therapy. PMID:27329582

  9. Hyperinvasive approach to out-of hospital cardiac arrest using mechanical chest compression device, prehospital intraarrest cooling, extracorporeal life support and early invasive assessment compared to standard of care. A randomized parallel groups comparative study proposal. “Prague OHCA study”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a poor outcome. Recent non-randomized studies of ECLS (extracorporeal life support) in OHCA suggested further prospective multicenter studies to define population that would benefit from ECLS. We aim to perform a prospective randomized study comparing prehospital intraarrest hypothermia combined with mechanical chest compression device, intrahospital ECLS and early invasive investigation and treatment in all patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin compared to a standard of care. Methods This paper describes methodology and design of the proposed trial. Patients with witnessed OHCA without ROSC (return of spontaneous circulation) after a minimum of 5 minutes of ACLS (advanced cardiac life support) by emergency medical service (EMS) team and after performance of all initial procedures (defibrillation, airway management, intravenous access establishment) will be randomized to standard vs. hyperinvasive arm. In hyperinvasive arm, mechanical compression device together with intranasal evaporative cooling will be instituted and patients will be transferred directly to cardiac center under ongoing CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). After admission, ECLS inclusion/exclusion criteria will be evaluated and if achieved, veno-arterial ECLS will be started. Invasive investigation and standard post resuscitation care will follow. Patients in standard arm will be managed on scene. When ROSC achieved, they will be transferred to cardiac center and further treated as per recent guidelines. Primary outcome 6 months survival with good neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category 1–2). Secondary outcomes will include 30 day neurological and cardiac recovery. Discussion Authors introduce and offer a protocol of a proposed randomized study comparing a combined “hyperinvasive approach” to a standard of care in refractory OHCA. The protocol is opened for sharing by other cardiac centers with available ECLS and

  10. A randomized, double-masked, parallel-group, comparative study to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of 1% azithromycin–0.1% dexamethasone combination compared to 1% azithromycin alone, 0.1% dexamethasone alone, and vehicle in the treatment of subjects with blepharitis

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Kamran; Lindstrom, Richard L; Foulks, Gary; Nichols, Kelly K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of a 1% azithromycin–0.1% dexamethasone combination in DuraSite (“combination”) compared to 0.1% dexamethasone in DuraSite, 1% azithromycin in DuraSite, and vehicle in the treatment of subjects with blepharitis. Materials and methods This was a Phase III, double-masked, vehicle-controlled, four-arm study in which 907 subjects with blepharitis were randomized to combination (n=305), 0.1% dexamethasone (n=298), 1% azithromycin (n=155), or vehicle (n=149). Ten study visits were scheduled: screening visit, days 1 and 4 (dosing phase) and 15, and months 1–6 (follow-up phase). On day 1, subjects applied one drop of the study drug to the eyelid of the inflamed eye(s) twice daily, and continued with twice-daily dosing for 14 days. After completing 14 days of dosing, subjects were followed for 6 months for efficacy and safety. Results A total of 57 subjects (6.3%) had complete clinical resolution at day 15: 25 (8.2%), 17 (5.7%), 8 (5.2%), and 7 (4.7%) subjects in the combination-, 0.1% dexamethasone-, 1% azithromycin-, and vehicle-treatment groups, respectively. The combination was superior to 1% azithromycin and vehicle alone, but not to 0.1% dexamethasone alone. Mean composite (total) clinical sign and symptom scores improved in all four treatment groups during the post-treatment evaluation phase for the intent-to-treat population, but outcomes were superior when a drop containing 0.1% dexamethasone was utilized. Clinical response was noted as early as day 4, and persisted as long as 6 months. Most adverse events were considered mild in severity and not related to the study drug. Conclusion A higher percentage of subjects in the combination group achieved complete clinical resolution of the signs and symptoms of blepharitis at day 15 than with 1% azithromycin and vehicle, but outcomes were similar to treatment with 0.1% dexamethasone alone. The combination was well tolerated. PMID:27570444

  11. A Phase IIIb, Multicentre, Randomised, Parallel-Group, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of OROS Hydromorphone in Subjects with Moderate-to-Severe Chronic Pain Induced by Osteoarthritis of the Hip or the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Vojtaššák, Jozef; Vojtaššák, Jozef; Jacobs, Adam; Rynn, Leonie; Waechter, Sandra; Richarz, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Background. Opioid analgesics are included in treatment guidelines for the symptomatic management of osteoarthritis (OA). Starting with a low dose of opioid and slowly titrating to a higher dose may help avoid intolerable side effects. Methods. Subjects aged ≥40 years, with moderate to severe pain induced by OA of the hip or knee not adequately controlled by previous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or paracetamol treatment, were enrolled. Subjects received OROS hydromorphone 4 mg or placebo once-daily. The dose was titrated every 3-4 days in case of unsatisfactory pain control during the 4-week titration phase. A 12 week maintenance phase followed. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in “pain on average” measured on the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) scale from baseline to the end of the maintenance phase. Results. 139 subjects received OROS hydromorphone and 149 subjects received placebo. All efficacy endpoints showed similar improvements from baseline to end of study in the 2 groups. The safety results were consistent with the safety profile of OROS hydromorphone. Conclusion.The study did not meet the primary endpoint; although many subjects' pain was not adequately controlled at inclusion, their pain may have improved with continued paracetamol or NSAID treatment. PMID:22110921

  12. Study protocol of Prednisone in episodic Cluster Headache (PredCH): a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel group trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral prednisone as an add-on therapy in the prophylactic treatment of episodic cluster headache with verapamil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Episodic cluster headache (ECH) is a primary headache disorder that severely impairs patient’s quality of life. First-line therapy in the initiation of a prophylactic treatment is verapamil. Due to its delayed onset of efficacy and the necessary slow titration of dosage for tolerability reasons prednisone is frequently added by clinicians to the initial prophylactic treatment of a cluster episode. This treatment strategy is thought to effectively reduce the number and intensity of cluster attacks in the beginning of a cluster episode (before verapamil is effective). This study will assess the efficacy and safety of oral prednisone as an add-on therapy to verapamil and compare it to a monotherapy with verapamil in the initial prophylactic treatment of a cluster episode. Methods and design PredCH is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with parallel study arms. Eligible patients with episodic cluster headache will be randomized to a treatment intervention with prednisone or a placebo arm. The multi-center trial will be conducted in eight German headache clinics that specialize in the treatment of ECH. Discussion PredCH is designed to assess whether oral prednisone added to first-line agent verapamil helps reduce the number and intensity of cluster attacks in the beginning of a cluster episode as compared to monotherapy with verapamil. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00004716 PMID:23889923

  13. A Phase IIIb, Multicentre, Randomised, Parallel-Group, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of OROS Hydromorphone in Subjects with Moderate-to-Severe Chronic Pain Induced by Osteoarthritis of the Hip or the Knee.

    PubMed

    Vojtaššák, Jozef; Vojtaššák, Jozef; Jacobs, Adam; Rynn, Leonie; Waechter, Sandra; Richarz, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Background. Opioid analgesics are included in treatment guidelines for the symptomatic management of osteoarthritis (OA). Starting with a low dose of opioid and slowly titrating to a higher dose may help avoid intolerable side effects. Methods. Subjects aged ≥40 years, with moderate to severe pain induced by OA of the hip or knee not adequately controlled by previous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or paracetamol treatment, were enrolled. Subjects received OROS hydromorphone 4 mg or placebo once-daily. The dose was titrated every 3-4 days in case of unsatisfactory pain control during the 4-week titration phase. A 12 week maintenance phase followed. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in "pain on average" measured on the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) scale from baseline to the end of the maintenance phase. Results. 139 subjects received OROS hydromorphone and 149 subjects received placebo. All efficacy endpoints showed similar improvements from baseline to end of study in the 2 groups. The safety results were consistent with the safety profile of OROS hydromorphone. Conclusion.The study did not meet the primary endpoint; although many subjects' pain was not adequately controlled at inclusion, their pain may have improved with continued paracetamol or NSAID treatment.

  14. Integrative application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial act configuration design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The performance and economic benefits of a constrained application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) are identified, and the approach to airplane design is established for subsequent steps leading to the development of a less constrained final ACT configuration. The active controls configurations are measured against a conventional baseline configuration, a state-of-the-art transport, to determine whether the performance and economic changes resulting from ACT merit proceeding with the project. The technology established by the conventional baseline configuration was held constant except for the addition of ACT. The wing, with the same planform, was moved forward on the initial ACT configuration to move the loading range aft relative to the wing mean aerodynamic chord. Wing trailing-edge surfaces and surface controls also were reconfigured for load alleviation and structural stabilization.

  15. Comparison of parallel group velocity of ECH waves with electron resonant velocity: Implication for electron diffusion by ECH waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.

    2009-10-01

    We have investigated the role of group velocity in the calculation of pitch-angle diffusion coefficients by electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves in planetary magnetospheres. The assumption which is generally made that the parallel group velocity can be neglected in comparison with particle parallel velocity is examined in detail. It is found that for lowest harmonic band this assumption is quite good. It is found that in general it is not possible to ignore the parallel group velocity. However, for lowest harmonic band this assumption is quite good at low electron temperatures.

  16. Risperidone versus zuclopenthixol in the treatment of acute schizophrenic episodes: a double-blind parallel-group trial.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, M O; Piepponen, T; Rantanen, H; Larmo, I; Nyholm, R; Raitasuo, V

    1995-04-01

    A double-blind, randomized, multi-center, parallel-group study was conducted in Finland to compare the efficacy and safety of risperidone with zuclopenthixol in patients with acute exacerbations of schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder. Ninety-eight patients were randomly assigned to treatment with risperidone (n = 48) or zuclopenthixol (n = 50), in variable doses, for 6 weeks. The mean daily doses of risperidone and zuclopenthixol at the end of the trial were 8 mg and 38 mg respectively. Efficacy was assessed throughout by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for schizophrenia and Clinical Global Impression. Safety assessments included the Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale, UKU Side-Effect Rating Scale, vital signs, body weight and laboratory screening. The results indicate that risperidone is at least as effective as zuclopenthixol for the treatment of acute schizophrenic episodes, with a trend towards greater improvement in the overall severity of symptoms. The onset of action was significantly shorter with risperidone than with zuclopenthixol. Although the general tolerability of the two drugs was comparable, fewer patients experienced extrapyramidal symptoms with risperidone, so that significantly fewer risperidone-treated patients required antiparkinsonian medication.

  17. A written self-help intervention for depressed adults comparing behavioural activation combined with physical activity promotion with a self-help intervention based upon behavioural activation alone: study protocol for a parallel group pilot randomised controlled trial (BAcPAc)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Challenges remain to find ways to support patients with depression who have low levels of physical activity (PA) to overcome perceived barriers and enhance the perceived value of PA for preventing future relapse. There is an evidence-base for behavioural activation (BA) for depression, which focuses on supporting patients to restore activities that have been avoided, but practitioners have no specific training in promoting PA. We aimed to design and evaluate an integrated BA and PA (BAcPAc) practitioner-led, written, self-help intervention to enhance both physical and mental health. Methods/design This study is informed by the Medical Research Council Complex Intervention Framework and describes a protocol for a pilot phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the feasibility and acceptability of the trial methods to inform a definitive phase III RCT. Following development of the augmented written self-help intervention (BAcPAc) incorporating behavioural activation with physical activity promotion, depressed adults are randomised to receive up to 12 sessions over a maximum of 4 months of either BAcPAc or behavioural activation alone within a written self-help format, which represents treatment as usual. The study is located within two ‘Improving Access to Psychological Therapies’ services in South West England, with both written self-help interventions supported by mental health paraprofessionals. Measures assessed at 4, 9, and 12 month follow-up include the following: CIS-R, PHQ-9, accelerometer recorded (4 months only) and self-reported PA, body mass index, blood pressure, Insomnia Severity Index, quality of life, and health and social care service use. Process evaluation will include analysis of recorded support sessions and patient and practitioner interviews. At the time of writing the study has recruited 60 patients. Discussion The feasibility outcomes will inform a definitive RCT to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the

  18. Multicentre, open-label, randomised, parallel-group, superiority study to compare the efficacy of octreotide therapy 40 mg monthly versus standard of care in patients with refractory anaemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from small bowel angiodysplasias: a protocol of the OCEAN trial

    PubMed Central

    van Geenen, E J M; Drenth, J P H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal angiodysplasias are an important cause of difficult-to-manage bleeding, especially in older patients. Endoscopic coagulation of angiodysplasias is the mainstay of treatment, but may be difficult for small bowel angiodysplasias because of the inability to reach them for endoscopic intervention. Some patients are red blood cell (RBC) transfusion dependent due to frequent rebleeding despite endoscopic treatment. In small cohort studies, octreotide appears to decrease the number of bleeding episodes in patients with RBC transfusion dependency due to gastrointestinal angiodysplasias. This trial will assess the efficacy of octreotide in decreasing the need for RBC transfusions and parenteral iron in patients with anaemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding of small bowel angiodysplasias despite endoscopic intervention. Study design Randomised controlled, superiority, open-label multicentre trial. Participants 62 patients will be included with refractory anaemia due to small bowel angiodysplasias, who are RBC transfusion or iron infusion dependent despite endoscopic intervention and oral iron supplementation. Intervention Patients will be randomly assigned (1:1) to standard care or 40 mg long-acting octreotide once every 4 weeks for 52 weeks, in addition to standard care. The follow-up period is 8 weeks. Main outcome measures The primary outcome is the difference in the number of blood and iron infusions between the year prior to inclusion and the treatment period of 1 year. Important secondary outcomes are the per cent change in the number of rebleeds from baseline to end point, adverse events and quality of life. Ethics and dissemination The trial received ethical approval from the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects and from the local accredited Medical Research Ethics Committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands (reference number: 2014-1433). Results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and

  19. A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study to compare the efficacy and safety of a once-daily loratadine-pseudoephedrine combination with that of a twice-daily loratadine-pseudoephedrine combination in the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-An; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Hao, Sheng-Po

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of a once-daily loratadine-pseudoephedrine sustained release tablet with that of a twice-daily loratadine-pseudoephedrine in the treatment of patients with allergic rhinitis. Forty-eight subjects were randomized into either the treatment or control group. The efficacy endpoint was assessed by total symptom scores (TSS). And the results were analyzed by non-inferiority testing and t-tests. Non-inferiority testing of the once daily loratadine 10 mg-pseudoephedrine 240 mg sustained release tablets to the twice-daily loratadine 5 mg-pseudoephedrine 120 mg combination tablets was not supported by statistical significance. However, both the treatment and control groups showed a significant reduction from the baseline in TSS (P < 0.05), and the difference between groups did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05). In conclusion, once-daily and twice-daily preparations of loratadine-pseudoephedrine were comparable in efficacy and safety in the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

  20. Active control system trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yore, E. E.; Gunderson, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The active control concepts which achieve the benefit of improved mission performance and lower cost and generate system trends towards improved dynamic performance, more integration, and digital fly by wire mechanization are described. Analytical issues and implementation requirements and tools and approaches developed to address the analytical and implementation issues are briefly discussed.

  1. Exercises and Dry Needling for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Parallel-Group Trial.

    PubMed

    Arias-Buría, José L; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Palacios-Ceña, María; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Salom-Moreno, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial investigated the effectiveness of exercise versus exercise plus trigger point (TrP) dry needling (TrP-DN) in subacromial pain syndrome. A randomized parallel-group trial, with 1-year follow-up was conducted. Fifty subjects with subacromial pain syndrome were randomly allocated to receive exercise alone or exercise plus TrP-DN. Participants in both groups were asked to perform an exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice daily for 5 weeks. Further, patients allocated to the exercise plus TrP-DN group also received dry needling to active TrPs in the muscles reproducing shoulder symptoms during the second and fourth sessions. The primary outcome was pain-related disability assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included mean current pain and the worst pain experienced in the shoulder during the previous week. They were assessed at baseline, 1 week, and 3, 6, and 12 months after the end of treatment. Analysis was according to intention to treat with mixed analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline outcomes. At 12 months, 47 patients (94%) completed follow-up. Statistically larger improvements (all, P < .01) in shoulder disability was found for the exercise plus TrP-DN group at all follow-up periods (post: Δ -20.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) -23.8 to -17.4]; 3 months: Δ -23.2 [95% CI -28.3 to -18.1)]; 6 months: Δ -23.6 [95% CI -28.9 to -18.3]; 12 months: Δ -13.9 [95% CI -17.5 to -10.3]). Both groups exhibited similar improvements in shoulder pain outcomes at all follow-up periods. The inclusion of TrP-DN with an exercise program was effective for improving disability in subacromial pain syndrome. No greater improvements in shoulder pain were observed.

  2. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial ACT configuration design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The initial ACT configuration design task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is summarized. A constrained application of active controls technology (ACT) resulted in significant improvements over a conventional baseline configuration previously established. The configuration uses the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, payload, and design requirements/objectives as the baseline, except for flying qualities, flutter, and ACT. The baseline wing is moved forward 1.68 m. The configuration incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle of attack limiter, wing load alleviation, and flutter mode control. This resulted in a 930 kg reduction in airplane operating empty weight and a 3.6% improvement in cruise efficiency, yielding a 13% range increase. Adjusted to the 3590 km baseline mission range, this amounts to 6% block fuel reduction and a 15.7% higher incremental return on investment, using 1978 dollars and fuel cost.

  3. Optimizing trial design in pharmacogenetics research: comparing a fixed parallel group, group sequential, and adaptive selection design on sample size requirements.

    PubMed

    Boessen, Ruud; van der Baan, Frederieke; Groenwold, Rolf; Egberts, Antoine; Klungel, Olaf; Grobbee, Diederick; Knol, Mirjam; Roes, Kit

    2013-01-01

    Two-stage clinical trial designs may be efficient in pharmacogenetics research when there is some but inconclusive evidence of effect modification by a genomic marker. Two-stage designs allow to stop early for efficacy or futility and can offer the additional opportunity to enrich the study population to a specific patient subgroup after an interim analysis. This study compared sample size requirements for fixed parallel group, group sequential, and adaptive selection designs with equal overall power and control of the family-wise type I error rate. The designs were evaluated across scenarios that defined the effect sizes in the marker positive and marker negative subgroups and the prevalence of marker positive patients in the overall study population. Effect sizes were chosen to reflect realistic planning scenarios, where at least some effect is present in the marker negative subgroup. In addition, scenarios were considered in which the assumed 'true' subgroup effects (i.e., the postulated effects) differed from those hypothesized at the planning stage. As expected, both two-stage designs generally required fewer patients than a fixed parallel group design, and the advantage increased as the difference between subgroups increased. The adaptive selection design added little further reduction in sample size, as compared with the group sequential design, when the postulated effect sizes were equal to those hypothesized at the planning stage. However, when the postulated effects deviated strongly in favor of enrichment, the comparative advantage of the adaptive selection design increased, which precisely reflects the adaptive nature of the design.

  4. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The current status of the Active Controls Technology (ACT) for the advanced subsonic transport project is investigated through analysis of the systems technical data. Control systems technologies under examination include computerized reliability analysis, pitch axis fly by wire actuator, flaperon actuation system design trade study, control law synthesis and analysis, flutter mode control and gust load alleviation analysis, and implementation of alternative ACT systems. Extensive analysis of the computer techniques involved in each system is included.

  5. Local treatment of vaginal infections of varying etiology with dequalinium chloride or povidone iodine. A randomised, double-blind, active-controlled, multicentric clinical study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Eiko E; Weissenbacher, Ernst R; Hengst, Peter; Spitzbart, Heinz; Weise, Wolfgang; Wolff, Friedrich; Dreher, Ekkehard; Ernst, Uwe; Della Casa, Vera; Pohlig, Gabriele; Graf, Federico; Kaiser, R Renato

    2002-01-01

    This randomised, double-blind, multicentric clinical study compared the efficacy and tolerability of the two vaginal antiseptics, 10 mg dequalinium chloride (CAS 522-51-0, Fluomycin N) and 200 mg povidone iodine (CAS 25655-41-8), in a parallel-group design. A total of 180 patients with vaginal infections of varying etiology participated in this study (bacterial vaginosis, fluor vaginalis, vulvo-vaginal candidiasis, trichomoniasis). Patients were randomly allocated to one of the two treatment groups and were treated once per day for 6 days. Control examinations took place 5 to 7 days after the end of treatment, and 3 to 4 weeks after the first control examination. The total symptoms score, a summary score for the clinical symptoms, discharge, burning, pruritus, redness of vulva/vagina, was defined as primary efficacy parameter. The treatments at the first control examination were compared in the full analysis set using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U-test, 2-sided, thereby proving equivalence of both treatments at the 5% level. Both treatments strongly improved the symptoms of vaginal infections both on short-term and long-term follow-up. Descriptive analysis of the secondary parameters, vaginal pH, degree of purity of the vaginal flora, and number of lactobacilli in the wet mounts, supported the comparable efficacy of both therapies to restore the vaginal milieu. Analysis of the diagnostic subgroups indicated that irrespective of the diagnosis, both treatments improved the efficacy criteria as observed for the entire population. The global assessment of the therapeutic efficacy by investigators and patients supported the results of the efficacy analysis with good to very good ratings in 70-90% of the cases. A good tolerability of both preparations was observed in this study with a low number of adverse events in the test group (5.8%).

  6. Active controls for ride smoothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.; Thompson, G. O.

    1976-01-01

    Active controls technology offers great promise for significantly smoothing the ride, and thus improving public and air carrier acceptance, of certain types of transport aircraft. Recent findings which support this promise are presented in the following three pertinent areas: (1) Ride quality versus degree of traveler satisfaction; (2) significant findings from a feasibility study of a ride smoothing system; and (3) potential ride problems identified for several advanced transport concepts.

  7. “Everybody Brush!”: Protocol for a Parallel-Group Randomized Controlled Trial of a Family-Focused Primary Prevention Program With Distribution of Oral Hygiene Products and Education to Increase Frequency of Toothbrushing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Twice daily toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste is the most widely advocated preventive strategy for dental caries (tooth decay) and is recommended by professional dental associations. Not all parents, children, or adolescents follow this recommendation. This protocol describes the methods for the implementation and evaluation of a quality improvement health promotion program. Objective The objective of the study is to show a theory-informed, evidence-based program to improve twice daily toothbrushing and oral health-related quality of life that may reduce dental caries, dental treatment need, and costs. Methods The design is a parallel-group, pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Families of Medicaid-insured children and adolescents within a large dental care organization in central Oregon will participate in the trial (n=21,743). Families will be assigned to one of three groups: a test intervention, an active control, or a passive control condition. The intervention aims to address barriers and support for twice-daily toothbrushing. Families in the test condition will receive toothpaste and toothbrushes by mail for all family members every three months. In addition, they will receive education and social support to encourage toothbrushing via postcards, recorded telephone messages, and an optional participant-initiated telephone helpline. Families in the active control condition will receive the kit of supplies by mail, but no additional instructional information or telephone support. Families assigned to the passive control will be on a waiting list. The primary outcomes are restorative dental care received and, only for children younger than 36 months old at baseline, the frequency of twice-daily toothbrushing. Data will be collected through dental claims records and, for children younger than 36 months old at baseline, parent interviews and clinical exams. Results Enrollment of participants and baseline interviews have been completed. Final

  8. No relevant cardiac, pharmacokinetic or safety interactions between roflumilast and inhaled formoterol in healthy subjects: an open-label, randomised, actively controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Roflumilast is an oral, selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor with anti-inflammatory effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The addition of roflumilast to long-acting bronchodilators improves lung function in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. The present study investigated drug-drug interaction effects between inhaled formoterol and oral roflumilast. Methods This was a single-centre (investigational clinic), open, randomised, multiple-dose, parallel-group study. In Regimen A, healthy men were treated with roflumilast (500 μg tablet once daily; Day 2-18) and concomitant formoterol (24 μg twice daily; Day 12-18). In Regimen B, healthy men were treated with formoterol (24 μg twice daily; Day 2-18) and concomitant roflumilast (500 μg once daily; Day 9-18). Steady-state plasma pharmacokinetics of roflumilast, roflumilast N-oxide and/or formoterol (Cmax and AUC0-τ) as well as pharmacodynamics - blood pressure, transthoracic impedance cardiography (ZCG), 12-lead digital electrocardiography, peripheral blood eosinophils, and serum glucose and potassium concentrations - were evaluated through Day 1 (baseline), Day 8 (Regimen B: formoterol alone) or Day 11 (Regimen A: roflumilast alone), and Day 18 (Regimen A and B: roflumilast plus formoterol). Blood and urine samples were taken for safety assessment at screening, pharmacokinetic profiling days and Day 19. Adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Results Of the 27 subjects enrolled, 24 were evaluable (12 in each regimen). No relevant pharmacokinetic interactions occurred. Neither roflumilast nor formoterol were associated with significant changes in cardiovascular parameters as measured by ZCG, and these parameters were not affected during concomitant administration. Formoterol was associated with a slight increase in heart rate and a corresponding shortening of the QT interval, without changes in the heart rate-corrected QTc interval. There were small effects on the other

  9. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Actively controlled mechanical seals have recently been developed for industrial use. This study investigates the feasibility of using such seals for aerospace applications. In a noncontacting mechanical seal, the film thickness depends on the geometry of the seal interface. The amount of coning, which is a measure of the radial convergence or divergence of the seal interface, has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the coning with a piezoelectric material. A mathematical model has been formulated to predict the performance of an actively controlled mechanical seal.

  10. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 2: Canceling Noise Source-Design of an Acoustic Plate Radiator Using Piezoceramic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, F. G.; Rajiyah, H.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic plate radiators powered by piezoceramic thin sheets as canceling sources for active control of aircraft engine fan noise is demonstrated. Analytical and numerical models of actuated beams and plates are developed and validated. An optimization study is performed to identify the optimum combination of design parameters that maximizes the plate volume velocity for a given resonance frequency. Fifteen plates with various plate and actuator sizes, thicknesses, and bonding layers were fabricated and tested using results from the optimization study. A maximum equivalent piston displacement of 0.39 mm was achieved with the optimized plate samples tested with only one actuator powered, corresponding to a plate deflection at the center of over 1 millimeter. This is very close to the deflection required for a full size engine application and represents a 160-fold improvement over previous work. Experimental results further show that performance is limited by the critical stress of the piezoceramic actuator and bonding layer rather than by the maximum moment available from the actuator. Design enhancements are described in detail that will lead to a flight-worthy acoustic plate radiator by minimizing actuator tensile stresses and reducing nonlinear effects. Finally, several adaptive tuning methods designed to increase the bandwidth of acoustic plate radiators are analyzed including passive, active, and semi-active approaches. The back chamber pressurization and volume variation methods are investigated experimentally and shown to be simple and effective ways to obtain substantial control over the resonance frequency of a plate radiator. This study shows that piezoceramic-based plate radiators can be a viable acoustic source for active control of aircraft engine fan noise.

  11. Active control of buildings during earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vance, Vicki L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an overview of the different types of control systems used in buildings, to discuss the problems associated with current active control mechanisms, and to show the cost-effectiveness of applying active control to buildings. In addition, a small case study investigates the feasibility and benefits of using embedded actuators in buildings. Use of embedded actuators could solve many of the current problems associated with active control by providing a wider bandwidth of control, quicker speed of response, increased reliability and reduced power requirement. Though embedded actuators have not been developed for buildings, they have previously been used in space structures. Many similarities exist between large civil and aerospace structures indicating that direct transfer of concepts between the two disciplines may be possible. In particular, much of the Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology currently being developed could be beneficially applied to civil structures. While several buildings with active control systems have been constructed in Japan, additional research and experimental verification are necessary before active control systems become widely accepted and implemented.

  12. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The active control technology (ACT) control/guidance system task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the NASA energy efficient transport program was documented. The air traffic environment of navigation and air traffic control systems and procedures were extrapolated. An approach to listing flight functions which will be performed by systems and crew of an ACT configured airplane of the 1990s, and a determination of function criticalities to safety of flight, are the basis of candidate integrated ACT/Control/Guidance System architecture. The system mechanizes five active control functions: pitch augmented stability, angle of attack limiting, lateral/directional augmented stability, gust load alleviation, and maneuver load control. The scope and requirements of a program for simulating the integrated ACT avionics and flight deck system, with pilot in the loop, are defined, system and crew interface elements are simulated, and mechanization is recommended. Relationships between system design and crew roles and procedures are evaluated.

  13. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability; (2) angle of attack limiting; (3) lateral/directional augmented stability; (4) gust load alleviation; (5) maneuver load control; and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  14. A double-blind, randomized, and active-controlled phase III study of Herbiron drink in the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in premenopausal females in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ching-Tzu; Jeng, Cherng-Jye; Yeh, Lian-Shung; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chen, Shih-Ming; Lee, Chyi-Long; Lin, Willie; Hsu, Chun-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Background About 468 million non-pregnant women are estimated to suffer from iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) worldwide. The highest prevalence of IDA occurs in the Taiwanese population. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of Herbiron to increase iron absorption in women with IDA. Design Phase III double-blind, randomized, active-controlled, and parallel comparative study enrolled 124 patients with IDA and consisted of a 2-week run-in period, randomization, 12 weeks of supplementation, and 4 weeks of follow-up. The treatment group received Herbiron drink 50 mL p.o., b.i.d., before meals (daily iron intake: 21 mg/day) plus placebo tablets. The control group received a ferrous sulfate tablet, t.i.d., plus placebo 50-mL drink before meals (daily iron intake: 195 mg/day). Results Both treatments significantly improved hemoglobin and all secondary efficacy endpoints. Most IDA patients treated with Herbiron or ferrous sulfate finished the study in the normal range. Ferrous sulfate treatment induced a rapid rate of hemoglobin synthesis, which plateaued by week 8, whereas Herbiron treatment increased the rate of hemoglobin synthesis more slowly, likely due to its nine-fold lower iron content. Gastrointestinal adverse events (diarrhea, abdominal pain, dyspepsia, and nausea) but not infectious adverse events were significantly more common in the ferrous sulfate group (n=11, 18.3%) than those in the Herbiron group (n=1, 1.6%) (p=0.004). Conclusion Twelve weeks of Herbiron treatment delivering 21mg of iron or ferrous sulfate treatment delivering 195 mg of iron induced normal hemoglobin levels in 62 or 91% of non-pregnant women with IDA in Taiwan, respectively, suggesting dose-dependent and bioavailability effects. PMID:27343206

  15. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport is reported. Supplementary technical data on the following topics are included: (1) 1990's avionics technology assessment; (2) function criticality assessment; (3) flight deck system for total control and functional features list; (4) criticality and reliability assessment of units; (5) crew procedural function task analysis; and (6) recommendations for simulation mechanization.

  16. A comparative study of the clinical efficacy of nedocromil sodium and placebo. How does cromolyn sodium compare as an active control treatment?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, H J; Blumenthal, M; Brady, R; Braun, S; Lockey, R; Myers, D; Mansfield, L; Mullarkey, M; Owens, G; Ratner, P; Repsher, L; van As, A

    1996-04-01

    Nedocromil sodium and cromolyn sodium are the only two currently available nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agents for treatment of asthma. Clinical differences between the two agents remain under continuous investigation with reports differentiating the two on the basis of atopy of the patient and reversibility of bronchoconstriction. This study investigated the efficacy of nedocromil sodium (4 mg, qid) for treatment of mild-to-moderate asthma in comparison to placebo using cromolyn sodium (2 mg, qid) as an active control treatment. Patients were primarily allergic asthmatics (with at least 15% reversibility) previously maintained on a regimen of regular bronchodilator therapy. During a 2-week run-in period, the patient's slow-release theophylline therapy was removed, and the patients were randomized to treatment after deterioration of asthma control (asthma symptom summary score of 3 for 7 of the 14 days). After 8 weeks of treatment, patients were returned to as occasion requires bronchodilator therapy, as per the 2-week baseline period. The results demonstrate that patients treated with nedocromil sodium showed statistically significant improvements during the primary time period (mean weeks 3 through 8) over placebo-treated patients as evidenced by all indexes of asthma symptoms, pulmonary function measures, and decreased bronchodilator reliance (p<0.05). Patients treated with cromolyn sodium demonstrated similar improvements over placebo-treated patients. Comparisons between nedocromil sodium and cromolyn sodium showed the two agents to be comparable in this group of primarily allergic patients with reversible disease. Between-group differences were noted for 3 of the 13 variables (nighttime asthma, FEV1, and forced expiratory flow rate between 25 % and 75% of the FVC) in favor of cromolyn sodium when the data were pooled during the primary time period. The number of patients missing 1 or more days from work/school/regular activity due to asthma was significantly

  17. mHealth Intervention to Improve Diabetes Risk Behaviors in India: A Prospective, Parallel Group Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Saligram, Nalini; Davé, Raj; Gowda, Arun; Blais, Linelle; Arora, Monika; Ranjani, Harish; Ganda, Om; Hedeker, Donald; Reddy, Sethu; Ramalingam, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    Background In low/middle income countries like India, diabetes is prevalent and health care access limited. Most adults have a mobile phone, creating potential for mHealth interventions to improve public health. To examine the feasibility and initial evidence of effectiveness of mDiabetes, a text messaging program to improve diabetes risk behaviors, a global nonprofit organization (Arogya World) implemented mDiabetes among one million Indian adults. Objective A prospective, parallel cohort design was applied to examine whether mDiabetes improved fruit, vegetable, and fat intakes and exercise. Methods Intervention participants were randomly selected from the one million Nokia subscribers who elected to opt in to mDiabetes. Control group participants were randomly selected from non-Nokia mobile phone subscribers. mDiabetes participants received 56 text messages in their choice of 12 languages over 6 months; control participants received no contact. Messages were designed to motivate improvement in diabetes risk behaviors and increase awareness about the causes and complications of diabetes. Participant health behaviors (exercise and fruit, vegetable, and fat intake) were assessed between 2012 and 2013 via telephone surveys by blinded assessors at baseline and 6 months later. Data were cleaned and analyzed in 2014 and 2015. Results 982 participants in the intervention group and 943 in the control group consented to take the phone survey at baselne. At the end of the 6-month period, 611 (62.22%) in the intervention and 632 (67.02%) in the control group completed the follow-up telephone survey. Participants receiving texts demonstrated greater improvement in a health behavior composite score over 6 months, compared with those who received no messages F(1, 1238) = 30.181, P<.001, 95% CI, 0.251-0.531. Fewer intervention participants demonstrated health behavior decline compared with controls. Improved fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption (P<.01) but not exercise were observed in those receiving messages, as compared with controls. Conclusions A text messaging intervention was feasible and showed initial evidence of effectiveness in improving diabetes-related health behaviors, demonstrating the potential to facilitate population-level behavior change in a low/middle income country. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN): 12615000423516; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=367946&isReview=true (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6j5ptaJgF) PMID:27496271

  18. Sandstone compaction under actively controlled uniaxial strain conditions - an experimental study on the causes of subsidence in the Dutch Wadden Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, Sander; Mossop, Antony; van der Linden, Arjan; Zuiderwijk, Pedro; Makurat, Axel; van Eijs, Rob

    2016-04-01

    In the Wadden Sea, a tidal-flat area located between the North Sea and the Dutch mainland shore, and UNESCO World Heritage site, subsidence could potentially impact the ecological system. To guide the licensing process governing gas extraction for the area by a solid understanding of the system's response to production, Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij (NAM) has carried out a study on the magnitudes, timing, and mechanisms of subsidence related to gas production. As part of this study program, we address the effect of production-induced reservoir compaction, using core samples from the Moddergat field located at the Wadden Sea coastline, from a depth of ~3800 m TVDSS, to assess the nature of the compaction mechanisms that operate. In this contribution, we focus on the uniaxial strain response of Permian, Aeolian sandstone to pore pressure depletion. As the majority of experiments reported in the literature are conducted under triaxial stress conditions, this data set is somewhat unique, and can help confirm the validity of micromechanical processes found for triaxial stress conditions. We report over 30 data sets of experiments carried out using 1.0 and 1.5 inch diameter plugs, sub-sampled from the extracted sandstone core material. The experiments start at in-situ conditions of pore pressure (Pf=~57 MPa), stress (Sv=~80 MPa, Sh=~67 MPa) and temperature (T up to 100 °C), and deplete to a pore pressure of 3 MPa, under actively controlled lateral constraint boundary conditions (i.e. uniaxial strain). Care was taken to systematically vary porosity and sample morphology to ensure representation of the intra-reservoir variability. Our laboratory data show that pressure-depletion results in a strain in the range of 5·10-3-1·10-2 over the total duration of the experiments of 5-12 weeks, with approximately 80% of the total strain response being close to instantaneous, and 20% developing over time. The total strain response develops during depletion as a result of

  19. Lobeglitazone and pioglitazone as add-ons to metformin for patients with type 2 diabetes: a 24-week, multicentre, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, active-controlled, phase III clinical trial with a 28-week extension.

    PubMed

    Jin, S-M; Park, C-Y; Cho, Y M; Ku, B J; Ahn, C W; Cha, B-S; Min, K W; Sung, Y A; Baik, S H; Lee, K W; Yoon, K-H; Lee, M-K; Park, S W

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of lobeglitazone and pioglitazone as add-ons to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients who were inadequately controlled by metformin were randomized and treated once daily with either lobeglitazone (0.5 mg, n = 128) or pioglitazone (15 mg, n = 125) for 24 weeks, with a 28-week extension trial of lobeglitazone treatment in patients who consented. The primary endpoint was the change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration from baseline to week 24. At week 24, the mean change from baseline in HbA1c was -0.74% for the lobeglitazone group and -0.74% for the pioglitazone group, with a mean difference of 0.01% [95% confidence interval (CI) of difference, -0.16 to 0.18]. The effects of lobeglitazone on lipid variables and the adverse events associated with lobeglitazone were similar to those observed with pioglitazone. Lobeglitazone was not inferior to pioglitazone as an add-on to metformin in terms of their efficacy and safety.

  20. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100 C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changed suddenly.

  1. The efficacy of a brief intervention in reducing hazardous drinking in working age men in Russia: the HIM (Health for Izhevsk men) individually randomised parallel group exploratory trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Russia has particularly low life expectancy for an industrialised country, with mortality at working ages having fluctuated dramatically over the past few decades, particularly among men. Alcohol has been identified as the most likely cause of these temporal variations. One approach to reducing the alcohol problem in Russia is 'brief interventions' which seek to change views of the personal acceptability of excessive drinking and to encourage self-directed behaviour change. Very few studies to evaluate the efficacy of brief interventions in Russia have been conducted. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a person-centred counselling style which can be adapted to brief interventions in which help is offered in thinking through behaviour in the context of values and goals, to decide whether change is needed, and if so, how it may best be achieved. Methods This paper reports on an individually randomised two-armed parallel group exploratory trial. The primary hypothesis is that a brief adaptation of MI will be effective in reducing self-reported hazardous and harmful drinking at 3 months. Participants were drawn from the Izhevsk Family Study II, with eligibility determined based on proxy reports of hazardous and harmful drinking in the past year. All participants underwent a health check, with MI subsequently delivered to those in the intervention arm. Signed consent was obtained from those in the intervention arm only at this point. Both groups were then invited for 3 and 12 month follow ups. The control group did not receive any additional intervention. Results 441 men were randomised. Of these 61 did not have a health check leaving 190 in each trial arm. Follow up at 3 months was high (97% of those having a health check), and very similar in the two trial arms (183 in the intervention and 187 in the control). No significant differences were detected between the randomised groups in either the primary or the secondary outcomes at three months in the

  2. Actively Controlled Shaft Seals for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.; Wolff, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  3. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1995-07-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  4. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project-longitudinal handling qualities study of a relaxed-stability airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of a piloted simulation of longitudinal handling qualities of an airplane with relaxed static stability are described. This task was performed under the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the NASA Energy Efficient Transport Program. A representative medium range transport airplane, the Boeing Model 757, was simulated. Evaluations were made of the unaugmented airplane and of the airplane with an Essential Pitch Augmented Stability (PAS) System and with a Primary PAS System at various center of gravity (cg) conditions. Level 2 pilot ratings were attained with cg locations aft to about 57% mean aerodynamic chord (MAC) or 6% aft of the neutral point for unaugmented landing approach. For Mach = 0.80, unaugmented cruise Level 2 ratings were attained to 47% MAC or 5% forward of the maneuver point. The augmented airplane model provided handling qualities close to or within the Level 1 boundary at all cg locations for both Essential and Primary PAS. Analyses of the test conditions when compared with existing handling qualities criteria based on classical unaugmented airplane characteristics agreed well with the pilot ratings. The unaugmented results are comparable to those reported by both the Douglas Aircraft Company and Lockheed California Company from simulation investigations of transport configurations with roughly similar dimensional and mass characteristics.

  5. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    An active controls technology (ACT) system architecture was selected based on current technology system elements and optimal control theory was evaluated for use in analyzing and synthesizing ACT multiple control laws. The system selected employs three redundant computers to implement all of the ACT functions, four redundant smaller computers to implement the crucial pitch-augmented stability function, and a separate maintenance and display computer. The reliability objective of probability of crucial function failure of less than 1 x 10 to the -9th power per flight of 1 hr can be met with current technology system components, if the software is assumed fault free and coverage approaching 1.0 can be provided. The optimal control theory approach to ACT control law synthesis yielded comparable control law performance much more systematically and directly than the classical s-domain approach. The ACT control law performance, although somewhat degraded by the inclusion of representative nonlinearities, remained quite effective. Certain high-frequency gust-load alleviation functions may require increased surface rate capability.

  6. Active control of combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Masoud, Nidal A.

    A theoretical analysis of active control of combustion thermo-acoustic instabilities is developed in this dissertation. The theoretical combustion model is based on the dynamics of a two-phase flow in a liquid-fueled propulsion system. The formulation is based on a generalized wave equation with pressure as the dependent variable, and accommodates all influences of combustion, mean flow, unsteady motions and control inputs. The governing partial differential equations are converted to an equivalent set of ordinary differential equations using Galerkin's method by expressing the unsteady pressure and velocity fields as functions of normal mode shapes of the chamber. This procedure yields a representation of the unsteady flow field as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators that is used as a basis for controllers design. Major research attention is focused on the control of longitudinal oscillations with both linear and nonlinear processes being considered. Starting with a linear model using point actuators, the optimal locations of actuators and sensors are developed. The approach relies on the quantitative measures of the degree of controllability and component cost. These criterion are arrived at by considering the energies of the system's inputs and outputs. The optimality criteria for sensor and actuator locations provide a balance between the importance of the lower order (controlled) and the higher (residual) order modes. To address the issue of uncertainties in system's parameter, the minimax principles based controller is used. The minimax corresponds to finding the best controller for the worst parameter deviation. In other words, choosing controller parameters to minimize, and parameter deviation to maximize some quadratic performance metric. Using the minimax-based controller, a remarkable improvement in the control system's ability to handle parameter uncertainties is achieved when compared to the robustness of the regular control schemes such as LQR

  7. Cognitive bias modification for interpretation with and without prior repetitive negative thinking to reduce worry and rumination in generalised anxiety disorder and depression: protocol for a multisession experimental study with an active control condition

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Andrew; Whyte, Jessica; Hirsch, Colette R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Worry and rumination are two forms of repetitive thinking characterised by their negative content and apparently uncontrollable nature. Although worry and rumination share common features and have been conceptualised as part of a transdiagnostic repetitive negative thinking (RNT) process, it remains unclear whether they share the same underlying cognitive mechanisms. This multisession experimental study investigates the tendency to make negative interpretations regarding ambiguous information as a cognitive mechanism underlying RNT. We compare multisession cognitive bias modification for interpretations (CBM-I) with an active control condition to examine whether repeatedly training positive interpretations reduces worry and rumination in individuals with generalised anxiety disorder or depression, respectively. Further, we examine the potential modulatory effects of engaging in RNT immediately prior to CBM-I. Design, methods and analysis A community sample of individuals meeting diagnostic criteria for either generalised anxiety disorder (n=60) or current major depressive episode (n=60) will be randomly allocated to CBM-I with prior RNT, CBM-I without prior RNT (ie, standard CBM-I), or an active control (no resolution of ambiguity) condition. All conditions receive a 3-week internet-based intervention consisting of one initial session at the first study visit and nine home-based sessions of CBM-I training (or active control). We will assess and compare the effects of CBM-I with and without prior RNT on ‘near-transfer’ measures of interpretation bias closely related to the training as well as ‘far-transfer’ outcomes related to RNT and emotional distress. Impact on questionnaire measures will additionally be assessed at 1-month follow-up. Multigroup analyses will be conducted to assess the impact of CBM-I on near-transfer and far-transfer outcome measures. PMID:27986741

  8. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize and unstable wave.

  9. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize an unstable wave.

  10. Mediation of late excitation from human hand muscles via parallel group II spinal and group I transcortical pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, George; Iglesias, Caroline; Cavallari, Paolo; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Emmanuel; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique

    2006-01-01

    This study addresses the question of the origin of the long-latency responses evoked in flexors in the forearm by afferents from human hand muscles. The effects of electrical stimuli to the ulnar nerve at wrist level were assessed in healthy subjects using post-stimulus time histograms for flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor carpi radialis (FCR) single motor units (eight subjects) and the modulation of the ongoing rectified FCR EMG (19 subjects). Ulnar stimulation evoked four successive peaks of heteronymous excitation that were not produced by purely cutaneous stimuli: a monosynaptic Ia excitation, a second group I excitation attributable to a propriospinally mediated effect, and two late peaks. The first long-latency excitation occurred 8–13 ms after monosynaptic latency and had a high-threshold (1.2–1.5 × motor threshold). When the conditioning stimulation was applied at a more distal site and when the ulnar nerve was cooled, the latency of this late excitation increased more than the latency of monosynaptic Ia excitation. This late response was not evoked in the contralateral FCR of one patient with bilateral corticospinal projections to FCR motoneurones. Finally, oral tizanidine suppressed the long-latency high-threshold excitation but not the early low-threshold group I responses. These results suggest that the late high-threshold response is mediated through a spinal pathway fed by muscle spindle group II afferents. The second long-latency excitation, less frequently observed (but probably underestimated), occurred 16–18 ms after monosynaptic latency, had a low threshold indicating a group I effect, and was not suppressed by tizanidine. It is suggested that this latest excitation involves a transcortical pathway. PMID:16484303

  11. Safety evaluation of the consumption of high dose milk fat globule membrane in healthy adults: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial with parallel group design.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sayaka; Ochiai, Ryuji; Shioya, Yasushi; Katsuragi, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) in combination with habitual exercise suppresses age-associated muscle loss. The effects of high dose MFGM, however, are not known. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial with parallel group design was conducted to evaluate the safety of consuming high dose MFGM tablets. The subjects were 32 healthy adult men and women. Subjects were given 5 times the recommended daily intake of the tablets containing 6.5 g of MFGM or whole milk powder for 4 weeks. Stomach discomfort and diarrhea were observed; however, these symptoms were transitory and slight and were not related to consumption of the test tablets. In addition, there were no clinically significant changes in anthropometric measurements or blood tests. Total degree of safety assessed by the physicians of all subjects was "safe." These findings suggest that consumption of the tablets containing 6.5 g MFGM for 4 weeks is safe for healthy adults.

  12. Effects of a Topical Saffron (Crocus sativus L) Gel on Erectile Dysfunction in Diabetics: A Randomized, Parallel-Group, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh-Moghadam, Hossein; Nazari, Seyed Mohammad; Shamsa, Ali; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Esmaeeli, Habibollah; Asadpour, Amir Abbas; Khajavi, Abdoljavad

    2015-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a man's persistent or recurrent inability to achieve and maintain erection for a satisfactory sexual relationship. As diabetes is a major risk factor for erectile dysfunction, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction among diabetic men has been reported as 35% to 90%. This randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigated the effects of a topical saffron (Crocus sativus L) gel on erectile dysfunction in diabetic men. Patients were randomly allocated to 2 equal groups (with 25 patients each). The intervention group was treated with topical saffron, and the control received a similar treatment with placebo. The 2 groups were assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire before the intervention and 1 month after the intervention. Compared to placebo, the prepared saffron gel could significantly improve erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients (P < .001). This preliminary evidence suggests that saffron can be considered as a treatment option for diabetic men with erectile dysfunction.

  13. Tools for active control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.; Newsom, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Efficient control law analysis and design tools which properly account for the interaction of flexible structures, unsteady aerodynamics and active controls are developed. Development, application, validation and documentation of efficient multidisciplinary computer programs for analysis and design of active control laws are also discussed.

  14. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 5; Numerical Computation of Acoustic Mode Reflection Coefficients for an Unflanged Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    A computational method to predict modal reflection coefficients in cylindrical ducts has been developed based on the work of Homicz, Lordi, and Rehm, which uses the Wiener-Hopf method to account for the boundary conditions at the termination of a thin cylindrical pipe. The purpose of this study is to develop a computational routine to predict the reflection coefficients of higher order acoustic modes impinging on the unflanged termination of a cylindrical duct. This effort was conducted wider Task Order 5 of the NASA Lewis LET Program, Active Noise Control of aircraft Engines: Feasibility Study, and will be used as part of the development of an integrated source noise, acoustic propagation, ANC actuator coupling, and control system algorithm simulation. The reflection coefficient prediction will be incorporated into an existing cylindrical duct modal analysis to account for the reflection of modes from the duct termination. This will provide a more accurate, rapid computation design tool for evaluating the effect of reflected waves on active noise control systems mounted in the duct, as well as providing a tool for the design of acoustic treatment in inlet ducts. As an active noise control system design tool, the method can be used preliminary to more accurate but more numerically intensive acoustic propagation models such as finite element methods. The resulting computer program has been shown to give reasonable results, some examples of which are presented. Reliable data to use for comparison is scarce, so complete checkout is difficult, and further checkout is needed over a wider range of system parameters. In future efforts the method will be adapted as a subroutine to the GEAE segmented cylindrical duct modal analysis program.

  15. Effects of vilazodone on sexual functioning in healthy adults: results from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and active-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Durgam, Suresh; Li, Dayong; Chen, Changzheng; Chen, Laishun; Mathews, Maju; Gommoll, Carl P.; Szegedi, Armin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of vilazodone on sexual functioning in healthy, sexually active adults and assess the impact of medication nonadherence in this type of trial. Participants were randomized to vilazodone (20 or 40 mg/day), paroxetine (20 mg/day), or placebo for 5 weeks of double-blind treatment. The primary endpoint was change from baseline to day 35 in Change in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (CSFQ) total score in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. Post-hoc analyses were carried out in modified intent-to-treat (mITT) populations that excluded participants in the active-treatment groups with undetectable plasma drug concentrations at all visits (mITT-I) or at least one visit (mITT-II). In the ITT population (N=199), there were no statistically significant differences between any treatment groups for CSFQ total score change: placebo, −1.0; vilazodone 20 mg/day, −1.4; vilazodone 40 mg/day, −1.9; and paroxetine, −3.5. In mITT-I (N=197) and mITT-II (N=159), CSFQ total score change was not significantly different between vilazodone (either dose) versus placebo; the CSFQ total score decreased significantly (P<0.05) with paroxetine versus both placebo and vilazodone 20 mg/day, but not versus vilazodone 40 mg/day. Vilazodone exerted no significant effect on sexual functioning in healthy adults. Medication nonadherence can alter study results and may be an important consideration in trials with volunteer participants. PMID:27643885

  16. Integration of modeling and simulation to support changes to ondansetron dosing following a randomized, double-blind, placebo-, and active-controlled thorough QT study.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Peiying; Haberer, Lynda J; Fang, Lei; Hunt, Thomas L; Ridgway, Derry; Russo, Mark W

    2014-11-01

    Prolongation of the QT interval has been observed with ondansetron and other members of the 5-HT3 antagonist class. This is the first thorough QTc study of ondansetron conducted in accordance with ICH E14 guidelines, designed to investigate the effect of single intravenous (IV) doses of ondansetron on cardiac conduction compared to placebo and a positive control, moxifloxacin, in healthy subjects. Statistical analysis of dose-response showed the maximum mean difference in QTcF, compared to placebo and corrected for baseline (ddQTcF), was less than 10 milliseconds (ms) after an 8 mg IV dose and approximately 20 ms after the 32 mg dose, each infused over 15 minutes. The concentration-response (Cp-ddQTcF) model resulted in similar predictions for the 8 and 32 mg and was used to predict the maximum mean ddQTcF (upper 90% CI bound) of 9.2 (11.2) ms for 16 mg IV. As a result, single IV doses of ondansetron greater than 16 mg should no longer be used. Adult cancer patients, under 75 years, may receive up to a maximum initial 15-minute IV dose of 16 mg, prior to chemotherapy, followed by 2 additional IV or IM doses of 8 mg for the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV).

  17. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 3; Active Fan Noise Cancellation in the NASA Lewis Active Noise Control Fan Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G.; Hu, Ziqiang; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's (LERC) 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF). The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for global active noise cancellation of fan tones. The GE ANC system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is canceled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. Inputs to the controller are signals from a shaft encoder and from a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The key results are that the (6,0) was completely eliminated at the 920 Hz design frequency and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 6.8 dB (out of a possible 9.8 dB). Farfield reductions of 15 dB (SPL) were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB PWL decrease. The results indicate that global attenuation of PWL at the target frequency was obtained in the aft quadrant using an ANC actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct. The quality of the results depended on precise mode generation. High spillover into spurious modes generated by the ANC actuator array caused less than optimum levels of PWL reduction. The variation in spillover is believed to be due to calibration procedure, but must be confirmed in subsequent tests.

  18. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2005-07-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic.

  19. A double blind, randomized, active controlled study to assess the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of measles, mumps rubella, and varicella vaccine (MMRV) manufactured using an alternative process.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Gary S; Senders, Shelly D; Shepard, Julie; Twiggs, Jerry D; Gardner, Julie; Hille, Darcy; Hartzel, Jonathan; Valenzuela, Rowan; Stek, Jon E; Helmond, Frans A

    2016-08-02

    Vaccination against measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella is recommended for all children in the US. Limitations manufacturing Oka/Merck strain varicella-zoster virus have hampered the availability of the combination vaccine (MMRV) against these 4 viruses, which drove the need to investigate an alternative manufacturing process. Healthy children 12-to-23 months of age at 71 US sites were randomized (1:1) to receive MMRV manufactured using an alternative process (MMRVAMP) or the currently licensed MMRV. Subjects received 2 0.5 mL doses 3 months apart. Sera were collected before and 6 weeks after Dose-1. Adverse experiences (AEs) were collected for 42 d after each dose and serious AEs and events of special interest for 180 d after Dose-2. Overall, 706 subjects were randomized to MMRVAMP and 706 to MMRV and 698 and 702 received at least 1 dose of study vaccine, respectively. The risk difference in response rates and geometric mean concentrations of antibody to measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella viruses 6 weeks after Dose-1 met non-inferiority criteria for MMRVAMP versus, MMRV. Response rates met acceptability criteria for each virus, and the seroconversion rate to varicella-zoster virus was 99.5% in both groups. Vaccine-related AEs were mostly mild-to-moderate in intensity and somewhat more common after MMRVAMP. Febrile seizures occurred at similar rates in both groups during the first 42 d after each vaccine dose. MMRVAMP is non-inferior to MMRV and represents an important advancement in maintaining an adequate supply of vaccines against these diseases.

  20. Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier; Miller, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale to determine which structural experiments are sufficient to verify the design of structures employing Controlled Structures Technology was derived. A survey of proposed NASA missions was undertaken to identify candidate test articles for use in the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE). The survey revealed that potential test articles could be classified into one of three roles: development, demonstration, and qualification, depending on the maturity of the technology and the mission the structure must fulfill. A set of criteria was derived that allowed determination of which role a potential test article must fulfill. A review of the capabilities and limitations of the STS middeck was conducted. A reference design for the MACE test article was presented. Computing requirements for running typical closed-loop controllers was determined, and various computer configurations were studied. The various components required to manufacture the structure were identified. A management plan was established for the remainder of the program experiment development, flight and ground systems development, and integration to the carrier. Procedures for configuration control, fiscal control, and safety, reliabilty, and quality assurance were developed.

  1. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  2. The aircraft energy efficiency active controls technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Broad outlines of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program for expediting the application of active controls technology to civil transport aircraft are presented. Advances in propulsion and airframe technology to cut down on fuel consumption and fuel costs, a program for an energy-efficient transport, and integrated analysis and design technology in aerodynamics, structures, and active controls are envisaged. Fault-tolerant computer systems and fault-tolerant flight control system architectures are under study. Contracts with leading manufacturers for research and development work on wing-tip extensions and winglets for the B-747, a wing load alleviation system, elastic mode suppression, maneuver-load control, and gust alleviation are mentioned.

  3. Fuel conservation through active control of rotor clearances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beitler, R. S.; Saunders, A. A.; Wanger, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) Project, technology is being developed which will significantly reduce the fuel consumption of turbofan engines for subsonic transport aircraft. One technology concept being pursued is active control of rotor tip clearances. Attention is given to rotor tip clearance considerations and an overview of preliminary study results as well as the General Electric EEE clearance control approach is presented. Finally, potential fuel savings with active control of rotor clearances for a typical EEE mission are predicted.

  4. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  5. Three versus seven days to return-to-work after mild traumatic brain injury: a randomized parallel-group trial with neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Studerus-Germann, Aline M; Engel, Doortje C; Stienen, Martin N; von Ow, Dieter; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2017-02-02

    Although most patients with a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) recover within days to weeks, some experience persistent physical, cognitive and emotional symptoms, often described as post-concussion syndrome (PCS). The optimal recovery time including return-to-work (RTW) after mTBI is unclear. In this single-centre parallel-group trial, patients assigned three days (3D-group) or seven days (7D-group) sick leave were compared with a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery including the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) within one week, after three and 12 months post-injury. The influence of the effective time until RTW on post-concussional symptoms and cognitive performance was analysed. The 3D-group rated significantly higher mean scores in some PCSS symptoms, tended to fulfil diagnosis criteria of PCS more often and showed better cognitive performance in several neuropsychological test scores than the 7D-group at all three time-points of follow-up. Overall, patients returned to work 11.35 d post-injury, thus distinctly above both recommended sick leaves. There was a trend for longer sick leave in patients randomized into the 3D-group. Further analyses revealed that the group with an absolute RTW within one week showed lower symptom severity in fatigue at 3 and 12 months, less PCS and faster performance in fine motor speed at 12 months than the group with an absolute RTW after one week. Our data underline the heterogeneity of mTBI and show that acute and sub-acute symptoms are not prognostic factors for neuropsychological outcome at one year. Later, ability to work seems to be prognostic for long-term occurrence of PCS.

  6. Active control of transmission loss with smart foams.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Abhishek; Berry, Alain

    2011-02-01

    Smart foams combine the complimentary advantages of passive foam material and spatially distributed piezoelectric actuator embedded in it for active noise control applications. In this paper, the problem of improving the transmission loss of smart foams using active control strategies has been investigated both numerically and experimentally inside a waveguide under the condition of plane wave propagation. The finite element simulation of a coupled noise control system has been undertaken with three different smart foam designs and their effectiveness in cancelling the transmitted wave downstream of the smart foam have been studied. The simulation results provide insight into the physical phenomenon of active noise cancellation and explain the impact of the smart foam designs on the optimal active control results. Experimental studies aimed at implementing the real-time control for transmission loss optimization have been performed using the classical single input/single output filtered-reference least mean squares algorithm. The active control results with broadband and single frequency primary source inputs demonstrate a good improvement in the transmission loss of the smart foams. The study gives a comparative description of the transmission and absorption control problems in light of the modification of the vibration response of the piezoelectric actuator under active control.

  7. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Sepe, Raymond B.; Rey, Daniel; Saarmaa, Erik; Crawley, Edward F.

    1993-01-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is a NASA In-Step and Control Structure Interaction (CSI) Office funded Shuttle middeck experiment. The objective is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero-gravity (0-g) can be predicted. This prediction becomes particularly difficult when dynamic behavior during ground testing exhibits extensive suspension and direct gravity coupling. On-orbit system identification and control reconfiguration is investigated to improve performance which would otherwise be limited due to errors in prediction. The program is presently in its preliminary design phase with launch expected in the summer of 1994. The MACE test article consists of three attitude control torque wheels, a two axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this will represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. This paper presents on-going work in the areas of modelling and control of the MACE test article in the zero and one-gravity environments. Finite element models, which include suspension and gravity effects, and measurement models, derived from experimental data, are used as the basis for Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller designs. Finite element based controllers are analytically used to study the differences in closed-loop performance as the test article transitions between the 0-g and 1-g environments. Measurement based controllers are experimentally applied to the MACE test article in the 1-g environment and achieve over an order of magnitude improvement in payload pointing accuracy when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The various aspects of the flight portion of the experiment are also discussed.

  8. The Efficacy and Safety of Wenxin Keli in Patients with Frequent Premature Ventricular Contractions: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled, Parallel-group, Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Wei; Gao, Run-Lin; Zhao, Bu-Chang; Wang, Jing; Chen, Xu-Hua; Cai, Chi; Zhang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) are common in the general population, and frequent PVCs may result in the poor quality of life or even the damage of cardiac function. We examined the efficacy and safety of a traditional Chinese medicine Wenxin Keli for the treatment of frequent PVCs among a relatively large Chinese cohort. Methods: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter trial. A total of 1200 eligible participants were randomly assigned in a ratio of 1:1 to receive Wenxin Keli or the placebo for 4 weeks. The primary and secondary endpoint was the change of PVC numbers and PVC-related symptoms after a 4-week treatment compared with baseline, respectively. In addition, vital signs, laboratory values, and electrocardiographic parameters were assessed in a safety analysis. Results: At the initial evaluation, no significant differences in the baseline characteristics were observed between the Wenxin Keli group and the placebo group. A smaller number of PVCs was observed after the 4-week treatment than at baseline, in both the Wenxin Keli group (5686 ± 5940 vs. 15,138 ± 7597 beats/d, P < 0.001) and the placebo group (10,592 ± 8009 vs. 14,529 ± 5929 beats/d, P < 0.001); moreover, the Wenxin Keli group demonstrated a significantli greater reduction in the frequency of PVCs than the placebo group (P < 0.001). In a full analysis set, patients in the Wenxin Keli group exhibited significantly higher total effective responses in the reduction of PVCs compared to those in the placebo group (83.8% vs. 43.5%, P < 0.001). The per-protocol analysis yielded similar results (83.0% vs. 39.3%, P < 0.001). Treatment with Wenxin Keli also demonstrated superior performance compared to the placebo with respect to PVC-related symptoms. No severe adverse effects attributable to Wenxin Keli were reported. Conclusions: Wenxin Keli treatment effectively reduced the overall number of PVCs and alleviated PVC

  9. Abacavir, zidovudine, or stavudine as paediatric tablets for African HIV-infected children (CHAPAS-3): an open-label, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mulenga, Veronica; Musiime, Victor; Kekitiinwa, Adeodata; Cook, Adrian D; Abongomera, George; Kenny, Julia; Chabala, Chisala; Mirembe, Grace; Asiimwe, Alice; Owen-Powell, Ellen; Burger, David; McIlleron, Helen; Klein, Nigel; Chintu, Chifumbe; Thomason, Margaret J; Kityo, Cissy; Walker, A Sarah; Gibb, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background WHO 2013 guidelines recommend universal treatment for HIV-infected children younger than 5 years. No paediatric trials have compared nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Africa, where most HIV-infected children live. We aimed to compare stavudine, zidovudine, or abacavir as dual or triple fixed-dose-combination paediatric tablets with lamivudine and nevirapine or efavirenz. Methods In this open-label, parallel-group, randomised trial (CHAPAS-3), we enrolled children from one centre in Zambia and three in Uganda who were previously untreated (ART naive) or on stavudine for more than 2 years with viral load less than 50 copies per mL (ART experienced). Computer-generated randomisation tables were incorporated securely within the database. The primary endpoint was grade 2–4 clinical or grade 3/4 laboratory adverse events. Analysis was intention to treat. This trial is registered with the ISRCTN Registry number, 69078957. Findings Between Nov 8, 2010, and Dec 28, 2011, 480 children were randomised: 156 to stavudine, 159 to zidovudine, and 165 to abacavir. After two were excluded due to randomisation error, 156 children were analysed in the stavudine group, 158 in the zidovudine group, and 164 in the abacavir group, and followed for median 2·3 years (5% lost to follow-up). 365 (76%) were ART naive (median age 2·6 years vs 6·2 years in ART experienced). 917 grade 2–4 clinical or grade 3/4 laboratory adverse events (835 clinical [634 grade 2]; 40 laboratory) occurred in 104 (67%) children on stavudine, 103 (65%) on zidovudine, and 105 (64%), on abacavir (p=0·63; zidovudine vs stavudine: hazard ratio [HR] 0·99 [95% CI 0·75–1·29]; abacavir vs stavudine: HR 0·88 [0·67–1·15]). At 48 weeks, 98 (85%), 81 (80%) and 95 (81%) ART-naive children in the stavudine, zidovudine, and abacavir groups, respectively, had viral load less than 400 copies per mL (p=0·58); most ART

  10. Active Control by Conservation of Energy Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    Three unrelated experiments are discussed; each was extremely sensitive to initial conditions. The initial conditions are the beginnings of the origins of the information that nonlinearity displays. Initial conditions make the phenomenon unstable and unpredictable. With the knowledge of the initial conditions, active control requires far less power than that present in the system response. The first experiment is on the control of shocks from an axisymmetric supersonic jet; the second, control of a nonlinear panel response forced by turbulent boundary layer and sound; the third, control of subharmonic and harmonics of a panel forced by sound. In all three experiments, control is achieved by redistribution of periodic energy response such that the energy is nearly preserved from a previous uncontrolled state. This type of active control improves the performance of the system being controlled.

  11. Active control of turbomachine discrete tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeter, Sanford

    This paper was directed at active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the blade row interaction generated propagating acoustic waves. First discrete frequency noise generated by a rotor and stator in a duct was analyzed to determine the propagating acoustic pressure waves. Then a mathematical model was developed to analyze and predict the active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the propagating acoustic waves, accomplished by utilizing oscillating airfoil surfaces to generate additional control propagating pressure waves. These control waves interact with the propagating acoustic waves, thereby, in principle, canceling the acoustic waves and thus, the far field discrete frequency tones. This model was then applied to a fan exit guide vane to investigate active airfoil surface techniques for control of the propagating acoustic waves, and thus the far field discrete frequency tones, generated by blade row interactions.

  12. Active Control of Cryogenic Propellants in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William

    2011-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space. This requires development of active control systems to mitigate the effect of heat leak. This work summarizes current state of the art, proposes operational design strategies and presents options for future architectures. Scaling and integration of active systems will be estimated. Ideal long range spacecraft systems will be proposed with Exploration architecture benefits considered.

  13. Rotor Flapping Response to Active Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Johnson, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    Rotor active control using higher harmonic blade pitch has been proposed as a means to reduce both rotor radiated noise and airframe vibration and to enhance rotor performance. The higher harmonic input, however, can affect rotor thrust and cyclic flapping - the basic trim characteristics of the rotor. Some of the trim changes can negate the active control benefits. For example, wind tunnel test results of a full scale BO-105 rotor with individual-blade control indicate some rotor performance improvements, accompanied with changes in rotor trim, using two-per-rev blade pitch input. The observed performance benefits could therefore be a simple manifestation of the trim change rather than an efficient redistribution of the rotor airloads. More recently, the flight test of the BO-105 helicopter equip,ped with individual-blade-control actuators also reported trim changes whenever the two-per-rev blade pitch for noise reduction was activated. The pilot had to adjust the trim control to maintain the aircraft under a constant flight path. These two cases highlight the, importance of trim considerations in the application of active control to rotorcraft.

  14. An extended active control for chaos synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rong-An; Liu, Ya-Li; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2009-04-01

    By introducing a control strength matrix, the active control theory in chaotic synchronization is developed. With this extended method, chaos complete synchronization can be achieved more easily, i.e., a much smaller control signal is enough to reach synchronization in most cases. Numerical simulations on Rossler, Liu's four-scroll, and Chen system confirmed this and show that the synchronization result depends on the control strength significantly. Especially, in the case of Liu and Chen systems, the response systems' largest Lyapunov exponents' variation with the control strength is not monotone and there exist minima. It is novel for Chen system that the synchronization speed with a special small strength is higher than that of the usual active control which, as a special case of the extended method, has a much larger control strength. All these results indicate that the control strength is an important factor in the actual synchronization. So, with this extended active control, one can make a better and more practical synchronization scheme by adjusting the control strength matrix.

  15. The combination of oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein for the control of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: Results of a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group, multicentre clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Alexea, Octavian; Bacarea, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    Background A medical device containing the film-forming agent reticulated protein and a prebiotic mixture of vegetable oligo- and polysaccharides has been developed, recently receiving European approval as MED class III for the treatment of chronic/functional or recidivant diarrhoea due to different causes including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In the present paper, we evaluate a protein preparation containing these components in comparison with placebo in adult patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS. Methods In a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group, multicentre clinical trial, patients were randomly assigned to receive the combination of oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein and placebo (four oral tablets/day for 56 days). Demographic, clinical and quality of life characteristics and presence and intensity of abdominal pain and flatulence (seven-point Likert scale) were assessed at three study visits (baseline and at 28 and 56 days). Stool emissions were recorded on the diary card using the seven-point Bristol Stool Scale. Results A total of 128 patients were randomised to receive either tablets containing the combination (n = 63) or placebo (n = 65). Treatment with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein was safe and well tolerated. A significant improvement in symptoms across the study was observed in patients treated with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein between visit 2 and visit 3 in abdominal pain (p = 0.0167) and flatulence (p = 0.0373). We also detected a statistically significant increase in the quality of life of patients receiving the active treatment from baseline to visit 3 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Treatment with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein is safe, improving IBS symptoms and quality of life of patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS. PMID:27403313

  16. Effect of L-Tryptophan and L-Leucine on Gut Hormone Secretion, Appetite Feelings and Gastric Emptying Rates in Lean and Non-Diabetic Obese Participants: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Parallel-Group Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin; Häfliger, Simon; Meili, Julian; Doody, Alison; Rehfeld, Jens F; Drewe, Jürgen; Beglinger, Christoph; Wölnerhanssen, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Gut hormones such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) play a role as satiation factors. Strategies to enhance satiation peptide secretion could provide a therapeutic approach for obesity. Carbohydrates and lipids have been extensively investigated in relation to peptide release. In contrast, the role of proteins or amino acids is less clear. Our aim was to compare the effects of the amino acids L-tryptophan (L-trp) and L-leucine (L-leu) separately on gastric emptying and gut peptide secretion. Participants/Methods The study was conducted as a randomized (balanced), double-blind, parallel-group trial. A total of 10 lean and 10 non-diabetic obese participants were included. Participants received intragastric loads of L-trp (0.52 g and 1.56 g) and L-leu (1.56 g), dissolved in 300 mL tap water; 75 g glucose and 300 mL tap water served as control treatments. Results Results of the study are: i) L-trp at the higher dose stimulates CCK release (p = 0.0018), and induces a significant retardation in gastric emptying (p = 0.0033); ii) L-trp at the higher dose induced a small increase in GLP-1 secretion (p = 0.0257); iii) neither of the amino acids modulated subjective appetite feelings; and iv) the two amino acids did not alter insulin or glucose concentrations. Conclusions L-trp is a luminal regulator of CCK release with effects on gastric emptying, an effect that could be mediated by CCK. L-trp’s effect on GLP-1 secretion is only minor. At the doses given, the two amino acids did not affect subjective appetite feelings. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02563847 PMID:27875537

  17. Effect of amiloride, or amiloride plus hydrochlorothiazide, versus hydrochlorothiazide on glucose tolerance and blood pressure (PATHWAY-3): a parallel-group, double-blind randomised phase 4 trial

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Morris J; Williams, Bryan; Morant, Steve V; Webb, David J; Caulfield, Mark J; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Ford, Ian; McInnes, Gordon; Sever, Peter; Salsbury, Jackie; Mackenzie, Isla S; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; MacDonald, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Potassium depletion by thiazide diuretics is associated with a rise in blood glucose. We assessed whether addition or substitution of a potassium-sparing diuretic, amiloride, to treatment with a thiazide can prevent glucose intolerance and improve blood pressure control. Methods We did a parallel-group, randomised, double-blind trial in 11 secondary and two primary care sites in the UK. Eligible patients were aged 18–80 years; had clinic systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher and home systolic blood pressure of 130 mmHg or higher on permitted background drugs of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers, β blockers, calcium-channel blockers, or direct renin inhibitors (previously untreated patients were also eligible in specific circumstances); and had at least one component of the metabolic syndrome in addition to hypertension. Patients with known diabetes were excluded. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to 24 weeks of daily oral treatment with starting doses of 10 mg amiloride, 25 mg hydrochlorothiazide, or 5 mg amiloride plus 12·5 mg hydrochlorothiazide; all doses were doubled after 12 weeks. Random assignment was done via a central computer system. Both participants and investigators were masked to assignment. Our hierarchical primary endpoints, assessed on a modified intention-to-treat basis at 12 and 24 weeks, were the differences from baseline in blood glucose measured 2 h after a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), compared first between the hydrochlorothiazide and amiloride groups, and then between the hydrochlorothiazide and combination groups. A key secondary endpoint was change in home systolic blood pressure at 12 and 24 weeks. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00797862, and the MHRA, Eudract number 2009-010068-41, and is now complete. Findings Between Nov 18, 2009, and Dec 15, 2014, 145 patients were randomly assigned to amiloride, 146 to

  18. An observer-blind randomised parallel group study comparing the efficacy and tolerability of tenoxicam and piroxicam in the treatment of post-operative pain after oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Roelofse, J A; Swart, L C; Stander, I A

    1996-11-01

    Tenoxicam and piroxicam were compared for analgesic efficacy in 58 patients undergoing removal of bilateral impacted third molar teeth, under general anaesthesia. Pain intensity was assessed over a 7 day period by the patient using verbal and visual analogue scales. The patients received one hour pre-operatively dormicum 7.5 mg orally and either tenoxicam 40 mg or piroxicam 40 mg rectally. This was followed by tenoxicam 20 mg daily in effervescent form, or piroxicam 20 mg daily in despersible tablet form for 7 days. Surgical and anaesthetic techniques were standardized for all patients. Therapeutic gain was assessed by comparing hourly pain levels 4 hours post-operatively and then twice daily for 7 days. Trismus was evaluated pre-operatively, at one hour, 24 hours and 7 days post-operatively. Analysis of the results showed a statistical significant difference between the treatment groups only 4 hours post-operatively, patients in the tenoxicam group experiencing less pain than those in the piroxicam group (p = < 0.05).

  19. Mechanisms of active control for noise inside a vibrating cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1987-01-01

    The active control of propeller-induced noise fields inside a flexible cylinder is studied with attention given to the noise reduction mechanisms inherent in the present coupled acoustic shell model. The active noise control model consists of an infinitely long aluminum cylinder with a radius of 0.4 m and a thickness of 0.001 m. Pressure maps are shown when the two external sources are driven in-phase at a frequency corresponding to Omega = 0.22.

  20. Active control of robot manipulator compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, C. C.; Pooran, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed at Catholic University on the research grant entitled Active Control of Robot Manipulator Compliance, supported by NASA/Goddard space Flight Center during the period of May 15th, 1986 to November 15th, 1986 is described. The modelling of the two-degree-of-freedom robot is first presented. Then the complete system including the robot and the hybrid controller is simulated on an IBM-XT Personal Computer. Simulation results showed that proper adjustments of controller gains enable the robot to perform successful operations. Further research should focus on developing a guideline for the controller gain design to achieve system stability.

  1. Spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound.

    PubMed

    Rafaely, Boaz

    2009-05-01

    Active control of sound has been employed to reduce noise levels around listeners' head using destructive interference from noise-canceling sound sources. Recently, spherical loudspeaker arrays have been studied as multiple-channel sound sources, capable of generating sound fields with high complexity. In this paper, the potential use of a spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound is investigated. A theoretical analysis of the primary and secondary sound fields around a spherical sound source reveals that the natural quiet zones for the spherical source have a shell-shape. Using numerical optimization, quiet zones with other shapes are designed, showing potential for quiet zones with extents that are significantly larger than the well-known limit of a tenth of a wavelength for monopole sources. The paper presents several simulation examples showing quiet zones in various configurations.

  2. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose, parallel-group clinical trial to assess the effects of teduglutide on gastric emptying of liquids in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Teduglutide, a recombinant analog of human glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2, is a novel therapy recently approved for the treatment of adult patients with short bowel syndrome who are dependent on parenteral support. Previous studies assessing the effect of GLP-2 on gastric emptying in humans have yielded inconsistent results, with some studies showing no effect and others documenting a GLP-2–dependent delay in gastric emptying. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of teduglutide on gastric emptying of liquids in healthy subjects, as measured by the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen. Methods This double-blind, parallel-group, single-center study enrolled and randomized 36 healthy subjects (22 men, 14 women) to receive subcutaneous doses of teduglutide 4 mg or placebo (2:1 ratio; 23:13) once daily on Days 1 through 10 in the morning. Gastric emptying of a mixed nutrient liquid meal was assessed by measuring acetaminophen levels predose and at 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, 2, 3, 3.5, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 hours after administration of 1000 mg acetaminophen on Days 0 and 10. The primary study endpoint was a pharmacokinetic analysis of acetaminophen absorption in subjects receiving teduglutide or placebo. Results No significant differences in gastric emptying of liquids (acetaminophen area under the concentration [AUC] vs time curve from time 0 to the last measurable concentration, AUC extrapolated to infinity, maximum concentration [Cmax], and time to Cmax) were observed on Day 10 in subjects receiving teduglutide 4 mg versus subjects receiving placebo. There were no serious adverse events (AEs), deaths, or discontinuations due to an AE reported during the study. Conclusions Teduglutide 4 mg/day for 10 days does not affect gastric emptying of liquids in healthy subjects as measured by acetaminophen pharmacokinetics. No unexpected safety signals were observed. Trial registration This study was registered at Clinical

  3. Lightweight active controlled primary mirror technology demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzinghi, P.; Bratina, V.; Ferruzzi, D.; Gambicorti, L.; Simonetti, F.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.; Salinari, P.; Lisi, F.; Olivier, M.; Bursi, A.; Gallieni, D.; Biasi, R.; Pereira, J.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the design, manufacturing and test of a ground demonstrator of an innovative technology able to realize lightweight active controlled space-borne telescope mirror. This analysis is particularly devoted to applications for a large aperture space telescope for advanced LIDAR, but it can be used for any lightweight mirror. For a space-borne telescope the mirror weight is a fundamental parameter to be minimized (less than 15 Kg/m2), while maximizing the optical performances (optical quality better than λ/3). In order to guarantee these results, the best selected solution is a thin glass primary mirror coupled to a stiff CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) panel with a surface active control system. A preliminary design of this lightweight structure highlighted the critical areas that were deeply analyzed by the ground demonstrator: the 1 mm thick mirror survivability on launch and the actuator functional performances with low power consumption. To preserve the mirror glass the Electrostatic Locking technique was developed and is here described. The active optics technique, already widely used for ground based telescopes, consists of a metrology system (wave front sensor, WFS), a control algorithm and a system of actuators to slightly deform the primary mirror and/or displace the secondary, in a closed-loop control system that applies the computed corrections to the mirror's optical errors via actuators. These actuators types are properly designed and tested in order to guarantee satisfactory performances in terms of stroke, force and power consumption. The realized and tested ground demonstrator is a square CFRP structure with a flat mirror on the upper face and an active actuator beneath it. The test campaign demonstrated the technology feasibility and robustness, supporting the next step toward the large and flat surface with several actuators.

  4. Head-to-head comparison of intensive lifestyle intervention (U-TURN) versus conventional multifactorial care in patients with type 2 diabetes: protocol and rationale for an assessor-blinded, parallel group and randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Hansen, Katrine B; Johansen, Mette Y; Pedersen, Maria; Zacho, Morten; Hansen, Louise S; Kofoed, Katja; Thomsen, Katja; Jensen, Mette S; Nielsen, Rasmus O; MacDonald, Chris; Langberg, Henning; Vaag, Allan A; Pedersen, Bente K; Karstoft, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current pharmacological therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are challenged by lack of sustainability and borderline firm evidence of real long-term health benefits. Accordingly, lifestyle intervention remains the corner stone in the management of T2D. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the optimal intervention programmes in T2D ensuring both compliance as well as long-term health outcomes. Our objective is to assess the effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention (the U-TURN intervention) on glycaemic control in patients with T2D. Our hypothesis is that intensive lifestyle changes are equally effective as standard diabetes care, including pharmacological treatment in maintaining glycaemic control (ie, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c)) in patients with T2D. Furthermore, we expect that intensive lifestyle changes will decrease the need for antidiabetic medications. Methods and analysis The study is an assessor-blinded, parallel group and a 1-year randomised trial. The primary outcome is change in glycaemic control (HbA1c), with the key secondary outcome being reductions in antidiabetic medication. Participants will be patients with T2D (T2D duration <10 years) without complications who are randomised into an intensive lifestyle intervention (U-TURN) or a standard care intervention in a 2:1 fashion. Both groups will be exposed to the same standardised, blinded, target-driven pharmacological treatment and can thus maintain, increase, reduce or discontinue the pharmacological treatment. The decision is based on the standardised algorithm. The U-TURN intervention consists of increased training and basal physical activity level, and an antidiabetic diet including an intended weight loss. The standard care group as well as the U-TURN group is offered individual diabetes management counselling on top of the pharmacological treatment. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the Scientific Ethical Committee at the

  5. A multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group, randomised controlled trial to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of three physiotherapy-led exercise interventions for knee osteoarthritis in older adults: the BEEP trial protocol (ISRCTN: 93634563)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is consistently recommended for older adults with knee pain related to osteoarthritis. However, the effects from exercise are typically small and short-term, likely linked to insufficient individualisation of the exercise programme and limited attention to supporting exercise adherence over time. The BEEP randomised trial aims to improve patients’ short and long-term outcomes from exercise. It will test the overall effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two physiotherapy-led exercise interventions (Individually Tailored Exercise and Targeted Exercise Adherence) to improve the individual tailoring of, and adherence to exercise, compared with usual physiotherapy care. Methods/design Based on the learning from a pilot study (ISRCTN 23294263), the BEEP trial is a multi-centre, pragmatic, parallel group, individually randomised controlled trial, with embedded longitudinal qualitative interviews. 500 adults in primary care, aged 45 years and over with knee pain will be randomised to 1 of 3 treatment groups delivered by fully trained physiotherapists in up to 6 NHS services. These are: Usual Physiotherapy Care (control group consisting of up to 4 treatment sessions of advice and exercise), Individually Tailored Exercise (an individualised, supervised and progressed lower-limb exercise programme) or Targeted Exercise Adherence (supporting patients to adhere to exercise and to engage in general physical activity over the longer-term). The primary outcomes are pain and function as measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis index. A comprehensive range of secondary outcomes are also included. Outcomes are measured at 3, 6 (primary outcome time-point), 9, 18 and 36 months. Data on adverse events will also be collected. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a subsample of 30 participants (10 from each treatment group) will be undertaken at two time-points (end of treatment and 12 to 18 months later) and analysed thematically

  6. Rolling maneuver load alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1992-01-01

    Rolling Maneuver Load Alleviation (RMLA) was demonstrated on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model in the LaRC Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The design objective was to develop a systematic approach for developing active control laws to alleviate wing incremental loads during roll maneuvers. Using linear load models for the AFW wind-tunnel model which were based on experimental measurements, two RMLA control laws were developed based on a single-degree-of-freedom roll model. The RMLA control laws utilized actuation of outboard control surface pairs to counteract incremental loads generated during rolling maneuvers and roll performance. To evaluate the RMLA control laws, roll maneuvers were performed in the wind tunnel at dynamic pressures of 150, 200, and 250 psf and Mach numbers of .33, .38, and .44, respectively. Loads obtained during these maneuvers were compared to baseline maneuver loads. For both RMLA controllers, the incremental torsion moments were reduced by up to 60 percent at all dynamic pressures and performance times. Results for bending moment load reductions during roll maneuvers varied. In addition, in a multiple function test, RMLA and flutter suppression system control laws were operated simultaneously during roll maneuvers at dynamic pressures 11 percent above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure.

  7. Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J.; Yuen, W.

    1986-01-01

    The Air Force goal is to develop vibration control techniques for large flexible spacecraft by addressing sensor, actuator, and control hardware and dynamic testing. The Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES) program will address the Air Force goal by looking at two leading control techniques and implementing them on a structural model of a flexible spacecraft under laboratory testing. The first phase in the ACES program is to review and to assess the High Authority Control/Low Authority Control (HAC/LAC) and Filter accomodated Model Error Sensitivity Suppression (FAMESS) control techniques for testing on the modified VCOSS structure. Appropriate sensors and actuators will be available for use with both techniques; locations will be the same for both techniques. The control actuators will be positioned at the midpoint and free end of the structure. The laser source for the optical sensor is mounted on the feed mast. The beam will be reflected from a mirror on the offset antenna onto the detectors mounted above the shaker table bay. The next phase is to develop an analysis simulation with the control algorithms implemented for dynamics verification. The third phase is to convert the control laws into high level computer language and test them in the NASA-MSFC facility. The final phase is to compile all analytical and test results for performance comparisons.

  8. Active control of transmitted sound in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompsett, Russell Harvey George

    The problem of noise from neighbours has increased dramatically over the last few years. Many of the noise complaints are due to the high level, low frequency noise from modern stereo equipment, and are often described in terms of the low frequency characteristics of the music; the repetitive, booming, bass beat. The objective of this research was to establish the feasibility of applying active noise control to alleviate this problem. The initial approach was to evaluate the possibility of exploiting the dominance of individual modes in the response of rooms at low frequency to effect global control. However, initial investigations using a modal model of the sound field revealed that this would be difficult due to the contribution of many acoustic modes excited off resonance. This conclusion was supported by measurements of acoustic room responses in typical buildings, illustrating a non-resonant characteristic. Consequently, attention was turned to the feasibility of using local active control systems to create zones of quiet by concentrating control at a specific location near the observers ears, for example in a seat headrest, or near the pillows of a bed. The lack of a reference signal in either approach requires the use of a feedback control strategy. With a typically non-resonant system, the predictability in the disturbance necessary for successful feedback control must be contained in the primary excitation, namely the music. Examples of different music styles were investigated and of those with the potential to be a nuisance surprisingly few were significantly more predictable than a random disturbance. As expected the most encouraging control performance simulations were found for modern dance music, with a strong repetitive beat. A real-time, local controller was demonstrated in the laboratory with such a disturbance signal and the properties of the quiet zone were measured. The subjective response when hearing the controller in operation was found to be

  9. The Benchmark Active Controls Technology Model Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Durham, Michael H.

    1997-01-01

    The Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model is a part of the Benchmark Models Program (BMP). The BMP is a NASA Langley Research Center program that includes a series of models which were used to study different aeroelastic phenomena and to validate computational fluid dynamics codes. The primary objective of BACT testing was to obtain steady and unsteady loads, accelerations, and aerodynamic pressures due to control surface activity in order to calibrate unsteady CFD codes and active control design tools. Three wind-tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) have been completed. The first and parts of the second and third tests focused on collecting open-loop data to define the model's aeroservoelastic characteristics, including the flutter boundary across the Mach range. It is this data that is being presented in this paper. An extensive database of over 3000 data sets was obtained. This database includes steady and unsteady control surface effectiveness data, including pressure distributions, control surface hinge moments, and overall model loads due to deflections of a trailing edge control surface and upper and lower surface

  10. Quadratic Optimization in the Problems of Active Control of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loncaric, J.; Tsynkov, S. V.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the problem of suppressing the unwanted component of a time-harmonic acoustic field (noise) on a predetermined region of interest. The suppression is rendered by active means, i.e., by introducing the additional acoustic sources called controls that generate the appropriate anti-sound. Previously, we have obtained general solutions for active controls in both continuous and discrete formulations of the problem. We have also obtained optimal solutions that minimize the overall absolute acoustic source strength of active control sources. These optimal solutions happen to be particular layers of monopoles on the perimeter of the protected region. Mathematically, minimization of acoustic source strength is equivalent to minimization in the sense of L(sub 1). By contrast. in the current paper we formulate and study optimization problems that involve quadratic functions of merit. Specifically, we minimize the L(sub 2) norm of the control sources, and we consider both the unconstrained and constrained minimization. The unconstrained L(sub 2) minimization is certainly the easiest problem to address numerically. On the other hand, the constrained approach allows one to analyze sophisticated geometries. In a special case, we call compare our finite-difference optimal solutions to the continuous optimal solutions obtained previously using a semi-analytic technique. We also show that the optima obtained in the sense of L(sub 2) differ drastically from those obtained in the sense of L(sub 1).

  11. Active Control of Complex Physical Systems: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    release; distribution is unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maxtmum 200 words) Active control of complex systems imposes unique requirements for physical models and...months after the meeting, SPrinte In USA. Acceslon For NTIS CRA&W DTIC TAB Unlannounced ] Active Control of Complex Physical Systems Justificatton An...control strategies. Physical models This work on the active control of which are adequate to predict the influence of specific physical systems has been

  12. Quasi-modal vibration control by means of active control bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.; Fleming, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper investigates a design method of an active control bearing system with only velocity feedback. The study provides a new quasi-modal control method for a control system design of an active control bearing system in which feedback coefficients are determined on the basis of a modal analysis. Although the number of sensors and actuators is small, this quasi-modal control method produces a control effect close to an ideal modal control.

  13. Effect of active control on optimal structures in wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, BingQing; Xu, ChunXiao; Huang, WeiXi; Cui, GuiXiang

    2013-02-01

    The effect of active control imposed at the wall on optimal structures in wall turbulence is studied by using a linear transient growth model. When the detection plane of the control is located in the buffer layer, the influence of the control on the transient growth of large scale motion becomes negligible as Reynolds number increases. However, if the control signal is detected at the plane located in the logarithm region, the transient growth at large scale can be greatly suppressed. New peak values of transient growth resulting from the strong blowing and suction on the wall exist. The study indicates that a proper selection of control imposed on the wall can suppress the large scale motion in the logarithmic region.

  14. A parallel-group, randomised controlled trial of a multimedia, self-directed, coping skills training intervention for patients with cancer and their partners: design and rationale

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Sylvie D; Girgis, Afaf; McElduff, Patrick; Turner, Jane; Levesque, Janelle V; Kayser, Karen; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Shih, Sophy T F; Barker, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Coping skills training interventions have been found to be efficacious in helping both patients and their partners manage the physical and emotional challenges they face following a cancer diagnosis. However, many of these interventions are costly and not sustainable. To overcome these issues, a self-directed format is increasingly used. The efficacy of self-directed interventions for patients has been supported; however, no study has reported on the outcomes for their partners. This study will test the efficacy of Coping-Together—a multimedia, self-directed, coping skills training intervention for patients with cancer and their partners. Methods and analysis The proposed three-group, parallel, randomised controlled trial will recruit patients diagnosed in the past 4 months with breast, prostate, colorectal cancer or melanoma through their treating clinician. Patients and their partners will be randomised to (1) a minimal ethical care (MEC) condition—selected Cancer Council New South Wales booklets and a brochure for the Cancer Council Helpline, (2) Coping-Together generic—MEC materials, the six Coping-Together booklets and DVD, the Cancer Council Queensland relaxation audio CD and login to the Coping-Together website or (3) Coping-Together tailored—MEC materials, the Coping-Together DVD, the login to the website and only those Coping-Together booklet sections that pertain to their direct concerns. Anxiety (primary outcome), distress, depression, dyadic adjustment, quality of life, illness or caregiving appraisal, self-efficacy and dyadic and individual coping will be assessed before receiving the study material (ie, baseline) and again at 3, 6 and 12 months postbaseline. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analysis will be conducted. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the relevant local area health and University ethics committees. Study findings will be disseminated not only through peer-reviewed publications and

  15. A status report on a model for Benchmark active controls testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Michael H.; Keller, Donald F.; Bennett, Robert M.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    1991-01-01

    This 'work-in-progress' paper presents a status report on an active controls flutter model which is currently in the design and fabrication phase. This model is a part of the Benchmark Models Program (BMP). The BMP is a NASA LaRC program that includes a series of models which will be used to study different aeroelastic phenomena and to validate aeroelastic methods. The objective of Benchmark Active Controls testing is to validate active control design tools. Flutter testing will be conducted with a pressure-instrumented rigid model attached to a flexible pitch and plunge mount system. Unsteady pressure distributions and transonic flutter boundaries will be measured with and without active control system engaged.

  16. Fluoxetine versus sertraline in the treatment of patients with undifferentiated somatoform disorder: a randomized, open-label, 12-week, parallel-group trial.

    PubMed

    Han, Changsu; Pae, Chi-Un; Lee, Bun Hee; Ko, Young-Hoon; Masand, Prakash S; Patkar, Ashwin A; Jung, In-Kwa

    2008-02-15

    The present study was conducted to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of fluoxetine and sertraline in the treatment of undifferentiated somatoform disorder (USD), using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15), which was specifically designed for assessing the severity of somatic symptoms. A randomized, 12-week, open-label trial of fluoxetine (10-60 mg/d) and sertraline (25-350 mg/d) in patients with USD was conducted. Six visits, at baseline and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12, were scheduled. Assessments for effectiveness and tolerability were conducted at each visit. The primary effectiveness measure was the mean change in PHQ-15 total score, from baseline to the end of treatment. Secondary effectiveness measures were the mean changes in total scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), from baseline to the end of treatment. A total of 45 subjects were enrolled; of them, 28 were randomly assigned to receive fluoxetine and 17 to receive sertraline. The total score on the PHQ-15 from baseline to the end of treatment significantly decreased in the fluoxetine (-10.7, p<0.0001) and sertraline (-10.3, p<0.0001) treatment groups, with no between-group difference (F=0.0701, p=0.7924). Overall, both treatments were well tolerated and no serious adverse event was reported. This study suggests that both agents may have a potential role in the treatment of USD. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and/or head-to-head comparison study with larger samples are required to draw more definite conclusions.

  17. Auricular Acupuncture Versus Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients with Anxiety Disorders or Major Depressive Disorder: A Prospective Parallel Group Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    de Lorent, Lukas; Agorastos, Agorastos; Yassouridis, Alexander; Kellner, Michael; Muhtz, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Although acupuncture treatment is increasingly in demand among psychiatric patients, to date no studies have investigated the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture (AA) in treating anxiety disorders or major depressive disorder. Thus, this study aimed to compare the effectiveness of AA versus progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), a standardized and accepted relaxation method. We examined 162 patients with a primary diagnosis of anxiety disorder or major depressive disorder, and each patient chose between treatment with AA, executed according to the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association protocol, and treatment with PMR. Each group had treatments twice a week for 4 weeks. Before and after treatment, each participant rated four items on a visual analog scale: anxiety, tension, anger/aggression, and mood. Statistical analyses were performed with the original visual analog scale scores and the Change-Intensity Index, an appropriate indicator of the difference between two values of a variable. Our results show that treatment with AA significantly decreased tension, anxiety, and anger/aggression throughout the 4 weeks, but did not elevate mood. Between AA and PMR, no statistically significant differences were found at any time. Thus, we suggest that both AA and PMR may be useful, equally-effective additional interventions in the treatment of the above-mentioned disorders.

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Crocus sativus L. in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment: One Year Single-Blind Randomized, with Parallel Groups, Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Tsolaki, Magda; Karathanasi, Elina; Lazarou, Ioulietta; Dovas, Kostas; Verykouki, Eleni; Karacostas, Anastasios; Georgiadis, Kostas; Tsolaki, Anthoula; Adam, Katerina; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis; Sinakos, Zacharias

    2016-07-27

    There is evidence to suggest the efficacy of Crocus (saffron) in the management of cognitive decline. This study examined the efficacy of Crocus in patients with amnesic and multi domain MCI (aMCImd). The participants included 17 patients on Crocus and 18 on a waiting list, who were examined with a short neuropsychological battery, MRI 3T, while some patients were examined via 256-channel electroencephalogram (HD-EEG) at baseline and after 12 months. The results showed that patients on Crocus had improved Mini-Mental State Examination scores (p = 0.015), while the control group deteriorated. Also, MRI, EEG, and ERP showed improvement in specific domains. This led us to conclude that Crocus is a good choice for management of aMCImd.

  19. Moxibustion as an adjuvant for benign prostatic hyperplasia with lower urinary tract symptoms: a protocol for a parallel-group, randomised, controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Yoon; Nam, Jong-Kil; Lee, Sang-Don; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Han, Ji-Yeon; Yun, Young-Ju; Lee, Ji-Hye; Park, Hye-lim; Park, Seong-Ha; Kwon, Jung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to explore the feasibility of using moxibustion as a supplementary intervention and to assess the sample size for verifying the effectiveness and safety of integrative treatment involving moxibustion compared with conventional treatment for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia accompanying moderate to severe lower urinary tract symptoms. Methods and analysis A total of 60 patients diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia by a urologist based on prostate size, prostate-specific antigen and clinical symptoms will participate of their own free will; urologists will monitor the patients and evaluate their symptoms. The patients will be randomised to either a conventional group or an integrative group with a 1:1 allocation according to computer-generated random numbers concealed in opaque, sealed, sequentially numbered envelopes. Watchful waiting or oral medication including α blocker, 5α-reductase inhibitors or antimuscarinic drugs will be offered as conventional treatment. Integrative treatment will include moxibustion therapy in addition to the conventional treatment. The moxibustion therapy will be conducted twice a week for 4 weeks on the bilateral acupoints SP6, LR3 and CV4 by a qualified Korean medical doctor. The primary outcome will be the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) after eight sessions. The secondary outcomes will be the post-void residual urine volume, the maximum urinary flow rate, IPSS, the results of a Short-Form 36-Question Health Survey after 12 weeks, and the patients’ global impression of changes at each visit. Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. This study was approved by the institutional review boards of both Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital and Pusan National University Korean Medicine Hospital. The trial results will be disseminated through open-access journals and conferences. Trial registration number NCT02051036. PMID

  20. A mechanistic multicentre, parallel group, randomised placebo-controlled trial of mesalazine for the treatment of IBS with diarrhoea (IBS-D)

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Ching; Tan, Wei; Leighton, Matthew; Hastings, Margaret; Lingaya, Melanie; Falcone, Yirga; Zhou, Xiaoying; Xu, Luting; Whorwell, Peter; Walls, Andrew F; Zaitoun, Abed; Montgomery, Alan; Spiller, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Immune activation has been reported in the mucosa of IBS patients with diarrhoea (IBS-D), and some small studies have suggested that mesalazine may reduce symptoms. We performed a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial of 2 g mesalazine twice daily versus placebo for 3 months in patients with Rome III criteria IBS-D. Primary outcome was daily average stool frequency during weeks 11–12; secondary outcomes were abdominal pain, stool consistency, urgency and satisfactory relief of IBS symptoms. Methods Participants were randomised after a 2-week baseline stool diary. All participants completed a 12-week stool diary and at the end of each week recorded the presence of ‘satisfactory relief of IBS symptoms’. Results 136 patients with IBS-D (82 women, 54 men) were randomised, 10 patients withdrew from each group. Analysis by intention to treat showed the daily average stool frequency during weeks 11 and 12 were mean (SD), 2.8 (1.2) in mesalazine and 2.7 (1.9) in the placebo group with no significant group difference, (95% CI) 0.1 (−0.33 to 0.53), p=0.66. Mesalazine did not improve abdominal pain, stool consistency nor percentage with satisfactory relief compared with placebo during the last two-weeks follow-up. Conclusions This study does not support any clinically meaningful benefit or harm of mesalazine compared with placebo in unselected patients with IBS-D. More precise subtyping based on underlying disease mechanisms is needed to allow more effective targeting of treatment in IBS. Trial registration number NCT01316718. PMID:25765462

  1. A multicentre randomised, 1-year comparative effectiveness, parallel-group trial protocol of a physical therapy approach compared to corticosteroid injections

    PubMed Central

    Deyle, Gail D; Gill, Norman W; Rhon, Daniel I; Allen, Chris S; Allison, Stephen C; Hando, Ben R; Petersen, Evan J; Dusenberry, Douglas I; Bellamy, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Corticosteroid injections (CSIs) are commonly used as an initial or a primary intervention for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Consistent evidence indicates CSIs offer symptom relief with conflicting reports regarding long-term efficacy. Physical therapy (PT) offers a non-invasive alternative. There is moderate evidence suggesting short-term and long-term symptom relief and functional improvement with PT interventions. Patients with knee OA are more commonly prescribed CSI than PT prior to total joint replacement. UnitedHealthcare and Military Health System data show substantially more total knee replacement patients receive preoperative CSI than PT. There are no studies comparing CSI to a PT approach in individuals with knee OA. The primary objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of CSI to PT in individuals with knee OA at 1, 2 and 12 months. Methods and analysis We plan to recruit 156 participants meeting established knee OA criteria. Following informed consent, participants will be randomised to receive either CSI or PT. All participants will receive instruction on recommended exercise and weight control strategies plus usual medical care. The CSI intervention consisting of 3 injections and the PT intervention consisting of 8–12 sessions will be spaced over 12 months. Measures of the dependent variables (DVs) will occur at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months post enrolment. This pragmatic, randomised clinical trial will be a mixed-model 2×5 factorial design. The independent variables are treatment (CSI and PT) and time with five levels from baseline to 1 year. The primary DV is the Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). We will also compare healthcare utilisation between the 2 groups. Ethics and Dissemination The protocol was approved by the Madigan Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board. The authors intend to publish the results in a peer-reviewed source. Trial Registration

  2. Reducing substance involvement in college students: a three-arm parallel-group randomized controlled trial of a computer-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Christoff, Adriana de Oliveira; Boerngen-Lacerda, Roseli

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of alcohol and other drug use is high among college students. Reducing their consumption will likely be beneficial for society as a whole. Computer and web-based interventions are promising for providing behaviorally based information. The present study compared the efficacy of three interventions (computerized screening and motivational intervention [ASSIST/MBIc], non-computerized screening and motivational intervention [ASSIST/MBIi], and screening only [control]) in college students in Curitiba, Brazil. A convenience sample of 458 students scored moderate and high risk on the ASSIST. They were then randomized into the three arms of the randomized controlled trial (ASSIST/MBIc, ASSIST/MBIi [interview], and assessment-only [control]) and assessed at baseline and 3 months later. The ASSIST involvement scores decreased at follow-up compared with baseline in the three groups, suggesting that any intervention is better than no intervention. For alcohol, the specific involvement scores decreased to a low level of risk in the three groups and the MBIc group showed a positive outcome compared with control, and the scores for each question were reduced in the two intervention groups compared to baseline. For tobacco, involvement scores decreased in the three groups, but they maintained moderate risk. For marijuana, a small positive effect was observed in the ASSIST/MBIi and control groups. The ASSIST/MBIc may be a good alternative to interview interventions because it is easy to administer, students frequently use such computer-based technologies, and individually tailored content can be delivered in the absence of a counselor.

  3. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation of patients with chronic widespread pain: primary endpoint of the randomized, nonblinded, parallel-group IMPROvE trial.

    PubMed

    Amris, Kirstine; Wæhrens, Eva E; Christensen, Robin; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the functional and psychological outcomes of a 2-week, group-based multicomponent treatment course that targeted patients with chronic widespread pain. Patients (192 included in the intention-to-treat population), all fulfilling the 1990 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for fibromyalgia, were consecutively recruited from a tertiary care setting and randomized (1:1) to either the treatment course or a waiting list control group. Co-primary outcomes were the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) and SF-36 Mental Composite Score (MCS) evaluated at 6-month follow-up. Primary endpoints were partly achieved with a statistically significant improvement in AMPS activities of daily living motor (group mean difference: 0.20 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.09 to 0.31] logits; P=.0003) and AMPS activities of daily living process (0.20 [95% CI: 0.12 to 0.27] logits, P<.0001) ability measures, whereas no difference in the SF-36 MCS (1.14 [95% CI: -1.52 to 3.81], P=.40) was observed. Individual patient responses varied, and the proportion of patients achieving a clinically meaningful change of at least 0.3 logits on the AMPS seemed influenced by the reporting of a pending social welfare application at the time of enrollment. We conclude that even in fibromyalgia patients presenting with a substantial disability established over many years, the 2-week multicomponent treatment course resulted in observable improvement of functional ability in a subgroup of patients at 6-month follow-up. This improvement, however, was not reflected in secondary patient reported outcomes, including scores of self-reported functional ability on standardized questionnaires. We suggest including observation-based assessments in future clinical trials focusing on functional outcomes in patients with fibromyalgia.

  4. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  5. Diagnostics and Active Control of Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    This project deals with developing advanced methods for investigating and controlling interior noise in aircraft. The work concentrates on developing and applying the techniques of Near Field Acoustic Holography (NAH) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to the aircraft interior noise dynamic problem. This involves investigating the current state of the art, developing new techniques and then applying them to the particular problem being studied. The knowledge gained under the first part of the project was then used to develop and apply new, advanced noise control techniques for reducing interior noise. A new fully active control approach based on the PCA was developed and implemented on a test cylinder. Finally an active-passive approach based on tunable vibration absorbers was to be developed and analytically applied to a range of test structures from simple plates to aircraft fuselages.

  6. Active control: an investigation method for combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinsot, T.; Yip, B.; Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.; Samaniego, J. M.; Candel, S.

    1992-07-01

    Closed-loop active control methods and their application to combustion instabilities are discussed. In these methods the instability development is impeded with a feedback control loop: the signal provided by a sensor monitoring the flame or pressure oscillations is processed and sent back to actuators mounted on the combustor or on the feeding system. Different active control systems tested on a non-premixed multiple-flame turbulent combustor are described. These systems can suppress all unstable plane modes of oscillation (i.e. low frequency modes). The active instability control (AIC) also constitutes an original and powerful technique for studies of mechanisms leading to instability or resulting from the instability. Two basic applications of this kind are described. In the first case the flame is initially controlled with AIC, the feedback loop is then switched off and the growth of the instability is analysed through high speed Schlieren cinematography and simultaneous sound pressure and reaction rate measurements. Three phases are identified during th growth of the oscillations: (1) a linear phase where acoustic waves induce a flapping motion of the flame sheets without interaction between sheets, (2) a modulation phase, where flame sheets interact randomly and (3) a nonlinear phase where the flame sheets are broken and a limit cycle is reached. In the second case we investigate different types of flame extinctions associated with combustion instability. It is shown that pressure oscillations may lead to partial or total extinctions. Extinctions occur in various forms but usually follow a rapid growth of pressure oscillations. The flame is extinguished during the modulation phase observed in the initiation experiments. In these studies devoted to transient instability phenomena, the control system constitutes a unique investigation tool because it is difficult to obtain the same information by other means. Implications for modelling and prediction of

  7. Application of Semi Active Control Techniques to the Damping Suppression Problem of Solar Sail Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.; Whorton, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Solar sails provide a propellant free form for space propulsion. These are large flat surfaces that generate thrust when they are impacted by light. When attached to a space vehicle, the thrust generated can propel the space vehicle to great distances at significant speeds. For optimal performance the sail must be kept from excessive vibration. Active control techniques can provide the best performance. However, they require an external power-source that may create significant parasitic mass to the solar sail. However, solar sails require low mass for optimal performance. Secondly, active control techniques typically require a good system model to ensure stability and performance. However, the accuracy of solar sail models validated on earth for a space environment is questionable. An alternative approach is passive vibration techniques. These do not require an external power supply, and do not destabilize the system. A third alternative is referred to as semi-active control. This approach tries to get the best of both active and passive control, while avoiding their pitfalls. In semi-active control, an active control law is designed for the system, and passive control techniques are used to implement it. As a result, no external power supply is needed so the system is not destabilize-able. Though it typically underperforms active control techniques, it has been shown to out-perform passive control approaches and can be unobtrusively installed on a solar sail boom. Motivated by this, the objective of this research is to study the suitability of a Piezoelectric (PZT) patch actuator/sensor based semi-active control system for the vibration suppression problem of solar sail booms. Accordingly, we develop a suitable mathematical and computer model for such studies and demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach with computer simulations.

  8. Investigation of spherical loudspeaker arrays for local active control of sound.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Tomer; Rafaely, Boaz

    2011-10-01

    Active control of sound can be employed globally to reduce noise levels in an entire enclosure, or locally around a listener's head. Recently, spherical loudspeaker arrays have been studied as multiple-channel sources for local active control of sound, presenting the fundamental theory and several active control configurations. In this paper, important aspects of using a spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound are further investigated. First, the feasibility of creating sphere-shaped quiet zones away from the source is studied both theoretically and numerically, showing that these quiet zones are associated with sound amplification and poor system robustness. To mitigate the latter, the design of shell-shaped quiet zones around the source is investigated. A combination of two spherical sources is then studied with the aim of enlarging the quiet zone. The two sources are employed to generate quiet zones that surround a rigid sphere, investigating the application of active control around a listener's head. A significant improvement in performance is demonstrated in this case over a conventional headrest-type system that uses two monopole secondary sources. Finally, several simulations are presented to support the theoretical work and to demonstrate the performance and limitations of the system.

  9. Active controllers and the time duration to learn a task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Goodyear, C.

    1986-01-01

    An active controller was used to help train naive subjects involved in a compensatory tracking task. The controller is called active in this context because it moves the subject's hand in a direction to improve tracking. It is of interest here to question whether the active controller helps the subject to learn a task more rapidly than the passive controller. Six subjects, inexperienced to compensatory tracking, were run to asymptote root mean square error tracking levels with an active controller or a passive controller. The time required to learn the task was defined several different ways. The results of the different measures of learning were examined across pools of subjects and across controllers using statistical tests. The comparison between the active controller and the passive controller as to their ability to accelerate the learning process as well as reduce levels of asymptotic tracking error is reported here.

  10. Overview of Langley activities in active controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active controls technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. The activities of the Langley Research Center (laRC) in advancing active controls technology. Activities are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  11. Active control of nano dimers response using piezoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekkawy, Ahmed A.; Ali, Tamer A.; Badawi, Ashraf H.

    2016-09-01

    Nano devices can be used as building blocks for Internet of Nano-Things network devices, such as sensors/actuators, transceivers, and routers. Although nano particles response can be engineered to fit in different regimes, for such a nano particle to be used as an active nano device, its properties should be dynamically controlled. This controllability is a challenge, and there are many proposed techniques to tune nanoparticle response on the spot through a sort of control signal, wither that signal is optical (for all-optical systems) or electronic (for opto-electronic systems). This will allow the use of nano particles as nano-switches or as dynamic sensors that can pick different frequencies depending on surrounding conditions or depending on a smart decisions. In this work, we propose a piezoelectric substrate as an active control mediator to control plasmonic gaps in nano dimers. This method allows for integrating nano devices with regular electronics while communicating control signals to nano devices through applying electric signals to a piezoelectric material, in order to control the gaps between nano particles in a nano cluster. We do a full numerical study to the system, analyzing the piezoelectric control resolution (minimum gap change step) and its effect on a nanodimer response as a nanoantenna. This analysis considers the dielectric functions of materials within the visible frequencies range. The effects of different parameters, such as the piezoelectric geometrical structure and materials, on the gap control resolution and the operating frequency are studied.

  12. Application of neural networks to seismic active control

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-07-01

    An exploratory study on seismic active control using an artificial neural network (ANN) is presented in which a singledegree-of-freedom (SDF) structural system is controlled by a trained neural network. A feed-forward neural network and the backpropagation training method are used in the study. In backpropagation training, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each training cycle. The training patterns for the neural net are generated randomly. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control algorithm. The control strategy proposed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to destroy the build-up of the system response. The ground motions considered in the simulations are the N21E and N69W components of the Lake Hughes No. 12 record that occurred in the San Fernando Valley in California on February 9, 1971. Significant reduction of the structural response by one order of magnitude is observed. Also, it is shown that the proposed control strategy has the ability to reduce the peak that occurs during the first few cycles of the time history. These promising results assert the potential of applying ANNs to active structural control under seismic loads.

  13. An aeroelastician's perspective of wind tunnel and flight experiences with active control of structural response and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    Active controls technology is assessed based on a review of most of the wind-tunnel and flight tests and actual applications of active control concepts since the late sixties. The distinction is made between so-called ""rigid-body'' active control functions and those that involve significant modification of structural elastic response or stability. Both areas are reviewed although the focus is on the latter area. The basic goals and major results of the various studies or applications are summarized, and the anticipated use of active controls on current and near-future research and demonstration aircraft is discussed. Some of the ""holes'' remaining in the feasbility/benefits demonstration of active controls technology are examined.

  14. Development of Active Control within Working Memory: Active Retrieval versus Monitoring in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blain-Brière, Bénédicte; Bouchard, Caroline; Bigras, Nathalie; Cadoret, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare children's performance on two mnemonic functions that engage the lateral prefrontal cortex. Brain imaging studies in adults have shown that the mid-ventrolateral prefrontal cortex is specifically involved in active controlled retrieval, and the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is specifically involved in monitoring…

  15. Optical properties of actively controlled reflection and transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Miguel Angel

    2001-05-01

    Reflection and transmission gratings have found a wide variety of applications as optical filters and beam steering elements. In this work we have studied the optical properties of reflection and transmission gratings whose diffraction properties could be actively controlled. Two different material systems were utilized for the study. Reflection gratings in optical fibers were used and reflection and transmission gratings were fabricated holographically in a polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) material. The optical properties of refractive index-shifted gratings were studied using the fiber Bragg gratings. It was found that narrow, high transmission spikes developed inside a high reflectivity stopgap when the refractive index of a section of the grating is shifted. The refractive index-shift was achieved using the thermo- optic effect. Experimental as well as theoretical results are presented and discussed. The optical properties of electrically switchable reflection and transmission gratings fabricated in polymer dispersed liquid crystal materials were also studied. The PDLC material is electro-optic and therefore by applying an external electric field to the gratings the diffraction properties are modified. Gratings were fabricated holographically. From the study of the transmission properties of the reflection gratings we found that the reflection of the structures can be switched off by applying an external electric field and that the reflectivity is polarization insensitive for normal incidence. We also studied the diffraction properties of PDLC transmission gratings. In our analysis of the diffraction properties of these electrically- switchable liquid crystal gratings we found that it was necessary to use a generalized two-wave coupled mode theory that includes the effects of the optical anisotropy of the liquid crystal. We found that the morphology of the PDLC gratings depends on the specific PDLC mixture used to fabricate the grating.

  16. Characterization of an Actively Controlled Three-Dimensional Turret Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Patrick; Glauser, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Three-dimensional turrets are commonly used for housing optical systems on airborne platforms. As bluff bodies, these geometries generate highly turbulent wakes that decrease the performance of the optical systems and the aircraft. The current experimental study looked to use dynamic suction in both open and closed-loop control configurations to actively control the turret wake. The flow field was characterized using dynamic pressure and stereoscopic PIV measurements in the wake of the turret. Results showed that the suction system was able to manipulate the wake region of the turret and could alter not only the spatial structure of the wake, but also the temporal behavior of the wake flow field. Closed-loop, feedback control techniques were used to determine a more optimal control input for the flow control. Similar control effects were seen for both the steady open-loop control case and the closed-loop feedback control configuration with a 45% reduction in the suction levels when comparing the closed-loop to the open-loop case. These results provide unique information regarding the development of the baseline three-dimensional wake and the wake with three different active flow control configurations.

  17. Randomized, double-blind, active-controlled study evaluating the safety and immunogenicity of three vaccination schedules and two dose levels of AV7909 vaccine for anthrax post-exposure prophylaxis in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Robert J; Kalsi, Gurdyal; Montalvo-Lugo, Victor M; Sharma, Mona; Wu, Yukun; Muse, Derek D; Sheldon, Eric A; Hampel, Frank C; Lemiale, Laurence

    2016-04-19

    AV7909 vaccine being developed for post-exposure prophylaxis of anthrax disease may require fewer vaccinations and reduced amount of antigen to achieve an accelerated immune response over BioThrax(®) (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed). A phase 2, randomized, double-blind, BioThrax vacccine-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of three intramuscular vaccination schedules and two dose levels of AV7909 in 168 healthy adults. Subjects were randomized at a 4:3:2:4:2 ratio to 5 groups: (1) AV7909 on Days 0/14; (2) AV7909 on Days 0/28; (3) AV7909 on Days 0/14/28; (4) half dose AV7909 on Days 0/14/28; and (5) BioThrax vaccine on Days 0/14/28. Vaccinations in all groups were well tolerated. The incidences of adverse events (AEs) were 79% for AV7909 subjects and 65% for BioThrax subjects; 92% of AV7909 subjects and 87% of BioThrax subjects having AEs reported Grade 1-2 AEs. No serious AEs were assessed as potentially vaccine-related, and no AEs of potential autoimmune etiology were reported. There was no discernible pattern indicative of a safety concern across groups in the incidence or severity of reactogenicity events. Groups 2-4 achieved success for the primary endpoint, demonstrated by a lower 95% confidence limit of the percentage of subjects with protective toxin neutralizing antibody NF50 values (≥0.56) to be ≥40% at Day 63. Group 1 marginally missed the criterion (lower bound 95% confidence limit of 39.5%). Immune responses were above this threshold for Groups 1, 3 and 4 at Day 28 and all groups at Day 42. Further study of an AV7909 two-dose schedule given 2 weeks apart is warranted in light of the favorable tolerability profile and immunogenicity response relative to three doses of BioThrax vaccine, as well as preliminary data from nonclinical studies indicating similar immune responses correlate with higher survival for AV7909 than BioThrax vaccine.

  18. Efficacy and safety of prophylaxis with once-weekly BAY 79-4980 compared with thrice-weekly rFVIII-FS in haemophilia A patients. A randomised, active-controlled, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jerry; Martinowitz, Uri; Windyga, Jerzy; Di Minno, Giovanni; Hellmann, Andrzej; Pabinger, Ingrid; Maas Enriquez, Monika; Schwartz, Lawrence; Ingerslev, Jørgen

    2012-11-01

    The benefits of prophylaxis of haemophilia A patients regarding joint health and quality-of-life are well established. However, adherence to an up to every-other-day infusion regimen is a barrier to widespread adoption of prophylaxis. BAY 79-4980 is an investigational drug consisting of rFVIII-FS (sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII) reconstituted with liposome solvent. Previous clinical studies showed extended protection from bleeding after a single injection of BAY 79-4980 (13.3 ± 6.2 days) compared with rFVIII-FS (7.2 ± 1.7 days). The effect of once-a-week prophylaxis with BAY 79-4980 (35 IU/kg) compared with three times-per-week rFVIII-FS (25 IU/kg) in previously treated, severe haemophilia A patients was evaluated in a 52-week, double-blind, two-arm, randomised, controlled study. The primary and secondary endpoints were protection from total bleeds and joint bleeds, respectively. Short- and long-term safety and tolerability of BAY 79-4980 including effects on lipid levels were assessed. A total of 139 and 131 subjects were evaluable for safety and efficacy analyses, respectively. A large difference in efficacy between treatment groups was observed with 72.1% (49/68) in the rFVIII-FS control group demonstrating <9 bleeds/year compared with 38.1% (24/63) of BAY 79-4980-treated subjects. A similar difference was seen in annualised joint bleeds, with 43 subjects (63.2%) in the control group demonstrating <5 joint bleeds/year compared with 24 subjects (38.1%) treated with BAY 79-4980. The distribution of bleeds seven days post-prophylactic treatment with BAY 79-4980 showed that 61% of bleeds occurred after day 4 post dosing. There were no safety concerns identified. The investigational treatment arm was prematurely discontinued due to failure to achieve the primary endpoint.

  19. Effects of a combined oral contraceptive containing oestradiol valerate/dienogest on hormone withdrawal-associated symptoms: results from the multicentre, randomised, double-blind, active-controlled HARMONY II study.

    PubMed

    Macìas, G; Merki-Feld, G S; Parke, S; Mellinger, U; Serrani, M

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this multicentre, randomised, double-blind study was to compare a combined oral contraceptive (COC) containing oestradiol valerate/dienogest (E2V/DNG) administered in a dynamic dosing regimen with a monophasic COC containing ethinyloestradiol/levonorgestrel (EE/LNG), with regard to their ability to reduce the frequency and intensity of headache and pelvic pain in women with hormone withdrawal-associated symptoms (HWAS). Women aged 18-50 years received E2V/DNG in an oestrogen step-down and progestin step-up regimen (26/2 regimen; n = 223) or EE 20 μg/LNG 100 μg (21/7 regimen; n = 218) over six cycles. Headache and pelvic pain were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) during cycle days 22-28. Rescue medication use was also assessed. E2V/DNG was superior to EE/LNG with regard to reducing the frequency and intensity of headache and pelvic pain from baseline to cycle 6 (change from baseline in the average of the three highest VAS values [mean ± standard deviation]: 47.7 ± 29.4 vs 34.5 ± 25.7 mm, respectively; p < 0.0001). The use of rescue medication was also significantly reduced with E2V/DNG compared with EE/LNG (p < 0.05). E2V/DNG may be a good option for women who experience HWAS with traditional 21/7-day regimen COCs.

  20. Impact of active controls technology on structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of The Technical Cooperation Program to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting the loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle. The potential for active controls to adversely affect structural integrity is described, and load predictions obtained using two state-of-the-art analytical methods are given.

  1. Advanced aerodynamics and active controls. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and active control concepts for application to commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Selected topics include in flight direct strike lightning research, triply redundant digital fly by wire control systems, tail configurations, winglets, and the drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) program.

  2. Synchronization of two different systems by using generalized active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ming-Chung; Hung, Yao-Chen

    2002-09-01

    We have already generalized the techniques from active control theory, and applied them to synchronize two different systems. In this Letter, we demonstrate these techniques by period-system, Lorenz and Rossler systems. Moreover, the effect of external noise is also included in our discussion.

  3. Active control strategy on a catenary-pantograph validated model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Rebollo, C.; Jimenez-Octavio, J. R.; Carnicero, A.

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic simulation methods have become essential in the design process and control of the catenary-pantograph system, overall since high-speed trains and interoperability criteria are getting very trendy. This paper presents an original hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) strategy aimed at integrating a multicriteria active control within the catenary-pantograph dynamic interaction. The relevance of HIL control systems applied in the frame of the pantograph is undoubtedly increasing due to the recent and more demanding requirements for high-speed railway systems. Since the loss of contact between the catenary and the pantograph leads to arcing and electrical wear, and too high contact forces cause mechanical wear of both the catenary wires and the strips of the pantograph, not only prescribed but also economic and performance criteria ratify such a relevance. Different configurations of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller are proposed and applied to two different plant systems. Since this paper is mainly focused on the control strategy, both plant systems are simulation models though the methodology is suitable for a laboratory bench. The strategy of control involves a multicriteria optimisation of the contact force and the consumption of the energy supplied by the control force, a genetic algorithm has been applied for this purpose. Thus, the PID controller is fitted according to these conflicting objectives and tested within a nonlinear lumped model and a nonlinear finite element model, being the last one validated against the European Standard EN 50318. Finally, certain tests have been accomplished in order to analyse the robustness of the control strategy. Particularly, the relevance or the plant simulation, the running speed and the instrumentation time delay are studied in this paper.

  4. The validation of an active control intervention for Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR).

    PubMed

    MacCoon, Donal G; Imel, Zac E; Rosenkranz, Melissa A; Sheftel, Jenna G; Weng, Helen Y; Sullivan, Jude C; Bonus, Katherine A; Stoney, Catherine M; Salomons, Tim V; Davidson, Richard J; Lutz, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Most of the extant literature investigating the health effects of mindfulness interventions relies on wait-list control comparisons. The current article specifies and validates an active control condition, the Health Enhancement Program (HEP), thus providing the foundation necessary for rigorous investigations of the relative efficacy of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and for testing mindfulness as an active ingredient. 63 participants were randomized to either MBSR (n = 31) or HEP (n = 32). Compared to HEP, MBSR led to reductions in thermal pain ratings in the mindfulness- but not the HEP-related instruction condition (η(2) = .18). There were significant improvements over time for general distress (η(2) = .09), anxiety (η(2) = .08), hostility (η(2) = .07), and medical symptoms (η(2) = .14), but no effects of intervention. Practice was not related to change. HEP is an active control condition for MBSR while remaining inert to mindfulness. These claims are supported by results from a pain task. Participant-reported outcomes (PROs) replicate previous improvements to well-being in MBSR, but indicate that MBSR is no more effective than a rigorous active control in improving these indices. These results emphasize the importance of using an active control condition like HEP in studies evaluating the effectiveness of MBSR.

  5. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 2; Methodology Application Software Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes the user's manual and software toolbox developed at the University of Washington to design a multirate flutter suppression control law for the BACT wing.

  6. Low-dose dexamethasone as a treatment for women with heavy menstrual bleeding: protocol for response-adaptive randomised placebo-controlled dose-finding parallel group trial (DexFEM)

    PubMed Central

    Warner, P; Weir, C J; Hansen, C H; Douglas, A; Madhra, M; Hillier, S G; Saunders, P T K; Iredale, J P; Semple, S; Walker, B R; Critchley, H O D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) diminishes individual quality-of-life and poses substantial societal burden. In HMB endometrium, inactivation of cortisol (by enzyme 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11βHSD2)), may cause local endometrial glucocorticoid deficiency and hence increased angiogenesis and impaired vasoconstriction. We propose that ‘rescue’ of luteal phase endometrial glucocorticoid deficiency could reduce menstrual bleeding. Methods and analysis DexFEM is a double-blind response-adaptive parallel-group placebo-controlled trial in women with HMB (108 to be randomised), with active treatment the potent oral synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, which is relatively resistant to 11βHSD2 inactivation. Participants will be aged over 18 years, with mean measured menstrual blood loss (MBL) for two screening cycles ≥50 mL. The primary outcome is reduction in MBL from screening. Secondary end points are questionnaire assessments of treatment effect and acceptability. Treatment will be for 5 days in the mid-luteal phases of three treatment menstrual cycles. Six doses of low-dose dexamethasone (ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 mg twice daily) will be compared with placebo, to ascertain optimal dose, and whether this has advantage over placebo. Statistical efficiency is maximised by allowing randomisation probabilities to ‘adapt’ at five points during enrolment phase, based on the response data available so far, to favour doses expected to provide greatest additional information on the dose–response. Bayesian Normal Dynamic Linear Modelling, with baseline MBL included as covariate, will determine optimal dose (re reduction in MBL). Secondary end points will be analysed using generalised dynamic linear models. For each dose for all end points, a 95% credible interval will be calculated for effect versus placebo. Ethics and dissemination Dexamethasone is widely used and hence well-characterised safety-wise. Ethical approval has been

  7. Active control of multi-dimensional random sound in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Elliott, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated how active control may be applied to the control of random noise in ducts. These implementations, however, have been restricted to frequencies where only plane waves are propagating in the duct. In spite of this, the need for this technology at low frequencies has progressed to the point where commercial products that apply these concepts are currently available. Extending the frequency range of this technology requires the extension of current single channel controllers to multi-variate control systems as well as addressing the problems inherent in controlling higher order modes. The application of active control in the multi-dimensional propagation of random noise in waveguides is examined. An adaptive system is implemented using measured system frequency response functions. Experimental results are presented illustrating attained suppressions of 15 to 30 dB for random noise propagating in multiple modes.

  8. Active Control Analysis for Aeroelastic Instabilities in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Turbomachines onboard aircraft operate in a highly complex and harsh environment. The unsteady flowfield inherent to turbomachines leads to several problems associated with safety, stability, performance and noise. In-flight surge or flutter incidents could be catastrophic and impact the safety and reliability of the aircraft. High-Cycle-Fatigue (HCF), on the other hand, can significantly impact safety, readiness and maintenance costs. To avoid or minimize these problems generally a more conservative design method must be initiated which results in thicker blades and a loss of performance. Actively controlled turbomachines have the potential to reduce or even eliminate the instabilities by impacting the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. By modifying the unsteady aerodynamics, active control may significantly improve the safety and performance especially at off-design conditions, reduce noise, and increase the range of operation of the turbomachine. Active control can also help improve reliability for mission critical applications such as the Mars Flyer. In recent years, HCF has become one of the major issues concerning the cost of operation for current turbomachines. HCF alone accounts for roughly 30% of maintenance cost for the United States Air-Force. Other instabilities (flutter, surge, rotating-stall, etc.) are generally identified during the design and testing phase. Usually a redesign overcomes these problems, often reducing performance and range of operation, and resulting in an increase in the development cost and time. Despite a redesign, the engines do not have the capabilities or means to cope with in-flight unforeseen vibration, stall, flutter or surge related instabilities. This could require the entire fleet worldwide to be stood down for expensive modifications. These problems can be largely overcome by incorporating active control within the turbomachine and its design. Active control can help in maintaining the integrity of the system in

  9. Active control of near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qimei; Zhou, Ting; Wang, Tongbiao; Liu, Wenxing; Liu, Jiangtao; Yu, Tianbao; Liao, Qinghua; Liu, Nianhua

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered metamaterials is investigated. The electric surface plasmons (SPs) supported by metamaterials can be coupled with the SPs supported by graphene. The near-field heat transfer between the graphene-covered metamaterials is significantly larger than that between metamaterials because of the strong coupling in our studied frequency range. The relationship between heat flux and chemical potential is studied for different vacuum gaps. Given that the chemical potential of graphene can be tuned by the external electric field, heat transfer can be actively controlled by modulating the chemical potential. The heat flux for certain vacuum gaps can reach a maximum value when the chemical potential is at a particular value. The results of this study are beneficial for actively controlling energy transfer.

  10. Active Control of Linear Periodic System with Two Unstable Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    tV;;;.~II.~9 - B ~ZV ~- p1 . ,,~ >. ~ ACTIVE CONTROL OF LINEAR PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS by Gregory E. Myers, B.S.E. 2nd Lt...PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University...December 1982 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited -ow PREFACE This thesis is a continuation of the work done by Yeakel in the control of

  11. Flightworthy active control landing gear for a supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.

    1980-01-01

    A flightworthy active control landing gear system for a supersonic aircraft was designed to minimize aircraft loads during takeoff, impact, rollout, and taxi. The design consists of hydromechanical modifications to the existing gear and the development of a fail-safe electronic controller. analytical RESULTS INDICATE that for an aircraft sink rate of 0.914 m/sec (3 ft/sec) the system achieves a peak load reduction of 36% during landing impact.

  12. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment is performed to study the mechanisms of active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders via vibrational outputs. In the present method of control, a vibrational force input was used as the secondary control input to reduce the radiated acoustic field. For the frequencies considered, the active vibration technique provided good global reduction of interior sound even though only one actuator was used.

  13. Five years of specialised early intervention versus two years of specialised early intervention followed by three years of standard treatment for patients with a first episode psychosis: randomised, superiority, parallel group trial in Denmark (OPUS II)

    PubMed Central

    Melau, Marianne; Jensen, Heidi; Emborg, Charlotte; Jepsen, Jens Richardt Mollegaard; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Gluud, Christian; Mors, Ole; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of five years of specialised early intervention (SEI) treatment for first episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder with the standard two years of SEI plus three years of treatment as usual. Design Randomised, superiority, parallel group trial with blinded outcome assessment. Randomisation was centralised and computerised with concealed randomisation sequence carried out at an external site. Setting Participants were recruited from six OPUS teams in Denmark between 2009 and 2012. OPUS teams provide SEI treatment to all patients diagnosed with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder in Denmark. Participants 400 participants (51% women) with a mean age of 25.6 (standard deviation 4.3) were randomised to five years of SEI (experimental intervention; n=197) or to two years of SEI plus three years of treatment as usual (control; n=203). Interventions OPUS treatment consists of three core elements—modified assertive community treatment, family involvement, and social skill training—with a patient-case manager ratio of no more than 12:1. For participants randomised to five years of OPUS treatment, the treatment was largely unchanged. Participants randomised to the control group were mostly referred to community health centres after two years of SEI treatment. Main outcomes Follow-up assessments were conducted five years after start of OPUS treatment. Primary outcome was negative symptoms measured on the scale for assessment of negative symptoms (avolition-apathy, anhedonia, alogia, and affective blunting). Secondary outcomes were remission of both negative and psychotic symptoms, psychotic symptoms, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, compliance with medical treatment, adherence with treatment, client satisfaction, days in hospital care, and labour market affiliation. Results Levels of negative symptoms did not differ between the intervention group and control group (1.72 v 1.81 points; estimated mean difference −0.10 (95% confidence

  14. Active control of excessive sound emission on a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se-Woon; Youn, Dae Hee; Park, Young-cheol; Lee, Gun-Woo

    2015-04-01

    During a phone conversation, loud vocal emission from the far-end to the near-end space can disturb nearby people. In this paper, the possibility of actively controlling such unwanted sound emission using a control source placed on the mobile device is investigated. Two different approaches are tested: Global control, minimizing the potential energy measured along a volumetric space surface, and local control, minimizing the squared sound pressure at a discrete point on the phone. From the test results, both approaches can reduce the unwanted sound emission by more than 6 dB in the frequency range up to 2 kHz.

  15. Selected advanced aerodynamic and active control concepts development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A summary is presented of results obtained during analysis, design and test activities on six selected technical tasks directed at exploratory improvement of fuel efficiency for new and derivative transports. The work included investigations into the potential offered by natural laminar flow, improved surface coatings and advanced high lift concepts. Similar investigations covering optimum low-energy flight path control, integrated application of active controls and evaluation of primary flight control systems reliability and maintenance are also summarized. Recommendations are included for future work needed to exploit potential advancements.

  16. Simultaneous active control of flexural and extensional waves in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Gibbs, G. P.; Silcox, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The simultaneous active control of flexural and extensional vibrations in elastic beams is experimentally investigated. The results demonstrate that using pairs of piezoceramic transducers, whose elements are symmetrically located and independently controlled by a multichannel adaptive controller, enables the high attenuation of both flexural and extensional response. This capability is due to the nature of the piezoceramic element, which when bonded to the surface of the structure and electrically excited, exerts a surface strain on the structure. This strain enables input of both shear forces and moments into the structural system. The results are applicable to many situations where extensional vibrations couple to large flexural vibrations and subsequently radiate significant sound levels.

  17. Active control of spacecraft potentials at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R.; Deforest, S. E.

    1976-01-01

    Tests have been conducted concerning the active control of the potentials of the geosynchronous satellites ATS-5 and ATS-6. The ATS-5 tests show that a simple electron emitter can be used to reduce the magnitude of the potential of a spacecraft which has been charged negatively by the environment. The ATS-6 ion thruster had also a pronounced effect on the potential barrier. In this case, the flux of high-energy primary ions and of low-charge exchange ions produces a space-charge neutralization effect which the electron gun alone cannot achieve.

  18. Effect of bonding on the performance of a piezoactuator-based active control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The utilization of piezoelectric actuators in controlling the structural vibrations of flexible beams is studied. A Modified Independent Modal Space Control (MIMSC) method is devised to select the optimal location, control gains and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators in a way that would minimize the amplitudes of vibrations of beams to which these actuators are bonded, as well as the input control energy necessary to suppress these vibrations. The presented method accounts for the effects that the piezoelectric actuators and the bonding layers have on changing the elastic and inertial properties of the flexible beams. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the MIMSC method and to demonstrate the effect of the physical and geometrical properties of the bonding layer on the dynamic performance of the actively controlled beams. The obtained results emphasize the importance of the devised method in designing more realistic active control systems for flexible beams, in particular, and large flexible structures in general.

  19. The impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry; Kaynes, Ian; Lee, Ben; Sparrow, James

    1993-01-01

    The findings of an investigation conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle are summarized. Important points concerning structural technology considerations implicit in applying active controls technology in new aircraft are summarized. These points are well founded and based upon information received from within the aerospace industry and government laboratories, acquired by sponsoring workshops which brought together experts from contributing and interacting technical disciplines, and obtained by conducting a case study to independently assess the state of the technology. The paper concludes that communication between technical disciplines is absolutely essential in the design of future high performance aircraft.

  20. Active Control of Jets in Cross-Flow for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    2003-01-01

    Jets in cross-flow have applications in film cooling of gas turbine vanes, blades and combustor liners. Their cooling effectiveness depends on the extent to which the cool jet-fluid adheres to the cooled component surface. Lift-off of the cooling jet flow or other mechanisms promoting mixing, cause loss of cooling effectiveness as they allow the hot "free-stream" fluid to come in contact with the component surface. The premise of this project is that cooling effectiveness can be improved by actively controlling (e.9. forcing, pulsing) the jet flow. Active control can be applied to prevent/delay lift-off and suppress mixing. Furthermore, an actively controlled film-cooling system coupled with appropriate sensory input (e.g. temperature or heat flux) can adapt to spatial and temporal variations of the hot-gas path. Thus, it is conceivable that the efficiency of film-cooling systems can be improved, resulting in coolant fluid economy. It is envisioned that Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) will play a role in the realization of such systems. As a first step, a feasibility study will be conducted to evaluate the concept, identify actuation and sensory elements and develop a control strategy. Part of this study will be the design of a proof-of-concept experiment and collection of necessary data.

  1. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  2. Active control of multi-input hydraulic journal bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Jen-Chen; Chen, Chi-Yin; Tu, Jia-Ying

    2016-09-01

    Because of the advantages of high accuracy, high capacity, and low friction, the development of hydrostatic bearing for machine tool receives significant attention in the last decades. The mechanics and mechanical design of hydrostatic journal bearing with capillary restrictors has been discussed in literature. However, pragmatically, the undesired loading effects of cutting force tend to result in resonance and instability of the rotor and damage the shaft during operation. Therefore, multi-input, active flow control using state feedback design is proposed in this paper. To this purpose, the proportional pressure valves are added to the hydraulic system as active control devices, and the linearised models of the bearing and valve are discussed and identified. Simulation and experimental work is conducted to verify the proposed active control and parameter identification techniques. The results show that the unbalance responses of the rotor are reduced by the proposed state feedback controller, which is able to regulate the flow pressure effectively, thus enhancing the stability and accuracy of the hydraulic journal bearing.

  3. Actively controlled multiple-sensor system for feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, Michael J.; Silberberg, Teresa M.

    1991-08-01

    Typical vision systems which attempt to extract features from a visual image of the world for the purposes of object recognition and navigation are limited by the use of a single sensor and no active sensor control capability. To overcome limitations and deficiencies of rigid single sensor systems, more and more researchers are investigating actively controlled, multisensor systems. To address these problems, we have developed a self-calibrating system which uses active multiple sensor control to extract features of moving objects. A key problem in such systems is registering the images, that is, finding correspondences between images from cameras of differing focal lengths, lens characteristics, and positions and orientations. The authors first propose a technique which uses correlation of edge magnitudes for continuously calibrating pan and tilt angles of several different cameras relative to a single camera with a wide angle field of view, which encompasses the views of every other sensor. A simulation of a world of planar surfaces, visual sensors, and a robot platform used to test active control for feature extraction is then described. Motion in the field of view of at least one sensor is used to center the moving object for several sensors, which then extract object features such as color, boundary, and velocity from the appropriate sensors. Results are presented from real cameras and from the simulated world.

  4. Active Control of Mixing and Combustion, from Mechanisms to Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2001-11-01

    Implementation of active control in complex processes, of the type encountered in high Reynolds number mixing and combustion, is predicated upon the identification of the underlying mechanisms and the construction of reduced order models that capture their essential characteristics. The mechanisms of interest must be shown to be amenable to external actuations, allowing optimal control strategies to exploit the delicate interactions that lead to the desired outcome. Reduced order models are utilized in defining the form and requisite attributes of actuation, its relationship to the monitoring system and the relevant control algorithms embedded in a feedforward or a feedback loop. The talk will review recent work on active control of mixing in combustion devices in which strong shear zones concur with mixing, combustion stabilization and flame anchoring. The underlying mechanisms, e.g., stability of shear flows, formation/evolution of large vortical structures in separating and swirling flows, their mutual interactions with acoustic fields, flame fronts and chemical kinetics, etc., are discussed in light of their key roles in mixing, burning enhancement/suppression, and combustion instability. Subtle attributes of combustion mechanisms are used to suggest the requisite control strategies.

  5. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of active controls on the suppression of flutter and gust alleviation of two different types of subsonic aircraft (the Arava, twin turboprop STOL transport, and the Westwind twin-jet business transport) are investigated. The active controls are introduced in pairs which include, in any chosen wing strip, a leading-edge (LE) control and a trailing-edge (TE) control. Each control surface is allowed to be driven by a combined linear-rotational sensor system, located on the activated strip. The control law, which translates the sensor signals into control surface rotations, is based on the concept of aerodynamic energy. The results indicate the extreme effectiveness of the active systems in controlling flutter. A single system spanning 10% of the wing semispan made the Arava flutter-free, and a similar active system, for the Westwind aircraft, yielded a reduction of 75% in the maximum bending moment of the wing and a reduction of 90% in the acceleration of the cg of the aircraft. Results for simultaneous activation of several LE - TE systems are presented. Further work needed to bring the investigation to completion is also discussed.

  6. Combination therapy for erectile dysfunction: a randomized, double blind, unblinded active-controlled, cross-over study of the pharmacodynamics and safety of combined oral formulations of apomorphine hydrochloride, phentolamine mesylate and papaverine hydrochloride in men with moderate to severe erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lammers, P I; Rubio-Aurioles, E; Castell, R; Castaneda, J; Ponce de Leon, R; Hurley, D; Lipezker, M; Loehr, L A; Lowrey, F

    2002-02-01

    Oral therapy has become first line treatment for patients with mild to moderate erectile dysfunction (ED). Studies have shown that sildenafil may not be effective in all patients, and has been associated with a variety of adverse effects and an adverse interaction with nitrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 enzymes. The objective was to compare the efficacy and safety of three different oral combinations with the highest dose of sildenafil in men with moderate to severe ED. Randomized, double blind, unblinded active-controlled, Phase II study was carried out at three sites in Mexico. After a 4-week placebo run-in period, patients received all four of the following treatments using a 4-way cross-over design: 40 mg phentolamine (PM) +6 mg apomorphine (Apo); 40 mg PM +150 mg papaverine (Pap); 40 mg PM +6 mg Apo +150 mg Pap (Tricombo); 100 mg sildenafil (SC). With the exception of sildenafil tablets, all study medication was blinded. Moderate to severe ED was defined as a less than 50% vaginal penetration success rate during the placebo run-in period. A total of 44 patients were enrolled, of whom 36 completed all four treatment periods. All treatments produced a significant effect in primary efficacy variable (Sexual Encounter Profile) compared to baseline, however, no statistically significant differences were found between treatments. A significant period effect was observed. Also, the four treatments were found not to differ significantly in five out of six secondary efficacy variables. The lowest incidence of treatment-related adverse events (AE) occurred in the 40 mg PM +6 mg Apo group (9.8%), followed by 100 mg SC (15%), and the other two combinations (16.7 and 17.5%, respectively). Nasocongestion and headache were the most frequently reported AE. An oral combination of vasoactive agents may provide an alternative approach to sildenafil. Based on these results a combination of phentolamine and apomorphine warrants further clinical investigation.

  7. Active control of combustion instabilities in low NO{sub x} gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, B.T.; Neumeier, Y.

    1995-10-01

    This 3-year research program was initiated in September, 1995, to investigate active control of detrimental combustion instabilities in low NO{sub x} gas turbines (LNGT), which burn natural gas in a lean premixed mode to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. The program will investigate the mechanisms that drive these instabilities. Furthermore, it will study active control systems (ACS) that can effectively prevent the onset of such instabilities and/or reduce their amplitudes to acceptable levels. An understanding of the driving mechanisms will not only guide the development of effective ACS for LNGT but may also lead to combustor design changes (i.e., passive control) that will fully or partially resolve the problem. Initial attempts to stabilize combustors (i.e., chemical rockets) by ACS were reported more than 40 years ago, but were unsuccessful due to lack of adequate sensors, electronics, and actuators for performing the needed control actions. Progress made in recent years in sensor and actuator technology, electronics, and control theory has rekindled interest in developing ACS for unstable combustors. While initial efforts in this area, which focused on active control of instabilities in air breathing combustors, have demonstrated the considerable potential of active control, they have also indicated that more effective observers, controllers, and actuators are needed for practical applications. Considerable progress has been made in the observer and actuator areas by the principal investigators of this program during the past 2 years under an AFOSR program. The developed observer is based upon wavelets theory, and can identify the amplitudes, frequencies, and phases of the five most dominant combustor modes in (virtually) real time. The developed actuator is a fuel injector that uses a novel magneto-strictive material to modulate the fuel flow rate into the combustor.

  8. Two Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Parallel Group Comparison Studies of a Novel Enhanced Lotion Formulation of Halobetasol Propionate, 0.05% Versus Its Vehicle in Adult Subjects With Plaque Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Pariser, David; Bukhalo, Michael; Guenthner, Scott; Kempers, Steven; Shideler, Stephen; Gold, Linda Stein; Tschen, Eduardo; Berg, Jim; Ferdon, Mary Beth; Dromgoole, Syd

    2017-03-01

    BACKGROUND: A novel lotion formulation of halobetasol propionate, 0.05% (HBP Lotion) with enhanced vehicle characteristics of a cream while preserving the ease of use and cosmetic elegance of a lotion has been developed to treat plaque psoriasis.

  9. Uptake and efficacy of a systematic intensive smoking cessation intervention using motivational interviewing for smokers hospitalised for an acute coronary syndrome: a multicentre before–after study with parallel group comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Reto; Gencer, Baris; Tango, Rodrigo; Nanchen, David; Matter, Christian M; Lüscher, Thomas Felix; Windecker, Stephan; Mach, François; Cornuz, Jacques; Humair, Jean-Paul; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy of a proactive approach with a reactive approach to offer intensive smoking cessation intervention using motivational interviewing (MI). Design Before–after comparison in 2 academic hospitals with parallel comparisons in 2 control hospitals. Setting Academic hospitals in Switzerland. Participants Smokers hospitalised for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Intervention In the intervention hospitals during the intervention phase, a resident physician trained in MI systematically offered counselling to all smokers admitted for ACS, followed by 4 telephone counselling sessions over 2 months by a nurse trained in MI. In the observation phase, the in-hospital intervention was offered only to patients whose clinicians requested a smoking cessation intervention. In the control hospitals, no intensive smoking cessation intervention was offered. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome was 1 week smoking abstinence (point prevalence) at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were the number of smokers who received the in-hospital smoking cessation intervention and the duration of the intervention. Results In the intervention centres during the intervention phase, 87% of smokers (N=193/225) received a smoking cessation intervention compared to 22% in the observational phase (p<0.001). Median duration of counselling was 50 min. During the intervention phase, 78% received a phone follow-up for a median total duration of 42 min in 4 sessions. Prescription of nicotine replacement therapy at discharge increased from 18% to 58% in the intervention phase (risk ratio (RR): 3.3 (95% CI 2.4 to 4.3; p≤0.001). Smoking cessation at 12-month increased from 43% to 51% comparing the observation and intervention phases (RR=1.20, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.46; p=0.08; 97% with outcome assessment). In the control hospitals, the RR for quitting was 1.02 (95% CI 0.84 to 1.25; p=0.8, 92% with outcome assessment). Conclusions A proactive strategy offering intensive smoking cessation intervention based on MI to all smokers hospitalised for ACS significantly increases the uptake of smoking cessation counselling and might increase smoking abstinence at 12 months. PMID:27650761

  10. Strain-optic active control for quantum integrated photonics.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter C; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Spring, Justin B; Moore, Merritt; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J; Steven Kolthammer, W; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-08

    We present a practical method for active phase control on a photonic chip that has immediate applications in quantum photonics. Our approach uses strain-optic modification of the refractive index of individual waveguides, effected by a millimeter-scale mechanical actuator. The resulting phase change of propagating optical fields is rapid and polarization-dependent, enabling quantum applications that require active control and polarization encoding. We demonstrate strain-optic control of non-classical states of light in silica, showing the generation of 2-photon polarisation N00N states by manipulating Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We also demonstrate switching times of a few microseconds, which are sufficient for silica-based feed-forward control of photonic quantum states.

  11. Multidisciplinary analysis of actively controlled large flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Paul A.; Young, John W.; Sutter, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    The control of Flexible Structures (COFS) program has supported the development of an analysis capability at the Langley Research Center called the Integrated Multidisciplinary Analysis Tool (IMAT) which provides an efficient data storage and transfer capability among commercial computer codes to aid in the dynamic analysis of actively controlled structures. IMAT is a system of computer programs which transfers Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) configurations, structural finite element models, material property and stress information, structural and rigid-body dynamic model information, and linear system matrices for control law formulation among various commercial applications programs through a common database. Although general in its formulation, IMAT was developed specifically to aid in the evaluation of the structures. A description of the IMAT system and results of an application of the system are given.

  12. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  13. Active Control of High-Frequency Combustor Instability Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities-high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the combustor and turbine safe operating life. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Propulsion and Power Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center in partnership with Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Center, and Georgia Institute of Technology is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities.

  14. Active control of radiated pressure of a submarine hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xia; Tso, Yan; Juniper, Ross

    2008-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of the active control of low-frequency radiated pressure from submarine hulls is presented. Two typical hull models are examined in this paper. Each model consists of a water-loaded cylindrical shell with a hemispherical shell at one end and conical shell at the other end, which forms a simple model of a submarine hull. The conical end is excited by an axial force to simulate propeller excitations while the other end is free. The control action is implemented through a Tee-sectioned circumferential stiffener driven by pairs of PZT stack actuators. These actuators are located under the flange of the stiffener and driven out of phase to produce a control moment. A number of cost functions for minimizing the radiated pressure are examined. In general, it was found that the control system was capable of reducing more than half of the total radiated pressure from each of the submarine hull for the first three axial modes.

  15. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  16. Active control of bearing preload using piezoelectric translators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nye, Ted W.

    1990-01-01

    In many spacecraft applications, mechanisms are required to perform precision pointing operations or to sometimes dither about or track a moving object. These mechanisms perform in a predictable and repeatable manner in benign temperature environments. Severe thermal gradients experienced in actual space applications however, cause assemblies to expand and contract around their bearings. This results in unpredictable changes in bearing preload, and hence bearing friction. This becomes a limitation for servos controlling pointing accuracy. Likewise, uncontrollable vibrations may couple into fixed preload (hence, fixed stiffness) mechanisms and limit pointing accuracy. Consequently, a complex problem faced today is how to design mechanisms that remain insensitive to changing thermal and vibrational spacecraft environments. Research presented involves the simplified modeling and test results of an actuator module that used piezoelectrically preload controlled bearings. The feasibility of actively controlling bearing preload was demonstrated. Because bearing friction is related to preload, a thermally active system designed with aluminum components and a 440 C bearing, was friction tested at temperatures ranging from 0 to 70 C (32 to 158 F). Effectiveness of the translators were demonstrated by mapping a controllable friction range throughout tested temperatures. It was learned that constant preload for this system could be maintained over an approximate 44 C (79 F) temperature span. From testing, it was also discovered that at the more deviate temperatures, expansions were so large that radial clearances were taken up and the duplex bearing became radially preloaded. Thus, active control of bearing preload is feasible but may be limited by inherent geometry constraints and materials used in the system.

  17. Clinical trials: active control vs placebo--what is ethical?

    PubMed

    Spławiński, Jacek; Kuźniar, Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    The quest for effective medicines is very old. In modern times two important tools have been developed to evaluate efficacy of drugs, superiority and non-inferiority types of clinical trials. The former tests the null hypothesis of micro (the difference between a tested drug and comparator) < or = 0 against micro > 0; the latter tests the null hypothesis of micro < or = - delta against, micro > - delta, where delta is the clinical difference from the comparator. In a superiority trial, a new drug is tested against a placebo; in a non-inferiority trial, a new drug is tested against active treatment. In this paper, arguments are presented to show that a superiority trial against a placebo is scientifically sound but ethically unacceptable, whereas a non-inferiority trial against active treatment is ethically sound but scientifically not reliable. Switching from a superiority type of trial with placebo to a non-inferiority trial with an active-control--following the latest revision of Declaration of Helsinki--is in practice switching from the violation of the uncertainty principle to uncertainty of results. Given human and financial resources, it appears an academic question as to which is more unethical: to violate patients' rights or to produce results without scientific value. All presented considerations lead to the conclusion that the use of a superiority trial of design with an active control instead of placebo will satisfy scientific needs, expectation of patients, and the ancient quest for effective medicines. In the era of Good (Clinical, Laboratory, Manufacture) Practice, the attention of those performing clinical trials is focused on the procedure, not always on its essence. However even the excellent performance of a trial which is not worth doing is fruitless.

  18. Active control and sound synthesis--two different ways to investigate the influence of the modal parameters of a guitar on its sound.

    PubMed

    Benacchio, Simon; Mamou-Mani, Adrien; Chomette, Baptiste; Finel, Victor

    2016-03-01

    The vibrational behavior of musical instruments is usually studied using physical modeling and simulations. Recently, active control has proven its efficiency to experimentally modify the dynamical behavior of musical instruments. This approach could also be used as an experimental tool to systematically study fine physical phenomena. This paper proposes to use modal active control as an alternative to sound simulation to study the complex case of the coupling between classical guitar strings and soundboard. A comparison between modal active control and sound simulation investigates the advantages, the drawbacks, and the limits of these two approaches.

  19. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 1; Theory and Design Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes a project at the University of Washington to design a multirate suppression system for the BACT wing. The objective of the project was two fold. First, to develop a methodology for designing robust multirate compensators, and second, to demonstrate the methodology by applying it to the design of a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing.

  20. Digital active control law synthesis for aeroservoelastic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivekananda

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a formulation for synthesis of digital active control laws for aeroservoelastic systems, which are typically modeled by large order equations in order to accurately represent the rigid and flexible body modes, unsteady aerodynamic forces, actuator dynamics, and gust spectra. The control law is expected to satisfy multiple design requirements on the dynamic loads, responses, actuator deflection and rate limitations, as well as maintain certain stability margins, yet should be simple enough to be implemented by an onboard digital microprocessor. The synthesis procedure minimizes a linear quadratic Gaussian type cost function, by updating selected free parameters of the control law, while satisfying a set of inequality constraints on the design loads, responses and stability margins. A stable classical control law or an estimator based full or reduced order control law can be used as an initial design starting point. The gradients of the cost function and the constraints, with respect to the digital control law design variables are derived analytically, to facilitate rapid convergence. Selected design responses can be treated as constraints instead of lumping them into the cost function, in order to satisfy individual root-mean-square load and response limitations. Constraints are also imposed on the minimum singular value requirements for stability robustness improvement.

  1. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1994-01-01

    A three-channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and the high-pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provide blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. To minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three-channel controller by up to 16 dB over a +/- 30-deg angle about the engine axis. A single-channel controller could produce reduction over a +/- 15-deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Outside of the areas contolled, the levels of the tone actually increased due to the generation of radial modes by the control sources. Simultaneous control of two tones is achieved with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high-pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  2. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1993-01-01

    A three channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine in order to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and high pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provides blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. In order to minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three channel controller by up to 16 dB over a 60 deg angle about the engine axis. A single channel controller could produce reduction over a 30 deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Simultaneous control of two tones is done with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 dBA and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  3. Recent advances in active control of aircraft cabin noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Gopal; Fuller, Christopher

    2002-11-01

    Active noise control techniques can provide significant reductions in aircraft interior noise levels without the structural modifications or weight penalties usually associated with passive techniques, particularly for low frequency noise. Our main objective in this presentation is to give a review of active control methods and their applications to aircraft cabin noise reduction with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges facing the noise control engineer in the practical application of these techniques. The active noise control method using secondary acoustic sources, e.g., loudspeakers, as control sources for tonal noise reduction is first discussed with results from an active noise control flight test demonstration. An innovative approach of applying control forces directly to the fuselage structure using piezoelectric actuators, known as active structural acoustic control (ASAC), to control cabin noise is then presented. Experimental results from laboratory ASAC tests conducted on a full-scale fuselage and from flight tests on a helicopter will be discussed. Finally, a hybrid active/passive noise control approach for achieving significant broadband noise reduction will be discussed. Experimental results of control of broadband noise transmission through an aircraft structure will be presented.

  4. Sensitivity method for integrated structure/active control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    The development is described of an integrated structure/active control law design methodology for aeroelastic aircraft applications. A short motivating introduction to aeroservoelasticity is given along with the need for integrated structures/controls design algorithms. Three alternative approaches to development of an integrated design method are briefly discussed with regards to complexity, coordination and tradeoff strategies, and the nature of the resulting solutions. This leads to the formulation of the proposed approach which is based on the concepts of sensitivity of optimum solutions and multi-level decompositions. The concept of sensitivity of optimum is explained in more detail and compared with traditional sensitivity concepts of classical control theory. The analytical sensitivity expressions for the solution of the linear, quadratic cost, Gaussian (LQG) control problem are summarized in terms of the linear regulator solution and the Kalman Filter solution. Numerical results for a state space aeroelastic model of the DAST ARW-II vehicle are given, showing the changes in aircraft responses to variations of a structural parameter, in this case first wing bending natural frequency.

  5. Archerfish actively control the hydrodynamics of their jets.

    PubMed

    Gerullis, Peggy; Schuster, Stefan

    2014-09-22

    Among tool-using animals [1-4], none are known to adaptively change the hydrodynamic properties of a free jet of water--a task considered difficult in human technology [5-7]. Hunting archerfish can strike their targets with precisely aimed water jets (e.g., [8, 9]), but they are also presently thought to be unable to actively control the hydrodynamics of their jets [8-13]. By using specifically trained fish, we were able to monitor several aspects of jet production and propagation as the fish fired at targets over a much wider range of distances than previously explored [10, 13]. We show that jets that have to travel farther also live longer. Furthermore, the time needed until water assembles at the jet tip is not fixed. Rather, it is adjusted so that maximum focusing occurs just before impact. Surprisingly, the fish achieve this by modulating the dynamics of changes in the cross-section of their mouth opening, a mechanism that seems to not have been applied yet in human-built nozzles. The timing adjustments archerfish make in order to powerfully hit targets over an extended range strikingly parallel the situation in the "uniquely human" ability of powerful throwing [14-18]. Based on the key role throwing played in human encephalization and cognitive evolution [14-20], skillfully "throwing" water should similarly have led to the correlated rapid evolution of cognitive skills in this animal.

  6. Active Control of Vibrations and Noise of Double Wall Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.-Y.; Vaicaitis, R.

    1998-10-01

    Active control of vibrations and noise transmissions of double wall composite cylindrical shells using pairs of spatially discrete piezoelectric actuators is investigated. The velocity feedback and sound pressure rate feedback control procedures are developed. The inner and outer shells which are separated by a soft core are modelled by Love's thin shell theory for laminate composite materials and the inputs are taken as stationary random pressures and/or random point forces. A galerkin-like procedure is used to obtain solutions of the governing structural-acoustic equations. Parametric studies are performed to demonstrate the effect of actuator placement, actuator size, control gains, spillover, structural and acoustic damping characteristics

  7. A robust active control system for shimmy damping in the presence of free play and uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Calogero; Alaimo, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Shimmy vibration is the oscillatory motion of the fork-wheel assembly about the steering axis. It represents one of the major problem of aircraft landing gear because it can lead to excessive wear, discomfort as well as safety concerns. Based on the nonlinear model of the mechanics of a single wheel nose landing gear (NLG), electromechanical actuator and tire elasticity, a robust active controller capable of damping shimmy vibration is designed and investigated in this study. A novel Decline Population Swarm Optimization (PDSO) procedure is introduced and used to select the optimal parameters for the controller. The PDSO procedure is based on a decline demographic model and shows high global search capability with reduced computational costs. The open and closed loop system behavior is analyzed under different case studies of aeronautical interest and the effects of torsional free play on the nose landing gear response are also studied. Plant parameters probabilistic uncertainties are then taken into account to assess the active controller robustness using a stochastic approach.

  8. Active Control of Combustor Instability Shown to Help Lower Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2002-01-01

    In a quest to reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities, or high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves, that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the safe operating life of the combustor and turbine. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base Research and Technology Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with Pratt & Whitney and United Technologies Research Center, is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities. With active combustion control, the fuel is pulsed to put pressure oscillations into the system. This cancels out the pressure oscillations being produced by the instabilities. Thus, the engine can have lower pollutant emissions and long life.The use of active combustion instability control to reduce thermo-acoustic-driven combustor pressure oscillations was demonstrated on a single-nozzle combustor rig at United Technologies. This rig has many of the complexities of a real engine combustor (i.e., an actual fuel nozzle and swirler, dilution cooling, etc.). Control was demonstrated through modeling, developing, and testing a fuel-delivery system able to the 280-Hz instability frequency. The preceding figure shows the capability of this system to provide high-frequency fuel modulations. Because of the high-shear contrarotating airflow in the fuel injector, there was some concern that the fuel pulses would be attenuated to the point where they would

  9. Active control for stabilization of neoclassical tearing modesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Ferron, J. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Welander, A. S.

    2006-05-01

    This work describes active control algorithms used by DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] to stabilize and maintain suppression of 3/2 or 2/1 neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by application of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational q surface. The DIII-D NTM control system can determine the correct q-surface/ECCD alignment and stabilize existing modes within 100-500ms of activation, or prevent mode growth with preemptive application of ECCD, in both cases enabling stable operation at normalized beta values above 3.5. Because NTMs can limit performance or cause plasma-terminating disruptions in tokamaks, their stabilization is essential to the high performance operation of ITER [R. Aymar et al., ITER Joint Central Team, ITER Home Teams, Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The DIII-D NTM control system has demonstrated many elements of an eventual ITER solution, including general algorithms for robust detection of q-surface/ECCD alignment and for real-time maintenance of alignment following the disappearance of the mode. This latter capability, unique to DIII-D, is based on real-time reconstruction of q-surface geometry by a Grad-Shafranov solver using external magnetics and internal motional Stark effect measurements. Alignment is achieved by varying either the plasma major radius (and the rational q surface) or the toroidal field (and the deposition location). The requirement to achieve and maintain q-surface/ECCD alignment with accuracy on the order of 1cm is routinely met by the DIII-D Plasma Control System and these algorithms. We discuss the integrated plasma control design process used for developing these and other general control algorithms, which includes physics-based modeling and testing of the algorithm implementation against simulations of actuator and plasma responses. This systematic design/test method and modeling environment enabled successful mode suppression by the NTM control system upon first-time use in an experimental

  10. Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar Boundary Layers-Overview and Concept Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yoursuff

    1997-01-01

    This paper (the first in a series) focuses on using active-control methods to maintain laminar flow in a region of the flow in which the natural instabilities, if left unattended, lead to turbulent flow. The authors review previous studies that examine wave cancellation (currently the most prominent method) and solve the unsteady, nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations to evaluate this method of controlling instabilities. It is definitively shown that instabilities are controlled by the linear summation of waves (i.e., wave cancellation). Although a mathematically complete method for controlling arbitrary instabilities has been developed, the review, duplication, and physical explanation of previous studies are important steps for providing an independent verification of those studies, for establishing a framework for the work which will involve automated transition control, and for detailing the phenomena by-which the automated studies can be used to expand knowledge of flow control.

  11. Active control of instabilities in laminar boundary-layer flow. Part 1: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1994-01-01

    This paper (the first in a series) focuses on using active-control methods to maintain laminar flow in a region of the flow in which the natural instabilities, if left unattended, lead to turbulent flow. The authors review previous studies that examine wave cancellation (currently the most prominent method) and solve the unsteady, nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations to evaluate this method of controlling instabilities. It is definitely shown that instabilities are controlled by the linear summation of waves (i.e., wave cancellation). Although a mathematically complete method for controlling arbitrary instabilities has been developed (but not yet tested), the review, duplication, and physical explanation of previous studies are important steps for providing an independent verification of those studies, for establishing a framework for subsequent work which will involve automated transition control, and for detailing the phenomena by which the automated studies can be used to expand knowledge of flow control.

  12. [Cross-over studies].

    PubMed

    Bonten, Tobias N; Siegerink, Bob; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2013-01-01

    Randomized, parallel group clinical trials often require large groups of patients; this is expensive and takes time. A randomized cross-over trial can be an efficient and more affordable alternative. A cross-over design can be used to study chronic disorders in which treatments have temporary effects. Participants receive all treatments in consecutive periods and outcomes are measured after every period. In general, only a quarter of the total group size is needed for cross-over studies compared with parallel group studies. Results can be affected by period-effects and carry-over-effects, which can be prevented through randomization and a wash-out period of sufficient length. The dropping-out of participants has more negative consequences for cross-over studies than for parallel group studies.

  13. The role of AAA+ proteases in mitochondrial protein biogenesis, homeostasis and activity control.

    PubMed

    Voos, Wolfgang; Ward, Linda A; Truscott, Kaye N

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are specialised organelles that are structurally and functionally integrated into cells in the vast majority of eukaryotes. They are the site of numerous enzymatic reactions, some of which are essential for life. The double lipid membrane of the mitochondrion, that spatially defines the organelle and is necessary for some functions, also creates a physical but semi-permeable barrier to the rest of the cell. Thus to ensure the biogenesis, regulation and maintenance of a functional population of proteins, an autonomous protein handling network within mitochondria is required. This includes resident mitochondrial protein translocation machinery, processing peptidases, molecular chaperones and proteases. This review highlights the contribution of proteases of the AAA+ superfamily to protein quality and activity control within the mitochondrion. Here they are responsible for the degradation of unfolded, unassembled and oxidatively damaged proteins as well as the activity control of some enzymes. Since most knowledge about these proteases has been gained from studies in the eukaryotic microorganism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, much of the discussion here centres on their role in this organism. However, reference is made to mitochondrial AAA+ proteases in other organisms, particularly in cases where they play a unique role such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. As these proteases influence mitochondrial function in both health and disease in humans, an understanding of their regulation and diverse activities is necessary.

  14. The use of an active controlled enclosure to attenuate sound radiation from a heavy radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Yang, Tiejun; Zhu, Minggang; Pan, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Active structural acoustical control usually experiences difficulty in the control of heavy sources or sources where direct applications of control forces are not practical. To overcome this difficulty, an active controlled enclosure, which forms a cavity with both flexible and open boundary, is employed. This configuration permits indirect implementation of active control in which the control inputs can be applied to subsidiary structures other than the sources. To determine the control effectiveness of the configuration, the vibro-acoustic behavior of the system, which consists of a top plate with an open, a sound cavity and a source panel, is investigated in this paper. A complete mathematical model of the system is formulated involving modified Fourier series formulations and the governing equations are solved using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The coupling mechanisms of a partly opened cavity and a plate are analysed in terms of modal responses and directivity patterns. Furthermore, to attenuate sound power radiated from both the top panel and the open, two strategies are studied: minimizing the total radiated power and the cancellation of volume velocity. Moreover, three control configurations are compared, using a point force on the control panel (structural control), using a sound source in the cavity (acoustical control) and applying hybrid structural-acoustical control. In addition, the effects of boundary condition of the control panel on the sound radiation and control performance are discussed.

  15. Color difference amplification between gold nanoparticles in colorimetric analysis with actively controlled multiband illumination.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaodong; Dai, Dinggui; Yuan, Zhiqin; Peng, Lan; He, Yan; Yeung, Edward S

    2014-08-05

    Spectral chemical sensing with digital color analysis by using consumer imaging devices could potentially revolutionize personalized healthcare. However, samples with small spectral variations often cannot be differentiated in color due to the nonlinearity of color appearance. In this study, we address this problem by exploiting the color image formation mechanism in digital photography. A close examination of the color image processing pipeline emphasizes that although the color can be represented digitally, it is still a reproducible subjective perception rather than a measurable physical property. That makes it possible to physically manage the color appearance of a nonradiative specimen through engineered illumination. By using scattering light imaging of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a model system, we demonstrated via simulation that enlarged color difference between spectrally close samples could be achieved with actively controlled illumination of multiple narrow-band light sources. Experimentally, darkfield imaging results indicate that color separation of single GNPs with various sizes can be significantly improved and the detection limit of GNP aggregation-based colorimetric assays can be much reduced when the conventional spectrally continuous white light was replaced with three independently intensity-controlled laser beams, even though the laser lines were uncorrelated with the LSPR maxima of the GNPs. With low-cost narrow-band light sources widely available today, this actively controlled illumination strategy could be utilized to replace the spectrometer in many spectral sensing applications.

  16. Improving the vibration suppression capabilities of a magneto-rheological damper using hybrid active and semi-active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Irfan; Wagg, David; Sims, Neil D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid active and semi-active control method for vibration suppression in flexible structures. The method uses a combination of a semi-active device and an active control actuator situated elsewhere in the structure to suppress vibrations. The key novelty is to use the hybrid controller to enable the magneto-rheological damper to achieve a performance as close to a fully active device as possible. This is achieved by ensuring that the active actuator can assist the magneto-rheological damper in the regions where energy is required. In addition, the hybrid active and semi-active controller is designed to minimize the switching of the semi-active controller. The control framework used is the immersion and invariance control technique in combination with sliding mode control. A two degree-of-freedom system with lightly damped resonances is used as an example system. Both numerical and experimental results are generated for this system, and then compared as part of a validation study. The experimental system uses hardware-in-the-loop to simulate the effect of both the degrees-of-freedom. The results show that the concept is viable both numerically and experimentally, and improved vibration suppression results can be obtained for the magneto-rheological damper that approach the performance of an active device.

  17. Method and apparatus for actively controlling a micro-scale flexural plate wave device

    DOEpatents

    Dohner, Jeffrey L.

    2001-01-01

    An actively controlled flexural plate wave device provides a micro-scale pump. A method of actively controlling a flexural plate wave device produces traveling waves in the device by coordinating the interaction of a magnetic field with actively controlled currents. An actively-controlled flexural plate wave device can be placed in a fluid channel and adapted for use as a micro-scale fluid pump to cool or drive micro-scale systems, for example, micro-chips, micro-electrical-mechanical devices, micro-fluid circuits, or micro-scale chemical analysis devices.

  18. Enhancing Cognitive Abilities with Comprehensive Training: A Large, Online, Randomized, Active-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Joseph L.; Nelson, Rolf A.; Thomason, Moriah E.; Sternberg, Daniel A.; Katovich, Kiefer; Farzin, Faraz; Scanlon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of studies have demonstrated gains in cognitive ability following cognitive training interventions. However, other studies have not shown such gains, and questions remain regarding the efficacy of specific cognitive training interventions. Cognitive training research often involves programs made up of just one or a few exercises, targeting limited and specific cognitive endpoints. In addition, cognitive training studies typically involve small samples that may be insufficient for reliable measurement of change. Other studies have utilized training periods that were too short to generate reliable gains in cognitive performance. Methods The present study evaluated an online cognitive training program comprised of 49 exercises targeting a variety of cognitive capacities. The cognitive training program was compared to an active control condition in which participants completed crossword puzzles. All participants were recruited, trained, and tested online (N = 4,715 fully evaluable participants). Participants in both groups were instructed to complete one approximately 15-minute session at least 5 days per week for 10 weeks. Results Participants randomly assigned to the treatment group improved significantly more on the primary outcome measure, an aggregate measure of neuropsychological performance, than did the active control group (Cohen’s d effect size = 0.255; 95% confidence interval = [0.198, 0.312]). Treatment participants showed greater improvements than controls on speed of processing, short-term memory, working memory, problem solving, and fluid reasoning assessments. Participants in the treatment group also showed greater improvements on self-reported measures of cognitive functioning, particularly on those items related to concentration compared to the control group (Cohen’s d = 0.249; 95% confidence interval = [0.191, 0.306]). Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that a varied training program composed of a number of

  19. Selected advanced aerodynamics and active controls technology concepts development on a derivative B-747

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of applying wing tip extensions, winglets, and active control wing load alleviation to the Boeing 747 is investigated. Winglet aerodynamic design methods and high speed wind tunnel test results of winglets and of symmetrically deflected ailerons are presented. Structural resizing analyses to determine weight and aeroelastic twist increments for all the concepts and flutter model test results for the wing with winglets are included. Control law development, system mechanization/reliability studies, and aileron balance tab trade studies for active wing load alleviation systems are discussed. Results are presented in the form of incremental effects on L/D, structural weight, block fuel savings, stability and control, airplane price, and airline operating economics.

  20. A randomised, assessor blind, parallel group comparative efficacy trial of three products for the treatment of head lice in children - melaleuca oil and lavender oil, pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide, and a "suffocation" product

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are many different types of pediculicides available OTC in Australia. In this study we compare the efficacy and safety of three topical pediculicides: a pediculicide containing melaleuca oil (tea tree oil) and lavender oil (TTO/LO); a head lice "suffocation" product; and a product containing pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide (P/PB). Method This study was a randomised, assessor-blind, comparative, parallel study of 123 subjects with live head lice. The head lice products were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions (the TTO/LO product and the "suffocation" product were applied three times at weekly intervals according to manufacturers instructions (on Day 0, Day 7 and Day 14) and the P/PB product was applied twice according to manufacturers instructions (on Day 0 and Day 7)). The presence or absence of live lice one day following the last treatment was determined. Results The percentage of subjects who were louse-free one day after the last treatment with the product containing tea tree oil and lavender oil (41/42; 97.6%) and the head lice "suffocation" product (40/41, 97.6%) was significantly higher compared to the percentage of subjects who were louse-free one day after the last treatment with the product containing pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide (10/40, 25.0%; adj. p < 0.0001). Conclusion The high efficacy of the TTO/LO product and the head lice "suffocation" product offers an alternative to the pyrethrins-based product. Trial Registration The study was entered into the Australian/New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry, ACTRN12610000179033. PMID:20727129

  1. Use of particle filters in an active control algorithm for noisy nonlinear structural dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajeeb, R.; Manohar, C. S.; Roy, D.

    2007-09-01

    The problem of active control of nonlinear structural dynamical systems, in the presence of both process and measurement noises, is considered. The focus of the study is on the use of particle filters for state estimation in feedback control algorithms for nonlinear structures, when a limited number of noisy output measurements are available. The control design is done using the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) method. The stochastic differential equations (SDEs) governing the dynamical systems are discretized using explicit forms of Ito-Taylor expansions. The Bayesian bootstrap filter and that based on sequential important sampling (SIS) are employed for state estimation. The simulation results show the feasibility of using particle filters and SDRE techniques in control of nonlinear structural dynamical systems.

  2. Test/analysis comparison of piezoelectric patch local behavior for vibroacoustic active control application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florens, Corine; Balmes, Etienne; Clero, Franck

    2007-04-01

    To predict the effect of active control on aircraft or helicopter trim panels, made with honeycomb sandwich composite, one approach consists in modeling the panel by Finite Element Method. FEM with shell elements for the laminate and volume elements for the core is classically used in industry; in a previous study the homogenized modeling approach has been validated. The aim of the present paper is to make a test/analysis comparison of the dynamic behavior of a honeycomb core sandwich beam actuated by a piezoelectric patch. More precisely, the behavior in the vicinity of the piezoelectric actuator is characterized, in order to validate the modeling approach of honeycomb sandwich composite equipped with piezoelectric patches.

  3. Modeling and Validation of a Navy A6-Intruder Actively Controlled Landing Gear System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground-induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads by using actively controlled landing gear. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance, The facility uses a Navy A6 Intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented, including modifications to actuate the gear externally, and test data are used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  4. Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational force inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders is analytically and experimentally studied. The primary (noise) field in the cylinder model is generated by the coupled dynamic response of the shell under loading by a single exterior acoustic source. Control of the interior sound field is achieved by applying vibrational force inputs directly to the shell wall. Action of the point controllers serve to increase the input impedance of select structural modes of the shell which are well-coupled to the interior acoustic cavity, thus substantially reducing sound transmission into the cavity. Spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 30 dB are demonstrated for acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity. Twin controller configurations are presented which demonstrate the ability to independently control orthogonal modes of the interior acoustic space. Benefits and drawbacks of this new methodology for noise control are discussed and clearly demonstrated.

  5. Semi-active controller design for vibration suppression and energy harvesting via LMI approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yilun; Lin, Chi-Chang; Zuo, Lei

    2014-04-01

    The vibration control plays an important role in energy harvesting systems. Compared to the active control, semi-active control is a more preferred alternative for practical use. Many different semi-active control strategies have been developed, among which LQ-clip, Skyhook and model predictive control are the most popular strategies in literatures. In this paper, a different control strategy that designs semi-active controller via LMI approach is proposed. Different from clipping the control input after controller construction like most existing control methods, the proposed method fulfills the semi-active control input feasibility constraints before the controller construction. The methodology is developed through LMI approach which leads to a stabilizing linear controller to ensure semi-active constraint and the pre-designed performance. An illustrative example, vibration control system of a tall building, is presented to show the efficiency of the method and validate the new approach.

  6. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  7. Active control of counter-rotating open rotor interior noise in a Dornier 728 experimental aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, Thomas; Unruh, Oliver; Algermissen, Stephan; Pohl, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The fuel consumption of future civil aircraft needs to be reduced because of the CO2 restrictions declared by the European Union. A consequent lightweight design and a new engine concept called counter-rotating open rotor are seen as key technologies in the attempt to reach this ambitious goals. Bearing in mind that counter-rotating open rotor engines emit very high sound pressures at low frequencies and that lightweight structures have a poor transmission loss in the lower frequency range, these key technologies raise new questions in regard to acoustic passenger comfort. One of the promising solutions for the reduction of sound pressure levels inside the aircraft cabin are active sound and vibration systems. So far, active concepts have rarely been investigated for a counter-rotating open rotor pressure excitation on complex airframe structures. Hence, the state of the art is augmented by the preliminary study presented in this paper. The study shows how an active vibration control system can influence the sound transmission of counter-rotating open rotor noise through a complex airframe structure into the cabin. Furthermore, open questions on the way towards the realisation of an active control system are addressed. In this phase, an active feedforward control system is investigated in a fully equipped Dornier 728 experimental prototype aircraft. In particular, the sound transmission through the airframe, the coupling of classical actuators (inertial and piezoelectric patch actuators) into the structure and the performance of the active vibration control system with different error sensors are investigated. It can be shown that the active control system achieves a reduction up to 5 dB at several counter-rotating open rotor frequencies but also that a better performance could be achieved through further optimisations.

  8. Long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in patients taking low-dose aspirin with a history of peptic ulcers: a phase 2/3, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, extension clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kato, Mototsugu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Sugisaki, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hisao; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    A 24-week, double-blind, clinical trial of rabeprazole for the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers caused by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been reported, but trials for longer than 24 weeks have not been reported. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole for preventing peptic ulcer recurrence on LDA therapy. Eligible patients had a history of peptic ulcers on long-term LDA (81 or 100 mg/day) therapy. Patients with no recurrence of peptic ulcers at the end of the 24-week double-blind phase with rabeprazole (10- or 5-mg once daily) or teprenone (50 mg three times daily) entered the extension phase. Rabeprazole doses were maintained for a maximum of 76 weeks, including the double-blind 24-week period and the extension phase period (long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). Teprenone was randomly switched to rabeprazole 10 or 5 mg for a maximum of 52 weeks in the extension phase (newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). The full analysis set consisted of 151 and 150 subjects in the long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups, respectively, and the cumulative recurrence rates of peptic ulcers were 2.2 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrent peptic ulcers were not observed in the newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups. No bleeding ulcers were reported. No clinically significant safety findings, including cardiovascular events, emerged. The use of long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg once daily prevents the recurrence of peptic ulcers in subjects on low-dose aspirin therapy, and both were well-tolerated. PMID:26060354

  9. Long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in patients taking low-dose aspirin with a history of peptic ulcers: a phase 2/3, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, extension clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kato, Mototsugu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Sugisaki, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hisao; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2015-05-01

    A 24-week, double-blind, clinical trial of rabeprazole for the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers caused by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been reported, but trials for longer than 24 weeks have not been reported. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole for preventing peptic ulcer recurrence on LDA therapy. Eligible patients had a history of peptic ulcers on long-term LDA (81 or 100 mg/day) therapy. Patients with no recurrence of peptic ulcers at the end of the 24-week double-blind phase with rabeprazole (10- or 5-mg once daily) or teprenone (50 mg three times daily) entered the extension phase. Rabeprazole doses were maintained for a maximum of 76 weeks, including the double-blind 24-week period and the extension phase period (long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). Teprenone was randomly switched to rabeprazole 10 or 5 mg for a maximum of 52 weeks in the extension phase (newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). The full analysis set consisted of 151 and 150 subjects in the long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups, respectively, and the cumulative recurrence rates of peptic ulcers were 2.2 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrent peptic ulcers were not observed in the newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups. No bleeding ulcers were reported. No clinically significant safety findings, including cardiovascular events, emerged. The use of long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg once daily prevents the recurrence of peptic ulcers in subjects on low-dose aspirin therapy, and both were well-tolerated.

  10. Effect of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on defecation frequency in healthy subjects with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial.

    PubMed

    Eskesen, Dorte; Jespersen, Lillian; Michelsen, Birgit; Whorwell, Peter J; Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Morberg, Cathrine M

    2015-11-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on two primary end points - defecation frequency and gastrointestinal (GI) well-being - in healthy adults with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort. A total of 1248 subjects were included in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomised to 1 or 10 billion colony-forming units/d of the probiotic strain BB-12® or a matching placebo capsule once daily for 4 weeks. Subjects completed a diary on bowel habits, relief of abdominal discomfort and symptoms. GI well-being, defined as global relief of abdominal discomfort, did not show significant differences. The OR for having a defecation frequency above baseline for ≥50% of the time was 1·31 (95% CI 0·98, 1·75), P=0·071, for probiotic treatment overall. Tightening the criteria for being a responder to an increase of ≥1 d/week for ≥50 % of the time resulted in an OR of 1·55 (95% CI 1·22, 1·96), P=0·0003, for treatment overall. A treatment effect on average defecation frequency was found (P=0·0065), with the frequency being significantly higher compared with placebo at all weeks for probiotic treatment overall (all P<0·05). Effects on defecation frequency were similar for the two doses tested, suggesting that a ceiling effect was reached with the one billion dose. Overall, 4 weeks' supplementation with the probiotic strain BB-12® resulted in a clinically relevant benefit on defecation frequency. The results suggest that consumption of BB-12® improves the GI health of individuals whose symptoms are not sufficiently severe to consult a doctor (ISRCTN18128385).

  11. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel-group dual site trial to evaluate the effects of a Bacillus coagulans-based product on functional intestinal gas symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This randomized double blind placebo controlled dual site clinical trial compared a probiotic dietary supplement to placebo regarding effects on gastrointestinal symptoms in adults with post-prandial intestinal gas-related symptoms (abdominal pain, distention, flatulence) but no gastrointestinal (GI) diagnoses to explain the symptoms. Methods Sixty-one adults were enrolled (age 36.5 ± 12.6 years; height 165.1 ± 9.2 cm; weight 75.4 ± 17.3 kg) and randomized to either Digestive Advantage™ Gas Defense Formula - (GanedenBC30 Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086): n = 30; or Placebo: n = 31. Study subjects were evaluated every two weeks over a four-week period using validated questionnaires and standard biochemical safety testing. Outcome criteria of interest included change from baseline in Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) abdominal pain, abdominal distention, flatus, and the Severity of Dyspepsia Assessment (SODA) bloating and gas subscores over four weeks of product use. Results Measured against the placebo, subjects in the probiotic group achieved significant improvements in GSRS abdominal pain subscore (p = 0.046) and the GSRS total score (p = 0.048), with a strong trend for improvement on the GSRS abdominal distension subscore (p = 0.061). A strong placebo effect was evident which could explain the lack of statistical significant differences between the groups for many of the efficacy variables. Conclusion In conclusion, the Bacillus coagulans-based product was effective in improving the quality of life and reducing gastrointestinal symptoms in adults with post prandial intestinal gas-related symptoms and no GI diagnoses. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00881322 PMID:19922649

  12. Effects of low-dose oral enoximone administration on mortality, morbidity, and exercise capacity in patients with advanced heart failure: the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group ESSENTIAL trials

    PubMed Central

    Metra, Marco; Eichhorn, Eric; Abraham, William T.; Linseman, Jennifer; Böhm, Michael; Corbalan, Ramon; DeMets, David; De Marco, Teresa; Elkayam, Uri; Gerber, Michael; Komajda, Michel; Liu, Peter; Mareev, Vyacheslev; Perrone, Sergio V.; Poole-Wilson, Philip; Roecker, Ellen; Stewart, Jennifer; Swedberg, Karl; Tendera, Michal; Wiens, Brian; Bristow, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Use of inotropic agents in patients with heart failure (HF) has been limited by adverse effects on outcomes. However, administration of positive inotropes at lower doses and concomitant treatment with beta-blockers might increase benefit–risk ratio. We investigated the effects of low doses of the positive inotrope enoximone on symptoms, exercise capacity, and major clinical outcomes in patients with advanced HF who were also treated with beta-blockers and other guideline-recommended background therapy. Methods and results The Studies of Oral Enoximone Therapy in Advanced HF (ESSENTIAL) programme consisted of two identical, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials that differed only by geographic location (North and South America: ESSENTIAL-I; Europe: ESSENTIAL-II). Patients with New York Heart Association class III–IV HF symptoms, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤30%, and one hospitalization or two ambulatory visits for worsening HF in the previous year were eligible for participation in the trials. The trials had three co-primary endpoints: (i) the composite of time to all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization, analysed in the two ESSENTIAL trials combined; (ii) the 6 month change from baseline in the 6 min walk test distance (6MWTD); and (iii) the Patient Global Assessment (PGA) at 6 months, both analysed in each trial separately. ESSENTIAL-I and -II randomized 1854 subjects at 211 sites in 16 countries. In the combined trials, all-cause mortality and the composite, first co-primary endpoint did not differ between the two treatment groups [hazard ratio (HR) 0.97; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80–1.17; and HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.86–1.12, respectively, for enoximone vs. placebo]. The two other co-primary endpoints were analysed separately in the two ESSENTIAL trials, as prospectively designed in the protocol. The 6MWTD increased with enoximone, compared with placebo, in ESSENTIAL-I (P = 0.025, not reaching, however, the pre

  13. An ex vivo, assessor blind, randomised, parallel group, comparative efficacy trial of the ovicidal activity of three pediculicides after a single application - melaleuca oil and lavender oil, eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil, and a "suffocation" pediculicide

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    group treated with melaleuca oil and lavender oil had an ovicidal efficacy of 44.4% (SD 23%) and the group treated with the "suffocation" pediculicide had an ovicidal efficacy of 68.3% (SD 38%). Conclusion Ovicidal efficacy varied substantially among treatments, from 3.3% to 68.3%. The "suffocation" pediculicide and the melaleuca oil and lavender oil pediculicide (TTO/LO) were significantly more ovicidal than eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil pediculicide (EO/LTTO) (P < 0.0001). Ranking: 1. "Suffocation" pediculicide (68.3% efficacy against eggs); 2. Melaleuca oil and lavender oil (44.4%) pediculicide; 3. Eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil (3.3%) pediculicide. The "suffocation" pediculicide and TTO/LO are also highly efficacious against the crawling-stages. Thus, the "suffocation" pediculicide and TTO/LO should be recommended as first line treatments. Trial Registration The study was listed at the Australian/New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR): reg. no. 12609000884202. PMID:21864348

  14. Multirate flutter suppression system design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Martin C.; Mason, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies will be applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing (also called the PAPA wing). Eventually, the designs will be implemented in hardware and tested on the BACT wing in a wind tunnel. This report describes a project at the University of Washington to design a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing. The objective of the project was two fold. First, to develop a methodology for designing robust multirate compensators, and second, to demonstrate the methodology by applying it to the design of a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing. The contributions of this project are (1) development of an algorithm for synthesizing robust low order multirate control laws (the algorithm is capable of synthesizing a single compensator which stabilizes both the nominal plant and multiple plant perturbations; (2) development of a multirate design methodology, and supporting software, for modeling, analyzing and synthesizing multirate compensators; and (3) design of a multirate flutter suppression system for NASA's BACT wing which satisfies the specified design criteria. This report describes each of these contributions in detail. Section 2.0 discusses our design methodology. Section 3.0 details the results of our multirate flutter suppression system design for the BACT wing. Finally, Section 4.0 presents our conclusions and suggestions for future research. The body of the report focuses primarily on the results. The associated theoretical background appears in the three technical papers that are included as Attachments 1-3. Attachment 4 is a user's manual for the software that is key to our design methodology.

  15. Trunk extensor and flexor strength of long-distance race car drivers and physically active controls.

    PubMed

    Baur, Heiner; Muller, Steffen; Pilz, Frederike; Mayer, Patrizia; Mayer, Frank

    2010-09-01

    Seventy percent of motor sports athletes report low back pain. Information on the physical capacity of race car drivers is limited. The purpose of this study was to compare the maximum trunk extensor and flexor strength of elite race car drivers and physically active controls. Thirteen elite race car drivers and 13 controls were measured in concentric mode for maximal trunk flexion and extension at 60° x s(-1) and 120° x s(-1). Peak torque (mean ± s) at 60° x s(-1) in trunk extension was 283 ± 80 N x m in the drivers and 260 ± 88 N x m in controls (P > 0.05). At 120° x s(-1), drivers produced peak torques of 248 ± 55 N x m compared with 237 ± 74 N x m for controls (P > 0.05). Peak torques in flexion were less than in extension for both groups (60° x s(-1): drivers 181 ± 56 N x m, controls 212 ± 54 N x m, P > 0.05; 120° x s(-1): drivers 191 ± 57 N x m, controls 207 ± 48 N x m, P > 0.05). Individual ratios of flexion to extension forces exhibited ratios of 0.88 (60° x s(-1)) and 0.93 (120° x s(-1)) for controls and 0.66 (60° x s(-1)) and 0.77 (120° x s(-1)) for drivers (60° x s(-1): P > 0.05; 120° x s(-1): P > 0.05). The maximum strength performance capacity of the trunk muscles of elite motor sport athletes competing in long-distance racing did not differ from that of anthropometrically matched and physically active controls.

  16. Relapse Prevention in Major Depressive Disorder: Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Versus an Active Control Condition

    PubMed Central

    Shallcross, Amanda J.; Gross, James J.; Visvanathan, Pallavi D.; Kumar, Niketa; Palfrey, Amy; Ford, Brett Q.; Dimidjian, Sona; Shirk, Stephen; Holm-Denoma, Jill; Goode, Kari M.; Cox, Erica; Chaplin, William; Mauss, Iris B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the comparative effectiveness of Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) versus an active control condition (ACC) for depression relapse prevention, depressive symptom reduction, and improvement in life satisfaction. Method Ninety-two participants in remission from Major Depressive Disorder with residual depressive symptoms were randomized to either an 8-week MBCT or a validated ACC that is structurally equivalent to MBCT and controls for non-specific effects (e.g., interaction with a facilitator, perceived social support, treatment outcome expectations). Both interventions were delivered according to their published manuals. Results Intention-to-treat analyses indicated no differences between MBCT and ACC in depression relapse rates or time to relapse over a 60-week follow-up. Both groups experienced significant and equal reductions in depressive symptoms and improvements in life satisfaction. A significant quadratic interaction (group x time) indicated that the pattern of depressive symptom reduction differed between groups. The ACC experienced immediate symptom reduction post-intervention and then a gradual increase over the 60-week follow-up. The MBCT group experienced a gradual linear symptom reduction. The pattern for life satisfaction was identical but only marginally significant. Conclusions MBCT did not differ from an ACC on rates of depression relapse, symptom reduction, or life satisfaction, suggesting that MBCT is no more effective for preventing depression relapse and reducing depressive symptoms than the active components of the ACC. Differences in trajectory of depressive symptom improvement suggest that the intervention-specific skills acquired may be associated with differential rates of therapeutic benefit. This study demonstrates the importance of comparing psychotherapeutic interventions to active control conditions. PMID:26371618

  17. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities and load reductions are achieved.

  18. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing. Part 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Part 2-Appendices of a study conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities, and load reductions were achieved.

  19. Active control of shocks and sonic boom ground signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagiz, Bedri

    The manipulation of a flow field to obtain a desired change is a much heightened subject. Active flow control has been the subject of the major research areas in fluid mechanics for the past two decades. It offers new solutions for mitigation of shock strength, sonic boom alleviation, drag minimization, reducing blade-vortex interaction noise in helicopters, stall control and the performance maximization of existing designs to meet the increasing requirements of the aircraft industries. Despite the wide variety of the potential applications of active flow control, the majority of studies have been performed at subsonic speeds. The active flow control cases were investigated in transonic speed in this study. Although the active flow control provides significant improvements, the sensibility of aerodynamic performance to design parameters makes it a nontrivial and expensive problem, so the designer has to optimize a number of different parameters. For the purpose of gaining understanding of the active flow control concepts, an automated optimization cycle process was generated. Also, the optimization cycle reduces cost and turnaround time. The mass flow coefficient, location, width and angle were chosen as design parameters to maximize the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft. As the main contribution of this study, a detailed parametric study and optimization process were presented. The second step is to appraise the practicability of weakening the shock wave and thereby reducing the wave drag in transonic flight regime using flow control devices such as two dimensional contour bump, individual jet actuator, and also the hybrid control which includes both control devices together, thereby gaining the desired improvements in aerodynamic performance of the air-vehicle. After this study, to improve the aerodynamic performance, the flow control and shape parameters are optimized separately, combined, and in a serial combination. The remarkable part of all these

  20. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-15

    analysis efforts. CFD solutions were completed and used to generate time-resolved flow data for further analysis to study relevant aeroacoustic...of the noise source continues and is guiding data analysis efforts. CFD solutions were completed and used to generate time-resolved flow data for...Characterization 5 2.2 Exploring Aeroacoustic Source Terms 8 2.2.1 Time-Resolved CFD Data Set for Aeroacoustic Source Analysis ... 9 2.2.2 Computation of

  1. Active Control for Statistically Stationary Turbulent PremixedFlame Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Grcar, J.F.; Lijewski, M.J.

    2005-08-30

    The speed of propagation of a premixed turbulent flame correlates with the intensity of the turbulence encountered by the flame. One consequence of this property is that premixed flames in both laboratory experiments and practical combustors require some type of stabilization mechanism to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. Furthermore, the stabilization introduces additional fluid mechanical complexity into the overall combustion process that can complicate the analysis of fundamental flame properties. To circumvent these difficulties we introduce a feedback control algorithm that allows us to computationally stabilize a turbulent premixed flame in a simple geometric configuration. For the simulations, we specify turbulent inflow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm on methane flames at various equivalence ratios in two dimensions. The simulation data are used to study the local variation in the speed of propagation due to flame surface curvature.

  2. Active Control of Liner Impedance by Varying Perforate Orifice Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuji, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The present work explored the feasibility of controlling the acoustic impedance of a resonant type acoustic liner. This was accomplished by translating one perforate over another of the same porosity creating a totally new perforate that had an intermediate porosity. This type of adjustable perforate created a variable orifice perforate whose orifices were non-circular. The key objective of the present study was to quantify, the degree of attenuation control that can be achieved by applying such a concept to the buried septum in a two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) acoustic liner. An additional objective was to examine the adequacy of the existing impedance models to explain the behavior of the unique orifice shapes that result from the proposed silding perforate concept. Different orifice shapes with equivalent area were also examined to determine if highly non-circular orifices had a significant impact on the impedance.

  3. Active control of an aircraft tail subject to harmonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, M.; Bauomy, H. S.; Amer, Y. A.

    2007-08-01

    Vibration of structures is often an undesirable phenomena and should be avoided or controlled. There are two techniques to control the vibration of a system, that is, active and passive control techniques. In this paper, a negative feedback velocity is applied to a dynamical system, which is represented by two coupled second order nonlinear differential equations having both quadratic and cubic nonlinearties. The system describes the vibration of an aircraft tail. The system is subjected to multi-external excitation forces. The method of multiple time scale perturbation is applied to solve the nonlinear differential equations and obtain approximate solutions up to third order of accuracy. The stability of the system is investigated applying frequency response equations. The effects of the different parameters are studied numerically. Various resonance cases are investigated. A comparison is made with the available published work.

  4. Non-actively controlled double-inverted-pendulum-like dynamics can minimize center of mass acceleration during human quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Morimoto, Hiroki; Kiyono, Ken; Morasso, Pietro; Nomura, Taishin

    2015-08-01

    Multiple joint movements during human quiet standing exhibit characteristic inter-joint coordination, shortly referred to as reciprocal relationship, in which angular acceleration of the hip joint is linearly and negatively correlated with that of the ankle joint (antiphase coordination) and, moreover, acceleration of the center of mass (CoM) of the double-inverted-pendulum (DIP) model of the human body is close to zero constantly. A question considered in this study is whether the reciprocal relationship is established by active neural control of the posture, or rather it is a biomechanical consequence of non-actively controlled body dynamics. To answer this question, we consider a DIP model of quiet standing, and show that the reciprocal relationship always holds by Newton's second law applied to the DIP model with human anthropometric dimensions, regardless of passive and active joint torque patterns acting on the ankle and hip joints. We then show that characteristic frequencies included in experimental sway trajectories with the reciprocal relationship match with harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the stable antiphase eigenmode of the non-actively controlled DIP-like unstable body dynamics. The results suggest that non-actively controlled DIP-like mechanical dynamics is a major cause of the minimization of the CoM acceleration during quiet standing, which is consistent with a type of control strategy that allows switching off active neural control intermittently for suitable periods of time during quiet standing.

  5. Structural and mixing characteristics in actively controlled transverse jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Takeshi; Besnard, Andrea; Harris, Elijah; M'closkey, Robert; Karagozian, Ann; Cortelezzi, Luca

    2016-11-01

    These experiments explore the effect of external excitation on gaseous transverse jet (TJ) structural and mixing characteristics, emphasizing axisymmetric jet forcing. Sinusoidal as well as single and multiple square wave pulses, the latter with variable amplitudes, are explored for a range of jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios J, spanning regimes of absolutely unstable upstream shear layers (J < 10) and convectively unstable shear layers (J > 10). The studies utilize acetone PLIF imaging of the jet, as done for unforced jets. Axisymmetric forcing, irrespective of the waveform, can enhance cross-sectional symmetry of the TJ for convectively unstable conditions, but generally disrupts the usually symmetric counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP) observed for the absolutely unstable TJ. Conditions producing deeply penetrating, periodic vortical structures, such as square wave forcing at critical stroke ratios, increase jet spread, but do not always optimize molecular mixing. Creating multiple vortex structures of different strengths via multiple square pulses leads to enhanced interactions and accelerated vortex breakdown, potentially increasing mixing. Supported by NSF (CBET-1437014) & AFOSR (FA9550-15-1-0261).

  6. Development and demonstration of a flutter-suppression system using active controls. [wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, M. C.; Abel, I.; Gray, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The application of active control technology to suppress flutter was demonstrated successfully in the transonic dynamics tunnel with a delta-wing model. The model was a simplified version of a proposed supersonic transport wing design. An active flutter suppression method based on an aerodynamic energy criterion was verified by using three different control laws. The first two control laws utilized both leading-edge and trailing-edge active control surfaces, whereas the third control law required only a single trailing-edge active control surface. At a Mach number of 0.9 the experimental results demonstrated increases in the flutter dynamic pressure from 12.5 percent to 30 percent with active controls. Analytical methods were developed to predict both open-loop and closed-loop stability, and the results agreed reasonably well with the experimental results.

  7. Selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes in a concise manner three selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems. The three topics are as follows: (1) the active control of helicopter air-resonance using an LQG/LTR approach; (2) simulation of higher harmonic control (HHC) applied to a four bladed hingeless helicopter rotor in forward flight; and (3) vibration suppression in forward flight on a hingeless helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap, which is mounted on the blade. Only a few selected illustrative results are presented. The results obtained clearly indicate that the partial span, actively controlled flap has considerable potential for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors.

  8. The W. M. Keck Telescope segmented primary mirror active control system

    SciTech Connect

    Jared, R.C.; Arthur, A.A.; Andreae, S.; Biocca, A.; Cohen, R.W.; Fuertes, J.M.; Franck, J.; Gabor, G.; Llacer, J.; Mast, T.; Meng, J.; Merrick, T.; Minor, R.; Nelson, J.; Orayani, M.; Salz, P.; Schaefer, B.; Witebsky, C.

    1989-07-01

    The ten meter diameter primary mirror of the W. M. Keck Telescope is a mosaic of thirty-six hexagonal mirrors. An active control system stabilizes the primary mirror. The active control system uses 168 measurements of the relative positions of adjacent mirror segments and 3 measurements of the primary mirror position in the telescope structure to control the 108 degrees of freedom needed to stabilize the figure and position of the primary mirror. The components of the active control system are relative position sensors, electronics, computers, actuators that position the mirrors, and software. The software algorithms control the primary mirror, perform star image stacking, emulate the segments, store and fit calibration data, and locate hardware defects. We give an overview of the active control system, its functional requirements and test measurements. 12 refs.

  9. Research on elastic large space structures as "plants' for active control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.; Vonflotow, A.

    1983-01-01

    Research on active control of large space structures is discussed. Intrinsic damping in monolithic metallic structures is discussed. Thermal relaxation and grain boundary relaxation are discussed, as are properties of thermal damping.

  10. Active control of panel vibrations induced by boundary-layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1991-01-01

    Some problems in active control of panel vibration excited by a boundary layer flow over a flat plate are studied. In the first phase of the study, the optimal control problem of vibrating elastic panel induced by a fluid dynamical loading was studied. For a simply supported rectangular plate, the vibration control problem can be analyzed by a modal analysis. The control objective is to minimize the total cost functional, which is the sum of a vibrational energy and the control cost. By means of the modal expansion, the dynamical equation for the plate and the cost functional are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations and the cost functions for the modes. For the linear elastic plate, the modes become uncoupled. The control of each modal amplitude reduces to the so-called linear regulator problem in control theory. Such problems can then be solved by the method of adjoint state. The optimality system of equations was solved numerically by a shooting method. The results are summarized.

  11. Active control of all-fibre graphene devices with electrical gating

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Park, Nam Hun; Yim, Woongbin; Kim, Mi Hye; Park, Jae-Ku; Son, Suyeon; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Kwanil; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2015-01-01

    Active manipulation of light in optical fibres has been extensively studied with great interest because of its compatibility with diverse fibre-optic systems. While graphene exhibits a strong electro-optic effect originating from its gapless Dirac-fermionic band structure, electric control of all-fibre graphene devices remains still highly challenging. Here we report electrically manipulable in-line graphene devices by integrating graphene-based field effect transistors on a side-polished fibre. Ion liquid used in the present work critically acts both as an efficient gating medium with wide electrochemical windows and transparent over-cladding facilitating light–matter interaction. Combined study of unique features in gate-variable electrical transport and optical transition at monolayer and randomly stacked multilayer graphene reveals that the device exhibits significant optical transmission change (>90%) with high efficiency-loss figure of merit. This subsequently modifies nonlinear saturable absorption characteristics of the device, enabling electrically tunable fibre laser at various operational regimes. The proposed device will open promising way for actively controlled optoelectronic and nonlinear photonic devices in all-fibre platform with greatly enhanced graphene–light interaction. PMID:25897687

  12. Active control of all-fibre graphene devices with electrical gating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Park, Nam Hun; Yim, Woongbin; Kim, Mi Hye; Park, Jae-Ku; Son, Suyeon; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Kwanil; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2015-04-21

    Active manipulation of light in optical fibres has been extensively studied with great interest because of its compatibility with diverse fibre-optic systems. While graphene exhibits a strong electro-optic effect originating from its gapless Dirac-fermionic band structure, electric control of all-fibre graphene devices remains still highly challenging. Here we report electrically manipulable in-line graphene devices by integrating graphene-based field effect transistors on a side-polished fibre. Ion liquid used in the present work critically acts both as an efficient gating medium with wide electrochemical windows and transparent over-cladding facilitating light-matter interaction. Combined study of unique features in gate-variable electrical transport and optical transition at monolayer and randomly stacked multilayer graphene reveals that the device exhibits significant optical transmission change (>90%) with high efficiency-loss figure of merit. This subsequently modifies nonlinear saturable absorption characteristics of the device, enabling electrically tunable fibre laser at various operational regimes. The proposed device will open promising way for actively controlled optoelectronic and nonlinear photonic devices in all-fibre platform with greatly enhanced graphene-light interaction.

  13. Fire ants actively control spacing and orientation within self-assemblages.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul C; Mlot, Nathan J; Lin, Angela; Hu, David L

    2014-06-15

    To overcome obstacles and survive harsh environments, fire ants link their bodies together to form self-assemblages such as rafts, bridges and bivouacs. Such structures are examples of self-assembling and self-healing materials, as ants can quickly create and break links with one another in response to changes in their environment. Because ants are opaque, the arrangement of the ants within these three-dimensional networks was previously unknown. In this experimental study, we applied micro-scale computed tomography, or micro-CT, to visualize the connectivity, arrangement and orientation of ants within an assemblage. We identified active and geometric mechanisms that ants use to obtain favorable packing properties with respect to well-studied packing of inert objects such as cylinders. Ants use their legs to push against their neighbors, doubling their spacing relative to random packing of cylinders. These legs also permit active control of their orientation, an ability ants use to arrange themselves perpendicularly rather than in parallel. Lastly, we found an important role of ant polymorphism in promoting self-aggregation: a large distribution of ant sizes permits small ants to fit between the legs of larger ants, a phenomenon that increases the number of average connections per ant. These combined mechanisms lead to low packing fraction and high connectivity, which increase raft buoyancy and strength during flash floods.

  14. Semi-active control of helicopter vibration using controllable stiffness and damping devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    Semi-active concepts for helicopter vibration reduction are developed and evaluated in this dissertation. Semi-active devices, controllable stiffness devices or controllable orifice dampers, are introduced; (i) in the blade root region (rotor-based concept) and (ii) between the rotor and the fuselage as semi-active isolators (in the non-rotating frame). Corresponding semi-active controllers for helicopter vibration reduction are also developed. The effectiveness of the rotor-based semi-active vibration reduction concept (using stiffness and damping variation) is demonstrated for a 4-bladed hingeless rotor helicopter in moderate- to high-speed forward flight. A sensitivity study shows that the stiffness variation of root element can reduce hub vibrations when proper amplitude and phase are used. Furthermore, the optimal semi-active control scheme can determine the combination of stiffness variations that produce significant vibration reduction in all components of vibratory hub loads simultaneously. It is demonstrated that desired cyclic variations in properties of the blade root region can be practically achieved using discrete controllable stiffness devices and controllable dampers, especially in the flap and lag directions. These discrete controllable devices can produce 35--50% reduction in a composite vibration index representing all components of vibratory hub loads. No detrimental increases are observed in the lower harmonics of blade loads and blade response (which contribute to the dynamic stresses) and controllable device internal loads, when the optimal stiffness and damping variations are introduced. The effectiveness of optimal stiffness and damping variations in reducing hub vibration is retained over a range of cruise speeds and for variations in fundamental rotor properties. The effectiveness of the semi-active isolator is demonstrated for a simplified single degree of freedom system representing the semi-active isolation system. The rotor

  15. Experimental testing of a semi-active control scheme for vibration suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniwangsa, Wendy; Kelly, James M.

    1997-05-01

    An experimental investigation was performed on a semi-active control scheme that uses the rheological properties of electro-rheological fluids (ER-fluids) in squeeze-flow mode to control the dynamic behavior of single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems. The reversible and very rapid changes in the mechanical properties of the fluid under variable voltage are exploited by using a control scheme that automatically turns 'on' and 'off' the electrical field as loads are applied. This control scheme rapidly adapts to any changes in the mechanical properties of the system, reducing the response of the structure for a wide range of excitation frequencies. The ER- fluid used in this study, Zeolite in silicone oil, was subjected to an electrical field range from one to five kV/mm. Tests were carried out for the 'off' system, the 'on' system, and the controlled system, and the experimental and analytical results were compared. The experimental results show that this control scheme is effective for reducing the vibration of the system. Other types of ER-fluid should be tested using this control scheme to investigate the most effective fluid for vibration suppression.

  16. Effect of in-structure damping uncertainty on semi-active control performance: a modeling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthanpurayil, Arun M.; Reynolds, Paul; Nyawako, Donald

    2013-04-01

    The mathematical model of a vibrating structure includes mass, damping and stiffness; out of which mass and stiffness could be defined as a function of the system geometry, whereas damping is more of an observed phenomenon. Despite having a large literature on the subject, the underlying physics is only known in a phenomenological ad-hoc manner, making damping an overall mystery in the general dynamic analysis of structures. A major reason of this could be the fact that there is no single universally accepted model for damping. Common practice is to use the classical viscous damping model originated by Rayleigh, through his famous `Rayleigh dissipation function', with a preconceived damping ratio, irrespective of the purpose or type of analysis involved. This paper investigates the effect of this modelling uncertainty on the analytical prediction of the required control force in a semi-active control application for civil structures. Global classical Rayleigh damping models and global non-viscous damping models are used in the present study. Responses of a laboratory slab strip are simulated and are compared with experimental responses. The comparisons emphasises the fact that the choice of in-structure damping models has a significant effect in the computation of the required control force. The comparison also clearly indicates that mathematically sophisticated models have better prediction capability as compared to the classical Rayleigh model.

  17. Active control of high-frequency vibration: Optimisation using the hybrid modelling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthalif, Asan G. A.; Langley, Robin S.

    2012-06-01

    This work presents active control of high-frequency vibration using skyhook dampers. The choice of the damper gain and its optimal location is crucial for the effective implementation of active vibration control. In vibration control, certain sensor/actuator locations are preferable for reducing structural vibration while using minimum control effort. In order to perform optimisation on a general built-up structure to control vibration, it is necessary to have a good modelling technique to predict the performance of the controller. The present work exploits the hybrid modelling approach, which combines the finite element method (FEM) and statistical energy analysis (SEA) to provide efficient response predictions at medium to high frequencies. The hybrid method is implemented here for a general network of plates, coupled via springs, to allow study of a variety of generic control design problems. By combining the hybrid method with numerical optimisation using a genetic algorithm, optimal skyhook damper gains and locations are obtained. The optimal controller gain and location found from the hybrid method are compared with results from a deterministic modelling method. Good agreement between the results is observed, whereas results from the hybrid method are found in a significantly reduced amount of time.

  18. A modal H∞-norm-based performance requirement for damage-tolerant active controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genari, Helói F. G.; Mechbal, Nazih; Coffignal, Gérard; Nóbrega, Eurípedes G. O.

    2017-04-01

    Damage-tolerant active control (DTAC) is a recent research area that encompasses control design methodologies resulting from the application of fault-tolerant control methods to vibration control of structures subject to damage. The possibility of damage occurrence is not usually considered in the active vibration control design requirements. Damage changes the structure dynamics, which may produce unexpected modal behavior of the closed-loop system, usually not anticipated by the controller design approaches. A modal H∞ norm and a respective robust controller design framework were recently introduced, and this method is here extended to face a new DTAC strategy implementation. Considering that damage affects each vibration mode differently, this paper adopts the modal H∞ norm to include damage as a design requirement. The basic idea is to create an appropriate energy distribution over the frequency range of interest and respective vibration modes, guaranteeing robustness, damage tolerance, and adequate overall performance, taking into account that it is common to have previous knowledge of the structure regions where damage may occur during its operational life. For this purpose, a structural health monitoring technique is applied to evaluate modal modifications caused by damage. This information is used to create modal weighing matrices, conducting to the modal H∞ controller design. Finite element models are adopted for a case study structure, including different damage severities, in order to validate the proposed control strategy. Results show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology with respect to damage tolerance.

  19. In-flight simulation of high agility through active control: Taming complexity by design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padfield, Gareth D.; Bradley, Roy

    1993-01-01

    The motivation for research into helicopter agility stems from the realization that marked improvements relative to current operational types are possible, yet there is a dearth of useful criteria for flying qualities at high performance levels. Several research laboratories are currently investing resources in developing second generation airborne rotorcraft simulators. The UK's focus has been the exploitation of agility through active control technology (ACT); this paper reviews the results of studies conducted to date. The conflict between safety and performance in flight research is highlighted and the various forms of safety net to protect against system failures are described. The role of the safety pilot, and the use of actuator and flight envelope limiting are discussed. It is argued that the deep complexity of a research ACT system can only be tamed through a requirement specification assembled using design principles and cast in an operational simulation form. Work along these lines conducted at DRA is described, including the use of the Jackson System Development method and associated Ada simulation.

  20. Overall design of actively controlled smart structures by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbert, Ulrich; Koeppe, Heinz; Seeger, Falko

    2001-08-01

    The design process of engineering smart structures requires a virtual overall model, which includes the main functional parts such as the passive structure, the actuators and sensors as well as the control algorithm. The objective of the paper is to pre-sent such a design concept for vibration suppression of thin-walled shell structures controlled by piezoelectric wafers and fi-bers. This concept is based on a recently developed finite element package for the simulation of multi-physics problems. At first a rough design of actuator and sensor distributions is estimated which is based on the controllability and observabilty indices. Then the Matlab/Simulink software tool is used for controller design. From the finite element model all required data and information are transferred to Matlab/Simulink via a data exchange interface. After having designed the controller the result in form of the controller matrices or as C-codes can be transferred back into the finite element simulation package. Within the finite element code the controlled structural behavior can be studied under different disturbances. The structural design can be improved in an iterative way, e.g. by changing the actuator and sensor positions based on a sensitivity analy-sis. As an example an actively controlled smart plate structure is designed and tested to demonstrate the proposed procedure.

  1. Control strategies and mechanisms for active control of sound transmission into a vibro-acoustic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guoyong; Feng, Na; Yang, Tiejun

    2011-06-01

    An analytical study was presented on active control of sound transmission into a vibro-acoustic enclosure comprising two flexible plates. Two types of actuators were used, i.e. acoustic actuator and distributed lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric (PZT) actuator instead of point force actuator. Using the modal acoustic transfer impedance-mobility matrices, the excitation and interaction in the coupled sound transmission system can be described with clear physical significance. With the control system designed to globally reduce the sound field, different control system configurations were considered, including the structural actuator on the incident plate, actuator on the receiving plate, acoustic actuator on the cavity, and their combinations. The effectiveness and performance of the control strategy corresponding to each system configuration were compared and discussed. The role and control mechanism of each type of actuator were of particular interest. It was shown that the incident plate actuator is effective in controlling the cavity-dominated modes and the structural modes dominated by the incident plate and receiving plate. Two main control mechanisms are involved in this control configuration, i.e., modal suppressing and modal rearrangement. For control system configuration with only acoustic actuator in the enclosure, the mechanism involved in this arrangement is purely modal suppression. Desirable placements of structural actuators in terms of total potential energy reduction were also discussed.

  2. Improved training of neural networks for the nonlinear active control of sound and vibration.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, M; Paillard, B; Le Dinh, C T

    1999-01-01

    Active control of sound and vibration has been the subject of a lot of research in recent years, and examples of applications are now numerous. However, few practical implementations of nonlinear active controllers have been realized. Nonlinear active controllers may be required in cases where the actuators used in active control systems exhibit nonlinear characteristics, or in cases when the structure to be controlled exhibits a nonlinear behavior. A multilayer perceptron neural-network based control structure was previously introduced as a nonlinear active controller, with a training algorithm based on an extended backpropagation scheme. This paper introduces new heuristical training algorithms for the same neural-network control structure. The objective is to develop new algorithms with faster convergence speed (by using nonlinear recursive-least-squares algorithms) and/or lower computational loads (by using an alternative approach to compute the instantaneous gradient of the cost function). Experimental results of active sound control using a nonlinear actuator with linear and nonlinear controllers are presented. The results show that some of the new algorithms can greatly improve the learning rate of the neural-network control structure, and that for the considered experimental setup a neural-network controller can outperform linear controllers.

  3. Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar Boundary-Layer Flow. Part 2; Use of Sensors and Spectral Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Nicolaides, R. A.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff; Gunzburger, Max D.

    1994-01-01

    This study focuses on the suppression of instability growth using an automated active-control technique. The evolution of 2D disturbances that are spatially growing in a flat-plate boundary layer are computed with a spatial DNS code. A controller receives wall sensor information (pressure or shear) as input and provides a signal that controls an actuator response as output. The control law assumes that wave cancellation is valid. The results indicate that a measure of wave cancellation can be obtained for small- and large-amplitude instabilities without feedback; however, feedback is required to optimize the control amplitude and phase for exact wave cancellation.

  4. Extremal harmonic active control of power for a monocylinder hybrid powertrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Jean-Philippe; Micheau, Philippe; Cauet, Sébastien; Coirault, Patrick; Martin, Pascal

    2011-11-01

    This article presents a real-life application for the extremal harmonic active control of power [1] applied on a hybrid engine setup. The active control was adapted for a hybrid powertrain constituted of a one-cylinder diesel engine coupled with a permanent magnet synchronous machine. The problem was formulated in the harmonic domain and the control objective was to extremalize energetic criterions. Three criterions were considered: minimizing the speed ripple of the engine, maximizing the mechanical reactive power (mechanical impedance adaptation) and maximizing the active electric power for energy harvesting. The results show that, for the first and second orders of the ripple, speed oscillations can be completely cancelled and reactive power and active power can be optimized on-line. The implicit extremal controller converged rapidly, remaining stable even when the mean engine speed changed abruptly. These results confirm the robustness and the applicability of the extremal harmonic active control for industrial applications.

  5. Current and Future Research in Active Control of Lightweight, Flexible Structures Using the X-56 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, John J.; Bosworth, John T.; Burken, John J.; Suh, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    The X-56 Multi-Utility Technology Testbed aircraft system is a versatile experimental research flight platform. The system was primarily designed to investigate active control of lightweight flexible structures, but is reconfigurable and capable of hosting a wide breadth of research. Current research includes flight experimentation of a Lockheed Martin designed active control flutter suppression system. Future research plans continue experimentation with alternative control systems, explore the use of novel sensor systems, and experiments with the use of novel control effectors. This paper describes the aircraft system, current research efforts designed around the system, and future planned research efforts that will be hosted on the aircraft system.

  6. Synthesis of active controls for flutter suppression on a flight research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Perry, B., III; Murrow, H. N.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes some activities associated with the preliminary design of an active control system for flutter suppression capable of demonstrating a 20% increase in flutter velocity. Results from two control system synthesis techniques are given. One technique uses classical control theory, and the other uses an 'aerodynamic energy method' where control surface rates or displacements are minimized. Analytical methods used to synthesize the control systems and evaluate their performance are described. Some aspects of a program for flight testing the active control system are also given. This program, called DAST (Drones for Aerodynamics and Structural Testing), employs modified drone-type vehicles for flight assessments and validation testing.

  7. Development of weight and cost estimates for lifting surfaces with active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. D.; Flora, C. C.; Nelson, R. M.; Raymond, E. T.; Vincent, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Equations and methodology were developed for estimating the weight and cost incrementals due to active controls added to the wing and horizontal tail of a subsonic transport airplane. The methods are sufficiently generalized to be suitable for preliminary design. Supporting methodology and input specifications for the weight and cost equations are provided. The weight and cost equations are structured to be flexible in terms of the active control technology (ACT) flight control system specification. In order to present a self-contained package, methodology is also presented for generating ACT flight control system characteristics for the weight and cost equations. Use of the methodology is illustrated.

  8. Active Control of Panel Vibrations Induced by a Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, active and passive control of sound and vibration in aeroelastic structures have received a great deal of attention due to many potential applications to aerospace and other industries. There exists a great deal of research work done in this area. Recent advances in the control of sound and vibration can be found in the several conference proceedings. In this report we will summarize our research findings supported by the NASA grant NAG-1-1175. The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to study the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. The vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings will be presented in the next three sections. In Section II we shall describe our results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Section III is concerned with active control of the vibration and sound radiation from a nonlinear elastic panel. A detailed description of our work on the parametric vibrational control of nonlinear elastic panel will be presented in Section IV. This paper will be submitted to the Journal

  9. Contamination by an Active Control Condition in a Randomized Exercise Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Arthur F.; McAuley, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Contamination is commonly overlooked in randomized trials. The present study examined contamination (minutes of aerobic activity outside of exercise sessions) within an active control condition in a 6-month randomized exercise trial for older adults. We hypothesized that outside aerobic activity would be greater in the control condition compared to the intervention conditions. Participants (mean age = 65.06 years, 66.2% female) were randomly assigned to: Dance (n = 50), Walking, (n = 108), or Strength/Stretching/Stability (SSS; n = 48). Dance and Walking represented the experimental conditions and SSS the control condition. Participants attended exercise sessions three times weekly for 24 weeks. Participants recorded their physical activity outside of class on a weekly home log. Group assignment and covariates (age, gender, body mass index, exercise session intensity and enjoyment, and program adherence) were examined as predictors of weekly aerobic activity outside of exercise sessions. Participants who returned zero home logs were removed from the dataset (final N = 195). Out-of-class aerobic activity was lowest in the Walking group. Significant effects of gender, group, enjoyment, and intensity on out-of-class weekly aerobic activity were observed, all p<0.003. Higher perceived enjoyment of exercise sessions was associated with more out-of-class aerobic activity, while higher perceived intensity was associated with less out-of-class aerobic activity. A group x intensity interaction, p = 0.002, indicated that group differences in out-of-class aerobic activity were evident only among those with lower intensity perceptions. Walkers may have perceived exercise sessions as sufficient weekly exercise, while the Dance and SSS groups may have perceived the sessions as necessary, but insufficient. The lower aerobic intensity Dancers attributed to exercise sessions and non-aerobic nature of SSS may partially explain contamination observed in this study. Further

  10. Cyclic modulation of semi-active controllable dampers for tonal vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, P.; Gandhi, F.

    2004-08-01

    The present study examines the potential of using a semi-active controllable damper, whose damping coefficient can be modulated in real time, for tonal vibration isolation applications. A frequency-domain control algorithm is developed for determining the damping coefficient variation (at twice the disturbance frequency) that minimizes the force transmitted to the support at the disturbance frequency. The effectiveness of open-loop, closed-loop, and adaptive controllers in rejecting the transmitted disturbances are evaluated. The results of the study indicate that when limits in damping coefficient variation are considered, the support force could be reduced by about an additional 30%, beyond the levels due to the passive isolation characteristics (no cyclic damping modulation). When the disturbance phase changes during operation, the effectiveness of the open-loop controller is rapidly degraded. While the closed-loop controller (with inputs based on current levels of force transmitted to the support) performed better, there was still some degradation in performance, and transmitted support forces were not reduced to levels prior to the change in disturbance phase. The results show that for the semi-active system to retain its effectiveness in rejecting disturbances, a closed-loop, adaptive controller (with on-line system identification) is required; even when there is only a change in disturbance, and no change in basic system properties. An explanation for this phenomenon, related to the bi-linear nature of the semi-active system, is provided. Cyclic modulations in the damping coefficient were more effective in reducing the transmitted forces at the disturbance frequency than simply reducing the baseline damping coefficient (to improve the passive isolation characteristics).

  11. Active control of spectral detail radiated by an air-loaded impacted membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollow, J. Douglas, IV

    An active control system is developed to independently operate on the vibration of individual modes of an air-loaded drum head, resulting in changes in the acoustic field radiated from the structure. The timbre of the system is investigated, and techniques for changing the characteristic frequencies by means of the control system are proposed. A feedforward control system is constructed for empirical investigation of this approach, creating a musical instrument which can produce a variety of sounds not available with strictly mechanical systems. The work is motivated by applications for actively controlled structures, active control of sound quality, and musical acoustics. The instrument consists of a Mylar timpano head stretched over an enclosure which has been outfitted with electroacoustic drivers. Sensors are arranged on the surface of the drum head and combined to measure modal vibration, and the array of drivers allows independent control of these modes. A signal processor is used to form modal control filters which can modify the loading of each mode, changing the time-dependent and spectral characteristics, and therefore the timbre, of the radiated sound. A theoretical formulation of active control of structural vibration by means of fluid-coupled actuators is expressed, and computational solutions show the effects of fluid loading and the radiated field. Experimental results with the new instrument are shown, with implementations of the control system providing a demonstrated degree of control, and illustrating several limitations of such systems.

  12. Improvements to the FATOLA computer program including added actively controlled landing gear subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Modifications to a multi-degree-of-freedom flexible aircraft take-off and landing analysis (FATOLA) computer program, including a provision for actively controlled landing gears to expand the programs simulation capabilities, are presented. Supplemental instructions for preparation of data and for use of the modified program are included.

  13. Synchronization of Rossler and Chen chaotic dynamical systems using active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agiza, H. N.; Yassen, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    This Letter presents chaos synchronization of two identical Rossler and Chen systems by using active control. The proposed technique is applied to achieve chaos synchronization for the Rossler and Chen dynamical systems. We demonstrate that a coupled Rossler and Chen systems can be synchronized. Numerical simulations are used to show the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  14. An electronic control for an electrohydraulic active control landing gear for the F-4 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.

    1982-01-01

    A controller for an electrohydraulic active control landing gear was developed for the F-4 aircraft. A controller was modified for this application. Simulation results indicate that during landing and rollout over repaired bomb craters the active gear effects a force reduction, relative to the passive gear, or approximately 70%.

  15. Improvement of helicopter attitude stability by active control of the conventional swash plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Norman D.

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report on improvement of helicopter attitude stability by active control of the conventional swash plate covering the period from Nov. 1986 to Dec. 1993 is presented. A paper on the history, principles, and applications of helicopter individual-blade-control is included.

  16. Active controls for flutter suppression and gust alleviation in supersonic aircraft. [YF-17 flutter model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of work done on active controls on the modified YF-17 flutter model are summarized. The basic derivation of a suitable control law is discussed. It is shown that discrepencies found between analysis and wind tunnel tests originate from the lack of proper implementation of the desired control law. Program capabilities are described.

  17. Handling qualities of a wide-body transport airplane utilizing Pitch Active Control Systems (PACS) for relaxed static stability application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, William D.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Brown, Philip W.; Becker, Lawrence E.; Hunt, George E.; Rising, J. J.; Davis, W. J.; Willey, C. S.; Weaver, W. A.; Cokeley, R.

    1985-01-01

    Piloted simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of two pitch active control systems (PACS) on the flying qualities of a wide-body transport airplane when operating at negative static margins. These two pitch active control systems consisted of a simple 'near-term' PACS and a more complex 'advanced' PACS. Eight different flight conditions, representing the entire flight envelope, were evaluated with emphasis on the cruise flight conditions. These studies were made utilizing the Langley Visual/Motion Simulator (VMS) which has six degrees of freedom. The simulation tests indicated that (1) the flying qualities of the baseline aircraft (PACS off) for the cruise and other high-speed flight conditions were unacceptable at center-of-gravity positions aft of the neutral static stability point; (2) within the linear static stability flight envelope, the near-term PACS provided acceptable flying qualities for static stabilty margins to -3 percent; and (3) with the advanced PACS operative, the flying qualities were demonstrated to be good (satisfactory to very acceptable) for static stabilty margins to -20 percent.

  18. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an actively controlled partial span trailing edge flap located on the blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes an analytical study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap located on the blade. The vibration reduction produced by the actively controlled flap (ACF) is compared with that obtained using individual blade control (IBC), in which the entire blade is oscillated in pitch. For both cases a deterministic feedback controller is implemented to reduce the 4/rev hub loads. For all cases considered, the ACF produced vibration reduction comparable with that obtained using IBC, but consumed only 10-30% of the power required to implement IBC. A careful parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of blade torsional stiffness, spanwise location of the control flap, and hinge moment correction on the vibration reduction characteristics of the ACF. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach to vibration reduction. It should be emphasized than the ACF, used together with a conventional swashplate, is completely decoupled from the primary flight control system and thus it has no influence on the airworthiness of the helicopter. This attribute is potentially a significant advantage when compared to IBC.

  19. Active Control of Pressure Fluctuations due to Flow Over Helmholtz Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KOOK, H.; MONGEAU, L.; FRANCHEK, M. A.

    2002-08-01

    Grazing flows over Helmholtz resonators may result in self-sustained flow oscillations at the Helmholtz acoustic resonance frequency of the cavity system. The associated pressure fluctuations may be undesirable. Many solutions have been proposed to solve this problem including, for example, leading edge spoilers, trailing edge deflectors, and leading edge flow diffusers. Most of these control devices are “passive”, i.e., they do not involve dynamic control systems. Active control methods, which do require dynamic controls, have been implemented with success for different cases of flow instabilities. Previous investigations of the control of flow-excited cavity resonance have used mainly one or more loudspeakers located within the cavity wall. In the present study, oscillated spoilers hinged near the leading edge of the cavity orifice were used. Experiments were performed using a cavity installed within the test section wall of a wind tunnel. A microphone located within the cavity was used as the feedback sensor. A loop shaping feedback control design methodology was used in order to ensure robust controller performance over varying flow conditions. Cavity pressure level attenuation of up to 20dB was achieved around the critical velocity (i.e., the velocity for which the fundamental excitation frequency matches the Helmholtz resonance frequency of the cavity), relative to the level in the presence of the spoiler held stationary. The required actuation effort was small. The spoiler peak displacement was typically only 4% of the mean spoiler angle (approximately 1‧). The control scheme was found to provide robust performance for transient operating conditions. Oscillated leading edge spoilers offer potential advantages over loudspeakers for cavity resonance control, including a reduced encumbrance (especially for low-frequency applications), and a reduced actuation effort.

  20. Active control of acoustic field-of-view in a biosonar system.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Yossi; Falk, Ben; Moss, Cynthia F; Ulanovsky, Nachum

    2011-09-01

    Active-sensing systems abound in nature, but little is known about systematic strategies that are used by these systems to scan the environment. Here, we addressed this question by studying echolocating bats, animals that have the ability to point their biosonar beam to a confined region of space. We trained Egyptian fruit bats to land on a target, under conditions of varying levels of environmental complexity, and measured their echolocation and flight behavior. The bats modulated the intensity of their biosonar emissions, and the spatial region they sampled, in a task-dependant manner. We report here that Egyptian fruit bats selectively change the emission intensity and the angle between the beam axes of sequentially emitted clicks, according to the distance to the target, and depending on the level of environmental complexity. In so doing, they effectively adjusted the spatial sector sampled by a pair of clicks-the "field-of-view." We suggest that the exact point within the beam that is directed towards an object (e.g., the beam's peak, maximal slope, etc.) is influenced by three competing task demands: detection, localization, and angular scanning-where the third factor is modulated by field-of-view. Our results suggest that lingual echolocation (based on tongue clicks) is in fact much more sophisticated than previously believed. They also reveal a new parameter under active control in animal sonar-the angle between consecutive beams. Our findings suggest that acoustic scanning of space by mammals is highly flexible and modulated much more selectively than previously recognized.

  1. Active Control of Cell Size Generates Spatial Detail during Plant Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Mislata, Antonio; Schiessl, Katharina; Sablowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary How cells regulate their dimensions is a long-standing question [1, 2]. In fission and budding yeast, cell-cycle progression depends on cell size, although it is still unclear how size is assessed [3, 4, 5]. In animals, it has been suggested that cell size is modulated primarily by the balance of external signals controlling growth and the cell cycle [1], although there is evidence of cell-autonomous control in cell cultures [6, 7, 8, 9]. Regardless of whether regulation is external or cell autonomous, the role of cell-size control in the development of multicellular organisms remains unclear. Plants are a convenient system to study this question: the shoot meristem, which continuously provides new cells to form new organs, maintains a population of actively dividing and characteristically small cells for extended periods [10]. Here, we used live imaging and quantitative, 4D image analysis to measure the sources of cell-size variability in the meristem and then used these measurements in computer simulations to show that the uniform cell sizes seen in the meristem likely require coordinated control of cell growth and cell cycle in individual cells. A genetically induced transient increase in cell size was quickly corrected by more frequent cell division, showing that the cell cycle was adjusted to maintain cell-size homeostasis. Genetically altered cell sizes had little effect on tissue growth but perturbed the establishment of organ boundaries and the emergence of organ primordia. We conclude that meristem cells actively control their sizes to achieve the resolution required to pattern small-scale structures. PMID:26526374

  2. Safety and efficacy of the cathepsin K inhibitor ONO-5334 in postmenopausal osteoporosis: the OCEAN study.

    PubMed

    Eastell, Richard; Nagase, Shinichi; Ohyama, Michiyo; Small, Maria; Sawyer, James; Boonen, Steven; Spector, Tim; Kuwayama, Tomohiro; Deacon, Steve

    2011-06-01

    Osteoporosis occurs when there is an imbalance between resorption and formation of bone, with resorption predominating. Inhibitors of cathepsin K may rebalance this condition. This is the first efficacy study of a new cathepsin K inhibitor, ONO-5334. The objective of the study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of ONO-5334 in postmenopausal osteoporosis. This was a 12-month, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled parallel-group study conducted in 13 centers in 6 European countries. Subjects included 285 postmenopausal women aged 55 to 75 years with osteoporosis. Subjects were randomized into one of five treatment arms: placebo; 50 mg twice daily, 100 mg once daily, or 300 mg once daily of ONO-5334; or alendronate 70 mg once weekly. Lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck BMD values were obtained along with biochemical markers of bone turnover and standard safety assessments. All ONO-5334 doses and alendronate showed a significant increase in BMD for lumbar spine, total hip (except 100 mg once daily), and femoral neck BMD. There was little or no suppression of ONO-5334 on bone-formation markers compared with alendronate, although the suppressive effects on bone-resorption markers were similar. There were no clinically relevant safety concerns. With a significant increase in BMD, ONO-5334 also demonstrated a new mode of action as a potential agent for treating osteoporosis. Further clinical studies are warranted to investigate long-term efficacy as well as safety of ONO-5334.

  3. Low-frequency absorption using a two-layer system with active control of input impedance.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Pedro; Fernández, Alejandro; Doutres, Olivier

    2003-12-01

    Broadband noise absorption, including low frequencies, may be obtained by a hybrid passive-active two-layer system. A porous layer in front of an air layer provides passive absorption, at medium and high frequencies. Active control of the input impedance of the two-layer system yields absorption at low frequencies. The active control system can implement either pressure-release or impedance-matching conditions. A simple analytical model based upon plane waves propagating in a tube permits the comparison of both control strategies. The results of this simple model show that the pressure-release condition affords higher absorption than the impedance-matching condition for some combinations of geometrical and material parameters. Experimental results corroborate the good performance of the pressure-release condition under the prescribed geometrical setup.

  4. Effect of a fluid layer on the sound radiation of a plate and its active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Pan, Jie; Yang, Tiejun

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a baffled plate facing a layer of fluid is used to investigate the effects of the radiating environment on the plate's sound radiation and its active control. By varying the thickness of the fluid layer, different radiation environments are presented to the plate, resulting in a variation in the efficiencies and shapes of the radiation modes of the plate. As the design of feed-forward control of the radiated sound power and of feedback control of the vibration velocity or volume velocity is limited by the properties of the secondary control path (an open-loop frequency response function), the performance of the control system may be deteriorated if a controller optimally designed for one radiation environment is used for a different environment. The effects of radiation environment on the properties of the secondary control path and performance of active control are investigated.

  5. ACFA 2020 - An FP7 project on active control of flexible fuel efficient aircraft configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, R.

    2013-12-01

    This paper gives an overview about the project ACFA 2020 which is funded by the European Commission within the 7th framework program. The acronym ACFA 2020 stands for Active Control for Flexible Aircraft 2020. The project is dealing with the design of highly fuel efficient aircraft configurations and, in particular, on innovative active control concepts with the goal to reduce loads and structural weight. Major focus lays on blended wing body (BWB) aircraft. Blended wing body type aircraft configurations are seen as the most promising future concept to fulfill the so-called ACARE (Advisory Council for Aeronautics Research in Europe) vision 2020 goals in regards to reduce fuel consumption and external noise. The paper discusses in some detail the overall goals and how they are addressed in the workplan. Furthermore, the major achievements of the project are outlined and a short outlook on the remaining work is given.

  6. A high accuracy sequential solver for simulation and active control of a longitudinal combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, W.; Thakur, S.; Udaykumar, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    A high accuracy convection scheme using a sequential solution technique has been developed and applied to simulate the longitudinal combustion instability and its active control. The scheme has been devised in the spirit of the Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) concept with special source term treatment. Due to the substantial heat release effect, a clear delineation of the key elements employed by the scheme, i.e., the adjustable damping factor and the source term treatment has been made. By comparing with the first-order upwind scheme previously utilized, the present results exhibit less damping and are free from spurious oscillations, offering improved quantitative accuracy while confirming the spectral analysis reported earlier. A simple feedback type of active control has been found to be capable of enhancing or attenuating the magnitude of the combustion instability.

  7. Benefits assessment of active control technology and related cockpit technology for rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Two main-rotor active control concepts, one incorporating multicyclic actuators located just below the swashplate, and the other providing for the actuators and power supplies to be located in the rotating frame are considered. Each design concept is integrated with cockpit controllers and displays appropriate to the actuation concept in each case. The benefits of applying the defined ACT/RCT concepts to rotorcraft are quantified by comparison to the baseline model 412 helicopter. These benefits include, in the case of one active control concept; (1) up to 91% reduction in 4/rev hub shears; (2) a flight safety failure rate of 1.96 x 10 to the 8th power failures per flight-hour; (3) rotating controls/rotor hub drag reduction of 40%; (4) a 9% reduction in control system weight; and (5) vibratory deicing. The related cockpit concept reduces pilot workload for critical mission segments as much as 178% visual and 25% manual.

  8. F-8 digital fly-by-wire flight test results viewed from an active controls perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalai, K. J.; Deets, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire flight test program are presented, along with the implications for active controls applications. The closed loop performance of the digital control system agreed well with the sampled-data system design predictions. The digital fly-by-wire mechanization also met pilot flying qualities requirements. The advantages of mechanizing the control laws in software became apparent during the flight program and were realized without sacrificing overall system reliability. This required strict software management. The F-8 flight test results are shown to be encouraging in light of the requirements that must be met by control systems for flight-critical active controls applications.

  9. State of the art review of semi active control for magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mughal, Umair Najeeb

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes causes severe damage to badly designed structures or buildings to fail or collapse, and also have caused some damage to well-designed structures to malfunction due to the damage or failure of the equipment housed in the structure or building. The use magnetorheological dampers to mitigate the effect of external excitation is increased to resolve this. This article is a state of the art review of nonlinear analytical models to understand the efficacy of semi-active control theory for magnetorheological dampers. A nonlinear semi active control law is desired to be designed which atleast guarantees analytical closed loop stability in order to mitigate the effect of perturbations and drive the desired output to equilibrium.

  10. Experimental investigation of an actively controlled three-dimensional turret wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Patrick R.

    help guide future studies, both experimental and computational, of similar geometries and to provide insight for developing active control systems for complex, three-dimensional flows.

  11. Fundamental Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Active Control of 3-D Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-06

    Farnsworth, J., Gressick, W. and Amitay, M., 2009, “Active Control of Flow Separation and Structural Vibrations of Wind Turbine Blades ”, Wind Energy, DOI...Ciuryla et. al., 2007). More recently it has been used for vibration suppression in wind turbines by Maldonado et. al. (2009). Synthetic jets have...10.1002/we.336 (in print ). Mallinson, S.G., Hong, G. and Reizes, J.A., 1999, “Some Characterstics of Synthetic Jets”, AIAA Paper 99-3651. Mallinson

  12. Active Control of Flexible Space Structures Using the Nitinol Shape Memory Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    number) FIELD !GROUP SUBGROUP I Active Control, Nitinol Actuators, Space Structures 9. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block...number) Summarizes research progress in the feasibility demonstration of active vibration control using Nitinol shape memory actuators. Tests on...FLEXIBLE SPACE STRUCTURES USING NITINOL SHAPE MEMORY ACTUATORS FINAL REPORT FOR PHASE I SDIO CONTRACT #F49620-87-C-0035 0 BY DR. AMR M. BAZ KARIM R

  13. An electric control for an electrohydraulic active control aircraft landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.; Edson, R.

    1979-01-01

    An electronic controller for an electrohydraulic active control aircraft landing gear was developed. Drop tests of a modified gear from a 2722 Kg (6000 lbm) class of airplane were conducted to illustrate controller performance. The results indicate that the active gear effects a force reduction, relative to that of the passive gear, from 9 to 31 percent depending on the aircraft sink speed and the static gear pressure.

  14. A Digital Program for Calculating the Interaction Between Flexible Structures, Unsteady Aerodynamics and Active Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peele, E. L.; Adams, W. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program, ISAC, is described which calculates the stability and response of a flexible airplane equipped with active controls. The equations of motion relative to a fixed inertial coordinate system are formulated in terms of the airplane's rigid body motion and its unrestrained normal vibration modes. Unsteady aerodynamic forces are derived from a doublet lattice lifting surface theory. The theoretical basis for the program is briefly explained together with a description of input data and output results.

  15. Design of a Synthetic Aperture Array to Support Experiments in Active Control of Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    IIC FILE COPY DESIGN OF A SYNTHETIC APERTURE ARRAY TO SUPPORT EXPERIMENTS IN ACTIVE CONTROL OF SCATTERING by JAMES P. DULLEA B.N.E. GEORGIA...Ain Sonin Clmairnnn, Mechancal Engineering Departmenlal Graduate Committee 90 09 24 053 DESIGN OF A SYNTHETIC APERTURE ARRAY TO SUPPORT EXPERIMENTS IN...partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degrees of Naval Engineer and Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering Abstract A synthetic aperture

  16. Experimental Active Control of Automotive Disc Brake Rotor Squeal Using Dither

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CUNEFARE, K. A.; GRAF, A. J.

    2002-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation into the application of “dither” control for the active control and suppression of automobile disc brake squeal. Dither control is characterized by the application of a control effort at a frequency higher than the disturbance to be controlled. In the particular system considered here, a vibro-acoustic analysis of a disc brake system during squeal determined the acoustic squeal signature to be emanating from the brake rotor. This squeal was eliminated, and could even be prevented from occurring, through the application of a harmonic force with a frequency higher than the squeal frequency. The harmonic force was generated by a stack of piezoelectric elements placed within the brake's caliper piston. The harmonic force represented a small variation about the mean clamping force exerted by the brake upon the rotor. The high-frequency vibration in the brake system due to the action of the control system was not heard if an ultrasonic control frequency was used. More importantly, the active control system is shown to be able to prevent squeal from even occurring. This gives rise to a possible active control system integrated into the brake system of automobiles to prevent squeal.

  17. Active Control of the Forced and Transient Response of a Finite Beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John Theodore

    1989-01-01

    When studying structural vibrations resulting from a concentrated source, many structures may be modelled as a finite beam excited by a point source. The theoretical limit on cancelling the resulting beam vibrations by utilizing another point source as an active controller is explored. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. In each case, a cost function is defined and minimized for numerous parameter variations. For the case of harmonic excitation, the cost function is obtained by integrating the mean squared displacement over a region of the beam in which control is desired. A controller is then found to minimize this cost function in the control interval. The control interval and controller location are continuously varied for several frequencies of excitation. The results show that control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam, but control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, the cost function is realized by integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the interval of the beam in which control is desired. This is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. A cost function representative of the beam vibration is obtained by integrating the transient displacement squared over a region of the beam and over all time. The form of the controller is chosen a priori as either one or two delayed pulses. Delays

  18. Active control of microbubbles stream in multi-bifurcated flow by using 2D phased array ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Koda, Ren; Koido, Jun; Hosaka, Naoto; Ito, Takumi; Onogi, Shinya; Mochizuki, Takashi; Masuda, Kohji; Ikeda, Seiichi; Arai, Fumihito

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported our attempt to propel microbbles in flow by a primary Bjerknes force, which is a physical phenomenon where an acoustic wave pushes an obstacle along its direction of propagation. However, when ultrasound was emitted from surface of the body, controlling bubbles in against flow was needed. It is unpractical to use multiple transducers to produce the same number of focal points because single element transducer cannot produce more than two focal points. In this study, we introduced a complex artificial blood vessel according to a capillary model and a 2D array transducer to produce multiple focal points for active control of microbubbles in against flow. Furthermore, we investigated bubble control in viscous fluid. As the results, we confirmed clearly path selection of MBs in viscous fluid as well as in water.

  19. Dynamic behavior of thermoacoustic combustion oscillations in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor with and without active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Ryosuke; Domen, Shohei; Okuno, Yuta; Nakagaki, Yoshitake; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    We experimentally study the dynamic behavior of thermoacoustic combustion oscillations in a laboratory-scale lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor with and without active control. We adopt the delayed feedback control method based on the concept of chaos control to suppress thermoacoustic combustion oscillations. The unstable periodic orbits in the attractor of uncontrolled thermoacoustic combustion oscillations are led to the desired orbits with a small diameter of the attractor when the perturbation is switched on, resulting in the notable suppression of thermoacoustic combustion oscillations. Color-recurrence plots (Gotoda et al., Phys. Rev. E 89, 022910 (2014)) are used for characterizing the complexity of the combustion state with and without delayed feedback control.

  20. Use of active control systems to improve bending and rotor flapping response of a tilt rotor VTOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, H. P.; Cheng, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The results are summarized of an analytical study of the use of active control systems for the purpose of reducing the root mean square response of wing vertical bending and rotor flapping to atmospheric turbulence for a tilt-rotor VTOL airplane. Only the wing/rotor assembly was considered so that results of a wind tunnel test program would be applicable in a subsequent phase of the research. The capabilities and limitations of simple single feedback configurations were identified, and the most promising multiloop feedback configurations were then investigated. Design parameters were selected so as to minimize either wing bending or rotor flapping response. Within the constraints imposed by practical levels of feedback gains and complexity and by considerations of safety, reduction in response due to turbulence of the order of 30 to 50 percent is predicted using the rotor longitudinal cyclic and a trailing edge wing flap as control effectors.

  1. Mindfulness Training Alters Emotional Memory Recall Compared to Active Controls: Support for an Emotional Information Processing Model of Mindfulness

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Wolfe, Douglas; Sacchet, Matthew D.; Hastings, Elizabeth; Roth, Harold; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e., memory) biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions. Methods: Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years) participated in either a 12-week course containing a “meditation laboratory” or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music). Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course. Results: Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.02]. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [F(1, 56) = 3.0, p = 0.09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being (r = 0.31, p = 0.02) and decreased clinical symptoms (r = −0.29, p = 0.03). Conclusion: Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing. Future

  2. Decreasing the damage in smart structures using integrated online DDA/ISMP and semi-active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, K.; Amini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Integrated structural health monitoring (SHM) and vibration control has been considered recently by researchers. Up to now, all of the research in the field of integrated SHM and vibration control has been conducted using control devices and control algorithms to enhance system identification and damage detection. In this study, online SHM is used to improve the performance of structural vibration control, unlike previous research. Also, a proposed algorithm including integrated online SHM and a semi-active control strategy is used to reduce both damage and seismic response of the main structure due to strong seismic disturbance. In the proposed algorithm the nonlinear behavior of the building structure is simulated during the excitation. Then, using the measured data and the damage detection algorithm based on identified system Markov parameters (DDA/ISMP), a method proposed by the authors, damage corresponding to axial and bending stiffness of all structural elements is identified. In this study, a 20 t MR damper is employed as a control device to mitigate both damage and dynamic response of the building structure. Also, the interaction between SHM and a semi-active control strategy is assessed. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, a two bay two story steel braced frame structure is used. By defining the damage index and damage rate index, the input current of the MR damper is generated using a fuzzy logic controller. The obtained results show that the possibility of smart building creation is provided using the proposed algorithm. In comparison to the widely used strategy of only vibration control, it is shown that the proposed algorithm is more effective. Furthermore, in the proposed algorithm, the total consumed current intensity and generated control forces are considerably less than for the strategy of only vibration control.

  3. Biologically-inspired robust and adaptive multi-sensor fusion and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Deepak; Dow, Paul A.; Huber, David J.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a method and system for robust and efficient goal-oriented active control of a machine (e.g., robot) based on processing, hierarchical spatial understanding, representation and memory of multimodal sensory inputs. This work assumes that a high-level plan or goal is known a priori or is provided by an operator interface, which translates into an overall perceptual processing strategy for the machine. Its analogy to the human brain is the download of plans and decisions from the pre-frontal cortex into various perceptual working memories as a perceptual plan that then guides the sensory data collection and processing. For example, a goal might be to look for specific colored objects in a scene while also looking for specific sound sources. This paper combines three key ideas and methods into a single closed-loop active control system. (1) Use high-level plan or goal to determine and prioritize spatial locations or waypoints (targets) in multimodal sensory space; (2) collect/store information about these spatial locations at the appropriate hierarchy and representation in a spatial working memory. This includes invariant learning of these spatial representations and how to convert between them; and (3) execute actions based on ordered retrieval of these spatial locations from hierarchical spatial working memory and using the "right" level of representation that can efficiently translate into motor actions. In its most specific form, the active control is described for a vision system (such as a pantilt- zoom camera system mounted on a robotic head and neck unit) which finds and then fixates on high saliency visual objects. We also describe the approach where the goal is to turn towards and sequentially foveate on salient multimodal cues that include both visual and auditory inputs.

  4. Active Control of Combustion Instability in a Ramjet Using Large-Eddy Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    INSTABILITY IN A RAMJET USING LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS S. Menon N.TIS CR.A,1i ()TiC TAB September 1992 1 , o -d 6 y ... . ... .. Prepared for t.Cft OFFICE OF...pressure oscillations initially show a large-aznplitude, low- frequency oscillatio that eventually decays o that a high-frequency oscillation at around...injec- tion were recently presented (M o ., 199•1) TP-276/02-91 10 4.1 Acsntlc Fedback Cesto l Active control through acoustic forcing was demonstrated

  5. Development of a microcontrolled bioinstrumentation system for active control of leg prostheses.

    PubMed

    Delis, Alberto Lopez; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira; Dos Santos, Icaro; Sene, Iwens Gervasio; Salomoni, Sauro; Borges, Geovany Araujo

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the design of a microcontrolled bioinstrumentation system for active control of leg prostheses, using 4-channel electromyographic signal (EMG) detection and a single-channel electrogoniometer. The system is part of a control and instrumentation architecture in which a master processor controls the tasks of slave microcontrollers, through a RS-485 interface. Several signal processing methods are integrated in the system, for feature extraction (Recursive Least Squares), feature projection (Self Organizing Maps), and pattern classification (Levenberg-Marquardt Neural Network). The acquisition of EMG signals and additional mechanical information could help improving the precision in the control of leg prostheses.

  6. Multilayer Active Control For Structural Damping And Optical-Path Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zahidul H.; Spanos, John T.; Fanson, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Two active-control concepts incorporated into system for suppression of vibrations in truss structure and regulation of length of optical path on structure to nanometer level. Optical-path-length-control subsystem contains two feedback control loops to obtain active damping in wide amplitude-and-frequency range. Concept described in more detail in number of previous articles, including "Stabilizing Optical-Path Length on a Vibrating Structure" (NPO-19040), "Controllable Optical Delay Line for Stellar Interferometry" (NPO-18686), "Test Bed for Control of Optical-Path Lengths" (NPO-18487).

  7. Active control synthesis for flexible space structures excited by persistent disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Gonzalez, Marcelo

    1990-01-01

    Both classical and state-space synthesis methods for active control of flexible space structures in the presence of persistent disturbances are presented. The methods exploit the so-called internal model principle for asymptotic disturbance rejection. A generic example of flexible space structures is used to illustrate the simplicity of the proposed design methodologies. The concept of a disturbance rejection filter dipole is introduced from a classical control viewpoint. It is shown that the proposed design methods will invariably make use of non-minimum-phase compensation for a class of noncolocated control problems. The need for tradeoffs between performance and parameter robustness is discussed.

  8. A randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of yoga with an active control on ambulatory blood pressure in individuals with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hagins, Marshall; Rundle, Andrew; Consedine, Nathan S; Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of yoga with an active control (nonaerobic exercise) in individuals with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension. A randomized clinical trial was performed using two arms: (1) yoga and (2) active control. Primary outcomes were 24-hour day and night ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Within-group and between-group analyses were performed using paired t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance (time × group), respectively. Eighty-four participants enrolled, with 68 participants completing the trial. Within-group analyses found 24-hour diastolic, night diastolic, and mean arterial pressure all significantly reduced in the yoga group (-3.93, -4.7, -4.23 mm Hg, respectively) but no significant within-group changes in the active control group. Direct comparisons of the yoga intervention with the control group found a single blood pressure variable (diastolic night) to be significantly different (P=.038). This study has demonstrated that a yoga intervention can lower blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension. Although this study was not adequately powered to show between-group differences, the size of the yoga-induced blood pressure reduction appears to justify performing a definitive trial of this intervention to test whether it can provide meaningful therapeutic value for the management of hypertension.

  9. A randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of yoga to an active control on ambulatory blood pressure in individuals with Pre- and Stage 1 Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hagins, Marshall; Rundle, Andrew; Consedine, Nathan S.; Khalsa, Sat Bir S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of yoga to an active control (non-aerobic exercise) in individuals with pre- and Stage 1 hypertension. A randomized clinical trial was performed using two arms: 1) yoga and 2) active control. Primary outcomes were 24-hour, day and night ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Within-group and between-group analyses were performed using paired t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs (time x group), respectively. Eighty-four participants enrolled with 68 participants completing the trial. Within-group analyses found 24-hour diastolic, night diastolic, and mean arterial pressure all significantly reduced in the yoga group (−3.93, −4.7, −4.23 mmHg, respectively) but no significant within-group changes in the active control group. Direct comparisons of the yoga intervention to the control group found a single blood pressure variable (diastolic night) to be significantly different (p =.038). This study has demonstrated that a yoga intervention can lower blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension. Although this study was not adequately powered to show between-group differences, the size of the yoga-induced blood pressure reduction we observed appears to justify performing a definitive trial of this intervention to test whether it can provide meaningful therapeutic value for the management of hypertension. PMID:24387700

  10. Active control of acoustic radiation from laminated cylindrical shells integrated with a piezoelectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiongtao; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Xusheng; Jiang, Guohe

    2013-06-01

    Active control of sound radiation from piezoelectric laminated cylindrical shells is theoretically investigated in the wavenumber domain. The governing equations of the smart cylindrical shells are derived by using first-order shear deformation theory. The smart layer is divided into lots of actuator patches, each of which is coated with two very thin electrodes at its inner and outer surfaces. Proportional derivative negative feedback control is applied to the actuator patches and the stiffness of the controlled layer is derived in the wavenumber domain. The equivalent driving forces and moments generated by the piezoelectric layer can produce distinct sound radiation. Large actuator patches cause strong wavenumber conversion and fluctuation of the far-field sound pressure, and do not make any contribution to sound reduction. Nevertheless, suitable small actuator patches induce weak wavenumber conversion and play an important role in the suppression of vibration and acoustic power. The derivative gain of the active control can effectively suppress sound radiation from smart cylindrical shells. The effects of small proportional gain on the sound field can be neglected, but large proportional gain has a great impact on the acoustic radiation of cylindrical shells. The influence of different piezoelectric materials on the acoustic power is described in the numerical results.

  11. Active control of harmonic sound transmission into an acoustic enclosure using both structural and acoustic actuators

    PubMed

    Kim; Brennan

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes an analytical and experimental investigation into the active control of harmonic sound transmission in a structural-acoustic coupled system. A rectangular enclosure is considered that has five acoustically rigid walls and a flexible plate on the remaining side through which a harmonic sound wave is transmitted into the enclosure. The control system is designed to globally reduce the sound field inside the enclosure, and the roles of structural and acoustic actuators are of particular interest. Three control configurations, classified by the type of actuators, are compared and discussed. They are: (i) use of a single point-force actuator, (ii) use of a single acoustic piston source, and (iii) simultaneous use of both a point-force actuator and an acoustic piston source. It is shown both analytically and experimentally that the point-force actuator is effective in controlling plate-dominated modes while the acoustic source is effective in controlling cavity-dominated modes. Since the transmitted sound field is governed by both plate- and cavity-dominated modes, the hybrid use of both types of actuators is shown to be a desirable configuration for the active control of sound transmission into a structural-acoustic coupled system.

  12. Semi-active control of a sandwich beam partially filled with magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajkowski, Jacek M.; Bajer, Czesław I.

    2015-08-01

    The paper deals with the semi-active control of vibrations of structural elements. Elastomer composites with ferromagnetic particles that act as magnetorheological fluids are used. The damping coefficient and the shear modulus of the elastomer increases when it is exposed to an electro-magnetic field. The control of this process in time allows us to reduce vibrations more effectively than if the elastomer is permanently exposed to a magnetic field. First the analytical solution for the vibrations of a sandwich beam filled with an elastomer is given. Then the control problem is defined and applied to the analytical formula. The numerical solution of the minimization problem results in a periodic, perfectly rectangular control function if free vibrations are considered. Such a temporarily acting magnetic field is more efficient than a constantly acting one. The surplus reaches 20-50% or more, depending on the filling ratio of the elastomer. The resulting control was verified experimentally in the vibrations of a cantilever sandwich beam. The proposed semi-active control can be directly applied to engineering vibrating structural elements, for example helicopter rotors, aircraft wings, pads under machines, and vehicles.

  13. The MODE family of on-orbit experiments: The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.; Deluis, Javier; Waldman, Mel; Bicos, Andy

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment entitled the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), proposed by the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is described. This is the second in a family of flight experiments being developed at MIT. The first is the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) which investigates the nonlinear behavior of contained fluids and truss structures in zero gravity. The objective of the MACE program is to investigate and validate the modeling of the dynamics of an actively controlled flexible, articulating, multibody platform free floating in zero gravity. A rationale and experimental approach for the program are presented. The rationale shows that on-orbit testing, coupled with ground testing and a strong analytical program, is necessary in order to fully understand both how flexibility of the platform affects the pointing problem, as well as how gravity perturbs this structural flexibility causing deviations between 1- and 0-gravity behavior. The experimental approach captures the essential physics of multibody platforms, by identifying the appropriate attributes, tests, and performance metrics of the test article and defines the tests required to successfully validate the analytical framework.

  14. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Program review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport Project, established as one element of the NASA/Boeing Energy Efficient Transport Technology Program. The performance assessment showed that incorporating ACT into an airplane designed to fly approximately 200 passengers approximately 2,000 nmi could yield block fuel savings from 6 to 10 percent at the design range. The principal risks associated with incorporating these active control functions into a commercial airplane are those involved with the ACT system implementation. The Test and Evaluation phase of the IAAC Project focused on the design, fabrication, and test of a system that implemented pitch axis fly-by-wire, pitch axis augmentation, and wing load alleviation. The system was built to be flight worthy, and was planned to be experimentally flown on the 757. The system was installed in the Boeing Digital Avionics Flight Controls Laboratory (DAFCL), where open loop hardware and software tests, and a brief examination of a direct drive valve (DDV) actuation concept were accomplished. The IAAC Project has shown that ACT can be beneficially incorporated into a commercial transport airplane. Based on the results achieved during the testing phase, there appears to be no fundamental reason(s) that would preclude the commercial application of ACT, assuming an appropriate development effort is included.

  15. The MODE family of on-orbit experiments: The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.; Deluis, Javier; Waldman, Mel; Bicos, Andy

    1990-12-01

    A flight experiment entitled the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), proposed by the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is described. This is the second in a family of flight experiments being developed at MIT. The first is the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) which investigates the nonlinear behavior of contained fluids and truss structures in zero gravity. The objective of the MACE program is to investigate and validate the modeling of the dynamics of an actively controlled flexible, articulating, multibody platform free floating in zero gravity. A rationale and experimental approach for the program are presented. The rationale shows that on-orbit testing, coupled with ground testing and a strong analytical program, is necessary in order to fully understand both how flexibility of the platform affects the pointing problem, as well as how gravity perturbs this structural flexibility causing deviations between 1- and 0-gravity behavior. The experimental approach captures the essential physics of multibody platforms, by identifying the appropriate attributes, tests, and performance metrics of the test article and defines the tests required to successfully validate the analytical framework.

  16. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial of Classroom-Based Mindfulness Meditation Compared to an Active Control Condition in 6th Grade Children

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Willoughby B.; Lepp, Nathaniel E.; Niles, Halsey F.; Rocha, Tomas; Fisher, Nathan; Gold, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Children in the United States are at risk for numerous psychological problems, such as anxiety, attention problems, and mood disorders, and are underserved by current mental health provisions. The current study is a pilot trial to examine the effects of a nonelective, classroom-based, teacher-implemented, mindfulness meditation intervention on standard clinical measures of mental health and affect in middle school children. A total of 101 healthy sixth-grade students (55 boys and 46 girls) were randomized to either an Asian history course with daily mindfulness meditation practice (intervention group) or an African history course with a matched experiential activity (active control group). Self-reported data was collected by administering the Youth Self Report (YSR), a modified Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Measure -Revised before and after 6 weeks of meditation or active control condition. Both meditators and active controls decreased significantly on the YSR Internalizing Problems, Externalizing Problems, and Attention Problems subscales but did not differ in the extent of their improvements. Both groups also showed comparable improvements on measures in affect. Meditators were significantly less likely to develop suicidal ideation or thoughts of self-harm than controls. Improvements in affect were correlated with increases in mindfulness in meditators but not controls. These results suggest that mindfulness training may yield both unique and nonspecific benefits that are shared by other novel activities. PMID:24930819

  17. Active Control of Inlet Noise on the JT15D Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jerome P.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the year from November 1997 to December 1998 on the Active Noise Control of Turbofan Engines research project funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The concept of implementing active noise control techniques with fuselage-mounted error sensors is investigated both analytically and experimentally. The analytical part of the project involves the continued development of an advanced modeling technique to provide prediction and design guidelines for application of active noise control techniques to large, realistic high bypass engines of the type on which active control methods are expected to be applied. Results from the advanced analytical model are presented that show the effectiveness of the control strategies, and the analytical results presented for fuselage error sensors show good agreement with the experimentally observed results and provide additional insight into the control phenomena. Additional analytical results are presented for active noise control used in conjunction with a wavenumber sensing technique. The experimental work is carried out on a running JT15D turbofan jet engine in a test stand at Virginia Tech. The control strategy used in these tests was the feedforward Filtered-X LMS algorithm. The control inputs were supplied by single and multiple circumferential arrays of acoustic sources equipped with neodymium iron cobalt magnets mounted upstream of the fan. The reference signal was obtained from an inlet mounted eddy current probe. The error signals were obtained from a number of pressure transducers flush-mounted in a simulated fuselage section mounted in the engine test cell. The active control methods are investigated when implemented with the control sources embedded within the acoustically absorptive material on a passively-lined inlet. The experimental results show that the combination of active control techniques with fuselage

  18. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept with a small tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Parasite drag reduction evaluation is composed of wind tunnel tests with a standard L-1011 tail and two reduced area tail configurations. Trim drag reduction is evaluated by rebalancing the airplane for relaxed static stability. This is accomplished by pumping water to tanks in the forward and aft of the airplane to acheive desired center of gravity location. Also, the L-1011 is modified to incorporate term and advanced augmented systems. By using advanced wings and aircraft relaxed static stability significant fuel savings can be realized. An airplane's dynamic stability becomes more sensitive for decreased tail size, relaxed static stability, and advanced wing configurations. Active control pitch augmentation will be used to acheive the required handling qualities. Flight tests will be performed to evaluate the pitch augmentation systems. The effect of elevator downrig on stabilizer/elevator hinge moments will be measured. For control system analysis, the normal acceleration feedback and pitch rate feedback are analyzed.

  19. Analogy electromagnetism-acoustics: Validation and application to local impedance active control for sound absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, L.; Furstoss, M.; Galland, M. A.

    1998-10-01

    An analogy between electromagnetism and acoustics is presented in 2D. The propagation of sound in presence of absorbing material is modeled using an open boundary microwave package. Validation is performed through analytical and experimental results. Application to local impedance active control for free field sound absorption is finally described. Une analogie entre acoustique et électromagnétisme est présentée en 2D, afin de modéliser la propagation d'ondes acoustiques, en présence de matériau absorbant et à l'aide d'un logiciel de micro-ondes en domaine ouvert. Cette analogie est validée par des résultats analytiques et expérimentaux. Une application au contrôle actif de l'impédance acoustique de surface de matériaux poreux est finalement décrite.

  20. Active control of thermoacoustic amplification in a thermo-acousto-electric engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Come; Penelet, Guillaume; Poignand, Gaelle; Lotton, Pierrick

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a new approach is proposed to control the operation of a thermoacoustic Stirling electricity generator. This control basically consists in adding an additional acoustic source to the device, connected through a feedback loop to a reference microphone, a phase-shifter, and an audio amplifier. Experiments are performed to characterize the impact of the feedback loop (and especially that of the controlled phase-shift) on the overall efficiency of the thermal to electric energy conversion performed by the engine. It is demonstrated that this external forcing of thermoacoustic self-sustained oscillations strongly impacts the performance of the engine, and that it is possible under some circumstances to improve the efficiency of the thermo-electric transduction, compared to the one reached without active control. Applicability and further directions of investigation are also discussed.

  1. Active control of elastic and rigid body response of a three-dimensional underwater structure

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, H.; Yoshida, K.; Watanabe, K.

    1995-02-01

    One key technology for the offshore development of the increasing water depth will be remotely operated installation and construction of flexible structure in the deep water or on the seabed. The flexibility comes from scale-up or weight reduction of the structure. Conventional operation from the sea surfaces is affected by the weather conditions, and, therefore, not so efficient. This paper presents basic research on active control of elastic response and rigid body motion of an underwater elastic structure toward the remotely operated installation technique. The numerical model of the dynamics of the structural model is formulated, and based on the numerical model the control is formulated. The formulated control is tested by computer simulations and model experiments. The structural model is propelled by thrusters and taken from initial position to another position, while the elastic responses are controlled by variable buoyancy-type actuators.

  2. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  3. Weak-light solitons and their active control in a parity-time-symmetric atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2015-04-01

    We propose a realistic physical scheme to produce one-dimensional and two-dimensional weak-light solitons in an atomic system with PT symmetry. The system we suggest is a cold three-level atomic gas with two species and is driven by control and probe laser fields. We show that by the interference of two Raman resonances a highly adjustable probe-field refractive index with PT symmetry in one and two dimensions can be realized. We further show that it is possible to produce various light solitons when the weak nonlinearity of the probe field is taken into account. Due to the resonant character of the system, the light solitons obtained in one and two dimensions have extremely low light power (at the level of nanowatts). In addition, we demonstrate that the stability of these light solitons can be actively controlled via PT phase transition of the system.

  4. Double active control of the plasmonic resonance of a gold nanoparticle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sio, Luciano; Cunningham, Alastair; Verrina, Vanessa; Tone, Caterina Maria; Caputo, Roberto; Bürgi, Thomas; Umeton, Cesare

    2012-11-01

    A two-fold active control of the plasmonic resonance of randomly distributed gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has been achieved. GNPs have been immobilized on an Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate and then covered with a liquid crystalline compound. The system has been investigated by means of atomic force and scanning electron microscopy, revealing the presence of isolated and well distributed GNPs. The application of an external electric field to the sample has a two-fold consequence: the re-orientation of the hybrid-aligned liquid crystal layer and the formation of a carrier accumulation layer in the proximity of the ITO substrate. The refractive indices of both liquid crystal and accumulation layers are influenced by the applied field in a competitive way and produce a ``dancing behavior'' of the GNP's plasmonic resonance spectral position.

  5. Active control of bending vibrations in thick bars using PZT stack actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Parker, G.; Barney, P.; Rodeman, R.

    1995-07-01

    An experimental investigation into active control of bending vibrations in thick bar and plate-like structural elements is described. This work is motivated by vibration problems in machine tools and photolithography machines that require greater control authority than available from conventional surface mounted PZT patches or PVDF films. Focus of this experiment is a cantilevered circular steel bar in which PZT stacks are mounted in cutouts near the bar root. Axially aligned and offset from the neutral axis, these actuators control the bending vibrations by generating moments in the bar through their compressive loads. A Positive Feedback control law is used to significantly augment the damping in the first bending mode. Implications of the experimental results for machine tool stability enhancement are discussed.

  6. Active control of aircraft cabin noise and vibration using a physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Desheng

    In this thesis, active noise and vibration control of aircraft cabins is investigated, in which aircraft cabins are modeled as a cylindrical shell with a floor partition. As the first step toward a successful control strategy, a structural acoustic coupling analysis of the investigated structure is carried out. A new method called "Radiation Efficiency Analysis of Structural Modes (REASM)", suitable for enclosures with irregular shapes, is proposed and applied in the current analysis. Then, the optimal design of control systems consisting of PZT actuators and PVDF error sensors is discussed. A novel design method for PVDF error sensors called "GA-based method" is introduced and shown to be very effective when complex structures are involved. Finally, an active control system is implemented on a scaled laboratory aircraft-cabin model. Both the simulation and experimental results show the great potential of using piezoelectric transducers in noise control and the significant performance improvement achieved through optimal design.

  7. Application of active control landing gear technology to the A-10 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.; Edson, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two concepts which reduce the A-10 aircraft's wing/gear interface forces as a result of applying active control technology to the main landing gear are described. In the first concept, referred to as the alternate concept a servovalve in a closed pressure control loop configuration effectively varies the size of the third stage spool valve orifice which is embedded in the strut. This action allows the internal energy in the strut to shunt hydraulic flow around the metering orifice. The command signal to the loop is reference strut pressure which is compared to the measured strut pressure, the difference being the loop error. Thus, the loop effectively varies the spool valve orifice size to maintain the strut pressure, and therefore minimizes the wing/gear interface force referenced.

  8. Active control of low-frequency sound radiation by cylindrical shell with piezoelectric stack force actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yin; Sun, Hongling; An, Fengyan; Li, Xiaodong

    2012-05-01

    A novel active control method of sound radiation from a cylindrical shell under axial excitations is proposed and theoretically analyzed. This control method is based on a pair of piezoelectric stack force actuators which are installed on the shell and parallel to the axial direction. The actuators are driven in phase and generate the same forces to control the vibration and the sound radiation of the cylindrical shell. The model considered is a fluid-loaded finite stiffened cylindrical shell with rigid end-caps and only low-frequency axial vibration modes are involved. Numerical simulations are performed to explore the required control forces and the optimal mounting positions of actuators under different cost functions. The results show that the proposed force actuators can reduce the radiated sound pressure of low-frequency axial modes in all directions.

  9. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. II - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, V. L.; Fuller, C. R.; Silcox, R. J.; Brown, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Actively controlled harmonic force inputs were applied experimentally to reduce the sound transmitted through an elastic circular plate. The control implementation used a time domain least mean square adaptive algorithm with two error sensors. The control forces were applied directly to the plate by point force vibration inputs, while the error information and performance were measured in the radiated acoustic field by microphones. Test cases were also performed in which the error sensors were accelerometers mounted on the plate. When accelerometers were used as error sensors, the controller performance was degraded; leading to the conclusion that minimizing plate motion does not necessarily lead to an associated decrease in radiated sound levels. In contrast, the results show excellent attenuation of the transmitted sound field when microphone error sensors were used. This result was consistent over a range of frequencies. In addition, the experimental results are compared to previously derived analytical results and the effect of using a point or global minimization scheme is discussed.

  10. Electromechanical simulation and testing of actively controlled rotordynamic systems with piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Reng R.; Palazzolo, A. B.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, G. T.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical developments for the simulation of an actively controlled rotorbearing system with piezoelectric type actuators are summarized. Two simulation models were derived; the first assumes that the actuators and other electrical components in the feedback system operate at all frequencies without phase lag or rolloff, while the second model includes the nonideal behavior of these components which are modeled with linear electric circuits. The two models predict identical unbalance response at low frequencies, and the nonideal model also predicts instability-onset feedback gains. The agreement between the measured and predicted results for unbalance response and instability onset gain is very good. The predicted instability-onset feedback gain for active damping was found to be very sensitive to the tare (uncontrolled) damping in the unstable mode.

  11. Extended flight evaluation of a near-term pitch active control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, Wiley A.; Willey, Craig S.; Chong, Michael G.

    1983-01-01

    Fuel savings can be achieved by moving the center of gravity of an aircraft aft which reduces the static stability margin and consequently the trim drag. However, flying qualities of an aircraft with relaxed static stability can be significantly degraded. The flying qualities can be restored by using a pitch active control system (PACS). This report documents the work accomplished during a follow-on program (see NASA CR-165951 for initial program report) to perform extended flight tests of a near-term PACS. The program included flying qualities analyses, piloted flight simulation tests, aircraft preparation and flight tests to demonstrate that the near-term PACS provided good flying qualities within the linear static stability envelope to a negative 3% static stability margin.

  12. Modified independent modal space control method for active control of flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1987-01-01

    A modified independent modal space control (MIMSC) method is developed for designing active vibration control systems for large flexible structures. The method accounts for the interaction between the controlled and residual modes. It incorporates also optimal placement procedures for selecting the optimal locations of the actuators in the structure in order to minimize the structural vibrations as well as the actuation energy. The MIMSC method relies on an important feature which is based on time sharing of a small number of actuators, in the modal space, to control effectively a large number of modes. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the method to generic flexible systems. The results obtained suggest the potential of the devised method in designing efficient active control systems for large flexible structures.

  13. Outsourcing neural active control to passive composite mechanics: a tissue engineered cyborg ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Park, Sung Jin; Park, Kyung Soo; Park, Shirley; di Santo, Valentina; Deisseroth, Karl; Lauder, George V.; Mahadevan, L.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-11-01

    Translating the blueprint that stingrays and skates provide, we create a cyborg swimming ray capable of orchestrating adaptive maneuvering and phototactic navigation. The impossibility of replicating the neural system of batoids fish is bypassed by outsourcing algorithmic functionalities to the body composite mechanics, hence casting the active control problem into a design, passive one. We present a first step in engineering multilevel "brain-body-flow" systems that couple sensory information to motor coordination and movement, leading to behavior. This work paves the way for the development of autonomous and adaptive artificial creatures able to process multiple sensory inputs and produce complex behaviors in distributed systems and may represent a path toward soft-robotic "embodied cognition".

  14. Nonlinear parametrically excited vibration and active control of gear pair system with time-varying characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Wang, Jin-Jin; Liu, Jin-Jie; Li, Ya-Qian

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, we investigate the nonlinear parametrically excited vibration and active control of a gear pair system involving backlash, time-varying meshing stiffness and static transmission error. Firstly, a gear pair model is established in a strongly nonlinear form, and its nonlinear vibration characteristics are systematically investigated through different approaches. Several complicated phenomena such as period doubling bifurcation, anti period doubling bifurcation and chaos can be observed under the internal parametric excitation. Then, an active compensation controller is designed to suppress the vibration, including the chaos. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed controller is verified numerically. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61104040), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2012203090), and the University Innovation Team of Hebei Province Leading Talent Cultivation Project, China (Grant No. LJRC013).

  15. Active control of sound transmission through stiff lightweight composite fuselage constructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D. R.; Nelson, P. A.; Pinnington, R. J.; Elliott, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Work was performed on the active control of sound transmission in composite structures. First, a model was outlined of a vibrating plate with arbitrary boundary conditions. Second, the far field was minimized to radiate acoustic power using secondary force inputs. Third, a model of a simple case of freely mounted stiff lightweight panels was used. Fourth, experimental results for aluminum honeycomb composite panels is presented. Fifth, experimental results are presented for the combination of a clamped steel plate and an aluminum honeycomb panel with secondary forces acting between the partitions. Finally, experimental results for the combination of a clamped steel plate with four secondary aluminum honeycomb panels is presented. All materials are shown in viewgraph format.

  16. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qin; Skaar, Johannes; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-15

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  17. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  18. Magnetic self organization, MHD active control and confinement in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrelli, L.; Zanca, P.; Valisa, M.; Marchiori, G.; Alfier, A.; Bonomo, F.; Gobbin, M.; Piovesan, P.; Terranova, D.; Agostini, M.; Alessi, C.; Antoni, V.; Apolloni, L.; Auriemma, F.; Barana, O.; Bettini, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Brombin, M.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavinato, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; DeLorenzi, A.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Franz, P.; Gadani, G.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Grando, L.; Guo, S. C.; Innocente, P.; Lorenzini, R.; Luchetta, A.; Malesani, G.; Manduchi, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Martin, P.; Martini, S.; Martines, E.; Masiello, A.; Milani, F.; Moresco, M.; Murari, A.; Novello, L.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Pizzimenti, A.; Pomaro, N.; Predebon, I.; Puiatti, M. E.; Rostagni, G.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spizzo, G.; Spolaore, M.; Taccon, C.; Taliercio, C.; Toigo, V.; Vianello, N.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zollino, G.; Zuin, M.

    2007-12-01

    RFX-mod is a reversed field pinch (RFP) experiment equipped with a system that actively controls the magnetic boundary. In this paper we describe the results of a new control algorithm, the clean mode control (CMC), in which the aliasing of the sideband harmonics generated by the discrete saddle coils is corrected in real time. CMC operation leads to a smoother (i.e. more axisymmetric) boundary. Tearing modes rotate (up to 100 Hz) and partially unlock. Plasma-wall interaction diminishes due to a decrease of the non-axisymmetric shift of the plasma column. With the ameliorated boundary control, plasma current has been successfully increased to 1.5 MA, the highest for an RFP. In such regimes, the magnetic dynamics is dominated by the innermost resonant mode, the internal magnetic field gets close to a pure helix and confinement improves.

  19. Cognitive-affective neural plasticity following active-controlled mindfulness intervention

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Micah; Dietz, Martin; Blair, Karina S.; van Beek, Martijn; Rees, Geraint; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Lutz, Antoine; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation is a set of attention-based, regulatory and self-inquiry training regimes. Although the impact of mindfulness meditation training (MT) on self-regulation is well established, the neural mechanisms supporting such plasticity are poorly understood. MT is thought to act on attention through interoceptive salience and attentional control mechanisms, but until now conflicting evidence from behavioral and neural measures has made it difficult to distinguish the role of these mechanisms. To resolve this question we conducted a fully randomized 6-week longitudinal trial of MT, explicitly controlling for cognitive and treatment effects with an active control group. We measured behavioral metacognition and whole-brain Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signals using functional MRI during an affective Stroop task before and after intervention. Although both groups improved significantly on a response-inhibition task, only the MT group showed reduced affective Stroop conflict. Moreover, the MT group displayed greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) responses during executive processing, consistent with increased recruitment of top-down mechanisms to resolve conflict. In contrast, we did not observe overall group by time interactions on negative affect-related RTs or BOLD responses. However, only participants with the greatest amount of MT practice showed improvements in response-inhibition and increased recruitment of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and right anterior insula during negative valence processing. Collectively our findings highlight the importance of active control in MT research, and indicate unique neural mechanisms for progressive stages of mindfulness training. PMID:23115195

  20. Effect of contrast on the active control of a moving line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Sweet, Barbara T.; Stone, Leland S.

    2005-01-01

    In many passive visual tasks, human perceptual judgments are contrast dependent. To explore whether these contrast dependencies of visual perception also affect closed-loop manual control tasks, we examined visuomotor performance as humans actively controlled a moving luminance-defined line over a range of contrasts. Four subjects were asked to use a joystick to keep a horizontal line centered on a display as its vertical position was perturbed by a sum of sinusoids under two control regimes. The total root mean square (RMS) position error decreased quasi-linearly with increasing log contrast across the tested range (mean slope across subjects: -8.0 and -7.7% per log2 contrast, for the two control regimes, respectively). Frequency-response (Bode) plots showed a systematic increase in open-loop gain (mean slope: 1.44 and 1.30 dB per log2 contrast, respectively), and decrease in phase lag with increasing contrast, which can be accounted for by a decrease in response time delay (mean slope: 32 and 40 ms per log2 contrast, respectively). The performance data are well fit by a Crossover Model proposed by McRuer and Krendel, which allowed us to identify both visual position and motion cues driving performance. This analysis revealed that the position and motion cues used to support manual control under both control regimes appear equally sensitive to changes in stimulus contrast. In conclusion, our data show that active control of a moving visual stimulus is as dependent on contrast as passive perception and suggest that this effect is attributed to a shared contrast sensitivity early in the visual pathway, before any specialization for motion processing.

  1. Cognitive-affective neural plasticity following active-controlled mindfulness intervention.

    PubMed

    Allen, Micah; Dietz, Martin; Blair, Karina S; van Beek, Martijn; Rees, Geraint; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Lutz, Antoine; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2012-10-31

    Mindfulness meditation is a set of attention-based, regulatory, and self-inquiry training regimes. Although the impact of mindfulness training (MT) on self-regulation is well established, the neural mechanisms supporting such plasticity are poorly understood. MT is thought to act through interoceptive salience and attentional control mechanisms, but until now conflicting evidence from behavioral and neural measures renders difficult distinguishing their respective roles. To resolve this question we conducted a fully randomized 6 week longitudinal trial of MT, explicitly controlling for cognitive and treatment effects with an active-control group. We measured behavioral metacognition and whole-brain blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals using functional MRI during an affective Stroop task before and after intervention in healthy human subjects. Although both groups improved significantly on a response-inhibition task, only the MT group showed reduced affective Stroop conflict. Moreover, the MT group displayed greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex responses during executive processing, consistent with increased recruitment of top-down mechanisms to resolve conflict. In contrast, we did not observe overall group-by-time interactions on negative affect-related reaction times or BOLD responses. However, only participants with the greatest amount of MT practice showed improvements in response inhibition and increased recruitment of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, and right anterior insula during negative valence processing. Our findings highlight the importance of active control in MT research, indicate unique neural mechanisms for progressive stages of mindfulness training, and suggest that optimal application of MT may differ depending on context, contrary to a one-size-fits-all approach.

  2. Active Control of a Moving Noise SOURCE—EFFECT of Off-Axis Source Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GUO, J.; PAN, J.; HODGSON, M.

    2002-03-01

    An optimally arranged multiple-channel active-control system is known to be able to create a large quiet zone in free space for a stationary primary noise source. When the primary noise source moves, the active control of the noise becomes much more difficult, as the primary noise field changes with time in space. In this case, the controller of the control system must respond fast enough to compensate for the change; much research has been focused on this issue. In this paper, it is shown that a moving source also causes difficulties from an acoustical perspective. A moving source not only changes continuously the strengths and phases of the sound field in the space, but also changes the wavefront of the primary sound field continuously. It is known that the efficiency of active noise control is determined mainly by the wavefront matching between the primary and control fields. To keep the control system effective in the case of a moving source, the wavefront of the control field needs to change, in order to continuously match the primary-wavefront change. This paper shows that there are limitations to the control-wavefront change. An optimally pre-arranged, multiple-channel control system is not able to construct a matching wavefront when the primary source moves outside a certain range. In other words, the control system is still able to create a large quiet zone only when the primary source moves within a range around the central axis of the control system. Both the location and the size of the quiet zone change with the location of the primary source.

  3. Skyhook-based semi-active control of full-vehicle suspension with magneto-rheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Enrong; Min, Fuhong; Subash, Rakheja; Su, Chunyi

    2013-05-01

    The control study of vehicle semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological (MR) dampers has been attracted much attention internationally. However, a simple, real time and easy implementing semi-active controller has not been proposed for the MR full-vehicle suspension system, and a systematic analysis method has not been established for evaluating the multi-objective suspension performances of MR full-vehicle vertical, pitch and roll motions. For this purpose, according to the 7-degree of freedom (DOF) full-vehicle dynamic system, a generalized 7-DOF MR and passive full-vehicle dynamic model is set up by employing the modified Bouc-wen hysteretic force-velocity ( F-v) model of the MR damper. A semi-active controller is synthesized to realize independent control of the four MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension systems in the full-vehicle, which is on the basis of the proposed modified skyhook damping scheme of MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension system. The proposed controller can greatly simplify the controller design complexity of MR full-vehicle suspension and has merits of easy implementation in real application, wherein only absolute velocities of sprung and unsprung masses with reference to the road surface are required to measure in real time when the vehicle is moving. Furthermore, a systematic analysis method is established for evaluating the vertical, pitch and roll motion properties of both MR and passive full-vehicle suspensions in a more realistic road excitation manner, in which the harmonic, rounded pulse and real road measured random signals with delay time are employed as different road excitations inserted on the front and rear two wheels, by considering the distance between front and rear wheels in full-vehicle. The above excitations with different amplitudes are further employed as the road excitations inserted on left and right two wheels for evaluating the roll motion property. The multi-objective suspension performances of ride comfort and

  4. A comparison of mindfulness-based stress reduction and an active control in modulation of neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, Melissa A.; Davidson, Richard J.; MacCoon, Donal G.; Sheridan, John F.; Kalin, Ned H.; Lutz, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Psychological stress is a major provocative factor of symptoms in chronic inflammatory conditions. In recent years, interest in addressing stress responsivity through meditation training in health-related domains has increased astoundingly, despite a paucity of evidence that reported benefits are specific to meditation practice. We designed the present study to rigorously compare an 8-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) intervention to a well-matched active control intervention, the Health Enhancement Program (HEP) in ability to reduce psychological stress and experimentally-induced inflammation. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was used to induce psychological stress and inflammation was produced using topical application of capsaicin cream to forearm skin. Immune and endocrine measures of inflammation and stress were collected both before and after MBSR training. Results show those randomized to MBSR and HEP training had comparable post-training stress-evoked cortisol responses, as well as equivalent reductions in self-reported psychological distress and physical symptoms. However, MBSR training resulted in a significantly smaller post-stress inflammatory response compared to HEP, despite equivalent levels of stress hormones. These results suggest behavioral interventions designed to reduce emotional reactivity may be of therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammatory conditions. Moreover, mindfulness practice, in particular, may be more efficacious in symptom relief than the well-being promoting activities cultivated in the HEP program. PMID:23092711

  5. A comparison of mindfulness-based stress reduction and an active control in modulation of neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Melissa A; Davidson, Richard J; Maccoon, Donal G; Sheridan, John F; Kalin, Ned H; Lutz, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Psychological stress is a major provocative factor of symptoms in chronic inflammatory conditions. In recent years, interest in addressing stress responsivity through meditation training in health-related domains has increased astoundingly, despite a paucity of evidence that reported benefits are specific to meditation practice. We designed the present study to rigorously compare an 8-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) intervention to a well-matched active control intervention, the Health Enhancement Program (HEP) in ability to reduce psychological stress and experimentally-induced inflammation. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was used to induce psychological stress and inflammation was produced using topical application of capsaicin cream to forearm skin. Immune and endocrine measures of inflammation and stress were collected both before and after MBSR training. Results show those randomized to MBSR and HEP training had comparable post-training stress-evoked cortisol responses, as well as equivalent reductions in self-reported psychological distress and physical symptoms. However, MBSR training resulted in a significantly smaller post-stress inflammatory response compared to HEP, despite equivalent levels of stress hormones. These results suggest behavioral interventions designed to reduce emotional reactivity may be of therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammatory conditions. Moreover, mindfulness practice, in particular, may be more efficacious in symptom relief than the well-being promoting activities cultivated in the HEP program.

  6. Active control of the tip vortex: an experimental investigation on the performance characteristics of a model turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anik, E.; Abdulrahim, A.; Ostovan, Y.; Mercan, B.; Uzol, O.

    2014-06-01

    This study is part of an on-going experimental research campaign that focuses on the active control of the tip leakage/vortex characteristics of a model horizontal axis wind turbine rotor using tip injection. This paper presents both baseline (no-injection) data as well as data with tip injection, concentrating on the effects of tip injection on power and thrust variations with the Tip Speed Ratio (TSR). The experiments are conducted by placing a specially designed 3-bladed model wind turbine rotor at the exit of a 1.7 m diameter open-jet wind tunnel. The rotor blades are non-linearly twisted and tapered with NREL S826 airfoil profile all along the span. The nacelle, hub and the blades are specifically designed to allow pressurized air to pass through and get injected from the blade tips while the rotor is rotating. Baseline results show that the general trends are as expected for a small wind turbine and the maximum power coefficient is reached at around TSR=4.5. Results with injection show that the tip injection has significant effect on the power and thrust coefficients in comparison to the baseline data, especially at TSR values higher than the max CP TSR value. Both coefficients seem to be significantly increased due to tip injection and the max CP TSR value also gets shifted to a slightly higher TSR value. Tip injection seems to have no significant effect for TSR values less than 3.5.

  7. Contributions of the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to the Testing of Active Control of Aeroelastic Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.; Scott, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    By the 1960s, researchers began to investigate the feasibility of using active controls technology (ACT) for increasing the capabilities of military and commercial aircraft. Since then many researchers, too numerous to mention, have investigated and demonstrated the usefulness of ACT for favorably modifying the aeroelastic response characteristics of flight vehicles. As a result, ACT entered the limelight as a viable tool for answering some very difficult design questions and had the potential for obtaining structural weight reductions optimizing maneuvering performance, and satisfying the multimission requirements being imposed on future military and commercial aircraft designs. Over the past 40 years, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has played a major role in developing ACT in part by its participation in many wind-tunnel programs conducted in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). These programs were conducted for the purposes of: (1) establishing concept feasibility; (2) demonstrating proof of concept; and (3) providing data for validating new modeling, analysis, and design methods. This paper provides an overview of the ACT investigations conducted in the TDT. For each program discussed herein, the objectives of the effort, the testing techniques, the test results, any, signIficant findings, and the lessons learned with respect to ACT testing are presented.

  8. Three Dimensional Solution of Pneumatic Active Control of Forebody Vortex Asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; SharafEl-Din, Hazem H.; Liu, C. H.

    1995-01-01

    Pneumatic active control of asymmetric vortical flows around a slender pointed forebody is investigated using the three dimensional solution for the compressible thin-layer Navier-Stokes equation. The computational applications cover the normal and tangential injection control of asymmetric flows around a 5 degree semi-apex angle cone at a 40 degree angle of attack, 1.4 freestream Mach number and 6 x 10(exp 6) freestream Reynolds number (based on the cone length). The effective tangential angle range of 67.5 approaches minus 67.5 degrees is used for both normal and tangential ports of injection. The effective axial length of injection is varied from 0.03 to 0.05. The computational solver uses the implicit, upwind, flux difference splitting finite volume scheme, and the grid consists of 161 x 55 x 65 points in the wrap around, normal and axial directions, respectively. The results show that tangential injection is more effective than normal injection.

  9. Three-dimensional rearrangement of single atoms using actively controlled optical microtraps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojun; Kim, Hyosub; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-02

    We propose and demonstrate three-dimensional rearrangements of single atoms. In experiments performed with single 87Rb atoms in optical microtraps actively controlled by a spatial light modulator, we demonstrate various dynamic rearrangements of up to N = 9 atoms including rotation, 2D vacancy filling, guiding, compactification, and 3D shuffling. With the capability of a phase-only Fourier mask to generate arbitrary shapes of the holographic microtraps, it was possible to place single atoms at arbitrary geometries of a few μm size and even continuously reconfigure them by conveying each atom. For this purpose, we loaded a series of computer-generated phase masks in the full frame rate of 60 Hz of the spatial light modulator, so the animation of phase mask transformed the holographic microtraps in real time, driving each atom along the assigned trajectory. Possible applications of this method of transformation of single atoms include preparation of scalable quantum platforms for quantum computation, quantum simulation, and quantum many-body physics.

  10. Active control of the optical properties of nanoscale coatings using 'smart' nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortie, Michael B.; Barnett, Michael; Ford, Michael J.

    2007-09-01

    Coatings that can self-modulate their optical properties as a function of an external stimulus are of significant technological interest. In this regard, the possibilities for thermo- or electrochromic materials such as VO II and WO 3 are already comparatively well-known. Here, however, we explore a new kind of 'smart' coating, based on the active control of a plasmon resonance in nanoparticles. One possible system is based on the modulation of the plasmon resonance of a precious metal nanorod or nanosphere by an active dielectric shell. The active dielectric undergoes an insulator-to-metal transition on increase of temperature which modulates the plasmon resonance of the underlying precious metal nanoparticle, thereby changing the wavelength at which its optical extinction is maximum. In the case of nanorods, the absorption maximum of the longitudinal plasmon is particularly sensitive to the aspect ratio of the nanoparticle and the dielectric properties of the environment, and may be readily tuned across the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. In addition, nanoparticles of certain thermochromic dielectrics, such as VO II, are expected to have a plasmon resonance of their own which can be switched on or off by control of the temperature. We consider some of the possibilities, using both the discrete dipole approximation and the exact analytical solution due to Mie to calculate the optical properties.

  11. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    A pitch active control system (PACS) was developed and flight tested on a wide body jet transport (L-1011) with a flying horizontal stabilizer. Two dual channel digital computers and the associated software provide command signals to a dual channel series servo which controls the stabilizer power actuators. Input sensor signals to the computer are pitch rate, column trim position, and dynamic pressure. Control laws are given for the PACS and the system architecture is defined. Discussions are given regarding piloted flight simulation and vehicle system simulation and vehicle system simulation tests that are performed to verify control laws and system operation prior to installation on the aircraft. Modifications to the basic aircraft included installation of the PACS, addition of a c.g. management system to provide a c.g. range from 25 to 39% mac, and downrigging of the geared elevator to provide the required nose down control authority for aft c.g. flight test conditions. Three pilots used the Cooper-Harper Rating Scale to judge flying qualities of the aircraft with PACS on and off. The handling qualities with the c.g. at 39% mac (41% stability margin) and PACS operating were judged to be as good as the handling qualities with the c.g. at 25% mac (+15% stability margin) and PACS off.

  12. Active Control of Turbulent Boundary Layer Induced Sound Radiation from Multiple Aircraft Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to experimentally investigate active structural acoustic control of turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced sound radiation from multiple panels on an aircraft sidewall. One possible approach for controlling sound radiation from multiple panels is a multi-input/multi-output scheme which considers dynamic coupling between the panels. Unfortunately, this is difficult for more than a few panels, and is impractical for a typical aircraft which contains several hundred such panels. An alternative is to implement a large number of independent control systems. Results from the current work demonstrate the feasibility of reducing broadband radiation from multiple panels utilizing a single-input/single-output (SISO) controller per bay, and is the first known demonstration of active control of TBL induced sound radiation on more than two bays simultaneously. The paper compares sound reduction for fully coupled control of six panels versus independent control on each panel. An online adaptive control scheme for independent control is also demonstrated. This scheme will adjust for slow time varying dynamic systems such as fuselage response changes due to aircraft pressurization, etc.

  13. A water activity control system for enzymatic reactions in organic media.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Anna E V; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Mattiasson, Bo

    2007-06-01

    A water activity control system for enzymatic synthesis in organic media, for litre-scale reactors has been constructed. Water activity, a(w), is a key factor when using enzymes in non-conventional media and the optimum value varies for different enzymes. The control system consists of a water activity sensor in the headspace of a jacketed glass reactor (equipped with narrow steel tubes to introduce air), gas-washing bottles containing blue silica gel (a(w)=0) and water (a(w)=1), a PC to monitor water activity and a programmable logic controller (PLC) to control the water activity. The system was evaluated by adjusting water activity in the medium, with a deviation from the set point of less than +/-0.05. Synthesis of cetyl palmitate, under controlled water activity and catalysed by two different lipase preparations, namely, Novozym 435 (immobilised Candida antarctica lipase B) and immobilised Candida rugosa lipase, were also performed. Novozym 435 catalyses reactions very well at extremely low water activity while C. rugosa lipase shows low activity for a(w)<0.5.

  14. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  15. A semi-active control suspension system for railway vehicles with magnetorheological fluid dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiukun; Zhu, Ming; Jia, Limin

    2016-07-01

    The high-speed train has achieved great progress in the last decades. It is one of the most important modes of transportation between cities. With the rapid development of the high-speed train, its safety issue is paid much more attention than ever before. To improve the stability of the vehicle with high speed, extra dampers (i.e. anti-hunting damper) are used in the traditional bogies with passive suspension system. However, the curving performance of the vehicle is undermined due to the extra lateral force generated by the dampers. The active suspension systems proposed in the last decades attempt to solve the vehicle steering issue. However, the active suspension systems need extra actuators driven by electrical power or hydraulic power. There are some implementation and even safety issues which are not easy to be overcome. In this paper, an innovative semi-active controlled lateral suspension system for railway vehicles is proposed. Four magnetorheological fluid dampers are fixed to the primary suspension system of each bogie. They are controlled by online controllers for enhancing the running stability on the straight track line on the one hand and further improving the curving performance by controlling the damper force on the other hand. Two control strategies are proposed in the light of the pure rolling concept. The effectiveness of the proposed strategies is demonstrated by SIMPACK and Matlab co-simulation for a full railway vehicle with two conventional bogies.

  16. Effect of active control of electric potential of filter medium on depth filtration.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, N; Kawasaki, H; Sasaki, T; Sasaki, S

    2010-01-01

    The effect of active control of electric potential of filter medium on depth filtration was explored experimentally. Activated carbon particles were selected as the conductive filter medium. The filter medium potential was controlled with an external DC power supply. Kaolin particles were used as the model suspended solid. The activated carbon and kaolin had negative zeta potential around neutral pH. When the filter medium potential against a counter electrode was greater than or equal to + 0.2 V, rejection rate of particles was 1.8 times higher than that when the potential was less than + 0.2 V. Thus adsorption of particles by interaction of electric double layers was enhanced by maintaining a positive charge on the filter media. Desorption of kaolin trapped on the filter media was also confirmed by changing the filter medium potential from positive to negative. The percentage of kaolin particles desorbed was 11% of the kaolin trapped on the filter media. The desorption rate was not high, but this technique will enhance refreshment of the filter media when combined with back washing.

  17. Physical mechanisms of active control of sound transmission through rib stiffened double-panel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiyue; Chen, Kean; Ding, Shaohu; Yu, Haoxin

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical investigation on physical mechanisms of actively controlling sound transmission through a rib stiffened double-panel structure using point source in the cavity. The combined modal expansion and vibro-acoustic coupling methods are applied to establish the theoretical model of such active structure. Under the condition of minimizing radiated power of the radiating ribbed plate, the physical mechanisms are interpreted in detail from the point of view of modal couplings similar as that used in existed literatures. Results obtained demonstrate that the rule of sound energy transmission and the physical mechanisms for the rib stiffened double-panel structure are all changed, and affected by the coupling effects of the rib when compared with the analytical results obtained for unribbed double-panel case. By taking the coupling effects of the rib into considerations, the cavity modal suppression and rearrangement mechanisms obtained in existed investigations are modified and supplemented for the ribbed plate case, which gives a clear interpretation for the physical nature involved in the active rib stiffened double-panel structure.

  18. Active control of turbulent boundary layer sound transmission into a vehicle interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, A.; Alujević, N.; Pluymers, B.; Desmet, W.

    2016-09-01

    In high speed automotive, aerospace, and railway transportation, the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is one of the most important sources of interior noise. The stochastic pressure distribution associated with the turbulence is able to excite significantly structural vibration of vehicle exterior panels. They radiate sound into the vehicle through the interior panels. Therefore, the air flow noise becomes very influential when it comes to the noise vibration and harshness assessment of a vehicle, in particular at low frequencies. Normally, passive solutions, such as sound absorbing materials, are used for reducing the TBL-induced noise transmission into a vehicle interior, which generally improve the structure sound isolation performance. These can achieve excellent isolation performance at higher frequencies, but are unable to deal with the low-frequency interior noise components. In this paper, active control of TBL noise transmission through an acoustically coupled double panel system into a rectangular cavity is examined theoretically. The Corcos model of the TBL pressure distribution is used to model the disturbance. The disturbance is rejected by an active vibration isolation unit reacting between the exterior and the interior panels. Significant reductions of the low-frequency vibrations of the interior panel and the sound pressure in the cavity are observed.

  19. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    PubMed

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy.

  20. Development and testing of an actively controlled large-aperture Cassegrain Telescope for spacecraft deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Bradley G.; Bruzzi, Jonathan R.; Kluga, Bernard E.; Rogala, Eric W.; Hale, R. D.; Chen, Peter C.

    2004-10-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is planning future deep space missions requiring space-based imaging reconnaissance of planets and recovery of imagery from these missions via optical communications. Both applications have similar requirements that can be met by a common aperture. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in collaboration with commercial and academic partners is developing a new approach to deploying and controlling large aperture (meter-class) optical telescopes on spacecraft that can be rapidly launched and deployed. The deployment mechanism uses flexible longeron struts to deploy the secondary. The active control system uses a fiber-coupled laser array near the focal plane that reflects four collimated laser beams off of the periphery of the secondary to four equally-disposed quad cell sensors at the periphery of the primary to correct secondary-to-primary misalignments and enable motion compensation. We describe a compensation technique that uses tip/tilt and piston actuators for quasi-static bias correction and dynamic motion compensation. We also describe preliminary optical tests using a commercial Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope in lieu of an ultra-lightweight composite Cassegrain, which is under development by Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. Finite element and ray trace modeling results for a 40 cm composite telescope design will also be described.

  1. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  2. Active Control of High Frequency Combustion Instability in Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Bob (Technical Monitor); DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    Active control of high-frequency (greater than 500 Hz) combustion instability has been demonstrated in the NASA single-nozzle combustor rig at United Technologies Research Center. The combustor rig emulates an actual engine instability and has many of the complexities of a real engine combustor (i.e. actual fuel nozzle and swirler, dilution cooling, etc.) In order to demonstrate control, a high-frequency fuel valve capable of modulating the fuel flow at up to 1kHz was developed. Characterization of the fuel delivery system was accomplished in a custom dynamic flow rig developed for that purpose. Two instability control methods, one model-based and one based on adaptive phase-shifting, were developed and evaluated against reduced order models and a Sectored-1-dimensional model of the combustor rig. Open-loop fuel modulation testing in the rig demonstrated sufficient fuel modulation authority to proceed with closed-loop testing. During closed-loop testing, both control methods were able to identify the instability from the background noise and were shown to reduce the pressure oscillations at the instability frequency by 30%. This is the first known successful demonstration of high-frequency combustion instability suppression in a realistic aero-engine environment. Future plans are to carry these technologies forward to demonstration on an advanced low-emission combustor.

  3. Inverse eigenvalue problems in vibration absorption: Passive modification and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.; Ram, Yitshak M.

    2006-01-01

    The abiding problem of vibration absorption has occupied engineering scientists for over a century and there remain abundant examples of the need for vibration suppression in many industries. For example, in the automotive industry the resolution of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) problems is of extreme importance to customer satisfaction. In rotorcraft it is vital to avoid resonance close to the blade passing speed and its harmonics. An objective of the greatest importance, and extremely difficult to achieve, is the isolation of the pilot's seat in a helicopter. It is presently impossible to achieve the objectives of vibration absorption in these industries at the design stage because of limitations inherent in finite element models. Therefore, it is necessary to develop techniques whereby the dynamic of the system (possibly a car or a helicopter) can be adjusted after it has been built. There are two main approaches: structural modification by passive elements and active control. The state of art of the mathematical theory of vibration absorption is presented and illustrated for the benefit of the reader with numerous simple examples.

  4. A Design Methodology for Rapid Implementation of Active Control Systems Across Lean Direct Injection Combustor Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, William T.; Saunders, William R.; Vandsburger, Uri; Saus, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The VACCG team is comprised of engineers at Virginia Tech who specialize in the subject areas of combustion physics, chemical kinetics, dynamics and controls, and signal processing. Currently, the team's work on this NRA research grant is designed to determine key factors that influence combustion control performance through a blend of theoretical and experimental investigations targeting design and demonstration of active control for three different combustors. To validiate the accuracy of conclusions about control effectiveness, a sequence of experimental verifications on increasingly complex lean, direct injection combustors is underway. During the work period January 1, 2002 through October 15, 2002, work has focused on two different laboratory-scale combustors that allow access for a wide variety of measurements. As the grant work proceeds, one key goal will be to obtain certain knowledge about a particular combustor process using a minimum of sophisticated measurements, due to the practical limitations of measurements on full-scale combustors. In the second year, results obtained in the first year will be validated on test combustors to be identified in the first quarter of that year. In the third year, it is proposed to validate the results at more realistic pressure and power levels by utilizing the facilities at the Glenn Research Center.

  5. Men, muscles, and body image: comparisons of competitive bodybuilders, weight trainers, and athletically active controls

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, T; Lewis, R; Cash, T; Pope, H

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate body image and psychosocial adjustment among competitive bodybuilders, non-competitive weight trainers, and athletically active men. Methods: Participants were 40 men in each of the three groups who were assessed on body composition and multiple facets of body image evaluation, investment and anxiety, eating attitudes, and social self esteem. Results: Relative to the other two groups, competitive bodybuilders had greater body mass due to fat-free body mass. Although groups did not differ in their situational body image discomfort, competitive bodybuilders and weight trainers had a more positive global appearance evaluation and were more psychologically invested in their physical appearance. Compared with active controls, men in both weightlifting groups were more satisfied with their upper torso and muscle tone. Competitive bodybuilders reported more mid torso satisfaction than the other two groups. Competitive bodybuilders also wished to be significantly heavier than controls did and reported higher social self esteem but greater eating disturbance. Conclusions: The findings suggest that competitive bodybuilders as a group are not more "muscle dysmorphic" than either non-competitive weight trainers or physically active men who do not train with weights. PMID:15793091

  6. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept with a small horizontal tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rising, J. J.; Kairys, A. A.; Maass, C. A.; Siegart, C. D.; Rakness, W. L.; Mijares, R. D.; King, R. W.; Peterson, R. S.; Hurley, S. R.; Wickson, D.

    1982-01-01

    A limited authority pitch active control system (PACS) was developed for a wide body jet transport (L-1011) with a flying horizontal stabilizer. Two dual channel digital computers and the associated software provide command signals to a dual channel series servo which controls the stabilizer power actuators. Input sensor signals to the computer are pitch rate, column-trim position, and dynamic pressure. Control laws are given for the PACS and the system architecture is defined. The piloted flight simulation and vehicle system simulation tests performed to verify control laws and system operation prior to installation on the aircraft are discussed. Modifications to the basic aircraft are described. Flying qualities of the aircraft with the PACS on and off were evaluated. Handling qualities for cruise and high speed flight conditions with the c.g. at 39% mac ( + 1% stability margin) and PACS operating were judged to be as good as the handling qualities with the c.g. at 25% (+15% stability margin) and PACS off.

  7. Active control of the forced and transient response of a finite beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Structural vibrations from a point force are modelled on a finite beam. This research explores the theoretical limit on controlling beam vibrations utilizing another point source as an active controller. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. For harmonic excitation, control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam. Control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the required interval, is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. The form of the controller is specified as either one or two delayed pulses, thus constraining the controller to be casual. The best possible control is examined while varying the region of control and the controller location. It is found that control is always possible using either one or two control pulses.

  8. Seismic protection of frame structures via semi-active control: modeling and implementation issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattulli, Vincenzo; Lepidi, Marco; Potenza, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Theoretical and practical issues concerning the multi-faceted task of mitigating the latero-torsional seismic response of a prototypal frame structure with asymmetric mass distribution are approached. Chevron braces with embedded magnetorheological dampers acting on the interstory drift are used to ensure additional energy dissipation. The semi-active control strategy employed to govern the modification of the damper characteristics via feedback is based on the selection of optimal forces according to a H2/LQG criterion, with respect to which the actual forces are regulated by a clipped-optimal logic. A dynamic observer is used to estimate the state through a non-collocated placement of the acceleration sensors. Several aspects to be addressed throughout the complex process including the design, modelization, and implementation phases of semi-active protection systems are discussed. Finally, experimental results obtained to mitigate the motion induced by ground excitation in a large-scale laboratory prototype, simulating the seismic response of a two-story building, are summarized.

  9. Pulsed electromagnetic fields on postmenopausal osteoporosis in Southwest China: a randomized, active-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Fang; Yang, Lin; He, Hong-Chen; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Ying; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Chao; He, Cheng-Qi

    2013-05-01

    A randomized, active-controlled clinical trial was conducted to examine the effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) in southwest China. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to receive alendronate or one course of PEMFs treatment. The primary endpoint was the mean percentage change in bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMDL), and secondary endpoints were the mean percentage changes in left proximal femur bone mineral density (BMDF), serum 25OH vitamin D3 (25(OH)D) concentrations, total lower-extremity manual muscle test (LE MMT) score, and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) score. The BMDL, BMDF, total LE MMT score and BBS score were recorded at baseline, 5, 12, and 24 weeks. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D were measured at baseline and 5 weeks. Using a mixed linear model, there was no significant treatment difference between the two groups in the BMDL, BMDF, total LE MMT score, and BBS score (P ≥ 0.05). For 25(OH)D concentrations, the effects were also comparable between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05) with the Mann-Whitney's U-test. These results suggested that a course of PEMFs treatment with specific parameters was as effective as alendronate in treating PMO within 24 weeks.

  10. Regarding "Semi-active control of the rocking motion of monolithic art objects" [Journal of Sound and Vibration, 374 (2016) 1-16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartmell, Matthew P.

    2016-09-01

    The Editor wishes to make the reader aware that the paper "Semi-active control of the rocking motion of monolithic art objects" by R. Ceravolo, M.L. Pecorelli, and L.Z. Fragonara, did not contain a direct citation of the fundamental and original work by D. Konstantinidis and N. Makris entitled "Experimental and analytical studies on the seismic response of free-standing and anchored laboratory equipment", Report No. PEER 2005/07. Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Center, University of California, Berkeley, 2005. The Editor regrets that this omission was not noted at the time that the above paper was accepted and published.

  11. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transpot project-demonstration act system definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Crumb, C. B.; Flora, C. C.; Macdonald, K. A. B.; Smith, R. D.; Sassi, A. P.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The 1985 ACT airplane is the Final Active Controls Technology (ACT) Airplane with the addition of three-axis fly by wire. Thus it retains all the efficiency features of the full ACT system plus the weight and cost savings accruing from deletion of the mechanical control system. The control system implements the full IAAC spectrum of active controls except flutter-mode control, judged essentially nonbeneficial, and incorporates new control surfaces called flaperons to make the most of wing-load alleviation. This redundant electronic system is conservatively designed to preserve the extreme reliability required of crucial short-period pitch augmentation, which provides more than half of the fuel savings.

  12. Using the decision ladder to understand road user decision making at actively controlled rail level crossings.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Christine M; Salmon, Paul M; Beanland, Vanessa; Lenné, Michael G; Read, Gemma J M; Walker, Guy H; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-09-01

    Rail level crossings (RLXs) represent a key strategic risk for railways worldwide. Despite enforcement and engineering countermeasures, user behaviour at RLXs can often confound expectations and erode safety. Research in this area is limited by a relative absence of insights into actual decision making processes and a focus on only a subset of road user types. One-hundred and sixty-six road users (drivers, motorcyclists, cyclists and pedestrians) completed a diary entry for each of 457 naturalistic encounters with RLXs when a train was approaching. The final eligible sample comprised 94 participants and 248 encounters at actively controlled crossings where a violation of the active warnings was possible. The diary incorporated Critical Decision Method probe questions, which enabled user responses to be mapped onto Rasmussen's decision ladder. Twelve percent of crossing events were non-compliant. The underlying decision making was compared to compliant events and a reference decision model to reveal important differences in the structure and type of decision making within and between road user groups. The findings show that engineering countermeasures intended to improve decision making (e.g. flashing lights), may have the opposite effect for some users because the system permits a high level of flexibility for circumvention. Non-motorised users were more likely to access information outside of the warning signals because of their ability to achieve greater proximity to the train tracks and the train itself. The major conundrum in resolving these issues is whether to restrict the amount of time and information available to users so that it cannot be used for circumventing the system or provide more information to help users make safe decisions.

  13. Active control of smart structures with optimal actuator and sensor locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengxiang; Rao, Vittal S.; Derriso, Mark M.

    2002-07-01

    Sensors and actuators used in active control of smart structures have to be located appropriately in order to ensure maximum control and measurement effectiveness. Many placement techniques are based on the structure itself and overlook the effects of the applied control law. The optimal locations determined from open-loop system can not guarantee the best performance of the closed-loop system because the performance is closely related with the design requirements and applied controller. In this paper, we presented a method of obtaining the optimal locations of actuators/sensors by combining the open-loop and closed-loop optimal criterions. First, for open-loop system, location indices of the controlled modes are calculated on the basis of modal controllability and observability. The controlled modes are weighted based on the controller design requirements. To reduce the spill-over effect of uncontrolled modes, the location index values of uncontrolled modes are added as penalty terms. Locations with high index values are chosen as candidate locations of actuator/sensor for the next determining step on the closed-loop system. Three control techniques, optimal H2, H(infinity ) norms and optimal pole-placement, are utilized for two different control objectives, disturbance rejection and damping property enhancement. Linear matrix inequality (LMI) techniques are utilized to formulate the control problems and synthesize the controllers. For each candidate location of actuator/sensor, a controller is designed and the obtained performance is taken as location index. By solving the location problem in two steps, we reduced the computational burden and ensured good control performance of the closed-loop system. The proposed method is tested on a clamped plate with piezoelectric actuators and sensors.

  14. A mathematical model of an active control landing gear for load control during impact and roll-out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Carden, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model of an active control landing gear (ACOLAG) was developed and programmed for operation on a digital computer. The mathematical model includes theoretical subsonic aerodynamics; first-mode wing bending and torsional characteristics; oleo-pneumatic shock strut with fit and binding friction; closed-loop, series-hydraulic control; empirical tire force-deflection characteristics; antiskid braking; and sinusoidal or random runway roughness. The mathematical model was used to compute the loads and motions for a simulated vertical drop test and a simulated landing impact of a conventional (passive) main landing gear designed for a 2268-kg (5000-lbm) class airplane. Computations were also made for a simply modified version of the passive gear including a series-hydraulic active control system. Comparison of computed results for the passive gear with experimental data shows that the active control landing gear analysis is valid for predicting the loads and motions of an airplane during a symmetrical landing. Computed results for the series-hydraulic active control in conjunction with the simply modified passive gear show that 20- to 30-percent reductions in wing force, relative to those occurring with the modified passive gear, can be obtained during the impact phase of the landing. These reductions in wing force could result in substantial increases in fatigue life of the structure.

  15. The Pervasive Problem With Placebos in Psychology: Why Active Control Groups Are Not Sufficient to Rule Out Placebo Effects.

    PubMed

    Boot, Walter R; Simons, Daniel J; Stothart, Cary; Stutts, Cassie

    2013-07-01

    To draw causal conclusions about the efficacy of a psychological intervention, researchers must compare the treatment condition with a control group that accounts for improvements caused by factors other than the treatment. Using an active control helps to control for the possibility that improvement by the experimental group resulted from a placebo effect. Although active control groups are superior to "no-contact" controls, only when the active control group has the same expectation of improvement as the experimental group can we attribute differential improvements to the potency of the treatment. Despite the need to match expectations between treatment and control groups, almost no psychological interventions do so. This failure to control for expectations is not a minor omission-it is a fundamental design flaw that potentially undermines any causal inference. We illustrate these principles with a detailed example from the video-game-training literature showing how the use of an active control group does not eliminate expectation differences. The problem permeates other interventions as well, including those targeting mental health, cognition, and educational achievement. Fortunately, measuring expectations and adopting alternative experimental designs makes it possible to control for placebo effects, thereby increasing confidence in the causal efficacy of psychological interventions.

  16. Multi-domain computerized cognitive training program improves performance of bookkeeping tasks: a matched-sampling active-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lampit, Amit; Ebster, Claus; Valenzuela, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive skills are important predictors of job performance, but the extent to which computerized cognitive training (CCT) can improve job performance in healthy adults is unclear. We report, for the first time, that a CCT program aimed at attention, memory, reasoning and visuo-spatial abilities can enhance productivity in healthy younger adults on bookkeeping tasks with high relevance to real-world job performance. 44 business students (77.3% female, mean age 21.4 ± 2.6 years) were assigned to either (a) 20 h of CCT, or (b) 20 h of computerized arithmetic training (active control) by a matched sampling procedure. Both interventions were conducted over a period of 6 weeks, 3–4 1-h sessions per week. Transfer of skills to performance on a 60-min paper-based bookkeeping task was measured at three time points—baseline, after 10 h and after 20 h of training. Repeated measures ANOVA found a significant Group X Time effect on productivity (F = 7.033, df = 1.745; 73.273, p = 0.003) with a significant interaction at both the 10-h (Relative Cohen's effect size = 0.38, p = 0.014) and 20-h time points (Relative Cohen's effect size = 0.40, p = 0.003). No significant effects were found on accuracy or on Conners' Continuous Performance Test, a measure of sustained attention. The results are discussed in reference to previous findings on the relationship between brain plasticity and job performance. Generalization of results requires further study. PMID:25120510

  17. Active control of surge in centrifugal compressors using magnetic thrust bearing actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanadgol, Dorsa

    This research presents a new method for active surge control in centrifugal compressors with unshrouded impellers using a magnetic thrust bearing to modulate the impeller tip clearance. Magnetic bearings offer the potential for active control of flow instabilities. This capability is highly dependent on the sensitivity of the compressor characteristics to blade tip clearance. If the position of the shaft can be actuated with sufficient authority and speed, the induced pressure modulation makes control of surge promising. The active nature of the magnetic bearing system makes the real-time static and dynamic positioning of the rotor and therefore modulation of the impeller tip clearance possible. A theoretical model is first established that describes the sensitivity of the centrifugal compressor characteristic curve to tip clearance variations induced by axial motion of the rotor. Results from simulation of the nonlinear model for a single stage high-speed centrifugal compressor show that using the proposed control method, mass flow and pressure oscillations associated with compressor surge are quickly suppressed with acceptable tip clearance excursions, typically less than 20% of the available clearance. It is shown that it is possible to produce adequate axial excursions in the clearance between the impeller blades and the adjacent stationary shroud using a magnetic thrust bearing with practical levels of drive voltage. This surge control method would allow centrifugal compressors to reliably and safely operate with a wider range than is currently done in the field. The principal advantage of the proposed approach over conventional surge control methods lies in that, in machines already equipped with magnetic bearing, the method can potentially be implemented by simply modifying controller software. This dispenses with the need to introduce additional hardware, permitting adaptation of existing machinery at virtually no cost. In addition, since the controller is

  18. On active control of laminar-turbulent transition on two-dimensional wings.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Ralf; Pätzold, Andreas; Engert, Marcus; Peltzer, Inken; Nitsche, Wolfgang

    2011-04-13

    This paper gives an overview of drag reduction on aerofoils by means of active control of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves. Wind-tunnel experiments at Mach numbers of up to M(x)=0.42 and model Reynolds numbers of up to Re(c)=2 × 10(6), as well as in-flight experiments on a wing glove at Mach numbers of M<0.1 and at a Reynolds number of Re(c)=2.4 × 10(6), are presented. Surface hot wires were used to detect the linearly growing TS waves in the transitional boundary layer. Different types of voice-coil- and piezo-driven membrane actuators, as well as active-wall actuators, located between the reference and error sensors, were demonstrated to be effective in introducing counter-waves into the boundary layer to cancel the travelling TS waves. A control algorithm based on the filtered-x least mean square (FxLMS) approach was employed for in-flight and high-speed wind-tunnel experiments. A model-predictive control algorithm was tested in low-speed experiments on an active-wall actuator system. For the in-flight experiments, a reduction of up to 12 dB (75% TS amplitude) was accomplished in the TS frequency range between 200 and 600 Hz. A significant reduction of up to 20 dB (90% TS amplitude) in the flow disturbance amplitude was achieved in high-speed wind-tunnel experiments in the fundamental TS frequency range between 3 and 8 kHz. A downstream shift of the laminar-turbulent transition of up to seven TS wavelengths is presented. The cascaded sensor-actuator arrangement given by Sturzebecher & Nitsche in 2003 for low-speed wind-tunnel experiments was able to shift the transition Δx=240 mm (18% x/c) downstream by a TS amplitude reduction of 96 per cent (30 dB). By using an active-wall actuator, which is much shorter than the cascaded system, a transition delay of seven TS wavelengths (16 dB TS amplitude reduction) was reached.

  19. Real-time optimal sensing strategies for active control of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Suk-Min; Fowler, Leslie P.; Clark, Robert L.; Anderson, Eric H.

    2007-04-01

    The pointing and imaging performance of precision optical systems is degraded by disturbances on the system that create optical jitter. These disturbances can be caused by structural motion of optical components due to vibration sources that (1) originate within the optical system, (2) originate external to the system and are transmitted through the structural path in the environment, and (3) are air-induced vibrations from acoustic noise. Beam control systems can suppress optical jitter, and active control techniques can be used to extend performance by incorporating information from accelerometers, microphones, and other auxiliary sensors. In some applications, offline fixed gain controllers can be used to minimize jitter. However there are many applications in which a real-time adaptive control approach would yield improved optical performance. Often we would like the capability to adapt in real-time to a system which is time-varying or whose disturbances are non-stationary and hard to predict. In the presence of these harsh, ever-changing environments we would like to use every available tool to optimize performance. Improvements in control algorithms are important, but another potentially useful tool is a real-time adaptive control method employing optimal sensing strategies. In this approach, real-time updating of reference sensors is provided to minimize optical jitter. The technique selects an optimal subset of sensors to use as references from an array of possible sensor locations. The optimal, weighted reference sensor set is well correlated with the disturbance and when used with an adaptive control algorithm, results in improved line-of-sight jitter performance with less computational burden compared to a controller which uses multiple reference sensors. The proposed technique is applied to an experimental test bed in which multiple proof-mass actuators generate structural vibrations on a flexible plate. These vibrations are transmitted to an optical

  20. Dose Response Effects of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate Treatment in Adults with ADHD: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Kollins, Scott H.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Goodman, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore dose-response effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) treatment for ADHD. Method: This was a 4-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, forced-dose titration study in adult participants, aged 18 to 55 years, meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.)…

  1. Survey of Applications of Active Control Technology for Gust Alleviation and New Challenges for Lighter-weight Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Christopher D.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a historical survey and assessment of the state of the art in the modeling and application of active control to aircraft encountering atmospheric disturbances in flight. Particular emphasis is placed on applications of active control technologies that enable weight reduction in aircraft by mitigating the effects of atmospheric disturbances. Based on what has been learned to date, recommendations are made for addressing gust alleviation on as the trend for more structurally efficient aircraft yields both lighter and more flexible aircraft. These lighter more flexible aircraft face two significant challenges reduced separation between rigid body and flexible modes, and increased sensitivity to gust encounters due to increased wing loading and improved lift to drag ratios. The primary audience of this paper is engineering professionals new to the area of gust load alleviation and interested in tackling the multifaceted challenges that lie ahead for lighter-weight aircraft.

  2. Alleviation of whirl-flutter on a joined-wing tilt-rotor aircraft configuration using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanaken, Johannes M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using active controls to delay the onset of whirl-flutter on a joined-wing tilt rotor aircraft was investigated. The CAMRAD/JA code was used to obtain a set of linear differential equations which describe the motion of the joined-wing tilt-rotor aircraft. The hub motions due to wing/body motion is a standard input to CAMRAD/JA and were obtained from a structural dynamics model of a representative joined-wing tilt-rotor aircraft. The CAMRAD/JA output, consisting of the open-loop system matrices, and the airframe free vibration motion were input to a separate program which performed the closed-loop, active control calculations. An eigenvalue analysis was performed to determine the flutter stability of both open- and closed-loop systems. Sensor models, based upon the feedback of pure state variables and based upon hub-mounted sensors, providing physically measurable accelerations, were evaluated. It was shown that the onset of tilt-rotor whirl-flutter could be delayed from 240 to above 270 knots by feeding back vertical and span-wise accelerations, measured at the rotor hub, to the longitudinal cyclic pitch. Time response calculations at a 270-knot cruise condition showed an active cyclic pitch control level of 0.009 deg, which equates to a very acceptable 9 pound active-control force applied at the rotor hub.

  3. Application of the aerodynamic energy concept to flutter suppression and gust alleviation by use of active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Caspi, A.; Lottati, I.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of active controls on flutter suppression and gust alleviation of the Arava twin turboprop STOL transport and the Westwind twinjet business transport are investigated. The active control surfaces are introduced in pairs which include, in any chosen wing strip, a 20-percent chord leading-edge control and a 20-percent chord trailing-edge control. Each control surface is driven by a combined linear-rotational sensor system located on the activated strip. The control law is based on the concept of aerodynamic energy and utilizes previously optimized control law parameters based on two-dimensional aerodynamic theory. The best locations of the activated system along the span of the wing are determined for bending-moment alleviation, reduction in fuselage accelerations, and flutter suppression. The effectiveness of the activated system over a wide range of maximum control deflections is also determined. Two control laws are investigated. The first control law utilizes both rigid-body and elastic contributions of the motion. The second control law employs primarily the elastic contribution of the wing and leads to large increases in the activated control effectiveness as compared with the basic control law. The results indicate that flutter speed can be significantly increased (over 70 percent increase) and that the bending moment due to gust loading can be almost totally eliminated by a control system of about 10 to 20 percent span with reasonable control-surface rotations.

  4. A randomized controlled pilot trial of classroom-based mindfulness meditation compared to an active control condition in sixth-grade children.

    PubMed

    Britton, Willoughby B; Lepp, Nathaniel E; Niles, Halsey F; Rocha, Tomas; Fisher, Nathan E; Gold, Jonathan S

    2014-06-01

    The current study is a pilot trial to examine the effects of a nonelective, classroom-based, teacher-implemented, mindfulness meditation intervention on standard clinical measures of mental health and affect in middle school children. A total of 101 healthy sixth-grade students (55 boys, 46 girls) were randomized to either an Asian history course with daily mindfulness meditation practice (intervention group) or an African history course with a matched experiential activity (active control group). Self-reported measures included the Youth Self Report (YSR), a modified Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Measure -Revised. Both groups decreased significantly on clinical syndrome subscales and affect but did not differ in the extent of their improvements. Meditators were significantly less likely to develop suicidal ideation or thoughts of self-harm than controls. These results suggest that mindfulness training may yield both unique and non-specific benefits that are shared by other novel activities.

  5. Active control of primary mirror of an orbiting telescope with thermal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. L.; Youngblood, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    The generalization is presented that was made to model a layered structure of a kind that represents a light-weighted mirror. This theory is presented along with the strategy for error suppression. The results of a variety of error-suppression studies are also presented. The computer programs for all parts of this study are included.

  6. Impact of longitudinal flying qualities upon the design of a transport with active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Direct constrained parameter optimization was used to optimally size a medium range transport for minimum direct operating cost. Several stability and control constraints were varied to study the sensitivity of the configuration to specifying the unaugmented flying qualities of transports designed with relaxed static stability. Additionally, a number of handling quality related design constants were studied with respect to their impact to the design.

  7. Development of the method of an electrohydrodynamic force effect on a boundary layer for active control of aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, B. S.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Chernyshev, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The results of investigations on the possibility of an electrohydrodynamic force effect on a gas flow implemented with the help of a barrier discharge are presented. A new method of controlling the laminar flow around a base with suppression of instabilities of the incoming flow due to electrohydrodynamic force action on the boundary layer near the forward edge of a swept wing is proposed. An efficient multidischarge actuator system is developed and created for active control of aerodynamic flows with induced-air-flow characteristics exceeding the world analogues.

  8. 77 FR 37059 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Active Controls in Studies To Demonstrate Effectiveness of a New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 119 (Wednesday, June 20, 2012)] [Notices] [Page 37059] [FR Doc No: 2012-14988] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA... current thinking on this topic. It does not create or confer any rights for or on any person and does...

  9. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Conventional baseline configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Characteristics of the U.S. domestic fleet were evaluated to determine the mission characteristics that would have the most impact on U. S. transport fuel use in the future. This resulted in selection of a 197-passenger (plus cargo), about 3710-km (2000 nmi) mission. The existing data base was reviewed and additional analysis was conducted as necessary to complete the technical descriptions. The resulting baseline configuration utilizes a double-lobe, but nearly circular, body with seven-abreast seating. External characteristics feature an 8.71 aspect ratio, 31.5-degree sweep wing, a T-tail empennage, and a dual CF6-6D2, wing-mounted engine arrangement. It provides for 22 LD-2 or 11 LD-3 containers plus bulk cargo in the lower lobe. Passenger/cargo loading, servicing provisions, taxi/takeoff speeds, and field length characteristics are all compatible with accepted airline operations and regulatory provisions. The baseline configuration construction uses conventional aluminum structure except for advanced aluminum alloys and a limited amount of graphite epoxy secondary structure. Modern systems are used, including advanced guidance, navigation, and controls which emphasize application of digital electronics and advanced displays.

  10. Experimental study of improved HAWT performance in simulated natural wind by an active controlled multi-fan wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshimitsu, Kazuhiko; Narihara, Takahiko; Kikugawa, Hironori; Akiyoshi, Arata; Kawazu, Yuuya

    2017-04-01

    The effects of turbulent intensity and vortex scale of simulated natural wind on performance of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) are mainly investigated in this paper. In particular, the unsteadiness and turbulence of wind in Japan are stronger than ones in Europe and North America in general. Hence, Japanese engineers should take account of the velocity unsteadiness of natural wind at installed open-air location to design a higher performance wind turbine. Using the originally designed five wind turbines on the basis of NACA and MEL blades, the dependencies of the wind frequency and vortex scale of the simulated natural wind are presented. As the results, the power coefficient of the newly designed MEL3-type rotor in the simulated natural wind is 130% larger than one in steady wind.

  11. Active control of primary mirror of an orbiting telescope with thermal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. L.; Youngblood, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a study of the feasibility of an active method of surface error control using thermal elements are presented. It is shown that the control effort of the thermal elements is sufficient for the purpose, and that such benefits as low cost, low weight, and high reliability may be achieved in conjunction with a significant reduction in the mirror surface error figure.

  12. Passive vs. Active Control of Rhythmic Ball Bouncing: The Role of Visual Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Isabelle A.; Bardy, Benoit G.; Warren, William H.

    2010-01-01

    The simple task of bouncing a ball on a racket offers a model system for studying how human actors exploit the physics and information of the environment to control their behavior. Previous work shows that people take advantage of a passively stable solution for ball bouncing but can also use perceptual information to actively stabilize bouncing.…

  13. CONSORT 2010 Statement: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The CONSORT statement is used worldwide to improve the reporting of randomised controlled trials. Kenneth Schulz and colleagues describe the latest version, CONSORT 2010, which updates the reporting guideline based on new methodological evidence and accumulating experience. To encourage dissemination of the CONSORT 2010 Statement, this article is freely accessible on bmj.com and will also be published in the Lancet, Obstetrics and Gynecology, PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, Open Medicine, Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, BMC Medicine, and Trials. PMID:20334633

  14. CONSORT 2010 Statement: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The CONSORT statement is used worldwide to improve the reporting of randomised controlled trials. Kenneth Schulz and colleagues describe the latest version, CONSORT 2010, which updates the reporting guideline based on new methodological evidence and accumulating experience. To encourage dissemination of the CONSORT 2010 Statement, this article is freely accessible on bmj.com and will also be published in the Lancet, Obstetrics and Gynecology, PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, Open Medicine, Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, BMC Medicine, and Trials. PMID:20334632

  15. CONSORT 2010 statement: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Kenneth F; Altman, Douglas G; Moher, David

    2010-06-01

    The CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement is used worldwide to improve the reporting of randomized, controlled trials. Schulz and colleagues describe the latest version, CONSORT 2010, which updates the reporting guideline based on new methodological evidence and accumulating experience.

  16. Immobilization of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Ylip2 for the biocatalytic synthesis of phytosterol ester in a water activity controlled reactor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Caixia; Guan, Nan; Xing, Chen; Chen, Biqiang; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-10-01

    In this work, phytosterol ester was synthesized using Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Ylip2 that had been immobilized on inorganic support in a solvent-free system and reacted in a computer-aided water activity controlled bioreactor. The immobilization of Ylip2 on celite led to a remarkable increase in the phytosterol conversion compared to that of free lipase. An investigation of the reaction conditions were oleic acid as the fatty acid variety, 10,000U/g substrate, and a temperature of 50°C for phytosterol ester synthesis. Controlling of the water activity at a set point was accomplished by the introduction of dry air through the reaction medium at a digital feedback controlled flow rate. For the esterification of phytosterol ester, a low (15%) water activity resulted in a considerable improvement in phytosterol conversion (91.1%) as well as a decreased reaction time (78h). Furthermore, Ylip2 lipase immobilized on celite retained 90% esterification activity for the synthesis of phytosterol oleate after reused 8 cycles, while free lipase was only viable for 5 batches with 90% esterification activity remained. Finally, the phytosterol oleate space time yield increased from 1.65g/L/h with free lipase to 2.53g/L/h with immobilized lipase. These results illustrate that the immobilized Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Ylip2 in a water activity controlled reactor has great potential for the application in phytosterol esters synthesis.

  17. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Final ACT configuration evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Final ACT Configuration Evaluation Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology project within the energy efficient transport program is summarized. The Final ACT Configuration, through application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span, exhibits significant performance improvements over the conventional baseline configuration. At the design range for these configurations, 3590 km, the block fuel used is 10% less for the Final ACT Configuration, with significant reductions in fuel usage at all operational ranges. Results of this improved fuel usage and additional system and airframe costs and the complexity required to achieve it were analyzed to determine its economic effects. For a 926 km mission, the incremental return on investment is nearly 25% at 1980 fuel prices. For longer range missions or increased fuel prices, the return is greater. The technical risks encountered in the Final ACT Configuration design and the research and development effort required to reduce these risks to levels acceptable for commercial airplane design are identified.

  18. Active control of a cylinder wake flow by using a streamwise oscillating foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Y.; Tao, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this study, numerical experiments are carried out to control the vortex shedding of a circular cylinder by utilizing an oscillating foil. The thin foil of elliptic shape undergoes prescribed harmonic oscillations in the streamwise direction in the near wake region. This simplified model is intended to study how wake dynamics are modified via localized wake disturbance, and then to stabilize the global wake instability. The results show that, at proper gap spacing, the oscillating foil can completely suppress the wake unsteadiness and recover the recirculating bubble type flow. The global instability suppression is then established on the imposition of local symmetry into the reversed flow behind the cylinder. It is revealed that the dynamic interaction between the main shears layer and oscillatory boundary layers is responsible for the wake stabilization mechanism. In addition, the kinematic/dynamic parameters related to foil motions and flow properties are widely discussed to reveal their effects on the performance of wake stabilization and drag reduction.

  19. Active Control of Turbulent Boundary Layers for Drag and Noise Reduction in Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    methods that have been studied experimentally include localized heating [6], piezo-electric flaps [7], oscillatory blowing [8], synthetic jets [9...perpendicular to the core flow. Linear arrays of permanent magnets are interlaced with a commercially fabricated printed circuit board to generate the necessary...consists of a commercially fabricated two-layer printed circuit board (Multi-Lab, Inc. Manchester, MA). The electrodes protrude slightly above the surface

  20. Active control of vortex shedding: an explanation of the gain window.

    PubMed

    Illingworth, Simon J; Naito, Hiroshi; Fukagata, Koji

    2014-10-01

    This paper explains the gain window phenomenon seen in early experimental and computational studies on active, closed-loop control of vortex shedding, whereby shedding is completely suppressed only if the feedback gain lies within some narrow window of stabilizing gains. Using two-dimensional direct numerical simulations and reduced-order modeling techniques, a low-order, linear model of the cylinder wake is formed at a Reynolds number of 60. This model is used to reproduce and to explain the gain window seen in previous studies. It is shown that the gain window is not caused by the destabilization of a higher mode but rather is determined entirely by the behavior of the open-loop unstable mode under the action of the closed-loop controller. It is demonstrated that the time taken for actuated fluid to convect to the sensor location plays an important part in explaining this gain window. A similar analysis at a higher Reynolds number of 80 reveals that the wake remains unstable for all choices of the feedback gain. The study illustrates the limitations of closed-loop suppression of vortex shedding when a very simple control strategy is used.

  1. HBT-EP Program: MHD Dynamics and Active Control through 3D Fields and Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, G. A.; Abler, M. C.; Bialek, J.; Brooks, J. W.; Byrne, P. J.; Desanto, S.; Hughes, P. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Rhodes, D. J.; Hansen, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    The HBT-EP active mode control research program aims to: (i) advance understanding of the effects of 3D shaping on advanced tokamak fusion performance, (ii) resolve important MHD issues associated with disruptions, and (iii) measure and mitigate the effects of 3D scrape-off layer (SOL) currents through active and passive control of the plasma edge and conducting boundary structures. A GPU-based low latency control system uses 96 inputs and 64 outputs to control the plasma boundary. An in-vessel adjustable ferritic wall is used to study ferritic RWMs with increased growth rates, RMP response, and disruptivity. A quasi-linear sharp-boundary model is developed to study effects of toroidal curvature and plasma shaping on beta limits with resistive plasmas and walls. Measurement of currents between vessel sections reveals currents running from the plasma to the wall during wall-touching kink modes and disruptions. Asymmetries in plasma current are observed using segmented Rogowski coils. Biased electrodes in the plasma are used to control rotation of external kinks and drive currents in the SOL. An extensive array of SOL current monitors and edge drive electrodes will be installed for pioneering studies of helical edge current control. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  2. Graphene-based electrically reconfigurable deep-subwavelength metamaterials for active control of THz light propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arezoomandan, Sara; Yang, Kai; Sensale-Rodriguez, Berardi

    2014-08-01

    This work studies the terahertz light propagation through graphene-based reconfigurable metasurfaces where the unit cell dimensions are much smaller than the terahertz wavelength. The proposed devices, which poses deep-subwavelength unit cell and active region dimensions can operate as amplitude and/or phase modulators in certain specific frequency bands determined by the device geometry. Reconfigurability is attained via electrostatically tuning the optical conductivity of patterned graphene layers, which are strategically located in each unit cell. The ultra-small unit cell dimensions can be advantageous for beam shaping applications.

  3. Conceiving semi-active control devices for large-size monolithic monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciati, Fabio; El Attar, Adel; Casciati, Sara

    2001-07-01

    CHIME is a research project, funded by the European Union, which investigates the adoption of innovative structural control techniques in view of the seismic rehabilitation of the wide monumental cultural heritage in Mediterranean countries as Egypt, Tunisia and Cyprus. The structural control devices are mainly of the semi-active type. In this particular paper one reports the first results achieved within a case study. It considers an Egyptian large size monolithic monument. Alternative solutions for its seismic rehabilitation are eventually conceived and discussed.

  4. Active Control of Airfoil Boundary Layer Separation and Wake using Ns-DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durasiewicz, Claudia; Castro Maldonado, Jorge; Little, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Nanosecond pulse driven dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators are employed to control boundary layer separation and the wake of a NACA 0012 airfoil having aspect ratio of three. Ns-DBD plasma actuators are known to operate via a thermal mechanism in contrast to ac-DBDs which are momentum-based devices. Nominally 2D forcing is applied to the airfoil leading edge with pulse energy of 0.35 mJ/cm. Experiments are conducted at a Reynolds number of 0 . 74 ×106 primarily at 18° incidence which is well within the stalled regime. Baseline and controlled flow fields are studied using surface pressure measurements, constant temperature anemometry (CTA) and PIV. Forcing at a dimensionless frequency of F+ = fc /U∞ = 1 . 14 results in reattachment of nominally separated flow to the airfoil surface. Lower frequency forcing is less optimal for separation control, but produces strong fluctuations in the wake which are intended for use in the study of vortex body interaction in the future. Actuation below F+ = 0 . 23 shows behavior consistent with an impulse-like response while forcing in the range 0 . 23

  5. Biomechanics-based active control of bedding support properties and its influence on sleep.

    PubMed

    Van Deun, D; Verhaert, V; Willemen, T; Wuyts, J; Verbraecken, J; Exadaktylos, V; Haex, B; Vander Sloten, J

    2012-01-01

    Proper body support plays an import role in the recuperation of our body during sleep. Therefore, this study uses an automatically adapting bedding system that optimises spinal alignment throughout the night by altering the stiffness of eight comfort zones. The aim is to investigate the influence of such a dynamic sleep environment on objective and subjective sleep parameters. The bedding system contains 165 sensors that measure mattress indentation. It also includes eight actuators that control the comfort zones. Based on the measured mattress indentation, body movements and posture changes are detected. Control of spinal alignment is established by fitting personalized human models in the measured indentation. A total of 11 normal sleepers participated in this study. Sleep experiments were performed in a sleep laboratory where subjects slept three nights: a first night for adaptation, a reference night and an active support night (in counterbalanced order). Polysomnographic measurements were recorded during the nights, combined with questionnaires aiming at assessing subjective information. Subjective information on sleep quality, daytime quality and perceived number of awakenings shows significant improvements during the active support (ACS) night. Objective results showed a trend towards increased slow wave sleep. On the other hand, it was noticed that % N1-sleep was significantly increased during ACS night, while % N2-sleep was significantly decreased. No prolonged N1 periods were found during or immediately after steering.

  6. Attenuation of empennage buffet response through active control of damping using piezoelectric material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Miller, Jonathan M.; Doggett, Robert V., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Dynamic response and damping data obtained from buffet studies conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel by using a simple, rigid model attached to spring supports are presented. The two parallel leaf spring supports provided a means for the model to respond in a vertical translation mode, thus simulating response in an elastic first bending mode. Wake-induced buffeting flow was created by placing an airfoil upstream of the model of that the wake of the airfoil impinged on the model. Model response was sensed by a strain gage mounted on one of the springs. The output signal from the strain gage was fed back through a control law implemented on a desktop computer. The processed signals were used to 'actuate' a piezoelectric bending actuator bonded to the other spring in such a way as to add damping as the model responded. The results of this 'proof-of-concept' study show that the piezoelectric actuator was effective in attenuating the wake-induced buffet response over the range of parameters investigated.

  7. Activator control of nucleosome occupancy in activation and repression of transcription.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Gene O; Prabhu, Vidya; Floer, Monique; Wang, Xin; Spagna, Dan; Schreiber, David; Ptashne, Mark

    2008-12-23

    The relationship between chromatin structure and gene expression is a subject of intense study. The universal transcriptional activator Gal4 removes promoter nucleosomes as it triggers transcription, but how it does so has remained obscure. The reverse process, repression of transcription, has often been correlated with the presence of nucleosomes. But it is not known whether nucleosomes are required for that effect. A new quantitative assay describes, for any given location, the fraction of DNA molecules in the population that bears a nucleosome at any given instant. This allows us to follow the time courses of nucleosome removal and reformation, in wild-type and mutant cells, upon activation (by galactose) and repression (by glucose) of the GAL genes of yeast. We show that upon being freed of its inhibitor Gal80 by the action of galactose, Gal4 quickly recruits SWI/SNF to the genes, and that nucleosome "remodeler" rapidly removes promoter nucleosomes. In the absence of SWI/SNF, Gal4's action also results in nucleosome removal and the activation of transcription, but both processes are significantly delayed. Addition of glucose to cells growing in galactose represses transcription. But if galactose remains present, Gal4 continues to work, recruiting SWI/SNF and maintaining the promoter nucleosome-free despite it being repressed. This requirement for galactose is obviated in a mutant in which Gal4 works constitutively. These results show how an activator's recruiting function can control chromatin structure both during gene activation and repression. Thus, both under activating and repressing conditions, the activator can recruit an enzymatic machine that removes promoter nucleosomes. Our results show that whereas promoter nucleosome removal invariably accompanies activation, reformation of nucleosomes is not required for repression. The finding that there are two routes to nucleosome removal and activation of transcription-one that requires the action of SWI

  8. Towards brain-activity-controlled information retrieval: Decoding image relevance from MEG signals.

    PubMed

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Kandemir, Melih; Saarinen, Veli-Matti; Hirvenkari, Lotta; Parkkonen, Lauri; Klami, Arto; Hari, Riitta; Kaski, Samuel

    2015-05-15

    We hypothesize that brain activity can be used to control future information retrieval systems. To this end, we conducted a feasibility study on predicting the relevance of visual objects from brain activity. We analyze both magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and gaze signals from nine subjects who were viewing image collages, a subset of which was relevant to a predetermined task. We report three findings: i) the relevance of an image a subject looks at can be decoded from MEG signals with performance significantly better than chance, ii) fusion of gaze-based and MEG-based classifiers significantly improves the prediction performance compared to using either signal alone, and iii) non-linear classification of the MEG signals using Gaussian process classifiers outperforms linear classification. These findings break new ground for building brain-activity-based interactive image retrieval systems, as well as for systems utilizing feedback both from brain activity and eye movements.

  9. Neuronal activity controls the development of interneurons in the somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Babij, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neuronal activity in cortical areas regulates neurodevelopment by interacting with defined genetic programs to shape the mature central nervous system. Electrical activity is conveyed to sensory cortical areas via intracortical and thalamocortical neurons, and includes oscillatory patterns that have been measured across cortical regions. OBJECTIVE In this work, we review the most recent findings about how electrical activity shapes the developmental assembly of functional circuitry in the somatosensory cortex, with an emphasis on interneuron maturation and integration. We include studies on the effect of various neurotransmitters and on the influence of thalamocortical afferent activity on circuit development. We additionally reviewed studies describing network activity patterns. METHODS We conducted an extensive literature search using both the PubMed and Google Scholar search engines. The following keywords were used in various iterations: “interneuron”, “somatosensory”, “development”, “activity”, “network patterns”, “thalamocortical”, “NMDA receptor”, “plasticity”. We additionally selected papers known to us from past reading, and those recommended to us by reviewers and members of our lab. RESULTS We reviewed a total of 132 articles that focused on the role of activity in interneuronal migration, maturation, and circuit development, as well as the source of electrical inputs and patterns of cortical activity in the somatosensory cortex. 79 of these papers included in this timely review were written between 2007 and 2016. CONCLUSIONS Neuronal activity shapes the developmental assembly of functional circuitry in the somatosensory cortical interneurons. This activity impacts nearly every aspect of development and acquisition of mature neuronal characteristics, and may contribute to changing phenotypes, altered transmitter expression, and plasticity in the adult. Progressively changing oscillatory network patterns

  10. Reduced-order modeling and active control of dry-low-emission combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tongxun

    This dissertation is a complementary experimental and theoretical investigation of combustion instability and lean blowout (LBO) in dry-low-emission (DLE) gas turbine engines, aiming to understand the fundamental mechanisms and shed light on active combustion control. Combustion instability involves complicated physicochemical processes, and many of the underlying mechanisms remain unknown, despite extensive research in the past several decades. A practical control system must be able to achieve satisfactory control performances in the presence of large uncertainties, large variations, and even unknown system dynamics. Toward this goal, an observer-based controller, capable of attenuating multiple unstable modes with unknown characteristics, is developed. A mechanism suitable for online prediction of the safety margin to the onset of combustion instability is presented, which does not require knowing the unstable frequencies. The shortage of a reliable, high-frequency, proportional fuel actuator is a major technical challenge for active combustion control. A complementary theoretical and experimental study is performed on a pump-style, high-frequency, magnetostrictive fuel actuator. Improvements to the fuel setup have been made according to the model predictions, which have been experimentally shown to be beneficial to combustion instability control. The second part of this dissertation is about modeling, prediction, and control of lean blowout. The experimentally observed, "intensified", low frequency, near-LBO combustion oscillations have been used as incipient LBO precursors, and are characterized as low-dimension chaotic behavior in the present study. The normalized chemiluminescence RMS and the normalized cumulative duration of LBO precursor events are recommended for LBO prediction in generic gas turbine engines. Linear stability analysis shows that, with decreasing equivalence ratios, a complex conjugate pair of eigenvalues emerges from three negative real

  11. Effect of Baduanjin exercise on cognitive function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guohua; Huang, Maomao; Li, Shuzhen; Li, Moyi; Xia, Rui; Zhou, Wenji; Tao, Jing; Chen, Lidian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an intermediate stage between the cognitive changes of normal aging and dementia characterised by a reduction in memory and/or other cognitive processes. An increasing number of studies have indicated that regular physical activity/exercise may have beneficial association with cognitive function of older adults with or without cognitive impairment. As a traditional Chinese Qigong exercise, Baduanjin may be even more beneficial in promoting cognitive ability in older adults with MCI, but the evidence is still insufficient. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of Baduanjin exercise on neuropsychological outcomes of community-dwelling older adults with MCI, and to explore its mechanism of action from neuroimaging based on functional MRI (fMRI) and cerebrovascular function. Methods and analysis The design of this study is a randomised, controlled trial with three parallel groups in a 1:1:1 allocation ratio with allocation concealment and assessor blinding. A total of 135 participants will be enrolled and randomised to the 24-week Baduanjin exercise intervention, 24-week brisk walking intervention and 24-week usual physical activity control group. Global cognitive function and the specific domains of cognition (memory, processing speed, executive function, attention and verbal learning and memory) will be assessed at baseline and 9, 17, 25 and 37 weeks after randomisation, while the structure and function of brain regions related to cognitive function and haemodynamic variables of the brain will be measured by fMRI and transcranial Doppler, respectively, at baseline and 25 and 37 weeks after randomisation. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was given by the Medical Ethics Committee of the Second People's Hospital of Fujian Province (approval number 2014-KL045-02). The findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and at scientific conferences. Trial registration number

  12. Oscillation of p38 activity controls efficient pro-inflammatory gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Tomida, Taichiro; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Saito, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    The p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway controls inflammatory responses and is an important target of anti-inflammatory drugs. Although pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) appear to induce only transient activation of p38 (over ∼60 min), longer cytokine exposure is necessary to induce p38-dependent effector genes. Here we study the dynamics of p38 activation in individual cells using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based p38 activity reporter. We find that, after an initial burst of activity, p38 MAPK activity subsequently oscillates for more than 8 h under continuous IL-1β stimulation. However, as this oscillation is asynchronous, the measured p38 activity population average is only slightly higher than basal level. Mathematical modelling, which we have experimentally verified, indicates that the asynchronous oscillation of p38 is generated through a negative feedback loop involving the dual-specificity phosphatase MKP-1/DUSP1. We find that the oscillatory p38 activity is necessary for efficient expression of pro-inflammatory genes such as IL-6, IL-8 and COX-2. PMID:26399197

  13. PLIF Visualization of Active Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers Using Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Berry, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging was used to visualize the boundary layer flow on a 1/3-scale Hyper-X forebody model. The boundary layer was perturbed by blowing out of orifices normal to the model surface. Two blowing orifice configurations were used: a spanwise row of 17-holes spaced at 1/8 inch, with diameters of 0.020 inches and a single-hole orifice with a diameter of 0.010 inches. The purpose of the study was to visualize and identify laminar and turbulent structures in the boundary layer and to make comparisons with previous phosphor thermography measurements of surface heating. Jet penetration and its influence on the boundary layer development was also examined as was the effect of a compression corner on downstream boundary layer transition. Based upon the acquired PLIF images, it was determined that global surface heating measurements obtained using the phosphor thermography technique provide an incomplete indicator of transitional and turbulent behavior of the corresponding boundary layer flow. Additionally, the PLIF images show a significant contribution towards transition from instabilities originating from the underexpanded jets. For this experiment, a nitric oxide/nitrogen mixture was seeded through the orifices, with nitric oxide (NO) serving as the fluorescing gas. The experiment was performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center.

  14. Substrate lability and plant activity controls greenhouse gas release from Neotropical peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogersten, Sofie; Hoyos, Jorge; Lomax, Barry; Turner, Ben; Wright, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Almost one third of global CO2 emissions resulting from land use change and substantial CH4 emissions originate from tropical peatlands. However, our understanding of the controls of CO2 and CH4 release from tropical peatlands are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peat lability and the activity of the vegetation on gas release using a combination of field and laboratory experiments. We demonstrated that peat lability constrained CH4 production to the surface peat under anaerobic conditions. The presence of plants shifted the C balance from a C source to a C sink with respect to CO2 while the activity of the root system strongly influenced CH4 emissions through its impact on soil O2 inputs. Both field and laboratory data suggest a coupling between the photosynthetic activity of the vegetation and the release of both CO2 and CH4 following the circadian rhythm of the dominant plant functional types. Forest clearance for agriculture resulted in elevated CH4 release, which we attribute in part to the cessation of root O2 inputs to the peat. We conclude that high emissions of CO2 and CH4 from forested tropical peatlands are likely driven by labile C inputs from the vegetation but that root O2 release may limit CH4 emissions.

  15. High Temperature Superconducting Magnets with Active Control for Attraction Levitation Transport Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Jenkins, Richard G.; Goodall, Roger M.; Macleod, Colin; ElAbbar, Abdallah A.; Campbell, Archie M.

    1996-01-01

    A research program, involving 3 British universities, directed at quantifying the controllability of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) magnets for use in attraction levitation transport systems will be described. The work includes measurement of loss mechanisms for iron cored HTS magnets which need to produce a flux density of approx. 1 tesla in the airgap between the magnet poles and a ferromagnetic rail. This flux density needs to be maintained and this is done by introducing small variations of the magnet current using a feedback loop, at frequencies up to 10 Hz to compensate for load changes, track variation etc. The test magnet assemblies constructed so far will be described and the studies and modelling of designs for a practical levitation demonstrator (using commercially obtained HTS tape) will be discussed with particular emphasis on how the field distribution and its components, e.g., the component vector normal to the broad face of the tape, can radically affect design philosophy compared to the classical electrical engineering approach. Although specifically aimed at levitation transport the controllability data obtained have implications for a much wider range of applications.

  16. Active control of panel vibrations induced by a boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to consider the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. Although the sound radiation has not been included, the vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings are presented in three sections. In section two we describe results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Sections three and four are concerned with some analytical and numerical results in the optimal control of the linear and nonlinear panel vibrations, respectively, excited by the flow pressure fluctuations. Finally, in section five, we draw some conclusions from research findings.

  17. Light-activated control of protein channel assembly mediated by membrane mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David M.; Findlay, Heather E.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-12-01

    Photochemical processes provide versatile triggers of chemical reactions. Here, we use a photoactivated lipid switch to modulate the folding and assembly of a protein channel within a model biological membrane. In contrast to the information rich field of water-soluble protein folding, there is only a limited understanding of the assembly of proteins that are integral to biological membranes. It is however possible to exploit the foreboding hydrophobic lipid environment and control membrane protein folding via lipid bilayer mechanics. Mechanical properties such as lipid chain lateral pressure influence the insertion and folding of proteins in membranes, with different stages of folding having contrasting sensitivities to the bilayer properties. Studies to date have relied on altering bilayer properties through lipid compositional changes made at equilibrium, and thus can only be made before or after folding. We show that light-activation of photoisomerisable di-(5-[[4-(4-butylphenyl)azo]phenoxy]pentyl)phosphate (4-Azo-5P) lipids influences the folding and assembly of the pentameric bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL. The use of a photochemical reaction enables the bilayer properties to be altered during folding, which is unprecedented. This mechanical manipulation during folding, allows for optimisation of different stages of the component insertion, folding and assembly steps within the same lipid system. The photochemical approach offers the potential to control channel assembly when generating synthetic devices that exploit the mechanosensitive protein as a nanovalve.

  18. Active control for drag reduction in turbulent channel flow: the opposition control schemes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin-Shan; Huang, Wei-Xi; Xu, Chun-Xiao

    2016-10-01

    The opposition control schemes first proposed by Choi et al (1994 J. Fluid Mech. 262 75) employing wall-normal (v) and spanwise (w) velocity are revisited in the present study by performing direct numerical simulation to turbulent channel flow at R{e}τ = 180. Special attention is paid to the combined control, in which the wall-normal and spanwise velocities are imposed at the wall just instantaneously opposite to those at a small distance to the wall. In comparison to the v- and w-controls, combined-control could achieve the best drag reduction rate and control efficiency, with the greatest suppression of turbulence intensities. The influence of control on the statistical properties of vortices is scrutinized. By control, the numbers of vortices with every circulation and radius apparently decrease at the same normal location near the wall, while the vortex radius scaled by the actual wall-friction velocity almost remains the same. The streamwise vortices and the induced Reynolds shear stress undergo the greatest suppression by combined control. It is shown that combined control achieves a better efficacy, attributed to the co-work of the mechanisms of the v- and w-controls. At a higher Reynolds number R{e}τ = 1000, combined control is also more effective than v- and w-controls. The better suppression effect on the outer large scales is the primary reason for the larger drag reduction rate in combined control.

  19. From tunable core-shell nanoparticles to plasmonic drawbridges: Active control of nanoparticle optical properties

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Chad P.; Zhang, Hui; Swearer, Dayne F.; Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Hoener, Benjamin S.; Huang, Da; Hoggard, Anneli; Chang, Wei-Shun; Mulvaney, Paul; Ringe, Emilie; Halas, Naomi J.; Nordlander, Peter; Link, Stephan; Landes, Christy F.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles are highly sensitive to interparticle distance, giving rise to dramatic but frequently irreversible color changes. By electrochemical modification of individual nanoparticles and nanoparticle pairs, we induced equally dramatic, yet reversible, changes in their optical properties. We achieved plasmon tuning by oxidation-reduction chemistry of Ag-AgCl shells on the surfaces of both individual and strongly coupled Au nanoparticle pairs, resulting in extreme but reversible changes in scattering line shape. We demonstrated reversible formation of the charge transfer plasmon mode by switching between capacitive and conductive electronic coupling mechanisms. Dynamic single-particle spectroelectrochemistry also gave an insight into the reaction kinetics and evolution of the charge transfer plasmon mode in an electrochemically tunable structure. Our study represents a highly useful approach to the precise tuning of the morphology of narrow interparticle gaps and will be of value for controlling and activating a range of properties such as extreme plasmon modulation, nanoscopic plasmon switching, and subnanometer tunable gap applications. PMID:26665175

  20. Design of an actively controlled steerable needle with tendon actuation and FBG-based shape sensing.

    PubMed

    van de Berg, Nick J; Dankelman, Jenny; van den Dobbelsteen, John J

    2015-06-01

    This work presents a new steerable needle to facilitate active steering toward predefined target locations. It focuses on mechanical aspects and design choices in relation to the observed response in a tissue phantom. Tip steering with two rotational degrees of freedom was achieved by a tendon actuated ball joint mechanism. During insertion, the flexible cannula bends as a result of asymmetric tip-tissue interaction forces. The stylet was equipped with fiber Bragg gratings to measure the needle shape and tip position during use. A PI-controller was implemented to facilitate steering to predefined targets. During the validation study, nine targets were defined at a depth of 100 mm below the gelatin surface. One was located below the insertion point, the others at a radial offset of 30 mm in each of the eight principle steering directions. Per location, six repetitions were performed. The targeting accuracy was 6.2 ± 1.4 mm (mean ± std). The steering precision was 2.6 ± 1.1 mm. The ability to steer with this new needle steering approach is presented and the mechanical characteristics are discussed for this representative subset of steering directions.

  1. Disuse of rat muscle in vivo reduces protein kinase C activity controlling the sarcolemma chloride conductance

    PubMed Central

    Pierno, Sabata; Desaphy, Jean-François; Liantonio, Antonella; De Luca, Annamaria; Zarrilli, Antonia; Mastrofrancesco, Lisa; Procino, Giuseppe; Valenti, Giovanna; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Muscle disuse produced by hindlimb unloading (HU) induces severe atrophy and slow-to-fast fibre type transition of the slow-twitch soleus muscle (Sol). After 2 weeks HU, the resting ClC-1 chloride conductance (gCl) of sarcolemma, which controls muscle excitability, increases in Sol toward a value typical of the fast-twitch EDL muscle. After 3 days of HU, the gCl increases as well before initiation of fibre type transition. Since ClC-1 channels are acutely silenced by PKC-dependent phosphorylation, we studied the modulation of gCl by PKC and serine–threonine phosphatase in Sol during HU, using a number of pharmacological tools. We show that a fraction of ClC-1 channels of control Sol are maintained in an inactive state by PKC basal activity, which contributes to the lower gCl in control Sol compared to EDL. After 14 days of HU, PKC/phosphatase manipulation produces effects on Sol gCl that corroborate the partial slow-to-fast transition. After 3 days of HU, the early increase of gCl in Sol is entirely attributable to a reduction of PKC activity and/or activation of phosphatase, maintaining ClC-1 channels in a fully active state. Accordingly, we found that HU reduces expression of PKCα, ɛ, and θ isoenzymes in Sol and EDL muscles and reduces total PKC activity. Moreover, we show that the rheobase current is increased in Sol muscle fibres as soon as after 3 days of HU, most probably in relation to the increased gCl. In conclusion, Sol muscle disuse is characterized by a rapid reduction of PKC activity, which reduces muscle excitability and is likely to contribute to disuse-induced muscle impairment. PMID:17855757

  2. Effects of Elevated Free-Stream Turbulence on Active Control of a Separation Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, D. (Technical Monitor); Halfon, E.; Nishri, B.; Seifert, A.; Wygnanski, I.

    2004-01-01

    The Effects of elevated free-stream turbulence (FST) on the natural and periodically excited separation bubbles were studied experimentally, due to the relevance of this flow to low-pressure turbine blades at low Reynolds numbers. A bubble was formed at the leading edge of a flat plate and the FST level was altered by placing a grid across the flow at different locations upstream of the plate. The mixing across the separated shear-layer, forming the free boundary of the bubble, increased due to the elevated FST and due to nominally two-dimensional periodic excitation, both flattening and shortening the bubble. Periodic excitation at frequencies that were at least an order of magnitude lower than those associated with the initial shear-layer instability, were very effective at low FST, because the amplitudes of the excitation frequency and its harmonic were amplified over the bubble. High frequency excitation (F+ 3, based on the length of the baseline low FST bubble) had a major effect close to the separation location, while farther downstream the excited fluctuations rapidly decayed in the reattachment region. Low frequency excitation, that generated waves comparable to the length of the unperturbed bubble (F+ 1) were less effective and their magnitude decayed at a slower rate downstream of reattachment. An increase in the level of the FST reduced the net effect of the periodic excitation on the mixing enhancement and subsequent reattachment process, probably due to a destructive interference between the nominally 2D excitation and the random (in space and time) FST, reducing the spanwise coherence and therefore the effectiveness of the current control strategy. However, even at the reduced effectiveness of 2D periodic excitation at elevated FST, it accelerated the reattachment process and the recovery rate of the reattached boundary layer, enhancing the boundary layer resistance to repeat separation and reducing its momentum loss further downstream.

  3. The level of cholinergic nucleus basalis activation controls the specificity of auditory associative memory.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Norman M; Miasnikov, Alexandre A; Chen, Jemmy C

    2006-11-01

    Learning involves not only the establishment of memory per se, but also the specific details of its contents. In classical conditioning, the former concerns whether an association was learned while the latter discloses what was learned. The neural bases of associativity have been studied extensively while neural mechanisms of memory specificity have been neglected. Stimulation of the cholinergic nucleus basalis (NBs) paired with a preceding tone induces CS-specific associative memory. As different levels of acetylcholine may be released naturally during different learning situations, we asked whether the level of activation of the cholinergic neuromodulatory system can control the degree of detail that is encoded and retrieved. Adult male rats were tested pre- and post-training for behavioral responses (interruption of ongoing respiration) to tones of various frequencies (1-15 kHz, 70 dB, 2 s). Training consisted of 200 trials/day of tone (8.0 kHz, 70 dB, 2 s) either paired or unpaired with NBs (CS-NBs = 1.8 s) at moderate (65.7+/-9.0 microA, one day) or weak (46.7+/-12.1 microA, three training days) levels of stimulation, under conditions of controlled behavioral state (pre-trial stable respiration rate). Post-training (24 h) responses to tones revealed that moderate activation induced both associative and CS-specific behavioral memory, whereas weak activation produced associative memory lacking frequency specificity. The degree of memory specificity 24 h after training was positively correlated with the magnitude of CS-elicited increase in gamma activity within the EEG during training, but only in the moderate NBs group. Thus, a low level of acetylcholine released by the nucleus basalis during learning is sufficient to induce associativity whereas a higher level of release enables the storage of greater experiential detail. gamma waves, which are thought to reflect the coordinated activity of cortical cells, appear to index the encoding of CS detail. The findings

  4. Combination with intravenous iron supplementation or doubling erythropoietin dose for patients with chemotherapy-induced anaemia inadequately responsive to initial erythropoietin treatment alone: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Jiang, Hong; Gao, Wei; Tu, Ye; Zhou, Ying; Li, Xi; Zhu, Zhe; Jiang, Qixin; Zhan, Haifeng; Yu, Jiangming; Fu, Chuangang; Gao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Erythropoietin (EPO) is a commonly used option in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anaemia (CIA). However, ∼30–50% of patients fail to achieve an adequate response after initial treatment. Prior studies have demonstrated that intravenous iron might synergistically improve therapeutic response to EPO treatment in this patient population. Methods and analysis We will perform this multicentre, randomised, open-label, parallel-group, active controlled non-inferiority study to compare the two combination therapies of EPO plus intravenous iron regimen versus doubling the dose of EPO in patients with CIA who have an inadequate response to initial EPO treatment at a routine dose. A total of 603 patients with an increase in haemoglobin (Hb) <1 g/dL will be enrolled and randomised to one of the three study treatment groups at a 1:1:1 ratio Group 1: EPO treatment at the original dose plus intravenous iron dextran 200 mg every 3 weeks (Q3W) for 15 weeks; Group 2: EPO treatment at the original dose plus intravenous iron dextran 100 mg, twice a week for 5 weeks; Group 3: the control group, doubling the EPO dose without preplanned iron supplementation. The primary outcome measure to compare is the Hb response rate at week 15 and the secondary end points involve therapeutic blood transfusions. Time-to-progression, adverse events and quality of life will also be evaluated. Ethics and dissemination All participants will provide informed consent; the study protocol has been approved by the independent ethics committee of Shanghai East Hospital. This study would clearly demonstrate the potential benefit of combining epoetin treatment with intravenous iron supplementation. Findings will be shared with participating hospitals, policymakers and the academic community to promote the clinical management of CIA in China. Trial registration number NCT02731378. PMID:27855097

  5. Active control of massively separated high-speed/base flows with electric arc plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBlauw, Bradley G.

    The current project was undertaken to evaluate the effects of electric arc plasma actuators on high-speed separated flows. Two underlying goals motivated these experiments. The first goal was to provide a flow control technique that will result in enhanced flight performance for supersonic vehicles by altering the near-wake characteristics. The second goal was to gain a broader and more sophisticated understanding of these complex, supersonic, massively-separated, compressible, and turbulent flow fields. The attainment of the proposed objectives was facilitated through energy deposition from multiple electric-arc plasma discharges near the base corner separation point. The control authority of electric arc plasma actuators on a supersonic axisymmetric base flow was evaluated for several actuator geometries, frequencies, forcing modes, duty cycles/on-times, and currents. Initially, an electric arc plasma actuator power supply and control system were constructed to generate the arcs. Experiments were performed to evaluate the operational characteristics, electromagnetic emission, and fluidic effect of the actuators in quiescent ambient air. The maximum velocity induced by the arc when formed in a 5 mm x 1.6 mm x 2 mm deep cavity was about 40 m/s. During breakdown, the electromagnetic emission exhibited a rise and fall in intensity over a period of about 340 ns. After breakdown, the emission stabilized to a near-constant distribution. It was also observed that the plasma formed into two different modes: "high-voltage" and "low-voltage". It is believed that the plasma may be switching between an arc discharge and a glow discharge for these different modes. The two types of plasma do not appear to cause substantial differences on the induced fluidic effects of the actuator. In general, the characterization study provided a greater fundamental understanding of the operation of the actuators, as well as data for computational model comparison. Preliminary investigations

  6. Robotic Arm Manipulator Using Active Control for Sample Acquisition and Transfer, and Passive Mode for Surface Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jun; Underhill, Michael L.; Trease, Brian P.; Lindemann, Randel A.

    2010-01-01

    A robotic arm that consists of three joints with four degrees of freedom (DOF) has been developed. It can carry an end-effector to acquire and transfer samples by using active control and comply with surface topology in a passive mode during a brief surface contact. The three joints are arranged in such a way that one joint of two DOFs is located at the shoulder, one joint of one DOF is located at the elbow, and one joint of one DOF is located at the wrist. Operationally, three DOFs are moved in the same plane, and the remaining one on the shoulder is moved perpendicular to the other three for better compliance with ground surface and more flexibility of sample handling. Three out of four joints are backdriveable, making the mechanism less complex and more cost effective

  7. Final design and fabrication of an active control system for flutter suppression on a supercritical aeroelastic research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, G. E.; Mcgehee, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The final design and hardware fabrication was completed for an active control system capable of the required flutter suppression, compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA aeroelastic research wing number 1 (ARW-1) on Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The flutter suppression system uses vertical acceleration at win buttock line 1.930 (76), with fuselage vertical and roll accelerations subtracted out, to drive wing outboard aileron control surfac